Science.gov

Sample records for essential trace metals

  1. Metal-metal interactions among dietary toxic and essential trace metals in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Elsenhans, B.; Schmolke, G.; Kolb, K.; Stokes, J.; Forth, W.

    1987-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and essential metals is thought to be reflected by corresponding metal concentrations in tissues. However, toxic and essential metals may influence each other in regard to their retention in the body. Therefore, a basic diet containing four toxic metals (As 7, Cd 9, Ni 13, and Pb 20 ppm) and adequate amounts of essential metals was fed to rats for 2 weeks. Test groups received the basic diet with increasing concentrations of one of the toxic metals (up to 90 ppm As, 180 ppm Cd, 365 ppm Ni, and 394 ppm Pb). As, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined by atomic emission spectroscopy in liver, kidney, intestine, brain, muscle, bone, skin, hair, and blood. A linear relationship between diet and tissue concentration is observed for As and Ni in the kidney, for Cd in the liver, and for Pb in the bone. In other tissues saturation was observed. While Cd-Fe interactions were common to most of the tissues, other interactions were detected only in specific tissues, e.g., As-Cu in the kidney, Cd-Zn in the liver, and As-Mn, Cd-Mn, or Ni-Cu in the intestine. Increases of renal Pb and intestinal Cd by dietary Ni, and a decrease in bone As by dietary Pb were the most pronounced interactions between the toxic metals. The results demonstrate that potential target organs for the evaluation of metal exposure need to be carefully analyzed for interfering metal-metal interactions.

  2. Characterization of metal-peptide complexes in feed supplements of essential trace elements.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, Alexandros; Connolly, Cathal; Power, Ronan; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    Metal chelates with biomolecules are increasingly used in animal supplementation to increase the bioavailability of essential trace elements. However, the transfer of the chelates is not well understood and speciation studies may bring a comprehensive insight to further investigate the biological uptake mechanism(s) implicated. An analytical method was developed for the characterization of the water-soluble metal complexes in animal feed supplements obtained by reaction of a metal salt with a non-GMO soybean enzymatic digest. The method was based on fractionation of the extract by size-exclusion chromatography followed by the analysis of the metal-containing fraction by reversed-phase nanoHPLC with parallel ICP MS and electrospray MS/MS detection. The metal complexes were identified in the mass spectra owing to the Cu characteristic isotopic pattern; the complexation was corroborated by the presence of a peak corresponding to the non-metallated peptide. The study demonstrated the feasibility of SEC-ICP MS to produce characteristic metal (Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe) distribution patterns, which can be of interest to test batch-to-batch reproducibility and to determine the origin of the supplement. The use of the method could be extended to animal feeds prepared using the metal-chelated complexes. Electrospray MS/MS allowed the identification of a number of Cu complexes with peptides. Four different structure conformations were modeled by means of molecular mechanics investigations to assess the chelation stability.

  3. Determination of Trace Metals and Essential Minerals in Selected Fruit Juices in Minna, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajai, A I; Ochigbo, S S; Abdullahi, Z; Anigboro, P I

    2014-01-01

    Levels of trace metals and essential minerals in selected fruit juice samples purchased from Minna were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and Flame photometer. From the obtained result, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn were present in all the samples, while Cd, Pb, and Cr were not detectable in all the samples. Concentrations of K range between 1.31 ± 0.10 and 41.20 ± 0.10 mg/100 mL, Na between 15.47 ± 0.15 and 3.50 ± 0.20 mg/100 mL, Mn between Nd and 0.27 ± 0.08 mg/100 mL, Fe between Nd and 0.90 ± 0.05 mg/100 mL, Cu between Nd-0.60 ± 0.00 mg/100 mL, and Zn between Nd-0.09 ± 0.01 mg/100 mL, respectively. The trace metal levels in all the samples were within permissible limit as recommended by WHO for edible foods and drinks and could therefore be taken to compliment the deficiency of these essential minerals from other food sources.

  4. Levels of essential and potentially toxic trace metals in Antarctic macro algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Silvia; Arisnabarreta, Sebastián Pérez; Vodopivez, Cristian; Smichowski, Patricia

    2002-12-01

    Eleven species of Antarctic algae were examined for their accumulation ability in the uptake of different metals and metalloids from the Antarctic aquatic environment. Macro algae were collected during the 2000 austral summer season at Jubany Station (Argentinean base) around Potter Cove, King George Island. The elements quantified were: As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn. An optimized microwave-assisted digestion procedure was used to digest the samples and the elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. A wide range of metal retention capacity among the different species was observed. The highest levels of trace elements were found in Monostroma hariotii and Phaeurus antarcticus, with concentrations up to 3095 μg g -1 for Fe. On the basis of the levels of trace elements observed in Monostroma hariotii and its wide distribution in the Antarctic Peninsula, this organism accomplishes a number of prerequisites to be considered as an adequate biomonitor for future studies.

  5. Determination of toxic metals, trace and essentials, and macronutrients in Sarpa salpa and Chelon labrosus: risk assessment for the consumers.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Aridani; Gutiérrez, Angel J; Lozano, Gonzalo; González-Weller, Dailos; Rubio, Carmen; Caballero, José M; Hardisson, Arturo; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-03-10

    Due to increased environmental pollution, monitoring of contaminants in the environment and marine organisms is a fundamental tool for assessing the existence of risk from their consumption to human health. The levels of toxic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Al), trace and essential metals (B, Ba, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sr, V, and Zn), and macronutrients (Ca, K, Mg, Na) in two species of fish for human consumption were quantified in the present study. Eighty samples of muscle tissue and 80 samples of liver tissue belonging to two species of Osteichthyes fish; Sarpa salpa and Chelon labrosus were analyzed. The studied specimens were caught on the northern coast of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) with fishing rods. As they caught from the shore, they are suitable samples for assessing the toxic levels of representative species caught by local amateur fishermen. The results show that both species are fit for human consumption since they have toxic levels of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Al) which are below the maximum established levels; however, the toxic levels of the liver samples are several orders of magnitude higher than the muscle samples, so we discourage their regular consumption. The risk assessment indicated that the two species of fish are safe for the average consumer; however, if the livers of these species are consumed, there could be risks because they exceed the PTWI for Pb and the TWI for Cd.

  6. An essential memory trace found.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard F

    2013-10-01

    I argue here that we have succeeded in localizing an essential memory trace for a basic form of associative learning and memory--classical conditioning of discrete responses learned with an aversive stimulus--to the anterior interpositus nucleus of the cerebellum. We first identified the entire essential circuit, using eyelid conditioning as the model system, and used reversible inactivation, during training, of critical structures and pathways to localize definitively the essential memory trace. In recognition of the 30th anniversary of Behavioral Neuroscience, I highlight 1 paper (Tracy, Thompson, Krupa, & Thompson, 1998) that was particularly significant for the progress of this research program. In this review, I present definitive evidence that the essential memory trace for eyelid conditioning is localized to the cerebellum and to no other part of the essential circuit, using electrical stimulation of the pontine nuclei-mossy fibers projecting to the cerebellum as the conditional stimulus (CS; it proved to be a supernormal stimulus resulting in much faster learning than with any peripheral CS) and using an electrical stimulus to the output of the cerebellum as a test, which did not change. Pontine patterns of projection to the cerebellum were confirmed with retrograde labeling techniques.

  7. Influence of essential trace minerals and micronutrient insufficiencies on harmful metal overload in a Mongolian patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Fumio; Kagawa, Yasuo; Kawabata, Terue; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Kudoh, Hideki; Purvee, Baatar; Otgon, Jugder; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen

    2012-07-01

    Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders are prevalent in Mongolia. Our previous studies revealed a significant correlation of these diseases with high oxidative stress due to a high body burden of harmful metals, such as manganese, iron, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. This report describes a 37-year-old male Mongolian patient with multiple sclerosis and essential micronutrient deficiency. This patient demonstrated high oxidative stress, as shown by high urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels of 14.7 and 14.3 ng/mg creatinine (crea), although his hair levels of these toxic metals were markedly lower than other Mongolians. In addition, this patient was deficient not only in various essential minerals, including selenium, magnesium, copper, cobalt, vanadium, and nickel, but also in micronutrients such as vitamin B6, C, E, folic acid, niacin, and β-carotene. Furthermore, after taking 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid, a chelating agent, urinary excretion of lead, cadmium, manganese, aluminum, iron, copper, and lithium were increased 156-, 8.4-, 7.6-, 4.3-, 3.3-, 2.1-, and 2.1-fold, respectively. These results suggest that this patient suffered from a deficiency in micronutrients such as essential minerals and vitamins, which resulted in a disturbance in the ability to excrete harmful metals into the urine and hair. It is possible that a deficiency of micronutrients and a high burden of heavy metals play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Nutritional treatment may be an effective approach to this disease.

  8. New Perspectives on the Essential Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1985-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the 19 essential trace elements, examining: the concept of essentiality; evolution of these elements; possible future essential elements; the lanthanides and actinides; how essential trace elements work; the metalloenzymes; the nonmetals; iodine and the thyroid hormones; and antagonism among these elements. (JN)

  9. New Perspectives on the Essential Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1985-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the 19 essential trace elements, examining: the concept of essentiality; evolution of these elements; possible future essential elements; the lanthanides and actinides; how essential trace elements work; the metalloenzymes; the nonmetals; iodine and the thyroid hormones; and antagonism among these elements. (JN)

  10. Acute selenium selenite exposure effects on oxidative stress biomarkers and essential metals and trace-elements in the model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hauser-Davis, R A; Silva, J A N; Rocha, Rafael C C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana; Ziolli, R L; Arruda, M A Z

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace-element that becomes toxic when present at high concentrations. Little is known regarding Se effects on parameters such as oxidative stress biomarkers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute selenium exposure on oxidative stress biomarkers in a model organism, zebrafish (Danio rerio). Fish were exposed to selenium selenite at 1mgL(-1). Reduced glutathione (GSH), and metallothionein (MT) concentrations were determined in liver, kidney and brain, with MT also being determined in bile. Essential metals and trace-elements were also determined by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in order to verify possible metal homeostasis alterations. GSH concentrations in liver, kidney and brain increased significantly (1.05±0.03μmolg(-1) ww, 1.42±0.03μmolg(-1) ww and 1.64±0.03μmolg(-1) ww, respectively) in the Se-exposed group when compared to the controls (0.88±0.05μmolg(-1) ww, 0.80±0.04μmolg(-1) ww and 0.89±0.03μmolg(-1) ww for liver, kidney and brain, respectively). MT levels in Se-exposed liver (0.52±0.03μmolg(-1) ww) decreased significantly in comparison to the control group (0.64±0.02μmolg(-1) ww), while levels in bile increased, albeit non-significantly. This is in accordance with previous studies that indicate efficient biliary MT action, leading to a rapid metabolism and elimination of contaminants from the body. Levels in the brain increased significantly after Se-exposure (0.57±0.01μmolg(-1) ww) when compared to the control group (0.35±0.03μmolg(-1) ww) since this organ does not present a detoxification route as quick as the liver-gallbladder route. Several metal and trace-elements were altered with Se-exposure, indicating that excess of selenium results in metal dyshomeostasis. This is the first report on metal dyshomeostasis due to Se-exposure, which may be the first step in the mechanism of action of selenium toxicity, as is postulated to occur in certain major human

  11. Toxic and essential trace metals in first baby haircuts and mother hair from Imam Hossein Hospital Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Savabieasfahani, M; Hoseiny, M; Goodarzi, S

    2012-02-01

    Hair metal level in newborn and mother pairs from Iran is reported. Toxic metals including cadmium (157 vs. 87.5 μg/kg), mercury (246 vs. 198 μg/kg), copper (14,313 vs. 11,776 μg/kg) and aluminum (52,022 vs. 408,207 μg/kg) were higher in newborn hair when compared to their mothers; suggesting that metals maybe discarded in the fetus as a detoxification method. Comparison with available data from Germany and Poland, and Iraq suggests overall similarities and significant differences in the case of the Iraqi subjects. Public protection from mixture toxicity of metals will be facilitated by studies such as ours.

  12. Limitation of productivity by trace metals in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, F.M.M.; Price, N.M. ); Hudson, R.J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Some trace metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn are essential for the growth of phytoplankton. The concentrations of these essential trace elements in seawater are so low as to limit their availability to aquatic microbiota. Trace element uptake is ultimately limited by kinetics of reaction with transport ligands or by diffusion to the cell. From what the authors know of the characteristics of the uptake systems of phytoplankton and their trace metal requirements they can estimate that Fe and Zn may at some times in some place limit phytoplankton productivity, which is in accord with available field data on trace metal enrichments.

  13. An ABC-Type Cobalt Transport System Is Essential for Growth of Sinorhizobium melilotiat Trace Metal Concentrations ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiujun; Poduska, Branislava; Morton, Richard A.; Finan, Turlough M.

    2011-01-01

    We report expression and mutant phenotypes for a gene cluster in Sinorhizobium meliloti, designated cbtJKL, that has been shown to encode an ABC-type cobalt transport system. Transcription of cbtJKLinitiated 384 nucleotides upstream from the cbtJtranslation start codon, and the resulting 5′ region contained a putative B12riboswitch. Expression of the cbtJKLgenes appeared to be controlled by (cobalt-loaded) cobalamin interacting at the B12riboswitch, since (i) a putative B12riboswitch was located within this large upstream region, (ii) cbtJtranscription was repressed upon addition of cobalt or vitamin B12, and (iii) deletions in the B12riboswitch resulted in constitutive cbtJKLtranscription. Insertion mutants in cbtJKLfailed to grow in LB medium, and growth was restored through the addition of cobalt but not other metals. This growth phenotype appeared to be due to the chelation of cobalt present in LB, and cbtJKLmutants also failed to grow in minimal medium containing the chelating agent EDTA unless the medium was supplemented with additional or excess cobalt. In uptake experiments, 57Co2+accumulation was high in wild-type cells expressing the cbtJKLgenes, whereas wild-type cells in which cbtJKLexpression was repressed showed reduced accumulation. In cbtJKLmutant cells, 57Co2+accumulation was reduced relative to that of the wild type, and presumably, this residual cobalt transport occurred via an alternate ion uptake system(s) that is not specific to cobalt. In symbiosis, the alternate system(s) appeared to mediate cobalt transport into bacteroid cells, as low cbtJKLexpression was detected in bacteroids and cbtJKLmutants formed N2-fixing nodules on alfalfa. PMID:21725018

  14. Controls of Trace Metals in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruland, K. W.; Lohan, M. C.

    2003-12-01

    the impetus for such a program comes from the recognition of iron as an important micronutrient influencing global biogeochemical cycles in the oceans (Moore et al., 2002) and the potential role of other trace metals such as zinc. In particular, there is a pressing need for an expansion of the global database of dissolved iron distributions in the oceans. These measurements are needed to both initiate and verify models and to identify processes not contained in existing models.There have been a number of reviews of trace elements in seawater that form a foundation for this chapter. Among them are: Bruland (1983) on oceanographically consistent data sets; Burton and Statham (1990) on trace metals in seawater; and Donat and Bruland (1995) on trace elements in oceans. There are two reviews that deal with more of the biological role of trace metals: Bruland et al. (1991) on interactive influence of bioactive trace metals on biological production in ocean waters; and Hunter et al. (1997) on biological roles of trace metals in natural waters. A highly complementary chapter in this Treatise that deals with the influence of essential trace metals on biological processes has been written by Morel et al. (Chapter 6.05). Turning to "on-line" sources of information, Nozaki has done an excellent job perusing the available literature and compiling vertical profiles from the North Pacific for each element in a periodic table that makes an excellent figure (http://www.agu.org/eos_elec/97025e.html). Ken Johnson, a marine chemist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), has a web site with a periodic table of the elements containing a brief review of information on each element (http://www.mbari.org/chemsensor/pteo.htm).

  15. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR).

  16. Trace metals in Gulf of Mexico oysters.

    PubMed

    Presley, B J; Taylor, R J; Boothe, P N

    1990-11-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from 50 to 69 locations (sites) along the Gulf of Mexico coastline, collected annually in 1986, 1987 and 1988, have been analyzed for 13 trace metals, including most of the metals of concern from an environmental quality perspective. Essentially the entire U.S. Gulf coastline was sampled, from far south Texas to far south Florida. Pooled samples of 20 oysters from three different stations at each site were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentrations found were generally less than or equal to literature values from other parts of the world thought to be uncontaminated by anthropogenic trace metal inputs. A few sites did, however, show apparent trace metal pollution and other sites gave anomalous values that cannot readily be explained by either known anthropogenic or natural causes. The range of values for the overall data set (maximum/minimum) varied from 15-fold for Mn to 624-fold for Pb, whereas the coefficient of variation (standard deviation/mean) was generally in the 50-60% range for most metals. Variations were much greater between stations than between years at a given station. Enrichments usually occurred in suites of three to four elements with Ag, Cd, Cu and Zn being the most common suite, thus several strong inter-element correlations were found. There was, however, little correlation between metal levels in oysters and in sediments from the collection sites even when sediment data were rationed to Al (sediment data are not given here). There was likewise little correlation between oyster metal levels and size, sex or reproductive stage of the oysters (data given elsewhere). Geographically, appreciably elevated (greater than 3 times average) metal levels were generally restricted to single sites within bays or estuaries, implying local control. On the other hand, regionally, Ag, Cd and Se levels were somewhat higher in Texas oysters than in those from Florida, whereas the reverse was true for As and

  17. Fate of Trace Metals in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, F G; van Hullebusch, E D; Guibaud, G; Collins, G; Svensson, B H; Carliell-Marquet, C; Vink, J P M; Esposito, G; Frunzo, L

    2015-01-01

    A challenging, and largely uncharted, area of research in the field of anaerobic digestion science and technology is in understanding the roles of trace metals in enabling biogas production. This is a major knowledge gap and a multifaceted problem involving metal chemistry; physical interactions of metal and solids; microbiology; and technology optimization. Moreover, the fate of trace metals, and the chemical speciation and transport of trace metals in environments--often agricultural lands receiving discharge waters from anaerobic digestion processes--simultaneously represents challenges for environmental protection and opportunities to close process loops in anaerobic digestion.

  18. Heavy Metals and Related Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Harry V.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of heavy metals and related trace elements in the environment, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) trace treatment in natural water and in sediments; and (2) bioaccumulation and toxicity of trace elements. A list of 466 references is presented. (HM)

  19. Heavy Metals and Related Trace Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Harry V.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of heavy metals and related trace elements in the environment, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) trace treatment in natural water and in sediments; and (2) bioaccumulation and toxicity of trace elements. A list of 466 references is presented. (HM)

  20. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints).

  1. TRACE METAL TRANSFORMATION MECHANISMS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reviews mechanisms governing the fate of trace metals during coal combustion and presents new theoretical results that interpret existing data. Emphasis is on predicting the size-segregated speciation of trace metals in pulverized-coal-fired power plant effluents. Thi...

  2. TRACE METAL TRANSFORMATION MECHANISMS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article reviews mechanisms governing the fate of trace metals during coal combustion and presents new theoretical results that interpret existing data. Emphasis is on predicting the size-segregated speciation of trace metals in pulverized-coal-fired power plant effluents. Thi...

  3. Analytical Methods for Trace Metals. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the theoretical concepts involved in the methods listed in the Federal Register as approved for determination of trace metals. Emphasis is on laboratory operations. This course is intended for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in analytical methods for trace metals. Students should have…

  4. Dissolved Trace Metals in the Tay Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R. E.; Balls, P. W.

    1997-04-01

    Dissolved trace metals have been studied over an annual cycle in the relatively pristine Tay estuary (Scotland). The absence of a major anthropogenic signal has enabled some of the more subtle natural processes controlling trace metal distributions to be identified. Concentration ranges of dissolved metals in the Tay are similar to, or lower than, those observed in more industrialized estuaries. All metals behave non-conservatively in the Tay. Interactions with biogenic and detrital particulate phases are important in controlling dissolved trace metal concentrations. The degradation of organic matter appears to be particularly important for Cu. Removal of dissolved metals was observed in the turbidity maximum zone; a simple model was used to demonstrate that this could be accounted for by adsorption onto suspended particulate matter. At high salinity, coincident peaks of all six metals with ammonia and phosphate are attributed to sewage inputs from Dundee at the mouth of the estuary.

  5. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  6. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  7. Trace metal transformations in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.

    1995-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  8. Safety assessment of essential and toxic metals in infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Eken, Ayşe; Aydın, Ahmet; Şahin, Gönül; Baydar, Terken

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess toxic metal (Cd, Pb and Al) contamination and levels of three essential trace elements (Mn, Cr and Co) in 63 infant formulas. In addition, the levels of these metals in the study samples were compared with the acceptable limits of toxic heavy metals and the recommended daily allowances (RDAs) of essential trace elements. According to our results, the toxic metal levels measured in the formulas were within the acceptable limits, with the exception of Al levels in 8 of the 63 samples. In 16 samples, Mn levels exceeded 600 μg/day, and the Cr content in 7 samples was higher than 5.5 μg/day, these amounts being the adequate intake levels for infants. Cobalt levels in 10 formulas were higher than the RDA. In view of these findings, which indicate that metal levels in infant formulas are generally much higher than those found in breast milk, breast milk should be preferred for infant feeding. Moreover, since infants are potentially more susceptible to metals, infant foods should be monitored regularly and checked for contamination by toxic metals as well as for levels of essential trace elements.

  9. PRESERVATION OF TRACE METALS IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Questions about trace metal preservation are resurfacing because the health effect risks associated with certain metals continue to drive the required reporting limits lower. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used in this study to analyze preservation of samples co...

  10. Essential metal depletion in an anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Osuna, M B; Iza, J; Zandvoort, M; Lens, P N L

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the absence of trace elements on the conversion of a mixture of volatile fatty acids by a distillery anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. Two UASB reactors were operated under identical operational conditions except for the influent trace metal concentrations, during 140 days. Experiments were carried out in three periods, where different organic loading rates (OLR) were applied to the reactors. The total trace metal concentration steadily decreased at a rate of 48 microg metal/g TS.d in the deprived reactor (down to 35% of their initial value). In contrast, trace metals accumulated in granules present in the control reactor. At the end of the experiment, the COD removal efficiencies were 99% and 77% for the control and deprived reactors, respectively, due to the lack of propionate conversion. Cobalt sorption experiments were carried out in order to study its speciation, and its effects on the speciation of other metals as well. A paper mill wastewater treating granular sludge was also included in the study as a comparison. Results obtained showed that the principal metal forms normally associated with any sludge are a function of each soluble metal concentration in the system, and the characteristics of the particular sludge.

  11. Non-essential metals in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions and compounds are essential to life and many people routinely take them as food supplements in the form of vitamin and mineral pills. Most non-essential metals are considered to be toxic, nevertheless, many are widely used in imaging, diagnostics and medicine. This short review provides an overview from selected examples of the on-going research within my laboratory that uses metal compounds to either understand biological processes or that exhibit therapeutic properties overcoming the limitations of existing chemotherapies.

  12. Plasma trace metals during total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Layden, T J; Rosenberg, I H; Vo-Khactu, K; Sandstead, H H

    1976-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of the trace metals zinc and copper were studied prospectively in 13 patients with gastrointestinal diseases treated with parenteral alimentation (TPA) for periods of from 8 days to 7 1/2 weeks. Plasma copper levels fell rapidly and consistently in all patients, with an overall rate of - 11 mug per 100 ml per week. Zinc concentrations declined in 10 of 13 patients at a more gradual rate. Analysis of the standard parenteral alimentation fluids revealed zinc content equivalent to 50% of the daily requirement and a negligible content of copper. From combined analysis of plasma zinc, hair zinc, and taste acuity, there is evidence that increased utilization or redistribution within the body may effect plasma concentrations in some patients. Neither an increase in urinary excretion nor a primary decrease in plasma binding proteins appeared to be a major factor in lowering plasma trace metal concentrations. These findings indicate that a marked decrease in plasma copper is regular and a decline in plasma zinc is common during TPA using fluids unsupplemented with trace metals. Supplementation of parenteral alimentation fluids with the trace metals zinc and copper is recommended.

  13. Trace metals in barnacles: the significance of trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-05-01

    Barnacles have very high accumulated trace metal body concentrations that vary with local trace metal bioavailabilities and represent integrated measures of the supply of bioavailable metals. Pioneering work in Chinese waters in Hong Kong highlighted the potential value of barnacles (particularly Balanus amphitrite) as trace metal biomonitors in coastal waters, identifying differences in local trace metal bioavailabilities over space and time. Work in Hong Kong has also shown that although barnacles have very high rates of trace metal uptake from solution, they also have very high trace metal assimilation efficiencies from the diet. High assimilation efficiencies coupled with high ingestion rates ensure that trophic uptake is by far the dominant trace metal uptake route in barnacles, as verified for cadmium and zinc. Kinetic modelling has shown that low efflux rate constants and high uptake rates from the diet combine to bring about accumulated trace metal concentrations in barnacles that are amongst the highest known in marine invertebrates.

  14. New essential trace elements for the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, F H

    1990-01-01

    The possible importance of some new essential trace elements in nutrition is discussed. Most likely, insufficient intake of a specific trace element becomes obvious only when the body is stressed in some way that enhances the need for that element; this has been supported by recent findings with selenium. The trace elements boron and copper may be of nutritional significance in a manner similar to selenium. When the diets of animals and humans are manipulated to cause possible changes in cellular integrity or in hormone responsiveness, a large number of responses to dietary boron occur. The findings indicate that boron is important for optimal calcium and, thus, bone metabolism. High dietary cystine and fructose exacerbate the signs of copper deficiency in rats; this indicates that the response to copper deficiency by humans would vary with the amino acid and carbohydrate composition of the diet. There is some evidence that chromium, molybdenum, nickel, arsenic, and vanadium may also be of nutritional significance under stress conditions. In other words, an increasing number of studies have been performed that have examined the importance of trace element nutriture in various forms of nutritional, metabolic, hormonal, or physiologic stress in animals and humans. These studies indicate that situations will be found in which a trace element is of nutritional significance. It is likely that some of the trace elements are more important in human nutrition than is now generally acknowledged.

  15. [Is chromium an essential trace element in human nutrition?].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Munehiro

    2012-01-01

    It has been recognized that chromium is an essential trace element associated with carbohydrate metabolism, and chromium deficiency causes an impaired glucose tolerance. Recently, however, Vincent et al. have reported that chromium is not an essential trace element. In the present report, the author evaluated the nutritional essentiality of chromium by reviewing several previous reports. In almost all previous reports, the chromium concentration in the animal feed used was higher than 0.1 μg/g, and it is difficult to consider that the experimental animals were in a low-chromium state. In addition, the amount of chromium administered to the animals for the improvement of glucose tolerance was at a pharmacological level, and corresponded to a level that far exceeded the human daily chromium intake (20 to 80 μg/day). On the other hand, recent research has clearly shown that feeding with a severely low-chromium diet (0.016 μg/g) does not impair glucose tolerance. The amount of chromium absorbed in humans estimated from chromium intake (20 to 80 μg/day), chromium absorption rate (1%), and urinary chromium excretion (<1 μg/day) is less than 1 μg/day, which is much lower than those of other essential trace elements. In addition, because there is an inconsistency between the chromium concentration in food and chromium intake, chromium intake seems to be dependent on chromium contamination during food processing and cooking. It is concluded that there is a high possibility that chromium is not an essential trace element.

  16. Trace metal concentrations in shallow ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelewski, L.M.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Armstrong, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    Trace metal clean sampling and analysis techniques were used to examine the temporal patterns or Hg, Cu, and Zn concentrations in shallow ground water, and the relationships between metal concentrations in ground water and in a hydrologically connected river. Hg, Cu, and Zn concentrations in ground water ranged from 0.07 to 4.6 ng L-1, 0.07 to 3.10 ??g L-1, and 0.17 to 2.18 ??g L-1, respectively. There was no apparent seasonal pattern in any of the metal concentrations. Filtrable Hg, Cu, and Zn concentrations in the North Branch of the Milwaukee River ranged from below the detection limit to 2.65 ng Hg L-1, 0.51 to 4.30 ??g Cu L-1, and 0.34 to 2.33 ??g Zn L-1. Thus, metal concentrations in ground water were sufficiently high to account for a substantial fraction of the filtrable trace metal concentration in the river. Metal concentrations in the soil ranged from 8 to 86 ng Hg g-1, 10 to 39 ??g Cu g-1, and 15 to 84 ??g Zn g-1. Distribution coefficients, KD, in the aquifer were 7900, 22,000, and 23,000 L kg-1 for Hg, Cu, and Zn, respectively. These values were three to 40 times smaller than KD values observed in the Milwaukee River for suspended particulate matter.

  17. Regulating cellular trace metal economy in algae

    DOE PAGES

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2017-06-30

    As indispensable protein cofactors, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn are at the center of multifaceted acclimation mechanisms that have evolved to ensure extracellular supply meets intracellular demand. In starting with selective transport at the plasma membrane and ending in protein metalation, metal homeostasis in algae involves regulated trafficking of metal ions across membranes, intracellular compartmentalization by proteins and organelles, and metal-sparing/recycling mechanisms to optimize metal-use efficiency. Overlaid on these processes are additional circuits that respond to the metabolic state as well as to the prior metal status of the cell. Here, we focus on recent progress made toward understanding themore » pathways by which the single-celled, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii controls its cellular trace metal economy. We also compare these mechanisms to characterized and putative processes in other algal lineages. Photosynthetic microbes continue to provide insight into cellular regulation and handling of Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn as a function of the nutritional supply and cellular demand for metal cofactors. We found that new experimental tools such as RNA-Seq and subcellular metal imaging are bringing us closer to a molecular understanding of acclimation to supply dynamics in algae and beyond.« less

  18. Regulating cellular trace metal economy in algae.

    PubMed

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2017-10-01

    As indispensable protein cofactors, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn are at the center of multifaceted acclimation mechanisms that have evolved to ensure extracellular supply meets intracellular demand. Starting with selective transport at the plasma membrane and ending in protein metalation, metal homeostasis in algae involves regulated trafficking of metal ions across membranes, intracellular compartmentalization by proteins and organelles, and metal-sparing/recycling mechanisms to optimize metal-use efficiency. Overlaid on these processes are additional circuits that respond to the metabolic state as well as to the prior metal status of the cell. In this review, we focus on recent progress made toward understanding the pathways by which the single-celled, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii controls its cellular trace metal economy. We also compare these mechanisms to characterized and putative processes in other algal lineages. Photosynthetic microbes continue to provide insight into cellular regulation and handling of Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn as a function of the nutritional supply and cellular demand for metal cofactors. New experimental tools such as RNA-Seq and subcellular metal imaging are bringing us closer to a molecular understanding of acclimation to supply dynamics in algae and beyond. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The deposition and fate of trace metals in our environment.

    Treesearch

    Elon S. Verry; Stephen J. Vermette

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings contains 14 invited papers from Canada and the United States on trace metal emissions, trace metal measurement in precipitation and dry fall, regional deposition, and the fate of trace metals in soils, plants, waters, and fish. A summary paper integrates the major findings of each paper.

  20. Diverse stoichiometry of dissolved trace metals in the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Thi Dieu Vu, Huong; Sohrin, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals in seawater are essential to organisms and important as tracers of various processes in the ocean. However, we do not have a good understanding of the global distribution and cycling of trace metals, especially in the Indian Ocean. Here we report the first simultaneous, full-depth, and basin-scale section-distribution of dissolved (D) Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the Indian Ocean. Our data reveal widespread co-limitation for phytoplankton production by DFe and occurrence of redox-related processes. The stoichiometry of the DM/phosphorus ratio agrees within a factor of 5 between deep waters in the Indian and Pacific, whereas it shows variability up to a factor of 300 among water masses within the Indian Ocean. This indicates that a consistent mechanism controls the stoichiometry in the deep waters, which are significantly depleted in Mn, Fe, and Co compared to requirements for phytoplankton.

  1. Trace Metals and Nutrients in the Hudson River Buoyant Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. D.; Reinfelder, J. R.; Chant, R. J.; Glenn, S. M.; Schofield, O.; Wilkin, J. L.; Houghton, R. W.; Chen, R. F.; Moline, M. A.; Frazier, T. K.

    2004-12-01

    In order to determine the spatial distribution and biological impacts of contaminant metals and nutrients associated with the Hudson River buoyant plume, the transport and transformations of mercury, other trace metals, and major nutrients are being measured as part of the LaGrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment (LaTTE). Beginning in the spring of 2004, a series of dye patch experiments will be carried out that will include continuous underway chemical and biological sampling within the well-sampled framework of an operational ocean observatory. During the first experiment in May 2004, surface water samples for dissolved and suspended particle concentrations of mercury, monomethylmercury, and bioactive and non-essential trace metals were collected using a trace metal clean, underway sampling system. A semi-continuous (5 min resolution) record of dissolved gaseous mercury (elemental mercury) in surface waters revealed diurnal patterns of mercury reduction and volatilization. The results of this project will improve predictions of contaminant movements and ecosystem impacts within the Middle Atlantic Bight.

  2. Correlation between some selected trace metal concentrations in six species of fish from the Arabian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, M.; Jaffar, M.

    1988-07-01

    The role of trace metals in marine ecosystems has been keenly investigated during recent years. It is known that abundance of essential trace metals regulates the metal content in the organisms by homeostatic control mechanisms, which when cease to function cause essential trace metals to act in an either acutely or chronically toxic manner. Therefore, a correlation study based on essential and non-essential trace metal concentrations is imperative for extending the existing knowledge of bioaccumulation of trace metals in marine organisms. An attempt has been made in the present investigation to bring out quantitative correlations between the concentrations of iron, copper, lead and zinc in the edible muscle tissue of six species of marine fish: Salmon (salmon sole); tuna (thunnus thynnus); pomfret silver (pampus argenteus); Pomfret black (formioniger); long tail tuna (thynnus tonggel) and Indian oil sardine (sardinella longiceps). These fish are abundantly available in Pakistan along the coastal line of the Arabian Sea and have great commercial value. The computational analysis on the trace metal correlation was conducted using an MSTAT statistical package.

  3. Trace metal speciation in natural waters: Computational vs. analytical

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    1996-01-01

    Improvements in the field sampling, preservation, and determination of trace metals in natural waters have made many analyses more reliable and less affected by contamination. The speciation of trace metals, however, remains controversial. Chemical model speciation calculations do not necessarily agree with voltammetric, ion exchange, potentiometric, or other analytical speciation techniques. When metal-organic complexes are important, model calculations are not usually helpful and on-site analytical separations are essential. Many analytical speciation techniques have serious interferences and only work well for a limited subset of water types and compositions. A combined approach to the evaluation of speciation could greatly reduce these uncertainties. The approach proposed would be to (1) compare and contrast different analytical techniques with each other and with computed speciation, (2) compare computed trace metal speciation with reliable measurements of solubility, potentiometry, and mean activity coefficients, and (3) compare different model calculations with each other for the same set of water analyses, especially where supplementary data on speciation already exist. A comparison and critique of analytical with chemical model speciation for a range of water samples would delineate the useful range and limitations of these different approaches to speciation. Both model calculations and analytical determinations have useful and different constraints on the range of possible speciation such that they can provide much better insight into speciation when used together. Major discrepancies in the thermodynamic databases of speciation models can be evaluated with the aid of analytical speciation, and when the thermodynamic models are highly consistent and reliable, the sources of error in the analytical speciation can be evaluated. Major thermodynamic discrepancies also can be evaluated by simulating solubility and activity coefficient data and testing various

  4. Differential response of marine diatoms to trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Mbuthia, P.; Smith, W. )

    1990-06-01

    Phytoplankton constitutes the base of aquatic food chains and is thus important to aquatic communities. Trace metal micro-nutrients play a significant role in the ecology of phytoplankton. Phytoplankton species vary in their tolerance to trace metals. Diatoms in particular are able to detoxify trace metals by the excretion of organic compounds. The authors examined the effect of copper, nickel and zinc on ten marine diatoms to determine whether they differed in their responses to these metals.

  5. Strontium and Trace Metals in the Mississippi River Mixing Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Marcantonio, F.

    2001-12-01

    Strontium is generally believed to be a conservative element, i.e., it is assumed that dissolved Sr moves directly from rivers through estuaries to the ocean. More recently, however, detailed sampling of rivers suggests a weak non-conservative behavior for Sr. Here, we present dissolved and suspended load Sr and trace metal data for samples retrieved along salinity transects in the estuarine mixing zone of the Mississippi River. Our cruises took place during times representing high, falling, and low Mississippi River discharge. Sr concentration and isotopic composition were analyzed for both dissolved particulate loads. Selected particle-reactive or redox-sensitive trace metals (Mn, Fe, U, V, Mo, Ti, and Pb) were analyzed simultaneously. In the dissolved load, Sr showed conservative behavior in both high- and low- discharge periods. Non-conservative behavior of Sr predominated during falling discharge in the summer. Significant positive correlations were found between Sr, Mo and Ti. U and V distributions were found to be essentially controlled by mixing of river water and seawater, but with significantly lower riverine concentrations during high-flow stage. Particulate element concentrations can be quite variable and heterogeneous. In this study, strong correlations were found between particulate Mn (and Fe) concentrations and particulate concentrations of Ti, U, V, and Pb. No such correlations with Mn (or Fe) were found for particulate Sr and Mo. There is a vast hypoxic zone along the coast of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico that exists during the summer months. Based on the Sr isotope systematics and the relationships between Sr and trace metals, we believe that this eutrophication may contribute to the non-conservative behaviors of Sr and other trace metals. We discuss the potential implications of this hypothesis on the Sr mass balance of present-day and past seawater.

  6. Metals essentials for plants: the nickel case.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The long period of research that preceded the discovery of nickel (Ni) essentiality for plants constitutes a paradigmatic case of doubts and uncertainties that often occur in experimental biology. The history of the essentiality of chemical elements that are present as traces in the plant ash (micronutrients) began in the mid-Nineteenth, but it had blurred outlines until Daniel Arnon, towards the mid-twentieth century, fixed the now historic 'criteria of essentiality'. During this rather long time, seven micronutrients were recognised, step by step, as essential for higher plants, (iron, manganese, boron, Zinc, copper, molybdenum, and chloride), at first thanks to meticulous observations of deficiency symptoms and then to the culture of plant on aqueous solutions. The last element to be recognised as essential for plant nutrition was Ni, which was considered a very toxic element for more than a century. Towards the Thirties, Ni became to be regarded as a useful element by some researchers, but the ultimate proof of its essentiality was obtained only in the Eighties, when the American group of Ross M. Welch demonstrated that Ni is a cofactor of the enzyme urease. More recent research shows that Ni improves the nitrogen (N) metabolism and appears to be important for the efficiency of N fixation.

  7. Changes in trace metals in Thalassia testudinum after hurricane impacts.

    PubMed

    Whelan, T; Van Tussenbroek, B I; Santos, M G Barba

    2011-12-01

    Major hurricanes Emily and Wilma hit the Mexican Caribbean in 2005. Changes in trace metals in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum prior to (May 2004, 2005) and following passage of these hurricanes (May, June 2006) were determined at four locations along a ≈ 130 km long stretch of coast. Before the hurricanes, essential metals were likely limiting and concentrations of potentially toxic Pb were high in a contaminated lagoon (27.5 μg g(-1)) and near submarine springs (6.10 μg g(-1)); the likely sources were inland sewage disposal or excessive boat traffic. After the hurricanes, Pb decreased to 2.0 μg g(-1) in the contaminated lagoon probably through flushing. At the northern sites, essential Fe increased >2-fold (from 26.8 to 68.3 μg g(-1) on average), possibly from remobilization of anoxic sediments or upwelling of deep seawater during Wilma. Thus, hurricanes can be beneficial to seagrass beds in flushing toxic metals and replenishing essential elements.

  8. Zinc: an essential trace element with potential benefits to soldiers.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Scrimgeour, Angus G

    2005-12-01

    Zinc is a trace element known to be an essential nutrient for life. It functions as a cofactor for numerous enzymes, including those involved in DNA and RNA replication and protein synthesis. Soldiers represent a unique population faced with intense metabolic and mental demands, as well as exposure to various immune challenges. Some of these factors may affect their dietary zinc requirements. Although severe zinc deficiency is unlikely to occur, some soldiers may experience less than optimal zinc status because of diminished intake coupled with increased requirements. For those soldiers, supplemental dietary zinc may serve a protective function in numerous disease states affecting modern warfighters. This review highlights the importance of adequate zinc nutriture to soldiers and discusses the potential benefits of supplemental zinc in a number of diseases currently affecting soldiers, including diarrhea, respiratory diseases, malaria, and leishmaniasis.

  9. Statistical considerations for trace metal biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Daskalakis, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    Collection and chemical analysis of oysters has been done by numerous programs, including the National Status and Trends (NS and T) program, as a convenient and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring contaminant inputs into aquatic environments. It was the goal of this work to quantify the within-site variability in oysters for concentrations of several trace metals. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were collected from three sites at the Potomac River and the soft tissue of each animal was analyzed for Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The combined analytical+ within-site Percent Relative Standard Deviation (%RSD) for 20 to 23 individual samples from the same site was between 25 and 97, depending on metal. The order of increasing %RSD was Fe < Cd < Ni < Zn < Pb < Ag < Cu. Triplicate analyses of the samples revealed that the analytical error was significant relative to within-site variability only for Pb, presumably due to low concentrations of the metal. Bootstrap analysis with replacement, a statistical resampling procedure, was used to estimate population parameters for pooled samples. Simulated sampling of 10,000 pooled samples verified that the sampling error decreases exponentially with increasing number of individuals per pool. For 95 percent confidence limit the mean standard error for pooled samples of 20 oysters varied from 5% to 20%, depending on metal. The standard mean error increased by a factor of approximately 1.5 when 10 individuals were used instead of 20, and decreased by a factor of 0.6 when 50 oysters were used per pooled sample. Given these results a cost estimation of monitoring programs will be presented, and implications on trend assessments will be discussed.

  10. Bioremoval of trace metals from rhizosediment by mangrove plants in Indian Sundarban Wetland.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ranju; Favas, Paulo J C; Jonathan, M P; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Raja, P; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2017-02-07

    The study accentuated the trace metal accumulation and distribution pattern in individual organs of 13 native mangrove plants along with rhizosediments in the Indian Sundarban Wetland. Enrichment of the essential micronutrients (Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni) was recorded in all plant organs in comparison to non-essential ones, such as Cr, As, Pb, Cd, Hg. Trunk bark and root/pneumatophore showed maximum metal accumulation efficiency. Rhizosediment recorded manifold increase for most of the trace metals than plant tissue, with the following descending order: Fe>Mn>Zn>Cu>Pb>Ni>Cr>Co>As>Cd>Hg. Concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb and Hg were found to exceed prescribed sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) indicating adverse effect on adjacent biota. Both index of geoaccumulation (Igeo) and enrichment factor (EF) also indicated anthropogenic contamination. Based on high (>1) translocation factor (TF) and bioconcentration factor (BCF) values Sonneratiaapetala and Avicenniaofficinalis could be considered as potential accumulators, of trace metals.

  11. Determination of trace metals in drinking water in Irbid City-Northern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alomary, Ahmed

    2013-02-01

    Drinking water samples from Irbid, the second populated city in Jordan were analyzed for trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn, Ni, and Se) content. The study was undertaken to determine if the metal concentrations were within the national and international guidelines. A total of 90 drinking water samples were collected from Al-Yarmouk University area. The samples were collected from three different water types: tap water (TW), home-purified water (HPW), and plant-purified water (PPW). All the samples were analyzed for trace metals using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. All the samples analyzed were within the United States Environmental Protection Agency admissible pH limit (6.5-8.5). The results showed that concentrations of the trace metals vary significantly between the three drinking water types. The results showed that HPW samples have the lowest level of trace metals and the concentrations of some essential trace metals in these samples are less than the recommended amounts. Slight differences in the metal contents were found between HPW samples, little differences between PPW samples; however, significant differences were found between TW samples. Although some TW samples showed high levels of trace metals, however, the mean level of most elements determined in the samples were well within the Jordanian standards as well as the World Health Organization standards for drinking water.

  12. Consumer-producer relationships for trace metals in Chorthippus brunneus (Thunberg. )

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.S.

    1986-08-01

    The behavior of trace metals in terrestrial food chains is a subject of ecological interest, particularly in polluted environments where the potential exists for bioconcentration of metals known to be essential in trace amounts for normal plant and animal metabolism, as well as those with no known metabolic function but recognized toxicological properties. Laboratory studies of food chain relationships afford a means by which direct comparisons can be made between trace metals as a basis for interpretation of data collected from wild plant and animal populations. This study compares the behavior of three trace elements, copper, zinc and cadmium, in terms of their assimilation under experimental conditions by the herbivorous common field grasshopper, Chorthippus brunneus (Thunberg.). This voracious orthopteran is widely distributed in Britain and is particularly prominent in the restricted invertebrate community of some metal smelter-affected grasslands where it forms important seasonal prey for insectivorous small mammals.

  13. Trace metal concentrations in estuaries and coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    Estuaries and coastal regions are highly variable in the physical and hydrographic conditions. As a result of heavy urbanization and industrialization of the head waters of most estuaries, there are substantial localized inputs of contaminants to the estuary. These factors combined with the flushing characteristics of individual estuaries to create relatively unique features that result in variation in the typical levels of trace metals for these systems. This makes intercomparison of the estuaries difficult. Comparability among estuaries becomes even more difficult when metals analyses are conducted without proper control of field and laboratory contamination, now firmly established in the trace metal analytical literature as a prerequisite for reliable marine trace metals analysis. This paper compares the concentrations of selected trace metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the waters of several major estuaries of the United States. The basis of comparison is that all samples war collected under rigid trace metal clean collection and analysis procedures. Generally, metal concentrations within the estuaries are similar. Metal concentrations in the higher salinity coastal regions are more similar in concentration. The comparison provides a baseline of typical concentrations of these trace metals in the coastal waters against which future analytical results can be compared.

  14. Arsenic and Associated Trace Metals in Texas Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Herbert, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The value of groundwater has increased substantially worldwide due to expanding human consumption. Both the quantity and quality of groundwater are important considerations when constructing policies on natural resource conservation. This study is focused on evaluating groundwater quality in the state of Texas. Historical data from the Texas Water Development Board and the National Uranium Resource Evaluation were collected into a GIS database for spatial and temporal analyses. Specific attentions were placed on arsenic and other trace metals in groundwater. Recent studies in the United States have focused on isolated incidences of high arsenic occurrence, ignoring possible connections between arsenic and other trace metals. Descriptive statistics revealed strong correlations in groundwater between arsenic and other oxyanions including vanadium, selenium and molybdenum. Arsenic and associated trace metals were clustered at three physiographic hotspots, the Southern High Plains, the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas, and West Texas. A geologic survey showed that arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater follow local geologic trends. Uranium deposits and associated mineralization were found to occur in the same physiographic locations. Uranium mineralization may be a significant natural source of arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater. Recharge, evaporative concentration, and aquifer characteristics were also contributing factors to the occurrence of trace metals in Texas groundwater. Spatial statistics were used to delineate natural sources from anthropogenic inputs. Similarly, the natural background was estimated from the spatial distribution of trace metal observations in Texas groundwater.

  15. Effects of Trace Metal Concentrations on the Growth of the Coral Endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Lin, Senjie; Ho, Jiaxuan; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirements of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of Symbiodinium kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe >> Cu/Zn/Mn >> Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn, and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn, and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn, and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal inter replacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment. PMID:26903964

  16. Effects of Trace Metal Concentrations on the Growth of the Coral Endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Irene B; Lin, Senjie; Ho, Jiaxuan; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirements of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of Symbiodinium kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe > Cu/Zn/Mn > Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn, and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn, and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn, and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal inter replacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment.

  17. Zinc is an essential trace element for spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sonoko; Miura, Chiemi; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Celino, Fritzie T; Agusa, Tetsuro; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Miura, Takeshi

    2009-06-30

    Zinc (Zn) plays important roles in various biological activities but there is little available information regarding its functions in spermatogenesis. In our current study, we further examined the role of Zn during spermatogenesis in the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). Human CG (hCG) was injected into the animals to induce spermatogenesis, after which the concentration of Zn in the testis increased in tandem with the progression of spermatogenesis. Staining of testicular cells with a Zn-specific fluorescent probe revealed that Zn accumulates in germ cells, particularly in the mitochondria of spermatogonia and spermatozoa. Using an in vitro testicular organ culture system for the Japanese eel, production of a Zn deficiency by chelation with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylemethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) caused apoptosis of the germ cells. However, this cell death was rescued by the addition of Zn to the cultures. Furthermore, an induced deficiency of Zn by TPEN chelation was found to inhibit the germ cell proliferation induced by 11-ketotestosterone (KT), a fish specific androgen, 17alpha,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), the initiator of meiosis in fish, and estradiol-17beta (E2), an inducer of spermatogonial stem-cell renewal. We also investigated the effects of Zn deficiency on sperm motility and observed that TPEN treatment of eel sperm suppressed the rate and duration of their motility but that co-treatment with Zn blocked the effects of TPEN. Our present results thus suggest that Zn is an essential trace element for the maintenance of germ cells, the progression spermatogenesis, and the regulation of sperm motility.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  19. Trace metal enrichments in Lake Tanganyika sediments: Controls on trace metal burial in lacustrine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulson Brucker, Rebecca; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Owens, Jeremy; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the distributions of several key diagenetic reactants (C, S, Fe) and redox-sensitive trace metals (Mo, Cd, Re, U) in sediments from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa. This study includes modern sediments from a chemocline transect, which spans oxygenated shallow waters to sulfidic conditions at depth, as well as ancient sediments from a longer core (˜2 m) taken at ˜900 m water depth. Modern sediments from depths spanning ˜70-335 m are generally characterized by increasing enrichments of C, S, Mo, Cd, and U with increasing water depth but static Fe distributions. It appears that the sedimentary enrichments of these elements are, to varying degrees, influenced by a combination of organic carbon cycling and sulfur cycling. These modern lake characteristics contrast with a period of high total organic carbon (C org), total sulfur (S Tot), and trace metal concentrations observed in the 900 m core, a period which follows the most recent deglaciation (˜18-11 ky). This interval is followed abruptly by an interval (˜11-6 ky) that is characterized by lower C, S, U, and Mo. Consistent with other work we suspect that the low concentrations of S, Mo, and U may indicate a period of intense lake mixing, during which time the lake may have been less productive and less reducing as compared to the present. An alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypothesis is that changes in the lake's chemical inventory, driven by significant hydrological changes, could be influencing the distribution of sedimentary trace elements through time.

  20. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  1. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of trace metals in humid subtropical soil.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, several physicochemical properties of sub-tropical soil (up to 20 cm depth) like water holding capacity, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, texture, pH, and electrical conductivity were determined along with the trace metals, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, in order to evaluate inter-relations among the trace metals and the soil properties. The contribution of the trace metals to ecotoxicological risk was assessed using various tools. Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn contents were found to be lower than the world average, but Co, Ni, and Pb had higher contents. The trace metal concentrations were utilized to obtain the pollution index and the potential ecotoxicological aspects. The trace metals were shown to have come from similar origin and their retention in the soil was contributed by properties like organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, clay content and water holding capacity of the soil. The pollution index showed that the trace metals had the sequence of Pb (considerably polluted) > Co, Ni (moderately polluted) > Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn (unpolluted). The composite ecological risk index was the highest in agricultural land with irrigation and fertilizer use, and was the lowest in the forest land.

  2. Influence of biochar amendments on marine sediment trace metal bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, G. E.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar has become a desirable material for use in agricultural application to enhance soil quality and in-situ soil and sediment remediation to immobilize organic contaminants. We investigated the effects of biochar sediment amendments on the bioavailability of a suite of inorganic trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in contaminated sediments from multiple sites in Elizabeth River, VA. We incubated sediments in microcosms with a variety of water column redox and salinity conditions and compared sediments amended with two types of woody biochar to sediments amended with charcoal activated carbon and unamended sediments. We leached sediments in artificial gut fluid mimic of the benthic invertebrate Arenicola marina as a measure of bioavailability of the trace metals analyzed. In unamended anaerobic sediments, the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction of each trace metal is 1-4% of the total sediment concentration for each metal. Initial results indicate that in anaerobic microcosms, woody biochar sediment amendments (added to 5% dry wt) decrease the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction by 30-90% for all trace metals analyzed, and have comparable performance to charcoal activated carbon amendments. However, in microcosms without controlled redox conditions, woody biochar amendments increase the bioavailable fraction of Ni and Cu by up to 80%, while decreasing the bioavailable fraction of Co, Zn, and Pb by approximately 50%; charcoal activated carbon amendments decreased the bioavailability of all trace metals analyzed by approximately 20%. In microcosms without an overlying water column, biochar and activated carbon amendments had no significant effects on trace metal bioavailability. This research demonstrates that biochar can effectively decrease the bioavailability of trace metals in marine sediments, but its efficiency is metal-specific, and environmental conditions impact biochar performance.

  3. Trace metal accumulation in carbonate biominerals of the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.; Galkin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    New data on trace metal (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) distribution in carbonate biominerals formed in geochemically different oceanic environments are discussed. Calcite shells of shelf and deepwater hydrothermal vent mussels as well as planktic foraminifers and pteropods from the central Atlantic Ocean have been studied. The variability in concentrations of most trace elements between different groups of calcifying organisms are usually within one order of magnitude, except for Fe and Mn, the elevated contents of which in microfossils are caused by post-sedimentation interaction. Different groups of calcifying organisms demonstrate a biogeochemical uniformity in trace metal accumulation during the biomineralization processes.

  4. Trace metal sorption ability of insolubilized humic acids.

    PubMed

    Varrault, G; Bermond, A

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this work was to study the trace metal sorption ability of Insolubilized Humic Acids (IHA) in comparison with regular Humic Acids (HA). IHA were prepared from HA by heating at 330 degrees C for one hour under a nitrogen atmosphere. A solubility study was carried out at different pH values in NaNO3 (0.1 M) as a background electrolyte. It showed that IHA were insoluble until pH 10 whereas the solubility of HA increased with pH in one main step in the pH range 4-5 over which the soluble fraction of humic acids increased from 10% to 90%. We observed that trace metal sorption was dramatically influenced by these solubility properties. Indeed this study showed that above pH 5-6, HA and IHA may have opposite effects in terms of trace metal sorption. Solubilization of HA made possible the formation of soluble metal-humic complexes, retaining metal in solution even for pH at which hydroxide can form. Under such pH conditions, which very numerous soils show, HA could be involved in the transport and uptake of trace metals in the plant-soil system. In terms of remediation, HA are not a suitable binding phase. On the contrary IHA were not solubilized at neutral and alkaline pH, avoiding then the solubilization of sorbed trace metals. They appeared to be a suitable binding additive phase for future remediation trials.

  5. Trace metal concentrations in oxidation ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Suffern, J.S.; Fitzgerald, C.M.; Szluha, A.T.

    1981-11-01

    Heavy metal concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the wastewater, sludge, and biotic components of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory oxidation ponds were examined to determine whether metals accumulated in tilapia. Results indicated that metal levels in the wastewater and biotic components are generally low and that the major metal reservoir is the sludge. Metals did not accumulate beyond established standards in the muscle or liver of tilapia grown in the oxidation ponds. This result may be partially due to the rapid growth rates of these fish (1-2 g fish/sup -1//day/sup -1/), with new tissue developing more rapidly than metals can accumulate. Another factor may be that the high concentrations of organic complexes in the ponds lower the availability of metals to the biota.

  6. A primer on trace metal-sediment chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.

    1985-01-01

    In most aquatic systems, concentrations of trace metals in suspended sediment and the top few centimeters of bottom sediment are far greater than concentrations of trace metals dissolved in the water column. Consequently, the distribution, transport, and availability of these constituents can not be intelligently evaluated, nor can their environmental impact be determined or predicted solely through the sampling and analysis of dissolved phases. This Primer is designed to acquaint the reader with the basic principles that govern the concentration and distribution of trace metals associated with bottom and suspended sediments. The sampling and analysis of suspended and bottom sediments are very important for monitoring studies, not only because trace metal concentrations associated with them are orders of magnitude higher than in the dissolved phase, but also because of several other factors. Riverine transport of trace metals is dominated by sediment. In addition, bottom sediments serve as a source for suspended sediment and can provide a historical record of chemical conditions. This record will help establish area baseline metal levels against which existing conditions can be compared. Many physical and chemical factors affect a sediment's capacity to collect and concentrate trace metals. The physical factors include grain size, surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, composition, and so forth. Increases in metal concentrations are strongly correlated with decreasing grain size and increasing surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, and increasing concentrations of iron and manganese oxides, organic matter, and clay minerals. Chemical factors are equally important, especially for differentiating between samples having similar bulk chemistries and for inferring or predicting environmental availability. Chemical factors entail phase associations (with such sedimentary components as interstitial water, sulfides, carbonates, and organic

  7. The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) as an indicator of coastal trace metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Finger, Annett; Lavers, Jennifer L; Dann, Peter; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Orbell, John D; Robertson, Bruce; Scarpaci, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Monitoring trace metal and metalloid concentrations in marine animals is important for their conservation and could also reliably reflect pollution levels in their marine ecosystems. Concentrations vary across tissue types, with implications for reliable monitoring. We sampled blood and moulted feathers of the Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) from three distinct colonies, which are subject to varying levels of anthropogenic impact. Non-essential trace metal and metalloid concentrations in Little Penguins were clearly linked to the level of industrialisation adjacent to the respective foraging zones. This trend was more distinct in blood than in moulted feathers, although we found a clear correlation between blood and feathers for mercury, lead and iron. This study represents the first reported examination of trace metals and metalloids in the blood of any penguin species and demonstrates that this high trophic feeder is an effective bioindicator of coastal pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromium is not an essential trace element for mammals: effects of a "low-chromium" diet.

    PubMed

    Di Bona, Kristin R; Love, Sharifa; Rhodes, Nicholas R; McAdory, DeAna; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Kern, Naomi; Kent, Julia; Strickland, Jessyln; Wilson, Austin; Beaird, Janis; Ramage, James; Rasco, Jane F; Vincent, John B

    2011-03-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential trace element over 50 years ago and has been accepted as an essential element for over 30 years. However, the studies on which chromium's status are based are methodologically flawed. Whether chromium is an essential element has been examined for the first time in carefully controlled metal-free conditions using a series of purified diets containing various chromium contents. Male Zucker lean rats were housed in specially designed metal-free cages for 6 months and fed the AIN-93G diet with no added chromium in the mineral mix component of the diet, the standard AIN-93G diet, the standard AIN-93G diet supplemented with 200 μg Cr/kg, or the standard AIN-93G diet supplemented with 1,000 μg Cr/kg. The chromium content of the diet had no effect on body mass or food intake. Similarly, the chromium content of the diet had no effect on glucose levels in glucose tolerance or insulin tolerance tests. However, a distinct trend toward lower insulin levels under the curve after a glucose challenge was observed with increasing chromium content in the diet; rats on the supplemented AIN-93G diets had significantly lower areas (P < 0.05) than rats on the low-chromium diet. The studies reveal that a diet with as little chromium as reasonably possible had no effect on body composition, glucose metabolism, or insulin sensitivity compared with a chromium-"sufficient" diet. Together with the results of other recent studies, these results clearly indicate that chromium can no longer be considered an essential element.

  9. Trace metal concentrations in southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) at Península Valdés, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Clara L; Gil, Mónica N; Uhart, Marcela M

    2012-06-01

    The presence of essential (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni and Al) and non-essential trace metals (Cd and Pb) was tested in liver (N=26) and kidney (N=42) from dead Southern Right Whale (SRW--Eubalaena australis) calves found beached in Península Valdés, Argentina. Essential metals were detected in all samples, particularly in hepatic tissue; though Ni and Al were accumulated mainly in the kidney. Cd and Pb were not detected in any samples. Sex and length of calves did not influence metal levels found, nor did the geographic location of carcasses. Our findings for essential metals were similar to those reported for mysticetes in other parts of the world. Except for a previous report on one SRW calf, this is the first data on trace metals for this species in Patagonia. This information is vital for SRW management considering increasing human pressures impacting their feeding and breeding grounds.

  10. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-10-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. The project was started on July 1, 1994 and this is the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report. Specifically, the following progress has been made during this performance period from July 1, 1997 through September 30, 1997.

  11. Trace metals in upland headwater lakes in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Burton, Andrew; Aherne, Julian; Hassan, Nouri

    2013-10-01

    Trace elements (n = 23) in Irish headwater lakes (n = 126) were investigated to determine their ambient concentrations, fractionation (total, dissolved, and non-labile), and geochemical controls. Lakes were generally located in remote upland, acid-sensitive regions along the coastal margins of the country. Total trace metal concentrations were low, within the range of natural pristine surface waters; however, some lakes (~20 %) had inorganic labile aluminum and manganese at levels potentially harmful to aquatic organisms. Redundancy analysis indicated that geochemical weathering was the dominant controlling factor for total metals, compared with acidity for dissolved metals. In addition, many metals were positively correlated with dissolved organic carbon indicating their affinity (or complexation) with humic substances (e.g., aluminum, iron, mercury, lead). However, a number of trace metals (e.g., aluminum, mercury, zinc) were correlated with anthropogenic acidic deposition (i.e., non-marine sulfate), suggesting atmospheric sources or elevated leaching owing to acidic deposition. As transboundary air pollution continues to decline, significant changes in the cycling of trace metals is anticipated.

  12. Sedimentary input of trace metals from the Chukchi Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Islas, A. M.; Seguré, M.; Rember, R.; Nishino, S.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of trace metals in the Arctic Ocean has implications for their global cycles, yet until recently few trace metal observations were available from this rapidly changing ocean. Profiles of dissolved Fe from recent Japanese field efforts in the Western Canada Basin (2008, 2010) indicate the broad Chukchi Shelf as a source of Fe to the halocline of the Western Canada Basin. Here we present dissolved and particulate data for crustal (Al, Mn, Fe) and non-crustal elements (Co, Cu, Zn) from the productive Chukchi Sea to characterize the sedimentary input of these metals to shelf waters contributing to the halocline layer of the Canada Basin. Water column profiles were collected in late summer 2013 onboard the R/V Mirai at 10 stations from the Bering Strait to the slope, and at a time-series (10 days) station located over the outer shelf. A narrow and variable (5-10 m) benthic boundary layer was sampled at the time-series station with highly elevated dissolved and suspended particulate metal concentrations. High metal concentrations were also observed in the subsurface at a station over Barrow Canyon where mixing is enhanced. Reactivity of suspended particulate metals was determined by the leachable vs. refractory fractions. Metal concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. Trace metal transport from the shelf to the interior will be discussed in context with shelf mechanisms contributing to this export, and to expected future changes in the Arctic Ocean.

  13. Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in meat from cattle reared under organic, intensive or conventional production systems.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M; Hernández, J; Prieto, F; Shore, R F

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated if differences in non-essential and essential trace element accumulation in beef-cattle reared under different systems (including organic, conventional and intensive management) were reflected in the meat derived from these animals. Diaphragm muscle from 166 calves from nine farms were analysed. Muscle cadmium concentrations were low (<10 microg/kg wet weight) and muscle arsenic, mercury and lead levels were below the limits of detection (<12, 2 and 3 microg/kg, respectively) in most (77-97%) samples; there were no significant differences between farms. Essential trace element concentrations in muscle were generally within adequate physiological ranges and, although they varied significantly between farms, this was not apparently related to management practices. There were no significant correlations in element concentrations between muscle and liver or kidney (organ concentrations that better reflect exposure), except for cobalt (positive association) and zinc (negative association). Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in muscle in the studied animals did not generally reflect differences in exposure. This is particularly relevant for animals reared in systems (such as organic farms) where cattle are exposed to higher levels of non-essential elements (probably due to soil ingestion when grazing) but also can suffer from mineral deficiencies.

  14. Accumulation of trace metals in the embryos and hatchlings of Chelonia mydas from Peninsular Malaysia incubated at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Olszowy, Henry; Francis, Rod; Ibrahim, Kamarruddin; Whittier, Joan

    2013-04-15

    A variety of trace metals were measured in the egg contents of three clutches of Chelonia mydas collected from Kuala Terengganu state in Peninsular Malaysia. We quantified Mn, Cu, Zn, Se (essential trace metals) and As (anthropogenic pollutant) at several developmental stages obtained by incubating eggs at two different temperatures (27 °C and 31 °C). The incubation temperatures were chosen because they produce predominantly male or predominantly female hatchlings, respectively. The eggs were removed from the sand and washed before being placed in incubators, to ensure that the only possible source of the detected metals was maternal transfer. Other metals: Mo, Co, Ni, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl and Pb (all non-essential metals) were detected at concentrations below the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ). Trace metal concentrations, particularly [Zn], increased during development, other metals (Cu, As, Se and Cr) accumulated to a lesser degree than zinc but no significant differences were observed between the incubation temperatures at any stage of incubation. To date, only a few studies on trace metals in turtle embryos and hatchlings have been reported; this study will provide basic knowledge on the accumulation of trace metals during development at two different incubation temperatures.

  15. Effect of Trace Metals on Phagocytosis by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Judith A.; Gardner, Donald E.; Waters, Michael D.; Coffin, David L.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effect of trace metals on a vital function of the alveolar macrophage (AM), phagocytosis. Since certain trace metals were found to reduce the viability of AMs, a technique was developed to permit examination of live cells only for phagocytosis. Evidence is presented that Ni2+ selectively altered the phagocytic activity of AMs at concentrations lower than those which caused cell death. It is further shown that a level of VO3− that caused extensive lysis and death did not reduce phagocytosis in surviving cells. The effects of Cd2+, Cr3+, and Mn2+ on AMs were also examined. PMID:49299

  16. Clean Air Act requirements for trace-metals information

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, D.; Hunt, W.; Evans, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have expanded the requirements for trace metal and air toxics information in urban areas and added new requirements for this information in rural areas and ecosystems. Specific provisions germane to trace metals and other air toxics compounds are found in Title III, Section 112 and in Title IX, Section 901. In response to these provisions, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to conduct research in atmospheric monitoring networks in urban areas, in the Great Lakes watershed, and in regional components of a national Clean Air Act status and trends network.

  17. Hair concentration of essential trace elements in adult non-exposed Russian population.

    PubMed

    Skalny, Anatoly V; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Serebryansky, Eugeny P; Demidov, Vasily A; Lobanova, Yulia N; Grabeklis, Andrei R; Berezkina, Elena S; Gryazeva, Irina V; Skalny, Andrey A; Skalnaya, Oksana A; Zhivaev, Nikolay G; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate reference values of hair trace element content are required for correct interpretation of biomonitoring data. The primary objective of the current study was to estimate the reference values of selected essential trace elements in hair of adult Russian population. Involved in current investigation were 7256 occupationally non-exposed adults aged from 20 to 60 years and living in the European part of Russia. Occipital hair essential metal and metalloid (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, V, Zn) content was estimated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The reference ranges were calculated in accordance with the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations. Women were characterized by 55, 18, 58, and 7% higher values of hair Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn content as compared to the values observed in men. At the same time, hair Cr, Fe, Se, and V concentration in men significantly exceeded the respective female values by 65, 13, 20, and 56%. Consequently, the reference ranges of essential hair trace elements content should be separately calculated for both men and women. The obtained reference ranges for hair Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, V, and Zn in men were 0.11-0.67, 0.007-0.045, 10.4-22.6, 11.1-40.5, 0.24-1.05, 0.089-0.480, 0.014-0.083, and 125.7-262.8 μg/g, respectively. The respective values estimated for women were 0.06-0.40, 0.011-0.085, 12.1-44.5, 8.9-25.6, 0.32-2.05, 0.094-0.504, 0.010-0.056, and 140.0-315.1 μg/g. The reference ranges for hair Co (0.07-0.50), Cr (0.009-0.073), Cu (11.8-29.2), Fe (9.6-31.5), Mn (0.29-1.76), Se (0.093-0.482), V (0.011-0.069), and Zn (134.7-301.9) content (μg/g) in the general cohort were also calculated.

  18. Biomonitor of Environmental Stress: Coral Trace Metal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N.; Hughen, K.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical reef corals are extremely sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and, as a result of environmental degradation and global climate change, coral reefs around the globe are severely threatened. Increased human population and development in tropical regions is leading to higher turbidity and silt loading from terrestrial runoff, increased pesticides and nutrients from agricultural land-use and sewage, and the release of toxic trace metals to coastal waters from industrial pollution. The uptake of these metals and nutrients within the coral skeletal aragonite is a sensitive biomonitor of environmental stresses on coral health. We analyzed 18 trace metals from the surface of coral skeletons collected in Bermuda, Indonesia and Belize to assess a range of threats to coral reef health - including climate change, agricultural runoff and pesticides, and coastal development and tourism. This surface sample network also includes samples representing 4 different coral species. Trace metal analysis was performed on an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to a high degree of accuracy and precision at extremely low (ppb) concentrations using a protocol we developed for samples less than 2 mg. Proper cleaning techniques were employed to minimize blank level concentrations for ultra-trace metal ICP-MS solution analysis. However, Zn/Ca and Ni/Ca concentrations remain below analytical detection limits. Initial results indicate that sea surface temperature proxies (e.g., Sr/Ca, B/Ca and Mg/Ca) display similar ratios between the different sites, whereas those metals associated with anthropogenic activities, such as Co, Pb and Cu, are site-specific and are linked to individual environmental stressors. Results from this study will be applied to down core trace metal records in the future. In doing so, we aim to understand the impacts of compounding environmental stresses on coral health, and to identify regional threshold values beyond which corals

  19. Monitoring trace metals using moss bags in Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzaro, Grazia; Canu, Annalisa; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2010-05-01

    As well known anthropic activities are producing an increase of trace metal concentration in the terrestrial ecosystems. Previous researches have shown that several species of cryptogams can be used as a low-cost bio-accumulator to detect metal deposition. In this study biomonitoring of airborne trace metals was made using moss bags technique. The moss Hypnum cupressiforme was used as a bio-accumulator for the estimation of atmospheric traces metal deposition in three sites characterized by different source of pollution around an industrialized area and two urban areas (north-west of Sardinia, Italy). Moss carpets were collected from trees in a forest of central Sardinia where air pollution is not present. In the laboratory, the moss plant samples were cleaned and moss bags were prepared by weighing out 2 g air-dried weight, and packing it loosely in nylon nets of 12 x 12 cm with mesh of 4 mm2. In each site the moss bags were exposed for six weeks during autumn, winter, spring and summer seasons from November 2007 to July 2008. Two moss bags, used as control, were not exposed. Following exposure the moss samples were analyzed for total concentration of As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Results obtained showed higher values of trace metal load factor for the following elements: Cu, Ni, Zn, and As. The most accumulation values were found in moss bags exposed in the industrial area for all period of experimentation.

  20. Trace metal mobilization in soil by bacterial polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jyh-Herng; Czajka, D.R.; Lion, L.W.

    1995-02-01

    Enhanced transport of trace metal in porous media can occur in the presence of a ligand or {open_quotes}carrier{close_quotes} that has a high affinity for binding the pollutant, is dispersed and mobile in the soil environment, is recalcitrant with respect to microbial degradation, and is acceptable to the public. These aspects of the facilitated transport to trace metals are discussed with respect to a naturally occurring carrier; extracellular polymers of bacterial origin. The literature is reviewed regarding the production and composition of bacterial extracellular polymers, the processes relevant to the facilitated transport of trace metals in soil by bacterial polymers, and potential for transformation of polymers in soils by microbial degradation. Model calculations of contaminant retardation are presented for the case of polymer-mediated transport of cadmium in a sandy aquifer material. The available information suggests that extracellular polymers can bind metal ions and are mobile in the soil environment. Extracellular polymers also appear to be relatively slowly degraded by soil microorganisms. These properties and the supporting model calculations indicate that extracellular polymers of bacterial origin merit consideration as agents that may be applied to contaminated soils to enhance trace metal mobility. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Metallization Qualification for VLSI (TRACE Test).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Typical Voids Produced in Type 4 Line, 3.4 wr Wide, 1650 Uam Long 28 4.4 LIFE TEST APPARATUS Apparatus for simultaneously life testing 300 metal stripes at...sample design, test procedures, and results are consistent with this test method. 3.0 TESI SAMPLES The test samples must be designed and processed to meet

  2. Abnormal accumulation of trace metals by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, R.D.; Brooks, R.R.; Baker, A.J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The article describes the hyperaccumulation of metals by plants. Ranges for low, normal, high, and hyperaccumulating uptake are established. A partial list of hyperaccumulator species and their localities is included. Studies are reviewed and summarized for zinc, cadmium and lead, nickel, cobalt and copper, selenium, and cadmium and manganese hyperaccumulation.

  3. Essential and Beneficial Trace Elements in Plants, and Their Transport in Roots: a Review.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Recep; Ozyigit, Ibrahim Ilker; Filiz, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    The essentiality of 14 mineral elements so far have been reported in plant nutrition. Eight of these elements were known as micronutrients due to their lower concentrations in plants (usually ≤100 mg/kg/dw). However, it is still challenging to mention an exact number of plant micronutrients since some elements have not been strictly proposed yet either as essential or beneficial. Micronutrients participate in very diverse metabolic processes, including from the primary and secondary metabolism to the cell defense, and from the signal transduction to the gene regulation, energy metabolism, and hormone perception. Thus, the attempt to understand the molecular mechanism(s) behind their transport has great importance in terms of basic and applied plant sciences. Moreover, their deficiency or toxicity also caused serious disease symptoms in plants, even plant destruction if not treated, and many people around the world suffer from the plant-based dietary deficiencies or metal toxicities. In this sense, shedding some light on this issue, the 13 mineral elements (Fe, B, Cu, Mn, Mo, Si, Zn, Ni, Cl, Se, Na, Al, and Co), required by plants at trace amounts, has been reviewed with the primary focus on the transport proteins (transporters/channels) in plant roots. So, providing the compiled but extensive information about the structural and functional roles of micronutrient transport genes/proteins in plant roots.

  4. Trace metal contamination study on scalp hair of occupationally exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, W.; Jaffar, M. ); Mohammad, D. )

    1994-10-01

    Scalp hair is a metabolic end product that incorporates metals into its structure during the growth process. The levels of trace elements in the hair are considered to be influenced in particular by food, air and occupational exposure, and in general by race, age, sex, metabolism, hygienic condition and geographical location of individuals. Recently, trace metal content of human hair has been explored as a tool for monitoring the impact of environmental pollution on the inhabitants of a community. In this respect, the endogenous and exogenous contents of metals in hair are understood to play important role towards exposure assessment. The exogenous metal content of hair reflects exposure to the occupational, domestic and recreational environments, provided the donor is not suffering from heavy metal poisoning and depressed endogenous levels arising from dietary deficiencies. Keeping this in view, the exogenous and endogenous metal contents of scalp hair of occupationally exposed workers from various workshops were determined in the present study, both in unwashed and washed hair samples to assess the extent of metal contamination. All donors, within the age group of 6-45 years, were full-time workers of various autoworkshops situated in the densely populated and industrialized city of Lahore. ICP atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods were used for determining the levels of five non-essential and three essential elements in the scalp hair. 20 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Elucidating the Composition and Distribution of Trace Metals in Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Webb, S. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coral reefs host a plethora of marine life and thereby provide a wealth of aesthetic and economic benefits to coastal countries. Anthropogenic influences, including local coastal water contamination, however threaten the health of these delicate ecosystems. Metal incorporation into carbonate minerals, the backbone of coral reefs, is known to have a large yet variable impact on carbonate structure and solubility. Yet, trace metal influences on the structure, porosity, composition, and solubility of coral skeletons is largely unknown. Here, we coupled synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (u-XRF) mapping and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy with micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) to explore the distribution and speciation of trace metals associated with corals and their impact on the carbonate structure of corals obtained from reefs varying in anthropogenic influence - Florida Keys, FL USA and the Federated States of Micronesia. Iron and copper were the most abundant metals in the biological tissue, while in some areas zinc was observed in the tissue, overlapping with the skeleton. Trace metals were not detectable in the aragonite skeletons; in fact, the distributions of Ca and Fe were anti-correlated. XANES spectra show that the iron is primarily Fe(III), likely as the poorly crystalline iron oxide ferrihydrite structure or trapped within ferretin proteins. The same trace metals were observed in corals of different species and from different environments. This in situ investigation corroborates previous studies that corals tend to incorporate iron into the biological components but not into the aragonite skeleton. Given the dominant partitioning of metals within the biological tissue rather than the coral skeleton, the specific carbon molecules responsible for metal attenuation and their fate under changing geochemical conditions and following coral death require exploration.

  6. Levels of selected trace metals in hair of urban and rural adult male population of Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, W.; Jaffar, M.; Mohammad, D.

    1995-02-01

    Human scalp hair as a biopsy material may well serve the purpose of estimating the degree of human exposure to environmental contaminants, especially trace metals. To this effect, the levels of trace metals in hair of various groups of population living in areas with varying extent of environmental exposure are generally compared together. Such comparative evaluations are important since they are unique for each group of population and probably reflect not only a number of factors of genetical, nutritional and environmental origin, but also indicate relationship with factors such as food, ambient air, drinking water, occupational exposure, age, race, sex and metabolic condition etc. Also there are some elements which are selectively deposited in hair and may thus provide clinical information on the level of exposure and toxication. The aim of the present study was two-fold: to collect base-line trace metal data on hair and to evaluate the metal levels as measure of the nutritional status of the relevant groups of urban and rural population in terms of industrial, agricultural and occupation exposure. For this purpose, scalp hair samples were obtained from donors belonging to urban adult male population from the city of Peshawer and a rural town, Jamrood and were investigated for three essential metals (Na, K and Zn) and four non-essential metals (Co, Hg, As and Ag) by AAS technique. The impact of urban and rural environments, including the food habits of individuals, on trace metal distribution in scalp hair of the two classes of population is then reviewed with reference to the literature data available from other parts of the world. 16 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Pyritization of trace metals in anoxic marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Diaz, Miguel A.; Morse, John W.

    1992-07-01

    The pyritization of reactive trace elements in different anoxic marine sediments was investigated to determine the importance of factors such as ∑H 2S, reactive-Fe, pyrite content and salinity in controlling this process. The areas studied included anoxic-sulfidic sediments (Baffin Bay, a hypersaline coastal lagoon from Texas and Green Canyon, a hemipelagic oil seepage area), anoxic-nonsulfidic sediments with high sedimentation rates (Atchafalaya Bay-Mississippi Delta system), hemipelagic anoxic-nonsulfidic sediments with low sedimentation rates (Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope and Orca Basin, an euxinic hypersaline basin) and organic-rich marsh sediments (Atchafalaya Bay). Results indicate that the degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) of all trace metals, except Cd, increased with increasing degree of pyritization (DOP), irrespective of the type of sedimentary environment involved. However, for As, Hg and Mo, the DTMP/DOP values were generally above the 1:1 ratio line, whereas the transition metals Co, Cu, Mn and Ni displayed a close to linear increase in DTMP with DOP and moderate incorporation into pyrite. Chromium and the class B metals Pb and Zn were also gradually incorporated into the pyrite phase but without reaching the DTMP levels exhibited by the transition metals. Cadmium was not incorporated to a significant extent. These results are consistent with the chemical attributes of these different classes of trace elements. Availability of dissolved trace metals and organic matter content are apparently important factors controlling the incorporation of Co, Cr, Cu and Ni into pyrite in anoxicsulfidic (Fe-poor and H 2S-rich) environments.

  8. Subcritical water extraction of trace metals from petroleum source rock.

    PubMed

    Akinlua, Akinsehinwa; Smith, Roger M

    2010-06-15

    The extraction of trace metals from petroleum source rock by superheated water was investigated and the conditions for maximum yield were determined. The results showed that no significant extraction was attained at 100 degrees C but the extraction was enhanced at higher temperatures. The optimum temperature for superheated water extraction of the metals from petroleum source rocks was 250 degrees C. Extraction yields increased with enhanced extraction time. Exhaustive extraction time for all the trace metals determined in this study was attained at 30min. Comparison of results of leaching these trace metals by superheated water with those of acid digestion revealed that cadmium, chromium, manganese and nickel had better yields with superheated water while vanadium had better yield with acid digestion. The results showed that the temperature and kinetic rates have significant effects on superheated water extraction of metals from petroleum source rocks. The results also revealed that effective leaching of some metals from petroleum source rocks by superheated water can be achieved without any modification except for vanadium.

  9. Unexpected Consequences: Gold Mining in Peru and Trace Metal Mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. Z.; Pinedo-Gonzalez, P.; Clark, K. E.; West, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Artisanal miners in the Peruvian Amazon, especially in the Madre de Dios region, are targeting fluvial deposits along riverbanks as part of a modern-day gold rush. These miners often use mercury, causing Hg pollution and ecological damage. Research on the environmental consequences of these mines has focused primarily on the fate of Hg, and to date little work has considered whether mining river sediments affects the release and cycling of other trace metals. This project measures trace metal concentrations in soil and vegetation samples developed on fluvial sediments at one mine site and two non-mine (control) sites across gradients in natural plant succession and riverbank composition. Some metals, including Pb and Mo, showed leachable metal concentrations (determined using EPA Method 2050B and ICP-MS analysis) that were lower in mine site soils than control site soils, but higher in mine site vegetation than control site vegetation. These results held across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. This suggests that metals may be preferentially mobilized from the soil and taken up by surrounding vegetation as a result of mining activities. Soils were also treated with a sequential leach to separate metals that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe and Mn oxides, bound to organic matter and in the residual phase. Initial data shows that trace metal concentrations are generally lower in all phases from mine soils vs. control soils, across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. Trace metal mobilization due to mining is facilitated by changing pH or redox conditions - e.g., by exposing buried minerals to water and oxygen. Fluvial sediments at these studied sites were already exposed during their erosion and transport, but anoxic conditions following deposition may allow a build-up of metals that are mobilized once sediments are re-worked by mining. It is also possible that Hg affects the mobility of other

  10. Trace metals and cancer: The case of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Devès, G.; Vesvres, M. H.; Simonoff, M.; Bénard, J.

    2001-07-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is one of the most established prognostic factors in neuroblastoma (NB), a young children solid tumor. Amounts of ferritin, an iron storage protein, are abnormally increased in serum of patients with advanced stage disease. N- myc amplified NB cells can synthesize zinc metalloenzymes allowing tumor invasion and metastases formation. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between N- myc amplification and trace metals in human neuroblasts. Coupling PIXE and RBS techniques, nuclear microprobe allowed to analyze elemental distributions and to determine trace metal concentrations within cultured neuroblasts characterized by various degrees of N- myc amplification. They were compared to trace metal distributions and concentrations in tumor xenograft models of human NB, after injection of cells from the same lines in athymic nude mice. Our data allowed to establish a relation between trace metal contents and mechanisms of NB oncogenesis, amplified cell lines representing more aggressive phenotypes of the disease. They should be confirmed by analysis of cultured neuroblasts and tumors issued from a non-amplified cell line transfected with the N- myc oncogene.

  11. Trace metals accumulation in Bacopa monnieri and their bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Srikanth Lavu, Rama Venkata; Prasad, Majeti Narasimha Vara; Pratti, Varalakshmi Lalithya; Meißner, Ralph; Rinklebe, Jörg; Van De Wiele, Tom; Tack, Filip; Du Laing, Gijs

    2013-08-01

    Bacopa monnieri is commonly known as "Brahmi" or "Water hyssop" and is a source of nootropic drugs. Aboveground parts of plant samples collected from peri-urban Indian areas were analysed for total trace metal concentrations. Subsequently, three samples with high concentrations of Cd and Pb were subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion to assess the bioaccessibility of the trace metals in these plants. The total concentrations of trace metals on a dry weight basis were 1.3 to 6.7 mg·kg⁻¹ Cd, 1.5 to 22 mg·kg⁻¹ Pb, 36 to 237 mg·kg⁻¹ Cu, and 78 to 186 mg·kg⁻¹ Zn. The majority of Bacopa monnieri samples exceeded threshold limits of Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn for use as raw medicinal plant material or direct consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate Bacopa monnieri collected in nature for their trace metal content prior to human consumption and preparation of herbal formulations.

  12. The Genetics of Essential Metal Homeostasis During Development

    PubMed Central

    Kambe, Taiho; Weaver, Benjamin P.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The essential metals copper, zinc, and iron play key roles in embryonic, fetal, and postnatal development in higher eukaryotes. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecules involved in the intricate control of the homeostasis of these metals and the availability of natural mutations and targeted mutations in many of the genes involved have allowed for elucidation of the diverse roles of these metals during development. Evidence suggests that the ability of the embryo to control the homeostasis of these metals becomes essential at the blastocyst stage and during early morphogenesis. However, these metals play unique roles throughout development and exert pleiotropic, metalspecific, and often cell-specific effects on morphogenesis, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we briefly review the major players known to be involved in the homeostasis of each of these essential metals and their known roles in development. PMID:18395838

  13. Trace metals, stable isotope ratios, and trophic relations in seabirds from the North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John E

    2005-12-01

    Trace elements including mercury, cadmium, selenium, and stable nitrogen isotope ratios (sigma15N) were measured in tissues of Pacific seabirds. Two species of albatross (Diomedea immutabilis, Diomedea nigripes), four species of shearwaters (Puffinus bulleri, Puffinus carneipes, Puffinus griseus, Puffinus tenuirostris), northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis), and horned puffin (Fratercula corniculata) were collected opportunistically by an experimental fishery in the North Pacific Ocean. Two species each of petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa, Oceanodroma furcata) and auklets (Ptychoramphus aleuticus, Cerorhinca monocerata) were collected at breeding colonies on the north coast of British Columbia, Canada. Concentrations of toxic trace metals varied considerably among the pelagic nonbreeders; highest concentrations consistently were in D. nigripes (e.g., Hg), 70-fold greater than F. corniculata (e.g., Cd), eightfold greater than P. tenuirostris (e.g., Se), and fourfold greater than F. corniculata. Most essential trace elements varied little among species, consistent with physiological regulation. Values for sigma15N correlated positively with hepatic Se (r = 0.771, p = 0.025) and negatively with Co (r = 0.817, p = 0.013). Among the four breeding species, there were significant positive associations for sigma15N in muscle and hepatic Se (r = 0.822, p = 0.002), Hg (r = 0.744, p = 0.0001), and Cd (r = 0.589, p = 0.003). Differences in time scales integrated by sigma15N versus trace metals in tissues probably reduced the apparent associations between trace-metal exposure and diet.

  14. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  15. Accumulation and trace-metal variability of estuarine sediments, Barataria Basin, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, K.

    1994-09-01

    Prior to government regulation, little monitoring of metal discharges into the canals, bayous, and rivers that drain estuarine systems occurred. Discharges of heavy metals are now limited through the use of regulatory permit programs for industries and municipalities. Resource management of economically important estuarine systems has fostered increasing concern over the accumulation of heavy metal pollutants in water, sediments, and biota of these dynamic areas. As a result of the low solubility of most metals, very small amounts are transported in solution. Most metals transported by rivers are tightly bound in the aluminosilicate phases associated with the suspended and bottom sediments. The bottom sediments of lakes and estuaries have served as sinks for the accumulation of heavy metals from natural weathering products, spills, effluents, runoff, and atmospheric sources. These accumulations have left a metal signature upon essentially every bay and estuary in the northern Gulf. The acid-leachable concentrations of 14 metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) were determined for 136 bottom sediment samples and 40 core interval samples by plasma emission analysis. Elevated concentrations in heavy metals near the centers of the Barataria basin lakes reflect the strong correlations between increased trace-metal concentrations and smaller grain-size sediments. Heavy metal concentrations within the 2-cm core intervals indicate increases in Ba, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn (10-30%) within Barataria basin sediments accumulated in the last 75 yr. Although anthropogenic heavy metal contributions within Barataria basin exist, comparisons of average trace-metal concentrations from the study areas with those of other Gulf Coast estuaries and with the average shale indicate that the heavy metal contents of upper Barataria basin sediments have not reached alarming levels.

  16. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead

  17. Trace metal partitioning in Thalassia testudinum and sediments in the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Thomas; Espinoza, Jorge; Villarreal, Xiomara; Cottagoma, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Seagrass communities dominate the Laguna Madre, which accounts for 25% of the coastal region of Texas. Seagrasses are essential to the health of the Laguna Madre (LM) and have experienced an overall decline in coverage in the Lower Laguna Madre (LLM) since 1967. Little is known on the existing environmental status of the LLM. This study focuses on the trace metal chemistry of four micronutrient metals, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn, and two non-essential metals, Pb and As, in the globally important seagrass Thalassia testudinum. Seasonal trends show that concentrations of most essential trace metals increase in the tissue during the summer months. With the exception of (1) Cu in the vertical shoot and root, and (2) Mn in the roots, no significant positive correlation exists between the rhizosphere sediment and T. testudinum tissue. Iron indicates a negative correlation between the morphological units and the rhizosphere sediments. No other significant relationship was found between the sediments and the T. testudinum tissue. Mn was enriched up to 10-fold in the leaf tissue relative to the other morphological units and also enriched relative to the rhizosphere sediments. Both Cu and Mn appear to be enriched in leaf tissue compared to other morphological units and also enriched relative to the Cu and Mn in the rhizoshpere sediments. Sediments cores taken in barren areas were slightly elevated in Zn relative to the rhizosphere sediments, whereas no other metals showed statistical differences between barren sediment cores and rhizosphere sediments. However, no correlation was measured in T. testudinum tissue and Zn in rhizosphere sediments. Previous studies suggested that Fe/Mn ratios could indicate differences between seagrass environments. Our results indicate that there is an influence from the Rio Grande in the Fe/Mn signature in sediments, and that ratio is not reflected in the T. testudinum tissue. The results from this study show that the LLM contains trace metal

  18. Facilitation of trace metal uptake in cells by inulin coating of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Santillán-Urquiza, Esmeralda; Arteaga-Cardona, Fernando; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cole, Bryan; Wu, Bing; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Trace elements such as zinc and iron are essential for the proper function of biochemical processes, and their uptake and bioavailability are dependent on their chemical form. Supplementation of trace metals through nanostructured materials is a new field, but its application raises concerns regarding their toxicity. Here, we compared the intracellular zinc uptake of different sources of zinc: zinc sulfate, and ZnO and core-shell α-Fe2O3@ZnO nanoparticles, coated or uncoated with inulin, an edible and biocompatible polysaccharide. Using mussel haemocytes, a well-known model system to assess nanomaterial toxicity, we simultaneously assessed zinc accumulation and multiple cellular response endpoints. We found that intracellular zinc uptake was strongly enhanced by inulin coating, in comparison to the uncoated nanoparticles, while no significant effects on cell death, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane integrity, production of reactive oxygen species or lysosome abundance were observed at concentrations up to 20 ppm. Since no significant increments in toxicity were observed, the coated nanomaterials may be useful to increase in vivo zinc uptake for nutritional applications. PMID:28989755

  19. Facilitation of trace metal uptake in cells by inulin coating of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santillán-Urquiza, Esmeralda; Arteaga-Cardona, Fernando; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cole, Bryan; Wu, Bing; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Cherr, Gary N

    2017-09-01

    Trace elements such as zinc and iron are essential for the proper function of biochemical processes, and their uptake and bioavailability are dependent on their chemical form. Supplementation of trace metals through nanostructured materials is a new field, but its application raises concerns regarding their toxicity. Here, we compared the intracellular zinc uptake of different sources of zinc: zinc sulfate, and ZnO and core-shell α-Fe2O3@ZnO nanoparticles, coated or uncoated with inulin, an edible and biocompatible polysaccharide. Using mussel haemocytes, a well-known model system to assess nanomaterial toxicity, we simultaneously assessed zinc accumulation and multiple cellular response endpoints. We found that intracellular zinc uptake was strongly enhanced by inulin coating, in comparison to the uncoated nanoparticles, while no significant effects on cell death, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane integrity, production of reactive oxygen species or lysosome abundance were observed at concentrations up to 20 ppm. Since no significant increments in toxicity were observed, the coated nanomaterials may be useful to increase in vivo zinc uptake for nutritional applications.

  20. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  1. Trace metal source terms in carbon sequestration environments.

    PubMed

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2013-01-02

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO(2) or CO(2)-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO(2). Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  2. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  3. On nutrients and trace metals: Effects from Enhanced Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application of rock flour on suitable land ("Enhanced Weathering") is one proposed strategy to reduce the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At the same time it is an old and established method to add fertiliser and influence soil properties. Investigations of this method focused on the impact on the carbonate system, as well as on engineering aspects of a large-scale application, but potential side effects were never discussed quantitatively. We analysed about 120,000 geochemically characterised volcanic rock samples from the literature. Applying basic statistics, theoretical release rates of nutrients and potential contaminants by Enhanced Weathering were evaluated for typical rock types. Applied rock material can contain significant amounts of essential or beneficial nutrients (potassium, phosphorus, micronutrients). Their release can partly cover the demand of major crops like wheat, rice or corn, thereby increasing crop yield on degraded soils. However, the concentrations of considered elements are variable within a specific rock type, depending on the geological setting. High heavy metal concentrations are found in (ultra-) basic rocks, the class with the highest CO2 drawdown potential. More acidic rocks contain less or no critical amounts, but sequester less CO2. Findings show that the rock selection determines the capability to supply significant amounts of nutrients, which could partly substitute industrial mineral fertiliser usage. At the same time, the release of harmful trace element has to be considered. Through careful selection of regionally available rocks, benefits could be maximised and drawbacks reduced. The deployment of Enhanced Weathering to sequester CO2 and to ameliorate soils necessitates an ecosystem management, considering the release and fate of weathered elements in plants, soils and water. Cropland with degraded soils would benefit while having a net negative CO2 effect, while other carbon dioxide removal strategies, like

  4. Trace metals in edible tissues of livestock and poultry

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, M.E.; Elder, R.S.; Basu, P.; Koppenaal, G.P.

    1992-07-01

    Data from a random-sampling study are presented for trace metals in edible tissues of livestock (bovine including bull, steer, cow heifer, calf; ovine including bull, steer, cow, heifer, calf; ovine including mature sheep and lambs; porcine including market hogs, boar/stag, and slow) and poultry (including young and mature chicken, young turkey, and duck). Tissue homogenates were ashed, and residual materials were dissolved in hydrochloric acid for analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Statistical summaries of data are provided for the trace metals lead, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, and zinc. The heavy metals of toxicological concern, lead and cadmium, are emphasized in this study. Lead and cadmium were rarely detected in muscle (0.2-0.5% positive among 2314 animals sampled). Lead was also infrequently detected in liver (1.8% positive) and kidney (2.4% positive). Nearly 46% of livers analyzed were positive for cadmium, and approximately 78 of kidney samples were positive for cadmium. No regulatory limits are established in the United States for the trace metals reported in this study, although restrictions on the use of kidneys from mature poultry as human food have been established because of concern about potential cadmium levels. Kidneys from this study, more frequently than livers, bore cadmium levels that exceeded the regulatory limits of other countries or organizations. Regulatory implications of the data are discussed. 23 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency. PMID:27324564

  6. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency.

  7. Investigating Jacaranda mimosifolia tree as biomonitor of atmospheric trace metals.

    PubMed

    Olowoyo, J O; van Heerden, E; Fischer, J L

    2010-05-01

    Studies on the use of tree bark as biomonitors for environmental pollutants are still very scarce. We evaluated the reliability of using Jacaranda mimosifolia, a common tree in Tshwane City of South Africa, as a suitable biomonitor of atmospheric trace metals. Bark samples were collected from ten different locations during two sampling periods. The concentrations of the metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The concentrations of the metals were 33.2-1,795 microg/g (Pb), 21.4-210 microg/g (Cu), 68.4-490 microg/g (Zn), 30.6-2,916 microg/g (Cr), 0.12-1.34 microg/g (Cd), and 6.04-68.0 microg/g (V), respectively. The differences obtained for the results from different sites were significant (p < 0.05). A significant difference was also observed between the two sampling periods. The trace metals concentrations suggested that automobile emissions are a major source of these metals. The study also confirms the suitability of J. mimosifolia as a biomonitor of atmospheric deposition of these metals.

  8. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  9. The effect of solid metal composition on solid metal/ liquid metal partitioning of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, N.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-12-01

    Fundamental understanding of the partitioning behaviour of elements between different core and/or mantle phases is needed to constrain processes of planetary differentiation and evolution. The partitioning behaviour of elements between solid metal and liquid metal in the Fe-S system, of relevance to core crystallisation in planetesimals and the terrestrial planets, has been investigated by several workers [1-6], most of whom [1-5] conclude that variations in partition coefficients can be explained by variations in melt composition. However, recently Stewart et al. [6] showed that the crystal-lattice strain model commonly used to describe silicate mineral - silicate melt partitioning can be applied to partially molten metallic systems. This suggests the structure of the solid metal also plays a role in determining solid metal / molten metal partitioning. Here, we investigate the effect of the structure of the solid metal in the Fe-S system on solid/liquid metal partitioning by obtaining new element partitioning data at pressures between 0.5 and 3 GPa. The effect of the solid metal is isolated from pressure-temperature-melt composition effects by performing experiments at constant P and T with two Fe-S bulk compositions on either side of the eutectic composition. In addition to the effect of solid metal composition we investigate the effects of pressure and S content on trace element partitioning behaviour and the application of the lattice strain model to our results. Starting mixtures were doped with several hundred ppm levels of trace elements Ni, Co, W, Mo, V, Nb, Ta, Sn, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mn, P, Ge,. Experiments were performed using a QUICKPress piston cylinder apparatus at the VU University, Amsterdam using alumina capsules. Experiments were heated to 1073 K at pressure and allowed to sinter for a duration of 10 hours before the temperature was raised at a rate of 50 K / min to the target value. Preliminary EPMA data for a 1 GPa experiment with FeS as the solid

  10. Essential and toxic trace element concentrations in different commercial veal cuts in Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M; Benedito, J L; Pereira, V; García-Vaquero, M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate essential and toxic element concentration of ten commercially available veal cuts, together with diaphragm, cardiac muscle and liver tissue from 10 animals of "Galician Supreme Veal". Essential trace elements (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Se and Zn) and toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) were determined by ICP-MS. Essential trace element concentrations ranged from 0.002-55.64mg/kg between muscles. Toxic element concentrations were very low, and high numbers of samples showed unquantifiable residues of Cd and Pb. Veal cuts including muscles with a high proportion of oxidative slow-twitch fibers (diaphragm and cardiac muscle) showed significantly higher essential trace element concentrations, the lower concentrations being found in veal cuts including glycolytic fast-twitch fibers (eye round). Our results suggest that essential and toxic trace element concentration could be used as a new meat quality parameter, or to add further value to certain products (i.e. livestock reared on extensive systems with high physical activity). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of trace metal concentrations on coccolithophore growth and morphology: species-specific responses in past and present ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Giulia; Hoffmann, Linn; Bach, Lennart Thomas; Bottini, Cinzia; Erba, Elisabetta; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-04-01

    The Cretaceous witnessed intervals of profound perturbation named "Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs)" characterized by volcanic injection of large amounts of CO2, ocean anoxia, eutrophication, and introduction of biologically relevant metals. Some of these extreme events were characterized by size reduction and/or morphological changes of a number of nannofossil species. To detect the cause/s of such changes in the fossil record is challenging. Evidence of a correspondence between intervals of high trace metals concentrations and nannofossil dwarfism may be suggestive for a negative effect of these elements on nannoplankton biocalcification process. In order to verify the hypothesis that anomalously high quantities of essential and/or toxic metals were the cause of coccolith dwarfism, we explored the toxicities of a mixture of trace metals on four living coccolithophores species, namely Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Pleurochrysis carterae and Coccolithus pelagicus. The trace metals tested were chosen based upon concentration peaks identified in the geological record and upon known trace metal interaction with living coccolithophores algae. Our results demonstrate a species-specific response to trace metal enrichment in living coccolithophores: E. huxleyi, G. oceanica and C. pelagicus showed a decrease in their growth rate with progressively and exponentially increased trace metal concentrations, while P. carterae is unresponsive to trace metal content. Furthermore, E. huxleyi, G. oceanica and C. pelagicus evidenced a decrease in the cell diameter. Smaller coccoliths were detected in E. huxleyi and C. pelagicus, while coccolith of G. oceanica showed a decrease in size only at the highest trace metal concentrations tested. P. carterae size was unresponsive for changing trace metal concentration. Our results on living coccolithophore algae, demonstrate that elevated trace metal concentrations not only affect growth but also coccolith size and/or weight and that

  12. Bioactive trace metal time series during Austral summer in Ryder Bay, Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, Johann; Laan, Patrick; Ossebaar, Sharyn; Bakker, Karel; Rozema, Patrick; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2017-05-01

    The Western Antarctic Peninsula, one of the most productive regions of the Southern Ocean, is currently affected by the increasing of atmospheric and oceanic temperatures. For several decades, the Rothera Time Series (RaTS) site located in Ryder Bay has been monitored by the British Antarctic Survey and has shown long lasting phytoplankton summer blooms (over a month) that are likely driven by the length of the sea ice season. The dynamics of phytoplankton blooms in Ryder Bay may just as well be influenced by natural fertilization of iron and other bioactive trace metals due to the proximity of land, islands and glaciers. For the first time, temporal distributions in the surface layer (0-75 m depth) of six bioactive trace metals (dissolved: Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and dissolved labile Co) have been investigated with high temporal and spatial resolution at the RaTS site during a total of 2 and 3.5 months respectively, over two consecutive summers. Most of the studied trace elements showed wide ranges of concentrations and this dynamics appears to be driven by phytoplankton uptake, remineralization and occasional vertical mixing associated with storm episodes. The biological uptake of DMn, DZn, DCd, DCoL and DCu was proportional to uptake of phosphate and silicate, which was associated with weak to strong linear relationships depending on which phytoplankton bloom events was considered. This further suggests that the surface water distributions of these studied bio-active trace metals were mainly driven by biological uptake and remineralization during austral spring and summer in Ryder Bay. Even though DFe did not show any strong relationship with phosphate, DFe decreasing concentrations during each bloom event suggest that Fe is a key essential element for phytoplankton in the area of study. The consistency of trace metals/nutrient ratios during two consecutive summers indicates that over-winter scavenging removal was slow relative to mixing. The increase of DCd/P and

  13. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  14. Trace metal anomalies in bleached Porites coral at Meiji Reef, tropical South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jianxin; Feng, Yuexing; Chen, Tianran

    2017-01-01

    Coral bleaching has generally been recognized as the main reason for tropical coral reef degradation, but there are few long-term records of coral bleaching events. In this study, trace metals including chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), and yttrium (Y), were analyzed in two Porites corals collected from Meiji Reef in the tropical South China Sea (SCS) to assess differences in trace metal concentrations in bleached compared with unbleached coral growth bands. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo generally showed irregular fluctuations in both corals. Bleached layers contained high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb. Unbleached layers showed moderately high concentrations of Mn and Cu only. The different distribution of trace metals in Porites may be attributable to different selectivity on the basis of vital utility or toxicity. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo are discriminated against by both coral polyps and zooxanthellae, but Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb are accumulated by zooxanthellae and only Mn and Cu are accumulated by polyps as essential elements. The marked increase in Cu, Mn, Pb, and Sn are associated with bleaching processes, including mucus secretion, tissue retraction, and zooxanthellae expulsion and occlusion. Variation in these trace elements within the coral skeleton can be used as potential tracers of short-lived bleaching events.

  15. Trace metals in fleece wool and correlations with yellowness.

    PubMed

    King, A L; Millington, K R

    2013-03-01

    The presence of copper and iron in metal-doped wool has been shown previously to be associated with the production of free radicals and yellowing in photo-irradiated wool. In this study, the yellowness and trace metal content of 700 wool samples was measured to determine if photoyellowing, catalysed by metals, is a major determinant of the colour of fleece wool. Iron and copper content did not positively correlate with yellowness and yellower wool tended to have lower levels of these metals. Instead, a strong positive correlation of yellowness with the calcium, manganese and magnesium content was observed in yellow wools. High levels of calcium and magnesium is consistent with biofilm formation by Pseudomonas bacteria that have previously been associated with non-scourable staining of wool.

  16. Trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Davies, T.D. . School of Environmental Sciences); Tranter, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the techniques of non-destructive neutron activation analysis to determine trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events occurring in the Cairngorm Mountains in remote areas of Scotland. Thirty-one elements were determined in the particulate matter of snowpack cores that were sliced into sections. An additional analysis was performed for a black acidic snow event. Based on these results and on wind trajectories, increased loadings of many of the heavy metals and rare earth elements appeared to have originated from central Europe. Enrichment factor calculations show anthropogenic emissions for indium, arsenic, zinc, and selenium.

  17. Characterization of airborne trace metal and trace organic species from coal gasification.

    PubMed

    Osborn, J F; Santhanam, S; Davidson, C I; Flotard, R D; Stetter, J R

    1984-12-01

    Fugitive emissions from a slagging fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant were analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry for trace metal and trace organic species. Analysis of the size distributions of airborne particulate matter inside the plant showed an abundance of large metal-containing particles; outdoor distributions in the vicinity of the plant resembled the indoor distributions, suggesting the importance of the gasifier in influencing ambient air quality. This conclusion was further supported by identification of similar organic compounds inside and outside the plant. Trace element enrichment factors based on the earth's crustal composition were greater than those based on the composition of the lignite used in the gasifier, showing the importance of characterizing the proper source material when inverstigating chemical fraction during aerosol formation. Enrichments in the present study were much greater than those found in previous sampling during aborted start-up and cleaning procedures, where normal operating temperatures had not yet been reached. Both studies showed evidence of enrichment factors which decreased with increasing particle size. Although much of the airborne mass was associated with large particles having low respirability, the high concentrations of some metals indoors suggests that further assessment of potential occupational exposures is warranted.

  18. Particulate Trace Metal Composition in Coastal Waters Surrounding Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, K. T.; Huang, K. C.; Hsieh, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal zones are dynamic environments where materials are transported from the land and where biomass is the most abundant, feeding on the terrestrial nutrients supplied. Therefore, compositions of particulate matter in coastal waters are complex. We collected size-fractionated particulate matter from Taiwan's coastal waters and determine trace metal concentrations, along with some key parameters that allow for the assessment of contribution of particulate matter from different sources. Al content in the particles is used to derive a mineralogical contribution (largely terrestrial) in the particle samples, based on the fact that Al concentrations in common clay minerals and in biota are 2-3 orders of magnitude different. Thereafter, trace metal concentrations in biotic particles can be derived after subtracting contribution from mineral particles (using a reference trace metal concentration in mineral phase), and the results can be compared directly. In the four size classes of particulate matter we collected (0.4-10 µm, 10-60 µm, 60-153 µm, and >153 µm), Al concentration, i.e. mineralogical contribution, decreased with increasing size. The derived biotic trace metal concentrations in near-shore coastal waters showed large variations in different size fractions. Biotic Cd concentrations increased with increasing particle size, implying bioaccumulation along the food chain. For Pb, higher concentrations were mostly associated with smaller size fractions. This may suggest the particle-reactive characteristics applied here for biotic particles. For other elements of biological and environmental significance, such as Cu, Ni, and Zn, their bulk particulate concentrations were relatively constant regardless sample locations and size fraction, but large variations in the biotic contents were found among different size fractions, as well as among samples collected from different locations with various extent of anthropogenic influence.

  19. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  20. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in trace metal concentrations in the cockle, Austrovenus stutchburyi from Otago, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Peake, Barrie M; Marsden, Islay D; Bryan, Ashley M

    2006-04-01

    This is the first comprehensive study of sources of variation in metal concentrations within the whole tissues of a shallow burrowing, filter-feeding intertidal clam, Austrovenus stutchburyi. Samples were collected from 12 sites in April, August, November and February in 1993-1994 in the vicinity of Otago Harbour and Peninsula, New Zealand. Total tissue trace metal concentrations (microg g(-1) dry weight) were measured in individual animals for the essential metals : Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni and the non-essential Cr using trace-metal clean acid-digestion and ICP-OAES techniques. Average metal concentrations were 3-60 microg g(-1) for Cu, 40-118 microg g(-1) for Zn, 2-12 microg g(-1) for Mn, 5-35 microg g(-1) for Ni and 1-44 microg g(-1) for Cr. These levels decreased with body weight and differed amongst sites except for Cr in February (mid-summer). Highest concentrations occurred at sites close to a city (Dunedin) and within the central harbour region although the Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr concentrations did not correlate with the environmental gradient or season. At one coastal site, samples of both the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and cockles gave similar trends in trace metal levels. These results suggest that the cockle could be a useful trace metal biomonitor within NZ estuaries.

  2. Critical evaluation of soil contamination assessment methods for trace metals.

    PubMed

    Desaules, André

    2012-06-01

    Correctly distinguishing between natural and anthropogenic trace metal contents in soils is crucial for assessing soil contamination. A series of assessment methods is critically outlined. All methods rely on assumptions of reference values for natural content. According to the adopted reference values, which are based on various statistical and geochemical procedures, there is a considerable range and discrepancy in the assessed soil contamination results as shown by the five methods applied to three weakly contaminated sites. This is a serious indication of their high methodological specificity and bias. No method with off-site reference values could identify any soil contamination in the investigated trace metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni), while the specific and sensitive on-site reference methods did so for some sites. Soil profile balances are considered to produce the most plausible site-specific results, provided the numerous assumptions are realistic and the required data reliable. This highlights the dilemma between model and data uncertainty. Data uncertainty, however, is a neglected issue in soil contamination assessment so far. And the model uncertainty depends much on the site-specific realistic assumptions of pristine natural trace metal contents. Hence, the appropriate assessment of soil contamination is a subtle optimization exercise of model versus data uncertainty and specification versus generalization. There is no general and accurate reference method and soil contamination assessment is still rather fuzzy, with negative implications for the reliability of subsequent risk assessments.

  3. Trace metal evidence for a poorly ventilated glacial Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Meghan; Hendy, Ingrid L.

    2017-08-01

    Glacial benthic δ13C and Δ14C measurements from the Atlantic Ocean have been interpreted to indicate the existence of a poorly ventilated Southern Ocean with greater CO2 and nutrient contents compared to present. Enhanced storage of CO2 in the deep ocean predicts that oxygen concentrations should have declined at the same time-a prediction increasingly supported by evidence for oxygen depletion in the glacial Southern Ocean. Here we take a novel approach by using a suite of redox-sensitive trace metals (Ag, Cd, Re and Mo) to show that Southern Ocean sediments from two cores in the Atlantic sector were suboxic during and prior to deglaciation, implying changes to ocean circulation and/or elevated export production that significantly altered deep water chemistry. In the Cape Basin, enrichments of the authigenically deposited trace metal Re are comparable to those found in oxygen minimum zones, pointing to substantial decreases in oxygenation. Furthermore, trace metal results suggest potential spatial heterogeneity in the glacial Southern Ocean, and a more complicated oceanographic and oxygenation history than has previously been assumed.

  4. Trace metal dynamics in a seasonally anoxic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfett, K.; Davison, W.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.

    1988-02-01

    Selected results are presented from a detailed 12-month study of trace metals in a seasonally anoxic lake. Dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, organic carbon, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, and pH were determined in the water column and the interstitial waters on 39 occasions. Trace metal concentrations remained low throughout the year in both water column and pore waters. There was evidence for some remobilization at the sediment-water interface but sediments deeper than 3 cm acted as a sink throughout the year. Variations in the water concentrations were largely associated with increased loading during periods of heavy rainfall. During the summer, concentrations of Cu and Zn in the waters overlying the sediments were enhanced by release from decomposing algal material. Similarly, enhanced concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were observed during periods of much reduced mixing during ice-cover. Although there were large seasonal variations in the concentrations of dissolved and particulate Fe and Mn, there were no comparable changes in the concentrations of trace metals.

  5. Definitions and principles for bioindication and biomonitoring of trace metals in the environment.

    PubMed

    Markert, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Clear-cut definitions are given for most terms used in monitoring studies. In these studies the observation or experimental investigation of living organisms give a qualitative or quantitative information on the state of the environment with special reference to trace metals. The focus and future goals of biogeochemical research must consider the direct effects on human health, by including modelling of active biogeochemical processes than they have done so far. Newly developed strategies as the multi-markered bioindication concept (MMBC) with its functional and integrated windows on prophylactic healthcare are essential tools for successfully observing the environment with respect to trace metals. An intensified training of students and a strong hand in hand work between industrial, educational and public institutions is necessary.

  6. Toxic and essential metals determination in commercial seafood: Paracentrotus lividus by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Vadalà, Rossella; Mottese, Antonio Francesco; Bua, Daniel; Mallamace, Domenico; Giannetto, Carlo; Dugo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Toxic and essential metals content was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in commercial sea urchins samples from the Mediterranean Sea and Pacific Ocean. Results show that Chilean samples have the highest values of Cd, As, Ni, Cr and V; Spanish samples have the maximum Hg content while Sicilian samples have the lowest content of toxic metals. The toxic metal traces were compared with the limits of European Community (EC) No. 1881/2006 for bivalve molluscs. All samples exceed Pb and Cd limit levels; regarding Hg levels, only Sicilian and Sardinian samples have Hg content below the EC limits. The dietary intake of toxic and essential elements was evaluated for an adult. Furthermore, our study highlights a correlation between the toxic elements content and the marine environmental conditions of the places of origin even though only the generic FAO fishing area is specified.

  7. Particulate Trace Metal Composition in the Western Philippine Sea: the importance of anthropogenic aerosol deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W. H.; Ho, T. Y.

    2016-02-01

    The Western Philippine Sea (WPS), receiving huge amount of East Asian aerosols in winter and spring, is an ideal platform to investigate the impact of aerosol deposition on trace metal cycling in the oceanic surface water. Particulate trace metal composition provides useful information to elucidate the relative contribution of trace metal sources. In this study, we collected size-fractionated particles in the water column through two different seasons to investigate their trace metal composition and seasonal variability. Our results show that most of trace metal to phosphorus (P) normalized quotas in the size-fractionated particles are one to two orders of magnitude higher than intracellular trace metal quota in phytoplankton. Since all the particles collected are composed of biotic particles, the elevated trace metal to P quotas indicate that extracellular adsorption of trace metal accounts for larger amount than intracellular assimilation. In addition, the metal to Al ratios were similar to the ratios observed in aerosols, indicating that the metals mainly originated from aerosols. Overall, the extracellular adsorption of aerosol metals account for most of the particulate trace metals in the plankton samples. Our results prove the importance of aerosol metals on particulate trace metal composition in the open ocean. The impact of the input of anthropogenic aerosols on marine biogeochemistry deserves further studies in the global open ocean.

  8. Source apportionment of trace metals in river sediments: A comparison of three methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Li, Jiao; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Increasing trace metal pollution in river sediment poses a significant threat to watershed ecosystem health. Identifying potential sources of sediment metals and apportioning their contributions are of key importance for proposing prevention and control strategies of river pollution. In this study, three advanced multivariate receptor models, factor analysis with nonnegative constraints (FA-NNC), positive matrix factorization (PMF), and multivariate curve resolution weighted-alternating least-squares (MCR-WALS), were comparatively employed for source apportionment of trace metals in river sediments and applied to the Le'an River, a main tributary of Poyang Lake which is the largest freshwater lake in China. The pollution assessment with contamination factor and geoaccumulation index suggested that the river sediments in Le'an River were contaminated severely by trace metals due to human activities. With the three apportionment tools, similar source profiles of trace metals in sediments were extracted. Especially, the MCR-WALS and PMF models produced essentially the same results. Comparatively speaking, the weighted schemes might give better solutions than the unweighted FA-NNC because the uncertainty information of environmental data was considered by PMF and MCR-WALS. Anthropogenic sources were apportioned as the most important pollution sources influencing the sediment metals in Le'an River with contributions of about 90%. Among them, copper tailings occupied the largest contribution (38.4-42.2%), followed by mining wastewater (29.0-33.5%), and agricultural activities (18.2-18.7%). To protect the ecosystem of Le'an River and Poyang Lake, special attention should be paid to the discharges of mining wastewater and the leachates of copper tailing ponds in that region.

  9. Trace Metals in Urban Stormwater Runoff and their Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Hall, K.; Li, L. Y.; Schreier, H.

    2009-04-01

    In past decades, due to the rapid urbanization, land development has replaced forests, fields and meadows with impervious surfaces such as roofs, parking lots and roads, significantly affecting watershed quality and having an impact on aquatic systems. In this study, non-point source pollution from a diesel bus loop was assessed for the extent of trace metal contamination of Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn in the storm water runoff. The study was carried out at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) of British Columbia, Canada. Fifteen storm events were monitored at 3 sites from the diesel bus loop to determine spatial and temporal variations of dissolved and total metal concentrations in the storm water runoff. The dissolved metal concentrations were compared with the provincial government discharge criteria and the bus loop storm water quality was also compared with previous studies conducted across the GVRD urban area. To prevent storm water with hazardous levels of contaminants from being discharged into the urban drainage system, a storm water catch basin filter was installed and evaluated for its efficiency of contaminants removal. The perlite filter media adsorption capacities for the trace metals, oil and grease were studied for better maintenance of the catch basin filter. Dissolved copper exceeded the discharge criteria limit in 2 out of 15 cases, whereas dissolved zinc exceeded the criteria in 4 out of 15 cases, and dissolved manganese was below the criteria in all of the events sampled. Dissolved Cu and Zn accounted for 36 and 45% of the total concentration, whereas Mn and Fe only accounted for 20 and 4% of their total concentration, respectively. Since they are more mobile and have higher bioaccumulation potentials, Zn and Cu are considered to be more hazardous to the aquatic environment than Fe and Mn. With high imperviousness (100%) and intensive traffic at the UBC diesel bus loop, trace metal concentrations

  10. Trace metals in the Góta river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Lars-Göran; Magnusson, Bertil; Westerlund, Stig; Zhang, Kerong

    1983-07-01

    The concentrations of the trace metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn in the Göta River estuary have been investigated. The following metal fractions have been determined: acid-leachable, dissolved, labile and particulate. The estuary represents a salt wedge type estuary and is situated in a densely populated region of Sweden. The metal concentrations found for the dissolved fraction is in the range of what can be considered as background levels for freshwater. It is difficult to evaluate any estuarine processes other than conservative mixing for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn. The dissolved levels in the freshwater end member are Cd, 9-25 ngl -1; Cu, 1·1-1·4 μgl -1; Fe, 20-75 μg l -1: Ni, 0·7-0·9 μg l -1: Pb 0·09-0·2 μg l -1; and Zn, 6-7 μg l -1: The results from the acid-leachable fraction show that at high suspended load the particles sediment in the river mouth. The trace metal levels in this fraction are subject to large variations.

  11. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Trace metal seasonal variations in Texas marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Trace elements in coastal environments are derived from three major sources: (1) the bordering watershed; (2) the offshore marine environment; and (3) industrial and/or urban effluent. The site of deposition, however, is controlled by physical and chemical processes in the coastal zone. In many cases, these processes are controlled by climate and can vary seasonally. In the harbor at Corpus Christi, Texas, the summer climate creates an oxygen-poor environment in the water column near the sediment-water interface. This causes chalcophilic metals to precipitate from the water, resulting in high concentrations in the sediments near the source. During the winter, turbulence created by strong winds causes the entire water mass to become aerated and oxidizing, and remobilization of some metals results. In addition, this turbulence accelerates circulation which transports the metal-enriched waters from the harbor. On the outer continental shelf of south Texas, the infaunal activity varies seasonally with bottom water temperatures. As this infaunal activity has an effect on the chemical environment within the sediment near the sediment-water interface, the observed trace metal content at the interface also appears to change with the seasons. ?? 1986.

  13. Marine Bioinorganic Chemistry: The Role of Trace Metals in the Oceanic Cycles of Major Nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, F. M. M.; Milligan, A. J.; Saito, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    The bulk of living biomass is chiefly made up of only a dozen "major" elements - carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chlorine, calcium, magnesium, sulfur (and silicon in diatoms) - whose proportions vary within a relatively narrow range in most organisms. A number of trace elements, particularly first row transition metals - manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, copper, and zinc - are also "essential" for the growth of organisms. At the molecular level, the chemical mechanisms by which such elements function as active centers or structural factors in enzymes and by which they are accumulated and stored by organisms is the central topic of bioinorganic chemistry. At the scale of ocean basins, the interplay of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the cycling of biologically essential elements in seawater is the subject of marine biogeochemistry. For those interested in the growth of marine organisms, particularly in the one-half of the Earth's primary production contributed by marine phytoplankton, bioinorganic chemistry and marine biogeochemistry are critically linked by the extraordinary paucity of essential trace elements in surface seawater, which results from their biological utilization and incorporation in sinking organic matter. How marine organisms acquire elements that are present at nano- or picomolar concentrations in surface seawater; how they perform critical enzymatic functions when necessary metal cofactors are almost unavailable are the central topics of "marine bioinorganic chemistry." The central aim of this field is to elucidate at the molecular level the metal-dependent biological processes involved in the major biogeochemical cycles.By examining the solutions that emerged from the problems posed by the scarcity of essential trace elements, marine bioinorganic chemists bring to light hitherto unknown ways to take up or utilize trace elements, new molecules, and newer "essential" elements. Focusing on

  14. Lead isotopes and trace metals in dust at Yucca Mountain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwak, Loretta; Neymark, Leonid A.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb)-isotope compositions and trace-metal concentrations were determined for samples of dust collected from underground and surface locations at and near the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Rare earth element concentrations in the dust samples from the underground tunnels are similar to those in wholerock samples of the repository host rocks (Miocene Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff), supporting interpretation that the subsurface dust is mainly composed of rock comminuted during tunnel construction. Other trace metals (arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, thallium, and zinc) are variably enriched in the subsurface dust samples relative to the average concentrations in the host rocks. Average concentrations of arsenic and lead in dust samples, high concentrations of which can cause corrosion of waste canisters, have enrichment factors from 1.2 to 1.6 and are insignificant relative to the range of concentrations for these metals observed in the host rock samples. Most dust samples from surface sites also are enriched in many of these trace metals relative to average repository host rocks. At least some of these enrichments may be artifacts of sampling. Plotted on a 208Pb/206Pb-207Pb/206Pb graph, Pb-isotope compositions of dust samples from underground sites form a mixing line extending from host-rock Pb-isotope compositions towards compositions of many of the dust samples from surface sites; however, combined Pb concentration and isotope data indicate the presence of a Pbenriched component in the subsurface dust that is not derived from host rock or surface dust and may derive from anthropogenic materials introduced into the underground environment.

  15. Radionuclides and trace metals in eastern Mediterranean Sea algae.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Mamish, S; Budier, Y

    2003-01-01

    Three types of sea alga distributed along the Syrian coast have been collected and analyzed for radioactivity and trace elements. Results have shown that (137)Cs concentrations in all the analyzed sample were relatively low (less than 1.2 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) while the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides, such as (210)Po and (210)Pb, were found to be high in most samples; the highest observed value (27.43 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) for (210)Po being in the red Jania longifurca alga. In addition, most brown alga species were also found to accumulate (210)Po, which indicates their selectivity to this isotope. On the other hand, brown alga (Cystoseira and Sargassum Vulgare) have shown a clear selectivity for some trace metals such as Cr, As, Cu and Co, this selectivity may encourage their use as biomonitor for pollution by trace metals. Moreover, the red alga species were found to contain the highest levels of Mg while the brown alga species were found to concentrate Fe, Mn, Na and K and nonmetals such as Cl, I and Br.

  16. Trace metals geochemistry of Bengkulu river and estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, M. Lutfi; Darti, Puspa; Alwi, Wiwit; Swistoro, Eko; Sundaryono, Agus; Ruyani, Aceng

    2015-09-01

    Unique feature of Indonesian archipelago in addition to its location that settled between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean has made Indonesian seas as important parts of the world ocean system. In contrast, research on Indonesian seas including its marine geochemistry is scarce. Research findings have proven that Indonesian seas and its characteristics, such as Indonesian throughflow, are important in the seawater thermohaline circulation that affect world's global climate. The transports of mass and heat from the Pacific into the Indian Ocean are crucial for the oceanic circulation and sea surface temperatures. It is only until recently known that water masses movement could be traced using chemical elements such as Zr and Hf. In modern ocean, sources of these chemicals are mostly from continents. Chemicals had been brought to the oceans through river, estuary, coastal and eventually open seawater. We have analyzed selected important trace metals of Bengkulu river and estuary starting from upper stream of Bengkulu River to coastal seawater of the Indian Ocean. Concentrations of trace metals in the sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Dissolved and labile particulate concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, V, Sr and Zn are reported in this study.

  17. Trace metal concentrations and their transfer from sediment to leaves of four common aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Łojko, Renata; Polechońska, Ludmiła; Klink, Agnieszka; Kosiba, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of trace and alkali metals in leaves of four common helophytes, Sparganium erectum, Glyceria maxima, Phalaris arundinacea, and Phragmites australis, as well as in corresponding water and bottom sediments were investigated to ascertain plant bioaccumulation ability. Results showed that Mn and Fe were the most abundant trace metals in all plant species, while Co and Pb contents were the lowest. Leaves of species studied differed significantly in respect of element concentrations. The highest concentrations of Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Ni were noted in S. erectum while the highest contents of Co, Ca, Zn, and Cr in Phalaris arundinacea. Phragmites australis contained the lowest amounts of most elements. Concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, and Mn in all species studied and Ni in all except for Phragmites australis were higher than natural for hydrophytes. The leaves/sediment ratio was more than unity for all alkali metals as well as for Cu and Mn in Phragmites australis; Cr, Co, and Zn in Phalaris arundinacea; Cr and Mn in S. erectum; and Cr in G. maxima. High enrichment factors and high levels of toxic metals in the species studied indicated a special ability of these plants to absorb and store certain non-essential metals and, consequently, their potential for phytoremediation of contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Localization and characterization of an essential associative memory trace in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Andrew M; Thompson, Richard F

    2015-09-24

    We argue here that we have succeeded in localizing an essential memory trace for a basic form of associative learning and memory - classical conditioning of discrete responses learned with an aversive stimulus - to the anterior interpositus nucleus of the cerebellum. We first identified the entire essential circuit, using eyelid conditioning as the model system, and used reversible inactivation, during training, of critical structures and activation of pathways to localize definitively the essential memory trace. This discovery and the associated studies have: 1) shown that the essential cerebellar circuit applies equally to all mammals studied, including humans; 2) shown that this cerebellar circuit holds for the learning of any discrete behavioral response elicited by an aversive US, not just eyelid closure; 3) identified the essential circuit and process for reinforcement for this form of learning; 4) shown that this form of learning and its essential cerebellar circuitry is phylogenetically very old; 5) solved the long-standing puzzle of where memory traces are formed in the brain when the CS is electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex in conditioning; 6) shown that this cerebellar circuitry forms the essential neural substrate for the behavioral phenomenon of "blocking", and hence, 7) provides the first clear neural instantiation of the Rescorla-Wagner learning algorithm; 8) shown that the fundamental neural process underlying this form of learning is a strengthening of preexisting pathways, and 9) shown that the basic mechanism underlying this strengthening is the formation of new excitatory synapses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lability of trace metals in submerged soils: a column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimirciag, Ramona; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2013-04-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) and Mn (IV) and the decomposition of organic matter exert a great influence on the biogeochemical cycles of many trace metals and nutrients in the environment. In the particular case of intermittently submerged soils, metals associated with Fe and Mn oxides become readily available due to the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides. The effects of oxido-reductive conditions on the release of Cu and Zn from heavy metal contaminated soils and the changes in their chemical speciation were studied. Column experiments were performed, using Rhizon soil moisture samplers inserted at different heights to monitor the mobility and transport of metals in the submerged soil samples. Cu was released in solution immediately, in the first red-ox cycle, either due to the solubilization of Fe and Mn oxides, or to the oxidation of organic matter with which Cu is commonly complexed, or both. During the following reductive half-cycles, the amount of Cu extracted from the soil solution decreased. However, the concentration of Cu in the solution leached from the column, which was percolated in aerobic conditions, increased. Since in the successive red-ox cycles the Eh decreases faster and to lower values, it is possible that Cu might have been removed from pore water by sulfide precipitation during the anaerobic half-cycle and released during the aerobic half-cycle, due to the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates. The release of Zn was similar to the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxydes, and the amount extracted by Rhizon and by leaching increased during the four red-ox cycles. The chemical fractionation of the soils was also studied and the results showed that the alternate oxidative-reductive conditions cause, in general, an increase in the lability of trace metals. While Zn speciation suffers little change, Cu showed a much higher exchangeable fraction in the submerged soils, as compared to the initial, not submerged ones. The results of this study indicate

  20. Trace Element Partitioning Between Metal and Melt at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Moses, M.; Fei, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Fractionations between siderophile trace elements are produced during crystallization of solid metal from a molten planetary core. It has been proposed (e.g., Brandon et al., 2003) that fractionations of Re/Os and Pt/Os produced during crystallization of Earth's inner core are recorded in rocks whose source regions lie at the core-mantle boundary. However, the possible effects of pressure, temperature, composition, and metal crystal structure on metal-melt partitioning have not been fully evaluated experimentally. Accordingly, we have begun to measure the partitioning of major and trace siderophile elements between Fe-rich metal and metal-sulfide melt at high pressures and temperatures using laser ablation ICP-MS of multi-anvil press samples. The starting materials included iron meteorite powder (having natural abundances of PGEs at the /sim10 ppm level) and troilite. In some cases Ru powder was also added to the starting material to promote transformation of the Fe-rich metal to the hcp structure, as described by Campbell et al. (2003). The powders were loaded into an MgO or BN sample capsule in a 10/5 multi-anvil press assembly, and pressurized to 14.5 GPa. The sample chamber thickness was held to <0.4 mm to minimize the temperature gradient experienced by the samples. Melting was achieved at temperatures of 975 C or above, and run durations were 6 to 24 hours. The recovered run products were polished and examined by SEM or electron microprobe before LA-ICP-MS analysis. Laser ablation spot sizes ranged from 15 to 50 microns, depending on the available grain size. Partition coefficients (D) were determined for Co, Ni, Ru, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. Errors on the D values were based on the reproduceability of at least 3 measurements in each phase, and were <10% for major elements and <25% for trace elements. The effects of temperature and composition were evaluated and implications on the chemistry of the core will be discussed. Brandon A. D. et al. (2003) EPSL 206

  1. First assessment of trace metal concentration in mangrove crab eggs and other tissues, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Eduardo Vianna; Kütter, Vinicius Tavares; Marques, Eduardo Duarte; da Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2016-07-01

    The mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is widespread in the Brazilian coast, which has an important role in nutrient cycling. This species reproduces in summer and females carry eggs about a month, when they maintain contact with water and sediments. It remains unclear if trace metals can be absorbed or adsorbed by the eggs during development. The present study aims to investigate, for the first time, trace metal concentrations in ovigerous female tissues and eggs of U. cordatus in two areas with different metal pollution levels in the Southeastern Brazil. Samples were collected in two different mangroves, Guanabara Bay (GB) highly polluted environment and Paraíba do Sul River (PSR). In both populations, we observed significant increase of V, Cr, and Mn concentrations along eggs maturation. The higher metals averages were found in PSR population. This trend was reported since the 1990s and lower concentrations in GB marine organisms were attributed to reducing conditions, high organic load, and the presence of sulfide ions. These conditions restrict the bioavailability of metals in the bay, with exception of Mn. No significant differences were observed in gills and muscles. In both populations of the present study, V, Zn, As, and Pb were higher in eggs of initial stage, whereas Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cd were higher in hepatopancreas. Beside this, V, Cr, Mn, As, and Pb showed an increase concerning egg development. Thus, V, As, and Pb in eggs come from two sources previous discussed: females and environment. Zinc came mainly from females due to essential function. Those new information should be considered as one of the mechanisms of trace metal transfer to the trophic chain, between benthonic and pelagic environment.

  2. Contamination from an affluent of Furnas reservoir by trace metals.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, P P; Rodrigues, L C A; Beijo, L A; Barbosa, S; Xavier, T T; Magalhães, F

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to determine concentrations and characterize trace metals distribution in an affluent of Furnas reservoir, Alfenas-MG. Water and sediment samples were taken monthly, 2010/10-2011/07 in five sites of Córrego do Pântano for subsequent determination of Pb, Cd and Zn levels by chemical analysis. The stream studied is in disagreement with Brazilian legislation for Class II water bodies (CONAMA 357). The highlights are the unsuitable concentrations of Pb for human consumption, according to Ministry of Health 2914 decree, providing risk for population.

  3. Ultrastructural and trace metal studies on radiographers' hair and nails.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S; Chatterjee, J; Chaudhuri, K

    1999-02-01

    Scalp hair and fingernail samples of 42 medical radiographers and 42 nonradiographers (control) with matching age groups and food habits were collected for this study. Trace metal estimation by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has indicated a significant increase (P < 0.001) in Zn, Cu, and Cd contents in the radiographers' hair and nails. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed structural changes in the hair and nails of radiographers. Significant alterations in the Zn and Cd contents along with extensive structural damage in the hair and nails probably indicate that low-dose X-radiation imposes stress on these radiation workers.

  4. Trace Metals in the Oceans: Evolution, Biology and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baar, H.; La Roche, J.

    2003-04-01

    During evolution of prokaryotes and later on eukaryotes several metals became incorporated as essential factors in many biochemical functions in accordance with the abundance of these metals on the planet. The biological role of first row metals can be ranked Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Ni. Second row metals Ag and Cd or third row metals like Hg and Pb appear to have no biological function, except possibly for Cd. Iron (Fe) being the fourth most abundant element of the planet has also played a role to temper the evolution of biogenic oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans. Yet eventually O2 has taken over the biosphere where now both atmosphere and ocean are strongly oxidizing. Inside every cell the primordial reducing conditions have remained however. Therefore enzyme systems based on metal couples Fe-Mn and Cu-Zn are required to protect the cell interior from damage by reactive oxygen species. The key role of metals in these and many other enzymes as well as in protein folding is one of the major vectors in biological diversity at both the molecular and the species level. Plankton ecosystems are governed by colimitation of several metals. Co-limitation of plankton growth is consistent also with observed interactions between metals. The supply of Fe to ocean waters is one of the major controls of plankton ecosystems and ocean element cycling (C, Si, N, P) over time scales ranging from weeks to the 100,000 year periodicity of glaciations. Understanding the role of metals in the oceans is crucial for understanding global change of past, present and future.

  5. Trace metals and organic carbon in sediments of the northeastern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefry, John H.; Trocine, Robert P.; Cooper, Lee W.; Dunton, Kenneth H.

    2014-04-01

    Concentrations of Al, Fe and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V, Zn) in surface sediments from the northeastern Chukchi Sea (NECS) varied considerably as a function of sediment texture (i.e., grain size); however, essentially all metals, when normalized to Al, were present at natural, background values. Total organic carbon content ranged from 0.06-1.56% with a marine origin for at least two-thirds of the organic matter at each station based on δ13C values and C/N ratios. Recent sedimentation rates from 137Cs and 210Pb dating were 0.03-0.14 cm yr-1. Corresponding vertical distributions for most metals in age-dated sediment cores showed >100-yr records of uniform metal/Al ratios, including Pb and Hg. Concentrations of As, Mn and Cd were modified in surface sediments at a few stations by early chemical diagenesis. Surveys around two exploratory oil and gas drilling sites that were occupied in 1989 showed that Ba concentrations were as high as 10,000 µg g-1 within 200 m of one drilling site relative to background values of ~700 µg g-1. Barium enrichment was from barite, a drilling mud additive that was discharged to the seafloor. Above background concentrations of Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn also were found in sediments from 3-4 stations within 200 m of the two drilling sites. At present, sediments in the NECS are essentially pristine with respect to trace metals of anthropogenic origin, excluding small areas around drilling sites. These data should be of value for detecting and tracking future chemical changes in the sediments of the NECS, particularly in light of planned oil and gas exploration and production as well as environmental changes that may be associated with climate change.

  6. Levels of essential and non-essential metals in ginger (Zingiber officinale) cultivated in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wagesho, Yohannes; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is a common condiment for various foods and beverages and widely used worldwide as a spice. Its extracts are used extensively in the food, beverage, and confectionary industries in the production of products such as marmalade, pickles, chutney, ginger beer, ginger wine, liquors, biscuits, and other bakery products. In Ethiopia, it is among the important spices used in every kitchen to flavor stew, tea, bread and local alcoholic drinks. It is also chiefly used medicinally for indigestion, stomachache, malaria, fevers, common cold, and motion sickness. The literature survey revealed that there is no study conducted on the determination of metals in ginger cultivated in Ethiopia. Hence it is worthwhile to determine the levels of essential and non-essential metals in ginger cultivated in Ethiopia. The levels of essential (Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Mn, and Ni) and non-essential (Cd and Pb) metals in ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) cultivated in four different regions of Ethiopia and the soil where it was grown were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. 0.5 g of oven dried ginger and soil samples were digested using 3 mL of HNO3 and 1 mL of HClO4 at 210°C for 3 h and a mixture of 6 mL aqua-regia and 1.5 mL H2O2 at 270°C for 3 h, respectively. The mean metal concentration (μg/g dry weight basis) ranged in the ginger and soil samples, respectively, were: Ca (2000-2540, 1770-3580), Mg (2700-4090, 1460-2440), Fe (41.8-89.0, 21700-46900), Zn (38.5-55.2, 255-412), Cu (1.1-4.8, 3.80-33.9), Co (2.0-7.6, 48.5-159), Cr (6.0-10.8, 110-163), Mn (184-401, 1760-6470), Ni (5.6-8.4, 14.1-79.3) and Cd (0.38-0.97, 0.24-1.1). The toxic metal Pb was not detected in both the ginger and soil samples. There was good correlation between some metals in ginger and soil samples while poor correlation between other metals (Fe, Ni, Cu). This study revealed that Ethiopian gingers are good source of essential metals and free from toxic

  7. Should bioactive trace elements not recognized as essential, but with beneficial health effects, have intake recommendations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2014-10-01

    Today, most nutritionists do not consider a trace element essential unless it has a defined biochemical function in higher animals or humans. As a result, even though it has been found that trace elements such as boron and silicon have beneficial bioactivity in higher animals and humans, they generally receive limited attention or mention when dietary guidelines or intake recommendations are formulated. Recently, the possibility of providing dietary intake recommendations such as an adequate intake (AI) for some bioactive food components (e.g., flavonoids) has been discussed. Boron, chromium, nickel, and silicon are bioactive food components that provide beneficial health effects by plausible mechanisms of action in nutritional and supra nutritional amounts, and thus should be included in the discussions. Although the science base may not be considered adequate for establishing AIs, a significant number of findings suggest that statements about these trace elements should be included when dietary intake guidance is formulated. An appropriate recommendation may be that diets should include foods that would provide trace elements not currently recognized as essential in amounts shown to reduce the risk of chronic disease and/or promote health and well-being. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Trace metals in oysters and sediments of Botany Bay, Sydney.

    PubMed

    Hayes, W J; Anderson, I J; Gaffoor, M Z; Hurtado, J

    1998-03-05

    Trace metal concentrations (Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn) in Sydney rock oysters (Sacostera commercialis) and sediments (< 53 microns fraction) were determined for six sites in the northern regions of Botany Bay. Levels for lead, cadmium, copper and zinc in oysters ranged (in microgram g-1) from 1.38 to 15.3, 1.81 to 16.3, 56.1 to 212 and 1806 to 2902, respectively. In sediments, levels ranged (in microgram g-1) from 599 to 4081, 3.57 to 91.0, 191 to 1113 and 227 to 1472, respectively. Such values indicated high levels of contamination, especially in the sediments. Indeed, high proportions of the samples displayed metal concentrations that exceeded the prescribed limits for oysters and sediments. No significant correlations in metal concentrations were found between oysters and sediments, suggesting that changes in the sediment metal loading are not solely influencing the levels of bioavailable metal. The results supported the conclusion that different rates and mechanisms of metal accumulation are taking place in the two types of samples. Variability between sites was high, particularly for oysters. Multidimensional scaling identified that the Cooks River (site 3) and La Perouse (site 6) sites were most dissimilar, both to each other as well as to the other four sites. This was a reflection of high contamination in the Cooks River and the generally low levels in the La Perouse reference sample. The configuration was mainly influenced by the sediment parameters, rather than the oyster metal concentrations, indicating the sediment data were better for identifying site similarities. These ordinations provide evidence of the usefulness of multidimensional scaling in elucidating the physico-chemical variability of the sampling sites.

  9. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  10. Dietary intake of essential minor and trace elements from Asian diets.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G Venkatesh; Kawamura, Hisao; Parr, Robert M; Miah, Farin K; Wang, Ji-xian; Dang, Harminder S; Djojosubroto, Harjojoto; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Akher, Perveen; Natera, Erlinda S; Nguyen, Mong Sinh; Nguy, Mong Sinh

    2002-09-01

    In view of the limited data available from the Asian region on the daily intake of nutritionally essential trace elements, a study was taken up, as part of a coordinated research project of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to estimate the daily dietary intake and organ content of some selected trace elements of importance in radiation protection, and also in nutrition. Nine Asian countries--Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, and Vietnam--which represented more than 50% of the world's population, participated in this study. Analysis of about 700 diet samples was carried out for four minor (calcium, potassium, magnesium, and sodium) and eight trace (chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, iodine, manganese, selenium, and zinc) elements using nuclear and other sensitive analytical methods employing neutron activation analysis (NAA), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) techniques. These samples consisted of the total cooked diet, market basket, duplicate diets, and 225 staple foods. Emphasis was placed on the quality assurance and harmonization of the sampling techniques to ensure quality data. Significant inter- and intra-country variations in daily dietary intake of various trace elements were observed. The maximum inter-country variation was observed for iodine intake (factor of more than 45), being highest for Japan and lowest for Pakistan. For iron, an important trace element, the variation between the intakes was by a factor of four being lowest for Vietnam and highest for Pakistan.

  11. Mobilization of Trace Metals in an Experimental Carbon Sequestration Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcon, V.; Kaszuba, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Mobilizing trace metals with injection of supercritical CO2 into deep saline aquifers is a concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The potential for leakage from these systems requires an understanding of how injection reservoirs interact with the overlying potable aquifers. Hydrothermal experiments were performed to evaluate metal mobilization and mechanisms of release in a carbonate storage reservoir and at the caprock-reservoir boundary. Experiments react synthetic Desert Creek limestone and/or Gothic Shale, formations in the Paradox Basin, Utah, with brine that is close to equilibrium with these rocks. A reaction temperature of 1600C accelerates the reaction kinetics without changing in-situ water-rock reactions. The experiments were allowed to reach steady state before injecting CO2. Changes in major and trace element water chemistry, dissolved carbon and sulfide, and pH were tracked throughout the experiments. CO2 injection decreases the pH by 1 to 2 units; concomitant mineral dissolution produces elevated Ba, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the brine. Concentrations subsequently decrease to approximately steady state values after 120-330 hours, likely due to mineral precipitation as seen in SEM images and predicted by geochemical modeling. In experiments that emulate the caprock-reservoir boundary, final Fe (0.7ppb), an element of secondary concern for the EPA, and Pb (0.05ppb) concentrations exceed EPA limits, whereas Ba (0.140ppb), Cu (48ppb), and Zn (433ppb) values remain below EPA limits. In experiments that simulate deeper reservoir conditions, away from the caprock boundary, final Fe (3.5ppb) and Pb (0.017ppb) values indicate less mobilization than seen at the caprock-reservoir boundary, but values still exceed EPA limits. Barium concentrations always remain below the EPA limit of 2ppb, but are more readily mobilized in experiments replicating deeper reservoir conditions. In both systems, transition elements Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn behave in a

  12. Trace metals in wine and vineyard environment in southern Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Vystavna, Yuliya; Rushenko, Liliya; Diadin, Dmytro; Klymenko, Olga; Klymenko, Mykola

    2014-03-01

    The study was focused on measuring the concentration levels of trace metals in the environment, vines and wine within the wine-growing region of Ukraine and comparing the findings to the data from well known wine-growing areas. Analysis was carried out of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in irrigation water, grape juice and wine, Cu, Pb and Zn in soil (pseudo-total and acid-soluble fractions) and Vitis vinifera L. in leaves and grapes. The accumulation levels of Cu and Zn from soil to leaves were significantly higher than from soil to grapes. Pb had lower potential to accumulate in aerial parts than Cu and Zn. Higher contents of Cu and Zn were observed in Muscat white grape juice compared to Chardonnay. The concentration levels of Zn and Cu were higher in wine than in juice. Trace metals were regulated by the soil composition and biological specificity of cultivars. The data obtained from the study area did not exceed the international limits.

  13. Daily intake of trace metals through coffee consumption in India.

    PubMed

    Suseela, B; Bhalke, S; Kumar, A V; Tripathi, R M; Sastry, V N

    2001-02-01

    The trace element contents of five varieties of instant coffee powder available in the Indian market have been analysed. Ca, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn and Pb, Cd, Cu have been determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, respectively. The metal levels in the coffee powders observed in this study are comparable with those reported for green coffe beans (Arabica and Robusta variety) reported worldwide with the exception of Sr and Zn, which were on the lower side of the reported values. Concentrations of these metals have been converted into intake figures based on coffee consumption. The daily intakes of the above metals through ingestion of coffee are 1.4 mg, 1.58 microg, 124 microg, 41.5 mg, 4.9 mg, 17.9 microg, 2.9 microg, 3.8 microg, 12.5 microg, 0.2 microg, 0.03 microg and 15.5 microg, respectively. The values, which were compared with the total dietary, intake of metals through ingestion by the Mumbai population, indicate that the contribution from coffee is less than or around 1% for most of the elements except for Cr and Ni which are around 3%.

  14. Trace metal distributions in the Hudson River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhammer, G. P.; Bender, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Concentations of reactive PO 4, particulate Al and dissolved and particulate Cd, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cu and Mn were measured in the Hudson River estuary. Soluble trace metal concentrations ranged from 1 to 7 parts 10 -9 Cu; 1 to 60 parts 10 -9 Mn; 0·8 to 11 parts 10 -9 Ni; 3 to 33 parts 10 -9 Zn; 0·1 to 0·5 parts 10 -9 Cd and 5 to 96 parts 10 -9 Fe. The particulate levels were 0·2 to 6 parts 10 -9 Cu; 0·2 to 40 parts 10 -9 Mn; 0·1 to 8 parts 10 -9 Ni; 0·04 to 14 parts 10 -9 Zn; 0·005 to 0·3 parts 10 -9 Cd and 7 to 2200 parts 10 -9 Fe. With the exception of iron, the discharge of these metals with Manhattan/New Jersey sewage was comparable to the riverine flux. Anthropogenic Zn, Ni and Mn inputs were reflected in dissolved concentration maxima in New York Harbor. Mass-balance calculations demonstrate that the anthropogenic fraction of these metals left the Harbor in the dissolved form. Anthropogenic Cd, Fe and Cu were associated with solids and these metals were deposited in Harbor sediments.

  15. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Kost, Dave; Tian, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaolu; Watts, Dexter; Norton, Darrell; Wolkowski, Richard P; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. A large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance crop production. However, information is lacking concerning the potential environmental impacts of trace metals, especially Hg, in the FGD gypsum. Flue gas desulfurization and mined gypsums were evaluated to determine their ability to affect concentrations of Hg and other trace elements in soils and earthworms. The study was conducted at four field sites across the United States (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). The application rates of gypsums ranged from 2.2 Mg ha in Indiana to 20 Mg ha in Ohio and Alabama. These rates are 2 to 10 times higher than typically recommended. The lengths of time from gypsum application to soil and earthworm sampling were 5 and 18 mo in Ohio, 6 mo in Indiana, 11 mo in Alabama, and 4 mo in Wisconsin. Earthworm numbers and biomass were decreased by FGD and mined gypsums in Ohio. Among all the elements examined, Hg was slightly increased in soils and earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the control and the mined gypsum treatments. The differences were not statistically significant except for the Hg concentration in the soil at the Wisconsin site. Selenium in earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments was statistically higher than in the controls but not higher than in the mined gypsum treatments at the Indiana and Wisconsin sites. Bioaccumulation factors for nondepurated earthworms were statistically similar or lower for the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the controls for all elements. Use of FGD gypsum at normal recommended agricultural rates seems not to have a significant impact on concentrations of trace metals in earthworms and soils.

  16. Contribution of drinking water to dietary requirements of essential metals.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Drinking water can be a source of essential metals, but only one study published thus far has compared the intake of essential metals in drinking water to dietary reference intakes. This assessment compares the ingestion of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) from drinking water at the maximum concentrations that should be found in water, or at concentrations that are potentially more likely to be found in Canadian water, to the recommended dietary allowance or adequate intake values established by the Institute of Medicine. At guideline limits, water provides sufficient Cr and Cu to meet nutritional requirements, and Mn and Zn levels are sufficient for some age categories to meet nutritional requirements. At concentrations that are more likely to be found in Canadian water, adequate intakes for Cr and Mn may be met by water alone for bottle-fed infants, and water was estimated to provide 23-66% of daily Cu requirements. Drinking water might become a significant source of some essential metals in individuals whose diets are low in these metals, especially in the case of Cu.

  17. Essential metals profile of the hair and nails of patients with laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Golasik, Magdalena; Przybyłowicz, Agnieszka; Woźniak, Anna; Herman, Małgorzata; Gawęcki, Wojciech; Golusiński, Wojciech; Walas, Stanisław; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Florek, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Trace elements have an impact on numerous physiological processes. The monitoring of their levels in the organism allows you to detect not only their deficiencies, but also several illnesses. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of essential elements (calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) in hair, nails and serum of both patients with laryngeal cancer and healthy people. The determination of six metals was performed by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The concentration of essential elements in hair and nails of the control group was statistically significantly higher than in the group of patients with laryngeal cancer. In the case of serum, differences were found between the patients and controls in respect of the level of three metals. The results of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed the strong and similar clustering behavior of essential elements in hair and nails. The metals did not correlate between two alternative materials. The present study indicated that, using the level of essential elements in hair and nails as a basis, it is possible to distinguish cancer patients from healthy people. The alternative materials are independent of homeostasis and therefore seem to be more useful in the detection of diseases and mineral deficiencies in human than the classical biological materials, such as blood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of essential trace elements in tuberculosis infection: A review article.

    PubMed

    Sargazi, Aliyeh; Gharebagh, Roghayeh Afsar; Sargazi, Alireza; Aali, Halimeh; Oskoee, Hamid Owaysee; Sepehri, Zahra

    2017-10-01

    Malnutrition is one of the risk factors in tuberculosis (TB) infection. Mineral levels perturbation is seen in patients with TB. Moreover there are some strategies to starve pathogens of essential metals. Here we decided to conclude association between some essential elements and TB. Copper, calcium and iron are essential for hosts' immune system although calcium and iron are necessary for Mycobacterium tuberculosis vitality. Changing these elements alongside with anti-TB therapy is suggested for better treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Trace metals in oysters, Crassotrea sps., from UNESCO protected natural reserve of Urdaibai: space-time observations and source identification.

    PubMed

    Raposo, J C; Bartolomé, L; Cortazar, E; Arana, G; Zabaljauregui, M; de Diego, A; Zuloaga, O; Madariaga, J M; Etxebarria, N

    2009-08-01

    The seasonal and spatial variability of trace metal concentrations of oyster tissues (Crassostea sps.) was studied. The samples were collected between 2002 and 2004 along the Urdaibai estuary (Murueta, Kanala and Arteaga). The seasonal influence on some metal concentrations (higher values in spring-summer season than in autumn-winter season) is more pronounced than the local site-specific influence. Furthermore, within each location a significant time-specific dependence on the trace metal concentration variations can be detected. Substantially higher concentrations of Zn (445.5-2,403.3 mg kg(-1)) and Mn (29.4-169.6 mg kg(-1)) were recorded in oysters inhabiting estuarine locations, possibly indicating a markedly higher natural bioavailability at these locations. Principal component analysis demonstrated that oysters could be separated depending on the inhabiting areas: Sn for Murueta, essential metals for Kanala, and Co and Cd for Arteaga sampling points, respectively.

  20. Anatomically-related variations in trace-metal concentrations in hair

    SciTech Connect

    DeAntonio, S.M.; Katz, S.A.; Scheiner, D.M.; Wood, J.D.

    1982-12-01

    Scalp-hair analysis is used as an indicator of trace-metal concentrations in the human body. The major shortcoming of this approach is the inability to differentiate between endogenous and exogenous trace metals. Our analyses show no correlation between the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, or zinc in scalp hair and pubic hair in 67 donor-matched hair samples. We interpret this as a strong indication that exogenous trace metals make a significant contribution to the results for trace metals in human hair.

  1. Clean Sampling and Analysis of River and Estuarine Waters for Trace Metal Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiann, Kuo-Tung; Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    Most of the trace metal concentrations in ambient waters obtained a few decades ago have been considered unreliable owing to the lack of contamination control. Developments of some techniques aiming to reduce trace metal contamination in the last couple of decades have resulted in concentrations reported now being orders of magnitude lower than those in the past. These low concentrations often necessitate preconcentration of water samples prior to instrumental analysis of samples. Since contamination can appear in all phases of trace metal analyses, including sample collection (and during preparation of sampling containers), storage and handling, pretreatments, and instrumental analysis, specific care needs to be taken in order to reduce contamination levels at all steps. The effort to develop and utilize "clean techniques" in trace metal studies allows scientists to investigate trace metal distributions and chemical and biological behavior in greater details. This advancement also provides the required accuracy and precision of trace metal data allowing for environmental conditions to be related to trace metal concentrations in aquatic environments. This protocol that is presented here details needed materials for sample preparation, sample collection, sample pretreatment including preconcentration, and instrumental analysis. By reducing contamination throughout all phases mentioned above for trace metal analysis, much lower detection limits and thus accuracy can be achieved. The effectiveness of "clean techniques" is further demonstrated using low field blanks and good recoveries for standard reference material. The data quality that can be obtained thus enables the assessment of trace metal distributions and their relationships to environmental parameters.

  2. Measurements of trace metal concentrations, fluxes and bioavailability using DGT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Davison, W.

    1995-12-31

    The technique of diffusive gradient in thin-films (DGT) provides an insitu means of quantitatively measuring labile species in aqueous systems. By ensuring that transport of metal ions to an exchange resin is solely by free diffusion through a membrane, of known thickness, {Delta}g, the concentration in the bulk solution, C{sub b} can be calculated from the measured mass in the resin, M, after time, t, by C{sub b} = M{Delta}g/Dst, where D is the molecular diffusion coefficient and s is the exposure surface area of the membrane. If a sufficiently thick ({minus}1 mm) diffusion layer is selected, the flux of metal to the resin is independent of the hydrodynamics in solution above a threshold level of convection. Deployment for 1 day results in a concentration factor of about 300, allowing metals to be measured at extremely low levels (4 pmol 1{sup {minus}1}). Only labile metal species are measured, the effective time of measurement, typically 2 min., being determined by the thickness of the diffusion layer. The measurement is independent of ionic strength (10nM to 1M). For Chelex-100 as the resin, the measurement is independent of pH in the range of 5 to 8.3, but a sub-theoretical response is obtained at pH < 5 where binding to Chelex is diminished. The application of DGT to the insitu measurement of trace metals in freshwater and seawater is demonstrated. Its more general applicability as a pollution monitoring tool is discussed. In sediments and soils it can provide direct measurements of fluxes from solid phase to pore water, allowing it to be used as a surrogate for bioavailability.

  3. Urinary Concentrations of Toxic and Essential Trace Elements among Rural Residents in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yosuke; Umezaki, Masahiro; Jiang, Hongwei; Li, Dandan; Du, Jianwei; Jin, Yuming; Yang, Bin; Li, Bai; Li, Yufeng; Watanabe, Chiho

    2014-01-01

    Background: Toxic element exposure and essential trace element consumption may have changed after the Chinese economy transformed to a market-oriented system. The objectives of this study were to measure urinary concentrations of toxic (arsenic, cadmium, lead) and essential trace (selenium, zinc, copper) elements among rural residents in Hainan, China and to examine if variations in economic development are linked to differences in toxic and trace element exposure. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire-based survey and undertook anthropometric measurements of residents aged ≥20 years (n = 599). Urinary samples were collected and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: The median (μg/g creatinine) element concentrations were: arsenic, 73.2; cadmium, 1.8; lead, 3.1; selenium, 36.5; zinc, 371; and copper, 11.0. Intra-community variation in element concentrations was explained by age (arsenic, cadmium, zinc and copper), sex (arsenic, cadmium and selenium: higher in females; zinc: higher in males), body mass index (cadmium) and individual involvement in the market economy as indexed by agrochemical use (lead and selenium). The degree of community-level economic development, which was determined by the proportion of people living in better housing among the study communities, was positively associated with cadmium concentration. Conclusions: The degree of community-level economic development was positively associated with urinary cadmium concentration while individual involvement in the market economy was positively associated with lead and selenium. PMID:25514155

  4. Sediment trace metal concentrations from the mudflats of Kuala Juru and Kuala Muda of Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, I.; Maah, M.J. )

    1994-11-01

    About 4-5000 ha of the mudflats along the western coast of Peninsular Malaysia are currently utilized for the semi-culture of the economically important marine bivalve, Anadara granosa. Therefore, information on the status of the trace metal pollution in the culture areas is of considerable value in the interest of public health when shellfish from this area are available for consumption. As an initial assessment of the degree of trace metal pollution in the sediments, an approach to analyze the non-residual (non-lattice held) trace metal concentrations should be of prime consideration rather than the total metal content in the sediments. This approach has the advantage that it is not necessary to restrict the comparison of the non- residual metal fraction to sediments having similar textural composition. For the above reasons, assorted acids are used to partially extract the non-residual trace metal fraction. The partial extraction of sediment-bound trace metals is not only providing information on the strength of association between metals and sediment compositions but also the potential availability of these metals to aquatic organisms. It has been shown that the bioavailability of trace metals to the aquatic biota is best related to the easily leachable, non-residual fraction rather than the total sediment bound trace metals. Therefore, it makes very little sense to consider the total metal content in the sediment to be bioavailable to cause damage to aquatic organisms or to the aquatic ecosystems. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tab.

  5. Study of the Accumulation of Toxic and Essential Ultra-Trace Elements in Fruits of Sorbus domestica L.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Michaela; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Majić, Boris; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2017-03-24

    In the present work, the accumulation of selected toxic and essential ultra-trace elements in fruits of service tree (Sorbus domestica L.) were determined depending on harvest time. Samples were collected from the same sampling area in two different years and within one year in September and October (maturity state). Harvesting the fruits in the same area excludes the influence of metals taken up via roots, thus the impact of airborne contamination by heavy metal translocation can be studied. All samples were dried and digested using an acidic microwave assisted digestion system prior to quantification by inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). The elements chosen were Arsenic and Cadmium as well as Lithium, Molybdenum, and Selenium. The Arsenic content rose with maturity in mesocarp. Cadmium found in the mesocarp was unaffected by ripeness. For Selenium and Molybdenum, no statistically significant effect of ripeness could be found on their content in mesocarp. Lithium could not be detected in the majority of fruit samples. Differences between the metal concentrations based on the year of harvest were found for Arsenic, Molybdenum, and Selenium, depending on precipitation. The drier the season, the more Arsenic was accumulated. For Molybdenum and Selenium, the opposite effect was observed.

  6. Profiles of non-essential trace elements in ewe and goat milk and their yoghurt, Torba yoghurt and whey.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hasan; Güler, Zehra; Park, Young W

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the profiles of non-essential trace elements in ewes' and goats' milk and manufactured products, such as yoghurt, torba yoghurt and whey, as well as changes in trace element content during Torba yoghurt-making processes. Concentrations of non-essential trace elements in ewe (Awassi) and goat (Damascus) milk and their yoghurt, torba yoghurt and whey were quantitatively determined by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), after microwave digestion. Aluminium, antimony, arsenic, boron, beryllium, cadmium, nickel, lead, silver, titanium, thallium and vanadium were determined for both types of milk and their products. Barium was not detected in goats' milk or their products. Among all trace elements, boron was the most abundant and beryllium was least present in milk and the manufactured products. The results showed that goats' and ewes' milk and their manufactured products may be a source of 13 non-essential trace elements.

  7. Trace metals and radionuclides in macroalgae from Moroccan coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Benkdad, Azzouz; Laissaoui, Abdelmourhit; Tornero, Maria Victoria; Benmansour, Moncef; Chakir, ElMahjoub; Garrido, Ignacio Moreno; Moreno, Julian Blasco

    2011-11-01

    Macroalgae species Codium sp, Bangia atropurpurea, Membranoptera alata, Plocamium cartilagineum, Dictyota dichotoma, Fucus spiralis and Stypocaulon scoparia were collected from seven stations along the north coast of Morocco. Samples were analysed to determine activities of naturally occurring radionuclides ((210)Pb, U isotopes and (40)K) and concentrations of metals (Zn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, Cd, As and Cr) using radiometric and ICP-OES techniques, respectively. Metal concentrations were within ranges reported in the scientific literature, and concentrations of bio-essential elements were in the order Mn>Fe> Zn>Cu in all samples. Brown algae had the highest concentrations of almost all metals, and concentrations decreased in the order brown>red>green algae. With respect to radionuclides, the red alga P. cartilagineum had the highest activities of (210)Pb, in most cases an order of magnitude higher than for the green alga Codium sp. (234)U and (238)U activities in all algae samples were in the range 0.96- 7.61 and 1.16-6.14 Bq/kg dry weight, respectively. Our analyses of radionuclide activities and metal concentrations in marine macroalgae showed large differences among taxa. These results provide insights into which algal species should be used for biomonitoring programmes.

  8. Influence of essential elements on cadmium uptake and toxicity in a unicellular green alga: the protective effect of trace zinc and cobalt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude; Campbell, Peter G C

    2012-07-01

    Within the biotic ligand model (BLM) construct, major cations are considered to be simple competitors for metal binding to uptake sites and may offer some protection against metal-induced toxicity, but the influence of essential trace elements and cell preconditioning to different micronutrient concentrations on metal uptake and toxicity is considered negligible. To test these underlying assumptions, we monitored Cd uptake and toxicity in a green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) after long-term exposures (60 h) to a range of environmentally realistic free Zn(2+) , Co(2+) , Fe(3+) , Mn(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Cu(2+) concentrations buffered with nitrilotriacetic acid. A 200-fold increase in free [Mn(2+) ] as well as a 100-fold increase in free [Fe(3+) ] did not affect Cd uptake or toxicity, whereas a 50-fold increase in free [Ca(2+) ] effectively offered some protection, as predicted by the BLM. However, a 10-fold increase in free [Cu(2+) ] significantly enhanced Cd toxicity by a factor of approximately 2, whereas a 100-fold increase in free [Zn(2+) ] and [Co(2+) ] from 10(-11) to 10(-9) M significantly decreased Cd uptake and toxicity by more than twofold. These effects did not change with prior algal acclimation to different essential micronutrient concentrations. Low essential trace metal concentrations may strongly affect the uptake and toxicity of Cd in freshwater algae and should be taken into consideration in future developments of the BLM. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  9. Predicting the toxicity of sediment-associated trace metals with simultaneously extracted trace metal: Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations and dry weight-normalized concentrations: A critical comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.; Cubbage, J.C.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    The relative abilities of sediment concentrations of simultaneously extracted trace metal: acid-volatile sulfide (SEM:AVS) and dry weight- normalized trace metals to correctly predict both toxicity and nontoxicity were compared by analysis of 77 field-collected samples. Relative to the SEM:AVS concentrations, sediment guidelines based upon dry weight-normalized concentrations were equally or slightly more accurate in predicting both nontoxic and toxic results in laboratory tests.

  10. Mass balance of trace metals in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankéré, S. P. C.; Price, N. B.; Statham, P. J.

    2000-07-01

    A first order mass balance of six different trace metals (Mn, Fe, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni) was presented for a 1-year period for the different compartments of the Adriatic Sea: compartment 1 (northern Adriatic Sea), compartment 2 (central Adriatic Sea and surface layer of the southern Adriatic Sea) and compartment 3 (deep water of the southern Adriatic Sea). The Adriatic Sea appeared to be a source of dissolved Cu, Mn and Fe for the Mediterranean Sea through the Strait of Otranto whereas for dissolved Zn and Pb the Adriatic Sea appeared to be a net sink. For dissolved Ni, inputs and outputs through the Strait of Otranto balanced each other. The residence times of all metals in compartment 1 were significantly shorter than that of water indicating significant removal. In compartments 2 and 3, residence times of Mn and Fe were relatively short suggesting removal from the water column whereas for the other metals their residence times were similar to that of water. Calculations of turnover times of metals with respect to different processes showed that in compartments 1 and 2, sedimentation was the main process that affected the content of the reservoirs whereas in compartment 3, the water flux exchanges played an important role for Zn, Cu and Ni. Most of the metals clearly undergo a very dynamic cycle of sedimentation/remobilization particularly in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In the northern Adriatic Sea, most of the Mn and Fe in deposited sediment were remobilized. This was related to diagenetic processes involving the utilisation and solubilisation of Mn and Fe oxides, which occur in the surface of the sediment in the northern Adriatic Sea. In the central Adriatic Sea, remobilization of Mn and Fe was less than in the northern Adriatic Sea, suggesting that diagenesis processes appear deeper in the sediment. Advective transport of sediment was a major source of metals for the deep basin. As much as 80% of the sediments in the South Adriatic Pit might be advected from the shelf

  11. Sources and Contents of Heavy Metals and Other Trace Elements in Animal Manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trace elements are natural and added components of livestock and poultry feeds. Appropriate amounts of these trace elements in the diet of livestock and poultry ensures both health and reproduction. Unfortunately, many times trace metals that are added to livestock diets by producers or feed compani...

  12. Bioaccessibility of trace metals in boat paint particles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Radford, Abigail

    2010-07-01

    A ground composite of paint fragments collected from a leisure boatyard has been analysed for total and bioaccessible trace metal concentrations. The sample contained concentrations of Cu and Zn of about 1% due to their use in antifouling formulations, and significant quantities of Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb and Sn. In a simulated stomach phase (pH 2.5), bioaccessible concentrations relative to respective total concentrations ranged from metal accessibility was either reduced or maintained. Increasing pH of the stomach phase from 1 to 4.5 resulted in a reduction in bioaccessibility, an effect that was propagated, in most cases, into the intestinal phase. These results are critical to the formulation of risk assessments for individuals exposed to paint particles during vessel maintenance or in home environments subjected to particulate track-in.

  13. Assessment of essential elements and heavy metals content on Mytilus galloprovincialis from river Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    Santos, I; Diniz, M S; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P

    2014-06-01

    Trace elemental content was analysed in edible tissues of Mytilus galloprovincialis collected in five different sampling areas near the mouth of river Tagus estuary in Lisbon. The concentrations of essential elements (S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Sr) were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry, while toxic elements (Cr, Cd, Hg, Se and Pb) were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the essential elements K and S are present at the highest concentrations in all the studied samples reaching 2,920 and 4,520 μg g(-1) (fresh weight), respectively. The highest levels of heavy metals found were in two areas close to the city for Pb and Cd, but below the maximum allowed values.

  14. Trace metal levels, sources, and ecological risk assessment in a densely agricultural area from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Sallam, Abd El-Azeem S; Usman, Adel R A; Ahmad, Mahtab; El-Naggar, Ahmed Hamdy; El-Saeid, Mohammed Hamza; Al-Faraj, Abdulelah; El-Enazi, Khaled; Al-Romian, Fahad A

    2017-06-01

    The present study was conducted in one of the most densely cultivated area of Al-Qassim region in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to (i) monitor trace metal (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) contents in surface and subsurface soils, (ii) assess the pollution and potential ecological risk levels of trace metals, and (iii) identify trace metal sources using enrichment factor (EF), correlation matrix, and principal component analysis (PCA). The pollution levels of the analyzed trace metals calculated by the geoaccumulation index (I geo) and contamination factor (C f) suggested that the soils were highly contaminated with Cd and moderately contaminated with Pb. Based on the average values of EF, soil samples were found to present extremely high enrichment for Cd, significant enrichment for Pb, moderate enrichment for Zn, and deficient to minimal enrichment for other trace metals. Among the analyzed trace metals, a very high ecological risk was observed only in the case of Cd at some sampling sites. Meanwhile, other investigated trace metals had a low ecological risk. The results of PCA combined with correlation matrix suggested that Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cr Ni, Cu, and Co represent natural abundance in soil, but Cd, Pb, and Cu are of anthropogenic inputs, mainly due to agrochemical and fertilizer applications. It could be generally concluded that the obtained results can be useful for assessing and conducting a future program for trace metal monitoring in agricultural areas of Saudi Arabia.

  15. Trace metal concentrations in post-hatching cuttlefish Sepia officinalis and consequences of dissolved zinc exposure.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Charles; Caplat, Christelle; Lehodey, Jean-Paul; Milinkovitch, Thomas; Koueta, Noussithé; Cosson, Richard Philippe; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the changes of 13 trace metal and metalloid concentrations (i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn) and their subcellular fractionation in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis reared in controlled conditions between hatching and 2 months post-hatching. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations were determined. Our results highlighted contrasting changes of studied metals. Indeed, As and Fe concentrations measured in hatchlings suggested a maternal transfer of these elements in cuttlefish. The non-essential elements Ag and Cd presented the highest accumulation during our study, correlated with the digestive gland maturation. During the 6 first weeks of study, soluble fractions of most of essential trace metals (i.e. Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Se, Zn) slowly increased consistently with the progressive needs of cuttlefish metabolism during this period. In order to determine for the first time in a cephalopod how metal concentrations and their subcellular distributions are impacted when the animals are trace metal-exposed, we studied previously described parameters in juveniles exposed to dissolved Zn at environmental (i.e. 50 μg l(-1)) and sublethal (i.e. 200 μg l(-1)) levels. Moreover, oxidative stress (i.e. glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and lipid peroxidation (LPO)) was assessed in digestive gland and gills after 1 and 2 months exposures. Our results highlighted no or low ability of this stage of life to regulate dissolved Zn accumulation during the studied period, consistently with high sensitivity of this organism. Notably, Zn exposures caused a concentration-dependent Mn depletion in juvenile cuttlefish, and an increase of soluble fraction of Ag, Cd, Cu without accumulation modifications, suggesting substitution of these elements (i.e. Mn, Ag, Cd, Cu) by Zn. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations decreased in individuals most exposed to Zn. Finally, no

  16. Genetic and geological imprints of evolutionary advance: A trace metal view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickaby, R. E.; Williams, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    known to increase generally in evolution. It appears that multiple organisms, from very diverse lineages were able to recognise, manage and ultimately make use of the newly available trace metals almost simultaneously. Indeed, the development of increasing use of both Cu and Zn was essential for the synthesis and management of both messengers and connective tissue, key evolutionary steps towards multicellularity. We consider that evolution was chemically constrained, and that average changes in availability of particularly Fe, Zn and Cu, were critical for the systematic development of organisms. Williams, R. J. P., and Frausto da Silva, JJR, The Chemistry of Evolution: The Development of our Ecosystem, Elsevier, The Netherlands, 2006. Williams, R. J. P., and R. E. M. Rickaby, Evolution’s Destiny, submitted.

  17. Inhibitive potentiometric detection of trace metals with ultrathin polypyrrole glucose oxidase biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ayenimo, Joseph G; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2015-05-01

    A method, based on the inhibition of an ultrathin polypyrrole-glucose oxidase (PPy-GOx) potentiometric biosensor response, is described for the detection of Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) ions. Based on experimental conditions (0.2 M pyrrole, 500 U mL(-1) GOx, and an applied current density of 0.05 mA cm(-2) and a polymerization period of 500s) previously published by us, PPy-GOx films of approximately 55 nm thick were used to demonstrate the inhibitive potentiometric detection of selected trace metals down to 0.079 μM Cu(2+), 0.025 μM Hg(2+), 0.024 μM Pb(2+) and 0.044 μM Cd(2+). Furthermore, good linear concentration ranges were achieved for Cu(2+) (0.079-16 μM), Hg(2+) (0.025-5 μM), Pb(2+) (0.10-15 μM) and Cd(2+) (0.04-62 μM). The analysis of the nature of the inhibition of glucose oxidase in the PPy-GOx biosensor by these metals was achieved by Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots. The shapes of the curves (exponential decay, parabolic and linear) obtained for the inhibitors suggest that the inhibition by the metal ions may not be exclusively directed at the essential -SH group, but involve additional binding sites of the enzyme. Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots suggest that the inhibition is competitive for Cd(2+), while non-competitive inhibition was observed for other metal ions. The ultra-thin PPy-GOx film enabled improved permeability to the metal inhibitors than possible with conventional biosensors with thicker films and, hence, better reflects the actual inhibition effect of the trace metals on the enzyme activity. The use of the ultra-thin film also eliminated the usual need for incubation of the enzyme electrode for a long period in the presence of the inhibitors. Furthermore, a rapid recovery of the enzyme activity was achieved by simply washing the electrode with water and storing in phosphate buffer for 10-15 min. The proposed biosensing approach was successfully used for the detection of individual trace metals in tap water, achieving a 98

  18. Trace metal interactions with microbial biofilms in natural and engineered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L.; Hsieh, K.M.; Ghiorse, W.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Trace metal adsorption and desorption are important processes in natural aquatic systems and in designed treatment systems. Adsorption of metals onto particulate matter and humic substances has been documented in fresh water and marine systems. Although biofilms coating surfaces are well documented, the chemical mechanisms concerning metal removal have not been investigated thoroughly. Biofilms consist predominantly of bacterial cells enmeshed in a network of negatively charged extracellular polymers. The biofilms are assumed to contain ferromanganese deposits which can play an important role in trace metal absorption. Microorganisms have developed resistance to metal toxicity, especially since the Industrial Revolution. Detoxification mechanisms include biomethylation, biosynthesis of intracellular traps, cellular efflux, synthesis of chelating agents, and surface precipitation. Mathematical models have been developed to describe various aspects of trace metal interaction with surfaces: (1) cellular growth, attachment, and polymer production; (2) metal binding to inorganic surfaces; (3) metal binding to cellular surfaces; and (4) biofilm model integrated with a metal-binding model.

  19. Regulation of essential heavy metals (Cu, Cr, and Zn) by the freshwater prawn macrobrachium malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayram, K.; Geraldine, P.

    1996-02-01

    Despite the low concentrations of heavy metals in the surrounding medium, aquatic organisms take them up and accumulate them in their soft tissues to concentrations several fold higher than those of ambient levels. Knowledge of accumulation patterns of a particular trace metal is a prerequisite for understanding the significance of an observed metal concentration in a particular animal, especially from the aspect of biomonitoring. Many marine invertebrates accumulate heavy metals without any regulation and the accumulation necessarily being associated with mechanisms to store the metals in a detoxified form. Two detoxification mechanisms have been described, both of which may occur in one specimen. Heavy metals can either be bound up in insoluble metalliferous {open_quote}granules{close_quote}, or are bound to soluble metal-binding ligands, such as metallothioneins. Some marine decapod crustaceans have an innate ability to regulate the internal concentrations of essential but potentially toxic metals within a constant level, presumably to meet their metabolic demands. However, at present, there is no such information relating to freshwater decapod crustaceans, especially shrimps which occupy a totally different environment. Macrobrachium malcolmsonii, a potential aquaculture species for freshwater is found in abundance in one of the major Indian rivers, the Cauvery. In the present study, an attempt was made to determine whether the freshwater prawn, M. malcolmsonlii, is able to regulate the three essential elements, copper, chromium and zinc, over a wide range of dissolved concentrations. These three metals were chosen because the Cauvery River receives pollutants containing these metals.

  20. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  1. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  2. Accumulation and trace-metal variability of estuarine sediments, St. Bernard delta geomorphic region, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, K.E.

    1995-10-01

    Prior to government regulation, little monitoring of metal discharges into the canals, bayous, and rivers that drain estuarine systems occured. Discharges of trace-metals by industries and municipalities into surface water bodies are presently regulated through the use of Federal and State mandated permit programs. Resource management of economically important estuarine systems has fostered increasing concern over the accumulation of trace-metal pollutants in water, sediments, and biota from these dynamic areas. The acid-leachable concentrations of fourteen trace-metals were determined for 125 bottom sediment samples and 50 core interval samples by plasma emission analysis. Bottom sediments of the St. Bernard estuarom complex consist predominantly of silty clays and clayey silts derived from the erosion of the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi River delta and sediments associated with historic crevasses along the Mississippi River. Within the 2 cm core intervals, trace-metal concentrations of Ba, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn increased by 10% to 18% in sediments accumulated within the last 75 years. Trace-metal concentrations from sediments for the study area tend to have greater mean concentrations than Florida estuarine sediments, basinwide and Gulf Coast trace-metal comparisons, sediment geochronology. Rates varied from 0.12 to 0.21 cm/yr. Within the 2 cm core intervals, trace-metal concentrations of Ba, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn increased by 10% to 18% in sediments accumulated within the last 75 years. Natural trace-metal variability was examined through the use of an aluminum normalization model based on Florida and Louisiana estuarine sediments, basinwide and Gulf Coast trace-metal comparisons, sediment geochronology, and grain-size corrected data. Elevated concentrations of As, Ba, Cd, Pb, V and Zn were noted from sediments associated with oil and gas drilling and production, sandblasting and shipbuilding, dredging, and stormwater, municipal, and industrial discharges.

  3. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Mark A. Musich

    2007-02-01

    Three potential additives for controlling mercury emissions from syngas at temperatures ranging from 350 to 500 F (177 to 260 C) were developed. Current efforts are being directed at increasing the effective working temperature for these sorbents and also being able to either eliminate any potential mercury desorption or trying to engineer a trace metal removal system that can utilize the observed desorption process to repeatedly regenerate the same sorbent monolith for extended use. Project results also indicate that one of these same sorbents can also successfully be utilized for arsenic removal. Capture of the hydrogen selenide in the passivated tubing at elevated temperatures has resulted in limited results on the effective control of hydrogen selenide with these current sorbents, although lower-temperature results are promising. Preliminary economic analysis suggests that these Corning monoliths potentially could be more cost-effective than the conventional cold-gas (presulfided activated carbon beds) technology currently being utilized. Recent Hg-loading results might suggest that the annualized costs might be as high as 2.5 times the cost of the conventional technology. However, this annualized cost does not take into account the significantly improved thermal efficiency of any plant utilizing the warm-gas monolith technology currently being developed.

  4. Trace metal accumulation in sediments and benthic macroinvertebrates before and after maintenance of a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P; Muthukrishnan, Swarna; Barshatzky, Kristen; Wallace, William

    2012-04-01

    Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) require regular maintenance. The impact on trace metal concentrations in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, New York, was investigated by analyzing sediment concentrations and tissue residues of the dominant macroinvertebrates (Tubifex tubifex) prior and subsequent to maintenance. Trace metal concentrations were assessed using standard serial extraction (for sediment) and acid digestion (for tissue burdens) techniques, followed by quantitative determination using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, respectively. The results suggest that disturbance of sediment during maintenance of the BMP resulted in an increase in the most mobile fraction of trace metals, especially those associated with finer grained sediments (< 63 tm), and as a consequence, measured metal concentrations in macroinvertebrates increased. Regressions of a subset of metal concentrations (copper, lead, and zinc) in sediment and the macroinvertebrate tissue burden samples generally increased as a result of maintenance. A follow-up sampling event 9 months after maintenance demonstrated that the most readily available form of trace metal in the BMP was reduced, which supports (1) long-term sequestration of metals in the BMP and (2) that elevated bioavailability following maintenance was potentially a transient feature of the disturbance. This study suggests that in the long-term, performing sediment removal might help reduce bioavailability of trace metal concentrations in both the BMP and the receiving water to which a BMP discharges. However, alternative practices might need to be implemented to reduce trace metal bioavailability in the short-term.

  5. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  6. Distribution and Potential Toxicity of Trace Metals in the Surface Sediments of Sundarban Mangrove Ecosystem, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Ramanathan, A.; Mathukumalli, B. K. P.; Datta, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, enrichment and ecotoxocity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. Geoaccumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality w.r.t. Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves.

  7. Trace and ultratrace metals in bottled waters: survey of sources worldwide and comparison with refillable metal bottles.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William

    2009-01-15

    Bottled waters from diverse natural and industrial sources are becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Several potentially harmful trace metals (Ag, Be, Li, Ge, Sb, Sc, Te, Th, U) are not monitored regularly in such waters. As a consequence, there is extremely limited data on the abundance and potential health impacts of many potentially toxic trace elements. Containers used for the storage of bottled waters might also increase trace metal levels above threshold limits established for human consumption by the EPA or WHO. Applying strict clean room techniques and sector field ICP-MS, 23 elements were determined in 132 brands of bottled water from 28 countries. In addition, leaching experiments with high purity water and various popular metal bottles investigated the release of trace metals from these containers. The threshold limits for elements such as Al, Be, Mn and U in drinking water were clearly exceeded in some waters. Several bottled waters had Li concentrations in the low mg/L range, a level which is comparable to blood plasma levels of patients treated against manic depression with Li-containing drugs. The rate of release of trace metals from metal bottles assessed after 13 days was generally low, with one exception: Substantial amounts of both Sb and Tl were released from a commercially available pewter pocket flask, exceeding international guidelines 5- and 11-fold, respectively. Trace metal levels of most bottled waters are below guideline levels currently considered harmful for human health. The few exceptions that exist, however, clearly reveal that health concerns are likely to manifest through prolonged use of such waters. The investigated coated aluminium and stainless steel bottles are harmless with respect to leaching of trace metals into drinking water. Pocket flasks, in turn, should be selected with great care to avoid contamination of beverages with harmful amounts of potentially toxic trace metals such as Sb and Tl.

  8. Hair toxic and essential trace elements in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Skalny, Anatoly V; Simashkova, Natalia V; Klyushnik, Tatiana P; Grabeklis, Andrei R; Bjørklund, Geir; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate hair trace elements content in children suffering from autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A total of 74 ASD children and 74 sex- and age-matched controls divided into two age groups (2-4 and 5-9 years) were investigated. Hair trace elements content was assessed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A general cohort of ASD children was characterized by 29 %, 41 %, and 24 % lower hair levels of chromium (Cr), iodine (I), and vanadium (V), respectively, whereas the level of selenium (Se) exceeded the respective control values by 31 %. In ASD children aged 2-4 years hair Cr, I and V content was 68 %, 36 % and 41 % lower than in the controls. Older ASD children were characterized by 45 % increase in hair Se levels. In a general cohort of ASD children hair beryllium (Be) and tin (Sn) levels were 50 % and 34 % lower than the control values. In the first age group (2-4 years) of ASD children 34 %, 42 %, and 73 % lower levels of arsenic (As), boron (B), and Be were detected. In the second age group of ASD children only a nearly significant 25 % decrease in hair lead (Pb) was detected. Surprisingly, no significant group difference in hair mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) content was detected. Generally, the results of the present study demonstrate that children with ASD are characterized by lower values in hair of not only essential but also toxic trace elements.

  9. Source and Cycling of Trace Metals and Nutrients in a Microbial Coalbed Methane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earll, M. M.; Barnhart, E. P.; Ritter, D.; Vinson, D. S.; Orem, W. H.; Vengosh, A.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The source and cycling of trace metals and nutrients in coalbed methane (CBM) systems are controlled by both geochemical processes, such as dissolution or precipitation, and biological mediation by microbial communities. CBM production by the microbes is influenced by trace metals and macronutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P). Previous studies have shown the importance of these nutrients to both enhance and inhibit methane production; however, it's not clear whether they are sourced from coal via in-situ biodegradation of organic matter or transported into the seams with groundwater recharge. To address this knowledge gap, trace metal and nutrient geochemistry and the organic content of solid coal and associated groundwater will be investigated across a hydrologic gradient in CBM wells in the Powder River Basin, MT. Sequential dissolution experiments (chemical extraction of organic and inorganic constituents) using 8 core samples of coal and sandstone will provide insight into the presence of trace metals and nutrients in coalbeds, the associated minerals present, and their mobilization. If significant concentrations of N, P, and trace metals are present in core samples, in-situ sourcing of nutrients by microbes is highly probable. The biogeochemical evolution of groundwater, as it relates to trace metal and nutrient cycling by microbial consortia, will be investigated by targeting core-associated coal seams from shallow wells in recharge areas to depths of at least 165 m and across a 28 m vertical profile that include overburden, coal, and underburden. If microbial-limiting trace metals and nutrients are transported into coal seams with groundwater recharge, we would expect to see higher concentrations of trace metals and nutrients in recharge areas compared to deeper coalbeds. The results of this study will provide novel understanding of where trace metals and nutrients are sourced and how they are cycled in CBM systems.

  10. Trace metal retention in mangrove ecosystems in Guanabara Bay, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Silva-Filho, E V; Oliveira, R R; Lacerda, L D

    2002-11-01

    Along contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., degree of trace metal contamination and mangrove forest structural development), sediments of Laguncularia racemosa-dominated mangrove stands in Guanabara Bay (SE Brazil) presented a trend of trace metal accumulation in forms with low potential of remobilization and biotic uptake. Concurrently, a relatively low transfer of sediment-bound metals to L. racemosa leaves was observed, which may moderate the metal export from the forests via leaf litter transport and the metal availability to enter in food chains based on leaf consumption.

  11. Trace metal contamination of Beaufort's Dyke, North Channel, Irish Sea: a legacy of ordnance disposal.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Alexander; Quinn, Rory; Brown, Craig J; Service, Matthew; Benetti, Sara

    2011-11-01

    Beaufort's Dyke is a disused ordnance disposal ground within the North Channel of the Irish Sea. Over 1 million tonnes of ordnance were disposed of in the dyke over a 40 year period representing a substantial volume of trace metal pollutants introduced to the seabed. Utilising particle transport modelling software we simulated the potential transport of metal particles from Beaufort's Dyke over a 3 month period. This demonstrated that Beaufort's Dyke has the potential to act as a source for trace metal contamination to areas beyond the submarine valley. Trace metal analysis of sediments from the Dyke and surrounding National Marine Monitoring Programme areas demonstrate that the Dyke is not the most contaminated site in the region. Particle transport modelling enables the transport pathways of trace metal contaminants to be predicted. Implementation of the technique in other munitions disposal grounds will provide valuable information for the selection of monitoring stations. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Source identification and assessment of sediment contamination of trace metals in Kogarah Bay, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Alyazichi, Yasir M; Jones, Brian G; McLean, Errol

    2015-02-01

    The distribution of trace metals (spatial and temporal) and sedimentary fractions were investigated to identify the concentrations and sources of trace metals within Kogarah Bay, NSW, Australia. A total of 59 surface sediments and six subsurface samples from core of the sediment were collected. The contamination factor and pollution load index indices used to evaluate environmental effects of trace metals. The study area was found to be uncontaminated with Cr and Ni, moderately contaminated with As and considerably contaminated with Cu, Zn and Pb. The concentrations of Cr and Ni were below both effect range low and effect range median, while As, Cu, Zn and Pb were slightly above effect range low. The highest concentrations of these trace metals such as Cu, Zn and Pb were found in the north, northwest and southeast of the bay, close to discharge points, stormwater outlets and around boatyards and watercrafts. The spatial distributions of metals were strongly related to muddy particles and organic matter. The temporal sediments of metals declined with increased sediment depth, which reflects accumulation of trace metals since European settlement in this area. Furthermore, the source of the trace metals was found to be stormwater outlets, gasoline fumes, boatyards and other human activities.

  13. Atmospheric trace metals measured at a regional background site (Welgegund) in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Andrew D.; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Beukes, Johan P.; Josipovic, Micky; Hendriks, Johan; Vakkari, Ville; Laakso, Lauri

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric trace metals can cause a variety of health-related and environmental problems. Only a few studies on atmospheric trace metal concentrations have been conducted in South Africa. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine trace metal concentrations in aerosols collected at a regional background site, i.e. Welgegund, South Africa. PM1, PM1-2. 5 and PM2. 5-10 samples were collected for 13 months, and 31 atmospheric trace metal species were detected. Atmospheric iron (Fe) had the highest concentrations in all three size fractions, while calcium (Ca) was the second-most-abundant species. Chromium (Cr) and sodium (Na) concentrations were the third- and fourth-most-abundant species, respectively. The concentrations of the trace metal species in all three size ranges were similar, with the exception of Fe, which had higher concentrations in the PM1 size fraction. With the exception of titanium (Ti), aluminium (Al) and manganese (Mg), 70 % or more of the trace metal species detected were in the smaller size fractions, which indicated the influence of industrial activities. However, the large influence of wind-blown dust was reflected by 30 % or more of trace metals being present in the PM2. 5-10 size fraction. Comparison of trace metals determined at Welgegund to those in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex indicated that at both locations similar species were observed, with Fe being the most abundant. However, concentrations of these trace metal species were significantly higher in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex. Fe concentrations at the Vaal Triangle were similar to levels thereof at Welgegund, while concentrations of species associated with pyrometallurgical smelting were lower. Annual average Ni was 4 times higher, and annual average As was marginally higher than their respective European standard values, which could be attributed to regional influence of pyrometallurgical industries in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex. All three size

  14. Pollution status of the Bohai Sea: an overview of the environmental quality assessment related trace metals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuelu; Zhou, Fengxia; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that the ecosystem of the Bohai Sea is being rapidly degraded and the Sea has basically lost its function as a fishing ground. Billions of funds have been spent in slowing down, halting and finally reversing the environmental deterioration of the Bohai Sea. Although trace metals are routinely monitored, the data with high temporal resolution for a clear understanding of biogeochemical processes in the ecosystem of the Bohai Sea are insufficient, especially in the western literature. In this review, status of trace metal contamination in the Bohai Sea is assessed based on a comprehensive review of their concentrations recorded in the waters, sediments and organisms over the past decades. Studies show that metal contamination in the Bohai Sea is closely associated with the fast economic growth in the past decades. Concentrations of trace metals are high in coastal areas especially in the estuaries. Alarmingly high metal concentrations are observed in the waters, sediments and organisms from the western Bohai Bay and the northern Liaodong Bay, especially the coasts near Huludao in the northernmost area of the Bohai Sea, which is being polluted by industrial sewage from the surrounding areas. The knowledge of the speciation and fractionation of trace metals and the influence of submarine groundwater discharge on the biogeochemistry of trace metals in the Bohai Sea is far from enough and related work needs to be done urgently to get a better understanding of the influence of trace metals on the ecosystem of the Bohai Sea. A clear understanding of the trace metal pollution status of the Bohai Sea could not be achieved presently for lack of systematic cooperation in different research fields. It is quite necessary to apply the environmental and ecological modeling to the investigation of trace metals in the Bohai Sea and then provide foundations for the protection of the environment and ecosystem of the Bohai Sea.

  15. Microbial Influences on Trace Metal Cycling in a Meromictic Lake, Fayetteville Green Lake, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A. L.; House, C.; Kump, L.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms can exist in aquatic environments at very high cell densities of up to 1011 cells/L, and can accumulate significant quantities of trace metals. Bacteria actively take up bioactive trace metals, including Fe, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Mo, which function as catalytic centers in metalloproteins and metal-activated enzymes involved in virtually all cellular functions. In addition, bacteria may catalyze the release of trace metals from inorganic substrates by processes such as the reduction of iron and manganese oxides, suggesting that trace metal distributions within a natural environment dominated by microbial processes may be controlled primarily by microbial ecology. Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), NY, is a permanently stratified meromictic lake that has a well-oxygenated surface water mass (mixolimnion) overlying a relatively stagnant, anoxic deep water mass (monimolimnion). A chemocline separates the water masses at around 20m depth, where oxygen concentrations decrease and sulfate and methane concentrations increase. In addition, previous studies have indicated that trace metals such as V, Cr, Co, Mn, and Fe reach elevated concentrations at the chemocline. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of FGL samples from depths of up to 40m with bacterial and archaeal probes, we have shown that fluctuating redox conditions within the FGL water column correlate with significant variations in the composition and distribution of microbial populations with depth. The mixolimnion is dominated by Eubacteria, with increasing concentrations of Archaea in the lower anoxic zone. Increases in microbial cell densities coincide with increases in trace metals at the chemocline, suggesting microbial activity may be responsible for trace metal release at this boundary. 16S rRNA PCR cloning techniques are currently being used to identify dominant microbial populations at various levels within the FGL water column. Future studies will focus on the potential for these

  16. Geochronology and historical deposition of trace metals in three tropical estuaries in the Gulf of Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, Edem; Nyarko, Elvis; Hulme, Samuel; Swarzenski, Peter; Asiedu, Daniel K.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-01

    The depositional histories of trace metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) in sediment cores from three Ghanaian estuaries were reconstructed using radioisotope-derived (210Pb and 137Cs) geochronologies. A core collected from each of the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries was analyzed for trace metals and radionuclides. Lead-210 and 137Cs dating via gamma spectroscopy, and trace metal analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used in deriving sedimentation rates, geochronologies and accumulation trends of trace metals. The sedimentation rates in all three estuaries (in the range of 0.54-0.83 cm yr-1) were greater than the predicted sea level rise (∼0.33 cm yr-1) for the Accra Coast of Ghana. The 210Pb depositional rates of 6.83 dpm cm-2 y-1, 2.74 dpm cm-2 y-1 and 1.75 dpm cm-2 y-1 estimated for the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries, respectively, are higher than those recorded in other latitudes. Trace metal analysis revealed differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn between deeper and surficial layers of each core to be in the range of 10-20%, which is well within the natural variations attributed to geochemical factors. Relative to the Amisa and Volta estuaries, the temporal profiles of Al-normalized metal concentrations and estimated fluxes suggest anthropogenic processes augmented the natural fluxes of trace metals, particularly Zn into the Sakumo II estuary during the last 7 years.

  17. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Robert J; Bain, Daniel J; Hillman, Aubrey L; Pompeani, David P; Finkenbinder, Matthew S; Abbott, Mark B

    2017-04-18

    Early industrial trace metal loadings are poorly characterized but potentially substantial sources of trace metals to the landscape. The magnitude of legacy contamination in southwestern Pennsylvania, the cradle of North American fossil fuel industrialization, is reconstructed from trace metal concentrations in a sediment core with proxies including major and trace metal chemistry, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Trace metal chemistry in this sediment record reflects 19th and 20th century land use and industry. In particular, early 19th century arsenic loadings to the lake are elevated from pesticides used by early European settlers at a lakeside tannery. Later, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of acidic mine drainage from coal operations. Twentieth century zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by emissions from the nearby, infamous Donora Zinc Works yet record both the opening of a nearby coal-fired power plant and amendments to the Clean Air Act. The impact of early industry is substantial and rivals more recent metal fluxes, resulting in a significant potential source of contaminated sediments. Thus, modern assessments of trace metal contamination cannot ignore early industrial inputs, as the potential remobilization of legacy contamination would impact ecosystem and human health.

  18. Trace metals, metal-binding proteins and histopathology of the hepatopancreas in Dungeness crab

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.A.J.; Brand, D.; Yunker, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have been examining trace metals and histopathology of the hepatopancreas in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, from four sites in the Fraser R. estuary and at two reference sites. Animals were collected at the same time over a two-year period. Tissues were analyzed for their trace metal content using ICPS and for metal-binding protein using pulse polarography. ANOVA and principal component analysis (PCA) were performed on all data. Copper, cadmium and silver are significantly higher in areas receiving sewage discharge. Copper and silver covary in all PCA models and form a cluster distinct from all other metals. The strong covariance raises the possibility that animals are taking up Ag along with Cu. In all PCA models, Ca and Sr (and to lesser extent Ba) form a distinct cluster in the third PC. Histopathological examination of crab hepatopancreatic tissue was carried out to determine if any idiopathic differences existed among populations from the Fraser River estuary and the reference sites. Four cell types were identified in all tissues examined: E-cell (embryonic), R-cell (reserve), B-cell (basophilic) and F-cell (fibrillar). The degree of vacuolation and glycogen storage within the R-cells was significantly greater in crabs collected from the estuary. Also, a significantly higher number of crabs from this site possessed proliferative invasive granulocytes associated with the hepatopancreas. Additionally, nucleolar hypertrophy within the F-cells occurred in crabs collected from the Fraser estuary, relative to those from the reference sites. The hepatopancreas may serve as a suitable subject for further examination of contaminant effects, since cell types show a varied response to exposure.

  19. Detecting long-term temporal trends in sediment-bound trace metals from urbanised catchments.

    PubMed

    Sharley, David J; Sharp, Simon M; Bourgues, Sophie; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2016-12-01

    The shift from rural lifestyles to urban living has dramatically altered the way humans interact and live across the globe. With over 50% of the world's populations living within cities, and significant increases expected over the next 50 years, it is critical that changes to social, economic and environmental sustainability of cities globally be implicit. Protecting and enhancing aquatic ecosystems, which provide important ecosystem services, is challenging. A number of factors influence pollutants in urban waterways including changes in land-use, impervious area and stormwater discharges, with sediment-bound pollution a major issue worldwide. This work aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of trace metals in freshwater sediments from six urbanised catchment over a 30-year period. It provides an estimate of pollution using a geoaccumulation index and examines possible toxicity using a probable effect concentration quotient (mPECq). Results showed significant temporal changes in metal concentrations over time, with lead generally decreasing in all but one of the sites, attributed to significant changes in environmental policies and the active elimination of lead products. Temporal changes in other metals were variable and likely dependent on site-specific factors. While it is likely that diffuse pollution is driving changes in zinc, for metals such as lead, chromium and copper, it is likely that watershed landuse and/or point sources are more important. The results clearly indicated that changes to watershed landuse, environmental policy and pollution abatement programs are all driving changes in sediment quality, highlighting the utility of long-term sediment monitoring for assessment of urban watershed condition. While this study has demonstrated the utility of detecting long-term changes in metal concentrations, this approach could easily be adapted to detect and assess future trends in other hydrophobic contaminants and emerging chemicals

  20. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  1. Trace Element Composition of Metal and Sulphides in Iron Meteorites Determined Using ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giscard, M. D.; Hammond, S. J.; Bland, P. A.; Benedix, G. K.; Rogers, N. W.; Russell, S. S.; Genge, M. J.; Rehkamper, M.

    2012-09-01

    We measured trace element concentrations in Nantan, Toluca, Cape York, Carthage, Gibeon and Dronino. Poikiloblastic daubreelite in Gibeon indicates shock metamorphism. There is a volatile depletion in metal and sulphides.

  2. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  3. Characterizing the Environmental Availability of Trace Metals in Savannah River Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-03-18

    An eight step sequential extraction technique was used to characterize the environmental availability of trace metals from background and waste site soil samples collected from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS).

  4. Impact of trace metal concentrations on coccolithophore growth and morphology: laboratory simulations of Cretaceous stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Giulia; Hoffmann, Linn; Bach, Lennart T.; Bottini, Cinzia; Erba, Elisabetta; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-07-01

    The Cretaceous ocean witnessed intervals of profound perturbations such as volcanic input of large amounts of CO2, anoxia, eutrophication and introduction of biologically relevant metals. Some of these extreme events were characterized by size reduction and/or morphological changes of a few calcareous nannofossil species. The correspondence between intervals of high trace metal concentrations and coccolith dwarfism suggests a negative effect of these elements on nannoplankton biocalcification processes in past oceans. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the potential effect of a mixture of trace metals on growth and morphology of four living coccolithophore species, namely Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Pleurochrysis carterae and Coccolithus pelagicus. The phylogenetic history of coccolithophores shows that the selected living species are linked to Mesozoic species showing dwarfism under excess metal concentrations. The trace metals tested were chosen to simulate the environmental stress identified in the geological record and upon known trace metal interactions with living coccolithophore algae.Our laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated trace metal concentrations, similarly to the fossil record, affect coccolithophore algae size and/or weight. Smaller coccoliths were detected in E. huxleyi and C. pelagicus, while coccoliths of G. oceanica showed a decrease in size only at the highest trace metal concentrations. P. carterae coccolith size was unresponsive to changing trace metal concentrations. These differences among species allow discriminating the most- (P. carterae), intermediate- (E. huxleyi and G. oceanica) and least-tolerant (C. pelagicus) taxa. The fossil record and the experimental results converge on a selective response of coccolithophores to metal availability.These species-specific differences must be considered before morphological features of coccoliths are used to reconstruct paleo-chemical conditions.

  5. Presence of trace metals in aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Italy).

    PubMed

    Squadrone, S; Brizio, P; Stella, C; Prearo, M; Pastorino, P; Serracca, L; Ercolini, C; Abete, M C

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding chemical pollutant levels in farmed fish and shellfish, along with the risks associated with their consumption is still scarce. This study was designed to assess levels of exposure to 21 trace elements in fish (Dicentrarchus labrax), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected from aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Metal concentrations showed great variability in the three species; the highest values of the nonessential elements As and Cd were found in oysters while the highest levels of Al, Pb and V were found in mussels. The essential elements Cu, Mn and Zn were highest in oysters, but Fe, Cr, Ni, Se, Co and Mo levels were highest in mussels. Fish had the lowest concentrations for all trace elements, which were at least one order of magnitude lower than in bivalves. The rare earth elements cerium and lanthanum were found at higher levels in mussels than in oysters, but undetectable in fish. The maximum values set by European regulations for Hg, Cd and Pb were never exceeded in the examined samples. However, comparing the estimated human daily intakes (EHDIs) with the suggested tolerable copper and zinc intakes suggested a potential risk for frequent consumers of oysters. Similarly, people who consume high quantities of mussels could be exposed to concentrations of Al that exceed the proposed TWI (tolerable weekly intake).

  6. Facilitation Drives the Positive Effects of Plant Richness on Trace Metal Removal in a Biodiversity Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yuan; Chen, Tong; Bai, Yi; Qian, Bao Ying; Zhang, Chong Bang

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytoextraction is an environmentally acceptable and inexpensive technique for mine tailing rehabilitation that uses metallophyte plants. These plants reduce the soil trace metal contents to environmentally acceptable levels by accumulating trace metals. Recently, whether more trace metals can be removed by species-rich communities of these plants received great attention, as species richness has been reported having positive effects on ecosystem functions. However, how the species richness affects trace metals removal of plant communities of mine tailing is rarely known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of species richness on soil trace metal removal in both natural and experimental plant communities. The root lengths and stem heights of each plant species were measured in order to calculate the functional diversity indices. Our results showed that trace metal (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) concentrations in mine tailing soil declined as species richness increased in both the natural and experimental plant communities. Species richness, rather than functional diversity, positively affected the mineralomass of the experimental plant communities. The intensity of plant-plant facilitation increased with the species richness of experimental communities. Due to the incremental role of plant-plant facilitation, most of the species had higher biomasses, higher trace metal concentrations in their plant tissues and lower malondialdehyde concentrations in their leaves. Consequently, the positive effects of species richness on mineralomass were mostly attributable to facilitation among plants. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide clear evidence that, due to plant-plant facilitation, species richness positively affects the removal of trace metals from mine tailing soil through phytoextraction and provides further information on diversity conservation and environmental remediation in a mine tailing environment. PMID:24695538

  7. Effects of trace metal ions on secondary metabolism and the morphological development of streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Fabricio M; Goo, Kian-Sim; Ulanova, Dana

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptomyces genus are characterized by a complex life cycle and the production of many bioactive secondary metabolites. Trace metals play an important role in streptomycete metabolism and development, however, their mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on metallosensing regulators and trace metal action, as well as discuss the possible application in natural product discovery.

  8. Trace metal enrichments in core sediments in Muthupet mangroves, SE coast of India: application of acid leachable technique.

    PubMed

    Janaki-Raman, D; Jonathan, M P; Srinivasalu, S; Armstrong-Altrin, J S; Mohan, S P; Ram-Mohan, V

    2007-01-01

    Core sediments from Mullipallam Creek of Muthupet mangroves on the southeast coast of India were analyzed for texture, CaCO(3), organic carbon, sulfur and acid leachable trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn and Cd). Textural analysis reveals a predominance of mud while CaCO(3) indicates dissolution in the upper half of the core, and reprecipitation of carbonates in reduction zones. Trace metals are diagenetically modified and anthropogenic processes control Pb and, to some extent, Ni, Zn and Fe. A distinct event is identified at 90 cm suggesting a change in deposition. Strong relationship of trace metals with Fe indicates that they are associated with Fe-oxyhydroxides. The role of carbonates in absorbing trace metals is evident from their positive relationship with trace metals. Comparison of acid leachable trace metals indicates increase in concentrations in the study area and the sediments act as a sink for trace metals contributed from multiple sources.

  9. Essential trace and toxic element distribution in the scalp hair of Pakistani myocardial infarction patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hasssan Imaran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Gul Hassan; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shar, Ghulam Qadir

    2006-10-01

    to be p < 0.001-0.009 and for females to be p < 0.0.002-0.007 and significantly high concentration of Cd were observed in hair samples of patients than in controls in the range for males (p < 0.001-0.009) and in females (p < 0.001-0.011). The Zn/Cu and Zn/Cd ratios in the scalp hair (p < 0.01) of the diseased groups were significantly lower than that of the healthy groups. Deficiency of essential trace metals and high level of toxic metals might play a role in the development of heart disease in the subjects of this study. Toxic metals might also cause diminished absorption of essential elements.

  10. Final report on CCQM-K89: Trace and essential elements in Herba Ecliptae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente, Liliana; Saxby, David; Merrick, Jeffrey; Kotzeva, Boriana; Mester, Zoltan; Yang, Lu; Willie, Scott; Feng, Liuxing; Wang, Jun; Labarraque, Guillaume; Rienitz, Olaf; Wai-mei Sin, Della; Mok, Chuen-sing; Wong, Siu-kay; Ng, Chi-shing; Fung, Wai-hong; Yau, Ho-pan; Zhu, Yanbei; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung Seok; Kim, In Jung; Lim, Young Ran; Ramirez Cruz, Pedro; Mercader Trejo, Flora E.; Valle Moya, Edith; Santiago Castellanos, Itzel; del Rocio Arvizu Torres, Maria; Manzano, Judith Velina Lara; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Yu A.; Shin, Richard; Horvat, Milena; Jacimovic, Radojko; Milacic, Radmila; Yafa, Charun; Taebunpakul, Sutthinun; Kaewkhomdee, Nattikarn; Phukphatthanachai, Pranee; Cankur, Oktay; Gonca Coskun, F.; Turk, Gregory C.; Davis, W. Clay; Wood, Laura J.; Murphy, Karen E.; Entwisle, John

    2013-01-01

    The key comparison CCQM-K89 was undertaken to demonstrate the capability of participating NMIs and DIs in measuring the contents of incurred trace elements (total arsenic, cadmium and lead) and essential elements (calcium and zinc) at µg/g (for arsenic, cadmium, lead and zinc) and mg/g (for calcium) levels in a herb matrix sample by various analytical techniques. This key comparison was organized by the Government Laboratory of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (GLHK) and agreed at the Inorganic Analysis Working Group Meeting in Hindås, Sweden in October 2010 as a benchmarking exercise with arsenic (a trace element) and calcium (an essential element) chosen as the 'exemplary' elements. It was also agreed that a pilot study CCQM-P126 would be run in parallel with this key comparison. The key comparison serves to facilitate claims by participants on the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) as listed in Appendix C of the Key Comparison Database (KCDB) under the Mutual Recognition Arrangement of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM MRA). A total of 20 NMIs/DIs registered for this programme and 18 of them submitted their results. Most of the participants used microwave acid digestion methods for sample dissolution. For the instrumental determination, a variety of techniques like ICP-MS, AAS, INAA, ICP-AES were employed by the participants. For this key comparison, inorganic core capabilities have been demonstrated by concerned participants with respect to methods including ICP-MS (without isotope dilution), ID-ICP-MS, ICP-AES, INAA, AAS and ion chromatography with iteratively matrix-matched calibration on the determination of total arsenic, calcium, cadmium, lead and zinc in a matrix of herb. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for

  11. Dry deposition of airborne trace metals on the Los Angeles Basin and adjacent coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Turco, R. P.; Stolzenbach, K.; Friedlander, S. K.; Xiong, C.; Schiff, K.; Tiefenthaler, L.; Wang, Guangyu

    2003-01-01

    We present an assessment of the deposition rates of airborne trace metals onto the Los Angeles Basin and adjacent coastal waters. For this purpose, the UCLA Surface Meteorology and Ozone Generation (SMOG) air pollution modeling system has been used to simulate the geographical distributions of trace metals and their deposition fluxes. Calculations were performed for average summer and winter conditions, as well as for extreme meteorological events, in particular, for Santa Ana winds. Thus, a series of simulations were carried out that define the range of meteorological conditions contributing to dry deposition in the region. These predictions have been calibrated and validated using measurements collected in the LA area. Significant spatial and temporal variability are found in trace metal concentrations and deposition rates. Large spatial gradients occur near the coast as well as at the mountainous boundaries of the airshed. Considerable diurnal and seasonal variations in trace metal deposition are also noted. For example, the development of a daytime sea breeze, particularly in the warmer months, leads to greater deposition in the northern and eastern basin as well as in the high desert. A nighttime land breeze, especially in the colder months, enhances deposition onto coastal ocean surfaces. Large particles dominate local trace metal deposition in central urban (and adjacent) areas, while fine particles export metals over regional scales through long-range advection. Since the majority of urban metal deposition occurs on particles larger than 10-μm diameter, routine measurements of PM10 or PM2.5 concentrations for air quality characterization may not be reliable indicators of local sources. Some 35-45% of all trace metal emissions are deposited locally within the Los Angeles Basin on an annual basis. Santa Monica Bay and its watersheds receive about 6% of this amount, which can have a significant impact on trace metal concentrations in the surface waters of the

  12. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7 ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6 ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5 ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8 ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6 ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trace metal concentrations in Spartina densiflora and associated soil from a Patagonian salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Bouza, Pablo J; Marinho, Carmen H; Gil, Mónica N

    2014-12-15

    The objectives of this study were to (i) assess in situ trace metal concentrations in soil and in Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh (Rawson, Chubut, Argentina) and (ii) investigate the relationship between trace metal concentrations in soils and in plants to improve our knowledge regarding the ability of S. densiflora to take up and accumulate trace metals from the soil within its native region. Our results indicate that the soil and S. densiflora exhibit low metal concentrations in the Rawson salt marsh. S. densiflora accumulates Zn in below- and above-ground plant structures and Cr in below-ground parts. These results suggest at the time of this study there is scarce human impact associated with metals in the Rawson salt marsh.

  14. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of food waste by trace metal elements supplementation and reduced metals dosage by green chelating agent [S, S]-EDDS via improving metals bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of trace metals on methane production from food waste and examining the feasibility of reducing metals dosage by ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) via improving metals bioavailability. The results indicated that the effects of metal elements highly depended on the supplemental concentrations. Trace metals supplemented under moderate concentrations greatly enhanced the methane yield. However, the excessive supplementation of Fe (1000 mg/L) and Ni (50 mg/L) exhibited the obvious toxicity to methanogens. The combinations of trace metals exhibited remarkable synergistic effects. The supplementation of Fe (100 mg/L) + Co (1 mg/L) + Mo (5 mg/L) + Ni (5 mg/L) obtained the greatest methane yield of 504 mL/g VSadded and the highest increment of 35.5% compared to the reactor without metals supplementation (372 mL/g VSadded). The changes of metals speciation showed the reduction of metals bioavailability during anaerobic digestion, which might weaken the stimulative effects of trace metals. However, the addition of EDDS improved metals bioavailability for microbial uptake and stimulated the activity of methanogens, and therefore, strengthened the stimulative effects of metals on anaerobic digestion of food waste. The batch and semi-continuous experiments confirmed that the addition of EDDS (20 mg/L) bonded to trace metals prior to their supplementation could obtain a 50% reduction of optimal metals dosage. This study provided a feasible method to reduce trace metals dosage without the degeneration of process performance of anaerobic digestion.

  15. Spatial distribution and sources of dissolved trace metals in surface water of the Wei River, China.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Fadong, Li; Qiang, Liu; Shuai, Song; Guangshuai, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    For this study, 34 water samples were collected along the Wei River and its tributaries. Multivariate statistical analyses were employed to interpret the environmental data and to identify the natural and anthropogenic trace metal inputs to the surface waters of the river. Our results revealed that Zn, Se, B, Ba, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni and V were all detected in the Wei River. Compared to drinking water guidelines, the primary trace metal pollution components (B, Ni, Zn and Mn) exceeded drinking water standard levels by 47.1, 50.0, 44.1 and 26.5%, respectively. Inter-element relationships and landscape features of trace metals conducted by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) identified a uniform source of trace metals for all sampling sites, excluding one site that exhibited anomalous concentrations. Based on the patterns of relative loadings of individual metals calculated by principal component analysis (PCA), the primary trace metal sources were associated with natural/geogenic contributions, agro-chemical processes and discharge from local industrial sources. These results demonstrated the impact of human activities on metal concentrations in the Wei River.

  16. The level of toxic and essential trace elements in hair of petrochemical workers involved in different technological processes.

    PubMed

    Skalny, Anatoly V; Kaminskaya, Galina A; Krekesheva, Tatyana I; Abikenova, Sholpan K; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Berezkina, Elena S; Grabeklis, Andrei R; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the investigation is comparative analysis of hair trace element content in workers of different departments of petrochemical plant. A total of 75 men working in office (engineers), and departments 1 (D1), 3 (D3), and 4 (D4) of the petrochemical plant, as well as occupationally non-exposed persons, were examined. Hair trace element levels were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The office workers were characterized by the highest hair As, Hg, Sn, I, and Si content as compared to the workers of other departments, whereas the level of those elements did not differ significantly from the control values. It is notable that hair Be levels in all employees of petrochemical plant were significantly lower, whereas Se content was significantly higher than that in unexposed controls. Hair toxic trace element content in workers directly involved in industrial processes did not differ significantly or was lower than that in the control group. At the same time, the highest levels of essential trace elements (Cr, Fe, and I) were observed in employees working in primary oil refining (D1). Hair levels of Co, I, and Li were maximal in persons of sulfur and bitumen-producing division (D4). The lowest levels of both essential and toxic trace elements in hair were detected in employees involved in production of liquefied gas, kerosene, and diesel fuel (D3). The obtained data demonstrate that involvement in different technological processes in petrochemical complex differentially affect hair trace element content in workers.

  17. Low concentration toxic metal mixture interactions: Effects on essential and non-essential metals in brain, liver, and kidneys of mice on sub-chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Mao, Guanghua; Xu, Hai; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-08-01

    The deleterious effects of long term exposure to individual toxic metals in low doses are well documented. There is however, a paucity of information on interaction of low dose toxic metal mixtures with toxic and essential metals. This study reports on interactions between low dose mixtures of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) and toxic and essential metals. For 120d, six groups of forty mice each were exposed to metal mixtures, however, the control group was given distilled water. Exposure to Pb+Cd increased brain Pb by 479% in 30d, whiles Pb+Hg+As+Cd reduced liver Hg by 46.5%, but increased kidney As by 130% in 30d. Brain Cu, increased by 221% on Pb+Hg+As+Cd exposure, however, liver Ca reduced by 36.1% on Pb+Hg exposure in 60-d. Interactions within metal mixtures were largely synergistic. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that low dose metal exposures influenced greatly levels of Hg (in brain and liver) and As (brain). The influence exerted on essential metals was highest in liver (PC1) followed by kidney (PC2) and brain (PC3). Exposure to low dose metal mixtures affected homeostasis of toxic and essential metals in tissues of mice.

  18. Determination of trace and heavy metals in some commonly used medicinal herbs in Ayurveda.

    PubMed

    Nema, Neelesh K; Maity, Niladri; Sarkar, Birendra K; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2014-11-01

    Traditionally, the herbal drugs are well established for their therapeutic benefits. Depending upon their geographical sources sometimes the trace and heavy metals' content may differ, which may lead to severe toxicity. So, the toxicological and safety assessment of these herbal drugs are one of the major issues in recent days. Eight different plant species including Aloe vera, Centella asiatica, Calendula officinalis, Cucumis sativus, Camellia sinensis, Clitoria ternatea, Piper betel and Tagetes erecta were selected to determine their heavy and trace metals content and thereby to assure their safer therapeutic application. The trace and heavy metals were detected through atomic absorption spectrometry analysis. The selected medicinal plant materials were collected from the local cultivated regions of West Bengal, India, and were digested with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid as specified. Absorbance was measured through atomic absorption spectrometer (AA 303) and the concentration of different trace and heavy metals in the plant samples were calculated. The quantitative determinations were carried out using standard calibration curve obtained by the standard solutions of different metals. The contents of heavy metals were found to be within the prescribed limit. Other trace metals were found to be present in significant amount. Thus, on the basis of experimental outcome, it can be concluded that the plant materials collected from the specific region are safe and may not produce any harmful effect of metal toxicity during their therapeutic application. The investigated medicinal plants contain trace metals such as copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) as well as heavy metals such as arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), which were present within the permissible limit. © The Author(s) 2012.

  19. Development of a Constructed Brackish Tidal Marsh and its Effect on Trace Metal Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBishlawi, H.

    2011-12-01

    Two tidal marshes along the Hackensack River in the New Jersey Meadowlands, one constructed and the other natural and well established, were characterized to determine and compare their ability to immobilize trace metals including as Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn in their sediments. Pore-waters were sampled throughout the year, and sediment cores were collected to determine the dynamics of trace metals in sediments and their interactions with redox active species such as iron and sulfide as well as organic matter. Precipitation of metals with sulfides played a major factor in immobilizing certain metals including Pb and Zn. However, the constructed marsh, which exhibited lower dissolved sulfide concentrations, but higher dissolved iron species, removed certain dissolved trace metals including Zn and Pb more effectively than the established marsh. At both sites, the presence of sulfide did not result in the expected precipitation of elements such as Cu and Zn with sulfide and a small dissolved concentration these metals was detectable in the sediment pore water. These trace metals exhibited an association with heterogeneous dissolved organic matter, which was further confirmed through thermodynamic equilibrium modeling. The constructed high marsh immobilized the most trace metals in the region where sulfide produced through sulfate reduction reacted with but had not yet been completely titrated out of solution by dissolved iron. Additionally, the intermittently oxic/anoxic tidal zone of the high marsh removed more metals than the permanently inundated low marsh due to its higher tidal water exchange. Building constructed wetlands that maximize intertidal high marsh areas may optimize trace metal immobilization.

  20. New food sources of essential trace elements produced by biotechnology facilities.

    PubMed

    Mazo, Vladimir K; Gmoshinski, Ivan V; Zorin, Sergey N

    2007-10-01

    Population satiety with trace elements (TE) is a problem that is widely discussed in nutrition science. For optimal nutrition, the form of TE eaten in food is very important. Organic forms of TE in nutrition are appropriate as human metabolism has adapted to these kinds of nutrients during species evolution. This is now considered a reason for the beneficial use of biotechnologically produced TE sources in human food. Advanced matrixes for TE incorporation are unicellular organisms such as yeast, lactobacilli and Spirulina. Addition of inorganic salts at certain concentrations into cultivation media enables the mineral ions to incorporate into the microbial biomass. As a consequence, the biomass becomes enriched with organic forms of incorporated TE, which are presented by their complexes with amino acids, proteins and probably lipids and polysaccharides. In addition, a new direction of research has made good advances, in which technology has been developed for production of organic forms of TE through complex formation between transition metals (zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, iron) with amino acids and peptides formed during enzymatic hydrolysis of food protein. This brief review discusses the results demonstrating the advances in the biotechnological production of new TE sources, to obtain food components destined for wide prophylaxis of TE deficiency or for dietary treatment of the adverse consequences of these deficiencies.

  1. Toxic and essential trace elemental contents in fish species from the Black Sea, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa

    2009-08-01

    Toxic and essential element content of ten different fish species from the Black Sea were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion method. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference materials (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 10%. Toxic element content in fish samples were found 25-84 microg/kg for mercury, 0.11-0.32 microg/g for arsenic, 0.28-0.87 microg/g for lead, 0.10-0.35 microg/g for cadmium, 1.14-3.60 microg/g for nickel. Trace element content in fish samples were found 36.2-145 microg/g for iron, 0.65-2.78 microg/g for copper, 2.76-9.10 microg/g for manganese, 38.8-93.4 microg/g for zinc, 0.19-0.85 microg/g for selenium, 0.63-1.74 microg/g for chromium. The levels of lead and cadmium in fish samples were higher than the recommended legal limits for human consumption.

  2. Element and Isotopic Repartitioning during Low-Temperature Mineral Recrystallization: Implications for Trace Metal Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.; Dye, K. G.; Chen, H.; Flynn, E. D.; Frierdich, A. J.; Gadol, H. J.; Hinkle, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxides are widely assumed to be stable hosts for trace metals. These phases are insoluble under most conditions and the more crystalline forms are slow to be reduced microbially, often persisting in sediments until sulfidic conditions develop. Incorporation of trace metals into iron oxides is believed to trap micronutrients and record ancient fluid compositions. However, a substantial body of prior work has demonstrated that microbial iron cycling creates chemical conditions that initiate abiotic reactions between dissolved Fe(II) and iron oxide minerals, causing extensive mineral recrystallization and phase transformations. We have investigated the effect of such processes on the trace metal content and isotopic composition of iron oxides. Transformation of ferrihydrite into goethite catalyzed by dissolved Fe(II) releases to the fluid one- to two-thirds of Ni that was originally bound in the mineral structure. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite and hematite causes both the incorporation and release of the trace metals Ni and Zn, with the directionality determined by the fluid composition. Incorporation into goethite during this process produces a Zn isotopic fractionation distinct from that caused by adsorption. Inorganic (e.g., sulfate, phosphate) and organic (e.g., oxalate) ligands modify trace metal repartitioning during Fe(II)-promoted recrystallization, and organic acids activate such processes under fully oxic conditions by complexing and solubilizing Fe(III). These studies demonstrate that trace metals have a surprisingly high potential for remobilization from iron oxide minerals under a range of chemical conditions. Such remobilization may increase the availability of bioessential metals but raises uncertainty about the stability of trace metals in iron oxide-bearing sedimentary rocks and their ability to record ancient ocean chemistry.

  3. Depuration effects on trace metals in Anomalocardia brasiliana (Gmelin, 1791)

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner-Kersanach, M. ); Lobo, S.E.; Silva, E.M. da )

    1994-06-01

    Bivalves have been regarded as suitable bioindicators of metal pollution in the marine and estuarine environments. However, the metal concentrations of the soft parts of individual bivalves can vary considerably depending on size variations, geographic and genetic differences, individual variability in metal uptake, ingestion of sediment particles and induction of metal-binding proteins. Metal-containing particulate matter in the gut can also be significant. These authors showed that if deputation is not carried out, then large variations in metal concentrations are more likely to occur. In the Todos os Santos Bay on the northeastern coast of Brazil, the cockle A. brasiliana is the most abundant bivalve and is well adapted to area conditions. An important source of food for many local communities, this species has been frequently used as an indicator for heavy metals pollution; however, no data have been published on metal concentrations of A. brasiliana of different size classes and on the effects of deputation on overall concentration. It is therefore important to determine the metal concentrations in A. brasiliana both from the point of view of how the concentrations relate to metal loading of the area. The effect of size upon metal concentration of shellfish has been examined by Boyden, who found that zinc in Mytilus edulis was greater in smaller individuals while cadmium was independent of size. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead in A. brasiliana collected from a site with a relatively low impact of heavy metal contamination, to examine metals in different size classes and to assess the effect of depuration on tissue concentration of the metals. These elements were selected due to their toxicity to marine organisms, when their excess as free metal may interact with cell structures and/or enzymes affecting metabolic activities. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Insight of EDX analysis and EFTEM: are spherocrystals located in Strombidae digestive gland implied in detoxification of trace metals?

    PubMed

    Volland, Jean-Marie; Lechaire, Jean-Pierre; Frebourg, Ghislaine; Aranda, Dalila Aldana; Ramdine, Gaëlle; Gros, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Digestive tubules of Strombidae are composed by three cell types: digestive cells, vacuolated cells, and crypt cells. The last one is characterized by the presence of intracellular granules identified as spherocrystals. Such structures are known to occur in basophilic cells of gastropod digestive gland, where they are supposed to be involved in the regulation of some minerals and in detoxification. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) were used to determine the elemental content of spherocrystals in two Strombidae, Strombus gigas and Strombus pugilis. In freshly collected individuals of both species, the following elements were detected: Ca, Fe, Mg, P, and Zn. Aluminum and Mn were also detected in S. gigas. Their presence in spherocrystals indicates that, in Strombidae, spherocrystals are involved in the regulation of minerals and essential trace metals. In order to answer the question "are spherocrystals involved in nonessential trace metals scavenging?," artificial cadmium and lead exposure by both waterborne and dietary pathways was applied to S. pugilis. No evidence of cadmium (Cd(NO(3))(2)) or lead (Pb(NO(3))(2)) provided by food was found in spherocrystals. Cadmium provided in water (Cd(NO(3))(2) and CdCl(2)) causes structural modifications of the digestive gland; however, this element was not trapped in spherocrystals. These results suggest that spherocrystals are not involved in detoxification of such nonessential trace metals.

  5. Turritella attenuata (Kasinathan): as biological indicator of marine pollution--a trace metal analytical study.

    PubMed

    Paul, V I; Radhakrishnan, M V; Hemalatha, S

    1999-11-01

    A study to monitor marine pollution with reference to trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu) on T. attenuata, commonly called as screw shell over a period of one year on the whole body and various organs, viz. digestive diverticula, foot, mantle and ovary was conducted from the sandy beach of Porto Novo Coast (Lat 11 degrees 29' N Long: 79 degrees 46' E) of Peninsular India using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). Higher concentration of all the four trace metals analysed were recorded in the digestive diverticula, whereas lower concentration of zinc and manganese were recorded in the ovary during the monsoon period. The higher level of trace metal concentration in the monsoon period may be due to the presence of these pollutants in large amounts in water. The accumulation of selected trace metals varies in different seasons according to the extent of pollution load in the marine environment.

  6. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes.

  7. Heavy Metal and Trace Metal Analysis in Soil by Sequential Extraction: A Review of Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amanda Jo; Weindorf, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of heavy and trace metal contamination in soil can be arduous, requiring the use of lengthy and intricate extraction procedures which may or may not give reliable results. Of the many procedures in publication, some are designed to operate within specific parameters while others are designed for more broad application. Most procedures have been modified since their inception which creates ambiguity as to which procedure is most acceptable in a given situation. For this study, the Tessier, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR), Short, Galán, and Geological Society of Canada (GCS) procedures were examined to clarify benefits and limitations of each. Modifications of the Tessier, BCR, and GCS procedures were also examined. The efficacy of these procedures is addressed by looking at the soils used in each procedure, the limitations, applications, and future of sequential extraction. PMID:20414344

  8. Modelling of trace metal uptake by roots taking into account complexation by exogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Marc, Custos; Christian, Moyne; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2010-05-01

    The context of this study is phytoextraction of soil trace metals such as Cd, Pb or Zn. Trace metal transfer from soil to plant depends on physical and chemical processes such as minerals alteration, transport, adsorption/desorption, reactions in solution and biological processes including the action of plant roots and of associated micro-flora. Complexation of metal ions by organic ligands is considered to play a role on the availability of trace metals for roots in particular in the event that synthetic ligands (EDTA, NTA, etc.) are added to the soil to increase the solubility of the contaminants. As this role is not clearly understood, we wanted to simulate it in order to quantify the effect of organic ligands on root uptake of trace metals and produce a tool which could help in optimizing the conditions of phytoextraction.We studied the effect of an aminocarboxilate ligand on the absorption of the metal ion by roots, both in hydroponic solution and in soil solution, for which we had to formalize the buffer power for the metal. We assumed that the hydrated metal ion is the only form which can be absorbed by the plants. Transport and reaction processes were modelled for a system made up of the metal M, a ligand L and the metal complex ML. The Tinker-Nye-Barber model was adapted to describe the transport of solutes M, L and ML in the soil and absorption of M by the roots. This allowed to represent the interactions between transport, chelating reactions, absorption of the solutes at the root surface, root growth with time, in order to simulate metal uptake by a whole root system.Several assumptions were tested such as i) absorption of the metal by an infinite sink and according to a Michaelis-Menten kinetics, solutes transport by diffusion with and without ii) mass flow and iii) soil buffer power for the ligand L. In hydroponic solution (without soil buffer power), ligands decreased the trace metal flux towards roots, as they reduced the concentration of hydrated

  9. Temporal variability in trace metal solubility in a paddy soil not reflected in uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunyu; Koopmans, Gerwin F; Bonten, Luc T C; Song, Jing; Luo, Yongming; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Comans, Rob N J

    2016-12-01

    Alternating flooding and drainage conditions have a strong influence on redox chemistry and the solubility of trace metals in paddy soils. However, current knowledge of how the effects of water management on trace metal solubility are linked to trace metal uptake by rice plants over time is still limited. Here, a field-contaminated paddy soil was subjected to two flooding and drainage cycles in a pot experiment with two rice plant cultivars, exhibiting either high or low Cd accumulation characteristics. Flooding led to a strong vertical gradient in the redox potential (Eh). The pH and Mn, Fe, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations increased with decreasing Eh and vice versa. During flooding, trace metal solubility decreased markedly, probably due to sulfide mineral precipitation. Despite its low solubility, the Cd content in rice grains exceeded the food quality standards for both cultivars. Trace metal contents in different rice plant tissues (roots, stem, and leaves) increased at a constant rate during the first flooding and drainage cycle but decreased after reaching a maximum during the second cycle. As such, the high temporal variability in trace metal solubility was not reflected in trace metal uptake by rice plants over time. This might be due to the presence of aerobic conditions and a consequent higher trace metal solubility near the root surface, even during flooding. Trace metal solubility in the rhizosphere should be considered when linking water management to trace metal uptake by rice over time.

  10. Distribution and behavior of trace metals in the sediment and porewater of a tropical coastal wetland.

    PubMed

    Man, Kwok-Wai; Zheng, Jinshu; Leung, Amy P K; Lam, Paul K S; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yen, Yu-Fong

    2004-07-05

    Vertical profiles (0-30 cm below surface) of four trace metals-Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn)-in the sediment and sediment porewater of an ecologically important intertidal mudflat in the Mai Po and Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site were thoroughly studied over a period of 10 months (from March 1999 to January 2000). Two surveys, one in summer and another in winter, involving a total of eight sampling stations were conducted to study the seasonal variation of the remobilization characteristics of these trace metals in the mudflat sediment. The range of depth averaged concentration of these trace metals in the mudflat sediment was: 0.3-0.8 microg/g (Cd); 9.8-91.0 microg/g (Cr); 7.3-69.1 microg/g (Pb); and 39.5-192.0 microg/g (Zn), while that in the sediment porewater was: 0.3-121.1 microg/l (Cd); 3.0-2704.1 microg/l (Cr); 2.6-105.6 microg/l (Pb); and 32.6-4238.3 microg/l (Zn). In general, levels of dissolved trace metals in the sediment porewater were much higher in the summer than in the winter while their concentrations in the sediment were more or less the same throughout the year. Enrichment of Cd, Pb and Zn in the sediment porewater of the upper oxic layer and that of Cr in the oxic-sub-oxic boundary was generally observed. Regions in the vicinity of the Mai Po mangroves and the river mouths of Shenzhen River and Shan Pui River were found to be hotspots of trace metal pollution. Benthic diffusive fluxes of trace metals from the mudflat sediment were also estimated. Of the four trace metals, cadmium showed the greatest tendency toward remobilization from the sediment phase to the more bio-available porewater phase.

  11. Spatial distribution and ecological risk assessment of trace metals in urban soils in Wuhan, central China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chutian; Yang, Yong; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Zhang, Ruoxi; Mei, Yang; Liao, Xiangsen; Liu, Yingying

    2015-09-01

    Surface soil samples from 467 sample sites were collected in urban area of Wuhan City in 2013, and total concentrations of five trace metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, and Cd) were measured. Multivariate and geostatistical analyses showed that concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu are higher along Yangtze River in the northern area of Wuhan, gradually decrease from city center to suburbs, and are mainly controlled by anthropogenic activities, while those of Cr and Cd are relatively spatially homogenous and mainly controlled by soil parent materials. Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd have generally higher concentrations in roadsides, industrial areas, and residential areas than in school areas, greenbelts, and agricultural areas. Areas with higher road and population densities and longer urban construction history usually have higher trace metal concentrations. According to estimated results of the potential ecological risk index and Nemero synthesis pollution index, almost the whole urban area of Wuhan is facing considerable potential ecological risk caused by soil trace metals. These results reveal obvious trends of trace metal pollution, and an important impact of anthropogenic activities on the accumulation of trace metals in soil in Wuhan. Vehicular emission, industrial activities, and household wastes may be the three main sources for trace metal accumulation. Increasing vegetation cover may reduce this threat. It should be pointed out that Cd, which is strongly accumulated in soil, could be the largest soil pollution factor in Wuhan. Effective measures should be taken as soon as possible to deal with Cd enrichment, and other trace metals in soil should also be reduced, so as to protect human health in this important large city.

  12. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern.

    PubMed

    Anal, Jasha Momo H

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration.

  13. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Anal, Jasha Momo H.

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  14. Risk assessment of dissolved trace metals in drinking water of Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zahida

    2011-06-01

    Health risk caused by the exposure to trace metals in water through different exposure pathways was investigated. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the determination of trace metals (nickel, copper, chromium, lead, cobalt, manganese and iron) in drinking water samples. The concentration of metals was compared with the world health organization (WHO) drinking water quality guideline values. Risk of metals on human health was evaluated using Hazard Quotient (HQ). Hazard quotients of all metals through oral ingestion and dermal absorption are found in the range of 1.11 × 10⁻² to 1.35 × 10⁻¹ and 8.52 × 10⁻⁵ to 9.75 × 10⁻², respectively. The results of the present study reflect the unlikely potential for adverse health effects to the inhabitants of Karachi due to the oral ingestion and dermal absorption of water containing these metals.

  15. [Essential trace elements distribution in food micro algae Spirulina platensis biomass fractions].

    PubMed

    Zaretskaia, E S; Gmoshinskiĭ, I V; Mazo, V K; Zorin, S N; Aleshko-Ozhevskiĭ, Iu P

    2004-01-01

    Distribution of some trace elements elements (zinc, selenium, iron, manganese, chromium) was characterized in enriched biomass of food micro algae Spirulina platensis by means of water-methanol fractionation. The majority of said trace elements was shown to be incorporated in intercellular hydrophylic fraction, e.g. could be connected to cellular proteins. This result enable the conclusion, that Spirulina is a suitable matrix for biotechnological incorporation of new food trace elements preparations.

  16. Remediation studies of trace metals in natural and treated water using surface modified biopolymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musyoka, Stephen Makali; Ngila, Jane Catherine; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    In this study, remediation results of trace metals in natural water and treated water using three functionalized nanofiber mats of cellulose and chitosan are reported. The nanofiber materials, packed in mini-columns, were employed for the remediation of five toxic trace metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni) from natural water samples. Trace metals in real water samples were undetectable as the concentrations were lower than the instrument’s detection limits of 0.27 × 10-3 (Cd) and 4.2 × 10-2 (Pb) μg mL-1, respectively. However, after percolation through the functionalised biosorbents in cartridges, detectability of the metal ions was enhanced. The starting volume of the natural water sample was 100 mL, which was passed through a column containing the nanofibers sorbent and the retained metals eluted with 5 mL of 2.0 M nitric acid. The eluate was analyzed for metals concentrations. An enrichment factor of 20 for the metals was realized as a result of the pre-concentration procedure applied to handle the determination of the metals at trace levels. The order of remediation of the studied metals using the nanofibers was as follows: chitosan/PAM-g-furan-2,5-dione < cellulose-g-furan-2,5-dione < cellulose-g-oxolane-2,5-dione. The modified biopolymer nanofibers were able to adsorb trace metals from the river water and treated water, thereby confirming their capability of water purification. These materials are proposed as useful tools and innovative approach for improving the quality of drinking for those consumers in small scale households.

  17. Trace Metal Acquisition by Marine Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton with Contrasting Trophic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria in the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages shape the marine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur cycles, yet they do so having adopted divergent ecological strategies. Currently, it is unknown whether these globally significant groups partition into specific niches with respect to micronutrients (e.g., trace metals) and how that may affect marine trace metal cycling. Here, we used comparative genomics to identify diverse iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc uptake capabilities in SAR11 and Roseobacter genomes and uncover surprising unevenness within and between lineages. The strongest predictors for the extent of the metal uptake gene content are the total number of transporters per genome, genome size, total metal transporters, and GC content, but numerous exceptions exist in both groups. Taken together, our results suggest that SAR11 have strongly minimized their trace metal uptake versatility, with high-affinity zinc uptake being a unique exception. The larger Roseobacter genomes have greater trace metal uptake versatility on average, but they also appear to have greater plasticity, resulting in phylogenetically similar genomes having largely different capabilities. Ultimately, phylogeny is predictive of the diversity and extent of 20 to 33% of all metal uptake systems, suggesting that specialization in metal utilization mostly occurred independently from overall lineage diversification in both SAR11 and Roseobacter. We interpret these results as reflecting relatively recent trace metal niche partitioning in both lineages, suggesting that concentrations and chemical forms of metals in the marine environment are important factors shaping the gene content of marine heterotrophic Alphaproteobacteria of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages. PMID:26729720

  18. Fundamental Studies of Underpotential Metal Deposition and Trace Analysis Using Solid Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    7AD-At30 099 FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF UNDERPOTENTIAL METAL DEPOSITION 1 BUFFALO DEPT OF CHEMISTRY S BRUCKENSTEIN 1982 UNCLASSIFIED AFOSR-TR-83-0557...T’S CAT A--CG t,-V5EP A . ITE(ad utilS TYPE OF REPCRT 0 0 .’EOEt’ Fundamental Studies of Underpotential Metal Final Deposition and Trace411111110...siectrocatalyls (by underpotential metal deposition ). A second objective was to develop new approaches to studying electrcxhemical reactions at solid

  19. Trace Metals Monitoring In Water: Ability of Dgt Measurements For The Estimation of Bioavailability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbin, R.; Bakkaus, E.; Tusseau-Vuillemin, M.-H.

    The European Water Framework Directive point out the need for characterisation and monitoring of river waters in order to review the impact of human activity. Concern- ing trace metals pollution, it is now well established that the analysis of total con- centrations does not provide a good estimation of aquatic ecosystems exposure. Trace metals bioavailability depends on their speciation, i.e. their distribution among differ- ent forms (oxidation state, complexation with various ligands). Among these species, only the reactive species on cells surface are regarded as bioavailable (hydrated metal- lic ions and kinetically labile metal complexes). In this context, trace metals bioavail- ability was theorised by the formulation of the SFree Ion Activity ModelT and the & cedil;SBiotic Ligand ModelT. However, analytical methods used for the estimation of the & cedil; labile fraction of trace metals generally require a delicate calibration and are not eas- ily usable for field studies. Recently, a new technique for the measurement of effective hazardous metal concentrations was developed: Diffusion Gradients in Thin Films (Davison and Zhang, 1994). It allows to avoid some of the difficulties related to the traditional techniques, especially for in situ studies and monitoring: several in situ studies with this technique gave encouraging results. But prior to propose this ap- proach for a large use in trace metals monitoring in rivers, we still have to validate the technique by laboratory studies, by model simulations and an enlarge experience in field studies. The aim our work was to compare the experimental measurement by the DGT method with the measurement of biological effects by bioassays (acute toxicity) and the evaluation of free ion by chemical modelling (MINEQL+). Bioavailability of trace metals (Cu, Cd) in water was studied in the presence of characterised ligands (inorganic ligands, citrate, EDTA, standard humic substances). The results obtained should allow to

  20. Grain size effect on trace metals distribution in sediments from two coastal areas of Chile

    SciTech Connect

    I. De Gregori, H.; H. Pinochet, C.; M. Arancibia, J.; A. Vidal, B.

    1996-07-01

    Marine environment contamination by trace metals has received increased global attention during recent years. Presently it is widely recognized that marine ecosystem can become contaminated by trace metals from numerous and diverse sources. However, anthropogenic activities, such as mining and industrial processing of ores and metals, still remain the principal cause of the increased amount of heavy metals which have been dumped into oceans. After entering the aquatic environment trace metals are distributed among water, biotic and sediment compartments, this latter serving as a final sink for metal pollutants. The magnitude of this scavenging action of sediments depends on the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediments. Concentrations of trace metals in sediments are usually of a greater magnitude order than concentrations in water. Sediments were considered as an important indicator for environmental pollution, they act as permanent or temporary traps for material spread into the environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the grain size effect on the copper, cadmium and zinc levels distribution in surface marine sediments along the Chilean Coast. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Mechanisms of enhanced mobilisation of trace metals by anionic surfactants in soil.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Soriano, Maria del Carmen; Degryse, Fien; Smolders, Erik

    2011-03-01

    Long-term applications of small concentrations of surfactants in soil via wastewater irrigation or pesticide application may enhance trace metal solubility. Mechanisms by which anionic surfactants (Aerosol 22, SDS and Biopower) affect trace metal solubility were assessed using batch, incubation and column experiments. In batch experiments on seven soils, the concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni and Zn in the dissolved fraction of soils increased up to 100-fold at the high application rates, but increased less than 1.5-fold below the critical micelle concentration. Dissolved metal concentrations were less than 20% affected by surfactants in long-term incubations (70 days) up to the largest dose of 200 mg C kg(-1) soil. Leaching soil columns with A22 (100-1000 mg C L(-1)) under unsaturated conditions increased trace metal concentrations in the leachates 2-4 fold over the control. Correlation analysis and speciation modelling showed that the increased solubility of metals upon surfactant application was more related to the solubilisation of soil organic matter from soil than to complexation of the metals with the surfactant. Organic matter from soil was solubilised in response to a decrease of solution Ca(2+) as a result of Ca-surfactant precipitation. At environmentally relevant concentrations, surfactant application is unlikely to have a significant effect on trace metal mobility.

  2. Comparative biomonitors of coastal trace metal contamination in tropical South America (N. Brazil).

    PubMed

    e Silva, Carlos Augusto R; Smith, Brian D; Rainbow, Philip S

    2006-05-01

    Samples of 5 bivalve molluscs (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Mytella charruana, Anomalocardia brasiliana, Anadara ovalis, Phacoides pectinata), 2 barnacles (Fistulobalanus citerosum, Balanus amphitrite) and leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora mangle were collected from up to 11 sites in two estuaries in Natal, Brazil--the comparatively contaminated Potengi estuary and the comparatively uncontaminated Curimataú estuary. Specimens were analysed for the trace metals Zn, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mn and Ni, and a comparative assessment made of the power of the different species as trace metal biomonitors. Four of the 5 bivalves (not P. pectinata) take up metals from solution and suspended material (food source), while P. pectinata as a lucinid with symbiotic chemosynthetic bacteria takes up metals from dissolved sources only. The organisms with the strongest net accumulation of particular metals showed the greatest discrimination between trace metal bioavailabilities between sites. Barnacles (F. citerosum) showed the best discrimination, but oysters (C. rhizophorae) are particularly recommended as biomonitors given their strong accumulation patterns for many trace metals, their large size and their local abundance.

  3. Oyster-based national mapping of trace metals pollution in the Chinese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang-Yuan; Ke, Cai-Huan; Zhu, Aijia; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-03-02

    To investigate the distribution and variability of trace metal pollution in the Chinese coastal waters, over 1000 adult oyster individuals were collected from 31 sites along the entire coastline, spanning from temperate to tropical regions (Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea), between August and September 2015. Concentrations of macroelements [sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P)] and trace elements [cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), silver (Ag), and titanium (Ti)] in these oysters were concurrently measured and analyzed. The results showed high Ti, Zn and Cu bioaccumulation in oysters from Guangdong (South China Sea) and Zhejiang (East China Sea). Oysters at Nanji Island (Wenzhou) and Daya Bay (Huizhou) accumulated significantly high concentrations of Ni and Cr. The elements in these oysters were several times higher than the national food safety limits of China. On the other hand, the present study found that normalization of metals by salinity (Na) and nutrient (P) could reflect more details of metal pollution in the oysters. Biomonitoring of metal pollution could benefit from incorporating the macroelement calibration instead of focusing only on the total metal concentrations. Overall, simultaneous measurement of macroelements and trace metals coupled with non-linear analysis provide a new perspective for revealing the underlying mechanism of trace metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation in marine organisms.

  4. Chemical Speciation and Health Risk Assessment of Fine Particulate Bound Trace Metals Emitted from Ota Industrial Estate, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anake, Winifred U.; Ana, Godson R. E. E.; Williams, Akan B.; Fred-Ahmadu, Omowunmi H.; Benson, Nsikak U.

    2017-05-01

    In this study carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk due to exposure to PM2.5-bound trace metals from an industrial area in Southwestern Nigeria was estimated. A four-step chemical sequential extraction procedure was employed for the chemical extraction of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn). Samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results reveal Cr and Cu as the most dominant exchangeable fraction metals, indicating possibility of their being readily soluble once PM2.5 is inhaled. Cd and Cr record the highest bioavailability index of 0.7. The cumulative lifetime cancer risks due to inhalation exposure for adults (4.25×10-2), children 1-6 years old (4.87×10-3), and children 6-18 years old (1.46×10-2) were found above Environmental Protection Agency’s acceptable range of 1×10-6 to 1×10-4. The hazard index values for all studied trace metals suggest significant potential for non-carcinogenic health risks to adults and children. The choice of chemical speciation as an essential tool in facilitating a better predictive insight on metal bioavailability and toxicity for immediate remediation action has been highlighted.

  5. Insights into Carbonate Formation through the Incorporation of Trace Metals into Ooids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbank, V. E.; Robinson, L. F.; Parkinson, I. J.; Elliott, T.

    2014-12-01

    Trace metal ratios are widely used as paleoclimate proxies for past ocean conditions. In particular Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in biogenic carbonates have been used as paleothermometers. Of course the use of these trace metal ratios as reliable climate proxies does not come without complications. As well as biologically mediated "vital effects", there have also been other secondary controls on trace metal incorporation reported, including salinity, carbonate ion concentration and growth rate. Within this study a range of trace metal ratios and their isotopes have been measured for modern ooid samples forming under a range of environmental conditions. Since ooids are thought to form through inorganic precipitation (although microbial mediation may play a role), the "vital effects" seen in biogenic carbonates should be minimised or absent. Therefore, ooids should be expected to incorporate trace metals similarly to carbonate precipitated in experimental studies. Through studying modern ooids we can test this hypothesis, as well as looking at the factors that affect the incorporation of trace metals into calcium carbonates without the control of typical "vital effects".The sample set includes both pure aragonite and pure calcite ooids, as well as samples with intermediate mineralogy as determined by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The distribution coefficients for purely aragonite or calcite ooids are offset from the reported inorganic precipitate values, with DSr being larger, while DMg has been found to be lower. The incorporation of Mg and Sr across the sample set is inversely correlated and does not seem to be explained by mineralogy alone. Here we explore alternative secondary factors contributing to the incorporation of these trace elements into oolitic carbonate. This will be accomplished by utilising stable Sr isotope fractionation during incorporation and using kinetic models and distribution coefficients to investigate the controls on Mg and Sr partitioning into

  6. Preservation of NOM-metal complexes in a modern hyperalkaline stalagmite: Implications for speleothem trace element geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Adam; Fairchild, Ian J.; Müller, Wolfgang; Dominguez-Villar, David

    2014-03-01

    We report the first quantitative study of the capture of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and NOM-complexed trace metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) in speleothems. This study combines published NOM-metal dripwater speciation measurements with high-resolution laser ablation ICPMS (LA-ICPMS) and sub-annual stable isotope ratio (δ18O and δ13C), fluorescence and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses of a fast-growing hyperalkaline stalagmite (pH ˜11) from Poole’s Cavern, Derbyshire UK, which formed between 1997 and 2008 AD. We suggest that the findings reported here elucidate trace element variations arising from colloidal transport and calcite precipitation rate changes observed in multiple, natural speleothems deposited at ca. pH 7-8. We find that NOM-metal(aq) complexes on the boundary between colloidal and dissolved (˜1 nm diameter) show an annual cyclicity which is inversely correlated with the alkaline earth metals and is explained by calcite precipitation rate changes (as recorded by kinetically-fractionated stable isotopes). This relates to the strength of the NOM-metal complexation reaction, resulting in very strongly bound metals (Co in this system) essentially recording NOM co-precipitation (ternary complexation). More specifically, empirical partition coefficient (Kd) values between surface-reactive metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) [expressed as ratio of trace element to Ca ratios in calcite and in solution] arise from variations in the ‘free’ fraction of total metal in aqueous solution (fm). Hence, differences in the preservation of each metal in calcite can be explained quantitatively by their complexation behaviour with aqueous NOM. Differences between inorganic Kd values and field measurements for metal partitioning into calcite occur where [free metal] ≪ [total metal] due to complexation reactions between metals and organic ligands (and potentially inorganic colloids). It follows that where fm ≈ 0, apparent inorganic Kd app values are also ≈0, but the

  7. Trace metal accumulation in soil and their phytoavailability as affected by greenhouse types in north China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Biao; Mao, Mingcui; Yao, Lipeng; Hickethier, Martina; Hu, Wenyou

    2015-05-01

    Long-term heavy organic fertilizer application has linked greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) with trace metal contamination in north China. Given that trace metals release from fertilizers and their availability may be affected by discrepant environmental conditions, especially temperature under different greenhouses, this study investigated Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn accumulation and contamination extent in soil as well as their phytoavailability under two major greenhouses in Tongshan, north China, namely solar greenhouse (SG) and round-arched plastic greenhouse (RAPG), to evaluate their presumed difference. The results showed significant Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn accumulation in GVP soil by comparing with those in open-field soil, but their accumulation extent and rates were generally greater in SG than those in RAPG. This may be related to more release of trace metals to soil due to the acceleration of decomposition and humification process of organic fertilizers under higher soil temperature in SG relative to that in RAPG. Overall, soil in both greenhouses was generally less polluted or moderately polluted by the study metals. Similarly, decreased soil pH and elevated soil available metals in SG caused higher trace metals in leaf vegetables in SG than those in RAPG, although there was no obvious risk via vegetable consumption under both greenhouses. Lower soil pH may be predominantly ascribed to more intensive farming practices in SG while elevated soil available metals may be attributed to more release of dissolved organic matter-metal complexes from soil under higher temperature in SG. The data provided in this study may assist in developing reasonable and sustainable fertilization strategies to abate trace metal contamination in both greenhouses.

  8. Major Limitations in Using Element Concentrations in Hair as Biomarkers of Exposure to Toxic and Essential Trace Elements in Children.

    PubMed

    Skröder, Helena; Kippler, Maria; Nermell, Barbro; Tofail, Fahmida; Levi, Michael; Rahman, Syed Moshfiqur; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2017-06-29

    Hair is a commonly used exposure biomarker for metals and other trace elements, but concern has been raised regarding its appropriateness for assessing the internal dose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate children's hair as biomarker of internal dose for toxic (As, Mn, Cd, Pb) and essential elements (Mg, Ca, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Mo). In 207 children (9-10 years of age), originating from a population-based cohort in rural Bangladesh, we measured concentrations of the selected elements in hair ( closest to the scalp) using ICP-MS. We compared these with previously measured concentrations in erythrocytes, urine, and water. For a subset of children (), we analyzed four consecutive pieces of hair. There were strong associations between hair As and the other biomarkers (erythrocytes: rs=0.73, p<0.001; urine: rS=0.66, p<0.001); and water (rs=0.60, p<0.001); and there were significant correlations between Se in hair and erythrocytes (overall rs=0.38, p<0.001), and urine (rs=0.29, p<0.001). Hair Co and Mo showed weak correlations with concentrations in erythrocytes. Hair Mn was not associated with Mn in erythrocytes, urine, or water, and the geometric mean concentration increased almost five times from the 2 cm closest to the head to the 7th–8th cm (p<0.001). Also Mg, Ca, Co, Cd, and Pb increased from the scalp outward (>50% higher in 7th–8th cm compared with 1st–2nd cm, p<0.001). Hair was found to be a useful exposure biomarker of absorbed As and Se only. Of all measured elements, hair Mn seemed the least reflective of internal dose. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1239.

  9. Effects of exposure to multiple trace metals on biochemical, histological and ultrastructural features of gills of a freshwater fish, Channa punctata Bloch.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suwarna; Parvez, Suhel; Ansari, Rizwan Ahamd; Ali, Mehboob; Kaur, Manpreet; Hayat, Faisal; Ahmad, Firoz; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2008-08-11

    The trace metals are frequently encountered as mixtures of essential and non-essential elements. Therefore, evaluation of their toxic effects individually does not offer a realistic estimate of their impact on biological processes. We studied effects of a mixture of four essential and toxic metals (Cu, Cd, Fe and Ni) on biochemical and morphological characteristics of the gills of a biomarker freshwater fish Channa punctata (Bloch) using environmentally relevant concentrations. Fish were exposed to metal mixture through tank water for 7, 15 and 30 days. Biochemical studies as well as light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed significant metal exposure-induced alterations in gills. Besides ultastructural changes, activities of antioxidant enzymes such catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly altered in the gills of exposed fish. The reduced glutathione (GSH) was significantly (p<0.001) decreased, while lipid peroxidation (LPO) was significantly (p<0.001) increased. The main alterations in general morphology of fish gills included spiking and fusion of secondary lamellae, formation of club-shaped filaments, and vacuolization and necrosis of filament epithelium in the interlamellar regions. SEM studies showed gradual increase of the density and apical surface area of the chloride cells and transformation of the surface structure of the pavement cells. The results of this study indicate adaptive as well a toxic responses in fish gills exposed to mixture of trace metals. Low concentrations of trace metal appear to compromise the antioxidant defense of gills. Lesions in the gill morphology caused by the effect of low concentrations of trace metals could lead to functional alterations and interference with fundamental processes such as maintenance of osmoregulation, gas exchange and xenobiotic metabolism in the exposed fish populations.

  10. Interaction Between Trace Metals, Sodium and Sorbents in Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, O.L.; Davis, S.

    1997-10-17

    The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

  11. Trophic transfer of trace metals: Subcellular compartmentalization in a polychaete and assimilation by a decapod crustacean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical form of accumulated trace metal in prey is important in controlling the bioavailataility of dietary metal to a predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of radiolabelled Ag, Cd and Zn from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians. We used 2 populations of worms with different proportions of accumulated metals in different subcellular fractions as prey, and loaded the worms with radiolabelled metals either from sediment or from solution. Accumulated radiolabelled metals were fractionated into 5 components : metal-rich granules (MRG), cellular debris, organelles, metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP), and other (heat-sensitive) proteins (HSP). Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of the metals by P. varians were measured from the 4 categories of prey (i.e. 2 populations, radiolabelled from sediment or solution). There were significant differences for each metal between the AEs from the different prey categories, confirming that origin of prey and route of uptake of accumulated trace metal will cause intraspecific differences in subsequent metal assimilation. Correlations were sought between AEs and selected fractions or combinations of fractions of metals in the prey-MRG, Trophically Available Metal (TAM = MTLP + HSP + organelles) and total protein (MTLP + HSP). TAM explained 28% of the variance in AEs for Ag, but no consistent relationships emerged between AEs and TAM or total protein when the metals were considered separately. AEs did, however, show significant positive regressions with both TAM and total protein when the 3 metals were considered together, explaining only about 21 % of the variance in each case. A significant negative relationship was observed between MRG and AE for all metals combined. The predator (P. varians) can assimilate dietary metal from a range of the fractions binding metals in the prey (N. diversicolor), with different assimilation efficiencies summated across these

  12. Trace metal pollution and carbon and nitrogen isotope tracing through the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Conghui; Wei, Qi; Ma, Lixia; Li, Li; Wu, Guanghong; Pan, Ling

    2017-02-15

    A tide gate was built in 2010 to prevent seawater from moving upstream into the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China. We analysed the concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb, TOC, TN, δ(13)C and δ(15)N and studied their variations in the surface layer and vertical profiles of sediment cores collected from the Yongdingxin River estuary. Contamination factors and geo-accumulation indices were calculated for each metal, which revealed high levels of contamination for Hg and Cd in the sediments, likely from anthropogenic sources. δ(13)C and δ(15)N were used as natural tracers to determine the sources of TOC and TN. The results revealed that sewage was the main source of TOC, while TN may have more than one source in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Sewage dominated trace metal pollution in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Our results provide a baseline for trace metal contamination in an estuary facing a large water project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trace metals variability in sediments of the Adour estuary, southwestherm france.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareille, G.; Point, D.; Amouroux, D.; Stoichev, T.; Donard, O.

    2003-04-01

    Once release into the environment, trace metals may interact with suspended matter, and subsequently be removed from the water column by deposition. Estuarine environments are important sink of fine-grained suspended sediments in relation to the complex chemical and physical processes associated with the mixing zone between fresh and salts waters. In such area, the removal of trace metals may be only temporary, however, as metals become subject to a variety of physical, chemical and biological processes following deposition and burial. The spatial and temporal distribution of trace metals Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni and Cd has been studied in sediments of the Adour estuary during two sampling periods, October 2000 and June 2001. This estuary is flowing into the Gulf of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) with an average mean flow of 255 m^3 s-1. The Adour estuary has a catchment area of about 16.000 km^2 and is characterized by urban and industrial activities located both along its tributary Adour and Gaves and at its mouth. Trace metal data were obtained by complete sample digestion using a microwave digestion and were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Perkin-Elmer/Sciex Elan 6000). In order to compare samples from different places and periods, sediment trace metal content were normalized according to grain size content. Higher metal loads were observed in sediments collected in October 2000 compared to June 2001, especially for Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb but not for Ni. The magnitude of the concentrations rise ranged from 80 % to 100 % for most of the metals and they were related to different river flow regimes. Long period (at least 3 months) of low river flow (less than 100 m^3 s-1) were prevailing before October sampling, although June sampling followed high river flow conditions (average 400 m^3 s-1 ranging from 200 to 800). This leads to the conclusion that probably both natural and man-induced inputs and process account for the observed rise in sediment trace metals

  14. Use of negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the trace analysis of metals.

    PubMed Central

    Risby, T H

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis of various volatile and thermally stable derivatives of metals ions has permitted the use of conventional mass spectrometry for trace metal analysis. This paper reviews the development of the field using electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectrometry. This latter methodology produces simple mass spectra that enable complex mixtures to be analyzed. In addition the use of negative ion detection has produced selective ionization since many metal chelates contain heteroatoms which are electronegative. A discussion of the use of this general methodology for trace metal analysis is included, together with its applications to the analysis of ruthenium in automobile exhaust emissions and iron in red blood cells from laboratory rats. The future use of this methodology is expected to be for the monitoring of stable metal isotopes. This procedure could be used to follow these tracers in clinical and environmental studies and it is expected that their use will replace radioactive isotopes in most studies. PMID:7000514

  15. Accumulation of trace metals in two commercially important shrimp species from Camamu Bay, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Migues, Vitor Hugo; de Almeida Bezerra, Marcos; de Francisco, Ana Karina; Guerrazzi, Maria Cecília; de Mello Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes

    2013-09-01

    Camamu Bay is the second largest estuary in Bahia state, northeastern Brazil, being recognized by its high diversity and economical relevance for fisheries and tourism. To evaluate the impacts of environmental disturbances in Camamu Bay, trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pb) were quantified in two widespread and commercially exploited shrimp species (Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Xiphopenaeus kroyeri). High concentrations of all metals but Pb were observed in both species by ICPOES. The concentration values for Cr, Co, and Mn were invariably higher than the accepted limits for human consumption in Brazil. Inter and intraspecific variation in metal levels might be related to biological particularities and body size. The accentuated contamination by trace metals in both species validated them as efficient bioindicators of environmental quality. Thus, effective planning, monitoring and regulatory policies should be adopted to inspect and remediate the metal contamination in natural resources from Camamu Bay.

  16. Trace Metals Affect Early Maternal Transfer of Immune Components in the Feral Pigeon.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Haussy, C; Frantz, A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal early transfers of immune components influence eggs' hatching probability and nestlings' survival. They depend on females' own immunity and, because they are costly, on their physiological state. Therefore, trace metals, whether toxic and immunosuppressive (e.g., lead, cadmium, etc.) or necessary and immunostimulant (e.g., zinc, copper, iron, etc.), are likely to affect the amount of immune components transferred into the eggs. It may also vary with plumage eumelanin level, which is known to be linked to immunity, to transfer of antibodies, and to metal detoxification. In feral pigeons (Columba livia) injected with an antigen and experimentally exposed to lead and/or zinc (two highly abundant trace metals in urban areas), we measured specific antibody transfer and concentrations of two antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme and ovotransferrin) in eggs. As expected, lead had negative effects on specific antibody transfer, while zinc positively affected lysozyme egg concentrations. Moreover, eggs from lead-exposed females exhibited higher ovotransferrin concentrations; because it binds metal ions, ovotransferrin may enable egg detoxification and embryo protection. Finally, eggs' lysozyme concentrations increased with plumage darkness of females not exposed to zinc, while the relation was opposite among zinc-exposed females, suggesting that benefits and costs of plumage melanism depend on trace metal environmental levels. Overall, our study underlines the potential ecotoxicological effects of trace metals on maternal transfers of immune components and the role of plumage melanism in modulating these effects.

  17. A trace metal survey of non-occupationally exposed Gauteng residents.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kerry; Kielkowski, Danuta; Theodoru, Penny; Naik, Ina

    2011-10-01

    Specific reference values for background levels of body burden of trace metals are not available for South Africa. Currently, laboratories measuring trace metal levels in workers use internationaly established values for comparison. A preliminary cross-sectional survey of 107 non-occupationally exposed volunteers of both genders and all races provided blood and urine samples. The samples were collected with consideration for possible routes of contamination. Seven metals were measured in blood and ten in urine. Reference ranges for a Gauteng population were then calculated using the central 95% of data to provide lower and upper limits, which were then compared to international limits. The trace metal levels described had both lower and higher reference ranges in blood and urine compared to international studies. This reflects the differences in the environments. Statistically significant differences in metal levels were observed by gender. The differences in detected trace metal levels in our sample as compared to other published data demonstrate the need for the establishment of local reference values for laboratories. The establishment of local 95% reference ranges would also allow South Africa to determine its exposure levels compared to those internationally. This would assist with establishing pollution control priorities.

  18. Trace metal uptake by garden herbs and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Shariatpanahi, M; Anderson, A C; Mather, F

    1986-12-01

    In many regions of Iran, crops are irrigated with municipal and industrial wastewater that contain a variety of metals. The purpose of this study was to simulate the level of metals that may be presented to plants over a growing season in a controlled laboratory setting. Cadmium, lead, arsenic, chromium, mercury, nickel, copper, zinc, and selenium were applied to plants at the high rate of 200 g metal/ha/wk. The following plants were examined for metal accumulation and effects on yield: garden cress (Lipidium sativum), leek (Allium porrum L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), mint (Mentha arvensis L.), onion (Allium capa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and tarragon (Artemisia draculus L.). All plants showed significant uptake of all metals when compared to control (p=0.05), and growth was significantly reduced (p=0.05). Cadmium and chromium levels of 85±7.4 and 47.6±8.9 μg/g); selenium levels were highest in tarragon (16.5±5.8 μg/g). Zinc levels were similar (p=0.05) in all species tested, as were mercury and lead. The remaining metals (nickel and copper) showed significant differences in uptake, depending on plant species.

  19. Mobility of nutrients and trace metals during weathering in the late Archean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jihua; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    The evolution of the geosphere and biosphere depends on the availability of bio-essential nutrients and trace metals. Consequently, the chemical and isotopic variability of trace elements in the sedimentary record have been widely used to infer the existence of early life and fluctuations in the near-surface environment on the early Earth, particularly fluctuations in the redox state of the atmosphere. In this study, we applied late Archean weathering models (Hao et al., 2017), developed to estimate the behavior of major elements and the composition of late Archean world average river water, to explore the behavior of nutrient and trace metals and their potential for riverine transport. We focused on P, Mn, Cr, and Cu during the weathering of olivine basalt. In our standard late Archean weathering model (pCO2,g = 10-1.5 bars, pH2,g = 10-5.0 bars), crustal apatite was totally dissolved by the acidic rainwater during weathering. Our model quantitatively links the pCO2,g of the atmosphere to phosphate levels transported by rivers. The development of late Archean river water (pH = 6.4) resulted in riverine phosphate of at least 1.7 μmolar, much higher than at the present-day. At the end of the early Proterozoic snowball Earth event when pCO2,g could be 0.01-0.10 bars, river water may have transported up to 70 μmolar phosphate, depending on the availability of apatite, thereby stimulating high levels of oxygenic photosynthesis in the marine environment. Crustal levels of Mn in olivine dissolved completely during weathering, except at large extents of weathering where Mn was stored as a component of a secondary carbonate mineral. The corresponding Mn content of river water, about 1.2 μmolar, is higher than in modern river water. Whiffs of 10-5 mole O2 gas or HNO3 kg-1 H2O resulted in the formation of pyrolusite (MnO2) and abundant hematite and simultaneous dramatic decreases in the concentration of Mn(II) in the river water. Chromite dissolution resulted in negligible

  20. Trends of labile trace metals in tropical urban water under highly contrasted weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, J D; Le Coustumer, P; Denis, A; Abuyan, R; Huneau, F; Motelica-Heino, M; Peyraube, N; Celle-Jeanton, H; Perez, T R; Espaldon, M V O

    2015-09-01

    The spatio-temporal trend of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a tropical urban estuary under the influence of monsoon was determined using diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) in situ samplers. Three different climatic periods were observed: period 1, dry with dredging activity; period 2, intermediate meaning from dry to wet event; and period 3, wet having continuous rainfall. Conforming to monsoon regimes, these periods correspond to the following: transition from winter to summer, winter, and summer monsoons, respectively. The distinction of each period is defined by their specific hydrological and physico-chemical conditions. Substantial concentrations of the trace metals were detected. The distribution and trend of the trace metals under the challenge of a tropical climate were able to follow using DGT as a sensitive in situ sampler. In order to identify the differences among periods, statistical analyses were performed. This allowed discriminating period 2 (oxic water) as significantly different compared to other periods. The spatio-temporal analysis was then applied in order to distinguish the trend of the trace metals. Results showed that the trend of trace metals can be described according to their response to (i) seasonal variations (Cd and Cr), (ii) spatio-temporal conditions (Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb), and (iii) neither (i) nor (ii) meaning exhibiting no response or having constant change (Zn). The correlation of the trace metals and the physico-chemical parameters reveals that Cd, Co, Cu, and Cr are proportional to the dissolved oxygen (DO), Cd and Ni are correlated pH, and Zn lightly influenced by salinity.

  1. Micromorphology and Trace Metal Content as Indicators of Bleaching in Skeletons of Modern and Holocene Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, S. A.

    2005-05-01

    Morphology and trace metal content of scleractinian corals have previously been used as proxies for past environmental conditions, but no proxy for the health of ancient corals currently exists. Skeletal material associated with bleached and non-bleached tissue from Recent Porites divaricata and Montastrea franksii were analyzed with SEM and ICPAES. Both morphology and trace metal content differed between skeletal material associated with bleached and non-bleached tissue in P. divaricata. SEM analysis showed skeletal corallites associated with unbleached tissue had well-defined septal and columellar denticles. Skeletal corallites associated with bleached tissue had weakly-defined denticles, many appearing rudimentary. SEM analysis was inconclusive for morphological differences between samples known to have been bleached and non-bleached in M. franksii. Significantly higher trace metal/Ca ratios were found with ICPAES for Ag, As, Cd, and Co between skeletal material associated with bleached than with non-bleached tissue in P. divaricata, and Ag, As, P, and Zn between skeletal material associated with bleached than with non-bleached tissue in M. franksii. The presence of these differences suggested the processes of skeletogenesis and the uptake and deposition of trace metals in the scleractinian skeleton were affected by bleaching. Mid-Holocene (~5,000 ybp) Porites sp. were tested to determine if such indicators of bleaching might be observed in the fossil record. Skeletal morphology and trace metal content differ between Recent bleached and non-bleached Porites divaricata from Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, trace metal content differs between bleached and non-bleached Montastrea franksii from Looe Key, FL. It is possible that these indicators allow the recognition of coral bleaching in the fossil record

  2. Essential, trace and toxic element concentrations in the liver of the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish (Mola mola).

    PubMed

    Perrault, Justin R; Buchweitz, John P; Lehner, Andreas F

    2014-02-15

    No studies document essential (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium), trace (barium, boron, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, zinc) or toxic element (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, thallium) concentrations in any members of the family Molidae, including the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish (Mola mola). Here, we analyzed 21 elements in the liver of one M. mola. These values were compared to liver concentrations in multiple species with spatial and dietary overlap. Concentrations of calcium (3339 ppm wet weight) and iron (2311 ppm wet weight) were extremely elevated in comparison to a number of other fish species, indicating that calcium and/or iron toxicity may have occurred in this animal. Concentrations of toxic elements were generally low, with the exception of cadmium (3.5 ppm). This study represents the first report of essential, trace and toxic elements in this species.

  3. Trace metals in gills of fish from the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yakoob, S.; Bahloul, M. ); Bou-Olayan, A.H.

    1994-11-01

    Complexation of metals by coordinate linkages with appropriate organic molecules in biological tissues is an important process involved in metal accumulation by aquatic organisms. Fish respiratory systems differ from all other systems because damage to gills has immediate impacts on the rest of the fish's body. Veer et al. observed significant correlation between gill-metal concentration and whole-body weight. More nickel is accumulated in gill tissue of the catfish (Clarias batrachus) than in the liver or intestine. More cadmium is accumulated in gill tissue of the fish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and Channa punctatus (Bloch) than in the liver or kidney. When exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper, gills of the freshwater fish Labeo rohita (Hamilton) showed the highest degree of copper accumulation. Petroleum and petrochemical industry wastes contribute significantly to metal enrichment of the Arabian Gulf marine environment. Because accumulation of metal ions is significant in gills, levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb were investigated in gills of fish from potentially impacted areas along the western side of the Arabian Gulf after the 1991 oil-spill. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  5. Requirements for modeling trace metal partitioning in oxidized estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Davis, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The fate of particulate-bound metals is of particular importance in estuaries because major biological energy flows involve consumption of detrital particles. The biological impact of particulate-bound metals is strongly influenced by the partitioning of metals among sediment components at the oxidized sediment-water interface. Adequate methods for directly measuring this partitioning are not available, thus a modeling approach may be most useful. Important requirements for such a model include: (1) determinations of metal binding intensities which are comparable among sediment components important in oxidized sediments; (2) comparable determinations of the binding capacities of the several forms of each component; (3) operational determinations of the abundance in natural sediments of components of defined binding capacity; (4) assessments of the influence of particle coatings and multicomponent aggregation on the available binding capacity of each substrate; (5) consideration of the effect of Ca and Mg competition on binding to different components; and (6) determinations of the kinetics of metal redistribution among components in oxidized sediments. ?? 1983.

  6. Trace metals in mussels from mariculture zones, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chiu, S T; Lam, F S; Tze, W L; Chau, C W; Ye, D Y

    2000-07-01

    In 1997, concentrations of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) were analysed in green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) from three mariculture zones located in the north-east (Kat O), south (Lo Tik Wan) and to the west (Ma Wan) of Hong Kong. Spatial differences in the concentration of metals were found, chromium and copper were higher at Ma Wan and Lo Tik Wan compared to Kat O in the north-east. In contrast, the highest levels of lead (mean = 4.37 microg/g dry wt) were recorded at Kat O. There were no differences in the level of nickel between the study sites. A comparison of the metal concentrations in mussels with the results of a previous study seven years before, in 1990, showed a twofold increase in the mean levels of cadmium for all three sites. However, levels of the other metals in 1997 were lower by 12-32% for chromium, 32-39% for copper and 24-25% for nickel. The greatest reductions were recorded for lead: Kat O (39%), Ma Wan (51%) and Lo Tik Wan (75%). This may be related to the introduction of lead-free petrol in 1991. Despite the apparent reduction in some heavy metal bioaccumulation between 1990 and 1997, from a public health risk perspective, the data suggest a continued need for monitoring of heavy metals in mussels from mariculture zones.

  7. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  8. Reconnaissance for trace metals in bed sediment, Wright Patman Lake, near Texarkana, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Many contaminants can be introduced into the environment by urban and industrial activities. The drainage area of Wright Patman Lake is influenced by these activities. Among the contaminants associated with urban and industrial activities are trace metals such as arsenic, lead, mercury, and zinc. These contaminants are relatively insoluble in water and commonly are found in stream, lake, and reservoir bottom sediment, especially the clays and silts within the sediment.Wright Patman Lake serves as the major potable water supply for the city of Texarkana and surrounding communities. Texarkana, located in the northeastern corner of Texas and the southwestern corner of Arkansas, had a population of about 56,000 in 1998, which reflects an increase of about 3.4 percent from the 1990 census (Ramos, 1999). Texarkana Water Utilities, which manages the water-treatment facilities for Texarkana, proposes to dredge the lake bed near the water intake in the Elliot Creek arm of Wright Patman Lake. It is possible that arsenic, lead, mercury, and other trace metals might be released into the water if the bed sediment is disturbed. Bed sediment in the Elliot Creek arm of the lake, in particular, could contain trace metals because of its proximity to Red River Army Depot and because industrial land use is prevalent in the headwaters of Elliot Creek.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Reconnaissance for Trace Metals in Bed Sediment, Wright Patman Lake, Near Texarkana, Texas In cooperation with the Texarkana Water Utilities conducted a reconnaissance of Wright Patman Lake to collect bed-sediment samples for analysis of trace metals. This report presents trace metal concentrations in bed-sediment samples collected at six sites along the Elliot Creek arm of the lake, one site each in two adjacent arms, and one site near the dam on June 16, 1999 (fig. 1). One bed-sediment sample was collected at each of the nine sites, and one sediment core was collected at each of two

  9. Aquatic insects as biomonitors of trace metal contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Lynch, T.R. ); Jacobi, G.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of 13 heavy metals in water, stream sediments, and a variety of aquatic insects in the Red River above and below the Molycorp mine and mill is reported. The mine-mill complex is located between the towns of Red River and Questa and is connected by a pipeline to a tailings disposal pond located about 8 km downstream of Questa. The pipeline is adjacent the Red River. Numerous breaks have occurred in the pipeline in the past resulting in processed milled tailings being discharged directly into the river. Atomic absorption was used for metal analysis. Experimental results are presented.

  10. Seasonal variation and sources of dissolved trace metals in Maó Harbour, Minorca Island.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Soto, Marly C; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Sánchez-Quiles, David; Rodellas, Valentí; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Basterretxea, Gotzon

    2016-09-15

    The environmental conditions of semi-enclosed coastal water-bodies are directly related to the catchment, human activities, and oceanographic setting in which they are located. As a result of low tidal forcing, and generally weak currents, waters in Mediterranean harbours are poorly renewed, leading to quality deterioration. Here, we characterise the seasonal variation of trace metals (i.e. Co, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surface waters, and trace metal content in sediments from Maó Harbour, a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Our results show that most of the dissolved trace metals in the waters of Maó Harbour exhibit a marked inner-outer concentration gradient, suggesting a permanent input into the inner part of the harbour. In general, metal concentrations in the waters of Maó Harbour are higher than those in offshore waters. Concentration of Cu (21±8nM), Fe (9.2±3.2nM) and Pb (1.3±0.4nM) are particularly high when compared with other coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The concentration of some metals such as Cu and Zn increases during summertime, when the human population and boat traffic increase during the tourism season, and when resuspension from the metal enriched sediments is higher. The evaluation of the metal sources in the harbour reveals that, compared with other putative sources such as runoff, aerosol deposition and fresh groundwater discharges, contaminated sediments are the main source of the metals found in the water column, most likely through vessel-driven resuspension events. This study contributes to the understanding of the processes that control the occurrence and distribution of trace metals in Maó Harbour, thus aiding in the effective management of the harbour, and enhancing the overall quality of the seawater ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Trace metal storage in recent floodplain sediments along the Dill River, central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Charles W.

    2015-04-01

    Trace metals are stored in near-channel floodplain sediments along many rivers in industrial and mined watersheds of western European countries such as Germany. In this paper, I document the distribution of Cu, Pb, and Zn in 13 cores collected from near-channel floodplain sediments along a 25-km reach of the Dill River in central Germany. Mean concentrations of the three trace metals exceed background concentrations, an indication of anthropogenic enrichment along the study reach; many individual samples have concentrations several times the background levels and exceed standards for trace metals contained in the German Federal Soil Protection Act. Metal concentrations generally peak at depths of 0.2 to 0.7 m below the floodplain surface and are assumed to represent the period of maximum metal releases to the environment through upstream industrial activity, ore mining, or both. In eight of the cores, radiocarbon ages obtained below the depth of peak metal concentrations provide maximum dates for sediment accumulation of between 90 and 1700 years ago, with most ages clustering in the period of 90 to 300 years ago. The ages and depth to peak metal concentrations indicate 0.6 to 1.0 m of floodplain sedimentation over the last 150 to 300 years (0.3-0.4 cm y- 1), which exceed sedimentation amounts and rates found in surrounding watersheds. Surface sediments contain lower metal concentrations, suggesting deposition recently of cleaner sediments. Trace metals stored along the Dill River serve as a reminder that stores of contaminants exist in geomorphically sensitive locations of the fluvial system. These legacy sediments bear the chemical imprint of industrial or mining activities that no longer occur in the watershed.

  12. Associations between IVF outcomes and essential trace elements measured in follicular fluid and urine: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Mary E; Bloom, Michael S; Parsons, Patrick J; Steuerwald, Amy J; Kruger, Pamela; Fujimoto, Victor Y

    2017-02-01

    A hypothesis-generating pilot study exploring associations between essential trace elements measured in follicular fluid (FF) and urine and in vitro fertilization (IVF) endpoints. We recruited 58 women undergoing IVF between 2007 and 2008, and measured cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc in FF (n = 46) and urine (n = 45) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We used multivariable regression models to assess the impact of FF and urine trace elements on IVF outcomes, adjusted for age, body mass index, race, and cigarette smoking. Trace elements were mostly present at lower concentrations in FF than in urine. The average number of oocytes retrieved was positively associated with higher urine cobalt, chromium, copper, and molybdenum concentrations. FF chromium and manganese were negatively associated with the proportion of mature oocytes, yet urine manganese had a positive association. FF zinc was inversely associated with average oocyte fertilization. Urine trace elements were significant positive predictors for the total number of embryos generated. FF copper predicted lower embryo fragmentation while urine copper was associated with higher embryo cell number and urine manganese with higher embryo fragmentation. No associations were detected for implantation, pregnancy, or live birth. Our results suggest the importance of trace elements in both FF and urine for intermediate, although not necessarily clinical, IVF endpoints. The results differed using FF or urine biomarkers of exposure, which may have implications for the design of clinical and epidemiologic investigations. These initial findings will form the basis of a more definitive future study.

  13. Estuaries as Filters: The Role of Tidal Marshes in Trace Metal Removal

    PubMed Central

    Teuchies, Johannes; Vandenbruwaene, Wouter; Carpentier, Roos; Bervoets, Lieven; Temmerman, Stijn; Wang, Chen; Maris, Tom; Cox, Tom J. S.; Van Braeckel, Alexander; Meire, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Flux calculations demonstrate that many estuaries are natural filters for trace metals. Yet, the underlying processes are poorly investigated. In the present study, it was hypothesized that intertidal marshes contribute significantly to the contaminant filter function of estuaries. Trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were measured along a transect from the subtidal, over an intertidal flat and marsh to a restored marsh with controlled reduced tide. Metal concentrations in the intertidal and restored marsh were found to be a factor two to five higher than values in the subtidal and intertidal flat sediments. High metal concentrations and high accretion rates indicate a high metal accumulation capacity of the intertidal marshes. Overbank sedimentation in the tidal marshes of the entire estuary was calculated to remove 25% to 50% of the riverine metal influx, even though marshes comprise less than 8% of the total surface of the estuary. In addition, the large-scale implementation of planned tidal marsh restoration projects was estimated to almost double the trace metal storage capacity of the present natural tidal marshes in the estuary. PMID:23950927

  14. Elevated concentrations of trace elements in soil do not necessarily reflect metals available to plants.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Silitonga, Maifan R; Tsegaye, Teferi D; Unrine, Jason M; Coolong, Timothy; Snyder, John C

    2013-01-01

    Bioaccumulation and entry of trace elements from soil into the food chain have made trace-elements major environmental pollutants. The main objective of this investigation was to study the impact of mixing native agricultural soil with municipal sewage sludge (SS) or SS mixed with yard waste (SS+YW) compost on total concentration of trace elements in soil, metals available to plants, and mobility of metals from soil into peppers and melon fruits. Regardless of soil treatment, the average concentrations of Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Mo in melon fruits were 5.2, 0.7, 3.9, 0.9, 34.3, 96.1, and 3.5μg g(-1), respectively. Overall concentrations of Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn in melon fruits were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than pepper fruits. No significant differences were found in Cr, Cu, and Mo concentrations between pepper and melon fruits at harvest time. Total metal concentrations and metal ions in soil available to melon and pepper plants were also determined. Total concentration of each metal in the soil was significantly greater than concentration of metal ions available to plants. Elevated Ni and Mo bioaccumulation factor (BAF > 1) of melon fruits of plants grown in SS+YW mixed soil is a characteristic that would be less favorable when plants grown on sites having high concentrations of these metals.

  15. Sediment-bound trace metals in Golfe-Juan Bay, northwestern Mediterranean: Distribution, availability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tiquio, Ma Gregoria Joanne; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas; Taneez, Mehwish; Andral, Bruno; Jordan, Norbert; Francour, Patrice

    2017-05-15

    The concentration, potential mobility, cation exchange capacity and toxicity of eight sediment-bound metals in Golfe-Juan Bay, France were examined. Results revealed significant spatial gradient of metal contamination along Golfe-Juan coast. The distribution and concentration of the metals appear to be influenced by the geochemical properties of the sediment, proximity to anthropogenic sources and general water circulation in the bay. The portion of trace metals found in the exchangeable, carbonate, oxidizable and reducible fractions of the sediment constitute 31%-58% of the total sediment-bound trace metal content, suggesting significant potential for remobilization of metals into the water column. Pb and Ni content of the sediment exceed the limits of the French marine sediment quality. Whole sediment extracts showed acute toxicity to marine rotifers. This study concludes that monitoring and management of sediment-bound trace metals in Golfe-Juan Bay are important so as not to underestimate their availability and risk to the marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Estuaries as filters: the role of tidal marshes in trace metal removal.

    PubMed

    Teuchies, Johannes; Vandenbruwaene, Wouter; Carpentier, Roos; Bervoets, Lieven; Temmerman, Stijn; Wang, Chen; Maris, Tom; Cox, Tom J S; Van Braeckel, Alexander; Meire, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Flux calculations demonstrate that many estuaries are natural filters for trace metals. Yet, the underlying processes are poorly investigated. In the present study, it was hypothesized that intertidal marshes contribute significantly to the contaminant filter function of estuaries. Trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were measured along a transect from the subtidal, over an intertidal flat and marsh to a restored marsh with controlled reduced tide. Metal concentrations in the intertidal and restored marsh were found to be a factor two to five higher than values in the subtidal and intertidal flat sediments. High metal concentrations and high accretion rates indicate a high metal accumulation capacity of the intertidal marshes. Overbank sedimentation in the tidal marshes of the entire estuary was calculated to remove 25% to 50% of the riverine metal influx, even though marshes comprise less than 8% of the total surface of the estuary. In addition, the large-scale implementation of planned tidal marsh restoration projects was estimated to almost double the trace metal storage capacity of the present natural tidal marshes in the estuary.

  17. Offshore iron sand extraction in New Zealand: Potential trace metal exposure of benthic and pelagic biota.

    PubMed

    Vopel, Kay; Pook, Chris; Wilson, Peter; Robertson, John

    2017-09-12

    Plans to exploit an offshore source of iron sand in South Taranaki Bight (STB), New Zealand, caused concerns that such exploitation may expose benthic and pelagic biota to elevated trace metal concentrations. We conducted dilute-acid extractions and standard elutriate tests to investigate the potential of this exploitation to (1) create a new seafloor with elevated trace metal content, (2) mobilise trace metals during iron sand extraction and, (3) enrich the returning process seawater, which feeds iron sand through mills, with trace metals. We found that recruits of freshly uncovered sediment may encounter higher-than-natural concentrations of cadmium, nickel and chromium (but not of copper, lead, and zinc) and propose to investigate the bioavailability of these metals. Elutriate test with raw and milled iron sand revealed that, for nickel and copper, dilution of the process seawater may be required to meet the local water quality guideline. We argue that this dilution can be achieved by adjustment of the mass and seawater balance of the offshore extraction process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metals pollution tracing in the sewerage network using the diffusive gradients in thin films technique.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2009-01-01

    Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT) is a quantitative, passive monitoring technique that can be used to measure concentrations of trace species in situ in solutions. Its potential for tracing metals pollution in the sewer system has been investigated by placing the DGT devices into sewage pumping stations and into manholes, to measure the concentration of certain metals in the catchment of a sewage treatment works with a known metals problem. In addition the methodology and procedure of using the DGT technique in sewers was investigated. Parameters such as temperature and pH were measured to ensure they were within the limits required by the DGT devices, and the optimum deployment time was examined. It was found that although the results given by the DGT technique could not be considered to be fully quantitative, they could be used to identify locations that were showing an excess concentration of metals, and hence trace pollution back to its source. The DGT technique is 'user friendly' and requires no complicated equipment for deployment or collection, and minimal training for use. It is thought that this is the first time that the DGT technique has been used in situ in sewers for metals pollution tracing.

  19. Geological factors affecting the distribution of trace metals in glacial sediments of central Newfoundland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klassen, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    In central Newfoundland (NTS 12A/10, 15, 16, 2H/1), As, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the clay-sized ( 1000 ppm), exceeding levels commonly set for purposes of environmental protection. Near Pb-Zn mines at Buchans, geochemical variation with depth reflects the dispersal of detritus from mineralized bedrock, and differences in sediment type and provenance. There, surface sediments are rich in granitic debris derived from the Topsails igneous terrane 5 km north of Buchans and contain low concentrations of trace metals. These sediments are compositionally unrelated to either Buchans Group volcanic rock or an underlying, older till enriched in sulphide minerals and trace metals. Metal-rich till extending up to 10 km southwest of Buchans results from combined glacial and debris flow transport related to two distinct geological events. Trace metals are enriched (two- to fourfold) in the clay-sized fraction of till compared to the silt and clay-sized, and are associated with Al- and Mg-bearing minerals that preferentially concentrate in the clay fraction. The geochemistry of the silt and clay-sized fraction can approximate that of the < 2-mm fraction. Background variations in till illustrate the important role of a geological framework to the interpretation of geochemical surveys and the origins of trace metals in the environment.

  20. Metal-free” catalytic oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom- doped graphene is caused by trace metal impurities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2013-12-16

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of high industrial importance. There is a large body of literature showing that metal-based catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. Co, Mn, Fe or hybrid Mn/Co-based nanoparticles) supported on graphene act as efficient catalysts for the ORR. A significant research effort is also directed to the so-called “metal-free” oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene surfaces. While such studies of the ORR on nonmetallic heteroatom-doped graphene are advertised as “metal-free” there is typically no sufficient effort to characterize the doped materials to verify that they are indeed free of any trace metal. Here we argue that the claimed “metal-free” electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene is caused by metallic impurities present within the graphene materials.

  1. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.; Hillman, A. L.; Pompeani, D. P.; Abbott, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The remobilization of legacy contamination stored in floodplain sediments remains a threat to ecosystem and human health, particularly with potential changes in global precipitation patterns and flooding regimes. Vehicular and industrial emissions are often the dominant, recognized source of anthropogenic trace metal loadings to ecosystems today. However, loadings from early industrial activities are poorly characterized and potential sources of trace metal inputs. While potential trace metal contamination from these activities is recognized (e.g., the historical use of lead arsenate as a pesticide), the magnitude and distribution of legacy contamination is often unknown. This presentation reconstructs a lake sediment record of trace metal inputs from an oxbow lake in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sediment cores were analyzed for major and trace metal chemistry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Sediment trace metal chemistry in this approximately 250 year record (180 cm) record changes in land use and industry both in the 19th century and the 20th century. Of particular interest is early 19th century loadings of arsenic and calcium to the lake, likely attributable to pesticides and lime used in tanning processes near the lake. After this period of tanning dominated inputs, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of coal mining operations and resulting discharge of acid mine drainage to surface waters. In the 20th century portion of our record (70 -20 cm), patterns in sediment zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by the opening and closing of the nearby Donora Zinc Works and the American Steel & Wire Works, infamous facilities in the history of air quality regulation. The most recent sediment chemistry records periods include the enactment of air pollution legislation (~ 35 cm), and the phase out of tetraethyl leaded gasoline (~30 cm). Our study documents the impact of early industry in the

  2. Trace metal capture by various sorbents during fluidized bed coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Ghebremeskel, A.; Wang, K.S.; Hopper, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of employing suitable sorbents to capture toxic trace metallic substances during fluidized bed coal combustion. Metal capture experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm (1 inch) quartz fluidized bed combustor enclosed in an electric furnace. The metals involved were cadmium, lead, chromium, arsenic and selenium, and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and lime. In addition to the experimental investigations, potential metal-sorbent reactions were also identified through chemical equilibrium calculations based on the minimization of system free energy. The observed experimental results indicated that metal capture by sorbents can be as high as 88% depending on the metal species and sorbent involved. Results from thermodynamic equilibrium simulations suggested the formation of metal-sorbent compounds such as Pb{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(s), CdAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) and CdSiO{sub 3}(s) under the combustion conditions.

  3. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chien, Chia-Te; Post, Anton F.; Saito, Mak A.; Paytan, Adina

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined, and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 days period to (1) evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2) explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples), to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples). Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples). Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean. PMID:25653645

  4. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Chien, Chia-Te; Post, Anton F; Saito, Mak A; Paytan, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined, and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 days period to (1) evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2) explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples), to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples). Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples). Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean.

  5. Octanol-solubility of dissolved and particulate trace metals in contaminated rivers: implications for metal reactivity and availability.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Mawji, Edward

    2005-05-01

    The lipid-like, amphiphilic solvent, n-octanol, has been used to determine a hydrophobic fraction of dissolved and particulate trace metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in contaminated rivers. In a sample from the River Clyde, southwest Scotland, octanol-solubility was detected for all dissolved metals except Co, with conditional octanol-water partition coefficients, D(ow), ranging from about 0.2 (Al and Cu) to 1.25 (Pb). In a sample taken from the River Mersey, northwest England, octanol-solubility was detected for dissolved Al and Pb, but only after sample aliquots had been spiked with individual ionic metal standards and equilibrated. Spiking of the River Clyde sample revealed competition among different metals for hydrophobic ligands. Metal displacement from hydrophobic complexes was generally most significant following the addition of ionic Al or Pb, although the addition of either of these metals had little effect on the octanol-solubility of the other. In both river water samples hydrophobic metals were detected on the suspended particles retained by filtration following their extraction in n-octanol. In general, particulate Cu and Zn (up to 40%) were most available, and Al, Co and Pb most resistant (<1%) to octanol extraction. Distribution coefficients defining the concentration ratio of octanol-soluble particle-bound metal to octanol-soluble dissolved metal were in the range 10(3.3)-10(5.3)mlg(-1). The presence of hydrophobic dissolved and particulate metal species has implications for our understanding of the biogeochemical behaviour of metals in aquatic environments. Specifically, such species are predicted to exhibit characteristics of non-polar organic contaminants, including the potential to penetrate the lipid bilayer. Current strategies for assessing the bioavailability and toxicity of dissolved and particulate trace metals in natural waters may, therefore, require revision.

  6. Trace Metals and Metalloids in Forest Soils and Exotic Earthworms in Northern New England, USA

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J.B.; Görres, J.H.; Jackson, B.P.; Friedland, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals and metalloids (TMM) in forest soils and invasive earthworms were studied at 9 uncontaminated sites in northern New England, USA. Essential (Cu, Mo, Ni, Zn, Se) and toxic (As, Cd, Pb, Hg and U) TMM concentrations (mg kg-1) and pools (mg m-2) were quantified for organic horizons (forest floor), mineral soils and earthworm tissues. Essential TMM tissue concentrations were greatest for mineral soil-feeding earthworm Octolasion cyaneum. Toxic TMM tissue concentrations were highest for organic horizon-feeding earthworms Dendobaena octaedra, Aporrectodea rosea and Amynthas agrestis. Most earthworm species had attained tissue concentrations of Pb, Hg and Se potentially hazardous to predators. Bioaccumulation factors were Cd > Se > Hg > Zn > Pb > U > 1.0 > Cu > As > Mo > Ni. Only Cd, Se Hg and Zn were considered strongly bioaccumulated by earthworms because their average bioaccumulation factors were significantly greater than 1.0. Differences in bioaccumulation did not appear to be caused by soil concentrations as earthworm TMM tissue concentrations were poorly correlated with TMM soil concentrations. Instead, TMM bioaccumulation appears to be species and site dependent. The invasive Amynthas agrestis had the greatest tissue TMM pools, due to its large body mass and high abundance at our stands. We observed that TMM tissue pools in earthworms were comparable or exceeded organic horizon TMM pools; earthworm tissue pools of Cd were up 12 times greater than in the organic horizon. Thus, exotic earthworms may represent an unaccounted portion and flux of TMM in forests of the northeastern US. Our results highlight the importance of earthworms in TMM cycling in northern forests and warrant more research into their impact across the region. PMID:25883392

  7. PIXE as a complement to trace metal analysis of sediments by ICP-OES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunderberg, J. M.; Bartlett, R. J.; Behm, A. M.; Contreras, C.; DeYoung, P. A.; Hoogeveen, N. L.; Huisman, A. J.; Peaslee, G. F.; Postma, J. K.

    2008-11-01

    The adverse effects of metal contamination in sediments require methods that can quickly and accurately assess the extent of environmental pollution. Particle induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXE) is demonstrated to be a viable alternative to an established method, which consists of acid digestion and Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) to measure trace metals in sediment. The analysis of trace metal composition by both techniques on a NIST Standard Reference Material mud gives results that are consistent with the certified values for fourteen measured metals, seven of which are common to both methods. A comparison study conducted on a sediment core from a freshwater lake with a known chromium contamination in Muskegon County, MI also shows a good correlation between the methods for transition metals of environmental interest over a wide range of metal concentrations. Total sample preparation and analysis time for the PIXE measurements is roughly one third that of acid digestion and ICP-OES. Also, the acid digestion step does not elute all the metal, while the nondestructive PIXE approach is a total metals analysis method. However the PIXE method generally has higher limits of detection for many environmental metal contaminants. By combining the two techniques, the acid digestion elution factor can be quantified by running PIXE on an original sample and on the residue resulting from acid digestion.

  8. Authigenesis of trace metals in energetic tropical shelf environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breckel, E.J.; Emerson, S.; Balistrieri, L.S.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated authigenic changes of Fe, Mn, V, U, Mo, Cd and Re in suboxic, periodically remobilized, tropical shelf sediments from the Amazon continental shelf and the Gulf of Papua. The Cd/Al, Mo/Al, and U/Al ratios in Amazon shelf sediments were 82%, 37%, and 16% less than those in Amazon River suspended sediments, respectively. Very large depletions of U previously reported in this environment were not observed. The Cd/Al ratios in Gulf of Papua sediments were 76% lower than measurements made on several Papua New Guinea rivers, whereas U/Al ratios in the shelf sediments were enriched by approximately 20%. Other metal/Al ratios in the Papua New Guinea river suspended sediments and continental shelf sediments were not distinguishably different. Comparison of metal/Al ratios to grain size distributions in Gulf of Papua samples indicates that our observations cannot be attributed to differences in grain size between the river suspended sediments and continental shelf sediments. These two shelves constitute a source of dissolved Cd to the world ocean equal to 29-100% of the dissolved Cd input from rivers, but only 3% of the dissolved Mo input and 4% of the dissolved U input. Release of Cd, Mo, and U in tropical shelf sediments is likely a result of intense Fe and Mn oxide reduction in pore waters and resuspension of the sediments. Since we do not observe depletions of particulate Fe and Mn in the shelf sediments most of these dissolved metals must reoxidize in the overlying waters and reprecipitate. As Cd exhibits the largest losses on these tropical shelves, we examined the ability of newly formed Fe and Mn oxides to adsorb dissolved Cd using a geochemical diffuse double-layer surface complexation model and found the oxide surfaces are relatively ineffective at readsorbing Cd in seawater due to surface-site competition by Mg and Ca. If the remobilization and reoxidation of Fe and Mn occurs frequently enough before sediment is buried significant amounts of Cd may be

  9. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  10. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of the uptake of essential and xenobiotic metal cations in cells of the soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Kamnev, A A; Renou-Gonnord, M F; Antonyuk, L P; Colina, M; Chernyshev, A V; Frolov, I; Ignatov, V V

    1997-01-01

    The results of flame (FAAS) or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GFAAS) analyses are presented and discussed on the accumulation of essential metals (Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe contained in the cultivation medium) and traces of each one of the conventionally xenobiotic elements from the group V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Pb, added to the medium in concentrations (0.2 mM) which do not essentially suppress growth of the bacterial culture, in cells of the plant root-associated nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Along with the essential cations assimilated by the bacterium, Zn and Cu were found to effectively accumulate in the biomass from the environment. The uptake of Co and Ni was significantly less pronounced, whereas Pb and V appeared to be present in cells in much lower concentrations than in the cultivation medium evidently showing no tendency to be assimilated by azospirilla. The effect of the above xenobiotics on the uptake level of the four essential elements provided evidence that they may compete for the formation of biologically active complexes with substances of both intracellular and extracellular localization. The analytical data obtained are compared with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of intact vacuum-dried bacterial cells grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake.

  12. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trace Metal and Nutrient Cycling in San Francisco Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    interest in the cycling of contaminant metals and the role of benthic macrofauna in the Bay (especially the invasive species such as Potamocorbula) but...potential role of benthic macrofauna in collaboration with Dr. Jan Thompson (USGS/WRD) and are working with her to improve the chamber design as...study of South San Francisco Bay. In addition, we also included an objective to increase our understanding of the direct influence of benthic

  14. Stock and losses of trace metals from salt marsh plants.

    PubMed

    Caçador, Isabel; Caetano, Miguel; Duarte, Bernardo; Vale, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Pools of Zn, Cu, Cd and Co in the leaf, stem and root tissues of Sarcocornia fruticosa, Sarcocornia perennis, Halimione portulacoides and Spartina maritima were analysed for a Tagus estuary (Portugal) salt marsh. Pools of Cu and Cd in the salt marsh were higher in spring/summer, indicating a net uptake of these metals during the growing season. Standing stocks of Zn, Cu, Cd and Co in the leaf and stem biomass of S. fruticosa, S. perennis and H. portulacoides showed a strong seasonal variation, with higher values recorded in autumn. The metal-containing leaves and stems that shed in the autumn become metal-containing detritus. The amount of this material washed out from the total marsh area (200 ha) was estimated as 68 kg of Zn, 8.2 kg of Cu, 13 kg of Co and 0.35 kg of Cd. The high tidal amplitude, a branched system of channels and semi-diurnal tidal cycle greatly favour the export of the organic detritus to adjoining marsh areas.

  15. High concentrations of trace metals in oysters from the Patuxent River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.; Sanders, J.; Abbe, G.

    1995-12-31

    Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations from the Patuxent River have been analyzed for trace metals by a number of organizations over at least the past 19 years. During that period, high concentrations of Cu (200--500 {micro}g/g dry weight), Cd (3--7 {micro}g/g) and Ag (2--8 /{micro}g/g) have been found in oysters from the oyster bars furthest up river. In particular, Cd values in oysters from this region have had concentrations approaching or exceeding current FDA warning levels throughout the period. In previous studies it was suggested that a coal-burning power plant located in that region, Chalk Point Steam Electric Station, was responsible for the copper enrichment due to the corrosion of Cu/Ni alloy condenser tubes. However, a monthly survey of trace elements in the nearby oyster populations from 1986 to the present showed only a small decline in copper concentrations after the plant switched from Cu/Ni to Ti alloy condenser tubes in 1987. Other potential sources for trace metals in the region include municipal and industrial discharges, atmospheric deposition, and biocides (anti-fouling paint in particular). The very rapid rise in trace element concentrations in oysters with position up river, and the lack of such a response by another local bivalve, the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum), suggests that a physiological effect of low salinity stress on oysters may be in part responsible for the high concentrations of trace metals in oysters in this region.

  16. Trace metal geochemistry in mangrove sediments and their transfer to mangrove plants (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Marchand, C; Fernandez, J-M; Moreton, B

    2016-08-15

    Because of their physico-chemical inherent properties, mangrove sediments may act as a sink for pollutants coming from catchments. The main objective of this study was to assess the distribution of some trace metals in the tissues of various mangrove plants developing downstream highly weathered ferralsols, taking into account metals partitioning in the sediment. In New Caledonia, mangroves act as a buffer between open-cast mines and the world's largest lagoon. As a result of the erosion of lateritic soils, Ni and Fe concentrations in the sediment were substantially higher than the world average. Whatever the mangrove stand and despite low bioaccumulation and translocations factors, Fe and Ni were also the most abundant metals in the different plant tissues. This low bioaccumulation may be explained by: i) the low availability of metals, which were mainly present in the form of oxides or sulfur minerals, and ii) the root systems acting as barriers towards the transfer of metals to the plant. Conversely, Cu and Zn metals had a greater mobility in the plant, and were characterized by high bioconcentration and translocation factors compared to the other metals. Cu and Zn were also more mobile in the sediment as a result of their association with organic matter. Whatever the metal, a strong decrease of trace metal stock was observed from the landside to the seaside of the mangrove, probably as a result of the increased reactivity of the sediment due to OM enrichment. This reactivity lead to higher dissolution of bearing phases, and thus to the export of dissolved trace metals trough the tidal action. Cu and Zn were the less concerned by the phenomenon probably as a result of higher plant uptake and their restitution to the sediment with litter fall in stands where tidal flushing is limited.

  17. Trace metal levels in fruit juices and carbonated beverages in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Williams, Akan B; Ayejuyo, Olusegun O; Ogunyale, Adekunle F

    2009-09-01

    Trace metal levels in selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages purchased in Lagos, Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Unicam model 969) equipped with SOLAAR 32 windows software. Fruit juices analysed were grape, pineapple, apple, orange, lemon juices and their brand names were used. Some carbonated drinks were also evaluated for metal levels. Trace metals investigated were Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sn, Fe, Cd and Co. Trace metal contents of fruit juices were found to be more than the metallic contents of carbonated beverages. Pb level in the fruit juices ranged from 0.08 to 0.57 mg/l but was not detected in the carbonated drinks. Concentrations of Pb in lemon juice and Mn in pineapple juice were relatively high. Cd and Co were not detected in the selected juices and beverages. Additionally, Pb, Cu, Cr and Fe were not detected in canned beverages but were present in bottled beverages. However, the metal levels of selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages were within permissible levels except for Mn in pineapple juice and Pb in lemon juice.

  18. Airborne trace metals and organochlorine compounds in arctic Alaska and Siberia: How important?

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, D.H.; Allen-Gil, S.; Gubala, C.P.; Ford, J.

    1995-12-31

    Metal contaminants of anthropogenic origin identified in the arctic atmosphere and the presence of organochlorines in arctic marine mammal tissues has raised the question of the importance of long-range transport of contaminants to the Arctic. Research focused on arctic regions in Alaska and the Taimyr peninsula of north central Russia. Inland watersheds were examined for evidence of increases in trace metal flux during the past 150 years and the presence of organochlorine compounds. Fish and ground squirrels were examined for body burdens of organic contaminants and plasma biomarkers were examined to evaluate biological effects. Sediment data from several lakes suggest that over broad regions, trace metal fluxes have increased only slightly (< 10%), if at all, since the pre-industrial era. The highest metal concentrations in lake sediments are associated with known elevated geologic sources of metals within the respective watersheds. Organochlorines are present in remote inland arctic ecosystems and are most concentrated in the tissues (e.g. liver) of organisms representing higher trophic levels. Arctic Siberia and Alaska (Taimyr peninsula) are similar with regard to contaminant concentrations. However, lichen and moss data suggest that Pb from Eurasian sources does not reach arctic Alaska. The results indicate that long range, transpolar transport and deposition of trace metals is not a large scale current phenomena in the two study regions. The transport and deposition of organochlorine compounds, however, is occurring but at relatively low levels.

  19. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing metropolitan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Lu, Sijin; Wang, Yeyao; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the exposure risks of trace metals in contamination soils and apportioning their sources are the basic preconditions for soil pollution prevention and control. In this study, a detailed investigation was conducted to assess the health risks of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing which is one of the most populated cities in the world and to apportion their potential sources. The data set of metals for 12 elements in 240 soil samples was collected. Pollution index and enrichment factor were used to identify the general contamination characteristic of soil metals. The probabilistic risk model was employed for health risk assessment, and a chemometrics technique, multivariate curve resolution-weighted alternating least squares (MCR-WALS), was applied to apportion sources. Results suggested that the soils in Beijing metropolitan region were contaminated by Hg, Cd, Cu, As, and Pb in varying degree, lying in the moderate pollution level. As a whole, the health risks posed by soil metals were acceptable or close to tolerable. Comparatively speaking, children and adult females were the relatively vulnerable populations for the non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks, respectively. Atmospheric deposition, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and natural source were apportioned as the potential sources determining the contents of trace metals in soils of Beijing area with contributions of 15.5%-16.4%, 5.9%-7.7% and 76.0%-78.6%, respectively.

  20. Role of Coordination and Chelation in Utilization of Nutritionally Essential Trace Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BIOCHEMISTRY, *TRANSITION METALS), (*CHELATE COMPOUNDS, BIOCHEMISTRY), (*DIALYSIS, CHEMICAL ANALYSIS), NUTRITION , IRON, CHROMIUM, PHOSPHATES, AMINO ACIDS, HYDROXIDES, ALCOHOLS, PEPTIDES, MEMBRANES, LIQUID FILTERS

  1. Trace Metal Accumulation in Sediments and Benthic Macroinvertebrates before and after Maintenance of a Constructed Wetland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periodic maintenance of stormwater best management practices (BMP) includes the removal of accumulated sediment. The resulting impact on trace metal concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, NY was investiga...

  2. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF EMISSIONS FOR SEVERAL TRACE METALS OVER THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A regional model for atmospheric photochemistry and particulate matter is used to predict the fate and transport of five trace metals: lead, manganese, total chromium, nickel, and cadmium over the continental United States during January and July 2001. Predicted concentrations of...

  3. Seasonal comparison of trace metal residues in white-footed mice and soil from colliery stripmines

    SciTech Connect

    Hausbeck, J.S.; Husby, M.P.; McBee, K.

    1994-12-31

    Mine tailings of abandoned coal stripmines in Oklahoma and other regions of the US have been shown to contain slightly elevated levels of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Metalliferous stripmine spoil has been found to contain much higher levels of Cu and Zn than colliery stripmines, and many other trace metals including cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) among others. Although levels of trace metal contamination were lower for coal stripmines, research has shown small mammals exposed to low levels of trace metals may bioaccumulate trace metals. This study intended to determine the levels of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in liver, kidney, and bone tissues of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) and examine the variance of these levels among sites and seasons. Preliminary results of soil analysis have indicated that mice collected from stripmine sites were exposed to slightly elevated levels of Zn and Cd in stripmine spoil collected from Okmulgee Co., OK. Kidney and liver tissues from mice collected at stripmine sites within this county have shown significantly greater levels of Cd and Zn than tissues collected from reference mice. Significant seasonal variation in renal and hepatic Zn concentrations was observed and possibly was related to a change in diet or reproductive activity.

  4. Trace Metal Accumulation in Sediments and Benthic Macroinvertebrates before and after Maintenance of a Constructed Wetland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periodic maintenance of stormwater best management practices (BMP) includes the removal of accumulated sediment. The resulting impact on trace metal concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, NY was investiga...

  5. Continuous renal replacement therapy amino acid, trace metal and folate clearance in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We hypothesized that continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD) results in amino acid, trace metals, and folate losses, thereby adversely impacting nutrient balance. Critically ill children receiving CVVHD were studied prospectively for 5 days. Blood concentrations, amino acids, copper, zinc, man...

  6. Levels of PCBs and trace metals in Crab Orchard Lake sediment, benthos, zooplankton, and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.C.; Heidinger, R.C.; Call, T.

    1990-02-01

    Concentrations of trace metals and PCBs in six species of fish, zooplankton, macrobenthos, sediment, and water were studied in Crab Orchard Lake, Williamson County, Illinois. Eleven sites were chosen throughout the lake, including one site (site 10) near an abandoned dumpsite of a former electrical transformer manufacturing facility. PCB levels in the selected components from site 10 were considerably higher than the other sites. Thirty-eight percent (17/45) of fish fillets from various species at this site exceeded the 2.00 mg/kg FDA guideline for PCBs. PCB concentrations in fish were variable, and little relationship existed between age or size and PCB concentrations in most species. Common carp and channel catfish had higher PCB levels than the other species examined. Trace metals were low in fish and other components analyzed and were comparable to literature values for the midwestern United States. Mercury was the only trace metal to exhibit a significant positive relationship with age or size of fish. Mercury was also the only trace metal to exhibit biomagnification.

  7. Trace metal content and micromorphology as proxies for bleaching in the modern coral Porites divaricata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, S. A.

    2004-05-01

    Morphology and trace metal content of scleractinian corals have previously been used as proxies for past environmental conditions, but no proxy for the health of ancient corals currently exists. Skeletal material associated with bleached and non-bleached tissue from Recent Porites divaricata was analyzed with SEM and ICPAES. Differences in both morphology and trace metal content were found in samples associated with bleached and non-bleached tissue. SEM analysis showed skeletal corallites associated with unbleached tissue have well-defined septal denticles. Skeletal corallites associated with bleached tissue have weakly-defined septal denticles, many appearing rudimentary. Significanly higher trace metal/Ca ratios were found with ICPAES for Ag, As, Cd, and Co between skeletal material associated with bleached and non-bleached tissue. The presence of these differences suggests the processes of skeletogenesis and the uptake and deposition of trace metals in the scleractinian skeleton are affected by bleaching. Such indicators might be observed in the fossil record as indicators of past environmental stress and bleaching in scleractinian corals.

  8. Representativeness of laboratory sampling procedures for the analysis of trace metals in soil.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Jean-Sébastien; Boudreault, Jean-Philippe; Bost, Régis; Sona, Mirela; Duhaime, François; Éthier, Yannic

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to assess the representativeness of laboratory sampling protocols for purposes of trace metal analysis in soil. Five laboratory protocols were compared, including conventional grab sampling, to assess the influence of sectorial splitting, sieving, and grinding on measured trace metal concentrations and their variability. It was concluded that grinding was the most important factor in controlling the variability of trace metal concentrations. Grinding increased the reproducibility of sample mass reduction by rotary sectorial splitting by up to two orders of magnitude. Combined with rotary sectorial splitting, grinding increased the reproducibility of trace metal concentrations by almost three orders of magnitude compared to grab sampling. Moreover, results showed that if grinding is used as part of a mass reduction protocol by sectorial splitting, the effect of sieving on reproducibility became insignificant. Gy's sampling theory and practice was also used to analyze the aforementioned sampling protocols. While the theoretical relative variances calculated for each sampling protocol qualitatively agreed with the experimental variances, their quantitative agreement was very poor. It was assumed that the parameters used in the calculation of theoretical sampling variances may not correctly estimate the constitutional heterogeneity of soils or soil-like materials. Finally, the results have highlighted the pitfalls of grab sampling, namely, the fact that it does not exert control over incorrect sampling errors and that it is strongly affected by distribution heterogeneity.

  9. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF EMISSIONS FOR SEVERAL TRACE METALS OVER THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A regional model for atmospheric photochemistry and particulate matter is used to predict the fate and transport of five trace metals: lead, manganese, total chromium, nickel, and cadmium over the continental United States during January and July 2001. Predicted concentrations of...

  10. Determination of trace metallic impurities in high-purity quartz by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dash, K; Chandrasekaran, K; Thangavel, S; Dhaville, S M; Arunachalam, J

    2004-01-02

    A method has been developed for the determination of relevant trace impurities (alkali, alkaline and transition metals) in high purity quartz by ion-chromatography. In situ reagent (HF) purification and simultaneous sample dissolution was achieved in a multichannel vapour phase digestion assembly. Twenty-one samples can be digested at a time in this vapour phase system. Significant decrease in the process blank levels for all the analytes was observed. Drastic reduction (250 times) of NH4+ blank was achieved in the described vapour phase digestion, which enables the determination of trace concentration of sodium in high purity quartz. After volatilisation of the matrix and unreacted HF, the clear water leached solutions were injected into an ion-chromatograph equipped with conductivity detector for the determination of alkali and alkaline earth metals. In the case of transition metals, the trace residues were leached with 10 mM HCl and after separation on a mixed bed analytical column (IonPac CS5) were detected by spectrophotometry after post column derivatisation using 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR). The accuracy of the result was checked by their comparison with those obtained by independent methods like inductively coupled plasma (ICP) MS and ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The achievable detection limits are between 0.4 ng/g (Li) and 22 ng/g (Mn). The application of the method to the determination of the above trace metals in two high-purity-grade quartz samples is demonstrated.

  11. Record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.J.; Thomson, J.

    1980-12-01

    The possibility that a useful, historical record of deposition might be found in a salt marsh is investigated by considering a record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh. Evidence of salt-marsh deposition dominated by riverine runoff is presented.

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  13. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  14. Geochemistry of trace metals in a fresh water sediment: field results and diagenetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Canavan, R W; Van Cappellen, P; Zwolsman, J J G; van den Berg, G A; Slomp, C P

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in pore water and sediment of a coastal fresh water lake (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands). Elevated sediment trace metal concentrations reflect anthropogenic inputs from the Rhine and Meuse Rivers. Pore water and sediment analyses, together with thermodynamic calculations, indicate a shift in trace metal speciation from oxide-bound to sulfide-bound over the upper 20 cm of the sediment. Concentrations of reducible Fe and Mn decline with increasing depth, but do not reach zero values at 20 cm depth. The reducible phases are relatively more important for the binding of Co, Ni, and Zn than for Pb and Cd. Pore waters exhibit supersaturation with respect to Zn, Pb, Co, and Cd monosulfides, while significant fractions of Ni and Co are bound to pyrite. A multi-component, diagenetic model developed for organic matter degradation was expanded to include Zn and Ni dynamics. Pore water transport of trace metals is primarily diffusive, with a lesser contribution of bioirrigation. Reactions affecting trace metal mobility near the sediment-water interface, especially sulfide oxidation and sorption to newly formed oxides, strongly influence the modeled estimates of the diffusive effluxes to the overlying water. Model results imply less efficient sediment retention of Ni than Zn. Sensitivity analyses show that increased bioturbation and sulfate availability, which are expected upon restoration of estuarine conditions in the lake, should increase the sulfide bound fractions of Zn and Ni in the sediments.

  15. Behavior of trace metals in the sediment pore waters of intertidal mudflats of a tropical wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.T.; Lam, M.H.W.; Yen, Y.F.; Leung, A.P.K.

    2000-03-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the sediment pore waters of the intertidal mudflats of the Mai Po and Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site of Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, were measured using the polyacrylamide gel diffusive equilibration thin film (DET) technique. The ranges of concentrations of dissolved Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the pore water of the top 0 to 20 cm of sediment were 2.2 to 10.0 nM, 346.0 to 950.0 nM 243.8 to 454.8 nM, 23.2 to 51.2 nM, 39.8 to 249.5 {micro}M, and 13.4 to 20.7 {micro}M, respectively. Enrichment of these trace metals was observed in the upper 0- to 7-cm layer. Profiles of conditional distribution coefficient, log(K{sub D}), of the trace metals and results of multiple regression analysis have revealed that reduction of Mn (hydrous) oxides was the major remobilization mechanism for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the mudflats. Benthic diffusive fluxes of these trace metals from the mudflats were also estimated on the basis of the concentration gradients of trace metals between surface sediments and the overlying water column. The magnitude of the estimated diffusive fluxes followed the order Zn > Cr > Cu > Pb > Cd.

  16. Trace metal concentration in Trade Wind aerosols collected over Barbados and Miami.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. M.; Millero, F. J.; Prospero, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    African mineral dust aerosols are transported by trade winds to Barbados and often reach Miami. The trace metals contained in these aerosols play an important role in biogeochemical processes and thus the global carbon cycle. High-volume bulk aerosols were collected in the summer dust season (June-September) of 2003 and 2004 in Miami and Barbados on Whatman-41 filters and microwave digested using a modified version of EPA method 3051. Aliquots of digested samples were tested for trace metal concentrations by ICP-MS. Excellent agreement with gravimetrically determined ashed weights was observed with dust concentrations calculated based on Al crustal abundance. As a major component, aluminum averaged 8.7% content in agreement to 8.1% crustal abundance, and was used to examine other trace metals. Al, Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Tl, Ba, Cd, Pb and REE's were examined and deviations from average crustal abundance are discussed in relationship to temporal variation and meteorological conditions. In addition, trace metal pollutants in Miami aerosols were examined relative to the relatively clean samples offered by Barbados.

  17. Evaluation of status of trace and toxic metals in biological samples (scalp hair, blood, and urine) of normal and anemic children of two age groups.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faheem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Naveed; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Khan, Sumaira; Kolachi, Nida Fatima; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Anemia affects a substantial portion of the world's population, provoking severe health problems as well as important economic losses to the region in which this condition is found. This study was designed to compare the levels of essential trace and toxic elements in scalp hair, blood, and urine samples of anemic children (n = 132) with age range 1-5 and 6-10 years of both genders. For a comparative study, 134 non-anemic age- and sex-matched children as control subjects, residing in the same city, were selected. The metals in the biological samples were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry/electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The proposed method was validated using certified reference samples of hair, blood, and urine. The results indicated significantly lower levels of iron, copper, and zinc in the biological samples as compared to the control children of both genders (p = 0.01-0.008). The mean values of lead and cadmium were significantly high in all three biological samples of anemic children as compared to non-anemic children of both age groups (p = 0.005-0.001). The ratios of essential metal to toxic metals in the biological samples of anemic children of both age groups were significantly lower than that of controls. Deficiency of essential trace metals and high level of toxic metals may play a role in the development of anemia in the subjects under study.

  18. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture.

    PubMed

    McCall, A Scott; Cummings, Christopher F; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G

    2014-06-05

    Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br(-)) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br(-) is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a posttranslational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine formation. Dietary Br deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas Br replenishment restores viability, demonstrating its physiologic requirement. Importantly, Br-deficient flies phenocopy the developmental and BM defects observed in peroxidasin mutants and indicate a functional connection between Br(-), collagen IV, and peroxidasin. We establish that Br(-) is required for sulfilimine formation within collagen IV, an event critical for BM assembly and tissue development. Thus, bromine is an essential trace element for all animals, and its deficiency may be relevant to BM alterations observed in nutritional and smoking-related disease. PAPERFLICK:

  19. Trace metals in the living and nonliving components of scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Reichelt-Brushett, A J; McOrist, G

    2003-12-01

    Trace metals in coral tissue and skeleton have been investigated in various ways since the early seventies. More recently it has been suggested that the symbiotic zooxanthellae may play an important role in the accumulation and regulation of trace metals. Furthermore gamete development and mucus production may influence the metal accumulation and loss in corals. Many studies have attempted to use the annual growth bands in coral skeletons to investigate historical pollution events. However the relationship between the metal concentrations in the surrounding environment and the incorporation of this into coral skeleton is not well understood. This paper explains a method for investigating metal loads in coral tissue, zooxanthellae and skeleton. Furthermore, it presents new information suggesting that zooxanthellae accumulate most metals (Al, Fe, As, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) in greater concentrations than the coral tissue. Coral skeletons had consistently lower metal concentration than the zooxanthellae, tissue and gametes. The loss of zooxanthellae during stress events may have a significant contribution to the total metal loads in corals. The use of corals as biomonitors should carefully factor in zooxanthellae densities and gamete development before conclusions are drawn.

  20. New data on the trace metal composition of the planktonic foraminifera microfossils of the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports new data on the trace metal composition of planktonic foraminifer shells from surface sediments and cores (fraction >0.1 mm) in the central part of the Atlantic Ocean. This investigation has made it possible to identify a considerable accumulation of trace elements from water due to calcite entering into the crystal lattice under biomineralization and adsorption on the shell surface and pores, despite the fact that the shells are depleted in trace elements relative to pelagic clays. The trace element content in planktonic foraminifer microfossils is characterized by temporal variability, which is the most pronounced in long cores (Holocene-Upper Pleistocene) and reflects the sedimentation paleoenvironment in the ocean.

  1. Trends in trace organic and metal concentrations in the Pechora and Kara Seas and adjacent rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.M.; Champ, M.A.; Wade, T.L.; Kennicutt, M.C. II; Chambers, L.; Davis, T.

    1995-12-31

    Trace organic (pesticides, PCBs, PAHs and dioxin/furan) and trace metal concentrations have been measured in surficial sediment and tissue (i.e., clam, fish liver and flesh) samples from the Pechora and Kara Seas and their adjacent rivers -- Pechora, Ob and Yenisey Rivers. Total PAH, PCB and total DDT and chlordane concentrations ranged in surficial sediments from n.d. to 810 ppb, n.d.--8.7 ppb, n.d.--1.2 ppb, and n.d.--1.2 ppb, respectively, in a suite of 40 samples from the Kara Sea and its adjacent rivers. The highest concentrations of many of the trace organic and metal contaminants were found in the lower part of the Yenisey River below the salt wedge. Some trace metals (As for example) were elevated in the Pechora River dispositional plume region. Dioxin ranged from 1.36 to 413 ppt in a subset of 20 sediment samples. Higher trace organic contaminant concentrations compared to sediments were found in tissue samples from the region, especially fish liver samples. Concentrations as high as 1,114 ppb total PAHs, 89 ppb chlordane, 1,011 ppb for total DDT and 663 ppb PCBs were found in some fish liver samples. Dioxin concentrations in tissue samples ranged from 11.7 to 61 ppt. Concentrations of many trace organic and metal contaminants in these Russian marginal seas are influenced by inputs from these large Arctic rivers. Many organic contaminant concentrations in sediments are low, however detecting these compounds in tissue show they are bioavailable.

  2. Perirhinal and Postrhinal, but Not Lateral Entorhinal, Cortices Are Essential for Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Eugenie E.; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of temporal associative tasks such as trace eyeblink conditioning is hippocampus-dependent, while consolidated performance is not. The parahippocampal region mediates much of the input and output of the hippocampus, and perirhinal (PER) and entorhinal (EC) cortices support persistent spiking, a possible mediator of temporal…

  3. Perirhinal and Postrhinal, but Not Lateral Entorhinal, Cortices Are Essential for Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Eugenie E.; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of temporal associative tasks such as trace eyeblink conditioning is hippocampus-dependent, while consolidated performance is not. The parahippocampal region mediates much of the input and output of the hippocampus, and perirhinal (PER) and entorhinal (EC) cortices support persistent spiking, a possible mediator of temporal…

  4. Trace metal contents in wild edible mushrooms growing on serpentine and volcanic soils on the island of Lesvos, Greece.

    PubMed

    Aloupi, M; Koutrotsios, G; Koulousaris, M; Kalogeropoulos, N

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this survey were (1) to assess for the first time the Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn contents in wild edible mushrooms (Russula delica, Lactarius sanguifluus, Lactarius semisanguifluus, Lactarius deliciosus, Suillus bellinii) from the island of Lesvos, (2) to investigate the metals' variability among the species, as well as in relation to the chemical composition of the underlying soil, comparing mushrooms collected from volcanic and serpentine substrates and (3) to estimate metal intake by the consumption of the mushrooms under consideration. The trace metals in 139 samples were determined by flame or flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. The median metal concentrations were as follows: Cd: 0.14; Cr: 0.10; Cu: 8.51; Fe: 30.3; Mn: 5.26; Ni: 0.34; Pb: 0.093 and Zn: 64.50, all in mgkg(-1) dry weight. The observed concentrations are among the lowest reported for mushrooms from Europe or Turkey, while Pb and Cd values did not exceed the limits set by the European Union. Significant species- and substrate-related differences in the metal contents were found, but the variability did not follow a uniform pattern for all the metals in all mushroom species. As a general trend, the mushrooms growing in serpentine sites contained higher Cd, Cr and Ni than those from volcanic sites. The calculated bioconcentration factors (BCFs) showed that none of the mushrooms can be regarded as a metal bioaccumulator, although BCF values slightly above unity were found for Zn in the three Lactarius species, and for Cu in R. delica. The studied mushrooms could supply considerable amounts of essential metals such as Zn and Cr. On the other hand, the consumption of R. delica collected from volcanic soils could provide 12% of the Cd daily tolerable intake and as high as 53% when collected from serpentine soils. Nonetheless, our results indicate that the regular consumption of wild edible mushrooms from Lesvos is quite safe for human health.

  5. Contamination characteristics and source apportionment of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Chen, Ruihui; Li, Jiao; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Due to their toxicity and bioaccumulation, trace metals in soils can result in a wide range of toxic effects on animals, plants, microbes, and even humans. Recognizing the contamination characteristics of soil metals and especially apportioning their potential sources are the necessary preconditions for pollution prevention and control. Over the past decades, several receptor models have been developed for source apportionment. Among them, positive matrix factorization (PMF) has gained popularity and was recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a general modeling tool. In this study, an extended chemometrics model, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares based on maximum likelihood principal component analysis (MCR-ALS/MLPCA), was proposed for source apportionment of soil metals and applied to identify the potential sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir. Similar to PMF, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model can incorporate measurement error information and non-negativity constraints in its calculation procedures. Model validation with synthetic dataset suggested that the MCR-ALS/MLPCA could extract acceptable recovered source profiles even considering relatively larger error levels. When applying to identify the sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model obtained the highly similar profiles with PMF. On the other hand, the assessment results of contamination status showed that the soils around reservoir were polluted by trace metals in slightly moderate degree but potentially posed acceptable risks to the public. Mining activities, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition were identified as the potential anthropogenic sources with contributions of 24.8, 14.6, and 13.3 %, respectively. In order to protect the drinking water source of Beijing, special attention should be paid to the metal inputs to soils from mining and agricultural activities.

  6. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  7. Assessment of trace metals in four bird species from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Oh, Jong-Min

    2013-08-01

    In birds, heavy metal concentrations are influenced by diet intake, migratory pattern, and residence time. In the present study, heavy metal concentrations (in microgram per gram dry weight) were measured in livers of four bird species from Korea. Iron concentrations were greater in Eurasian Woodcocks (Scolopax rusticola) than in Grey Herons (Ardea cinerea), Little Egrets (Egretta garzetta), and Schrenck's Bitterns (Ixobrychus eurhythmus). Copper concentrations in Grey Herons were significantly higher than in other species. Lead concentrations were greater in Schrenck's Bitterns and Eurasian Woodcocks than in Grey Herons and Little Egrets. Eurasian Woodcocks had higher cadmium concentrations than in other species. Zinc and manganese concentrations did not differ among species. Iron, zinc, manganese, and copper concentrations from this study were within the range of other Korean bird studies, and these concentrations were far below toxic levels. Cadmium and lead accumulation trends in each species were different, and the results might be associated with their migration pattern and residence time in Korea. Grey Herons, Little Egrets, and Schrenck's Bitterns are usually summer visitors, and Eurasian Woodcocks are passage migrants. But herons and egrets were collected in spring, autumn, and winter, but not during breeding season. They might be residents, so they could more reflect Korean cadmium and lead contaminations than Schrenck's Bitterns. However, Eurasian Woodcocks could more reflect habitats outside Korea because of their short staying time in Korea.

  8. [Trace metals in coastal sediments from Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    García-Céspedes, Jairo; Acuña-González, Jenaro; Vargas-Zamora, José A

    2004-12-01

    Marine sediment samples from four coastal ecosystems in Costa Rica were taken between the years 2000-2002 and their iron, lead, copper and zinc concentrations were determined by the atomic absorption technique with flame or graphite furnace. In the Pacific coast, Culebra Bay (Papagayo Gulf), Gulf of Nicoya, and Golfito Bay (Dulce Gulf), were selected as representative sites, and Moín Bay, at the Caribbean coast. Mean metal concentrations for all ecosystems followed the same pattern: Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb. No temporal pattern was found for any metal. Iron and copper mean concentrations were higher in Golfito Bay (5.8% and 87 microg/g, respectively) and lower in Moín Bay (3.4% and 52 microg/g, respectively). Zinc mean concentration was also higher in Golfito Bay (96 microg/g), but lower in Culebra Bay (66 microg/g). Lead mean concentration was higher in Moín Bay (6.4 microg/g) and lower in Culebra Bay (3.0 microg/g). Lead highest concentrations occurred in the Caribbean and in Golfito Bay, and for the rest of the elements the maximum values were found in Golfito Bay. On the basis of data obtained in this work, Culebra Bay was considered a relatively unpolluted location; Golfito Bay was more contaminated, and Moín Bay and the Gulf of Nicoya showed an intermediate condition.

  9. Determination of trace metals in air particulate matters by capillary electrophoresis with spectrophotometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Y.S.; Tung, H.S.

    1998-12-31

    Chemical analysis of trace metals in air particulate matters are required for studies in the apportionment of major air pollution sources, occupational health protection, environmental monitoring of ambient and indoor air, and for atmospheric aerosol research purpose. The demand for the required analysis is towards more sensitive, cheaper and automated method, as well as capability of differentiating different chemical species present in the air particulate matters. The recent advance of capillary electrophoresis provides an alternative method for multi-element determination with capability of speciation of different chemical elements for both total and leachable metal determination. It also uses equipment available in many chemical laboratories with reasonable capital and low running cost. In the present paper, the application of CE for trace metal analysis in air particulate matters will be investigated in three areas. The first area is the development of sample pretreatment method. For total metal analysis, the microwave digestion method is chosen based on short digestion time and reduced contamination. The second area is the optimization of the CE buffers. The use of strong and weak complex system is compared using histidine and 4-methylbenzylamine for indirect UV detection and 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid (HQS) for direct UV detection for CE separation of alkali and alkaline earth metals (ammonium, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, barium, strontium) with transition metals (cobalt, cadmium, nickel, zinc, lead and copper). The role of lactic acid, 18-crown-6 and other additives to effect satisfactory separation of closely co-migrated pairs and to achieve suitable separation of large amounts of alkali metals (ppm) from trace levels of transition metals (ppb) will be discussed for both leachable and total metals present in air particulate matters.

  10. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and

  11. Speciation and Distribution of Trace Metals Associated with Iron Sulfides in the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, D. M.; Cahill, M.

    2014-12-01

    Black shales underlying the areas from Eastern Ohio, through Pennsylvania, and into Central New York State have become of economic interest lately due to the recent economic viability of shale gas extraction. Sulfide minerals such as pyrite and marcasite occurring in these shales are often the primary phases that trace metals are associated with. Trace metals can be incorporated into these sulfides via various pathways during initial shale deposition and secondary diagenesis including substitution for Fe (Co and Ni), substitution for S (As and Se), and excluded to form other sulfide phases (Cu and Zn). The manner in which these trace metals are incorporated directly influences how they are released into the environment during sulfide oxidation following shale weathering or hydraulic fracturing. The aim of this research is to examine the distribution of trace metals in iron sulfides from black shales using Synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques including micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction of shale thin sections. Marcellus Shale samples were collected from: (1) outcrops from the Oatka member in Leroy, NY and Jersey Shore, PA and the Union Springs member in Lewiston, PA, and (2) drilling core sample from Beaver Meadow, NY and Hancock Co, TN (Chattanooga shale). Analyses have shown that the sulfide grains are a combination of pyrite and marcasite. As and Se are spatially correlated with each other and within the pyrite grains. Ni is spatially correlated with larger euhedral pyrite, as well as smaller non-iron sulfide grains. Cu and Zn are not spatially correlated with the pyrite and form separate Cu- and Zn- sulfides. During iron sulfide oxidative dissolution, these differences in distribution of trace metals will affect the order and rate in which they are released into the environment.

  12. Review-Factors involving in fluctuation of trace metals concentrations in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Perween, Rubina

    2015-05-01

    Milk makes a significant contribution to human diet through provision of macronutrients, vitamins and minerals. The exact composition of milk varies with species among domestic animals according to their neonatal needs. It is recognized that imbalance in the quantity of minerals and trace elements is a serious health hazard especially for infants. Many studies reported the fluctuation in the level of metals in milk due to the influence of several factors such as geographical and exposure to environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic activity. Amongst all sources, industries take lion's share to alter the metal content in milk. The importance of different nutritional and toxic metals in milk from different geographical areas is discussed.

  13. The geochemistry of redox sensitive trace metals in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Morford, J.L.; Emerson, S.

    1999-06-01

    The authors analyzed the redox sensitive elements V, Mo, U, Re and Cd in surface sediments from the Northwest African margin, the US Northwest margin and the Arabian Sea to determine their response under a range of redox conditions. Where oxygen penetrates 1 cm or less into the sediments, Mo and V diffuse to the overlying water as Mn is reduced and remobilized. Authigenic enrichments of U, Re and Cd are evident under these redox conditions. With the onset of sulfate reduction, all of the metals accumulate authigenically with Re being by far the most enriched. General trends in authigenic metal accumulation are described by calculating authigenic fluxes for the 3 main redox regimes: oxic, reducing where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm, and anoxic conditions. Using a simple diagenesis model and global estimates of organic carbon rain rate and bottom water oxygen concentrations, the authors calculate the area of sediments below 1,000 m water depth in which oxygen penetration is {le} 1 cm to be 4% of the ocean floor. They conclude that sediments where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm release Mn, V and Mo to seawater at rates of 140%--260%, 60%--150% and 5%--10% of their respective riverine fluxes, using the authigenic metal concentrations and accumulation rates from this work and other literature. These sediments are sinks for Re, Cd and U, with burial fluxes of 70%--140%, 30%--80% and 20%--40%, respectively, of their dissolved riverine inputs. They modeled the sensitivity of the response of seawater Re, Cd and V concentrations to changes in the area of reducing sediments where oxygen penetrates {le} 1 cm. The analysis suggests a negligible change in seawater Re concentration, whereas seawater concentrations of Cd and V could have decreased and increased, respectively, by 5%--10% over 20 kyr if the area of reducing sediments increased by a factor of 2 and by 10%--20% if the area increased by a factor of 3. The concentration variations for a factor of 2 increase in the area of

  14. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    SciTech Connect

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Geochemical and biological controls on trace metal transport in an acid mine impacted watershed.

    PubMed

    Butler, Thomas W

    2006-06-01

    Water samples collected in an acid mine impacted watershed indicated that the concentrations of dissolved trace metals were diurnally influenced by mineral saturation, which is controlled primarily by pH and water temperature. Measurements taken suggested that these variations only occur at sample locations immediately downstream from the confluence of acidic and alkaline waters. It is at these locations where initial mineral precipitation occurred and where subtle changes in solubility were most affected, increasing trace metal removal when both the rate of photosynthesis (influencing pH in headwaters) and water temperature were at a maximum. The role of iron photoreduction (increased midday production of ferrous iron) on overall Cu, Mn, and Zn transport was also evaluated, but found to be inconclusive. Iron photoreduction may however influence adsorption and/or coprecipitation of trace metals through associated changes in oxidation state, solubility, and mineralogy of various iron colloids, which are produced upon the neutralization of acidic, metal enriched water. Furthermore, measured values of copper and zinc were compared to relative USEPA chronic criterion for exposure to continuous concentration (CCC) of metals by the calculation of a "toxicity unit" (TU). It was found that average values of both copper and zinc only exceeded the CCC (TU>1) in the acid mine-impacted Leona Creek. In general, zinc toxicity decreased while copper toxicity increased downstream of the confluence of the mine impacted Leona Creek and background Lion Creek (sampled at Lake Aliso), indicating a significant source of zinc in upstream, non mine-impacted samples.

  16. Relationship between gastric cancer and blood trace metal levels

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Sasaki, T.; Kurasaki, M.; Kaji, H.

    1981-06-01

    The metal concentrations in whole blood, blood plasma and blood cells of the patients were compared with those of normal subjects. Significantly lower levels of Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in whole blood of the patients were found. The Cu levels in the blood cells and Zn levels in the blood plasma of patients were of definitely lower levels than those of the normal subjects. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catale (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and delta aminolevulinic dehydratase (ALAD) metal enzymes were assayed in the 30 patients and in 24 normal subjects matches in age to the patients. SOD levels in blood cells of the patients were definitely lower than those of the normal subjects. The CAT activities showed a significantly higher level in the stage II and a significantly lower level in the stage IV and metastatic groups. The activities of GPX and ALAD did not show any significant difference between the patients with gastric cancer and the normal subjects. There were significant negative correlations between CAT activity in whole blood and Cu level in whole blood and blood plasma; also, positive correlations between Zn level and in whole blood and CAT activity, and between Zn level and GPX activity in patients with gastric cancer. Moreover there were positive correlations between Zn level and SOD level in the blood cells and also a negative correlation between Zn level in blood cells and GPX activity in whole blood. These correlations suggested that there may be some important relationship between the metabolism of superoxide anion in gastric cancer patients and advanced cancer.

  17. Assessment of trace metal toxicity in soils of Raniganj Coalfield, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Supriyo Kumar; Chakrapani, Govind J

    2011-06-01

    Soil, rock and water samples were collected from India's oldest coalfield Raniganj to investigate trace metal contamination from mining activity. Our data reveal that trace metal concentration in soil samples lies above the average world soil composition; especially, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations exceed the maximum allowable concentration proposed by the European Commission for agricultural soils. In particular, Cr, Cu and Ni exceed the ecotoxicological limit, and Ni exceeds the typical value for cultivated soils. Mineral dissolution from overburden material and high adsorption capacity of laterite soil are responsible for the elevated concentrations. This is evident from enrichment factor (E (f)), geoaccumulation index (I (geo)) and metal pollution index values. Sediment quality guideline index indicates toxicity to local biota although enrichment index suggests no threat from consuming crops cultivated in the contaminated soil.

  18. Source Evaluation and Trace Metal Contamination in Benthic Sediments from Equatorial Ecosystems Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Nsikak U.; Asuquo, Francis E.; Williams, Akan B.; Essien, Joseph P.; Ekong, Cyril I.; Akpabio, Otobong; Olajire, Abaas A.

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb) concentrations in benthic sediments were analyzed through multi-step fractionation scheme to assess the levels and sources of contamination in estuarine, riverine and freshwater ecosystems in Niger Delta (Nigeria). The degree of contamination was assessed using the individual contamination factors (ICF) and global contamination factor (GCF). Multivariate statistical approaches including principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis and correlation test were employed to evaluate the interrelationships and associated sources of contamination. The spatial distribution of metal concentrations followed the pattern Pb>Cu>Cr>Cd>Ni. Ecological risk index by ICF showed significant potential mobility and bioavailability for Cu, Cu and Ni. The ICF contamination trend in the benthic sediments at all studied sites was Cu>Cr>Ni>Cd>Pb. The principal component and agglomerative clustering analyses indicate that trace metals contamination in the ecosystems was influenced by multiple pollution sources. PMID:27257934

  19. Fraction distribution and risk assessment of heavy metals and trace elements in sediments of Lake Uluabat.

    PubMed

    Katip, Aslıhan; Karaer, Feza; Başkaya, Hüseyin Savaş; Ileri, Saadet; Sarmaşik, Sonay

    2012-09-01

    To examine the status and risk of heavy metal pollution, the distribution of As, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb in the sediment of Lake Uluabat was characterized. The present study used a four-stage method to assess the ecotoxicological effects of the heavy metal and trace elements fractions in the sediment of Lake Uluabat. Total Cr and Ni concentrations in the sediment were determined to have exceeded the severe effect level (SEL) limit values. The percentages of the variable fractions of Cr and Ni were below 10%. Because of this reason, they were not defined to have a high risk. The relationships among the physicochemical parameters, heavy metals and trace elements in water and sediment were determined statistically. Pb, Cd, and As in the water were found in relation with some of the fractions. Moreover, it was thought that the amounts of the elements of As releasing into the water might be increased due to their relations with the physicochemical parameters.

  20. Mechanisms for trace metal enrichment at the surface microlayer in an estuarine salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lion, Leonard W.

    1982-01-01

    The relative contributions of adsorption to particulate surfaces, complexation with surface-active organic ligands and uptake by micro-organisms were evaluated with respect to their importance in the surface microlayer enrichment (‘partitioning’) of Cd, Pb and Cu. The contributions of each process were inferred from field data in which partitioning of the dissolved and particulate forms of Cd, Pb and Cu, total and dissolved organic carbon, particles and total bacteria were observed. In the South San Francisco Bay estuary, particle enrichment appears to control trace metal partitioning. Trace metal association with the particulate phase and the levels of partitioning observed were in the order Pb > Cu > Cd and reflect the calculated equilibrium chemical speciation of these metals in computer-simulated seawater matrices.

  1. Early holocene trace metal enrichment in organic lake sediments, Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.P.; Haertling, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Trace metals having accumulated in preindustrial ({sup 14}C dated) sediments from two small, acid-sensitive, arctic lakes show unexpected stratigraphic trends. Concentrations of Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni, and Zn have successive maxima in early to mid-Holocene sediments, of amplitudes comparable to lakes affected by loading from industrial atmospheric fallout. These profiles contrast sharply the concentrations of elements primarily associated with catchment erosion (Ti, V, Zr), and are attributed to the enhanced transport of organic-bound trace metals from the catchments to the lakes in the early Holocene. Paleoliminological conditions conferred effective sedimentary sinks for each of the enriched elements, although a certain degree of diagenetic mobilization is also observed. The study verifies that natural conditions may, under specific circumstances, produce sediment chemical signatures of potentially toxic metals that bear similarities to those reported from lakes adversely impacted by atmospheric pollution. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Bioavailability of Sodium and Trace Metals under Direct and Indirect Effects of Compost in Urban Soils.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Maryam; Clark, O Grant; Hendershot, William H; Jutras, Pierre; Prasher, Shiv O

    2016-05-01

    The contamination of urban soil with sodium (Na) and trace metals can be one of the major concerns for groundwater contamination and street tree health. The bioavailability of Na, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in urban soil amended with 0, 5, and 10% w/w compost was evaluated at none, medium, and high contamination levels of soil mixtures. The relationship between soil properties, compost addition, contamination level and metal uptake by barley ( L.) was determined using multivariate linear regression and path analysis. The results indicated the direct negative effect of compost on metal absorption possibly through specific complexation for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. Compost can also affect the absorption of Na and Cd indirectly by means of cation exchange capacity (CEC) and pH. The degree of soil contamination with metals can affect the competition of cations for the complexing sites of the soil mixtures and, therefore, can induce changes in metal availability for plants. Compost addition to the soil also increased nutrient availability, except for ammonium (NH) and nitrate (NO). We concluded that in the short term, the addition of compost significantly reduced metal bioavailability and improved nutrient availability. However, more studies are required to monitor the long-term ability of the compost to reduce Na and trace metal bioavailability in urban soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Monitoring trace metals in different tissues of Cyprinus carpio from the Indus River in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Farhat; Chaudhry, Abdul Shakoor

    2010-11-01

    This replicated 4×2 factorial study investigated the bioaccumulation of selected metals (Mn, Pb, Zn, Hg and Cr) in four tissues (gills, liver, muscle and skin) of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) domiciled in two sites (upstream and downstream) of Indus River in Mianwali district of Pakistan. The data were statistically compared for the main effects of the site and fish organs and their interaction on the bioaccumulation pattern of these metals in fish organs at P<0.05. It appeared that the fish sampled from downstream had higher trace metals than the fish from upstream. Significant differences between fish organs were observed for these trace metals (P<0.001). The fish showed higher bioaccumulation of vital metals like Zn and lower bioaccumulation for the toxic metals like Pb. The gills had the highest metal load followed by liver, skin and muscles. High concentrations of Mn, Hg and Cr were observed in different fish organs as compared to the WHO and Federal Environmental Protection Agency standards for food fish. However, the mean concentration of Pb and Zn were under the permissible limits of food fish. It implies that higher levels of Mn, Hg and Cr in fish muscles would have detrimental effects on the health of fish consumers such as pregnant women, children and elderly people of this study area.

  4. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS) Study of Trace Metal `Grains' in Solid Asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Avin E.; Bassioni, Ghada; Stephen, Sasi; Kühn, Fritz E.

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of trace metal `grains' in asphaltenes could play a significant role in enhancing refining and processing of crudes and also in providing useful information on mechanistic and migratory features linked to asphaltenes. These metals originate directly from interaction of oils with source-rock, mineral matter, and formation water and their accumulation in asphaltene matrices could vary from oil well to oil well. Suitable asphaltene samples were subjected to high-performance ICP-MS laser depth profiling (213 nm) to depths of 50 μm at 5 μm intervals. The study was conducted in the absence of standardization and characteristic intensities originating from the metals of interest were measured. Ten metal profiles were investigated (Na, Mg, Al, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Pb, V, and Ni). The experimental results showed non-uniform distribution of trace metals and identified areas where such metals agglomerate. The data suggested that certain chemical and physical conditions within the structure of asphaltenes are favorable for metal `grain' formation at specific points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage, and has considerable scope for future studies, including mathematical modeling simulations of asphaltenes. We also found that solid asphaltenes could be a useful forerunner of scale formation.

  5. Trace Metal-Humic Complexes in Natural Waters: Insights From Speciation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; Salters, V.; Sonke, J.

    2006-12-01

    The DOM cycle is intimately linked to the cycling and bioavailability of trace metals in aqueous environments. The presence or absence of DOM in the water column can determined whether trace elements will be present in limited quantities as a nutrient, or in surplus quantities as a toxicant. Humic substances (HS), which represent the refractory products of DOM degradation, strongly affect the speciation of trace metals in natural waters. To simulate metal-HS interactions in nature, experiments must be carried out using trace metal concentrations. Sensitive detection systems such as ICP-MS make working with small (nanomolar) concentrations possible. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with ICP-MS (CE-ICP-MS) has recently been identified as a rapid and accurate method to separate metal species and calculate conditional binding constants (log K_c) of metal-humic complexes. CE-ICP-MS was used to measure partitioning of metals between humic substances and a competing ligand (EDTA) and calculate binding constants of rare earth element (REE) and Th, Hf, and Zr-humic complexes at pH 3.5-8 and ionic strength of 0.1. Equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange (EDLE) experiments to validate the CE-ICP-MS method were performed to separate the metal-HS and metal-EDTA species by partitioning due to size exclusion via diffusion through a 1000 Da membrane. CE-ICP-MS experiments were also conducted to compare binding constants of REE with humic substances of various origin, including soil, peat, and aquatic DOM. Results of our experiments show an increase in log K_c with decrease in ionic radius for REE-humic complexes (the lanthanide contraction effect). Conditional binding constants of tetravalent metal-humic complexes were found to be several orders of magnitude higher than REE-humic complexes, indicating that tetravalent metals have a very strong affinity for humic substances. Because thorium is often used as a proxy for the tetravalent actinides, Th-HS binding constants can allow us

  6. Trace metals in Antarctica related to climate change and increasing human impact.

    PubMed

    Bargagli, R

    2000-01-01

    Metals are natural constituents of the abiotic and biotic components of all ecosystems, and under natural conditions they are cycled within and between the geochemical spheres--the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere--at quite steady fluxes. In the second half of the twentieth century, the huge increase in energy and mineral consumption determined anthropogenic emissions of several metals exceeding those from natural sources, e.g., volcanoes and windborne soil particles. In the Northern Hemisphere, the biogeochemical cycles of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and other metals were significantly altered, even in Arctic regions. On the contrary, available data on trace metal concentrations in abiotic matrices from continental Antarctica, summarized in this review, suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of Pb is probably the only one that has been significantly altered by anthropogenic emissions in Antarctica and elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, especially in the period 1950-1975. Environmental contamination by other metals from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica itself can generally only be detected in snow samples taken within a range of a few kilometers or several hundred meters from scientific stations. Local metal pollution from human activities in Antarctica may compromise studies aimed at assessing the biogeochemical cycle of trace elements and the effects of global climate change. Thus, this review focuses on concentrations of metals in atmospheric particulate, snow, surface soils, and freshwater from the Antarctic continent and surface sediments and seawater from the Southern Ocean, which can plausibly be regarded as global background values of trace elements. These baselines are also necessary in view of the construction of new stations, the expansion of existing facilities to support research, and the growth of tourism and fisheries. Despite difficulties in making comparisons with data from other remote areas of the world, concentrations of trace metals

  7. Accumulation of trace metals in grey mangrove Avicennia marina fine nutritive roots: the role of rhizosphere processes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Punarbasu; Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin

    2014-02-15

    Mangrove sediment has long been recognized as being important in restricting the mobility of contaminants in estuarine environments. To investigate the role of rhizosphere processes in the accumulation of trace metals in mangrove fine nutritive roots, the mangrove sediments and associated fine nutritive roots are collected from five major embayments of Sydney estuary (Australia) for geochemical studies. In this estuary Avicennia marina sediments are accumulating large quantities of trace metals due to presence of abundant fine sediment (<62.5 μm) and organic matter as well as anthropogenic input. Accumulation of trace metals in fine nutritive roots responds to total sediment chemistry mainly due to rhizosphere sediment geochemical processes resulting in a strong linear correlation between metal concentrations in fine nutritive roots vs. total and bio-available contents in sediments. Accumulation of trace metals in fine nutritive roots is almost always exceeds rhizosphere total sediment metal concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioaccumulation of trace metals and total petroleum and genotoxicity responses in an edible fish population as indicators of marine pollution.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Avelyno; Shyama, S K; Praveen Kumar, M K

    2017-08-01

    The present study reports the genetic damage and the concentrations of trace metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons prevailing in natural populations of an edible fish, Arius arius in different seasons along the coast of Goa, India as an indicator of the pollution status of coastal water. Fish were collected from a suspected polluted site and a reference site in the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Physico-chemical parameters as well as the concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and trace metals in the water and sediment as well as the tissues of fish collected from these sites were recorded. The genotoxicity status of the fish was assessed employing the micronucleus test and comet assay. A positive correlation (p<0.001) was observed between the tail DNA and micronuclei in all the fish collected. Multiple regression analysis revealed that tissue and environmental pollutant concentrations and genotoxicity were positively associated and higher in the tissues of the fish collected from the polluted site. Pollution indicators and genotoxicity tests, combined with other physiological or biochemical parameters represent an essential integrated approach for efficient monitoring of aquatic ecosystems in Goa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Trace metals in Suisun Bay, California; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Cascos, P.V.; Dagovitz, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A 5-month partial study (February to July 1983) was completed in Suisun Bay, a shallow embayment of San Francisco Bay, Calif., to determine characteristic heavy metal concentrations present in sediments and organisms (Corbicula clams) prior to possible discharge of San Luis Drain irrigation tile return water. Preliminary results show sediments are typical of other San Francisco Bay study sites, ranging from coarse sands to fine silt-clays. The sediments are enriched in manganese and low in organic carbon; iron is moderately enriched, with acid-extractable iron concentrations of 162-3,521 micro-g/g. Sediment concentrations of silver, zinc, lead, and cadmium measured between April and July are reported. Previous area studies have shown increased concentrations during autumn and winter, a period not covered in the data set. Due to insufficient data, interpretations are incomplete. Clam-tissue burdens for silver and zinc are similar to those found in Corbicula from pristine areas. Lead concentrations are typically below the 2-micrograms/g detection level. Corbicula do show indications of more tissue enrichment for cadmium and copper at estuarine stations than at riverine stations. (USGS)

  10. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    van Griethuysen, Corine; Luitwieler, Marloes; Joziasse, Jan; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-09-01

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a severe winter inundation and a dramatic water level drop during summer. Temporal changes were interpreted using multivariate analysis and chemical equilibrium calculations. Metal concentrations in sediment increased with depth, indicating a gradual improvement of sediment quality. In contrast, dissolved metal concentrations were highest in top layers due to mobilization from oxyhydroxides and precipitation with sulfides in deeper layers. Inundation had a mobilizing effect as it stimulated resuspension and oxygenation of sediment top layers. Water table lowering combined with organic matter decomposition led to immobilization due to sulfide formation. The chemistry of the sediments was consistent with model calculations, especially for macro-elements. The results illustrate the importance of seasonality for metal risk assessment.

  11. Assessment of essential and nonessential metals and different metal exposure biomarkers in the human placenta in a population from the south of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Serafim, A; Company, R; Lopes, B; Rosa, J; Cavaco, A; Castela, G; Castela, E; Olea, N; Bebianno, M J

    2012-01-01

    The general population is exposed to metals as trace amounts of metallic compounds are present in air, water, and food. Information on background exposures and biomarker concentrations of environmental chemicals in the general Portuguese population is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the levels of important nonessential metals with recognized toxicity cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) and essential metals copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), and zinc (Zn) in placentas of mothers living in south Portugal (Algarve). Due to the difficulty in establishing the effects of chemicals in a complex and variable environment, this study also aimed to examine the response of biomarkers, such as biochemical changes that occurs at subcellular levels in the presence of contaminants. The investigated biomarkers in placentas indicative of metal exposure or damage included the metallothioneins (MT), delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) (specific for Pb), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) as an index of oxidative stress damage. Moreover, HJ-BIPLOT was applied in order to identify and categorize mothers vulnerable to environmental contamination in this region. Metal concentrations in the placenta were not excessive but within the range found in most European studies. In general, the biomarkers MT and LPO were positively correlated with metal levels, while with ALAD the opposite occurred, indicating the selected battery of biomarkers were suitable to study the effects of metals on human placenta. Further, the application of multivariate analysis with HJ-BIPLOT showed that most significant factors contributing to maternal and fetal exposures via placenta were dietary and smoking habits.

  12. Dissolved Trace Metal and Organic Matter Relationships over Various Fluvial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.; Bianchi, T. S.; Aiken, G. R.

    2006-05-01

    The fluvial mobilization of many dissolved trace elements is affected by dissolved organic matter, primarily through complexation. We have examined the metal-DOC relationship through various means including: a) metal-DOC comparisons over large scales, b) metal-DOC comparisons between watersheds of differing landscapes, and c) an incubation experiment designed to see how changing DOC composition affects metal speciation. Our compilation of data includes time series samples from the lower Mississippi River, the Loch Vale Watershed, the Pearl River (MS), and the Yukon River as well as short time series and grab samples from a wide variety of streams and rivers in the Yukon Basin. When pooled together, overall relationships between DOC and the concentrations of certain trace elements (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn) are observed. In many cases this probably reflects competition between adsorption and organic complexation and suggests the possibility that complexation and adsorption constants in these systems vary less than the amounts of organic matter and adsorbing surfaces. In other words, it may be possible to develop a simple one-site, one- ligand model to approximately (or, at least, conceptually) describe fluvial trace element behavior. We also observe, when comparing watersheds of the Yukon River Basin, differences in both DOC and associated dissolved metal concentrations. If DOC is truly a master variable for these trace elements, then prediction of how climate change will affect DOC mobilization from various environments will lead to predictions of dissolved trace elements will also be affected. However, some caution is required for these generalizations. Because DOC tends to vary inversely with pH and conductivity on global fluvial scales, the importance of other controlling factors cannot be ignored. To further investigate DOC metal relationships we have also used column partitioning methods the examine metal speciation during a photo-incubation experiment. The

  13. From waste water treatment to land management: Conversion of aquatic biomass to biochar for soil amelioration and the fortification of crops with essential trace elements.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Paul, Nicholas A; Cole, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-07-01

    Macroalgae can be grown in industrial waste water to sequester metals and the resulting biomass used for biotechnological applications. We have previously cultivated the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium at a coal-fired power station to treat a metal-contaminated effluent from that facility. We then produced biochar from this biomass and determined the suitability of both the biomass and the biochar for soil amelioration. The dried biomass of Oedogonium cultivated in the waste water contained several elements for which there are terrestrial biosolids criteria (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se and Zn) and leached significant amounts of these elements into solution. Here, we demonstrate that these biomass leachates impair the germination and growth of radishes as a model crop. However, the biochar produced from this same biomass leaches negligible amounts of metal into solution and the leachates support high germination and growth of radishes. Biochar produced at 750 °C leaches the least metal and has the highest recalcitrant C content. When this biochar is added to a low-quality soil it improves the retention of nutrients (N, P, Ca, Mg, K and Mo) from fertilizer in the soil and the growth of radishes by 35-40%. Radishes grown in the soils amended with the biochar have equal or lower metal contents than radishes grown in soil without biochar, but much higher concentrations of essential trace elements (Mo) and macro nutrients (P, K, Ca and Mg). The cultivation of macroalgae is an effective waste water bioremediation technology that also produces biomass that can be used as a feedstock for conversion to biochar for soil amelioration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling of the distribution of heavy metals and trace elements in argan forest soil and parts of argan tree.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Faez A E; Bchitou, Rahma; Boulmane, Mohamed; Bouhaouss, Ahmed; Guillaume, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of heavy metals and trace elements from argan forest soil into the wood, leaves, almonds, and argan oil was studied. Analyzed metals were: chromium, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium. Correlations linking different behaviors of the studied heavy metals and trace elements observed by multidimensional analysis were attributed to partial-spatial variations. Whereas the RV-coefficient of wood, leaf, almond and oil groups was high, the soil group correlated poorly with the other groups.

  15. Analysis of trace metal concentrations in raw cow's milk from three dairy farms in North Gondar, Ethiopia: chemometric approach.

    PubMed

    Akele, M L; Abebe, D Z; Alemu, A K; Assefa, A G; Madhusudhan, A; de Oliveira, R R

    2017-09-11

    Concentrations of essential (Cu, Mn, and Zn) and toxic (Cr, Cd, and Pb) trace metals in 30 raw cow's milk samples were quantified using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were collected from the Nara-Awudarda, Tana-Abo, and Kosoye Amba-Rass sites in North Gondar, Ethiopia, preserved in a deep freezer (-20 °C), and then digested by Kjeldahl apparatus with HNO3/H2O2 (5:2; v/v) at 300 °C for 2.5 h. The data were subject to principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Overall hazard quotient (HQ) and carcinogenic risk (CR) values were also estimated to assess metal-related health risks. The mean concentrations of Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the milk samples ranged 0.468-0.828, 1.614-2.806, 0.840-1.532, 1.208-5.267, ND-0.330, and ND-0.186 mg/kg, respectively. The lowest values were obtained for Kosoye Amba-Rass milk samples, while the highest were found for those collected from Nara-Awudarda milk samples, probably due to high mineral enrichment and metal leaching (especially Cd and Pb) from coal deposits. PCA revealed clustering of samples with respect to their geographic origin. Validation of PLS-DA model showed 100% classification efficiency using external validation samples and detected Cd and Cu as trace metal markers. The HQ and CR values were within the safe level; however, the former is close to the alert threshold level for Nara-Awudarda milk samples. Thus, further studies on common foodstuffs, constituting a higher proportion in the local diet, are required in this area to provide a complete risk assessment.

  16. Trace metal dynamics in zooplankton from the Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Rejomon, G; Kumar, P K Dinesh; Nair, M; Muraleedharan, K R

    2010-12-01

    Trace metal (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) concentrations in zooplankton from the mixed layer were investigated at 8 coastal and 20 offshore stations in the western Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon of 2003. The ecotoxicological importance of trace metal uptake was apparent within the Bay of Bengal zooplankton. There was a distinct spatial heterogeneity of metals, with highest concentrations in the upwelling zones of the southeast coast, moderate concentrations in the cyclonic eddy of the northeast coast, and lowest concentrations in the open ocean warm gyre regions. The average trace metal concentrations (μg g⁻¹) in coastal zooplankton (Fe, 44894.1 ± 12198.2; Co, 46.2 ± 4.6; Ni, 62.8 ± 6.5; Cu, 84.9 ± 6.7; Zn, 7546.8 ± 1051.7; Cd, 46.2 ± 5.6; Pb, 19.2 ± 2.6) were higher than in offshore zooplankton (Fe, 3423.4 ± 681.6; Co, 19.5 ± 3.81; Ni, 25.3 ± 7.3; Cu, 29.4 ± 4.2; Zn, 502.3 ± 124.3; Cd, 14.3 ± 2.9; Pb, 3.2 ± 2.0). A comparison of average trace metal concentrations in zooplankton from the Bay of Bengal showed enrichment of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in coastal zooplankton may be related to metal absorption from primary producers, and differences in metal concentrations in phytoplankton from coastal waters (upwelling zone and cyclonic eddy) compared with offshore waters (warm gyre). Zooplankton showed a great capacity for accumulations of trace metals, with average concentration factors of 4 867 929 ± 569 971, 246 757 ± 51 321, 337 180 ± 125 725, 43 480 ± 11 212, 1 046 371 ± 110 286, 601 679 ± 213 949, and 15 420 ± 9201 for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb with respect to dissolved concentrations in coastal and offshore waters of the Bay of Bengal. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2009.

  17. Trace metal behaviour in estuarine and riverine floodplain soils and sediments: a review.

    PubMed

    Du Laing, G; Rinklebe, J; Vandecasteele, B; Meers, E; Tack, F M G

    2009-06-15

    This paper reviews the factors affecting trace metal behaviour in estuarine and riverine floodplain soils and sediments. Spatial occurrence of processes affecting metal mobility and availability in floodplains are largely determined by the topography. At the oxic-anoxic interface and in the anoxic layers of floodplain soils, especially redox-sensitive processes occur, which mainly result in the inclusion of metals in precipitates or the dissolution of metal-containing precipitates. Kinetics of these processes are of great importance for these soils as the location of the oxic-anoxic interface is subject to change due to fluctuating water table levels. Other important processes and factors affecting metal mobility in floodplain soils are adsorption/desorption processes, salinity, the presence of organic matter, sulphur and carbonates, pH and plant growth. Many authors report highly significant correlations between cation exchange capacity, clay or organic matter contents and metal contents in floodplain soils. Iron and manganese (hydr)oxides were found to be the main carriers for Cd, Zn and Ni under oxic conditions, whereas the organic fraction was most important for Cu. The mobility and availability of metals in a floodplain soil can be significantly reduced by the formation of metal sulphide precipitates under anoxic conditions. Ascending salinity in the flood water promotes metal desorption from the floodplain soil in the absence of sulphides, hence increases total metal concentrations in the water column. The net effect of the presence of organic matter can either be a decrease or an increase in metal mobility, whereas the presence of carbonates in calcareous floodplain soils or sediments constitutes an effective buffer against a pH decrease. Moreover, carbonates may also directly precipitate metals. Plants can affect the metal mobility in floodplain soils by oxidising their rhizosphere, taking up metals, excreting exudates and stimulating the activity of

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci and Inter-Organ Partitioning for Essential Metal and Toxic Analogue Accumulation in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Reuscher, Stefan; Kolter, Andreas; Hoffmann, Astrid; Pillen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of both essential nutrients and chemically similar toxic analogues accumulated in cereal grains have a major impact on the nutritional quality and safety of crops. Naturally occurring genetic diversity can be exploited for the breeding of improved varieties through introgression lines (ILs). In this study, multi-element analysis was conducted on vegetative leaves, senesced flag leaves and mature grains of a set of 54 ILs of the wild ancestral Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum in the cultivated variety Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare cv. Scarlett. Plants were cultivated on an anthropogenically heavy metal-contaminated soil collected in an agricultural field, thus allowing simultaneous localization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the accumulation of both essential nutrients and toxic trace elements in barley as a model cereal crop. For accumulation of the micronutrients Fe and Zn and the interfering toxin Cd, we identified 25, 16 and 5 QTL, respectively. By examining the gene content of the introgressions, we associated QTL with candidate genes based on homology to known metal homeostasis genes of Arabidopsis and rice. Global comparative analyses suggested the preferential remobilization of Cu and Fe, over Cd, from the flag leaf to developing grains. Our data identifies grain micronutrient filling as a regulated and nutrient-specific process, which operates differently from vegetative micronutrient homoeostasis. In summary, this study provides novel QTL for micronutrient accumulation in the presence of toxic analogues and supports a higher degree of metal specificity of trace element partitioning during grain filling in barley than previously reported for other cereals. PMID:27078500

  19. Distribution of dissolved and particulate trace metals in Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Hendy, I. L.; Aciego, S.; Meyer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential biolimiting micronutrient, however, the bioavailablility of Fe is dependent on source and speciation. In a high nutrient/low chlorophyll region of the ocean such as the Arctic, sea ice is an important aggregator of dissolved and particulate Fe from aerosol, lithogenic, and biogenic sources. While particulate Fe is less bioavailable than dissolved Fe, it is far more abundant in sea ice. As a result, sea ice directly enhances productivity by ice entrapment of mineral dust particulates containing Fe, which can be released into the surface ocean waters during melting. In seawater underlying sea ice, Fe can be concentrated up to two orders of magnitude higher than in the ice-free open ocean (Lannuzel et al., 2011). A transect of sea ice cores were collected in the spring of 2014 offshore of Barrow, AK, and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago to capture a gradient of sediment contributions from shelf sediments to aeolian sediments. At Barrow, AK, land fast first year ice was sampled. In the Canadian Arctic, both multi-year (pack ice) and first year (land fast) ice cores were retrieved. First year ice cores were between 100-150 cm thick and the multi year core was 195 cm thick. Cores were subsampled by depth and filtered. The resulting ice core sediments were analyzed for elemental composition, and multistep Fe-leaching experiments were conducted to determine the fraction of soluble Fe. Thus we have ascertained the solubility of particulate Fe prior to onset of melt season. Dissolved trace metals were also analyzed to ascertain changes in concentration with ice core depth of lithogenic elements (Mn, Al) and biologically important elements (Si, Mo, Cu, Zn). Preliminary results show some enrichment of lithogenic inputs near surface, indicating dust deposition, and lower portions of the cores, suggesting resuspended sediments from the continental shelf. Concentrations of some biologically important elements decrease with depth, suggesting possible

  20. Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W.; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A.; Motelin, G.K.

    1998-11-01

    Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

  1. Baseline trace metals in seagrass, algae, and mollusks in a southern Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Linosa Island, Sicily).

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Bocca, Beatrice; Iacobucci, Marta; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Mecozzi, Mauro; Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Trace elements were analyzed in organisms collected at five sampling stations along coastal areas of Linosa Island, Sicily (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were measured in Posidonia oceanica L. Delile tissues, the two brown algae Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy and Cystoseira sp., and the two gastropod mollusks Monodonta turbinata Born and Patella caerulea L. Seawater samples were also collected at each site to assess soluble metal concentrations and to gain relevant information on their bioaccumulation ability. Data were processed by multivariate techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis on PCA factors. The scoreplots obtained showed that the pollutant distribution is more significantly correlated with species than with sites. For seaweeds, P. oceanica was associated with higher Cd, Cu, and Zn levels; Padina species had higher Cr concentrations, and Cystoseira had higher Pb levels. For mollusks, Monodonta species had high concentrations of Cu and Cr and Patella species were associated with Cd. Some general metal bioaccumulation patterns are described but no one sampling site was more contaminated than the others. The hypothesis of Linosa island serving as a reference ecosystem for baseline trace metal levels in southern Tyrrhenian areas is indeed supported by the statistical comparison among other southern Tyrrhenian ecosystems performed with Kruskall Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. For P. oceanica leaves, P. pavonica, M. turbinata, and P. caerulea, this study confirms their usefulness as possible cosmopolitan biomonitors of trace metals in marine Mediterranean areas.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace metal contamination of coastal sediment and biota from Togo.

    PubMed

    Gnandi, Kissao; Musa Bandowe, Benjamin A; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Porrachia, Magali; Kersten, Michael; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    The state of contamination of tropical environments, particularly in Africa, remains a relatively under explored subject. Here, we determined polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and trace metal concentrations in coastal sediment and biota samples (fish and mussels) from Togo (West Africa). In the sediments, the ∑21 PAH concentrations ranged from <4 ng g(-1) to 257 ng g(-1), averaging 92 ng g(-1). Concentration ratios of low molecular weight PAHs (2-3 rings) versus high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 rings) were always lower than 1 (ranging from 0.08 to 0.46) indicating that high molecular weight PAHs were dominant in all sediment samples, and that PAHs originated mainly from anthropogenic combustion activities. The sediments were also analyzed for major elements and a total of 15 trace metals, which were found in elevated concentrations. The calculated enrichment factor (EF) values relative to the Earth's crust show that the contamination is extremely severe for Cd (EF = 191), severe for Cr (EF = 18) and U (EF = 17.8), moderately severe for Zr (EF = 8.8), for Ni (EF = 6.8), Sr (EF = 5.9) and Ba (EF = 5.4), and moderate for V (EF = 3.6) and Zn (EF = 3.4). Sediments sampled in areas affected by the dumping of phosphorite mine tailings showed particularly high concentrations of trace metals. Overall, concentrations of both PAHs and trace metals in sediment tend to increase from the coastline to the open sea (2 km offshore). This is attributable to the increasingly finer texture of coastal sediment found offshore, which has a terrigenous origin and appears loaded with various contaminants through adsorption processes. Such high loads of trace metals were also found in the biota (fish and mussels). The ratio of measured trace metal concentrations in biota to threshold limits set by the World Health Organization herein defined as relative health factor (RHF) was high. Average RHF values in fish were highest for Se (470), As (250), Ag (97), Ni (78), Mn (63), Fe (53), Pb

  3. Trace metals in the coals of the East Siberia: Distribution, utilization and environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Pashkov, G.L.; Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuzmin, V.I.; Boiko, Y.V.; Kontsevoi, A.A.

    1998-12-31

    Three coal basins in East Siberia, the Russia Lena, Kansk-Achinsk and South-Yakutsk basins, are huge coal basins which contain various sorts of both brown and high quality subbituminous and bituminous coals with low ash and sulfur content. The coals have great industrial significance for the production of energy, coke and chemicals. However, these coals are less characterized in terms of the content and distribution of trace metals, some of which are of industrial significance, other metals are toxic and radioactive. The data on the distribution of trace metals in these three coal basins, their geochemical occurrence and the behavior in chemical treatment and burning are presented in the paper. Separate coals were found to contain a large amount of valuable metals such as Ge (up to 1,400 g/ton of ash), V (up to 1,400 g/t), Sc (up to 220 g/t), Nb (up to 280 g/t), Cr (up to 1,300 g/t), Co (up to 320 g/t), Ni (580 g/t) and thus could be an industrial source of metal production. The methods for the extraction of Ge, Sc, Y, Nb and other metals prior or after combustion are described. The aspects of coal characterization in terms of toxic and radioactive impact on the environment are discussed.

  4. The adaptive function of melanin-based plumage coloration to trace metals

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, M.; Gasparini, J.; Jacquin, L.; Frantz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals produced by anthropogenic activities are of major importance in urban areas and might constitute a new evolutionary force selecting for the ability to cope with their deleterious effects. Interestingly, melanin pigments are known to bind metal ions, thereby potentially sequestering them in inert body parts such as coat and feathers, and facilitating body detoxification. Thus, a more melanic plumage or coat coloration could bring a selective advantage for animals living in polluted areas. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the link between melanin-based coloration and zinc and lead concentrations in feathers of urban feral pigeons, both at capture time and after one year of captivity in standardized conditions. Results show that differently coloured pigeons had similar metal concentrations at capture time. Metal concentrations strongly decreased after one year in standardized conditions, and more melanic pigeons had higher concentrations of zinc (but not lead) in their feathers. This suggests that more melanic pigeons have a higher ability to store some metals in their feathers compared with their paler counterparts, which could explain their higher success in urbanized areas. Overall, this work suggests that trace metal pollution may exert new selective forces favouring more melanic phenotypes in polluted environments. PMID:24671830

  5. Trace metal levels in water, fish, and sediment from River Nile, Egypt: potential health risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Dahshan, Hesham; Abd-Elall, Amr Mohamed Mohamed; Megahed, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the impact of metal pollution on the main economic fish species Tilapia nilotica and to assess the potential health risk from consuming this contaminated fish in Egypt. Trace metals, including Ag, Al, Cd, Bo, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, St, V, Zn, and As, were determined in water, Tilapia nilotica, and sediments from the River Nile, Domiate branch, Egypt. Metal concentrations in fish of Al, Cd, Co, Fe, Mn, Pb, V, and Zn (mg/kg dry weight [dw]) and concentrations in sediment of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn (mg/kg dw) were above the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA-407) levels. However, trace metals in river water were still at permissible levels for Egyptian standards. The hazard index (HI) of estimated metal mixtures for intake of Tilapia nilotica (23.37) demonstrated that intake resulted in higher noncarcinogenic risk. In conclusion, the overall problem of metal contamination in fish collected from the River Nile was more serious than postulated to occur in an industrialized and densely populated area. In the light of known risks to public health, environmental protection laws are needed in Egypt.

  6. Trace metal concentrations in menhaden larvae Brevoortia patronus from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Peter J.; Hoss, Donald E.

    1986-09-01

    Whole body concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe were measured in individual gulf menhaden larvae, Brevoortia patronus (11-18 mm standard length) from coastal waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico as part of a continuing project investigating the mechanisms of biological interaction and effect of trace metals in marine food webs. Larvae were collected at three different times between February 1981 and 1982 at two locations, offshore of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River and offshore of Galveston, Texas. Fish at the Mississippi location had significantly ( P≤0·05) greater concentrations of all metals compared with those from the Galveston location. No significant ( P>0·05) differences in concentration were detected among the three sampling periods. Menhaden larvae had metal conentrations comparabe to other species of larval fish and zooplankton from the Gulf of Mexico and other coastal waters. Differences in metal concentrations in larvae from the two locations appear to be a subtle response of the fish to differences in the trace metal chemistries of the two coastal areas. Processes influencing metal concentrations are discussed.

  7. Biomonitoring of trace metal pollution using the bivalve molluscs, Villorita cyprinoides, from the Cochin backwaters.

    PubMed

    George, Rejomon; Martin, G D; Nair, S M; Chandramohanakumar, N

    2013-12-01

    Trace metal concentrations in the muscle of the bivalve Villorita cyprinoides from the Cochin backwaters (southwest coast of India) were investigated during the monsoon, post-monsoon and pre-monsoon periods. The seasonal average ranges of metals (μg g(-1), dry weight) in the bivalve were as follows: Fe (18,532.44-28,267.05), Co (23.25-37.58), Ni (10.56-19.28), Cu (3.58-11.35), Zn (48.45-139.15), Cd (1.06-1.50) and Pb (3.05-4.35). The marginally elevated metal concentrations in bivalve muscles are probably related to high influx of metals as a result of pollution from the industries and agricultural fields with consequent increased bioavailability of metals to the bivalve. Evaluation of the risks to human health associated with consumption of the bivalves suggested that there is no health risk for moderate shellfish consumers. A regular and continuous biomonitoring program is recommended to establish V. cyprinoides as a bioindicator for assessing the effects of trace metal pollution and to identify future changes to conserve the "health" of this fragile ecosystem.

  8. Trace metals solubility in rainwater: evaluation of rainwater quality at a watershed area, Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Başak, Bertan; Alagha, Omar

    2010-08-01

    In this study, 79 bulk precipitation samples were collected at two sampling sites near Büyükçekmece Lake, one of the important drinking water sources of Istanbul, for the period of October 2001 to July 2002. The study comprised the determination of trace and toxic metals concentrations in rain water. The concentrations of the metals in this study were found to be higher than those reported by other researchers around the world. The solubility of toxic metals was found in the order of Cd>Cu>V>Zn>Ni>Pb>Cr. Solubility of metals under acidic conditions (pH<5.5) was approximately five times higher than those under neutral conditions with Cd as the most soluble metal (50% soluble). Statistical evaluations including seasonal variations, crustal enrichment factors, and correlation matrix were discussed to identify the possible sources of these pollutants. The study revealed that anthropogenic elements were highly enriched especially for Cd>Cu>Pb which were found to be highly enriched. Significant portion of Cu and Pb could be increased by the effect of local sources like cement industry in the area; however, the rest of the investigated trace metals could be brought to the sampling site by long-range transport to the Büyükçekmece Lake watershed area.

  9. Tidal salt marsh sediment in California, USA. Part 2: occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Green, Peter G; Higashi, Richard M; Young, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Surface sediment samples (0-5 cm) from 5 tidal salt marshes along the coast in California, USA were analyzed to investigate the occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals. Among study areas, Stege Marsh located in the central San Francisco Bay was the most contaminated marsh. Concentrations of metals in Stege Marsh sediments were higher than San Francisco Bay ambient levels. Zinc (55.3-744 microg g(-1)) was the most abundant trace metal and was followed by lead (26.6-273 microg g(-1)). Aluminum normalized enrichment factors revealed that lead was the most anthropogenically impacted metal in all marshes. Enrichment factors of lead in Stege Marsh ranged from 8 to 49 (median=16). Sediments from reference marshes also had high enrichment factors (2-8) for lead, indicating that lead contamination is ubiquitous, possibly due to continuous input from atmospherically transported lead that was previously used as a gasoline additive. Copper, silver, and zinc in Stege Marsh were also enriched by anthropogenic input. Though nickel concentrations in Stege Marsh and reference marshes exceeded sediment quality guidelines, enrichment factors indicated nickel from anthropogenic input was negligible. Presence of nickel-rich source rock such as serpentinite in the San Francisco Bay watershed can explain high levels of nickel in this area. Coefficients of variation were significantly different between anthropogenically impacted and non-impacted metals and might be used as a less conservative indicator for anthropogenic input of metals when enrichment factors are not available.

  10. Risks of using EDTA as an agent for trace metals dosing in anaerobic digestion of olive mill solid waste.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Pinto-Ibieta, F; Braga, A F M; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2017-02-21

    Low concentrations of trace elements in many organic wastes recommend their supplementation in order to avoid potential limitations. Different chelating agents have been used to ensure an adequate trace metal pool in the soluble fraction, by forming dissolved complexes. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is probably the most common, although several negative effects could be associated with its usage. Biomethane potential tests were performed using Olive Mill Solid Waste as the substrate, supplementing different combinations of Fe, Co, Ni, Ba, always under the presence of EDTA. Results show that Ni and Co slightly recovered biodegradability. However, Ba supplementation resulted in worsening the methane yield coefficient in all cases. High concentration of EDTA led to decrease in the activity of anaerobic digestion. High availability of EDTA induces the capture of trace metals like Co or Ni, key trace metals for anaerobic biomass activity. While supplementing trace metals, the addition of Ba and/or EDTA must be carefully considered.

  11. Characterization of trace metals on soot aerosol particles with the SP-AMS: detection and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, S.; Onasch, T.; Saarikoski, S.; Timonen, H.; Saarnio, K.; Sueper, D.; Rönkkö, T.; Pirjola, L.; Häyrinen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-11-01

    A method to detect and quantify mass concentrations of trace metals on soot particles by the Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was developed and evaluated in this study. The generation of monodisperse Regal black (RB) test particles with trace amounts of 13 different metals (Na, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Ba) allowed for the determination of the relative ionization efficiency of each metal relative to black carbon (RIEmeas). The observed RIEmeas / RIEtheory values were larger than unity for Na, Rb, Ca, Sr and Ba due to thermal surface ionization (TSI) on the surface of the laser-heated RB particles. Values closer to unity were obtained for the transition metals Zn, Cu, V and Cr. Mn, Fe, and Ni presented the lowest RIEmeas / RIEtheory ratios and highest deviation from unity. The latter discrepancy is unexplained; however it may be related to problems with our calibration method and/or the formation of metal complexes that were not successfully quantified. The response of the metals to the laser power was investigated and the results indicated that a minimum pump laser current of 0.6 A was needed in order to vaporize the metals and the refractory black carbon (rBC). Isotopic patterns of metals were resolved from high-resolution mass spectra, and the mass-weighted size distributions for each individual metal ion were obtained using the high-resolution particle time-of-flight (HR-PToF) method. The RIEmeas values obtained in this study were applied to the data of emission measurements in a heavy-fuel-oil-fired heating station. Emission measurements revealed a large number of trace metals, including evidence for metal oxides and metallic salts, such as vanadium sulfate, calcium sulfate, iron sulfate and barium sulfate, which were identified in the SP-AMS high-resolution mass spectra. SP-AMS measurements of Ba, Fe, and V agreed with ICP-MS analyzed filter samples within a factor of 2 when emitted rBC mass loadings were elevated.

  12. Evaluation of essential trace and toxic elements in scalp hair samples of smokers and alcohol user hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Brabazon, Dermot; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Naher, Sumsun

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of hypertension has been associated to cigarette smoking and consumption of alcohol. In the present study, trace and toxic elements were determined in scalp hair of patients diagnosed with hypertension who are smokers and habitual alcohol drinkers living in Dublin, Ireland. These results were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy, nonsmokers, nondrinking controls. The concentrations of trace and toxic elements were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference material (NCS ZC 81002b) and by the conventional wet acid digestion method on the same certified reference material and on real samples. The recovery of all the studied elements was found to be in the range of 97.5%-99.7% in certified reference material. The results of this study showed that the mean values of cadmium, copper, iron, nickel and lead were significantly higher in scalp hair samples of both smoker and nonsmoker hypertensive patients than referents (P < 0.001); whereas, the concentration of zinc was lower in the scalp hair samples of hypertensive patients of both genders. The deficiency of zinc and the high exposure of trace and toxic metals as a result of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption may be synergistic with risk factors associated with hypertension.

  13. Microscopic evaluation of trace metals in cloud droplets in an acid precipitation region.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijun; Wang, Yan; Collett, Jeffrey L; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Wang, Zifa; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-05-07

    Mass concentrations of soluble trace metals and size, number, and mixing properties of nanometal particles in clouds determine their toxicity to ecosystems. Cloud water was found to be acidic, with a pH of 3.52, at Mt. Lu (elevation 1,165 m) in an acid precipitation region in South China. A combination of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for the first time demonstrates that the soluble metal concentrations and solid metal particle number are surprisingly high in acid clouds at Mt. Lu, where daily concentrations of SO2, NO2, and PM10 are 18 μg m(-3), 7 μg m(-3), and 22 μg m(-3). The soluble metals in cloudwater with the highest concentrations were zinc (Zn, 200 μg L(-1)), iron (Fe, 88 μg L(-1)), and lead (Pb, 77 μg L(-1)). TEM reveals that 76% of cloud residues include metal particles that range from 50 nm to 1 μm diameter with a median diameter of 250 nm. Four major metal-associated particle types are Pb-rich (35%), fly ash (27%), Fe-rich (23%), and Zn-rich (15%). Elemental mapping shows that minor soluble metals are distributed within sulfates of cloud residues. Emissions of fine metal particles from large, nonferrous industries and coal-fired power plants with tall stacks were transported upward to this high elevation. Our results suggest that the abundant trace metals in clouds aggravate the impacts of acid clouds or associated precipitation on the ecosystem and human health.

  14. Baseline sediment trace metals investigation: Steinhatchee River estuary, Florida, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, C.A.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Highley, A.B.; Donoghue, J.F.; Ragland, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. These data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with future metal concentration data measurements. The Steinhatchee River estuary is a relatively pristine bay located within the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area on the North Central Florida Gulf of Mexico coastline. The river flows 55 km through woodlands and planted pines before emptying into the Gulf at Deadman Harbor. Water quality in the estuary is excellent at present. There is minimal development within the watershed. The estuary is part of an extensive system of marshes that formed along the Florida Gulf coast during the Holocene marine transgression. Sediment accretion rate measurements range from 1.4 to 4.1 mm/yr on the basis of lead-210 measurements. Seventy-nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations, representing four lithofacies: clay- and organic-rich sands, organic-rich sands, clean quartz sands, and oyster bioherms. Samples were analyzed for texture, total organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, clay mineralogy, and major and trace-metal content. Following these analyses, metal concentrations were normalized against geochemical reference elements (aluminum and iron) and against total weight percent organic matter. Metals were also normalized granulometrically against total weight percent fines (<0.062 mm). Concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for all metals except mercury. Mercury concentrations were determined by cold-flameless atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Granulometric measurements were made by sieve and pipette analyses. Organic matter was determined by two methods: weight loss upon ignition and elemental analysis (by Carlo-Erba Furnace) of carbon and nitrogen. X

  15. Recovery of Trace and Heavy Metals from Coal Combustion Residues for Reuse and Safe Disposal: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashvani; Samadder, Sukha Ranjan; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian

    2016-09-01

    The safe disposal of coal combustion residues (CCRs) will remain a major public issue as long as coal is used as a fuel for energy production. Both dry and wet disposal methods of CCRs create serious environmental problems. The dry disposal method creates air pollution initially, and the wet disposal method creates water pollution as a result of the presence of trace and heavy metals. These leached heavy metals from fly ash may become more hazardous when they form toxic compounds such as arsenic sulfite (As2S3) and lead nitrate (N2O6Pb). The available studies on trace and heavy metals present in CCRs cannot ensure environmentally safe utilization. In this work, a novel approach has been offered for the retrieval of trace and heavy metals from CCRs. If the proposed method becomes successful, then the recovered trace and heavy metals may become a resource and environmentally safe use of CCRs may be possible.

  16. BCO-DMO: Supporting the Management and Sharing of Marine Trace Metal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N. J.; Gegg, S. R.; Groman, R. C.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Glover, D. M.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. GEOTRACES program seeks to identify processes controlling the distribution of trace elements and isotopes in the world's oceans. Quantifying marine trace elements and understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles is important for predicting the ocean's response to environmental changes, such as a changing climate and the release of elements into the ocean due to human activities. This research program is collaborative in nature and only one component within the broader International GEOTRACES program. An important part of the collaborative scientific process is having access to trustworthy, well-documented data from colleagues. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) serves as the U.S. GEOTRACES Data Assembly Center, and facilitates the management, sharing, and long-term preservation of trace element and isotope data not only from U.S. GEOTRACES researchers, but from marine biogeochemists across the United States. The BCO-DMO data managers work closely with investigators contributing their data to ensure quality and completeness of documentation to foster data discovery and re-use by potential collaborators. The BCO-DMO system provides free and open access to data and tools for discovery, mapping, visualization, and download. Trace element and isotope datasets from the recent U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect and Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruises, as well as other GEOTRACES-related projects are now available from BCO-DMO. Related data from legacy programs, including the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), are also freely available for use by investigators seeking to further the understanding of trace metal cycling in the oceans. This presentation will highlight relevant trace metal data managed by BCO-DMO as well as the tools and features that aid in data discovery, access, and visualization.

  17. Aerosol Organic Matter-Trace Metal Relationships Revealed by Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Sleighter, R. L.; Morton, P. L.; Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R. U.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric delivery of aerosols is important for the biogeochemical cycling of organic matter (OM) and trace elements in marine environments. Aerosols over marine environments can be derived from marine sources or transported from continental regions of variable vegetative cover and anthropogenic influence. These different sources are key determinants of aerosol OM composition, as well as trace metal amounts and characteristics. Dust-influenced aerosols typically contain higher amounts of Fe than anthropogenic-influenced aerosols but have lesser % of soluble Fe (%FeS), believed to be the bioavailable form of Fe for marine phytoplankton. Four samples from the 2008 GEOTRACES intercalibration experiments (Miami, FL, USA) were analyzed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and related to both air mass back trajectories and %FeS. Three samples showed aerosol sources from the east consistent with Saharan dust inputs, while the fourth sample was derived in part from air masses to the north, influenced by the North American continent. This North American-influenced sample was collected following the 3 day period with the highest %FeS (1.3-1.7%) of the 11 day intercalibration experiment (mean = 0.4-1.1%). FT-ICR mass spectra showed 795 peaks common to the dust-influenced samples but absent from the North American-influenced sample. These peaks were assigned molecular formulas characterized by CHO and CHON compounds with lower H/C and O/C ratios than the 1257 formulas common to all 4 samples, suggesting that the dust-influenced aerosols carry OM that is less oxygenated and more condensed in structure along with Fe of lesser solubility. Air mass trajectory analyses revealed samples collected during a 2010 cruise in the North Atlantic Ocean to be characterized by European-influenced (anthropogenic), African-influenced (dust), and primarily marine air masses, making them ideal for further exploration of the

  18. Feedback Interactions between Trace Metal Nutrients and Phytoplankton in the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Sunda, William G.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon) the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are also regulated by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium). Of these, iron is most limiting to phytoplankton growth and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N2) fixation rates, and thus is important in controlling ocean inventories of fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in regulating biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO2 pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO2 and CO2-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese) have lesser effects on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals control the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and recycling processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, biological release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution of marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history. PMID:22701115

  19. Airborne mineral components and trace metals in Paris region: spatial and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Poulakis, E; Theodosi, C; Bressi, M; Sciare, J; Ghersi, V; Mihalopoulos, N

    2015-10-01

    A variety of mineral components (Al, Fe) and trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) were simultaneously measured in PM2.5 and PM10 fractions at three different locations (traffic, urban, and suburban) in the Greater Paris Area (GPA) on a daily basis throughout a year. Mineral species and trace metal levels measured in both fractions are in agreement with those reported in the literature and below the thresholds defined by the European guidelines for toxic metals (Cd, Ni, Pb). Size distribution between PM2.5 and PM10 fractions revealed that mineral components prevail in the coarse mode, while trace metals are mainly confined in the fine one. Enrichment factor analysis, statistical analysis, and seasonal variability suggest that elements such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Fe, and Cu are attributed to traffic, V and Ni to oil combustion while Cd and Pb to industrial activities with regional origin. Meteorological parameters such as rain, boundary layer height (BLH), and air mass origin were found to significantly influence element concentrations. Periods with high frequency of northern and eastern air masses (from high populated and industrialized areas) are characterized by high metal concentrations. Finally, inner city and traffic emissions were also evaluated in PM2.5 fraction. Significant contributions (>50 %) were measured in the traffic site for Mn, Fe, Cr, Zn, and Cu, confirming that vehicle emissions contribute significantly to their levels, while in the urban site, the lower contributions (18 to 33 %) for all measured metals highlight the influence of regional sources on their levels.

  20. Use of Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence to Measure Trace Metal Distribution in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkous, D.; Flinn, J. M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Frederickson, C.; Jones, B. F.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2002-12-01

    X26A, National Synchrotron Light Source, was used to quantitatively evaluate the spatial distribution of trace metals, such as Zn and Cu, in brain tissue. X-ray microprobe techniques offer distinct advantages over other analytical methods by allowing analyses to be done in-situ with little or no chemical pretreatment and low detection limits (about 1 ppm). In the context of neuroscience, SXRF can provide non-destructive measurements of specific metal concentrations and distribution within nerve (brain) tissue. Neuronal tissue from organisms having undergone different normal or experimental conditions may be compared, with analytical capacities not limited by binding states of the metal (i.e., vesicular or enzymatic), as is the case with staining techniques.. Whole regions of tissue may be scanned for detectable trace metals at spatial resolutions of 10um or less using focused monochromatic x-ray beams. Here special attention has been given to zinc because it is the most common trace metal in the brain, and levels have been increasing in the environment. In this investigation, zinc concentrations present within the hilus of a rat hippocampus, and to a lesser extent in the cortex, have been shown to increase following long-term ingestion of zinc-enhanced drinking water that was associated with deficits in spatial memory. Concomitantly, copper concentrations in the internal capsule were comparatively lower. Other first order transition metals, Cr, V, Mn, and Co were not detected. In contrast, elevated levels of Zn, Cu, and Fe have been seen in amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Assessment of trace metal contamination in mangrove ecosystems from Senegal, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bodin, N; N'Gom-Kâ, R; Kâ, S; Thiaw, O T; Tito de Morais, L; Le Loc'h, F; Rozuel-Chartier, E; Auger, D; Chiffoleau, J-F

    2013-01-01

    The inorganic contamination of sediment and harvested molluscs was investigated in the mangrove environment of Southern West Senegal. Trace metals were analysed in surface sediments, two bivalves (Arca senilis and Crassostera gasar) and three gastropods (Conus spp., Hexaplex duplex and Pugilina morio) collected from four stations: Dionewar, Niodor and Falia localised in the Saloum Delta, and Fadiouth from the Petite Côte. A geochemical normalisation approach by using aluminium allowed for discrimination of sediment contamination among sites. Indeed, Fadiouth appeared highly contaminated with Cd, Hg and Ni compared to the Saloum Delta. For all mangrove sites, trace metals exhibited significant higher concentrations (on a dry weight basis) in shellfish compared to sediments, excepted for Ni and Pb. The distribution pattern followed a similar global trend in molluscs regardless of the spatio-temporal variability, with the predominance of Zn (80% of total metals) followed by Cu and Cd. However, strong differences of metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation in biota were demonstrated, revealing the requirement of employing a suite of organism bioindicators to monitor metal contamination in mangrove ecosystems. From an ecotoxicological point of view, trace metal levels in sediments from the Petite Côte and the Sine-Saloum Estuary were below the effects range-low (ERL) threshold limit of the sediment quality guidelines for adverse biological effects (SQGs). On the opposite, some concerns about Cd contamination of edible shellfish from Southern West Senegal were highlighted, from both the safety point of view of local populations' health, and the chemical quality point of view of exported resources.

  2. Feedback Interactions between Trace Metal Nutrients and Phytoplankton in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sunda, William G

    2012-01-01

    In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon) the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are also regulated by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium). Of these, iron is most limiting to phytoplankton growth and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N(2)) fixation rates, and thus is important in controlling ocean inventories of fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in regulating biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO(2) pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO(2) and CO(2)-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese) have lesser effects on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals control the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and recycling processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, biological release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution of marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history.

  3. Reactive solute transport in streams: A surface complexation approach for trace metal sorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    A model for trace metals that considers in-stream transport, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption is presented. Linkage between a surface complexation submodel and the stream transport equations provides a framework for modeling sorption onto static and/or dynamic surfaces. A static surface (e.g., an iron-oxide-coated streambed) is defined as a surface with a temporally constant solid concentration. Limited contact between solutes in the water column and the static surface is considered using a pseudokinetic approach. A dynamic surface (e.g., freshly precipitated metal oxides) has a temporally variable solid concentration and is in equilibrium with the water column. Transport and deposition of solute mass sorbed to the dynamic surface is represented in the stream transport equations that include precipitate settling. The model is applied to a pH-modification experiment in an acid mine drainage stream. Dissolved copper concentrations were depressed for a 3 hour period in response to the experimentally elevated pH. After passage of the pH front, copper was desorbed, and dissolved concentrations returned to ambient levels. Copper sorption is modeled by considering sorption to aged hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) on the streambed (static surface) and freshly precipitated HFO in the water column (dynamic surface). Comparison of parameter estimates with reported values suggests that naturally formed iron oxides may be more effective in removing trace metals than synthetic oxides used in laboratory studies. The model's ability to simulate pH, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between trace metal chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale.

  4. Modern proteomes contain putative imprints of ancient shifts in trace metal geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Christopher L.; Yang, Song; Palenik, Brian; Bourne, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    Because of the rise in atmospheric oxygen 2.3 billion years ago (Gya) and the subsequent changes in oceanic redox state over the last 2.3–1 Gya, trace metal bioavailability in marine environments has changed dramatically. Although theorized to have influenced the biological usage of metals leaving discernable genomic signals, a thorough and quantitative test of this hypothesis has been lacking. Using structural bioinformatics and whole-genome sequences, the Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Co-binding metallomes of 23 Archaea, 233 Bacteria, and 57 Eukarya were constructed. These metallomes reveal that the overall abundances of these metal-binding structures scale to proteome size as power laws with a unique set of slopes for each Superkingdom of Life. The differences in the power describing the abundances of Fe-, Mn-, Zn-, and Co-binding proteins in the proteomes of Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes are similar to the theorized changes in the abundances of these metals after the oxygenation of oceanic deep waters. This phenomenon suggests that Prokarya and Eukarya evolved in anoxic and oxic environments, respectively, a hypothesis further supported by structures and functions of Fe-binding proteins in each Superkingdom. Also observed is a proliferation in the diversity of Zn-binding protein structures involved in protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions within Eukarya, an event unlikely to occur in either an anoxic or euxinic environment where Zn concentrations would be vanishingly low. We hypothesize that these conserved trends are proteomic imprints of changes in trace metal bioavailability in the ancient ocean that highlight a major evolutionary shift in biological trace metal usage. PMID:17098870

  5. Modern proteomes contain putative imprints of ancient shifts in trace metal geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Christopher L; Yang, Song; Palenik, Brian; Bourne, Philip E

    2006-11-21

    Because of the rise in atmospheric oxygen 2.3 billion years ago (Gya) and the subsequent changes in oceanic redox state over the last 2.3-1 Gya, trace metal bioavailability in marine environments has changed dramatically. Although theorized to have influenced the biological usage of metals leaving discernable genomic signals, a thorough and quantitative test of this hypothesis has been lacking. Using structural bioinformatics and whole-genome sequences, the Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Co-binding metallomes of 23 Archaea, 233 Bacteria, and 57 Eukarya were constructed. These metallomes reveal that the overall abundances of these metal-binding structures scale to proteome size as power laws with a unique set of slopes for each Superkingdom of Life. The differences in the power describing the abundances of Fe-, Mn-, Zn-, and Co-binding proteins in the proteomes of Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes are similar to the theorized changes in the abundances of these metals after the oxygenation of oceanic deep waters. This phenomenon suggests that Prokarya and Eukarya evolved in anoxic and oxic environments, respectively, a hypothesis further supported by structures and functions of Fe-binding proteins in each Superkingdom. Also observed is a proliferation in the diversity of Zn-binding protein structures involved in protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions within Eukarya, an event unlikely to occur in either an anoxic or euxinic environment where Zn concentrations would be vanishingly low. We hypothesize that these conserved trends are proteomic imprints of changes in trace metal bioavailability in the ancient ocean that highlight a major evolutionary shift in biological trace metal usage.

  6. Ecological risk assessment of trace metal accumulation in sediments of Veraval Harbor, Gujarat, Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, S; Khadanga, Mukunda Kesari; Kumar, J Prince Prakash Jeba; Raghumaran, S; Vijaya, R; Jena, Basanta Kumar

    2017-01-15

    In this study, different types of indices were used to assess the ecological risk of trace metal contamination in sediments on the basis of sediment quality guidelines at Veraval Fishery Harbor. Sediment samples were collected from three sectors in pre-, post-, and monsoon seasons in 2006. Trace metal concentrations were higher in the inner sector during post-monsoon, and it showed the highest statistical significance (p<0.01) among the stations. Pollution load index was higher than unity, indicating alternation by effluent discharge from industries. Enrichment factor and geo-accumulation index showed that Cd, Pb, and Zn were enriched in the northern part of the harbor and Pb had accumulated in the harbor sediment. The ecological risk assessment index revealed that Ni, Zn, and Pb were higher than the effect range median values, indicating their potential toxicity to the aquatic environment in the Veraval Harbor. Hence, the harbor is dominated by anthropogenic activities rather than natural process.

  7. Effect of starvation on trace metal levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Uthe, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of bivalves as monitors of marine coastal contamination has become widespread. However, many investigations have shown that numerous factors affect contaminant concentrations, in particular trace metals, in mussels tissues. This is not surprising since some metals, e.g., copper and zinc, have well-established physiological roles, while others, such as cadmium, are toxic to higher animals and have no known physiological function. An organism can serve as a quantitative indicator of environmental contamination only if a tissue contaminant concentration or burden reflects the contamination of the animal's environment in a rational way. The authors have investigated the effect of starvation on a number of trace elements in blue mussels (mytilus edulis) to determine which elements were not eliminated as the animal starved (a burden control model) and which elements were excreted (a concentration control model) in response to decreasing tissue weight.

  8. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  9. Occurrence, bioavailability and toxic effects of trace metals and organic contaminants in mangrove ecosystems: a review.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane

    2012-11-01

    Although their ecological and socioeconomic importance has received recent attention, mangrove ecosystems are one of the most threatened tropical environments. Besides direct clearance, hydrological alterations, climatic changes or insect infestations, chemical pollution could be a significant contributor of mangrove degradation. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the occurrence, bioavailability and toxic effects of trace contaminants in mangrove ecosystems. The literature confirmed that trace metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) and Endocrine Disrupters Compounds (EDCs) have been detected in various mangrove compartments (water, sediments and biota). In some cases, these chemicals have associated toxic effects on mangrove ecosystem species, with potential impact on populations and biodiversity in the field. However, nearly all studies about the bioavailability and toxic effects of contaminants in mangrove ecosystems focus on selected trace metals, PAHs or some "conventional" POPs, and virtually no data exist for other contaminant groups. The specificities of mangrove ecosystems (e.g. biology, physico-chemistry and hydrology) support the need for specific ecotoxicological tools. This review highlights the major data and methodological gaps which should be addressed to refine the risk assessment of trace pollutants in mangrove ecosystems.

  10. LA-ICP-MS Study of Trace Elements in the Chanuskij Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petaev, Michail I.

    2005-01-01

    This progress report covers work done during the second year of the 3-year proposal. During this year we resolved many issues relevant to the analytical technique developed by us for measuring trace elements in meteoritic metals. This technique was used to measure concentrations of Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Sb, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in eight large (120 - 160 microns) metal grains from both "igneous" and "metamorphic" lithologies of the Chanuskij silicate inclusions. The first application of OUT technique to metal grains from thin sections showed some limitations. Small thickness of metal grains in the thin section limited the signal to 3-4 time-slices instead of 10- 1 1 ones in polished sections of iron meteorites studied before.

  11. Development of functional trait biomarkers for trace metal exposure in freshwater clams (Musculium spp.).

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Cody M; Wieker, Jessica; Pope, Rachelle; Brown, Chelsea; Cooper, Emily; DeWitt, Jariel; Gunselman, Samuel; Jensen, Cory; Stevens, Whitney; Yri, Jenae; Nezat, Carmen; Joyner-Matos, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to trace metals typically causes oxidative stress; these consequences are better-characterized in estuarine and marine species than in freshwater species. How cellular-level responses to metal pollution influence whole-organism and population-level traits is poorly understood. We tested whether exposure to single metals (zinc and cadmium) and to metal mixtures (water in equilibrium with sediment from a highly polluted lake) alters two ecologically-relevant traits in freshwater clams, locomotion and reproduction. Fingernail clams (Musculium spp.) from unimpacted habitats were exposed to single metals and the metal mixture for up to 49days. The single metal doses (≤5mg/L Zn and ≤20μg/L Cd) were not toxicologically meaningful as clam survival, burial, and climbing activity did not differ across treatments. Water in equilibrium with the lake sediment contained cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. Clams exposed to this metal mixture had decreased climbing activity but no change in burial activity. Metal-exposed clams had lower fecundity (number of shelled juveniles extruded by adult clams) and patterns in metal accumulation corresponded with lake sediment dose and clam activity. In contrast to the functional traits, stress protein expression and whole-clam glycogen content did not vary across treatment groups. These results indicate that fingernail clams of the genus Musculium are appropriate for development as sentinel species for metal pollution and can serve as a model for determining how metal pollution alters metabolic allocation patterns in freshwater organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Trace metal residues in biota and sediments from Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, C.J.; DeLeon, I.R.

    1986-07-01

    As part of the continuing studies to characterize and identify chemical pollutants in natural bodies of water and as part of a preliminary study of the nutrient and toxic substances chemistry for the three passes into Lake Pontchartrain, the present study was conducted to establish baseline values to twelve USEPA priority pollutant trace metals in indigenous biota and sediment samples from the three passes of Lake Pontchartrain. The twelve metals included arsenic, beryllium, copper, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel, thallium, selenium, chromium, silver, and zinc.

  13. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemi, M. M.; Parvin, P. Moosakhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A.; Majdabadi, A.; Abachi, S.

    2014-06-15

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  14. Ion beam methods to determine trace heavy metals concentrations and sources in urban airsheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David D.; Stelcer, Ed; Garton, David

    2002-05-01

    Unique data for Australia on the concentration of selected metals in fine particle ambient air pollution is presented for urban, industrial and rural sites along 300 km section of the eastern coast line of Australia around Sydney. IBA techniques were used to determine over 25 different chemical species in the air including, H, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Se and Pb. This included many trace metals at concentrations around 1 ng/m 3 of air sampled.

  15. The toxicity of selected trace metals to Lecane inermis rotifers isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Beata; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Kocerba-Soroka, Wioleta; Fyda, Janusz; Sobczyk, Mateusz; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the toxicity of a range of trace metals to the rotifer Lecane inermis, a species tested as a potential biological tool to control activated sludge bulking caused by overgrowth of filamentous bacteria in wastewater treatment plants. LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 % of individuals, mg dm(-3)) were ranked in the following order: Cu < Al < Fe < Zn < Sn < Mn. L. inermis apparently is more sensitive to metals than other aquatic species widely used as model organisms in ecotoxicological testing, making it potentially useful for quick ecotoxicological tests.

  16. Rapid amperometric detection of trace metals by inhibition of an ultrathin polypyrrole-based glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ayenimo, Joseph G; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive and reliable inhibitive amperometric glucose biosensor is described for rapid trace metal determination. The biosensor utilises a conductive ultrathin (55 nm thick) polypyrrole (PPy) film for entrapment of glucose oxidase (GOx) to permit rapid inhibition of GOx activity in the ultrathin film upon exposure to trace metals, resulting in reduced glucose amperometric response. The biosensor demonstrates a relatively fast response time of 20s and does not require incubation. Furthermore, a complete recovery of GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx biosensor is quickly achieved by washing in 2mM EDTA for only 10s. The minimum detectable concentrations achieved with the biosensor for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) by inhibitive amperometric detection are 0.48, 1.5, 1.6 and 4.0 µM, respectively. Also, suitable linear concentration ranges were achieved from 0.48-3.3 µM for Hg(2+), 1.5-10 µM for Cu(2+), 1.6-7.7 µM for Pb(2+) and 4-26 µM for Cd(2+). The use of Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots revealed that the suppressive effects observed with Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) were via non-competitive inhibition, while those of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were due to mixed and competitive inhibition. The stronger inhibition exhibited by the trace metals on GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx film was also confirmed by the low inhibition constant obtained from this analysis. The biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of trace metals in tap water samples.

  17. Mapping human health risks from exposure to trace metal contamination of drinking water sources in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis; Shen, Heqing; Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Syeda Maria; Bokhari, Habib; Schäfer, Ralf B; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah

    2015-12-15

    The consumption of contaminated drinking water is one of the major causes of mortality and many severe diseases in developing countries. The principal drinking water sources in Pakistan, i.e. ground and surface water, are subject to geogenic and anthropogenic trace metal contamination. However, water quality monitoring activities have been limited to a few administrative areas and a nationwide human health risk assessment from trace metal exposure is lacking. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) and eight relevant spatial predictors, we calculated nationwide human health risk maps by predicting the concentration of 10 trace metals in the drinking water sources of Pakistan and comparing them to guideline values. GWR incorporated local variations of trace metal concentrations into prediction models and hence mitigated effects of large distances between sampled districts due to data scarcity. Predicted concentrations mostly exhibited high accuracy and low uncertainty, and were in good agreement with observed concentrations. Concentrations for Central Pakistan were predicted with higher accuracy than for the North and South. A maximum 150-200 fold exceedance of guideline values was observed for predicted cadmium concentrations in ground water and arsenic concentrations in surface water. In more than 53% (4 and 100% for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% confidence interval (CI)) of the total area of Pakistan, the drinking water was predicted to be at risk of contamination from arsenic, chromium, iron, nickel and lead. The area with elevated risks is inhabited by more than 74 million (8 and 172 million for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% CI) people. Although these predictions require further validation by field monitoring, the results can inform disease mitigation and water resources management regarding potential hot spots.

  18. Geographic and Oceanographic Information within Trace Metals in Moray Eel Otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, W.; Windom, H.; Buck, C.

    2016-02-01

    Adult moray eels exhibit high site fidelity to particular reefs. We hypothesized that the trace metal composition of otoliths of eels could potentially provide insight into gradients in oceanographic processes on the South Atlantic Bight continental shelf where eels are resident on patchy hardbottom reefs throughout the entire region. Otoliths of moray eels collected from the mid-shelf of South Carolina were examined for their trace metal composition (Ba, Sr, Pb, Cu, Li, Mg, V, Mn, Zn). Samples were broadly lumped into four regions: "North," "North Cape Romain," "South Cape Romain," and "South". Trace metal composition within otoliths showed no latitudinal trends. However, factor analysis of the trace metals revealed that otoliths from the South Cape Romain region appeared as a compositionally distinct subgroup, based primarily on their Li and Mg content. Recent work on corals (Montagna et al. 2014) has shown the Li/Mg ratio within coral skeletons is sensitive to calcification temperature and can be used as a paleothermometer. If analogous processes influence Li/Mg ratios within otoliths, the data suggest that the bottom water at the South Cape Romain site is colder than other locations along the South Carolina shelf, perhaps as a result of locally enhanced upwelling. Additional samples from NC, SC, GA, and FL are being examined to see if other sites within the South Atlantic Bight show similar patterns. Montagna, P., McCulloch, M., Douville, E., et al. 2014. Li/Mg systematics in scleratinian corals: Calibration of the thermometer. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 132: 288-310.

  19. Impact of diatom growth on trace metal dynamics (Mn, Mo, V, U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterholz, Helena; Simon, Heike; Beck, Melanie; Maerz, Joeran; Rackebrandt, Siri; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Feudel, Ulrike; Simon, Meinhard

    2014-03-01

    In order to examine the specific role of diatoms in cycling of the trace metals manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), vanadium (V), and uranium (U) Thalassiosira rotula, Skeletonema marinoi, Chaetoceros decipiens, and Rhizosolenia setigera were grown in batch cultures axenically and inoculated with three different bacterial strains isolated from the North Sea. Algal and bacterial growth, concentrations of trace metals and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were monitored over time and showed that Mn and V were removed from the dissolved phase whereas Mo and U were not. R. setigera and T. rotula exhibited lowest growth and lowest removal whereas S. marinoi grew best and removed highest fractions of Mn and V. The high potential of Mn removal by S. marinoi was also evident from its 7 × higher Mn/P elemental ratio relative to T. rotula. The presence of bacteria modified the timing of the growth of S. marinoi but not directly trace metal removal whereas bacteria enhanced trace metal removal in the cultures of T. rotula and C. decipiens. Modeling of phytoplankton growth, concentrations of Mn and DOC fraction in axenic T. rotula cultures indicated that processes of binding and desorption of Mn to excreted organic components are important to explain the varying proportions of dissolved Mn and thus must be considered as an active component in Mn cycling. The results show distinct differences in the potential of the diatoms in the removal of Mn and V and that bacteria can play an active role in this context. S. marinoi presumably is an important player in Mn and V dynamics in coastal marine systems.

  20. Mineral and trace metal supplement for use with synthetic diets based on comminuted chicken.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J M; Aggett, P J; Delves, H T; Clayton, B E

    1978-12-01

    Earlier studies (Alexander et al., 1974; Lawson et al., 1977) suggested a suitable composition for a mineral and trace metal supplement for use with synthetic diets containing some natural food. Such a mixture has been evaluated in patients receiving a diet based on comminuted chicken and has been shown to be adequate. This conclusion was based on balance experiments measuring Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ca, Mg, N, and P.

  1. Trace metals inputs in the Adour estuary, southwestern france: upstream versus local sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Point, D.; Bareille, G.; Amouroux, D.; Stoichev, T.; Donard, O.

    2003-04-01

    Estuarine systems play a major role in the distribution, transport and fate of heavy metals. The contamination of number of estuarine environments in the Atlantic Europe has largely been studied, especially by determining the gross inputs of contaminants by their watersheds and by studying the behavior of metals in the mixing zone between fresh and salt waters where complex physical, chemical and biological processes occurs. However, in urban and industrialized estuaries source-specific information, including sewage effluents, industrial discharges, urban runoff, combined sewer overflows, is lacking. The Adour hydrosystem (southwestern, France) is poorly known. The estuarine part is characterized by an important anthropogenic pressure close to its mouth with large urban and industrial activities ending to important inputs of contaminants such as trace metals. An environmental assessment program was purchased to evaluate and quantify the anthropogenic pressure on the Adour estuary ecosystem. A total of 25 anthropogenic sources entering the estuarine mixing zone have been followed towards 4 campaigns along 2001 and 2002. On each stations both dissolved and particulate fractions were analyzed for trace elements (Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb) and organic carbon (OC) according to clean procedures for each effluent. Trace metal concentrations were combined with discharge flow measurements to establish anthropogenic net fluxes to the estuarine environment. These fluxes are compared with upstream inputs from the whole drainage basin and discussed in terms of specific contaminants/anthropogenic source identification. Specific data treatment approach allows the possibility to trace effluent source and origin ending to a classification. Specific periods focused in that study reflects well the influence and the anthropogenic impact into the estuary during dry weather conditions (summer) which combined to low discharge condition are the most unfavourable conditions ending to a maximum impact

  2. Trace metal bioavailability in sediments from a reference site, Ribeira Bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Janine M M; Machado, Wilson; Santos, Joana M; Lessa, Josane A

    2016-05-15

    Surface sediments were collected near potential contamination sources impacting Ribeira Bay (Brazil), a system considered as a 'reference site' for trace metals. Physicochemical properties (pH and Eh), grain size and concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (TP), acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) and simultaneously-extracted metals (Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were analyzed. Although relatively low metal concentrations were found, correlations of Zn and Ni with high TP levels suggested an association with sewage inputs, while other metals presented associations with specific geochemical carriers (TOC, Fe and Mn compounds). AVS levels exceeding those of the sums of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (ΣSEM) by at least one order of magnitude and TOC-normalized differences between ΣSEM and AVS ((ΣSEM-AVS)/fOC) near to or below than -200μmolgOC(-1) indicated that there were sufficient AVS and TOC levels to control trace metal bioavailability in sediment pore water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interspecific and geographical variations of trace metal concentrations in cephalopods from Tunisian waters.

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, Moncef; Metian, Marc; Hajji, Tarek; Guyot, Thierry; Ben Chaouacha-Chékir, Rafika; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-06-01

    The concentrations of six metals (Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) were investigated and compared in three tissues (arms, digestive gland, and mantle) of three cephalopod species from the Tunisian waters: the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), and the European squid (Loligo vulgaris). Whatever the species or the sites, the digestive gland displayed the highest concentrations of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, highlighting its major role in their bioaccumulation and detoxification. This is also true for Hg but only for the digestive gland of O. vulgaris. Muscle from the arms and the mantle contained thus relatively low trace metal concentrations except for Hg in L. vulgaris and S. officinalis. Geographic comparison of metal concentrations in Tunisian cephalopods from three locations indicates that higher concentrations of Ag, Pb, and Hg were observed in cephalopods from northern and eastern coasts, whereas the highest Cd levels were detected in the southeastern, reflecting different conditions of exposure. Comparing the trace element concentrations between species, Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, and Zn concentrations were the highest in the digestive gland of octopuses. This may be related to the differences in ecological features and swimming behavior among different cephalopod species. Effects of length and sex on metal levels were also considered, indicating a limited influence of sex on metal concentration.

  4. A mesocosm study of oxygen and trace metal dynamics in sediment microniches of reactive organic material.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Niklas J; Larsen, Morten; Zhang, Hao; Glud, Ronnie N; Davison, William

    2017-09-12

    Deposition of particulate organic matter (POM) induces diagenetic hot spots at the sediment-water interface (SWI). Here we explore the effects of intensive POM degradation for metal mobilization at the SWI. By using a combined planar optode-DGT (diffusive gradient in thin-films) sensor we obtained simultaneous measurements of dissolved O2 and trace metal dynamics around an aggregate of reactive organic matter placed on the SWI of a sediment mesocosm. The aggregate induced a rapid, highly localized, decrease in O2 concentration, resulting in an anoxic feature at the SWI. Co-located with this feature, we observed intense Fe and Mn mobilization, removal of Co, Ni and Zn and found evidence for the concurrent release and precipitation of Pb within a small confined volume. We also identified two small microniches in the anoxic sediment below the SWI, defined by elevated trace metal mobilization. Differences between the metal release rates in these two microniches indicate that they were formed by the mineralisation of different types of organic matter buried in the sediment. Our results provide direct empirical evidence for the potential importance of POM-induced reactive microniches when considering the fluxes of metals from and within aquatic sediments, and suggest that other elements' cycles may also be affected.

  5. Influence of inorganic complexes on the transport of trace metals through permeation liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane; Gunkel-Grillon, Peggy; Worms, Isabelle; Martin, Michel; Buffle, Jacques

    2009-07-30

    Under specific conditions (pH, concentrations), trace metals may form, with environmental inorganic ligands, neutral complexes which, in principle, might diffuse passively through biological membranes or influence the response of (bio)analytical sensors for trace metals based on permeation liquid membrane (PLM). In this study, metal (Cu, Cd, Pb) transport through the planar PLM device was evaluated in the presence of major environmental inorganic ligands such as sulfate, carbonate and chloride under conditions where neutral complexes may be formed (up to 73% of neutral metal complex in the solution). In the presence of sulfate, comparison of predicted and experimental PLM fluxes of Cu, Pb and Cd, suggests that passive transport of neutral sulfate-metal complexes does not occur. This was confirmed by comparing fluxes in the presence and absence of carrier. In the presence of carbonate (for Cd, Cu and Pb) and chloride (for Pb and Cd), however, experimental PLM fluxes were greater than predicted (up to 4 and 25 times in the presence of carbonate and chloride, respectively), but experiments in the absence of carrier in the membrane revealed that no passive transport of neutral complexes (MCl(2) or MCO(3)) occurs through PLM. A possible mechanism is discussed. In parallel to the experiments with PLM, the influence of carbonate on the internalization fluxes of Cu(II) and Pb(II) by the freshwater algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was assessed. Similarly to the results of PLM, the fluxes of these two metals were larger than expected (based on the free metal ion activity model). Thus, even though PLM and bioaccumulation mechanisms are certainly different, similar unexpected behaviours occur for the metal transport through the PLM and biological membrane of C. reinhardtii, in the presence of carbonate.

  6. New in-situ procedures for measuring trace metals in pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Davison, W.; Grime, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    The most mobile and biological and chemically active fractions of trace metals in sediments are the dissolved components present in pore waters. Measuring metals in pore waters is complicated by the requirement for anoxic handling procedures. Due to the dynamic nature of sediment, steep concentration gradients extending over as little as 1 mm may develop at the sediment-water interface. New procedures for measuring metals in pore waters using polyacrylamide gels as in-situ probes are described. The gel can be used to establish a diffusive equilibration in a thin-film (DET). Because the film is typically less than 1 mm thick, equilibration is achieved within five minutes and insertion of the gel assembly causes minimal disturbance of sediment. An alternative procedure is to use a diffusive gradient in a thin-film (DGT), whereby a monolayer of chelating resin is incorporated at one side of the gel. Such a technique provides a kinetic measurement of labile species in solution. If the supply of metal from solid phase sediment to pore waters is fast enough, DGT provides a quantitative estimate of labile metal concentration. Alternatively, it measures directly the rate of supply of metal from solid phase to pore waters. As both DET and DGT are simple procedures capable of submillimeter spatial resolution, they provide previously unobtainable information on trace metal concentrations and fluxes. Furthermore, DGT has the potential to be used as a long-term monitor, providing mean concentrations of metals in sediment pore waters over periods of days, weeks, or even months.

  7. Accumulation of Trace Metals by Mangrove Plants in Indian Sundarban Wetland: Prospects for Phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ranju; Favas, Paulo J C; Pratas, J; Jonathan, M P; Ganesh, P Sankar; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The work investigates on the potential of ten mangrove species for absorption, accumulation and partitioning of trace metal(loid)s in individual plant tissues (leaves, bark and root/pneumatophore) at two study sites of Indian Sundarban Wetland. The metal(loid) concentration in host sediments and their geochemical characteristics were also considered. Mangrove sediments showed unique potential in many- fold increase for most metal(loid)s than plant tissues due to their inherent physicochemical properties. The ranges of concentration of trace metal(loid)s for As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in plant tissue were 0.006-0.31, 0.02-2.97, 0.10-4.80, 0.13-6.49, 4.46-48.30, 9.2-938.1, 0.02-0.13, 9.8-1726, 11-5.41, 0.04-7.64, 3.81-52.20 μg g (-1)respectively. The bio- concentration factor (BCF) showed its maximum value (15.5) in Excoecaria agallocha for Cd, suggesting that it can be considered as a high-efficient plant for heavy metal bioaccumulation. Among all metals, Cd and Zn were highly bioaccumulated in E. agallocha (2.97 and 52.2 μg g (-1) respectively. Our findings suggest that the species may be classified as efficient metal trap for Cd in aerial parts, as indicated by higher metal accumulation in the leaves combined with BCF and translocation factor (TF) values.

  8. Accumulation and elimination of trace metals in a transplantation experiment with Crassostrea rhizophorae.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Kersanach, M; Theede, H; Eversberg, U; Lobo, S

    2000-01-01

    Oysters, Crassostrea rhizophorae, were reciprocally transplanted to two different sites: a contaminated site in the Cotegipe Channel at Aratu Bay and an uncontaminated site at Cacha-Prego, inside and outside of Todos os Santos Bay (Brazil), respectively. Trace metal accumulation was measured after 0, 15, 30, and 60 days of exposure at the contaminated site. Oysters transplanted for 60 days from the clean to the contaminated site had accumulated cadmium and lead to similar concentrations as found in the native oysters. They had also accumulated copper and zinc, but to lower levels compared to native specimens. Elimination experiments were carried out by transplanting oysters in the reverse direction. After 30 days, concentrations of cadmium and lead had decreased to levels comparable to those in the native specimen, whereas concentrations of copper and zinc did not diminish. A second elimination experiment, bringing back to Cacha-Prego oysters that had been exposed 60 days at Cotegipe Channel, indicated stronger decreases of copper and lead, but no clear changes of cadmium and zinc concentrations. The accumulation experiment with C. rhizophorae is useful to estimate trace metal bioavailability and changes in concentrations as a function of time at the contaminated site. The different results of elimination experiments in the uncontaminated site suggest different degrees of trace metal fixation after long-term and short-term accumulation periods.

  9. The recent history of trace metal accumulation in the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Heike; Reimers, Clare E.

    1991-11-01

    A new 56-year record, spanning the years 1931-1986, of trace metal accumulation rates for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn is constructed from the laminated sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California. The sedimentary record yields information on short-term climatic changes and allows a resolution of 1 year (±2 years) for age assignments. Concentrations of Cu, Ni and, especially Pb, in bulk sediment solids reflect anthropogenic input. The Pb sediment profile reflects recent developments in Pb consumption: the introduction of unleaded gasoline in the U.S.A. is documented by a levelling off of the Pb concentrations in the sediments. Within the Cd and Zn profiles, there is no suggestion of anthropogenic input. However, flux calculations indicate that industrial pollution does contribute to the accumulation of Zn in the basin sediments, while the Cd content can be attributed entirely to contributions from natural sources. When the total accumulation of anthropogenic trace metals in the Santa Barbara Basin is calculated for the time period 1971-1980, its magnitude is insignificant compared to amounts released from coastal areas both adjacent to and south of the basin. This finding indicates that the removal of trace metals from seawater in this region is efficient near the point sources.

  10. Determination of trace metals by anodic stripping voltammetry using a bismuth-modified carbon nanotube electrode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gil Ho; Han, Won Kyu; Park, Joon Shik; Kang, Sung Goon

    2008-07-15

    A bismuth-modified carbon nanotube electrode (Bi-CNT electrode) was employed for the determination of trace lead, cadmium and zinc. Bismuth film was prepared by in situ plating of bismuth onto the screen-printed CNT electrode. Operational parameters such as preconcentration potential, bismuth concentration, preconcentration time and rotation speed during preconcentration were optimized for the purpose of determining trace metals in 0.1M acetate buffer solution (pH 4.5). The simultaneous determination of lead, cadmium and zinc was performed by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The Bi-CNT electrode presented well-defined, reproducible and sharp stripping signals. The peak current response increased linearly with the metal concentration in a range of 2-100 microg/L. The limit of detection was 1.3 microg/L for lead, 0.7 microg/L for cadmium and 12 microg/L for zinc (S/N=3). The Bi-CNT electrode was successfully applicable to analysis of trace metals in real environments.

  11. The effect of selected trace metals on the fertilization success of several scleractinian coral species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt-Brushett, A. J.; Harrison, P. L.

    2005-12-01

    This study provides new information on the effects of various concentrations of the trace metals copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, and nickel on fertilization success of gametes from the scleractinian reef corals Goniastrea aspera, Goniastrea retiformis, Acropora tenuis, and Acropora longicyathus. The EC50 values (the concentration that reduces the fertilization rate by 50% relative to the control fertilization) for copper effects on fertilization success of these coral species range from 15 to 40 µg/L, which is similar to responses of other marine invertebrates. The EC50 values for lead were 1450 1800 µg/L for the Acropora species, and >2400 µg/L for G. aspera gametes, which indicates that lead was much less toxic than copper. Fertilization responses to zinc and nickel were variable and a significant reduction in fertilization success for A. tenuis gametes was found only at very high cadmium concentrations. The data from this study and other recent research clearly demonstrate that some trace metals impair the fertilization success of gametes from faviid and acroporiid reef corals. Trace metal inputs into reef waters should be limited and controlled to avoid potential interference with sexual reproductive processes of reef corals.

  12. Determination of trace metals in canned anchovies and canned rainbow trouts.

    PubMed

    Mol, Suhendan

    2011-02-01

    Trace metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd, Sn, Hg and Pb) concentrations of canned anchovies (Engraulis encrasicolus Linnaeus, 1758) and canned rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, 1792), commercialized in Turkey, were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The average contents of trace metals in canned anchovies and canned rainbow trouts were found as 50.708 and 6.980 mg/kg for iron, 22.467 and 11.605 mg/kg for zinc, 1.145 and 0.541 mg/kg for copper, 0.019 and 0.001 mg/kg for cadmium, 0.140 and 0.023 mg/kg for tin, 0.041 and 0.026 mg/kg for mercury, and 0.188 and 0.167 mg/kg for lead, respectively. Although these products pose no risk with respect to the concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, tin and mercury, some of the samples had higher contents of lead and iron than the permissible limits. Comprehensive and periodic controls of trace metals in canned fish are needed to assess the safety of these products with respect to human health.

  13. Distribution of arsenic and trace metals in the floodplain agricultural soil of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Dewan Ali; DelValls, Tomas Angel; Blasco, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic contaminated groundwater of Bangladesh is one of the largest natural calamities of the world. Soil samples were collected from floodplain agricultural land of Faridpur and Dhamrai regions to estimate the concentration of arsenic and other trace metals (copper, nickel, zinc, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, cobalt, mercury, and manganese). Average arsenic in Faridpur soil was recorded more than three times higher than the world limit and nearly five times higher than that of Dhamrai. The average copper, chromium and cobalt both in Faridpur and Dhamrai agricultural soil were also higher than the Dutch and the world standards. Both Fardipur and Dhamrai soil contain low amount of selenium in comparison to world limit (0.7 mg kg(-1)). A poor correlation between manganese and arsenic was noticed in Faridpur. This may be played a subordinate role in the fixation of arsenic in soil. This study also reveals that the area which has arsenic and trace metal contaminated groundwater may also contain high level of arsenic and trace metals in the agricultural soil due to irrigation with contaminated groundwater.

  14. Changes in blood concentrations of trace metals in cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Minoru; Niigata, Riho; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Kume, Manabu; Hirai, Midori; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The administration of cisplatin (CDDP) may influence trace metal concentrations in body fluids. In order to test this hypothesis, the blood concentrations of trace metals were determined during the present study in eight Japanese esophageal and lung cancer patients receiving CDDP-based chemotherapy. The levels of manganese, iron (Fe), cobalt, copper, zinc (Zn), platinum and lead in the plasma were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, the serum levels of Fe, transferrin and ferritin were evaluated. The baseline plasma concentration of Fe in patients with esophageal cancer was significantly lower than that in lung cancer patients (P=0.011), although there were no significant differences identified with respect to the plasma levels of other trace metals. The data obtained from six fasting patients without blood transfusion demonstrated that plasma concentrations of Fe increased 3.5-fold soon after CDDP treatment and returned to baseline levels ~10 days after therapy. The excessive Fe levels in the bloodstream induced changes in serum ferritin and transferrin levels. Furthermore, serum Zn levels increased 1.8-fold in the 1–3 days following CDDP treatment, and serum cystatin C levels transiently increased. These findings indicate that serum Fe and Zn levels may be useful to understanding the physiological responses in the early stages of CDDP-based chemotherapy, which may be associated with systemic inflammation and/or tissue distribution of CDDP. PMID:28105341

  15. Review of heavy metal accumulation on aquatic environment in Northern East Mediterrenean Sea part I: some essential metals.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ayşe Bahar; Yanar, Alper; Alkan, Ela Nur

    2017-03-01

    All pollutants can reach the aquatic environments and the levels of heavy metals in upper members of the food web like fish can reach values many times higher than those found in aquatic environment or in sediments. Although heavy metals are essential or non-essential, all heavy metals are potentially harmful to humans and most organisms at some level of exposure and absorption. Marine organisms are good indicators for long-term monitoring of metal accumulation. The present review study is for evaluation of the data from previous studies about the toxic effects of selected heavy metals, like essential metals (copper, zinc, iron, chromium, and manganese), on seawater, sediment, and in different tissues of aquatic animals (demersal and bentic fish, invertabres) collected from different areas in Northern East Mediterrenean Sea since the 1990s. Some concern arose from previous studies, particularly in terms of safety for human consumption. For this purpose, 86 articles and 4 theses were examined and information was collected on the table to open a forward-looking view of the pollution of studied area. In previous studies, the variations in feeding habits, habitats, and the level of copper found in edible muscles of the demersal fish species (deep water fish species, carnivore) such as Mullus barbatus barbatus, Solea lascaris, Sparus aurata were always higher than those found in pelagic (omnivore) Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata. Results show discrepancies caused by many factors; thus, more work must be done carefully.

  16. Detection of trace metals in coal and coal ash by an advanced optical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Munukutla, S.; Mahajan, S.; Collett, W.

    1997-12-31

    There is increasing concern regarding the surface or subsurface disposal of ash. It is well known that trace metals such as antimony, arsenic, thallium, cadmium, selenium, mercury and lead are released from ash into the ground by leaching. There is a considerable deterioration of the quality of ground water near ash disposal sites and edible plants nearby are known to absorb some of the trace metals and be passed to animals eating those plants. Some of the current techniques that are available for determining the concentrations of the trace elements in coal and coal ash are very time consuming and require very expensive and sophisticated instrumentation. Research supported by a consortium of five utilities and, subsequently, by the Electric Power Research Institute has been ongoing at the Center for Electric Power in order to detect trace metals in coal and coal ash by an advanced optical technique. The objective of this research has been to develop a simple and rapid technique giving results as accurately as possible. In this technique, a carefully weighed sample of coal or coal ash is mixed thoroughly with a known quantity of copper powder and is compacted into a circular disc. This disc forms the flat side of a hollow, conical copper cathode. The anode used in the system is also conical. The anode and the cathode are mounted in a vacuum chamber which is evacuated to a pressure of 0.05 torr and then filled with argon gas to 1.25 torr. A voltage of about 350 V is applied between the anode and the cathode. A discharge in the form of a glow is generated and thus results in optical emission signals. The optical signal generated by the glow discharge is focused by a lens onto a spectrometer slit. A computer-controlled system allows the optical signal to be scanned for discrete wavelengths. Each element in nature emits signals at specific wavelengths unique to the that element. The optical signal corresponding to a given wavelength (given element) is converted to an

  17. Phytotoxicity of trace metals in spiked and field-contaminated soils: Linking soil-extractable metals with toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hamels, Fanny; Malevé, Jasmina; Sonnet, Philippe; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Smolders, Erik

    2014-11-01

    Soil tests have been widely developed to predict trace metal uptake by plants. The prediction of metal toxicity, however, has rarely been tested. The present study was set up to compare 8 established soil tests for diagnosing phytotoxicity in contaminated soils. Nine soils contaminated with Zn or Cu by metal mining, smelting, or processing were collected. Uncontaminated reference soils with similar soil properties were sampled, and series of increasing contamination were created by mixing each with the corresponding soil. In addition, each reference soil was spiked with either ZnCl2 or CuCl2 at several concentrations. Total metal toxicity to barley seedling growth in the field-contaminated soils was up to 30 times lower than that in corresponding spiked soils. Total metal (aqua regia-soluble) toxicity thresholds of 50% effective concentrations (EC50) varied by factors up to 260 (Zn) or 6 (Cu) among soils. For Zn, variations in EC50 thresholds decreased as aqua regia > 0.43 M HNO3  > 0.05 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) > 1 M NH4 NO3  > cobaltihexamine > diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) > 0.001 M CaCl2 , suggesting that the last extraction is the most robust phytotoxicity index for Zn. The EDTA extraction was the most robust for Cu-contaminated soils. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of the total soil metal in the field-contaminated soils markedly explained the lower toxicity compared with spiked soils. The isotope exchange method can be used to translate soil metal limits derived from soils spiked with metal salts to site-specific soil metal limits.

  18. Speciation and leaching of trace metal contaminants from e-waste contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-Li; Luo, Chun-Ling; Tang, Chloe Wing-Yee; Chan, Ting-Shan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-05-05

    Primitive electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities have caused serious environmental problems. However, little is known about the speciation and leaching behaviors of metal contaminants at e-waste contaminated sites. This study investigated trace metal speciation/mobilization from e-waste polluted soil through column leaching experiments involving irrigation with rainwater for almost 2.5 years. Over the experimental period, Cu and Zn levels in the porewater were 0.14±0.08mg/L, and 0.16±0.08mg/L, respectively, increasing to 0.33±0.16mg/L, and 0.69±0.28mg/L with plant growth. The amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb released in surface soil (0-2cm) contributed 43.8%, 22.5%, and 13.8%, respectively, to the original levels. The released Cu and Zn were primarily caused by the mobilization of the carbonate species of metals, including Cu(OH)2, CuCO3, and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, and amorphous Fe/Mn oxides associated fractions characterized by sequential extraction coupling with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During the experiments, trace metals were not detected in the effluent, and the re-sequestration of trace metals was mainly attributed to the adsorption on the abundant Fe/Mn oxides in the sub-layer soil. This study quantitatively elucidated the molecular speciation of Cu and Zn in e-waste contaminated soil during the column leaching process.

  19. Assessment of acid leachable trace metals in sediment cores from River Uppanar, Cuddalore, Southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Ayyamperumal, T; Jonathan, M P; Srinivasalu, S; Armstrong-Altrin, J S; Ram-Mohan, V

    2006-09-01

    An acid leachable technique is employed in core samples (C1, C2 and C3) to develop a baseline data on the sediment quality for trace metals of River Uppanar, Cuddalore, southeast coast of India. Acid leachable metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn and Cd) indicate peak values at the sulphidic phase and enrichment of metals in the surface layers are due to the anthropogenic activities. Association of trace metals with Fe, Mn indicates their adsorption onto Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides and their correlation with S indicate that they are precipitated as metal sulphides. Factor analysis identified three possible types of geochemical associations and the supremacy of trace metals along with Fe, Mn, S and mud supports their geochemical associations. Factor analysis also signifies that anthropogenic activities have affected both the estuarine and fresh water regions of River Uppanar.

  20. Evaluation of Toxic Metals and Essential Elements in Children with Learning Disabilities from a Rural Area of Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Sabrina Nunes; Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Moro, Angela Maria; Roehrs, Miguel; Paniz, Clovis; Baierle, Marília; Brucker, Natália; Gioda, Adriana; Barbosa, Fernando; Bohrer, Denise; Ávila, Daiana Silva; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Children’s exposure to metals can result in adverse effects such as cognitive function impairments. This study aimed to evaluate some toxic metals and levels of essential trace elements in blood, hair, and drinking water in children from a rural area of Southern Brazil. Cognitive ability and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D) activity were evaluated. Oxidative stress was evaluated as a main mechanism of metal toxicity, through the quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. This study included 20 children from a rural area and 20 children from an urban area. Our findings demonstrated increase in blood lead (Pb) levels (BLLs). Also, increased levels of nickel (Ni) in blood and increase of aluminum (Al) levels in hair and drinking water in rural children were found. Deficiency in selenium (Se) levels was observed in rural children as well. Rural children with visual-motor immaturity presented Pb levels in hair significantly increased in relation to rural children without visual-motor immaturity (p < 0.05). Negative correlations between BLLs and ALA-D activity and positive correlations between BLLs and ALA-RE activity were observed. MDA was significantly higher in rural compared to urban children (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that rural children were co-exposed to toxic metals, especially Al, Pb and Ni. Moreover, a slight deficiency of Se was observed. Low performance on cognitive ability tests and ALA-D inhibition can be related to metal exposure in rural children. Oxidative stress was suggested as a main toxicological mechanism involved in metal exposure. PMID:25329533

  1. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments.

  2. Wash effect of atmospheric trace metals wet deposition and its source characteristic in subtropical watershed in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Hao, Zhuo; Yang, Tiantian; He, Nianpeng; Tian, Jing; Wen, Xuefa

    2016-10-01

    In order to better understand air pollution in deve-loping regions, such as China, it is important to investigate the wet deposition behavior of atmospheric trace metals and its sources in the subtropical watershed. This paper studies the seasonal change of trace metal concentrations in precipitation and other potential sources in a typical subtropical watershed (Jiazhuhe watershed) located in the downstream of the Yangtze River of China. The results show that typical crustal elements (Al, Fe) and trace element (Zn) have high seasonal variation patterns and these elements have higher contents in precipitation as compared to other metals in Jiazhuhe watershed. In addition, there is no observed Pb in base flow in this study, and the concentration magnitudes of Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, Sr, and Zn in base flow are significantly higher than that of other metals. During different rainfall events, the dynamic export processes are also different for trace metals. The various trace metals dynamic export processes lead to an inconsistent mass first flush and a significant accumulative variance throughout the rainfall events. It is found that in this region, most of the trace metals in precipitation are from anthropogenic emission and marine aerosols brought by typhoon and monsoon.

  3. The correlation of serum trace elements and heavy metals with carotid artery atherosclerosis in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ari, Elif; Kaya, Yuksel; Demir, Halit; Asicioglu, Ebru; Keskin, Sıddık

    2011-12-01

    Changes in essential trace elements and heavy metals may affect the atherosclerotic state of patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). The aim of the study was to evaluate the relation between the serum levels of some trace elements and heavy metals (iron, zinc, manganese, copper, magnesium, cobalt, cadmium, lead, and copper/zinc ratio) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) in HD patients. Fifty chronic HD patients without known atherosclerotic disease and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included in the study. The serum levels of trace elements (iron, zinc, manganese, copper, and magnesium) and heavy metals (cobalt, cadmium, and lead) were measured by Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer (UNICAM-929). CIMT was assessed by carotid artery ultrasonography. The serum levels of iron, zinc, and manganese were lower; levels of copper, magnesium, cobalt, cadmium, lead, and copper/zinc ratio were higher in HD patients compared to controls. CIMT in HD patients were higher than the control group (0.64 ± 0.11 vs 0.42 ± 0.05, p < 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between CIMT and serum levels of zinc (r = -0.70, p < 0.01), iron (r = -0.71, p < 0.01), and manganese (r = -0.47, p < 0.01), while there was a significant positive correlation between CIMT and serum levels of copper (r = 0.63, p < 0.01), magnesium (r = 0.77, p < 0.01), cobalt (r = 0.63, p < 0.01), cadmium (r = 0.48, p < 0.01), lead (r = 0.38, p < 0.01), and copper/zinc ratio (r = 0.68, p < 0.01). A linear regression analysis showed that serum levels of magnesium, cadmium, lead, and copper/zinc ratio were still significantly and positively correlated with CIMT. We propose that copper/zinc ratio, magnesium and toxic metals cadmium and lead are independent determinants of CIMT in maintenance HD patients without known atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Distribution of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements among protein fractions from hepatic cytosol of European chub (Squalius cephalus L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnići, Nesrete; Dragun, Zrinka; Erk, Marijana; Raspor, Biserka

    2013-04-01

    Association of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn) and nonessential (Cd, Pb) trace elements with cytosolic proteins of different molecular masses was described for the liver of European chub (Squalius cephalus) from weakly contaminated Sutla River in Croatia. The principal aim was to establish basic trace element distributions among protein fractions characteristic for the fish living in the conditions of low metal exposure in the water. The fractionation of chub hepatic cytosols was carried out by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC; Superdex™ 200 10/300 GL column), and measurements were performed by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS). Elution profiles of essential elements were mostly characterized by broad peaks covering wide range of molecular masses, as a sign of incorporation of essential elements in various proteins within hepatic cytosol. Exceptions were Cu and Fe, with elution profiles characterized by sharp, narrow peaks indicating their probable association with specific proteins, metallothionein (MT), and ferritin, respectively. The main feature of the elution profile of nonessential metal Cd was also single sharp, narrow peak, coinciding with MT elution time, and indicating almost complete Cd detoxification by MT under the conditions of weak metal exposure in the water (dissolved Cd concentration ≤0.3 μg L(-1)). Contrary, nonessential metal Pb was observed to bind to wide spectrum of proteins, mostly of medium molecular masses (30-100 kDa), after exposure to dissolved Pb concentration of ~1 μg L(-1). The obtained information within this study presents the starting point for identification and characterization of specific metal/metalloid-binding proteins in chub hepatic cytosol, which could be further used as markers of metal/metalloid exposure or effect on fish.

  5. Distribution of Mercury and Other Trace Metals in the Wabash River, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, K.; Bonzongo, J.

    2005-12-01

    There is very little information on mercury (Hg) and other trace metals (e.g., Co, Ni, Cu) in streams of central Indiana. Published research has focused mainly on the industrialized northern part of the State, close to Chicago, and on the Ohio River valley at the southern end of the State. For rivers draining the central part of Indiana, including the Wabash River, numerous Hg-based fish advisories are posted; yet, very little to no data on Hg and trace metals in water or sediments exists. We present some of the first Hg and trace metal data for the Wabash River in central Indiana. Water and surface sediment samples were collected in the summers of 2004 and 2005 from the river section that extends from upstream of Lafayette to Terre Haute. In contrast to the Wabash River upstream reaches, this section of the river has no water inputs from tributaries that drain reservoirs, and the above two cities as well as a power plant located upstream of Terre Haute are potential sources for Hg and trace metals to the river. Total-Hg concentrations determined on filtered samples ranged from 0.57 to 1.7ng/L in samples collected in August 2004, with very little change in concentrations a year after (range: 0.61 to 0.83ng/L). Total Hg levels in non-filtered samples ranged from ~1.6 to 5.0ng/L and from 3.31 to 4.17ng/L in August 2004 and 2005, respectively. These values compare to those reported for rivers and streams in neighboring states. Dissolved trace metal concentrations are generally low (e.g., Co, Ni, Cu less than 2μg/L) and show only small increases as the Wabash River passes through Lafayette. We will examine the relationships between aqueous Hg, sedimentary Hg (0.93-16.8μg/g) and Hg in biological tissues in comparison with trends/levels reported for other US rivers with similar land use types within watersheds.

  6. Trace metal concentrations in hair and nails from Alzheimer's disease patients: Relations with clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu, Emel; Koseoglu, Rahmi; Kendirci, Murat; Saraymen, Recep; Saraymen, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Metals, especially transition metals, seem to be important in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. This study aims to determine the relationship of trace metal elements to the pathogenesis and/or course of Alzheimer Disease in terms of clinical severity. The hair and nail trace metal levels of 62 Alzheimer Disease patients at different clinical stages (21 mild, 20 moderate, 21 severe) and 60 healthy control subjects were measured by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The statistical comparisons were performed with regards to the study groups, clinical stages, disease duration and age. The patient and control groups were significantly different from each other in regards to Mn, Fe, Cu, Cd, Hg (p<0.001), Zn (p<0.01) in nail concentrations and, Na, Al, Pb, Co (p<0.001), Fe, Mn (p=0.001), Hg, Cu, Cd, K in hair concentrations (p<0.01). No difference was detected in the levels of Mg and Ca. Nail Na level showed differences among different clinical stages of the disease (p<0.01). In comparing the mild degree Alzheimer patients to the control group; significant differences were detected in nail Mn, Fe, Cu, Co (p<0.001), Hg, Zn (p<0.01) and, hair Pb, Al (p<0.001), Na, K levels (p<0.01). Our results have shown that transition and posttransition metals are especially important metals for the disease process. The relation of nail Na level with clinical stages of AD is an interesting new finding, making someone to think that alkali metals may be important in the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Trace metals in soil and vegetables and associated health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Saiful; Ahmed, Md Kawser; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level of trace metals in soil and vegetables and health risk to the urban population in Bangladesh. The range of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Cd, and Pb in agricultural soils was 158-1160, 104-443, 157-519, 41-93, 3.9-13, and 84-574 mg/kg, respectively. Sequential extraction tests revealed that the studied metals were predominantly associated with the residual fraction, followed by the organically bound phase. Concerning Cu, Ni, Cd, and Pb in vegetables, more than 50 % samples exceeded the FAO/WHO recommended permissible limits. Considering the transfer of metals from soil to vegetables, Cu and Cd exhibited higher transfer factor (TF) values than the other metals. Target hazard quotient (THQ) for individual metal was below 1, suggesting that people would not experience significant health hazards if they ingest a single metal from vegetables. However, total metal THQ signifies the potential non-carcinogenic health hazard to the highly exposed consumers. The carcinogenic risk (TR) of As (1.9 × 10(-4)) and Pb (2.3 × 10(-5)) through consumption of vegetables were higher than the USEPA threshold level (10(-6)), indicating potential cancer risks.

  8. Land use impacts on trace metal concentrations of suburban stream sediments in the Helsinki region, Finland.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto-Hjort, Paula; Hjort, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to statistically analyze the effect of different suburban land use types on trace metal contamination of suburban streams. Acid extractable metal concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) of stream bed sediments (<63 μm) and high-flow suspended sediments were determined for 61 suburban and six baseline catchments in the Helsinki metropolitan region, Finland. Our results showed that the average suburban metal concentrations were 3-5-fold compared to baseline values for stream bed sediments and 2-9-fold for suspended sediments. Correlation analyses revealed moderate relationships between the land use parameters of the contributing catchment and the metal concentrations. Metals, particularly Zn and Cu, were most strongly correlated with proportions of dense suburban land use and imperviousness. In addition, industrial land use appeared to be particularly important for describing the variations of suspended sediment metal concentrations. Our findings present statistical evidence that the intensity of urbanization and industrial land use provides an indication of metal contamination even within the suburban environment.

  9. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture

    PubMed Central

    McCall, A. Scott; Cummings, Christopher F.; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br−) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br− is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a post-translational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine formation. Dietary Br-deficiency is lethal in Drosophila while Br-replenishment restores viability, demonstrating its physiologic requirement. Importantly, Br-deficient flies phenocopy the developmental and BM defects observed in peroxidasin mutants and indicate a functional connection between Br−, collagen IV, and peroxidasin. We establish that Br− is required for sulfilimine formation within collagen IV, an event critical for BM assembly and tissue development. Thus, bromine is an essential trace element for all animals and its deficiency may be relevant to BM alterations observed in nutritional and smoking related disease. PMID:24906154

  10. Trace metals in sediments and benthic animals from aquaculture ponds near a mangrove wetland in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Liu, Jinling; Bi, Xiangyang; Lin, Guanghui; Feng, Christopher C; Li, Zhengjie; Qi, Fei; Zheng, Tianling; Xie, Liqi

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we measured the concentrations of trace metals (Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb and Hg) in typical cultured animals (crabs, clams, and shrimps) and sediments from aquaculture ponds nearby mangrove wetlands in Zhangjiang estuary, China. The contents of Cr, Cu, Cd, and Pb in mangrove sediments were significantly higher than those in pond sediments, while an inverse distribution was observed for Zn, As, and Hg. Significantly higher concentrations of trace metals were found in clams from the mangrove mudflats compared to those from the aquaculture ponds. The sources of trace metals in the clams were primarily from organic fertilizer, whereas those in the shrimp were from contaminated sediment. The results of geo-accumulation index and the ecological risk assessment indicated that the aquaculture ponds near the mangrove wetlands in this subtropical estuary posed a special risk of endogenous and exogenous trace metal pollution to nearby systems.

  11. Trace metals health risk appraisal in fish species of Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Yasmeen, Kousar; Mirza, Muhammad Aslam; Khan, Namra A; Kausar, Nazish; Rehman, Atta-Ur; Hanif, Muddasir

    2016-01-01

    Fish is a vital food for humans and many animals. We report an environmental monitoring study to assess the trace metals in fish species caught from Arabian Sea and commercially available in the coastal city Karachi, Pakistan. Heavy metals such as copper, iron, lead and cadmium were determined in the skin, fillet and heart of the fish species Pampus argenteus, Epinephelus chlorostigma, Rachycentron canadum, Scomberomorus commerson, Johnius belangerii, Labeo rohita, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, Trachinotus blochii, Pomadsys olivaceum and Acanthopagrus berda by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The concentration (mg kg(-1), dry weight) range was: Cd (0.00-0.041), Cu (0.006-0.189), Fe (0.413-4.952) and Pb (0.00-0.569). Cadmium, copper and iron levels were below the tolerable limits whereas concentration of lead in the skins of S. commerson, E. chlorostigma, J. belangerii, A. berda; L. argentimaculatus, fillets of J. belangerii, E. chlorostigma and in the heart of J. belangerii exceeded the recommended limits. Therefore fish skin should be discouraged as food for humans or animals. The results indicate that a number of fish species have higher concentration of heavy metals dangerous for human health. Since the fish P. olivaceum (Dhotar) has the lowest level of trace metals therefore we recommend it for breeding and human consumption.

  12. Cigarettes as a source of some trace and heavy metals and pesticides in man.

    PubMed

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H; Leppänen, A; Salmela, S S; Pyysalo, H

    1986-01-01

    Trace and heavy metal and pesticide contents of different tobacco brands sold in Finland during 1920 to 1984 were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with the purpose of investigating the variation in contents over time. In addition, the following were studied: the effect of commercial filters in cigarettes in preventing the inhalation of metals, the transfer of metals and pesticides to the mainstream smoke; and the correlation between the cadmium content of adipose tissue of smokers and their smoking habits. No differences were found in trace and heavy metal contents of different brands and packs from different decades. The pesticide residues in tobacco have followed the pattern of their use in the tobacco plantation. The dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) content of tobacco has decreased during the past 20 yr to about 1/200 of the peak value, i.e., from 34.5 to 0.17 micrograms/g. Cigarette filters significantly prevent the inhalation of cadmium, lead, magnesium, and iron. The mean content of cadmium in fat tissue of male smokers was four times that of non-smokers. The difference was statistically significant.

  13. Accumulation and risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace metals in tropical urban soils.

    PubMed

    Khillare, P S; Hasan, Amreen; Sarkar, Sayantan

    2014-05-01

    The study deals with the combined contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals to health risk in Delhi soils. Surface soils (0-5 cm) collected from three different land-use regions (industrial, flood-plain and a reference site) in Delhi, India over a period of 1 year were characterized with respect to 16 US Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs and five trace metals (Zn, Fe, Ni, Cr and Cd). Mean annual ∑16PAH concentrations at the industrial and flood-plain sites (10,893.2 ± 2826.4 and 3075.4 ± 948.7 μg/kg, respectively) were ~15 and ~4 times, respectively, higher than reference levels. Significant spatial and seasonal variations were observed for PAHs. Toxicity potentials of industrial and flood-plain soils were ~88 and ~8 times higher than reference levels. Trace metal concentrations in soils also showed marked dependencies on nearness to sources and seasonal effects. Correlation analysis, PAH diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis (PCA) led to the identification of sources such as coal and wood combustion, vehicular and industrial emissions, and atmospheric transport. Metal enrichment in soil and the degree of soil contamination were investigated using enrichment factors and index of geoaccumulation, respectively. Health risk assessment (incremental lifetime cancer risk and hazard index) showed that floodplain soils have potential high risk due to PAHs while industrial soils have potential risks due to both PAHs and Cr.

  14. Temporal distribution of dissolved trace metal in the coastal waters of Southwestern Bay of Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Padhi, R K; Biswas, S; Mohanty, A K; Prabhu, R K; Satpathy, K K; Nayak, L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals in the coastal waters (500 m from shore) of Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India. The order of dissolved concentration of these metals was found to be as follows: Co (cobalt) < Cd (cadmium) < Cr (chromium) < Mn (manganese) < Cu (copper) < Ni (nickel) < Pb (lead) < Zn (zinc). The levels of these trace metals were found to be relatively low as compared to the reported values for other Indian coastal waters, which indicates negligible pollution at this location. Cadmium was the only metal found to increase its concentration during the monsoon period, suggesting its allochthonous input. Factor analysis indicated that chromium, nickel, zinc, cobalt, copper, manganese, and lead were of common origin, and external inputs through land runoff had nominal or little impact, typifying in-situ regeneration and remineralization linkage with their temporal variation. However, levels of zinc, cobalt, and copper remained relatively high during the summer period, and abrupt increases in their concentration during December (monsoon season) may be due to their dual (autochthonous as well as allochthonous) input.

  15. Analysis of Indian mint (Mentha spicata) for essential, trace and toxic elements and its antioxidant behaviour.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, R Paul; Kumar, A; Garg, A N

    2006-06-07

    Mint, belonging to the genus Mentha in the family Labiatae (Lamiaceae) is pungent in taste with post digestive effects and hot potency. Ten samples of mint leaves, collected from four different locations in North-West parts of India (Roorkee, Dehradun, Baghpat and Uttarkashi) were analysed for seven minor (Al, Na, K, Ca, Cl, Mg, and P) and 20 trace (As, Au, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, Hg, La, Mn, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn, Th and Zn) elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Also Ni, Cu and Cd were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Samples along with reference materials (RMs) and synthetic primary standard were irradiated at approximately 10(13) n cm-2s-1 and its gamma-activity was measured using HPGe detector and MCA system. Most elements were found in widely varying amounts depending on the location, e.g. Na (0.21-0.86 mg/g), K (12.4-53.3 mg/g) and Ca (5.82-16.8 mg/g) whereas mean contents of other nutrient elements in mint were: Fe (108+/-22 microg/g), Mg (4.83+/-0.92 mg/g), Mn (53.5+/-9.6 microg/g), P (3.88+/-0.94 mg/g), Cu (16.9+/-1.8 microg/g), Zn (21.0+/-4.7 microg/g) and Se (0.18+/-0.03 microg/g). Further, DPPH free radical scavenging activity test in diethyl ether extract showed 100% activity at approximately 40 microg/L suggesting it to be antioxidant in accordance with literature reports.

  16. Towards field trace metal speciation using electroanalytical techniques and tangential ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Adnívia Santos Costa; Parat, Corinne; Rosa, André Henrique; Pinheiro, José Paulo

    2016-05-15

    In this work we propose a trace metal speciation methodology to determine the total, free and ultrafiltered (<1 KDa) metal fractions using electrochemical methods (SCP and AGNES) and tangential ultrafiltration (UF) experiments that can easily be carried out on-site. We tested our methodology spiking Cadmium ions into two natural waters samples from Itapanhau and Sorocabinha rivers in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. The limits of detection (LOD) was 1.6×10(-9) M for the total Cd(2+) determination performed by Stripping Chronopotentiometry (SCP) in the source and acidified ultrafiltered solution and 1.9×10(-9) M for the free Cd(2+) determination using Absence of gradients and Nernstian equilibrium stripping (AGNES), using a thin mercury film electrode. The total metal determination was performed by SCP in acidified samples and the results compared with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). The SCP results were adequate with a 96% of recovery from the known metal spike for the 12 samples tested. For the Itapanhau sample the free metal determined by AGNES and the ultrafiltered fraction are identical, while for the Sorocabinha the free metal in the source is significantly smaller than the ultrafiltered fraction, indicating that this sample must be rich in metal complexes with small inorganic ligands that are able to permeate the 1kDa membrane. The proposed metal speciation methodology validated in the laboratory combining UF and SCP/AGNES is able to be used in on-site experiments providing valid information regarding the total and free metal concentrations and additionally some insight on the role of small inorganic ligands to the metal complexation.

  17. Trace metals in an urbanized estuarine sea turtle food web in San Diego Bay, CA.

    PubMed

    Komoroske, Lisa M; Lewison, Rebecca L; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Deustchman, Douglas D; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2012-02-15

    San Diego Bay is an anthropogenically impacted waterway that is also a critical habitat for many sensitive species such as the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas). In this study, we quantified trace metal concentrations in sediment and organisms composing the green sea turtle diet, and identified bioaccumulation patterns for a suite of trace metals. We found Ag, Cd, Cu, Mn, Se, and Zn exhibited the highest bioaccumulation levels in this food web. Cu and Mn concentrations in resident biota displayed a strong spatial gradient from the mouth to the head of the Bay, which was different from the patterns found in the sediment itself. Sediment median concentrations followed a general pattern across the bay of Al>Mn>Cu≈Zn>Pb>As>Cd>Ag>Se>Hg. In contrast, eelgrass displayed differential patterns in the mouth versus the back of the Bay (three front Bay sites: Al>Mn>Zn>Cu>Pb>Se>Cd≈Ag>As; five back Bay sites: Mn>Al>Zn>Cu>Pb≈Se>Cd>Ag>Hg>As) with the exception of Shelter Island where levels of Zn and Cu were elevated as a result of anti-fouling paint pollution. Observed differences between sediment and biota metal patterns are likely due to complex processes related to trace metals input and bioavailability, habitat characteristics and specific metabolic functioning of the trace metals for each member of the food web. These data highlight the fact that for the San Diego Bay ecosystem, the current use of toxicity reference values scaled up from sediment and invertebrate testing ex-situ is likely to be inaccurate when transposed to the green sea turtle. Here, we illustrate how identifying spatial variability in metal exposure can improve our understanding of habitat utilization by sea turtles in highly urbanized estuaries. Monitoring contaminants directly in food webs of sensitive vertebrates may greatly improve our understanding of their direct and indirect exposure to potentially deleterious contamination, and should be considered in the future to improve traditional risk

  18. Trace metals in the Ob and Yenisei Rivers' Estuaries (the Kara Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.

    2014-12-01

    Behavior of some trace metals (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb) in water column (soluble <0.45 µm and particulate fractions) and bottom sediments (surface and cores) along the two transects from the Ob River and Yenisei River Estuaries to the Kara Sea was studied. The length of both transects was about 700 km. Water depth was 12-63 m, O2 dissolved :5.36-9.55 ml l-1. Along the transects salinity increased from 0.07 to 34.2 psu, while the SPM' concentration decreased from 10.31 to 0.31 mg/l. Total suspended particulate matter load is more than one order of magnitude higher in the Ob River Estuary comparing to that of the Yenisei River. It has led to a significant difference between the suspended trace metals' concentrations (µg/l) in water of the two estuaries. With salinity increase along transects Fe susp., Mn susp. and Zn susp. decreased by a factor of 100-500, that has led to a growth of a relative portion of dissolved trace metals followed by their bioaccumulation (Demina et al., 2010). A strong direct correlation between suspended Cu, Fe and SPM mass concentration was found. For the first time along the Yenisei River' Estuary -the Kara Sea transect a direct positive correlation between Cu suspended and volume concentration of SPM (mg/ml3) was found, that was attributed to contribution of phytoplankton aggregates in the SPM composition. A trend of relationship between content of suspended As and pelitic fraction (2-10 µm) of SPM was firstly found in theses basins also. Study of trace metal speciation in the bottom sediments (adsorbed, associated with Fe-Mn (oxyhydr)oxides, organic matter and fixed in the mineral lattice or refractory) has revealed the refractory fraction to be prevailing (70-95% total content) for Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Cd and Pb. That means that toxic heavy metals were not available for bottom fauna. Mn was predominantly found in the adsorbed and (oxyhydr)oxides geochemically labile forms, reflecting the redox condition change

  19. Geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the potential culture-bed of the Marine Bivalve, Anadara granosa

    SciTech Connect

    Maah, M.J.; Mat, I.; Johari, A.

    1995-02-01

    The relative distribution of trace metals in coastal sediment geochemical phases has received considerable attention as a mean of assessing the degree of trace metal pollution. Metals in the non-residual fraction (exchangeable, carbonate, easily reducible, moderately reducible and organic phases) have been demonstrated to be strongly correlated with tissue-metal concentrations in various benthic organisms. Among these phases, the oxides of manganese (easily reducible phase) and iron (moderately reducible phase) and organic matter have been emphasized as important scavengers of available trace metals. Therefore, these phases are undoubtedly among the criteria that should be considered explicitly when assessing the potential bioavailability of metals. The marine bivalve Anadara granosa is commercially cultured in the tidal mudflats along the western coast of the Peninsular Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to provide an assessment of the geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the sediments collected from a culture-bed of A. granosa. The selected area is thought to receive minimal or restricted impacts of trace metal pollution. The present investigation is of significance as a baseline of information for comparative studies with other aquaculture areas in the region. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Trace metals in coastal sediments and in soft tissues of Paracentrotus lividus in the northern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzolla, Daniele; Scanu, Sergio; Mancini, Emanuele; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Bonamano, Simone; Marcelli, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of sediment dynamic is of fundamental help in defining the potential susceptibility to the accumulation of potentially harmful elements in coastal environment. The present work shows the spatial and temporal assessment of pollution degree and potential toxicity of some trace metals in marine sediments and the spatial assessment of bioaccumulation levels in soft tissues of Paracentrotus lividus in the coastal area of northern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy. Spatial distribution of trace metal concentrations highlights a notable enrichment degree of As and Mn located in two hotspots. These hotspots are profoundly influenced by the coastal dynamic of the area and by the sedimentary productivity of the Mignone and Marangone river basins. Moreover, the results of the trace metals spatial distribution are in agreement with the levels of trace metals measured in soft tissues of specimens of Paracentrotus lividus. Temporal assessment of trace metal concentrations in coastal sediments was carried out by sampling sediment cores at a depth of -50m. The chronology of sediment cores covers 40 - 60 years and trace metal values measured in the sections of the cores result to be below the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) numerical indices. Temporal distribution of trace metals in sediment cores does not show notable increases in the last 60 years as would be expected in the study area. This temporal trend can be attributable to the presence of geochemical anomalies and to the past mining activities occurred in the study area which could have masked any further enrichment of trace metals derived from fossil fuels combustion and maritime traffic. However, further geochemical and mineralogical studies are needed to better discriminate between the anthropogenic contributions and natural sources.

  1. The occurrence and distribution of trace metals in the Mississippi River and its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.; Garbarino, J.R.; Brinton, T.I.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative and semiquantitative analyses of dissolved trace metals are reported for designated sampling sites on the Mississippi River and its main tributaries utilizing depth-integrated and width-integrated sampling technology to collect statistically representative samples. Data are reported for three sampling periods, including: July-August 1987, November-December 1987, and May-June 1988. Concentrations of Al, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sr, Tl, U, V, and Zn are reported quantitatively, with the remainder of the stable metals in the periodic table reported semiquantitatively. Correlations between As and V, Ba and U, Cu and Zn, Li and Ba, and Li and U are significant at the 99% confidence level for each of the sampling trips. Comparison of the results of this study for selected metals with other published data show generally good agreement for Cr, Cu, Fe, and Zn, moderate agreement for Mo, and poor agreement for Cd and V.

  2. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, I. )

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Trace metals in antifouling paint particles and their heterogeneous contamination of coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nimisha; Turner, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Antifouling paint residues collected from the hard-standings of a marine leisure boat facility have been chemically characterised. Scanning electron microscopy revealed distinct layers, many containing oxidic particles of Cu and Zn. Quantitative analysis indicated concentrations of Cu and Zn averaging about 300 and 100 mg g(-1), respectively, and small proportions of these metals (<2%) in organometallic form as pyrithione compounds. Other trace metals present included Ag, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Sn, with maximum concentrations of about 330, 75, 1200, 780, 1800 and 25,000 microg g(-1), respectively. Estuarine sediment collected near a boatyard contained concentrations of Cu and Zn an order of magnitude greater than respective concentrations in "background" sediment, and mass balance calculations suggested that the former sample was contaminated by about 1% by weight of paint particles. Clearly, antifouling residues represent a highly significant, heterogeneous source of metallic contamination in the marine environment where boating activities occur.

  4. Natural trace metal concentrations in estuarine and coastal marine sediments of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Windom, H.L.; Schropp, S.J.; Calder, F.D.; Ryan, J.D.; Smith, R.G. Jr.; Burney, L.C.; Lewis, F.G.; Rawlinson, C.H.

    1989-03-01

    Over 450 sediment samples from estuarine and coastal marine areas of the southeastern US remote from contaminant sources were analyzed for trace metals. Although these sediments are compositionally diverse, As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn concentrations covary significantly with aluminum, suggesting that natural aluminosilicate minerals are the dominant natural metal bearing phases. Cd and Hg do not covary with aluminum apparently due to the importance of the contribution of natural organic phases to their concentration in sediments. It is suggested that the covariance of metals with aluminum provides a useful basis for identification and comparison of anthropogenic inputs to southeastern US coastal/estuarine sediments. By use of this approach sediments from the Savannah River, Biscayne Bay, and Pensacola Bay are compared.

  5. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace metals in insoluble particles of snow from Urumqi, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolan; Jiang, Fengqing; Wang, Shaoping; Turdi, Muyesser; Zhang, Zhaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize trace elements in snow in urban-suburb gradient over Urumqi city, China. The spatial distribution patterns of 11 trace metals in insoluble particulate matters of snow were revealed by using 102 snow samples collected in and around urban areas of Urumqi, a city suffering from severe wintertime air pollution in China. Similar spatial distribution for Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb was found and their two significant high-value areas located in the west and east, respectively, and a high-value area in the south, which were correlated with factory emissions, traffic activities, and construction fugitive dust. The high-value areas of Cr, Ni, and V occurred in the northeast corner and along main traffic paths, which were linked to oil refinery and vehicular emissions. High value of Be presented in the west of the city. The high-value area of Co in the northeast could be related to local soil. Cd and U displayed relatively even spatial patterns in the urban area. In view of distance from the urban center, e.g., from the first circular belt to the fourth circular belt, except Be, V, Cd, and U, the contents of other metals generally decreased from the first circular belt to the forth circular belt, implying the effect of human activity clearly. Additionally, prevailing northwesterly winds and occasionally southeasterly winds in winter were associated with decreased, generally, concentrations of trace metal in snow from the urban center to the southern suburb along a northwest and southeast transect. The information on concentrations and spatial distributions of these metals in insoluble particles of snow in winter will be valuable for further environmental protection and planning.

  6. Assessment of potable water quality including organic, inorganic, and trace metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Mst Shamsun; Zhang, Jing

    2012-02-01

    The quality of drinking water (tap, ground, and spring) in Toyama Prefecture, Japan was assessed by studying quality indicators including major ions, total carbon, and trace metal levels. The physicochemical properties of the water tested were different depending on the water source. Major ion concentrations (Ca(2+), K(+), Si(4+), Mg(2+), Na(+), SO(4)(2-), HCO(3)(-), NO(3)(-), and Cl(-)) were determined by ion chromatography, and the results were used to generate Stiff diagrams in order to visually identify different water masses. Major ion concentrations were higher in ground water than in spring and tap water. The relationship between alkaline metals (Na(+) and K(+)), alkaline-earth metals (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)), and HCO(3)(-) showed little difference between deep and shallow ground water. Toyama ground, spring, and tap water were all the same type of water mass, called Ca-HCO(3). The calculated total dissolved solid values were below 300 mg/L for all water sources and met World Health Organization (WHO