Science.gov

Sample records for established human breast

  1. Correlation of oncoprotein 18/stathmin expression in human breast cancer with established prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Brattsand, G

    2000-01-01

    Oncoprotein 18/stathmin (Op18) is a conserved cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics. The microtubule destabilizing activity is regulated by phosphorylation, mediated by both growth factor stimulated- and cell-cycle regulating kinases. The protein is highly expressed in a variety of human malignancies. In human breast carcinoma, Op18 has previously been shown to be up-regulated in a subset of the tumours, however, no correlation with clinicopathologic characteristics has been reported so far. In the present study we have examined Op18 protein expression by quantitative Western blot analysis in a panel of 151 semi-consecutive breast carcinoma samples. Op18 levels were negatively correlated with oestrogen receptor (OR) expression and positively correlated with a high fraction of aneuploid cells, proliferation measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression, tumour size and histopathologic grade. Taken together, and in contrast to what has been previously reported, the present study shows that high Op18 expression correlates with general predictive factors and is not restricted to a specific sub-group of breast carcinoma. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10917544

  2. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishment of three human breast epithelial cell lines derived from carriers of the 999del5 BRCA2 Icelandic founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Rubner Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Halldorsson, Thorhallur; Björnsson, Johannes; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Johannsson, Oskar Thor; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M

    2005-01-01

    Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a large proportion of inherited breast and ovarian cancer. Both genes are involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination and are thought to play a vital role in maintaining genomic stability. A major drawback for long-term functional studies of BRCA in general and BRCA2 in particular has been a lack of representative human breast epithelial cell lines. In the present study, we have established three cell lines from two patients harboring the 999del5 germ line founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene. Primary cultures were established from cellular outgrowth of explanted tissue and subsequently transfected with a retroviral construct containing the HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. Paired cancer-derived and normal-derived cell lines were established from one patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-2T and BRCA2-999del5-2N, respectively. In addition, one cell line was derived from cancer-associated normal tissue from another patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-1N. All three cell lines showed characteristics of breast epithelial cells as evidenced by expression of breast epithelial specific cytokeratins. Cytogenetic analysis showed marked chromosomal instability with tetraploidy and frequent telomeric associations. In conclusion, we have established three breast epithelial cell lines from two patients carrying the BRCA2 Icelandic 999del5 founder mutation. These cell lines form the basis for further studies on carcinogenesis and malignant progression of breast cancer on a defined genetic background.

  4. "You are a number, not a human being": Israeli breast cancer patients' experiences with the medical establishment.

    PubMed

    Sered, S; Tabory, E

    1999-06-01

    In the course of interviews with Israeli women who had recently been treated for breast cancer, we found that our informants tended to offer us "treatment narratives" rather than, or sometimes in addition to, the "illness narratives" made famous by Arthur Kleinman. For the women we interviewed, treatment narratives constitute verbal platforms on which to explore what it means to be human during a period in which one's body, spirit, and social identity are undergoing intense transformations. A central theme in these narratives is the Hebrew word yachas, loosely translated as "attitude," "attention," or "relationship." The women consistently contrasted the good yachas of medical staff who treated them "like humans" or like "real friends" with the bad yachas of staff who treated them like numbers, machines, or strangers. We argue that the women used language (in various contexts) as a means of resisting the medical culture's pattern of treating patients as "nonhumans."

  5. Establishment of a paclitaxel resistant human breast cancer cell strain (MCF-7/Taxol) and intracellular paclitaxel binding protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, K-Q; Zhang, X-P; Zou, J; Li, D; Lv, Z-W

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance of tumours is one of the most important factors that leads to chemotherapy failure. A multidrug-resistant breast cancer cell line, MCF-7/Taxol, was established from the drug-sensitive parent cell line MCF-7. The biological properties of MCF-7/Taxol, including its drug resistance profile and profile of paclitaxel binding proteins, were analysed and compared with the parent cell line. A number of paclitaxel binding proteins were present in MCF-7 cells but absent from MCF-7/Taxol cells, namely heat shock protein 90, actinin and dermcidin precursor. The identification of differential paclitaxel binding proteins between the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/Taxol cell line and the parent drug-sensitive cell line MCF-7 provides insight into possible mechanisms involved in resistance to these chemotherapy drugs.

  6. Establishment of the epithelial-specific transcriptome of normal and malignant human breast cells based on MPSS and array expression data

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, Anita; Mackay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Steele, Dawn; Iseli, Christian; Stevenson, Brian J; Jongeneel, C Victor; Valgeirsson, Haukur; Fenwick, Kerry; Iravani, Marjan; Leao, Maria; Simpson, Andrew JG; Strausberg, Robert L; Jat, Parmjit S; Ashworth, Alan; Neville, A Munro; O'Hare, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Diverse microarray and sequencing technologies have been widely used to characterise the molecular changes in malignant epithelial cells in breast cancers. Such gene expression studies to identify markers and targets in tumour cells are, however, compromised by the cellular heterogeneity of solid breast tumours and by the lack of appropriate counterparts representing normal breast epithelial cells. Methods Malignant neoplastic epithelial cells from primary breast cancers and luminal and myoepithelial cells isolated from normal human breast tissue were isolated by immunomagnetic separation methods. Pools of RNA from highly enriched preparations of these cell types were subjected to expression profiling using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) and four different genome wide microarray platforms. Functional related transcripts of the differential tumour epithelial transcriptome were used for gene set enrichment analysis to identify enrichment of luminal and myoepithelial type genes. Clinical pathological validation of a small number of genes was performed on tissue microarrays. Results MPSS identified 6,553 differentially expressed genes between the pool of normal luminal cells and that of primary tumours substantially enriched for epithelial cells, of which 98% were represented and 60% were confirmed by microarray profiling. Significant expression level changes between these two samples detected only by microarray technology were shown by 4,149 transcripts, resulting in a combined differential tumour epithelial transcriptome of 8,051 genes. Microarray gene signatures identified a comprehensive list of 907 and 955 transcripts whose expression differed between luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells, respectively. Functional annotation and gene set enrichment analysis highlighted a group of genes related to skeletal development that were associated with the myoepithelial/basal cells and upregulated in the tumour sample. One of the most

  7. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  8. Breast Milk HCMV viral load is associated with the establishment of breast milk CMV-pp65-specific CD8 T cells in Human CMV infected Mothers.

    PubMed

    Moylan, David C; Pati, Sunil K; Ross, Shannon A; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B; Sabbaj, Steffanie

    2017-08-29

    The role of HCMV-specific T-cell responses in breast milk of HCMV-seropositive mothers is not well defined. In these studies, we demonstrate that the frequency of CMV-pp65-specific T-cell responses in PBMC and breast milk cells (BMC) is increased for CD8+ T-cells in both sample sources when compared to CD4+ T-cells. The frequency of pp55-specific CD8 T-cells producing IFN- alone or dual IFN-/GrB producers is increased in breast milk compared to PBMC. Lastly, we observed a positive correlation between breast milk viral load and the CD8 pp65-specific response suggesting that local virus replication drives antigen-specific CD8 T-cells into the breast. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Development of the Human Breast

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Asma; Lteif, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Mammalia are so named based on the presence of the mammary gland in the breast. The mammary gland is an epidermal appendage, derived from the apocrine glands. The human breast consists of the parenchyma and stroma, originating from ectodermal and mesodermal elements, respectively. Development of the human breast is distinctive for several reasons. The human breast houses the mammary gland that produces and delivers milk through development of an extensive tree-like network of branched ducts. It is also characterized by cellular plasticity, with extensive remodeling in adulthood, a factor that increases its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Also, breast development occurs in distinct stages via complex epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, orchestrated by signaling pathways under the regulation of systemic hormones. Congenital and acquired disorders of the breast often have a basis in development, making its study essential to understanding breast pathology. PMID:24872732

  10. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Gulsen, Gultekin; Su, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature. PMID:26692524

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells play a potential role in regulating the establishment and maintenance of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF7 human breast cancer cells by paracrine and induced autocrine TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qilin; Wang, Liang; Li, Hongling; Han, Qin; Li, Jing; Qu, Xuebin; Huang, Shan; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2012-09-01

    Although the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a normal process that occurs during development, it is thought to be associated with cancer progression and metastasis. Emerging evidence links mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the tumor microenvironment with the occurrence of EMT in cancer progression. In this study, the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 was co-cultured with human adipose-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs) in a transwell system. Co-cultured cells were analyzed for changes in cellular morphology, EMT markers, protein expression and tumor characteristics. We found that co-cultured MCF7 cells underwent EMT and established a stable mesenchymal phenotype after prolonged co-culturing. Here, we demonstrate that paracrine transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) secreted by hAD-MSCs regulated the establishment of EMT in MCF7 cells by targeting the ZEB/miR-200 regulatory loop. The downregulation of paracrine TGF-β1 levels can inhibit and reverse the EMT progress by downregulating ZEB1/2 and upregulating miR-200b and miR-200c. The maintenance of a stable mesenchymal state by MCF7 cells required the establishment of autocrine TGF-β signaling to drive and sustain ZEB expression, which had been initiated by the prolonged co-culturing with hAD-MSCs. These results suggest that MSCs may promote breast cancer metastasis by stimulating and facilitating the EMT process.

  12. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Establishment of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing human TOX high mobility group box family member 3].

    PubMed

    Han, Cuicui; Yue, Liling; Yang, Ying; Jian, Baiyu; Ma, Liwei; Liu, Jicheng

    2014-11-01

    To construct the lentiviral expression vector of human TOX high mobility group box family member 3 (TOX3) gene and the MDA-MB-231 cell line which stably over-expresses TOX3 gene. TOX3 gene was synthesized by the gene synthesis method and amplified by PCR, and then cloned into pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro vector to construct pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 lentiviral vector. After restriction enzyme analysis and sequence identification, the lentiviral vector was packaged and the titer was detected. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with the recombinant lentiviral vector and cultured selectively by puromycin to acquire stably transfected cells. MDA-MB-231 cells which expressed GFP were observed by fluorescence microcopy. And the expression levels of TOX3 mRNA and protein in transfected MDA-MB-231 cells were detected by real-time quantitative PCR(qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis demonstrated that the lentiviral expression vectors of pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro and pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 were successfully constructed, and the viral titers were respectively 2×10(8) TU/mL and 1×10(8) TU/mL after lentiviral packaging. And after being transfected, more than 95% cells expressed GFP under a fluorescence microscope. The results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that, when compared with the MDA-MB-231-NC negative control group, the expression of TOX3 mRNA and protein significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231-TOX3 group. The study successfully constructed lentiviral expression vector of TOX3 gene and obtained MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing TOX3 gene by transfection with the recombinant vector.

  14. Establishment of the Detailed Breast Model of Chinese Adult Female and Application in External Radiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rui; Jiang, Chenxing; Ren, Li; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-05-03

    Breast is one of the most sensitive organs to radiation. In 2007, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) increased the tissue weighting factor for the breast from 0.05 to 0.12, which made the accurate evaluation of breast dose more important. But in the existing human voxel phantom, the structure of breast is not elaborate enough because of the limitation of image resolution used for phantom modeling. This will probably affect the accuracy of breast dose calculated in simulation. Some researches on detailed breast modeling have been carried out, but there is no such research in this field in China. A detailed breast model for Chinese adult female is established in this article using the mathematical modeling method. It is voxelized and merged with the Chinese reference adult female voxel model for breast dosimetry. Dose conversion coefficients of breast gland for external photon exposures in antero-posterior geometry are calculated as an example of the application and the results are compared with those calculated by the old voxel phantom and ICRP reference adult female voxel phantom.

  15. Cells of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Zimny, Malgorzata; Kaminska-El-Hassan, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Human milk is a complex fluid that has developed to satisfy the nutritional requirements of infants. In addition to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and other biologically active components, breast milk contains a diverse microbiome that is presumed to colonize the infant gastrointestinal tract and a heterogeneous population of cells with unclear physiological roles and health implications. Noteworthy cellular components of breast milk include progenitor/stem cells. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of breast milk cells, including leukocytes, epithelial cells, stem cells and potentially probiotic bacteria.

  16. Establishment of micromethods for macronutrient contents analysis in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Choi, Arum; Fusch, Gerhard; Rochow, Niels; Sheikh, Natasha; Fusch, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Commercially available milk analysers were originally developed for use in the dairy industry, but they are now used to analyse macronutrient content of breast milk in clinical studies and routine care of the premature or very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. Due to the different composition of cow and breast milk, these devices need to be validated against reference methods before they can be used in daily routine. However, current reference methods require a sample volume of 30-100 mL to analyse fat, protein and lactose. It is not feasible to obtain this volume of milk for research purposes, especially from VLBW infants as lactation may be delayed or impaired and the limited volume of breast milk must be provided to the infant. To support validation of milk analysers in both clinical and research settings, the aim of this study is to establish and validate micromethods for precise macronutrient analysis in small volume of breast milk and conduct a feasibility study of the micromethods as a post-validation. Methods include a modified Mojonnier ether extraction (fat), elemental analysis (protein) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (lactose). We were able to downsize volumes required for analysis of fat, protein and lactose to 1 mL, 260 μL and 100 μL; corresponding coefficients of variation are 1.7, 1.8 and 2.3%, respectively. The presented methods allow for reliable and precise analyses of macronutrients in ≤1.5 mL of breast milk and will be used to validate milk analysers.

  17. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  18. Immunoreactive opioid peptides in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scopsi, L.; Balslev, E.; Brünner, N.; Poulsen, H. S.; Andersen, J.; Rank, F.; Larsson, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    Opioid peptides have a variety of actions on inter alia pituitary hormone secretion and the immune system. Release of endogenous opioids has been found to stimulate growth of experimental breast cancers and opiate receptor blockers have reduced the growth of chemically induced rat breast tumors. Opioid peptides may therefore play a role in human breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinomas from 61 premenopausal women were immunocytochemically analyzed for the presence of opioid peptide immunoreactivity. Positive staining was unambiguously identified in 34 of the tumors (56%). In addition, a medullary carcinoma was positive. In a smaller series of tumors, opioid peptide immunoreactive cells were detected in both primary tumors and metastases. Positive tumor cells were usually few and scattered. Therefore, underestimates of their true frequency of occurrence are likely to have occurred, making accurate correlations with clinical behavior and estrogen receptor status difficult. No correlations with estrogen receptors were established for the unambiguously opioid peptide-positive tumors. Many of the positive tumors also stained with antibodies to gamma-endorphin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, suggesting the presence of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in them. However, peptides derived from other opioid precursors also may be present in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:2464945

  19. Microbial Dysbiosis Is Associated with Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Caiyun; Shamonki, Jaime M.; Chung, Alice; DiNome, Maggie L.; Chung, Maureen; Sieling, Peter A.; Lee, Delphine J.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24421902

  20. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in normal and neoplastic breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a persistent life-long infection, and can cause severe pathology in the fetus and the immunocompromised host[1]. Breast milk is the primary route of transmission in humans worldwide, and breast epithelium is thus a likely site of persistent infection and/or reactivation, though this phenomenon has not previously been demonstrated. Increasing evidence indicates HCMV infection can modulate signaling pathways associated with oncogenesis. We hypothesized that persistent HCMV infection occurs in normal adult breast epithelium and that persistent viral expression might be associated with normal and neoplastic ductal epithelium. Methods Surgical biopsy specimens of normal breast (n = 38) breast carcinoma (n = 39) and paired normal breast from breast cancer patients (n = 21) were obtained. Specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, PCR and DNA sequencing for evidence of HCMV antigens and nucleic acids. Results We detected HCMV expression specifically in glandular epithelium in 17/27 (63%) of normal adult breast cases evaluated. In contrast, HCMV expression was evident in the neoplastic epithelium of 31/32 (97%) patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases evaluated (p = 0.0009). Conclusions These findings are the first to demonstrate that persistent HCMV infection occurs in breast epithelium in a significant percentage of normal adult females. HCMV expression was also evident in neoplastic breast epithelium in a high percentage of normal and neoplastic breast tissues obtained from breast cancer patients, raising the possibility that viral infection may be involved in the neoplastic process. PMID:21429243

  1. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  2. Bactericidal mechanisms of human breast milk leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D F; France, G L; Marmer, D J; Steele, R W

    1980-01-01

    The functional capacity of human breast milk phagocytes was evaluated with both bactericidal and biochemical assays. Acridine orange was used as a vital stain for bacteria to directly visualize phagocytosis and killing. Bactericidal capabilities were further examined by colony count and chemiluminescent methods. Cytocentrifuged specimens stained for myeloperoxidase exhibited enzyme activity in breast milk leukocytes equal to that of peripheral neutrophils. A radioisotopic assay of hexose monophosphate shunt activity demonstrated metabolic activity in breast milk leukocytes greater than that in peripheral blood neutrophils. However, the chemiluminescent response of breast cells was negligible, apparently the result of quenching secondary to fat present in the milk; preincubation of human blood leukocytes with the fatty layer of breast milk produced similar inhibition in the chemiluminescence assay. By most parameters breast milk phagocytes are at least equal to blood neutrophils. PMID:6249738

  3. Microbiota of Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Baban, Chwanrow K.; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a greater appreciation for the microbes inhabiting human body sites has emerged. In the female mammary gland, milk has been shown to contain bacterial species, ostensibly reaching the ducts from the skin. We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland. A diverse population of bacteria was detected within tissue collected from sites all around the breast in women aged 18 to 90, not all of whom had a history of lactation. The principal phylum was Proteobacteria. The most abundant taxa in the Canadian samples were Bacillus (11.4%), Acinetobacter (10.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (8.3%), Pseudomonas (6.5%), Staphylococcus (6.5%), Propionibacterium (5.8%), Comamonadaceae (5.7%), Gammaproteobacteria (5.0%), and Prevotella (5.0%). In the Irish samples the most abundant taxa were Enterobacteriaceae (30.8%), Staphylococcus (12.7%), Listeria welshimeri (12.1%), Propionibacterium (10.1%), and Pseudomonas (5.3%). None of the subjects had signs or symptoms of infection, but the presence of viable bacteria was confirmed in some samples by culture. The extent to which these organisms play a role in health or disease remains to be determined. PMID:24610844

  4. Establishment of the Fox Chase Network Breast Cancer Risk Registry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    basic, clinical, epidemiological, behavioral and bioethical research needs to be done. B. Purpose The ability to systematically study the diverse...sensitive to cultural , ethnic and racial differences which will promote positive outcomes to breast cancer risk information, including the results of...interventions which are sensitive to cultural , ethnic and racial differences, which will promote positive outcomes to breast cancer risk information

  5. Human milk and breast feeding: recent highlights.

    PubMed

    Jelliffe, D B; Jelliffe, E F

    1979-10-01

    Interest in breast feeding and human milk continued in the literature in 1977. A review of the various areas related to lactation which appeared in publications in 1977 is made. The biological interactions between mother and nursing infant were explored. The biochemical composition of human milk was investigated in different circumstances. There seem to be particular problems with assessing the volume of breast milk produced in relation to optimal infant growth. Research as already shown that human milk has antiviral properties. Environmental pollutants are found in breast milk, but no immediate ill effects have yet been noted. Breast milk has been shown to be a better protection for the infant against protein allergies and common infections. Lactation seems to protect the mothers against development of breast cancer. Investigation continues into longterm advantages for the child of breast- as opposed to bottle-feeding. National health services have become interested in promoting breast feeding in many developing countries. Research is continuing into ways to promote breast feeding among working women.

  6. Human glandular kallikrein in breast milk, amniotic fluid, and breast cyst fluid.

    PubMed

    Magklara, A; Scorilas, A; López-Otín, C; Vizoso, F; Ruibal, A; Diamandis, E P

    1999-10-01

    Human glandular kallikrein (hK2) belongs to the serine protease family of enzymes and has high sequence homology with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The physiological role of hK2 has not as yet been determined, but there is evidence that it can regulate the proteolytic activity of PSA through processing and activating pro-PSA, an inactive precursor. Thus, it is conceivable that these two secreted proteins may coexist in biological fluids. Currently, hK2 is considered an androgen-regulated and prostate-specific protein. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hK2 is expressed in the breast cancer cell line T-47D after stimulation by steroid hormones, and we reported that hK2 can be detected in a subset of breast tumor extracts. These data suggest that hK2 may be expressed in tissues other than the prostate, such as those in which PSA has already been detected. Because hK2 is a secreted protein, it may be present in various biological fluids. We analyzed milk samples from lactating women, amniotic fluid from pregnant women, and breast cyst fluid from patients with gross breast cystic disease, using a highly sensitive and specific immunoassay for hK2. hK2 was present in all three biological fluids. We suggest that the female breast may produce hK2 and provide evidence that hK2 may have value as an additional marker for the discrimination between type I and type II breast cysts. The female breast produces hK2 in addition to PSA. More studies are necessary to establish the role of this kallikrein in nondiseased breast, gross breast cystic disease, and breast cancer.

  7. Human breast tissue disposition and bioactivity of limonene in women with early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica A; Lang, Julie E; Ley, Michele; Nagle, Ray; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Cordova, Catherine; Waer, Amy; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2013-06-01

    Limonene is a bioactive food component found in citrus peel oil that has shown chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in preclinical studies. We conducted an open-label pilot clinical study to determine the human breast tissue disposition of limonene and its associated bioactivity. We recruited 43 women with newly diagnosed operable breast cancer electing to undergo surgical excision to take 2 grams of limonene daily for two to six weeks before surgery. Blood and breast tissue were collected to determine drug/metabolite concentrations and limonene-induced changes in systemic and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk or carcinogenesis. Limonene was found to preferentially concentrate in the breast tissue, reaching high tissue concentration (mean = 41.3 μg/g tissue), whereas the major active circulating metabolite, perillic acid, did not concentrate in the breast tissue. Limonene intervention resulted in a 22% reduction in cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.002) in tumor tissue but minimal changes in tissue Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. No significant changes in serum leptin, adiponectin, TGF-β1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed following limonene intervention. There was a small but statistically significant postintervention increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. We conclude that limonene distributed extensively to human breast tissue and reduced breast tumor cyclin D1 expression that may lead to cell-cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, placebo-controlled clinical trials and translational research are warranted to establish limonene's role for breast cancer prevention or treatment.

  8. Breast-feeding and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, U K; Willingham, F F

    1997-01-01

    Breast-feeding provides nutritional, immunological, and psychological benefits. It protects children from mortality and morbidity associated with diarrheal diseases, pneumonia and other infections. Breast feeding has also been shown to prolong the interval between births and thereby improve child survival and maternal health. However, studies suggest that in certain populations, breast feeding may account for nearly 14% of perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. It is therefore important that the risk of HIV-1 infection through breast feeding be weighed against the morbidity and mortality associated with bottle feeding. This paper discusses the literature dealing with breast feeding in women with HIV-1 infection. Specifically, the review addresses the issues surrounding infant mortality in areas of different HIV-1 prevalence where breast-feeding or bottle-feeding may be employed. Analysis suggests that the benefits of breast-feeding or bottle-feeding may be employed. Analysis suggests that the benefits of breast-feeding can substantially outweigh the putative risk of HIV-1 transmission unless the prevalence of HIV-1 infection is high or the difference in mortality between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants is very low.

  9. Neuroendocrine differentiation in breast cancer: established facts and unresolved problems.

    PubMed

    Righi, Luisella; Sapino, Anna; Marchiò, Caterina; Papotti, Mauro; Bussolati, Gianni

    2010-02-01

    Neuroendocrine breast carcinoma (NEBC) diagnosis relies on (i) presence of morphologic neuroendocrine features, and (ii) neuroendocrine markers expressed in more than 50% of tumor cells. The World Health Organization classification describes 3 main histologic types: the solid, the small/oat cell, and the large cell variant. In addition, we have recently proposed a further categorization into 5 subgroups: the first 3 categories encompass solid lesions and include (i) solid cohesive carcinomas, (ii) alveolar carcinomas, and (iii) small cell carcinoma; the last subgroups include mucin-producing tumors which are (iv) solid papillary carcinomas and (v) cellular mucinous carcinomas. Chromogranin A and synaptophysin have been considered as the most sensitive and specific neuroendocrine markers in NEBC. At the molecular level, recent gene expression profiling studies have shown that NEBCs pertain to the luminal molecular type, being positive for hormone receptors and negative for HER2. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that mucinous and neuroendocrine carcinomas are transcriptionally distinct from conventional invasive ductal carcinomas. Following the above criteria, NEBCs constitute approximately 1% of all breast carcinomas. The clinical effect of neuroendocrine breast cancer is still a matter of debate; however, when compared with unselected breast cancers, NEBCs show a less aggressive clinical behavior.

  10. Epigenetic effects of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Verduci, Elvira; Banderali, Giuseppe; Barberi, Salvatore; Radaelli, Giovanni; Lops, Alessandra; Betti, Federica; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

    2014-04-24

    A current aim of nutrigenetics is to personalize nutritional practices according to genetic variations that influence the way of digestion and metabolism of nutrients introduced with the diet. Nutritional epigenetics concerns knowledge about the effects of nutrients on gene expression. Nutrition in early life or in critical periods of development, may have a role in modulating gene expression, and, therefore, have later effects on health. Human breast milk is well-known for its ability in preventing several acute and chronic diseases. Indeed, breastfed children may have lower risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, and also of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity and related-disorders. Beneficial effects of human breast milk on health may be associated in part with its peculiar components, possible also via epigenetic processes. This paper discusses about presumed epigenetic effects of human breast milk and components. While evidence suggests that a direct relationship may exist of some components of human breast milk with epigenetic changes, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Studies have to be conducted to clarify the actual role of human breast milk on genetic expression, in particular when linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases, to potentially benefit the infant's health and his later life.

  11. [Establishing margins from CTV to PTV in breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Cabanne, A; Schick, U; Pradier, O; Rivera, S

    2016-10-01

    The benefit of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer both in terms of local control and overall survival is widely acknowledged. Today, technological advances in simulation imaging and positioning control enable the definition of new margins from CTV to PTV. Improvements in mathematical modeling of random and systematic errors impact the treatment plans. However, there is no universal absolute value to consistently determine the margins from CTV to PTV. It is down to each centre to assess and correct as much as possible uncertainties due to positioning and internal movements depending on techniques and methods used for the implementation of treatment and monitoring. IMRT and respiratory gating techniques for breast radiotherapy will be considered more systematically in the years to come.

  12. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schüler-Toprak, Susanne; Treeck, Oliver; Ortmann, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is well known as a malignancy being strongly influenced by female steroids. Pregnancy is a protective factor against breast cancer. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is a candidate hormone which could mediate this antitumoral effect of pregnancy. For this review article, all original research articles on the role of HCG in breast cancer were considered, which are listed in PubMed database and were written in English. The role of HCG in breast cancer seems to be a paradox. Placental heterodimeric HCG acts as a protective agent by imprinting a permanent genomic signature of the mammary gland determining a refractory condition to malignant transformation which is characterized by cellular differentiation, apoptosis and growth inhibition. On the other hand, ectopic expression of β-HCG in various cancer entities is associated with poor prognosis due to its tumor-promoting function. Placental HCG and ectopically expressed β-HCG exert opposite effects on breast tumorigenesis. Therefore, mimicking pregnancy by treatment with HCG is suggested as a strategy for breast cancer prevention, whereas targeting β-HCG expressing tumor cells seems to be an option for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28754015

  13. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  14. Nondestructive testing of the human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockburn, William

    1999-03-01

    The utilization of thermal imaging in the evaluation of the human breast has been for the past two decades a highly effective form of screening for breast cancer and other breast disease. The procedure however, is not without controversy and a continuing debate concerning the competitive paradox with mammography as the gold standard in breast cancer screening/detection still exists. This paper and its accompanying oral presentation at Thermosense XXI will provide a brief historic overview of breast thermal imaging and will explore the authors concepts of the paradigm shift which needs to occur in order for breast thermal imaging to gain acceptance in the scientific, medical, and public communities. Early thermal imaging equipment sold for medical application were based on liquid crystal detector plates, or electronic low band infrared detectors. While the final output of these devices was quite colorful and impressive, they lacked the quantification necessary to accurately measure temperature from a medical perspective, and as such, many false positive findings and papers were produced which damaged the early credibility of the procedure. The author has previously suggested appropriate changes in both technology and in utilization protocol for correction of errors which have hindered the advancement and indeed, the further development and implementation of this most beneficial quantitative diagnostic tool.

  15. Establishment and Clinical Application of an Electronic Database for Breast Cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong-Gang; Huang, Mei-Ling; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Ling, Rui

    2016-01-01

    To establish a database for breast cancer patients to save and manage clinical data and to preliminarily investigate its clinical application. Information on breast cancer patients hospitalized in our department from 2008.01 to 2013.01 were input into our breast cancer management system. SPSS 16.0 software was used as a convenient reference to evaluate the accuracy of the newly built database. A database of 2403 breast cancer patients was successfully established. Information in the database clearly displayed capabilities of storage, addition, retrieval, statistical analysis and other functions. As the continuously updated database showed, the distribution of age, sex, nationality, allergy history, pausimenia and marriage of patients was identical to that achieved by SPSS analysis, indicating reliable and accurate data analysis. The described database is easy and convenient to operate and manage, and should prove suitable for application in clinical research and treatment.

  16. Determination of Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High- Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...DAMD17-98-1-8216 Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) Douglas E. Stack, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...ultimate goal of this research is the development of a biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Breast

  17. Human milk oligosaccharides: only the breast.

    PubMed

    McVeagh, P; Miller, J B

    1997-08-01

    Over 100 years ago it was first deduced that a major component of human milk must be an unidentified carbohydrate that was not found in cows milk. At first this was thought to be a form of lactose and was called gynolactose. We now know that this was not a single carbohydrate but a complex mixture of approximately 130 different oligosaccharides. Although small amounts of a few oligosaccharides have been found in the milk of other mammals, this rich diversity of sugars is unique to human milk. The oligosaccharide content of human milk varies with the infant's gestation, the duration of lactation, diurnally and with the genetic makeup of the mother. Milk oligosaccharides have a number of functions that may protect the health of the breast fed infant. As they are not digested in the small intestine, they form the 'soluble' fibre of breast milk and their intact structure is available to act as competitive ligands protecting the breast-fed infant from pathogens. There is a growing list of pathogens for which a specific oligosaccharide ligand has been described in human milk. They are likely to form the model for future therapeutic and prophylactic anti-microbials. They provide substrates for bacteria in the infant colon and thereby contribute to the difference in faecal pH and faecal flora between breast and formula-fed infants. They may also be important as a source of sialic acid, essential for brain development.

  18. Establishment and characterization of two primary breast cancer cell lines from young Indian breast cancer patients: mutation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Two novel triple negative breast cancer cell lines, NIPBC-1 and NIPBC-2 were successfully established from primary tumors of two young breast cancer patients aged 39 and 38 years respectively, diagnosed as infiltrating duct carcinoma of breast. Characterization of these cell lines showed luminal origin with expression of epithelial specific antigen and cytokeratin 18 and presence of microfilaments and secretary vesicles, microvilli, tight junctions and desmosomes on ultra-structural analysis. Both the cell lines showed anchorage independent growth and invasion of matrigel coated membranes. Karyotype analysis showed aneuploidy, deletions and multiple rearrangements in chromosomes 7, 9, X and 11 and isochromosomes 17q in both the cell lines. P53 mutational analysis revealed no mutation in the coding region in both the cell lines; however NIPBC-2 cell line showed presence of heterozygous C/G polymorphism, g.417 C > G (NM_000546.5) resulting in Arg/Pro allele at codon 72 of exon 4. Screening for mutations in BRCA1&2 genes revealed presence of three heterozygous polymorphisms in exon 11 of BRCA1 and 2 polymorphisms in exons 11, and14 of BRCA2 gene in both the cell lines. Both the cell lines showed presence of CD 44+/24-breast cancer stem cells and capability of producing mammosphere on culture. The two triple negative breast cancer cell lines established from early onset breast tumors can serve as novel invitro models to study mechanisms underlying breast tumorigenesis in younger age group patients and also identification of new therapeutic modalities targeting cancer stem cells. PMID:24502646

  19. Human breast biomonitoring and environmental chemicals: use of breast tissues and fluids in breast cancer etiologic research.

    PubMed

    LaKind, Judy S; Wilkins, Amy A; Bates, Michael N

    2007-09-01

    Extensive research indicates that the etiology of breast cancer is complex and multifactorial and may include environmental risk factors. Breast cancer etiology and exposure to xenobiotic compounds, diet, electromagnetic fields, and lifestyle have been the subject of numerous scientific inquiries, but research has yielded inconsistent results. Biomonitoring has been used to explore associations between breast cancer and levels of environmental chemicals in the breast. Research using breast tissues and fluids to cast light on the etiology of breast cancer is, for the most part, predicated on the assumption that the tissue or fluid samples either contain measurable traces of the environmental agent(s) associated with the cancer or that they retain biological changes that are biomarkers of such exposure or precursors of carcinogenic effect. In this paper, we review breast cancer etiology research utilizing breast biomonitoring. We first provide a brief synopsis of the current state of understanding of associations between exposure to environmental chemicals and breast cancer etiology. We then describe the published breast cancer research on tissues and fluids, which have been used for biomonitoring, specifically human milk and its components, malignant and benign breast tissue, nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and breast cyst fluid. We conclude with a discussion on recommendations for biomonitoring of breast tissues and fluids in future breast cancer etiology research. Both human milk and NAF fluids, and the cells contained therein, hold promise for future biomonitoring research into breast cancer etiology, but must be conducted with carefully delineated hypotheses and a scientifically supportable epidemiological approach.

  20. Avoidance of bottles during the establishment of breast feeds in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Carmel T; Gillis, Jennifer; McPhee, Andrew J; Suganuma, Hiroki; Makrides, Maria

    2016-09-30

    Preterm infants start milk feeds by gavage tube. As they mature, sucking feeds are gradually introduced. Women who choose to breast feed their preterm infant are not always able to be in hospital with their baby and need an alternative approach to feeding. Most commonly, milk (expressed breast milk or formula) is given by bottle. Whether using bottles during establishment of breast feeds is detrimental to breast feeding success is a topic of ongoing debate. To identify the effects of avoidance of bottle feeds during establishment of breast feeding on the likelihood of successful breast feeding, and to assess the safety of alternatives to bottle feeds. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to July 2016), Embase (1980 to July 2016) and CINAHL (1982 to July 2016). We also searched databases of clinical trials and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing avoidance of bottles with use of bottles in women who have chosen to breast feed their preterm infant. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. When appropriate, we contacted study authors for additional information. Review authors used standard methods of The Cochrane Collaboration and the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We included seven trials with 1152 preterm infants. Five studies used a cup feeding strategy, one used a tube feeding strategy and one used a novel teat when supplements to breast feeds were needed. We included the novel teat study in this review, as the teat was designed to more closely mimic the sucking action of breast feeding. The trials were of small to moderate size, and two had high risk of attrition bias. Adherence with cup feeding was poor in one of the studies, indicating dissatisfaction

  1. Avoidance of bottles during the establishment of breast feeds in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Carmel T; Gillis, Jennifer; McPhee, Andrew J; Suganuma, Hiroki; Makrides, Maria

    2016-10-19

    Preterm infants start milk feeds by gavage tube. As they mature, sucking feeds are gradually introduced. Women who choose to breast feed their preterm infant are not always able to be in hospital with their baby and need an alternative approach to feeding. Most commonly, milk (expressed breast milk or formula) is given by bottle. Whether using bottles during establishment of breast feeds is detrimental to breast feeding success is a topic of ongoing debate. To identify the effects of avoidance of bottle feeds during establishment of breast feeding on the likelihood of successful breast feeding, and to assess the safety of alternatives to bottle feeds. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to July 2016), Embase (1980 to July 2016) and CINAHL (1982 to July 2016). We also searched databases of clinical trials and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing avoidance of bottles with use of bottles in women who have chosen to breast feed their preterm infant. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. When appropriate, we contacted study authors for additional information. Review authors used standard methods of The Cochrane Collaboration and the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We included seven trials with 1152 preterm infants. Five studies used a cup feeding strategy, one used a tube feeding strategy and one used a novel teat when supplements to breast feeds were needed. We included the novel teat study in this review, as the teat was designed to more closely mimic the sucking action of breast feeding. The trials were of small to moderate size, and two had high risk of attrition bias. Adherence with cup feeding was poor in one of the studies, indicating dissatisfaction

  2. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  3. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  4. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Welch, R M; Findlay, J W

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  5. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Jinhwan; Chang, Hyeyoon; Kim, Aeree

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast. Methods Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers. Results The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity. Conclusions These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. PMID:27725620

  6. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Jinhwan; Chang, Hyeyoon; Kim, Aeree

    2016-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast. Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers. The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity. These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer.

  7. Proprotein Convertases in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    are a family of serine gests an important role for proprotein convertases in proteinases of the subtilisin /kexin type. To date, human breast...Sambrook J 1989 Extraction, quences. Alternatively, the potential role of propro- purification and analysis of messenger RNA from eucaryotic tein...Chretien M Genetics 12 223-225. & Marcinkiewicz M 1999 Mammalian subtilisin /kexin Steiner DF, Smeekens SP, Ohagi S & Chan SJ 1992 The new isozyme SKI

  8. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  9. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  10. Establishing operational stability--developing human infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Max A; Byers, Ernest J; Stingley, Preston; Sheridan, Robert M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, Toyota has come under harsh scrutiny as a result of several recalls. These well publicized mishaps have not only done damage to Toyota's otherwise sterling reputation for quality but have also called into question the assertions from a phalanx of followers that Toyota's production system (generically referred to as TPS or Lean) is the best method by which to structure one's systems of operation. In this article, we discuss how Toyota, faced with the pressure to grow its business, did not appropriately cadence this growth with the continued development and maintenance of the process capabilities (vis a vis the development of human infrastructure) needed to adequately support that growth. We draw parallels between the pressure Toyota faced to grow its business and the pressure neurointerventional practices face to grow theirs, and offer a methodology to support that growth without sacrificing quality.

  11. Avoidance of bottles during the establishment of breast feeds in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Carmel T; Makrides, Maria; Gillis, Jennifer; McPhee, Andrew J

    2008-10-08

    Preterm infants start milk feeds by gavage tube. As they mature, sucking feeds are gradually introduced. Women who choose to breast feed their preterm infant are not always available and an alternative approach to feeding is needed. Most commonly, milk (expressed breast milk or formula) is given by bottle. There is some controversy about whether using bottles during the establishment of breast feeds is detrimental to breastfeeding success. To determine the effect of avoidance of bottle feeds during the establishment of breastfeeding on the likelihood of successful breastfeeding and to determine if alternatives to bottle feeds are safe. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE in any language. The search was updated in July 2008. Randomised or quasi randomised controlled trials comparing avoidance of bottles with use of bottles in women who have chosen to breast feed their preterm infant. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. When appropriate, we contacted study authors for additional information. Standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group were used. Five trials of 543 infants were included. Four trials used a cup feeding strategy and one trial used a tube feeding strategy when supplements to breast feeds were needed. The single study of tube feeding had a high risk of bias. In the analysis of all five trials, significant heterogeneity was evident in two of the primary outcomes. This was reduced when the tube feeding trial was removed from analyses.Cup feeding significantly decreased 'no breastfeeding or only partial breast feeding' on discharge home (summary RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.91). However, cup feeding significantly increased length of hospital stay by 10 days (95% CI 3.87 to 16.29). There was a high degree of noncompliance in the largest study of cup feeding indicating dissatisfaction with this method by staff and/or parents

  12. Characterization of Gene Expression in Human Breast Tumor Endothelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    to UV-induced apoptosis in primary culture of canine mammary gland tumors (7), and SFRP2 decreased apoptosis in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia(8...microdissection (LCM) of vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors and normal breast tissue for genomic analysis. We found SFRP2 to have 6 fold increased...vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors , where the RNA was of high quality and sufficient for genomic analysis(6). We found 55 genes with > 4

  13. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  14. Laminin receptor on human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, V P; Rao, C N; Kalebic, T; Margulies, I M; Liotta, L A

    1983-01-01

    Human MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells possess a receptor-like moiety on their surface that has a high binding affinity (Kd = 2 nM) for laminin, a glycoprotein localized in basement membranes. Laminin preferentially stimulates (8-fold) MCF-7 cells to attach to type IV (basement membrane) collagen, whereas fibronectin stimulates attachment only 2-fold for these cells on type I collagen. The attachment properties of two other human breast carcinoma cell lines to type IV collagen were also studied. The attachment of ZR-75-1 cells was stimulated 4-fold by laminin and 5-fold by fibronectin, whereas T47-D cell attachment was stimulated 2-fold by laminin and 7-fold by fibronectin. By employing protease-derived fragments of laminin, the major domains of the laminin molecule that participate in MCF-7 cell attachment to type IV collagen were identified. The whole laminin molecule has the configuration of a four-armed cross with three short arms and one long arm. A major cell-binding domain was found to reside near the intersection point of the short arms, and the type IV collagen-binding domain was associated with the globular end regions of the short arms. The receptor for laminin on the surface of these tumor cells may be involved in the initial interaction of tumor cells via laminin with the vascular basement membrane to facilitate invasion and subsequent promotion of metastasis. Images PMID:6300843

  15. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  16. Association Between Breast Milk Bacterial Communities and Establishment and Development of the Infant Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Pannaraj, Pia S; Li, Fan; Cerini, Chiara; Bender, Jeffrey M; Yang, Shangxin; Rollie, Adrienne; Adisetiyo, Helty; Zabih, Sara; Lincez, Pamela J; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey; Bushman, Frederic D; Sleasman, John W; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2017-07-01

    Establishment of the infant microbiome has lifelong implications on health and immunity. Gut microbiota of breastfed compared with nonbreastfed individuals differ during infancy as well as into adulthood. Breast milk contains a diverse population of bacteria, but little is known about the vertical transfer of bacteria from mother to infant by breastfeeding. To determine the association between the maternal breast milk and areolar skin and infant gut bacterial communities. In a prospective, longitudinal study, bacterial composition was identified with sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene in breast milk, areolar skin, and infant stool samples of 107 healthy mother-infant pairs. The study was conducted in Los Angeles, California, and St Petersburg, Florida, between January 1, 2010, and February 28, 2015. Amount and duration of daily breastfeeding and timing of solid food introduction. Bacterial composition in maternal breast milk, areolar skin, and infant stool by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. In the 107 healthy mother and infant pairs (median age at the time of specimen collection, 40 days; range, 1-331 days), 52 (43.0%) of the infants were male. Bacterial communities were distinct in milk, areolar skin, and stool, differing in both composition and diversity. The infant gut microbial communities were more closely related to an infant's mother's milk and skin compared with a random mother (mean difference in Bray-Curtis distances, 0.012 and 0.014, respectively; P < .001 for both). Source tracking analysis was used to estimate the contribution of the breast milk and areolar skin microbiomes to the infant gut microbiome. During the first 30 days of life, infants who breastfed to obtain 75% or more of their daily milk intake received a mean (SD) of 27.7% (15.2%) of the bacteria from breast milk and 10.3% (6.0%) from areolar skin. Bacterial diversity (Faith phylogenetic diversity, P = .003) and composition changes were associated with the

  17. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer - Assessment of Causality.

    PubMed

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case-control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is "specificity." HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers.

  18. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  19. A feasibility study of soft embalmed human breast tissue for preclinical trials of HIFU- preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Joyce; Yang, Yang; Purdie, Colin; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women in the UK, accounting for 30% of all new cancers in women, with an estimated 49,500 new cases in 20101. With the widespread negative publicity around over-diagnosis and over-treatment of low risk breast cancers, interest in the application of non-invasive treatments such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has increased. Development has begun of novel US transducers and platforms specifically designed for use with breast lesions, so as to improve the range of breast lesions that can be safely treated. However, before such transducers can be evaluated in patients in clinical trials, there is a need to establish their efficacy. A particular issue is the accuracy of temperature monitoring of FUS with MRI in the breast, since the presence of large amounts of surrounding fat can hinder temperature measurement. An appropriate anatomical model that imposes similar physical constraints to the breast and that responds to FUS in the same way would be extremely advantageous. The aim of this feasibility study is to explore the use of Thiel embalmed cadaveric tissue for these purposes. We report here the early results of laboratory-based experiments sonicating dissected breast samples from a Thiel embalmed soft human cadaver with high body mass index (BMI). A specially developed MRI compatible chamber and sample holder was developed to secure the sample and ensure reproducible sonications at the transducer focus. The efficacy of sonication was first studied with chicken breast and porcine tissue. The experiments were then repeated with the dissected fatty breast tissue samples from the soft-embalmed human cadavers. The sonicated Thiel breast tissue was examined histopathologically, which confirmed the absence of any discrete lesion. To investigate further, fresh chicken breast tissue was embalmed and the embalmed tissue was sonicated with the same parameters. The results confirmed the

  20. Guidelines for establishing a donor human milk depot.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Sheela R; List, Betsy A; Morrow, Georgia B

    2010-02-01

    Human milk is the preferred choice for infant feeding. When a sick or premature infant's own mother's milk is unavailable, donor human milk is becoming more widely used. Many potential milk donors do not live within close proximity to the 10 North American not-for-profit milk banks. Transporting milk via commercial carriers can be inconvenient and costly for recipient banks. A network of donor human milk depots is one practical way to increase the quantity of available donor human milk. This article provides guidelines and practical suggestions for establishing a donor human milk depot.

  1. National Breast Cancer Audit: establishing a web-based data system.

    PubMed

    Boult, Margaret; Cuncins-Hearn, Astrid; Tyson, Sarah; Kollias, Jim; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    2005-10-01

    An audit of surgical treatment of early breast cancer was introduced nationally in 1999. In August 2002, the Australian Safety and Efficacy Register of New Interventional Procedures - Surgical, under the auspices of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, assumed responsibility for managing this audit. This article provides an update of audit activities, now known formally as the National Breast Cancer Audit (NBCA), including a description of the new governance structure and the development of a secure online surgical audit system. Major changes have taken place in the design and governance of the NBCA during the last two years. Two committees have been established to oversee the audit. A clinical advisory committee comprises experts from a number of fields including breast surgery, oncology, government, and from peak breast cancer and consumer bodies. A technical advisory committee oversees many of the technical issues that have arisen with the development of an online data entry system. The online system of data entry was developed and launched to surgeons in May 2004. There are now 28,000 cases of primary breast surgery in the audit. Around 250 surgeons are currently participating, an increase of over 50 surgeons since May 2004. Surgeons can review their data using the online system and compare their own results by generating reports which graph their own results against national aggregate data. There has been a significant increase in the volume of data received since the launch of the secure online system. The governing committees are working towards creating a clinical audit which will provide an improved data entry system and better reporting for all participating surgeons. The NBCA can also serve as a template on which to base other surgical audits.

  2. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  3. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-02-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin v3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin v3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer.

  4. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin αvβ3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin αvβ3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer. PMID:11172040

  5. Aflatoxin M1 in human breast milk in southeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kılıç Altun, Serap; Gürbüz, Semra; Ayağ, Emin

    2017-05-01

    This study was performed to determine aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in human breast milk samples collected in Şanlıurfa, located in Southeastern region of Turkey, and to investigate a possible correlation between AFM1 occurrence (frequency and levels) and sampling seasons. Human breast milk samples collected in December 2014 and in June 2015 from a total of 74 nursing women, both outpatient and inpatient volunteers in hospitals located in Şanlıurfa, Turkey, were analyzed using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of AFM1. AFM1 was detected in 66 (89.2%) out of 74 samples at an average concentration of 19.0 ± 13.0 ng/l (min.-max., 9.6-80 ng/l). There was a statistically significant difference between December and June concerning AFM1 levels (p < 0.05). Further detailed studies will be needed to determine the main sources of aflatoxins in food, to establish protection strategies against maternal and infant exposure to these mycotoxins.

  6. Effective treatment of established human breast tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice with a single dose of the alpha-emitting radioisotope astatine-211 conjugated to anti-HER2/neu diabodies.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew K; Shaller, Calvin; Garmestani, Kayhan; Plascjak, Paul S; Hodge, Kathryn M; Yuan, Qing-An; Marks, James D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Brechbiel, Martin W; Adams, Gregory P

    2008-02-01

    Successful radioimmunotherapy strategies depend on selecting radioisotopes with physical properties complementary to the biological properties of the targeting vehicle. Small, engineered antitumor antibody fragments are capable of rapid, highly specific tumor targeting in immunodeficient mouse models. We hypothesized that the C6.5 diabody, a noncovalent anti-HER2 single-chain Fv dimer, would be an ideal radioisotope carrier for the radioimmunotherapy of established tumors using the short-lived alpha-emitting radioisotope (211)At. Immunodeficient nude mice bearing established HER2/neu-positive MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors treated with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[(211)At]astatophenethyl)succinamate ((211)At-SAPS)-C6.5 diabody. Additional cohorts of mice were treated with (211)At-SAPS T84.66 diabody targeting the carcinoembryonic antigen or (211)At-SAPS on a diabody specific for the Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor, which is minimally expressed on this tumor cell line. A single i.v. injection of (211)At-SAPS C6.5 diabody led to a 30-day delay in tumor growth when a 20 muCi dose was administered and a 57-day delay in tumor growth (60% tumor-free after 1 year) when a 45 muCi dose was used. Treatment of mice bearing the same tumors with (211)At-SAPS T84.66 diabody at the same doses led to a delay in tumor growth, but no complete responses, likely due to substantially lower expression of this antigen on the MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors. In contrast, a dose of 20 muCi of (211)At-SAPS on the anti-Müllerian-inhibiting substance type II receptor diabody did not affect tumor growth rate, demonstrating specificity of the therapeutic effect. These findings indicate that diabody molecules can be effective agents for targeted radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors using powerful, short-lived alpha-emitting radioisotopes.

  7. Effective Treatment of Established Human Breast Tumor Xenografts in Immunodeficient Mice with a Single Dose of the α-Emitting Radioisotope Astatine-211 Conjugated to Anti-HER2/neu Diabodies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew K.; Shaller, Calvin; Garmestani, Kayhan; Plascjak, Paul S.; Hodge, Kathryn M.; Yuan, Qing-An; Marks, James D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Adams, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    Successful RAIT strategies depend upon selecting radioisotopes with physical properties complementary to the biological properties of the targeting vehicle. Small, engineered anti-tumor antibody fragments are capable of rapid, highly specific tumor targeting in immunodeficient mouse models. We hypothesized that their rapid systemic elimination would make them ideal radioisotope carriers for the radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) of established tumors. The C6.5 diabody, a non-covalent anti-HER2 single-chain Fv dimer, has a T1/2 α (equilibration phase) of 0.7 hrs, a T1/2 β (elimination phase) of 6 hrs, and a T1/2 in tumor of approximately 30 hrs that favors the use of short-lived radioisotopes. In particular, the α-particle emitting radioisotope 211At (T1/2 = 7.2 hrs) was hypothesized to be very promising for diabody-directed RAIT. This hypothesis was tested in immunodeficient nude mice bearing established HER2/neu positive MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors treated with 211At-SAPS C6.5 diabody (N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl)succinamate-C6.5 diabody) at or below the maximum tolerated dose. A single i.v. injection of 211At-SAPS C6.5 diabody lead to a 30 day delay in tumor growth when a 20 µCi dose was administered and a 57 day delay in tumor growth (60% tumor free after one year) when a 45 µCi dose was employed. Treatment of mice bearing the same tumors with 211At-SAPS T84.66 diabody targeting the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) at the same doses led to a delay in tumor growth, but no complete responses, likely due to substantially lower expression of this antigen on the MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors. A dose of 20 µCi of 211At-SAPS on an a diabody specific for the Müllerian Inhibiting Substance Type II Receptor which is minimally expressed on this tumor cell line did not impact tumor growth rate, demonstrating specificity. These findings indicate that diabody molecules can be effective agents for targeted radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors using powerful, short-lived

  8. Establishing and sustaining a prospective screening program for breast cancer-related lymphedema at the massachusetts general hospital: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, Cheryl; Skolny, Melissa; Ferguson, Chantal; Swaroop, Meyha; O'Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2015-05-20

    There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population.

  9. A plasma metabolomic signature discloses human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quiles, José Luís; Ramírez-Tortosa, Mari-Carmen; Sol, Joaquim; Ruiz-Sanjuan, Maria; Fernandez, Mónica; de la Torre Cabrera, Capilla; Ramírez-Tortosa, Cesar; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Metabolomics is the comprehensive global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this retrospective pilot study we explored whether serum metabolomic profile can discriminate the presence of human breast cancer irrespective of the cancer subtype. Methods Plasma samples were analyzed from healthy women (n = 20) and patients with breast cancer after diagnosis (n = 91) using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest (RF) classifier were used to create a metabolomics panel for the diagnosis of human breast cancer. Results Metabolomics correctly distinguished between breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects. In the RF supervised class prediction analysis comparing breast cancer and healthy control groups, RF accurately classified 100% both samples of the breast cancer patients and healthy controls. So, the class error for both group in and the out-of-bag error were 0. We also found 1269 metabolites with different concentration in plasma from healthy controls and cancer patients; and basing on exact mass, retention time and isotopic distribution we identified 35 metabolites. These metabolites mostly support cell growth by providing energy and building stones for the synthesis of essential biomolecules, and function as signal transduction molecules. The collective results of RF, significance testing, and false discovery rate analysis identified several metabolites that were strongly associated with breast cancer. Conclusions In breast cancer a metabolomics signature of cancer exists and can be detected in patient plasma irrespectively of the breast cancer type. PMID:28076849

  10. A plasma metabolomic signature discloses human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Collado, Ricardo; Quiles, José Luís; Ramírez-Tortosa, Mari-Carmen; Sol, Joaquim; Ruiz-Sanjuan, Maria; Fernandez, Mónica; de la Torre Cabrera, Capilla; Ramírez-Tortosa, Cesar; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-03-21

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this retrospective pilot study we explored whether serum metabolomic profile can discriminate the presence of human breast cancer irrespective of the cancer subtype. Plasma samples were analyzed from healthy women (n = 20) and patients with breast cancer after diagnosis (n = 91) using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest (RF) classifier were used to create a metabolomics panel for the diagnosis of human breast cancer. Metabolomics correctly distinguished between breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects. In the RF supervised class prediction analysis comparing breast cancer and healthy control groups, RF accurately classified 100% both samples of the breast cancer patients and healthy controls. So, the class error for both group in and the out-of-bag error were 0. We also found 1269 metabolites with different concentration in plasma from healthy controls and cancer patients; and basing on exact mass, retention time and isotopic distribution we identified 35 metabolites. These metabolites mostly support cell growth by providing energy and building stones for the synthesis of essential biomolecules, and function as signal transduction molecules. The collective results of RF, significance testing, and false discovery rate analysis identified several metabolites that were strongly associated with breast cancer. In breast cancer a metabolomics signature of cancer exists and can be detected in patient plasma irrespectively of the breast cancer type.

  11. Is human cytomegalovirus associated with breast cancer progression?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may be associated with breast cancer progression. However, the role of HCMV infection in breast cancer remains controversial. We aimed to assess whether HCMV genes (UL122 and UL83) could be detected in breast carcinomas and reinvestigated their possible association with breast cancer progression. DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues was analyzed by real-time PCR. We investigated 20 fibroadenomas and 27 primary breast carcinomas (stages II, III, and IV). Findings Two carcinomas were positive for HCMV, one was positive for two TaqMan viral detection probes, and one was positive for a sole TaqMan viral detection probe (UL83), whereas the remainder of the samples was negative. Conclusions Samples studied showed no association between HCMV infection and breast cancer progression. PMID:23557440

  12. Tissue specific DNA methylation in normal human breast epithelium and in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Ayelet; Cho, Sean Soonweng; Uhlmann, Ronit; Polak, Mia Leonov; Sandbank, Judith; Karni, Tami; Pappo, Itzhak; Halperin, Ruvit; Vaknin, Zvi; Sella, Avishay; Sukumar, Saraswati; Evron, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous and tissue-specific disease. Thus, the tissue of origin reflects on the natural history of the disease and dictates the therapeutic approach. It is suggested that tissue differentiation, mediated mostly by epigenetic modifications, could guide tissue-specific susceptibility and protective mechanisms against cancer. Here we studied breast specific methylation in purified normal epithelium and its reflection in breast cancers. We established genome wide methylation profiles of various normal epithelial tissues and identified 110 genes that were differentially methylated in normal breast epithelium. A number of these genes also showed methylation alterations in breast cancers. We elaborated on one of them, TRIM29 (ATDC), and showed that its promoter was hypo-methylated in normal breast epithelium and heavily methylated in other normal epithelial tissues. Moreover, in breast carcinomas methylation increased and expression decreased whereas the reverse was noted for multiple other carcinomas. Interestingly, TRIM29 regulation in breast tumors clustered according to the PAM50 classification. Thus, it was repressed in the estrogen receptor positive tumors, particularly in the more proliferative luminal B subtype. This goes in line with previous reports indicating tumor suppressive activity of TRIM29 in estrogen receptor positive luminal breast cells in contrast to oncogenic function in pancreatic and lung cancers. Overall, these findings emphasize the linkage between breast specific epigenetic regulation and tissue specificity of cancer.

  13. Prognostic role of p27Kip1 and apoptosis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Shen, Z-Z; Lu, J-S; Jiang, M; Han, Q-X; Fontana, J A; Barsky, S H; Shao, Z-M

    1999-01-01

    Human breast carcinoma is biologically heterogeneous, and its clinical course may vary from an indolent slowly progressive one to a course associated with rapid progression and metastatic spread. It is important to establish prognostic factors which will define subgroups of patients with low vs high risk of recurrence so as to better define the need for additional therapy. Additional characterization of the molecular make-up of breast cancer phenotypes should provide important insights into the biology of breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated apoptosis, expression of p27Kip1 and p53 retrospectively in 181 human breast cancer specimens. In addition, their relevance to the biological behaviour of breast cancer was examined. Our studies found a significant association among high histological grade, high p53, low apoptosis and low p27. Our results also demonstrated that, in human breast cancer, low levels of p27 and apoptotic index (AI) strongly correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and decreased patient survival. In node-negative patients, however, p27 also had prognostic value for relapse-free and overall survival in multivariate analysis. Furthermore p27 and AI had predictive value for the benefits of chemotherapy. These latter observations should prompt prospective randomized studies designed to investigate the predictive role of p27 and AI in determining who should receive chemotherapy in node-negative patients. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188908

  14. The risks and benefits of human donor breast milk.

    PubMed

    Brent, Nancy

    2013-05-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Review the advantages and disadvantages of donor-banked milk over informal milk sharing.2.List disadvantages of proprietary infant formula for use as supplementation.3.Determine the primary ethical concerns when electing to use donor human milk versus propriety infant formula for supplementation. The benefits of breast-feeding, as well as the risks of some artificial formula, are well known. This growing recognition of the advantages of breast-feeding is reflected in the increased incidence of breast-feeding in recent years. However, one of the most common reasons for premature weaning is low milk supply, perceived or real, followed by nipple or breast pain. Given the increased awareness of the superiority of breast milk, however, more parents are turning to human donor milk to supplement their babies after they have been weaned. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Dietary boron: progress in establishing essential roles in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Curtiss D

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes the progress made in establishing essential roles for boron in human physiology and assesses that progress in view of criteria for essentiality of elements. The evidence to date suggests that humans and at least some higher animals may use boron to support normal biological functions. These include roles in calcium metabolism, bone growth and maintenance, insulin metabolism, and completion of the life cycle. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood but the nature of boron biochemistry suggests further characterization of the cell signaling molecules capable of complexing with boron. Such characterization may provide insights into the biochemical function(s) of boron in humans.

  16. Establishment of normative data for the amount of breast tissue present in healthy children up to two years of age.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Cha, Ruth; Horn-Ommen, Jennifer; O'Brien, Peter; Simmons, Patricia S

    2010-10-01

    To establish a set of normal values for breast size in children up to two years of age, and to assess the effects of gender, gestational age, and type of feeding and growth parameters on breast size. Prospective cohort study over 20 months The Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, neonatal nursery and Community Pediatrics Clinic. Well term infants and children through two years of age. Measurement of breast size based on previously described methods to yield a figure called the breast unit. Transformation of breast unit size into percentiles according to age. The 50(th) to 99(th) percentiles for 810 healthy term Caucasian infant visits were calculated. The 50th breast unit percentile was similar in males and females at birth and declined with age following a quadratic relationship for females and a cubic relationship for males. Breast tissue in female infants remained larger and persisted longer. Palpable breast tissue was still present in 45.2% of male and 61.6% of female visits after 10 months of age. At age 18 months, 5% of girls had a breast size unit greater than 2.88 cm(2) and 5% of boys had a breast size unit greater than 1.00 cm(2). These data allow creation of normal standards of breast size for age, which could provide a future clinical tool to assist clinicians in the evaluation of early childhood breast enlargement in similar populations. Copyright © 2010 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-25

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20-40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans.

  18. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  19. Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James Voltz Paloma Giangrande Donald McDonnell, Ph.D...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug DAMD17-98-1-8070 Discovery in Human Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) James

  20. [Human milk--some recent aspects of breast feeding].

    PubMed

    Plenert, W

    1979-01-01

    New data on the quality and quantity of protein and nor-protein nitrogen in human milk are discussed in the first part of this review. The second part presents a short review of current knowledge on immunologically important components of human milk (secretory IgA, Lactoferrin, ligands for folic acid and vitamine B-12. Lysozyme, cells, induction of breast milk flora in the intestine). There are very good reasons to enhance breast feeding also in developed countries.

  1. Exploring human breast milk composition by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Giulia; Capuani, Giorgio; Tomassini, Alberta; Baldassarre, Maria Elisabetta; Delfini, Maurizio; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is a complex fluid evolutionarily adapted to satisfy the nutritional requirements of growing infants. In addition, milk biochemical and immunological components protect newborns against infective agents in the new environment. Human milk oligosaccharides, the third most abundant component of breast milk, are believed to modulate the microbiota composition, thus influencing a wide range of physiological processes of the infant. Human milk also contains a number of other bioactive compounds, the functional role of which has not yet been clearly elucidated. In this scenario, NMR-based metabolic profiling can provide a rapid characterisation of breast milk composition, thus allowing a better understanding of its nutritional properties.

  2. Possible DNA Viral Factors of Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Lu, Tsong-Ming; Chin, Lengsu William; Yang, Chi-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are considered to be one of the high-risk factors closely related to human breast cancer. However, different studies of viruses in breast cancer present conflicting results and some of these works remain in dispute. DNA viruses, such as specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human herpes virus type 8 (HHV-8), have emerged as causal factors of some human cancers. These respective exogenous viruses and the possibility of multiple viral factors are discussed in this review. PMID:24281079

  3. The physiology of the normal human breast: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dixie; Gordon, Eva J; Casano, Ashley; Lahti, Sarah Michelle; Nguyen, Tinh; Preston, Alex; Tondre, Julie; Wu, Kuan; Yanase, Tiffany; Chan, Henry; Chia, David; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Himmel, Tiffany; Love, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    The physiology of the nonlactating human breast likely plays a key role in factors that contribute to the etiology of breast cancer and other breast conditions. Although there has been extensive research into the physiology of lactation, few reports explore the physiology of the resting mammary gland, including mechanisms by which compounds such as hormones, drugs, and potential carcinogens enter the breast ducts. The purpose of this study was to explore transport of exogenous drugs into ductal fluid in nonlactating women and determine if their concentrations in the fluid are similar to those observed in the breast milk of lactating women. We selected two compounds that have been well characterized during lactation, caffeine and cimetidine. Caffeine passively diffuses into breast milk, but cimetidine is actively transported and concentrated in breast milk. After ingestion of caffeine and cimetidine, 14 nonlactating subjects had blood drawn and underwent ductal lavage at five time points over 12 h to measure drug levels in the fluid and blood. The concentrations of both caffeine and cimetidine in lavage fluid were substantially less than those observed in breast milk. Our results support recent evidence that the cimetidine transporter is not expressed in the nonlactating mammary gland, and highlight intriguing differences in the physiology and molecular transport of the lactating and nonlactating breast. The findings of this exploratory study warrant further exploration into the physiology of the nonlactating mammary gland to elucidate factors involved in disease initiation and progression.

  4. Implantation and Establishment of Pregnancy in Human and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Fazleabas, Asgerally T.

    2016-01-01

    Implantation and the establishment of pregnancy are critical for the propagation of the species, but yet remain the limiting steps in human and primate reproduction. Successful implantation requires a competent blastocyst and a receptive endometrium during a specific window of time during the menstrual cycle to initiate the bilateral communication required for the establishment of a successful pregnancy. This chapter provides an overview of these processes and discusses the molecular mechanisms associated with implantation of the blastocyst and decidualization of the uterus in primates. PMID:26450500

  5. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  6. Bovine leukemia virus DNA in human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Buehring, Gertrude Case; Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M; Choi, K Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease.

  7. Human breast milk and antiretrovirals dramatically reduce oral HIV-1 transmission in BLT humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Swanson, Michael D; Nochi, Tomonori; Olesen, Rikke; Denton, Paul W; Chateau, Morgan; Garcia, J Victor

    2012-01-01

    Currently, over 15% of new HIV infections occur in children. Breastfeeding is a major contributor to HIV infections in infants. This represents a major paradox in the field because in vitro, breast milk has been shown to have a strong inhibitory effect on HIV infectivity. However, this inhibitory effect has never been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we address this important paradox using the first humanized mouse model of oral HIV transmission. We established that reconstitution of the oral cavity and upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mice with human leukocytes, including the human cell types important for mucosal HIV transmission (i.e. dendritic cells, macrophages and CD4⁺ T cells), renders them susceptible to oral transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Oral transmission of HIV resulted in systemic infection of lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues that is characterized by the presence of HIV RNA in plasma and a gradual decline of CD4⁺ T cells in peripheral blood. Consistent with infection of the oral cavity, we observed virus shedding into saliva. We then evaluated the role of human breast milk on oral HIV transmission. Our in vivo results demonstrate that breast milk has a strong inhibitory effect on oral transmission of both cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Finally, we evaluated the effect of antiretrovirals on oral transmission of HIV. Our results show that systemic antiretrovirals administered prior to exposure can efficiently prevent oral HIV transmission in BLT mice.

  8. In vitro methods to culture primary human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Sun, Yu Jia

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that much like leukemia, breast tumors are maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells are envisaged to be responsible for tumor formation and relapse. Therefore, knowledge about their nature will provide a platform to develop therapies to eliminate these breast cancer stem cells. This concept highlights the need to understand the mechanisms that regulate the normal functions of the breast stem cells and their immediate progeny as alterations to these same mechanisms can cause these primitive cells to act as cancer stem cells. The study of the primitive cell functions relies on the ability to isolate them from primary sources of breast tissue. This chapter describes processing of discarded tissue from reduction mammoplasty samples as sources of normal primary human breast epithelial cells and describes cell culture systems to grow single-cell suspensions prepared from these reduction samples in vitro.

  9. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  10. Adiponectin mediates antiproliferative and apoptotic responses in human MCF7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dieudonne, Marie-Noelle; Bussiere, Marianne; Dos Santos, Esther; Leneveu, Marie-Christine; Giudicelli, Yves . E-mail: biochip@wanadoo.fr; Pecquery, Rene

    2006-06-23

    It is well established that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer and that blood levels of adiponectin, a hormone mainly secreted by white adipocytes, are inversely correlated with the body fat mass. As adiponectin elicits anti-proliferative effects in some cell types, we tested the hypothesis that adiponectin could influence human breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth. Here we show that MCF-7 cells express adiponectin receptors and respond to human recombinant adiponectin by reducing their growth, AMPkinase activation, and p42/p44 MAPkinase inactivation. Further, we demonstrate that the anti-proliferative effect of adiponectin involves activation of cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle. These findings suggest that adiponectin could act in vivo as a paracrine/endocrine growth inhibitor towards mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, adipose adiponectin production being strongly reduced in obesity, this study may help to explain why obesity is a risk factor of developing breast cancers.

  11. Cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in invasive human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pohlodek, Kamil; Tan, Yen Y.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Loss of expression of cadherin-11 protein is correlated with a loss of epithelial phenotype and a gain in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. It has been hypothesized that cadherin-11 may be a molecular marker for a more aggressive subtype of breast cancer. The present study examined the expression of the mesenchymal gene/protein cadherin-11 in malignant, benign and healthy breast cancer samples. A paraffin-embedded tissue microarray of both malignant and benign/healthy breast tumor was used. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, grading, tumor size, hormone receptors and HER2 receptors status were obtained from patient medical records. Expression of cadherin-11 was analyzed using the monoclonal mouse anti cadherin-11 IgG2B clone. Total RNA was extracted from each breast cancer sample and subjected to semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis for cadherin-11. Cadherin-11 was detected in 80/82 malignant breast cancer samples and in 33/70 non-malignant tissue samples. Cadherin-11 expression was observed to be predominantly localized to the membrane of tumor cells. When compared to healthy breast tissue biopsies, both cadherin-11 mRNA and protein were demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in breast carcinoma (P=0.040 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within malignant tumors, however, protein expression was not identified to be associated with other clinicopathological parameters. Our results indicate that cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in malignant human breast cancer. PMID:28101202

  12. Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Chellakkan Selvanesan; Babu, Somasundaram Dinesh; Radhakrishna, Selvi; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Sankar, Bhaskaran Ravi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the world today. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases that can degrade extracellular matrix proteins and promote cell invasion and metastasis. MMPs are differentially expressed and their expressions are often associated with a poor prognosis for patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the expression of MMPs in different grades of human breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We collected 39 breast cancer samples (24 grade II and 15 grade III) along with 16 normal breast tissues from outside the tumor margin during cancer removal surgery. The samples were analysed for the expression of all known MMPs using real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: The results indicate that mRNA expressions of MMP-1, -9,-11,-15,-24 and -25 were upregulated in breast cancer tissues when compared to normal breast tissues. But, the mRNA expressions of MMP-10 and MMP-19 were downregulated in cancer tissue. In membrane associated MMPs like MMP-15 and MMP-24 we found a grade dependent increase of their mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our studies demonstrate that MMPs are differentially regulated in breast cancer tissues and they might play various roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Thus, MMPs are of immense value to be studied as diagnostic markers and drug target. PMID:23568046

  13. Alteration of the MT1 melatonin receptor gene and its expression in primary human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ling; Yuan, Lin; Cheng, Qi; Dong, Chunmin; Mao, Lulu; Hill, Steven Marc

    2009-11-01

    The MT1 melatonin receptor is bound and activated by the pineal hormone melatonin. This G protein-coupled melatonin receptor is expressed in human breast tumor cell lines, and when activated, mediates the growth-suppressive and steroid hormone/nuclear receptor modulatory actions of melatonin on breast tumor cells. In the current studies, we have examined the expression of the MT1 receptor in breast cancer cell lines and primary human breast tumors and correlated MT1 receptor expression with the deletion, rearrangement and amplification of the MT1 gene and established markers of breast cancer such as tumor size, stage, estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression. Theses studies suggest amplification of the MT1 gene in some breast tumors and an inverse correlation with ERalpha, PR and MT1 protein expression. Furthermore, these approaches employing immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent/confocal microscopic studies demonstrate that the MT1 receptor is localized to the caveoli and that MT1 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells can be repressed by estradiol and melatonin.

  14. Prevention of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    transcription and secretion in breast cancer cells. Oncogene 21, 7730-7739. 4. Sengupta K, Banerjee S , Saxena NK, Banerjee SK . (2004). Thrombospondin-1...findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or...of the Angiogenic Switch in Human Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0316 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S

  15. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  16. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  17. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    2012-10-04

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  18. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  19. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  20. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    PubMed

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  1. Prognostic significance of PLIN1 expression in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cefan; Wang, Ming; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Weiyong; Qin, Wenying; He, Rong; Lu, Yang; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease associated with diverse clinical, biological and molecular features, presenting huge challenges for prognosis and treatment. Here we found that perilipin-1 (PLIN1) mRNA expression is significantly downregulated in human breast cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients presenting with reduced PLIN1 expression exhibited poorer overall metastatic relapse-free survival (p = 0.03). Further Cox proportional hazard models analysis revealed that the reduced expression of PLIN1 is an independent predictor of overall survival in estrogen receptor positive (p < 0.0001, HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.81–0.92, N = 3,600) and luminal A-subtype (p = 0.02, HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.78–0.98, N = 1,469) breast cancer patients. We also demonstrated that the exogenous expression of PLIN1 in human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells significantly inhibits cell proliferation, migration, invasion and in vivo tumorigenesis in mice. Together, these data provide novel insights into a prognostic significance of PLIN1 in human breast cancer and reveal a potentially new gene therapy target for breast cancer. PMID:27359054

  2. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  3. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  4. Combinations of parabens at concentrations measured in human breast tissue can increase proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Charles, Amelia K; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), which are used as preservatives in consumer products, possess oestrogenic activity and have been measured in human breast tissue. This has raised concerns for a potential involvement in the development of human breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated the extent to which proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells can be increased by exposure to the five parabens either alone or in combination at concentrations as recently measured in 160 human breast tissue samples. Determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOEC), EC50 and EC100 values for stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7 cells by five parabens revealed that 43/160 (27%) of the human breast tissue samples contained at least one paraben at a concentration ≥ LOEC and 64/160 (40%) > NOEC. Proliferation of MCF-7 cells could be increased by combining all five parabens at concentrations down to the 50(th) percentile (median) values measured in the tissues. For the 22 tissue samples taken at the site of ER + PR + primary cancers, 12 contained a sufficient concentration of one or more paraben to stimulate proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This demonstrates that parabens, either alone or in combination, are present in human breast tissue at concentrations sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in vitro, and that functional consequences of the presence of paraben in human breast tissue should be assessed on the basis of all five parabens and not single parabens individually. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Spontaneous dormancy of metastatic breast cancer cells in an all human liver microphysiologic system.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, S E; Clark, A M; Taylor, D P; Young, C L; Pillai, V C; Stolz, D B; Venkataramanan, R; Lauffenburger, D; Griffith, L; Wells, A

    2014-12-09

    Metastatic outgrowth in breast cancer can occur years after a seeming cure. Existing model systems of dormancy are limited as they do not recapitulate human metastatic dormancy without exogenous manipulations and are unable to query early events of micrometastases. Here, we describe a human ex vivo hepatic microphysiologic system. The system is established with fresh human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) creating a microenvironment into which breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) are added. The hepatic tissue maintains function through 15 days as verified by liver-specific protein production and drug metabolism assays. The NPCs form an integral part of the hepatic niche, demonstrated within the system through their participation in differential signalling cascades and cancer cell outcomes. Breast cancer cells intercalate into the hepatic niche without interfering with hepatocyte function. Examination of cancer cells demonstrated that a significant subset enter a quiescent state of dormancy as shown by lack of cell cycling (EdU(-) or Ki67(-)). The presence of NPCs altered the cancer cell fraction entering quiescence, and lead to differential cytokine profiles in the microenvironment effluent. These findings establish the liver microphysiologic system as a relevant model for the study of breast cancer metastases and entry into dormancy.

  6. Spontaneous dormancy of metastatic breast cancer cells in an all human liver microphysiologic system

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, S E; Clark, A M; Taylor, D P; Young, C L; Pillai, V C; Stolz, D B; Venkataramanan, R; Lauffenburger, D; Griffith, L; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metastatic outgrowth in breast cancer can occur years after a seeming cure. Existing model systems of dormancy are limited as they do not recapitulate human metastatic dormancy without exogenous manipulations and are unable to query early events of micrometastases. Methods: Here, we describe a human ex vivo hepatic microphysiologic system. The system is established with fresh human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) creating a microenvironment into which breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) are added. Results: The hepatic tissue maintains function through 15 days as verified by liver-specific protein production and drug metabolism assays. The NPCs form an integral part of the hepatic niche, demonstrated within the system through their participation in differential signalling cascades and cancer cell outcomes. Breast cancer cells intercalate into the hepatic niche without interfering with hepatocyte function. Examination of cancer cells demonstrated that a significant subset enter a quiescent state of dormancy as shown by lack of cell cycling (EdU− or Ki67−). The presence of NPCs altered the cancer cell fraction entering quiescence, and lead to differential cytokine profiles in the microenvironment effluent. Conclusions: These findings establish the liver microphysiologic system as a relevant model for the study of breast cancer metastases and entry into dormancy. PMID:25314052

  7. Gene Expression Analysis in Human Breast Cancer Associated Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dylan T.; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M. J.; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J. Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5–72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel

  8. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dylan T; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M J; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel anti

  9. Short-term primary culture of epithelial cells derived from human breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Speirs, V.; Green, A. R.; Walton, D. S.; Kerin, M. J.; Fox, J. N.; Carleton, P. J.; Desai, S. B.; Atkin, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    As experimental models for breast cancer, most studies rely on established human breast cancer cell lines. However, many of these lines were established over 20 years ago, many from pleural effusions rather than the primary tumour, so the validity of using them as representative models is questionable. This paper describes our experiences, over a 3-year period, in establishing short-term epithelial-cell-enriched preparations from primary breast tumours based on differential centrifugation followed by culture in selective media. Epithelial cells were successfully cultured from 55% of samples, but culture success did not appear to be correlated with tumour histology, stage, grade or node status. Epithelial cell-enriched cultures were immunopositive for broad-spectrum cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Positivity for keratin 19 confirmed that the cultures contained tumour-derived cells, which additionally showed significantly higher activity of the reductive pathway of the steroid-converting enzyme 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I. That the cultures contained tumour and not normal epithelial cells was further substantiated by the complete absence of the calmodulin-like gene NB-1 in tumour-derived cultures; this is only associated with normal breast epithelia. Eighty-five per cent of cultures established from oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumours expressed ER in vitro; this was functional in 66% of cultures, although ER-positive phenotype was gradually lost over time. In conclusion, epithelial cells can be isolated and maintained as short-term cultures from primary breast tumours irrespective of histopathological or clinical details, providing a model system with a greater biological and clinical relevance than breast cancer cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:9836473

  10. COX-2-mediated stimulation of the lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Timoshenko, A V; Chakraborty, C; Wagner, G F; Lala, P K

    2006-01-01

    Increased expression of COX-2 or VEGF-C has been correlated with progressive disease in certain cancers. Present study utilized several human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, Hs578T and MDA-MB-231, varying in COX-2 expression) as well as 10 human breast cancer specimens to examine the roles of COX-2 and prostaglandin E (EP) receptors in VEGF-C expression or secretion, and the relationship of COX-2 or VEGF-C expression to lymphangiogenesis. We found a strong correlation between COX-2 mRNA expression and VEGF-C expression or secretion levels in breast cancer cell lines and VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Expression of LYVE-1, a selective marker for lymphatic endothelium, was also positively correlated with COX-2 or VEGF-C expression in breast cancer tissues. Inhibition of VEGF-C expression and secretion in the presence of COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitors or following downregulation of COX-2 with COX-2 siRNA established a stimulatory role COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis by breast cancer cells. EP1 as well as EP4 receptor antagonists inhibited VEGF-C production indicating the roles of EP1 and EP4 in VEGF-C upregulation by endogenous PGE2. Finally, VEGF-C secretion by MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited in the presence of kinase inhibitors for Her-2/neu, Src and p38 MAPK, indicating a requirement of these kinases for VEGF-C synthesis. These results, for the first time, demonstrate a regulatory role of COX-2 in VEGF-C synthesis (and thereby lymphangiogenesis) in human breast cancer, which is mediated at least in part by EP1/EP4 receptors. PMID:16570043

  11. Establishment of Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Dohun; Pearce, Shane M.; Lank, Simon M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Lambert, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis) for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these results also have

  12. TEAD activity is restrained by MYC and stratifies human breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Elster, Dana; Jaenicke, Laura A; Eilers, Martin; von Eyss, Björn

    2016-10-01

    c-Myc (MYC) is an oncogenic transcription factor that is commonly overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. In breast cancer, MYC has recently been linked to the triple-negative subtype, a subtype that lacks any targeted therapy. Previously, we demonstrated that MYC behaves as a potent repressor of YAP and TAZ, 2 transcriptional coactivators that function as downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway. In this previous study, MYC repressed YAP/TAZ not only in primary breast epithelial cells but also in mouse models of triple-negative tumors. Here, we extend our previous bioinformatic and experimental analyses and demonstrate that MYC deregulation in primary breast epithelial cells leads to a robust repression of TEAD transcription factor activity, the transcription factor family mainly responsible for YAP/TAZ recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that MYC and TEAD activity is able to stratify different breast cancer subtypes in large panels of breast cancer patients. Thus, a deep understanding of the MYC-YAP/TAZ circuitry might yield new insights into the establishment and maintenance of specific breast cancer subtypes.

  13. TEAD activity is restrained by MYC and stratifies human breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Elster, Dana; Jaenicke, Laura A.; Eilers, Martin; von Eyss, Björn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT c-Myc (MYC) is an oncogenic transcription factor that is commonly overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. In breast cancer, MYC has recently been linked to the triple-negative subtype, a subtype that lacks any targeted therapy. Previously, we demonstrated that MYC behaves as a potent repressor of YAP and TAZ, 2 transcriptional coactivators that function as downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway. In this previous study, MYC repressed YAP/TAZ not only in primary breast epithelial cells but also in mouse models of triple-negative tumors. Here, we extend our previous bioinformatic and experimental analyses and demonstrate that MYC deregulation in primary breast epithelial cells leads to a robust repression of TEAD transcription factor activity, the transcription factor family mainly responsible for YAP/TAZ recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that MYC and TEAD activity is able to stratify different breast cancer subtypes in large panels of breast cancer patients. Thus, a deep understanding of the MYC-YAP/TAZ circuitry might yield new insights into the establishment and maintenance of specific breast cancer subtypes. PMID:27433809

  14. X-ray scattering from human breast tissues and breast-equivalent materials.

    PubMed

    Poletti, M E; Gonçalves, D; Mazzaro, I

    2002-01-07

    The angular distributions of photons scattered by human breast tissues (adipose and glandular) and by eight breast-equivalent materials (water, polymethylmethacrylate, nylon, polyethylene and four commercial breast-equivalent materials simulating different glandular-adipose proportions) have been measured at a photon energy of 17.44 keV (Kalpha-radiation of Mo). Transmission target geometry has been used with an acceptance of +/- 0.6 degrees and an uncertainty of approximately 7%. Experimental molecular form factors were extracted from diffraction patterns normalizing the number of scattered photons with theoretical data in regions where no structure is expected. Linear attenuation coefficients have been measured for all samples at this energy. The results for water, polymethylmethacrylate, nylon and adipose tissue agree with former reported data. The results for human breast tissues at low and medium scattering angle (1-25 degrees, corresponding to the momentum transfer region between 0.2 and 3 nm(-1)) differ from the breast-equivalent materials. The results for adipose tissue are similar to the corresponding values from commercial breast-equivalent materials while the results for glandular tissue are similar to those for water.

  15. Establishment of a human glioblastoma stemlike brainstem rodent tumor model.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Tyler, Betty M; Chen, James X; Eberhart, Charles G; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Olivi, Alessandro; Jallo, George I; Riggins, Gregory J; Gallia, Gary L

    2010-07-01

    Diffuse brainstem tumors are the most difficult type of pediatric CNS malignancy to treat. These inoperable lesions are treated with radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy, and the survival rate is less than 10%. It is therefore essential to develop a reliable animal model to screen new therapeutic agents for the treatment of this type of tumor. A multipotent human glioblastoma stemlike neurosphere line, 060919, was established from a surgically resected glioblastoma specimen; when cells were implanted intracranially into athymic nude mice, they formed invasive, vascular tumors that exhibited the features of glioblastoma. Ten female Fischer 344 rats received an injection of 75,000 F98 rat glioma cells and 10 female athymic nude rats received an injection of 75,000 060919 human glioblastoma stemlike cells in the pontine tegmentum of the brainstem. A control group of 5 female Fischer rats received an injection of saline in the same location as the animals in the tumor groups. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for survival, and brains were processed postmortem for histopathological investigation. Both F98 cells and 060919 cells grew in 100% of the animals injected. Median survival of animals injected with F98 was 15 days, consistent with the authors' previous reports on the establishment of the brainstem tumor model using the F98 rat glioma line. Median survival of animals injected with 060919 was 31 days. Histopathological analysis of the tumors confirmed the presence of brainstem lesions in animals that received brainstem injections of F98 and in animals that received brainstem injections of 060919. The 060919 brainstem tumors histologically resembled glioblastoma. Tumor take and median survival were consistent for animals injected in the brainstem with either the established F98 rat glioma cell line or the 060919 human glioblastoma stemlike neurosphere line. Histopathological features of the 060919 brainstem tumors resembled glioblastoma

  16. A Distinct Macrophage Population Mediates Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Establishment and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Binzhi; Deng, Yan; Im, Jae Hong; Muschel, Ruth J.; Zou, Yiyu; Li, Jiufeng; Lang, Richard A.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The stromal microenvironment and particularly the macrophage component of primary tumors influence their malignant potential. However, at the metastatic site the role of these cells and their mechanism of actions for establishment and growth of metastases remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using animal models of breast cancer metastasis, we show that a population of host macrophages displaying a distinct phenotype is recruited to extravasating pulmonary metastatic cells regardless of species of origin. Ablation of this macrophage population through three independent means (genetic and chemical) showed that these macrophages are required for efficient metastatic seeding and growth. Importantly, even after metastatic growth is established, ablation of this macrophage population inhibited subsequent growth. Furthermore, imaging of intact lungs revealed that macrophages are required for efficient tumor cell extravasation. Conclusion/Significance These data indicate a direct enhancement of metastatic growth by macrophages through their effects on tumor cell extravasation, survival and subsequent growth and identifies these cells as a new therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic disease. PMID:19668347

  17. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Richard; Harismendy, Olivier; Pu, Minya; Crain, Brian; Yost, Shawn; Frazer, Kelly A.; Rana, Brinda; Hasteh, Farnaz; Wallace, Anne; Parker, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal) pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC) mutations/ # total HC mutations). Methods Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48) and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value <0.01), across renal cell, testicular, and colorectal cancer. The CLS test correctly classified all validation samples but one, which it appears may have been incorrectly classified in the published data. As proof-of-concept we then applied the CLS test to two new cases of invasive synchronous bilateral breast cancer at our institution, each with one hormone receptor positive (ER+/PR+/HER2-) lobular and one triple negative ductal carcinoma. High confidence mutations were identified by exome sequencing and results were validated using deep targeted sequencing. The first tumor pair had CLS of 81% (p-value < 10–15), supporting clonality. In the second pair, no common mutations of 184 variants were validated (p-value >0.99), supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the

  18. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Messer, Karen; Schwab, Richard; Harismendy, Olivier; Pu, Minya; Crain, Brian; Yost, Shawn; Frazer, Kelly A; Rana, Brinda; Hasteh, Farnaz; Wallace, Anne; Parker, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal) pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC) mutations/ # total HC mutations). Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas. We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48) and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value <0.01), across renal cell, testicular, and colorectal cancer. The CLS test correctly classified all validation samples but one, which it appears may have been incorrectly classified in the published data. As proof-of-concept we then applied the CLS test to two new cases of invasive synchronous bilateral breast cancer at our institution, each with one hormone receptor positive (ER+/PR+/HER2-) lobular and one triple negative ductal carcinoma. High confidence mutations were identified by exome sequencing and results were validated using deep targeted sequencing. The first tumor pair had CLS of 81% (p-value < 10-15), supporting clonality. In the second pair, no common mutations of 184 variants were validated (p-value >0.99), supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the clonal pair. We have developed

  19. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li-Hong; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Shu-Fen; Tong, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  20. Establishment of Cancer Stem Cell Cultures from Human Conventional Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Palmini, Gaia; Zonefrati, Roberto; Mavilia, Carmelo; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Luzi, Ettore; Marini, Francesca; Franchi, Alessandro; Capanna, Rodolfo; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The current improvements in therapy against osteosarcoma (OS) have prolonged the lives of cancer patients, but the survival rate of five years remains poor when metastasis has occurred. The Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) theory holds that there is a subset of tumor cells within the tumor that have stem-like characteristics, including the capacity to maintain the tumor and to resist multidrug chemotherapy. Therefore, a better understanding of OS biology and pathogenesis is needed in order to advance the development of targeted therapies to eradicate this particular subset and to reduce morbidity and mortality among patients. Isolating CSCs, establishing cell cultures of CSCs, and studying their biology are important steps to improving our understanding of OS biology and pathogenesis. The establishment of human-derived OS-CSCs from biopsies of OS has been made possible using several methods, including the capacity to create 3-dimensional stem cell cultures under nonadherent conditions. Under these conditions, CSCs are able to create spherical floating colonies formed by daughter stem cells; these colonies are termed "cellular spheres". Here, we describe a method to establish CSC cultures from primary cell cultures of conventional OS obtained from OS biopsies. We clearly describe the several passages required to isolate and characterize CSCs. PMID:27768062

  1. Mutagens in human breast lipid and milk: the search for environmental agents that initiate breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David H; Martin, Francis L; Williams, J Andrew; Wheat, Luise M C; Nolan, Lisa; Cole, Kathleen J; Grover, Philip L

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate the involvement of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer, but have not provided clear indications of the nature of the agents responsible. Several environmental carcinogens are known to induce mammary tumors in rodents, and the abundance of adipose tissue in the human breast suggests that the epithelial cells, from which breast tumors commonly arise, could be exposed to lipid-soluble carcinogens sequestered by the adipose tissue. In this report we review our studies in which we have examined human mammary lipid, obtained from elective reduction mammoplasties from healthy donors, and human milk from healthy mothers, for the presence of components with genotoxic activity in several in vitro assays. A significant proportion of lipid extracts induced mutations in bacteria and micronuclei in mammalian cells. They also caused DNA damage, detected as single-strand breaks in the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay, in both the MCL-5 cell line and in primary cultures of human mammary epithelial cells. Genotoxic activity was also found in a significant proportion of extracts of human breast milk. Viable cells recovered from milk samples showed evidence of DNA damage and were susceptible to comet formation by genotoxic agents in vitro. Genotoxic activity was found to be less prevalent in milk samples from countries of lower breast cancer incidence (the Far East) compared with that in samples from the UK. The agents responsible for the activity in milk appear to be moderately polar lipophilic compounds and of low molecular weight. Identification of these agents and their sources may hold clues to the origins of breast cancer.

  2. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    PubMed

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  3. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  4. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  5. Epithelin/Granulin Precursor Expression in Human Breast Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    presented in this paper summarized here show that PCDGF mRNA and protein is expressed in estrogen-dependent human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and...T47D. Treatment of human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D with estradiol stimulated PCDGF mRNA and protein expression in a dose (5-fold...and protein were very low in the non-tumorigenic cells and increased in tumorigenic cell lines in a positive correlation with their tumorigenic

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastasis Suppression in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    these results ................... 9 Section 3: Isolation of MDA-MB-435 single cell clones .................................... 9 Rationale... cloned the human homolog, NME 1 or Nm23-H 1, and showed that transfection into the metastatic human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435 caused...colleagues in a rat prostatic carcinoma model (Dong et al., 1995). The human homolog was cloned and maps to chromosome lIp 1 1.2. Since this gene maps

  7. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of coinhibitory B7/CD28 members B7x, B7-H3 (CD276), and PD-L1 (B7-H1/CD274) on tumor cells as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 on tumor-infiltrating immune cells are emerging as immune evasion pathways. Chemotherapy can affect the expression of these molecules, and therefore may dampen the immune response against breast cancer. Immunotherapy targeting T cell coinhibition as monotherapy or combined with standard therapies are in early stages of clinical development, but hold great promise for treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:23114578

  8. Subtractive transcriptomics : establishing polarity drives human endothelial morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D. A.; Zhang, W.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Buell, M. E.; Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2006-04-15

    Although investigations of mature normal and tumor-derived capillaries have resulted in characterization of these structures at the phenotypic level, less is known regarding the initial molecular cues for cellular assembly of endothelial cells into human capillaries. Here, we employ a novel combination of microenvironmental manipulation and microarray data filtration over narrowly delineated temporal data series to identify the morphogenesis component apart from the proliferation component, as pooled human microvascular-derived endothelial cells are induced to form capillary-like structures in vitro in a murine tumor-derived matrix. The 217 morphogenesis-specific genes identified using this subtractive transcriptomics approach are mostly independent of the angiogenic proteins currently used as therapeutic targets for aberrant angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate 20% of these transcripts. Immunofluorescent analysis of proliferating and tube-forming cells validates at the protein level the morphogenesis-specific expression pattern of 16 of the 217 gene products identified. The transcripts that are selectively up-regulated in tube-forming endothelial cells reveal a temporal expression pattern of genes primarily associated with intracellular trafficking, guided migration, cytoskeletal reorganization, cellular adhesion, and proliferation inhibition. These data show that a sequential upregulation of genes that establish and maintain polarity occurs during migration and morphogenesis of in vitro human endothelial cells undergoing tubulogenesis; some of which may well be effective as novel antiangiogenic drug targets.

  9. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins.

  10. The Establishment of an Inflammatory Breast Cancer Registry and Biospecimen Repository

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    of the Breast: Racial Considerations ................................................... 39 David F. Chhieng, Lynya I. Talley, William E . Grizzle...01-1-0244 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Paul H. Levine, M.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER E -mail: sphphl...97(13):966-75. 8 Figure 1: Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma V A 44 Anti-G12 Antibody Figure 2: Non-Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma H& E Anti-G12 Antibody

  11. Detection of cellular senescence within human invasive breast carcinomas distinguishes different breast tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Cotarelo, Cristina L; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Springer, Erik; Schmidt, Marcus; Thaler, Sonja

    2016-11-15

    Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to act as a barrier to tumorigenesis by arresting cells at risk of malignant transformation. Nevertheless, numerous findings suggest that senescent cells may conversely promote tumor progression through the development of the senescence-associated secretome they produce. It is likely that the composition and the physiological consequences mediated by the senescence secretome are dependent on the oncogenes that trigger the senescence program. Breast cancer represents a heterogenous disease that can be divided into breast cancer subtypes due to different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. As tumor initiation and progression of these breast cancer subtypes is triggered by diverse oncogenic stimuli, differences in the senescence secretomes within breast tumors might be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and therapeutic response. Many studies have addressed the role of senescence as a barrier to tumor progression using murine xenograft models. However, few investigations have been performed to elucidate the degree to which senescent tumor cells are present within untreated human tumors, and if present, whether these senescent tumor cells may play a role in disease progression. In the present study we analysed the appearance of senescent cells within invasive breast cancers. Detection of cellular senescence by the use of SAβ-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) staining within invasive breast carcinoms from 129 untreated patients revealed differences in the amount of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells between breast cancer subtypes. The highest percentages of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells were found in HER2-positive and luminal A breast carcinomas whereas triple negative tumors showed either little or no positivity.

  12. Detection of cellular senescence within human invasive breast carcinomas distinguishes different breast tumor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cotarelo, Cristina L.; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sleeman, Jonathan P.; Springer, Erik; Schmidt, Marcus; Thaler, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to act as a barrier to tumorigenesis by arresting cells at risk of malignant transformation. Nevertheless, numerous findings suggest that senescent cells may conversely promote tumor progression through the development of the senescence-associated secretome they produce. It is likely that the composition and the physiological consequences mediated by the senescence secretome are dependent on the oncogenes that trigger the senescence program. Breast cancer represents a heterogenous disease that can be divided into breast cancer subtypes due to different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. As tumor initiation and progression of these breast cancer subtypes is triggered by diverse oncogenic stimuli, differences in the senescence secretomes within breast tumors might be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and therapeutic response. Many studies have addressed the role of senescence as a barrier to tumor progression using murine xenograft models. However, few investigations have been performed to elucidate the degree to which senescent tumor cells are present within untreated human tumors, and if present, whether these senescent tumor cells may play a role in disease progression. In the present study we analysed the appearance of senescent cells within invasive breast cancers. Detection of cellular senescence by the use of SAβ-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) staining within invasive breast carcinoms from 129 untreated patients revealed differences in the amount of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells between breast cancer subtypes. The highest percentages of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells were found in HER2-positive and luminal A breast carcinomas whereas triple negative tumors showed either little or no positivity. PMID:27713152

  13. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Nicholas J; Kampmann, Beate; Mehring Le-Doare, Kirsty

    2015-11-01

    Breast milk is the perfect nutrition for infants, a result of millions of years of evolution, finely attuning it to the requirements of the infant. Breast milk contains many complex proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, the concentrations of which alter dramatically over a single feed, as well as over lactation, to reflect the infant's needs. In addition to providing a source of nutrition for infants, breast milk contains a myriad of biologically active components. These molecules possess diverse roles, both guiding the development of the infants immune system and intestinal microbiota. Orchestrating the development of the microbiota are the human milk oligosaccharides, the synthesis of which are determined by the maternal genotype. In this review, we discuss the composition of breast milk and the factors that affect it during the course of breast feeding. Understanding the components of breast milk and their functions will allow for the improvement of clinical practices, infant feeding and our understanding of immune responses to infection and vaccination in infants.

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus expressing soluble TGFβ receptor II-Fc-mediated inhibition of established bone metastases: a safe and effective systemic therapeutic approach for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zebin; Gerseny, Helen; Zhang, Zhenwei; Chen, Yun-Ju; Berg, Arthur; Zhang, Zhiling; Stock, Stuart; Seth, Prem

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, oncolytic adenoviruses have shown some promise as a novel class of antitumor agents. However, their utility in targeting bone metastases is relatively less studied. We have examined whether the systemic therapy of oncolytic adenoviruses expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) receptor II fused with human immunoglobulin G1 can be developed for the treatment of established breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231-luc2 human breast cancer cells were injected in the left heart ventricle of nude mice to establish bone metastasis. Mice with hind limb tumors were administered (on days 8 and 11) oncolytic adenoviruses-Ad.sTβRFc or mhTERTAd.sTβRFc. Skeletal tumor growth was monitored weekly by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and radiography. At the termination time on day 28, hind limb bones were analyzed for tumor burden, synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast activation. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTβRFc and mhTERTAd.sTβRFc induced significant inhibition of tumor growth, reduction of tumor burden, osteoclast activation, and increased animals' survival. Oncolytic adenoviruses were safer than dl309, a wild-type virus. A slight elevation of liver enzyme activity was observed after Ad.sTβRFc administration; this subsided with time. Based on these studies, we believe that Ad.sTβRFc and mhTERTAd.sTβRFc can be developed as a safe and effective approach for the treatment of established bone metastasis.

  15. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve.

  16. Next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the premenopausal breast epithelium using specimens from a normal human breast tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our efforts to prevent and treat breast cancer are significantly impeded by a lack of knowledge of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland. In order to provide the specimens that will facilitate such an understanding, The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB) was established. The KTB is, to our knowledge, the only biorepository in the world prospectively established to collect normal, healthy breast tissue from volunteer donors. As a first initiative toward a molecular understanding of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland, the effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on DNA expression in the normal breast epithelium was examined. Methods Using normal breast tissue from 20 premenopausal donors to KTB, the changes in the mRNA of the normal breast epithelium as a function of phase of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception were assayed using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results In total, 255 genes representing 1.4% of all genes were deemed to have statistically significant differential expression between the two phases of the menstrual cycle. The overwhelming majority (221; 87%) of the genes have higher expression during the luteal phase. These data provide important insights into the processes occurring during each phase of the menstrual cycle. There was only a single gene significantly differentially expressed when comparing the epithelium of women using hormonal contraception to those in the luteal phase. Conclusions We have taken advantage of a unique research resource, the KTB, to complete the first-ever next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the epithelial compartment of 20 normal human breast specimens. This work has produced a comprehensive catalog of the differences in the expression of protein-coding genes as a function of the phase of the menstrual cycle. These data constitute the beginning of

  17. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  18. Volatile metabolomic signature of human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Silva, Catarina L; Perestrelo, Rosa; Silva, Pedro; Tomás, Helena; Câmara, José S

    2017-03-03

    Breast cancer (BC) remains the most prevalent oncologic pathology in women, causing huge psychological, economic and social impacts on our society. Currently, the available diagnostic tools have limited sensitivity and specificity. Metabolome analysis has emerged as a powerful tool for obtaining information about the biological processes that occur in organisms, and is a useful platform for discovering new biomarkers or make disease diagnosis using different biofluids. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the headspace of cultured BC cells and normal human mammary epithelial cells, were collected by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), thus defining a volatile metabolomic signature. 2-Pentanone, 2-heptanone, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, ethyl acetate, ethyl propanoate and 2-methyl butanoate were detected only in cultured BC cell lines. Multivariate statistical methods were used to verify the volatomic differences between BC cell lines and normal cells in order to find a set of specific VOCs that could be associated with BC, providing comprehensive insight into VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers. The establishment of the volatile fingerprint of BC cell lines presents a powerful approach to find endogenous VOCs that could be used to improve the BC diagnostic tools and explore the associated metabolomic pathways.

  19. Volatile metabolomic signature of human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Catarina L.; Perestrelo, Rosa; Silva, Pedro; Tomás, Helena; Câmara, José S.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) remains the most prevalent oncologic pathology in women, causing huge psychological, economic and social impacts on our society. Currently, the available diagnostic tools have limited sensitivity and specificity. Metabolome analysis has emerged as a powerful tool for obtaining information about the biological processes that occur in organisms, and is a useful platform for discovering new biomarkers or make disease diagnosis using different biofluids. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the headspace of cultured BC cells and normal human mammary epithelial cells, were collected by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC–MS), thus defining a volatile metabolomic signature. 2-Pentanone, 2-heptanone, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, ethyl acetate, ethyl propanoate and 2-methyl butanoate were detected only in cultured BC cell lines. Multivariate statistical methods were used to verify the volatomic differences between BC cell lines and normal cells in order to find a set of specific VOCs that could be associated with BC, providing comprehensive insight into VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers. The establishment of the volatile fingerprint of BC cell lines presents a powerful approach to find endogenous VOCs that could be used to improve the BC diagnostic tools and explore the associated metabolomic pathways. PMID:28256598

  20. Genistein synergizes centchroman action in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shweta; Shyam, Hari; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the progress in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, it remains a major health problem in women. Natural flavones along with chemotherapeutic agents enhance therapeutic response and minimize toxicity of chemical agents. Centchroman (CC) colloquially called as ormeloxifene, is a nonsteroidal oral contraceptive categorized as selective estrogen receptor modulator with anti-breast cancer activity. Genistein (GN), an isoflavone found mainly in soy products possesses anti-cancerous potential against a number of cancers including breast. The present study aims at investigating the combination of CC and GN in human breast cancer cell lines (HBCCs). Materials and Methods: Cytotoxic effect of CC and GN separately and in combination were assessed by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay in MDA MB-231, MDA MB-468, MCF-7, T-47D HBCCs, and nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) MCF-10A. The drug interaction was analyzed using CompuSyn software through which combination index and dose reduction index were generated. Results: Combination of CC plus GN exerts significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to each drug per se in HBCCs, whereas HMEC-MCF-10A remains unaffected. Conclusion: On an overall basis, the drugs in combination enhanced cell killing in malignant cells. Therefore, the combination of CC with GN may offer a novel approach for the breast cancer. PMID:28066099

  1. [Soy isoflavones and human health: breast cancer and puberty timing].

    PubMed

    Valladares, Luis; Garrido, Argelia; Sierralta, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Accumulated exposure to high levels of estrogen is associated with an increased incidence of breast cancer. Thus, factors such as early puberty, late menopause and hormone replacement therapy are considered to be risk factors, whereas early childbirth, breastfeeding and puberty at a later age are known to consistently decrease the lifetime breast cancer risk. Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of isoflavones correlates with a lower incidence of breast cancer. Data from human intervention studies show that the effects of isoflavones on early breast cancer markers differ between pre- and post-menopausal women. The reports from experimental animals (rats and mice) on mammary tumors are variable. These results taken together with heterogeneous outcomes of human interventions, have led to a controversy surrounding the intake of isoflavones to reduce breast cancer risk. This review summarizes recent studies and analyzes factors that could explain the variability of results. In mammary tissue, from the cellular endocrine viewpoint, we analyze the effect of isoflavones on the estrogen receptor and their capacity to act as agonists or antagonists. On the issue of puberty timing, we analyze the mechanisms by which girls, but not boys, with higher prepuberal isoflavone intakes appear to enter puberty at a later age.

  2. Globular adiponectin enhances invasion in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FALK LIBBY, EMILY; LIU, JIANZHONG; LI, YI; LEWIS, MONICA J.; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, a large number of women succumb to metastatic breast cancer due to a lack of curative approaches for this disease. Adiponectin (AdipoQ) is the most abundant of the adipocyte-secreted adipokines. In recent years, there has been an interest in the use of AdipoQ and AdipoQ receptor agonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. However, while multiple epidemiological studies have previously indicated that low levels of circulating plasma AdipoQ portend poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, recent studies have reported that elevated expression levels of AdipoQ in breast tissue are correlated with advanced stages of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which AdipoQ in breast tissue acts directly on tumor cells to regulate the early steps of breast cancer metastasis. In the present study, the effects of different AdipoQ isoforms on the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells were investigated. The results revealed that globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted invasive cell morphology and significantly increased the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells, whereas full-length adiponectin (fAd) had no effect on these cells. Additionally, gAd, but not fAd, increased the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B)-II and intracellular LC3B puncta, which are indicators of autophagosome formation, thus suggesting autophagic induction by gAd. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagic function by autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown attenuated the gAd-induced increase in invasiveness in breast cancer cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that a specific AdipoQ isoform may enhance breast cancer invasion, possibly via autophagic induction. Understanding the roles of the different AdipoQ isoforms as microenvironmental regulatory molecules may aid the development of effective AdipoQ-based treatments for breast cancer

  3. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  4. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-06-06

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences.

  5. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  6. Optimized combination therapy using bortezomib, TRAIL and TLR agonists in established breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sujin; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J; Celis, Esteban

    2010-07-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF family of cytokines, which can induce apoptosis in various tumor cells by engaging the receptors, DR4 and DR5. Bortezomib (Velcade) is a proteasome inhibitor that has been approved for patients with multiple myeloma. There is some experimental evidence in preclinical models that bortezomib can enhance the susceptibility of tumors to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of TRAIL-induced death using an agonistic antibody to the TRAIL receptor DR5 (alpha-DR5) in combination with bortezomib administered to mice previously injected with breast cancer cells (TUBO). This combination had some beneficial therapeutic effect, which was significantly enhanced by the co-administration of a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG). In contrast, single agent treatments had little effect on tumor growth. In addition, we evaluated the effect of combination with alpha-DR5, bortezomib, and CpG in the prevention/treatment of spontaneous mammary tumors in Balb-neuT mice. In this model, which is more difficult to treat, we observed dramatic antitumor effects of alpha-DR5, bortezomib and CpG combination therapy. Since such a mouse model more accurately reflects the immunological tolerance that exists in human cancer, our results strongly suggest that these combination strategies could be directly applied to the therapy for cancer patients.

  7. Establishing a Program for Individuals at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cadiz, Fernando; Kuerer, Henry M.; Puga, Julio; Camacho, Jamile; Cunill, Eduardo; Arun, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our need to create a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer development led us to research the available data on such programs. In this paper, we summarize our findings and our thinking process as we developed our own program. Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Even though there are known risk factors for breast cancer development, approximately 60% of patients with breast cancer have no known risk factor, although this situation will probably change with further research, especially in genetics. For patients with risk factors based on personal or family history, different models are available for assessing and quantifying risk. Assignment of risk levels permits tailored screening and risk reduction strategies. Potential benefits of specialized programs for women with high breast cancer risk include more cost -effective interventions as a result of patient stratification on the basis of risk; generation of valuable data to advance science; and differentiation of breast programs from other breast cancer units, which can result in increased revenue that can be directed to further improvements in patient care. Guidelines for care of patients at high risk for breast cancer are available from various groups. However, running a high-risk breast program involves much more than applying a guideline. Each high-risk program needs to be designed by its institution with consideration of local resources and country legislation, especially related to genetic issues. Development of a successful high-risk program includes identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; developing a promotion plan; choosing a risk assessment tool; defining “high risk”; and planning screening and risk reduction strategies for the specific population served by the program. The information in this article may be useful for other institutions considering creation of programs for patients with high breast cancer risk. PMID:23833688

  8. Establishing a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cadiz, Fernando; Kuerer, Henry M; Puga, Julio; Camacho, Jamile; Cunill, Eduardo; Arun, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our need to create a program for individuals at high risk for breast cancer development led us to research the available data on such programs. In this paper, we summarize our findings and our thinking process as we developed our own program. Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Even though there are known risk factors for breast cancer development, approximately 60% of patients with breast cancer have no known risk factor, although this situation will probably change with further research, especially in genetics. For patients with risk factors based on personal or family history, different models are available for assessing and quantifying risk. Assignment of risk levels permits tailored screening and risk reduction strategies. Potential benefits of specialized programs for women with high breast cancer risk include more cost -effective interventions as a result of patient stratification on the basis of risk; generation of valuable data to advance science; and differentiation of breast programs from other breast cancer units, which can result in increased revenue that can be directed to further improvements in patient care. Guidelines for care of patients at high risk for breast cancer are available from various groups. However, running a high-risk breast program involves much more than applying a guideline. Each high-risk program needs to be designed by its institution with consideration of local resources and country legislation, especially related to genetic issues. Development of a successful high-risk program includes identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; developing a promotion plan; choosing a risk assessment tool; defining "high risk"; and planning screening and risk reduction strategies for the specific population served by the program. The information in this article may be useful for other institutions considering creation of programs for patients with high breast cancer risk.

  9. Quantitative 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human breast at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, Jannie P; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Luttje, Mariska P; Korteweg, Mies A; Luijten, Peter R; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2012-08-01

    This study presents quantified levels of phosphorylated metabolites in glandular tissue of human breast using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T. We used a homebuilt (1)H/(31)P radiofrequency coil to obtain artifact-free (31)P MR spectra of glandular tissue of healthy females by deploying whole breast free induction decay (FID) detection with adiabatic excitation and outer volume suppression. Using progressive saturation, the estimated apparent T(1) relaxation time of (31)P spins of phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine was 4.4 and 5.7 s, respectively. Quantitative measures for phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine levels in glandular tissue were established based on MR imaging. We used a 3D (1)H image of the breast to segment the glandular tissue; this was matched to a 3D (31)P image of the B1- field of the (31)P coil to correct for differences in glandular tissue volume and B(1) inhomogeneity of the (31)P coil. The (31)P MR spectra were calibrated using a phantom with known concentration. Average levels of phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine in 11 volunteers were 0.84 ± 0.21 mM and 1.18 ± 0.41 mM, respectively. In addition, data of three patients with breast cancer showed higher levels of phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine compared with healthy volunteers. This may indicate a potential role for the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy for characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring in breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  11. Paeonol reverses paclitaxel resistance in human breast cancer cells by regulating the expression of transgelin 2.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiangxia; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Sasa; Lu, Jun; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2014-06-15

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a first-line antineoplastic drug that is commonly used in clinical chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. However, the occurrence of drug resistance in chemotherapeutic treatment has greatly restricted its use. There is thus an urgent need to find ways of reversing paclitaxel chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. Plant-derived agents have great potential in preventing the onset of the carcinogenic process and enhancing the efficacy of mainstream antitumor drugs. Paeonol, a main compound derived from the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa, has various biological activities, and is reported to have reversal drug resistance effects. This study established a paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/PTX) and applied the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay, MTT assay, flow cytometry, transfection assay, Western blotting and the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the reversing effects of paeonol and its underlying mechanisms. It was found that transgelin 2 may mediate the resistance of MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel by up-regulating the expressions of the adenosine-triphosphate binding cassette transporter proteins, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Furthermore, the ability of paeonol to reverse paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer was confirmed, with a superior 8.2-fold reversal index. In addition, this study found that paeonol down-regulated the transgelin 2-mediated paclitaxel resistance by reducing the expressions of P-gp, MRP1, and BCRP in MCF-7/PTX cells. These results not only provide insight into the potential application of paeonol to the reversal of paclitaxel resistance, thus facilitating the sensitivity of breast cancer chemotherapy, but also highlight a potential role of transgelin 2 in the development of paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer.

  12. Human brain endothelial cell-derived COX-2 facilitates extravasation of breast cancer cells across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyue Yim; Kim, Youn-Jae; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Ho Jin

    2011-12-01

    With improvements in systemic control, metastasis to the brain has been more frequently found in patients with breast cancer. In order to gain access to the brain, breast cancer cells must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly selective filter against cellular and soluble substances. Human brain endothelial cells (HBECs) comprise a major element of the BBB, and breast cancer cells first encounter and pass through them for extravasation. To date, however, the precise role of HBECs in metastasis to the brain is unknown. In this study, we examined how HBECs take part in the extravasation process. In an established in vitro model of the BBB, unexpectedly, the transmigration of breast cancer cells was markedly enhanced in the presence of HBECs than in their absence, suggesting that HBECs facilitate the transmigration of breast cancer cells rather than acting as a barrier against them. We then showed that cyclooxygenase (COX-2) induced from HBECs rather than that from breast cancer cells plays a key role in the transmigration. Moreover, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) mediating the transmigration was induced in HBECs by COX-2 after co-culture with breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that COX-2 and MMP-2 produced from HBECs facilitate the extravasation of breast cancer cells across the BBB.

  13. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  14. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C

    2002-07-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  15. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  16. Establishment a CHO Cell Line Expressing Human CD52 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kadijeh, Tati; Mahsa, Yazdanpanah-Samani; Amin, Ramezani; Elham, Mahmoudi Maymand; Abbas, Ghaderi

    2016-01-01

    Background: CD52 is a small glycoprotein with a GPI anchor at its C-terminus. CD52 is expressed by Normal and malignant T and B lymphocytes and monocytes. There are detectable amounts of soluble CD52 in plasma of patients with CLL and could be used as a tumor marker. Although the biological function of CD52 is unknown but it seems that CD52 may be involved in migration and activation of T-cells .The aim of this study was to clone and express human CD52 gene in CHO cell line and studying its function in more details Methods: Based on GenBank databases two specific primers were designed for amplification of cd52 gene. Total RNA was extracted from Raji cell line and cDNA synthesized. Amplified fragment was cloned in pBudCE4.1 vector. The new construct was transfected to CHO-K1 cell line using electroporation method. Expression of recombinant CD52 protein was evaluated by Real time PCR and flow cytometry methods. Results: Amplification of CD52 gene using specific primers on Raji cDNA showed a 209 bp band. New construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction pattern and sequence analysis. The new construct was designated as pBudKT1. RT-PCR analysis detected cd52 mRNAs in transfected cells and Flow cytometry Results showed that 78.4 % of cells represented CD52 in their surfaces. Conclusion: In conclusion, we established a human CD52 positive cell line, CHO-CD52, and the protein was expressed on the membrane. Cloning of the CD52 gene could be the first step for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and detection systems for soluble CD52 in biological fluids PMID:28070536

  17. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-09-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer.

  18. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer. PMID:23958056

  19. Cancer associated fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  20. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J; Simard, Jacques; Velásquez-García, Héctor A; Spinelli, John J; Flamand, Louis

    2017-03-01

    Background: Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (iciHHV-6) is a condition observed in approximately 1% of the population. Whether such a genetic alteration predisposes to cancer development in currently unknown. Two studies were conducted to determine whether iciHHV-6 is associated with cancer development.Methods: First, a screen of 19,597 people from the province of Quebec (Canada) was conducted. A replication test, using data from a population-based case-control study of 1,090 women with incident breast cancer and 1,053 controls from British Columbia and Ontario (Canada) was conducted. DNA samples were analyzed by qPCR and droplet digital PCR to identify iciHHV-6(+) carriers.Results: In the initial study, a potential association between iciHHV-6 positivity and breast cancer was identified [OR = 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.95-7.44]. In the replication dataset, no association was found between iciHHV-6 positivity in women and breast cancer (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.35-2.15).Conclusions: We found no statistically significant associations between inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 and breast cancer in women.Impact: These results do not provide evidence to suggest that iciHHV-6 is a risk factor for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 425-7. ©2016 AACR.

  1. The establishment of a 3D breast photography service in medical illustration.

    PubMed

    Winder, R J; Ruddock, A; Hendren, K; O'Neill, P; Boyd, L A; McCaughan, E; McIntosh, S A

    2014-05-01

    This paper aims to describe the development of a 3D breast photography service managed by the Medical Illustration Department, in the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland. Dedicated 3D breast photography equipment was installed in Medical Illustration for 18 months. Women were referred for a variety of indications including pre- and post-surgical assessment. A dedicated 3D breast photography protocol was developed locally and this requires further refinement to allow reproducibility in other centres. There are image/data artefacts associated with this technology and special techniques are required to reduce these. Specialist software is necessary for clinicians and scientists to use 3D breast photography data in surgical planning and measurement of surgical outcome.

  2. KiSS-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Watkins, Gareth; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    The KiSS-1 gene encodes a 145 amino acid residue peptide that is further processed to a final peptide, metastin, a ligand to a G-coupled orphan receptor (OT7T175/AXOR12). KiSS-1 has been identified as a putative human metastasis suppressor gene in melanomas and in breast cancer cell lines. This study aimed to determine the expression and distribution of KiSS-1 and its receptor in human breast cancer tissues and to identify a possible link between expression levels and patient prognosis. Frozen sections from breast cancer primary tumours (matched tumour 124 and background 33) were immuno-stained with KiSS-1 antibody. RNA was reverse transcribed and analyzed by Q-PCR (standardized using beta-actin, and normalized with cytokeratin-19 levels). Levels of expression of KiSS-1 were higher in tumour compared to background tissues (3,124+/-1,262 vs 2,397+/-1,181) and significantly increased in node positive tumours compared to node negative (3,637+/-1,719 vs 2,653+/-1,994, P = 0.02). KiSS-1 expression was also increased with increasing grade and TNM status. There were no such trends with the KiSS-1 receptor. Expression of KiSS-1 was higher in patients who had died from breast cancer than those who had remained healthy (4,631+/-3,024 vs 2,280+/-1,403) whereas expression of the receptor was reduced (480+/-162 vs 195+/-134). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased expression of KiSS-1 in tumour sections. Insertion of the KiSS-1 gene into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, resulted in cells that were significantly more motile and invasive in behaviour, with reduced adhesion to matrix, using respective assays. In conclusion, KiSS-1 expression is increased in human breast cancer, particularly in patients with aggressive tumours and with mortality. Over-expression of KiSS-1 in breast cancer cells result in more aggressive phenotype. Together, it suggests that KiSS-1 plays a role beyond the initial metastasis repressor in this cancer type.

  3. Establishment of mice model with human viral hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li-Fen; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Chun-Hong; Liu, Su-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ning; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhu, Fa-Liang; Liu, Yu-Gang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mice model of hepatitis B by using HBV-transgenic mice, and to transfer HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induced from syngeneic BALB/c mice immunized by a eukaryotic expression vector containing HBV complete genome DNA. METHODS: HBV DNA was obtained from digested pBR322-2HBV and ligated with the vector pcDNA3. Recombinant pcDNA3-HBV was identified by restriction endonuclease assay and transfected into human hepatoma cell line HepG2 with lipofectin. ELISA was used to detect the expression of HBsAg in culture supernatant, and RT-PCR to determine the existence of HBV PreS1 mRNA. BALB/c mice were immunized with pcDNA3-HBV or pcDNA3 by intramuscular injection. ELISA was used to detect the expression of HBsAb in serum. MTT assay was used to measure non-specific or specific proliferation ability and specific killing activity of spleen lymphocytes. Lymphocytes from immunized mice were transferred into HBV-transgenic mice (2.5 × 107 per mouse). Forty-eight hours later, the level of serum protein and transaminase was detected with biochemical method, liver and kidney were sectioned and stained by HE to observe the pathological changes. RESULTS: By enzyme digestion with Eco RI, Xho I and Hind III, the recombinant pcDNA3-HBV was verified to contain a single copy of HBV genome, which was inserted in the positive direction. HepG2 cells transfected with the recombinant could stably express PreS1 mRNA and HBsAg. After immunized by pcDNA3-HBV for 4 weeks, HBsAb was detected in the serum of BALB/c mice. The potential of spleen lymphocytes for both non-specific and specific proliferation and the specific killing activity against target cells were enhanced. The transgenic mice in model group had no significant changes in the level of serum protein but had an obvious increase of ALT and AST. The liver had obvious pathological changes, while the kidney had no evident damage. CONCLUSION: A eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HBV containing HBV complete

  4. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:26259706

  5. Asynchronous milk ejection in human lactating breast: case series.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Hazel; Kent, Jacqueline C; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-05-01

    Milk production is under the influence of autocrine control such that the rate of milk synthesis decreases as the breast fills with milk. Effective elimination of milk from the alveoli via the milk ejection reflex will therefore result in increased milk synthesis. It has been assumed that milk ejection occurs in all alveoli simultaneously; however, animal studies have indicated that full alveoli eject milk sooner than less full alveoli, suggesting heterogeneous emptying of the mammary gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether milk ejection occurs asynchronously in the human lactating breast. Retrospective analysis of videos made of ultrasound monitoring of milk ducts during pumping. Six video clips (4 women) of ultrasound monitored milk ejections showed obvious differences in the timing of milk flow between different main milk ducts. Duct diameter was simultaneously measured every second in 2 different ducts that drained 2 separate lobes of the breast. For 5 of 6 ultrasound duct monitoring sessions, both duct dilation and visualization of milk flow in the 2 separate main milk ducts differed by 2 to 8 seconds. For the remaining woman, milk was observed to eject from 1 part of the lobe, and when not removed, it flowed in a retrograde fashion into a different part of the lobe. Asynchrony of milk ejection occurs in the human lactating breast, suggesting that the timing of myoepithelial cell response differs, resulting in heterogeneous emptying of the gland. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics

  7. Characterization of human breast cancer by scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Malyarenko, Eugene; Seviaryn, Fedar; Yuan, Ye; Sherman, Mark; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Gierach, Gretchen; Greenway, Christopher W.; Maeva, Elena; Strumban, Emil; Duric, Neb; Maev, Roman

    2013-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize human breast cancer tissues by the measurement of microacoustic properties. Methods: We investigated eight breast cancer patients using acoustic microscopy. For each patient, seven blocks of tumor tissue were collected from seven different positions around a tumor mass. Frozen sections (10 micrometer, μm) of human breast cancer tissues without staining and fixation were examined in a scanning acoustic microscope with focused transducers at 80 and 200 MHz. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections from the same frozen breast cancer tissues were imaged by optical microscopy for comparison. Results: The results of acoustic imaging showed that acoustic attenuation and sound speed in cancer cell-rich tissue regions were significantly decreased compared with the surrounding tissue regions, where most components are normal cells/tissues, such as fibroblasts, connective tissue and lymphocytes. Our observation also showed that the ultrasonic properties were influenced by arrangements of cells and tissue patterns. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that attenuation and sound speed imaging can provide biomechanical information of the tumor and normal tissues. The results also demonstrate the potential of acoustic microscopy as an auxiliary method for operative detection and localization of cancer affected regions.

  8. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  9. Establishment of human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells with overexpressed human hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cheng, Hongjing; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Chronic liver disease has become a major health problem that causes serious damage to human health. Since the existing treatment effect was not ideal, we need to seek new treatment methods. We utilized the gene recombination technology to obtain the human hair mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression of human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). Furthermore, we verified the property of transfected cells through detecting surface marker by flow cytometry. We show here establishment of the hHGF-overexpressing lentivirus vector, and successfully transfection to human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. The verified experiments could demonstrate the human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which have been transfected still have the properties of stem cells. We successfully constructed human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression hHGF, and maintain the same properties compared with pro-transfected cells.

  10. BreastDefend enhances effect of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shujie; Castillo, Victor; Welty, Matt; Alvarado, Mark; Eliaz, Isaac; Temm, Constance J; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been widely used for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and its combination with other therapies is being actively investigated as a way to increase efficacy and decrease side effects. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of co-treatment with TAM and BreastDefend (BD), a dietary supplement formula, in ER-positive human breast cancer. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined in ER-positive human breast cancer cells MCF-7 by MTT assay, quantitation of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments and expression of cleaved PARP, respectively. The molecular mechanism was identified using RNA microarray analysis and western blotting. Tumor tissues from xenograft mouse model were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Our data clearly demonstrate that a combination of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) with BD lead to profound inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This effect is consistent with the regulation of apoptotic and TAM resistant genes at the transcription and translation levels. Importantly, TAM and BD co-treatment significantly enhanced apoptosis, suppressed tumor growth and reduced tumor weight in a xenograft model of human ER-positive breast cancer. BD sensitized ER-positive human breast cancer cells to 4-OHT/TAM treatment in vitro and in vivo. BreastDefend can be used in an adjuvant therapy to increase the therapeutic effect of tamoxifen in patients with ER-positive breast cancer.

  11. Troglitazone inhibits cell migration, adhesion, and spreading by modulating cytoskeletal rearrangement in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Shan; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Porchia, Leonardo; Saji, Motoyasu; Pinzone, Joseph J

    2008-12-01

    Metastatic tumors are the primary cause of death in patients with breast cancer. Recent data indicate that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), possess anti-invasive activities on human breast cancer cells. However, the effects of TZDs on other metastatic properties of breast cancer cells such as adhesion, spreading, and migration are not well established. In this study, we show that troglitazone (TG), a member of the TZD family, inhibits lamellipodia formation or membrane ruffling as well as actin polymerization at these structures in MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells. In addition, TG reduces migration, adhesion, and spreading on fibronectin (FN)-coated plates. These phenomena were associated with the dramatic decrease of Tyr397 and Tyr576 phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the detergent-insoluble Rac1. We also found that TG upregulates Tyr416 phosphorylation of Src, but downregulates the Src-FAK complex. Moreover, we use a PPARgamma-inactive derivative of TG (STG28) and a PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) to eliminate PPARgamma-mediated effects. We found that treatment with STG28 or GW9662 plus TG showed similar effects compared to TG treatment alone on tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK and Src, indicating that these effects are not the result of PPARgamma activation. Interestingly, we found that TG upregulates actin filament assembly at the point of cell-cell contact in T47D cells, indicating that TG may also upregulate cell-cell adhesion in breast cancer cells which express E-cadherin. These results suggested that TG should be investigated further for its therapeutic potential in metastatic breast cancer.

  12. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  13. Bisphosphonates induce apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Senaratne, S G; Pirianov, G; Mansi, J L; Arnett, T R; Colston, K W

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer has a prodigious capacity to metastasize to bone. In women with advanced breast cancer and bone metastases, bisphosphonates reduce the incidence of hypercalcaemia and skeletal morbidity. Recent clinical findings suggest that some bisphosphonates reduce the tumour burden in bone with a consequent increase in survival, raising the possibility that bisphosphonates may have a direct effect on breast cancer cells. We have investigated the in vitro effects of bisphosphonates zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate and EB 1053 on growth, viability and induction of apoptosis in three human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, Hs 578T and MCF-7). Cell growth was monitored by crystal violet dye assay, and cell viability was quantitated by MTS dye reduction. Induction of apoptosis was determined by identification of morphological features of apoptosis using time-lapse videomicroscopy, identifying morphological changes in nucleis using Hoechst staining, quantitation of DNA fragmentation, level of expression of bcl-2 and bax proteins and identification of the proteolytic cleavage of Poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP). All four bisphosphonates significantly reduced cell viability in all three cell lines. Zoledronate was the most potent bisphosphonate with IC50values of 15, 20 and 3 μM respectively in MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and Hs 578T cells. Corresponding values for pamidronate were 40, 35 and 25 μM, whereas clodronate and EB 1053 were more than two orders of magnitude less potent. An increase in the proportion of cells having morphological features characteristic of apoptosis, characteristic apoptotic changes in the nucleus, time-dependent increase in the percentage of fragmented chromosomal DNA, down-regulation in bcl-2 protein and proteolytic cleavage of PARP, all indicate that bisphosphonates have direct anti-tumour effects on human breast cancer cells. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780527

  14. Human IGF1 pro-forms induce breast cancer cell proliferation via the IGF1 receptor.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Mauro; Annibalini, Giosuè; Barbieri, Elena; Villarini, Anna; Vallorani, Luciana; Contarelli, Serena; Berrino, Franco; Stocchi, Vilberto; Brandi, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    IGF1 is a key regulator of tissue growth and development and has been implicated in the initiation and progression of various cancers, including breast cancer. Through IGF1 mRNA splicing different precursor pro-peptides, i.e., the IGF1Ea, IGF1Eb and IGF1Ec pro-forms, are formed whose biological roles in the pathogenesis of breast cancer have not been established yet. The objective of this study was to assess the biological activity of the IGF1 pro-forms in human breast cancer-derived cells. The different IGF1 pro-forms were generated through transient transfection of HEK293 cells with the respective vector constructs. The resulting conditioned media were applied in vitro to MCF7, T47D and ZR751 breast cancer-derived cell cultures. The recombinant human IGF1 pro-forms were also tested for their binding affinity to an anti-IGF1 specific antibody by immunoprecipitation. To determine whether the IGF1 pro-forms induce cell proliferation, mature IGF1 was neutralised in HEK293-derived conditioned media. We found that the IGF1 pro-forms were the only forms that were produced intra-cellularly, whereas both mature IGF1 and the IGF1 pro-forms were detected extra-cellularly. We also found that E peptides can impair the IGF1 pro-form binding affinity for the anti-IGF1 antibody and, thus, hamper an accurate measurement of the IGF1 pro-forms. Additionally, we found that the IGF1 antibody can completely inhibit IGF1-induced breast cancer cell proliferation and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) phosphorylation, wheras the same antibody was found to only partially inhibit the biological activity of the pro-forms. Moreover, we found that the IGF1 pro-form activities can completely be inhibited by neutralising the IGF1R. Finally, we compared the bioactivity of the IGF1 pro-forms to that of mature IGF1, and found that the IGF1 pro-forms were less capable of phosphorylating the IGF1R in the breast cancer-derived cells tested. Our data indicate that IGF1 pro-forms can induce breast cancer cell

  15. Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin - Induction of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    rehydrated, and digested with proteinase K (25 ug/ml in TBS) using standard 19 methods. After quenching with 3% hydrogen peroxide , sections were...the 19 Chemicon Mouse to Mouse detection kit. Endogenous peroxidase was blocked with 3% aqueous 20 hydrogen peroxide . Slides were incubated with...Agwarwal, M.L., Das, T., Sa, G., 2002. Curcumin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells through p53-dependent Bax induction. FEBS Lett. 512

  16. Urinary isothiocyanate levels, brassica, and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fowke, Jay H; Chung, Fung-Lung; Jin, Fan; Qi, Dai; Cai, Qiuyin; Conaway, Cliff; Cheng, Jia-Rong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2003-07-15

    Brassica vegetable consumption (e.g., Chinese cabbage) provides isothiocyanates (ITC) and other glucosinolate derivatives capable of inducing Phase II enzymes [e.g., glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1) and NADPH quinine oxidoreductase] and apoptosis, altering steroid hormone metabolism, regulating estrogen receptor response, and stabilizing cellular proliferation. Asian populations consuming large amounts of Brassica have a lower breast cancer incidence compared with Western populations; however, the association between Brassica consumption and breast cancer risk is uncertain. It is difficult to estimate glucosinolate exposure and degradation in humans, possibly limiting epidemiological investigations of Brassica and cancer associations. We conducted a case control investigation of breast cancer in Shanghai, China, using urinary ITC levels as a biological measure of glucosinolate intake and degradation in populations with habitual Brassica intake. A representative subgroup of 337 cases providing presurgery, fasting, and first-morning urine specimens was one-to-one matched (age, menopausal status, date of urine collection, and day of laboratory assay) to population controls. Urinary ITC levels were inversely associated with breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) (Quartile 1) = 1 (ref); OR(Q2) = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (0.6, 1.4); OR(Q3) = 0.7, (0.5, 1.1); OR(Q4) = 0.5, (0.3, 0.8), adjusted for age, menopausal status, soy protein, fibroadenoma history, family breast cancer, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, age at menarche, and parity in conditional logistic model]. This protective association persisted within post and premenopausal women. In contrast, total Brassica intake estimated from a food frequency questionnaire was not associated with breast cancer. Trends in the association between urinary ITC and breast cancer were more consistent with homozygous deletion of GSTM1 or GSTT1, the AAgenotype of GSTP1 (A313G), or with the C

  17. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  18. Hyperactivation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase promotes escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd W.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Fox, Emily M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chen, Heidi; Higham, Catherine; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Many breast cancers exhibit a degree of dependence on estrogen for tumor growth. Although several therapies have been developed to treat individuals with estrogen-dependent breast cancers, some tumors show de novo or acquired resistance, rendering them particularly elusive to current therapeutic strategies. Understanding the mechanisms by which these cancers develop resistance would enable the development of new and effective therapeutics. In order to determine mechanisms of escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive (ER-positive) breast cancer, we established 4 human breast cancer cell lines after long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). LTED cells showed variable changes in ER levels and sensitivity to 17β-estradiol. Proteomic profiling of LTED cells revealed increased phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) substrates p70S6 kinase and p85S6 kinase as well as the PI3K substrate AKT. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR induced LTED cell apoptosis and prevented the emergence of hormone-independent cells. Using reverse-phase protein microarrays, we identified a breast tumor protein signature of PI3K pathway activation that predicted poor outcome after adjuvant endocrine therapy in patients. Our data suggest that upon adaptation to hormone deprivation, breast cancer cells rely heavily on PI3K signaling. Our findings also imply that acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer may be abrogated by combination therapies targeting both ER and PI3K pathways. PMID:20530877

  19. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  20. Monitoring Serial Changes in Circulating Human Breast Cancer Cells in Mruine Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Repollet, Madeline; Luker, Kathryn E.; Brown, Martha; Rae, James M.; Dontu, Gabriela; Schott, Anne F.; Wicha, Max; Doyle, Gerald V.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Luker, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are emerging as a powerful prognostic and predictive biomarker in several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate. Studies of CTC in metastasis and further development of CTC as a biomarker in cancer have been limited by the inability to repetitively monitor CTC in mouse models of cancer. We have validated a method to enumerate CTC in blood samples obtained from living mice using a modified version of an in vitro diagnostic system for quantifying CTC in patients. Different routes of blood collection were tested to identify a method to reproducibly recover CTC from tumor-bearing mice without interference from contaminating normal murine epithelial cells. CTC are present in blood samples from mice bearing orthotopic xenografts of several different breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer cells from patient biopsies. We also show that this technology can be used for serial monitoring of CTC in mouse xenograft models of human breast cancer. These results establish a new method for studying CTC in mouse models of epithelial cancer, providing the foundation for studies of molecular regulation of CTC in cancer and CTC as biomarker for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18632603

  1. Undecylprodigiosin selectively induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells independent of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Ma, C.-J.; Lu, C.-H.; Tsai, Yo-Ting; Wei, Y.-H.; Chang, J.-S.; Lai, J.-K.; Cheuh, Pin-Ju; Yeh, C.-T.; Tang, P.-C.; Jingua, T.C.; Ko, J.-L.; Liu, F.-S.; Yen, H.E.

    2007-12-15

    Undecylprodigiosin (UP) is a bacterial bioactive metabolite produced by Streptomyces and Serratia. In this study, we explored the anticancer effect of UP. Human breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D and one nonmalignant human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, were tested in this study. We found that UP exerted a potent cytotoxicity against all breast carcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, UP showed limited toxicity to MCF-10A cells, indicating UP's cytotoxic effect is selective for malignant cells. UP's cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, as confirmed by positive TUNEL signals, annexin V-binding, caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. Notably, UP-induced apoptosis was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk, further indicating the involvement of caspase activity. Moreover, UP caused a marked decrease of the levels of antiapoptotic BCL-X{sub L}, Survivin and XIAP while enhancing the levels of proapoptotic BIK, BIM, MCL-1S and NOXA, consequently favoring induction of apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cells with functional p53 (MCF-7, T47D) or mutant p53 (BT-20, MDA-MB-231) were both susceptible to UP's cytotoxicity. Importantly, UP was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells with p53 knockdown by RNA interference, confirming the dispensability of p53 in UP-induced apoptosis. Overall, our results establish that UP induces p53-independent apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells with no marked toxicity to nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its use as a new chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer irrespective of p53 status.

  2. Expression of a truncated form of hHb1 hair keratin in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Régnier, C. H.; Boulay, A.; Asch, P. H.; Wendling, C.; Chenard, M. P.; Tomasetto, C.; Rio, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Human hHb1 belongs to the type II hard keratin family and is physiologically expressed in hair shafts. In the present study, using specific 3' and 5' probes for hHb1, we established that breast carcinomas ectopically express a hHb1 5'-truncated mRNA, and that this transcript is restricted to malignant epithelial cells. Furthermore, an in vitro study indicated that it could be translated. We concluded that, in breast carcinomas, expression of truncated hHb1 is related to epithelial cell transformation. Because the hHb1 gene maps to 12q11-q13, a chromosome region known to present several breakpoints in solid tumours, we propose that the hHb1 gene might represent a target for such alterations. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9862577

  3. Polyamine Analogues as Novel Anti-HER Family Agents in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Cancer . Richards T. Breast Cancer Program Retreat, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns ...Family Agents in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Talmesha Richards CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins ...research conference. I have also had the opportunity to present my research at Johns Hopkins events such as the CMM Retreat, Breast Cancer

  4. [Inhibition of triclosan to fatty acid synthase from goose uropygial glands and human breast cancer cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Qiang; Lai, Bing-Sen; Anderson, Vernon E

    2003-03-01

    It has been indicated that fatty acid synthase (FAS) is abnormally overexpressed in human breast cancer compared with normal human tissue. Inhibition of FAS induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to observe the inhibition of triclosan on FAS from goose uropygial glands for establishing the method and to study the inhibition of triclosan on FAS from human breast cancer SKBr3 cells in vitro. The goose uropygial glands FAS was purified by ultra-centrifugation and Superdex PG 200 chromatography; the human breast cancer SKBr3 cell FAS was partially purified by ultra-centrifugation. The FAS was interacted with different concentrations of Triclosan with different times before catalyzing. Then the substrates of FAS were added to the reaction system. The inhibitory activities of triclosan against the FAS were investigated using spectrophotometric assays. In the goose uropygial gland group, FAS was purified as a single band at 250kDa with SDS-PAGE. The inhibitory activities of triclosan(12.5 micromol/L) at 0, 5, and 10 minute on FAS were 26.40%, 28.30%, and 43.93%, respectively. The inhibitory activities of triclosan (25.00 micromol/L) at 0, 5, and 10 minute on FAS were 46.22%, 50.28%, and 97.05%, respectively. The inhibitory activities of triclosan (100.00 micromol/L) at 0, 5, and 10 minute on FAS were 98.11%, 97.75%, and 97.37%, respectively. In human SKBr3 breast cancer cell group, the inhibitory activities of triclosan (25, 50, 100, and 200 micromol/L) at 5 minute on FAS were 20.00%, 26.67%, 60.00%, and 100%, respectively. Triclosan inhibits the FAS from goose uropygial glands and human breast cancer SKBr3 cells. The inhibitory activities depended on the concentrations of triclosan and the interaction times between triclosan and FAS before catalyzing.

  5. Parabens can enable hallmarks and characteristics of cancer in human breast epithelial cells: a review of the literature with reference to new exposure data and regulatory status.

    PubMed

    Darbre, Philippa D; Harvey, Philip W

    2014-09-01

    A framework for understanding the complexity of cancer development was established by Hanahan and Weinberg in their definition of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we consider the evidence that parabens can enable development in human breast epithelial cells of four of six of the basic hallmarks, one of two of the emerging hallmarks and one of two of the enabling characteristics. In Hallmark 1, parabens have been measured as present in 99% of human breast tissue samples, possess oestrogenic activity and can stimulate sustained proliferation of human breast cancer cells at concentrations measurable in the breast. In Hallmark 2, parabens can inhibit the suppression of breast cancer cell growth by hydroxytamoxifen, and through binding to the oestrogen-related receptor gamma may prevent its deactivation by growth inhibitors. In Hallmark 3, in the 10 nm-1 μm range, parabens give a dose-dependent evasion of apoptosis in high-risk donor breast epithelial cells. In Hallmark 4, long-term exposure (>20 weeks) to parabens leads to increased migratory and invasive activity in human breast cancer cells, properties that are linked to the metastatic process. As an emerging hallmark methylparaben has been shown in human breast epithelial cells to increase mTOR, a key regulator of energy metabolism. As an enabling characteristic parabens can cause DNA damage at high concentrations in the short term but more work is needed to investigate long-term, low-dose mixtures. The ability of parabens to enable multiple cancer hallmarks in human breast epithelial cells provides grounds for regulatory review of the implications of the presence of parabens in human breast tissue. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion Oncogene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0502 TITLE: Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer ...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 AUG 2005 - 14 AUG 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: In this study, we generated a novel mouse model of human breast cancer based on a recurrent chromosomal

  7. The Role of Osteopontin in the Malignancy of Human Breast Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    DAMD17-96-1-6075 TITLE: The Role of Osteopontin in the Malignancy of Human Breast Carcinoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATION: Dr. Frances O’Malley Alan B. Tuck...1997 Annual (I Jun 96 - 31 May 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Role of Osteopontin in the Malignancy of Human Breast Carcinoma DAMD17...OPN in the malignancy of human breast cancer will be of potential importance not only in the interpretation of prognostic information gained through

  8. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Teng, Zhi Ping; Chen, Yun Xin; Shen, Dan Hua; Li, Jin Tao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-05-01

    To explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. PCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 in the SKBR3 cell line and in 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Of the patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to be positive for HPV18 E6 and HPV18 E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18 E6 and E7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. HPV was a contributor to virus caused human breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic basis for p53 overexpression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, A M; Humphrey, P A; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1991-01-01

    Overexpression of an activated form of the p53 protein may be involved in neoplastic transformation. We found widespread overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in 11 (22%) of 49 primary invasive human breast cancers. Northern blot analysis showed that this overexpression was not due to an increase in the steady-state level of p53 mRNA. The p53 gene was directly sequenced in 7 of these tumors with elevated levels of the protein and, in each case, a mutation that altered the coding sequence for p53 was found in a highly conserved region of the gene. Whereas 4 of these tumors contained only a mutant p53 allele, the other 3 tumors exhibited coding sequences from both a mutant and a wild-type allele. p53 mutations have previously been correlated with allelic loss of part of chromosome 17p that contains the p53 locus. Examination of all 49 breast tumors revealed a 61% frequency of deletion at or near the p53 locus. However, the presence of allelic deletion did not correlate with overexpression of the protein. Six tumors that were deleted but did not express high levels of the protein were sequenced and all retained a wild-type p53 allele. In this series of human breast cancers, overexpression of the p53 protein, not allelic loss on chromosome 17p, was always associated with mutation of the p53 gene. Images PMID:2052583

  10. Minireview: Progesterone Regulation of Proliferation in the Normal Human Breast and in Breast Cancer: A Tale of Two Scenarios?

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J. Dinny; Clarke, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone (P), which signals through the P receptor (PR), is critical in normal development of the breast, but its signaling axis is also a major driver of breast cancer risk. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of P signaling in the normal human breast, with a focus on the importance of the balance between autocrine and paracrine signaling. To date, most data (which derive largely from mouse models or human breast cancer cell line studies) have demonstrated that the vast majority of PR+ cells appear to act as “sensor” cells, which respond to P stimulation by translating these hormonal cues into paracrine signals. However, growing evidence suggests that, dependent on the cellular context, P may also signal in an autocrine manner in a subset of cells in the normal mouse mammary gland and human breast. It has been suggested that it may be dysregulation of this autocrine signaling, resulting in a “switch” from a predominance of paracrine signaling to autocrine signaling in PR+ cells, which is an early event during breast tumorigenesis. This review summarizes current evidence in the literature that demonstrates the mechanisms through which P acts in the normal human breast, as well as highlighting the important questions that remain unanswered. PMID:26266959

  11. Establishment of novel prediction system of intestinal absorption in humans using human intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Toguchi, Hajime; Nishibayashi, Toru; Higaki, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Kitazume, Mina T; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Sato, Toshiro; Okamoto, Susumu; Kanai, Takanori; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a novel prediction system of drug absorption in humans by utilizing human intestinal tissues. Based on the transport index (TI), a newly defined parameter, calculated by taking account of the change in drug concentrations because of precipitation on the apical side and the amounts accumulated in the tissue and transported to the basal side, the absorbability of drugs in rank order as well as the fraction of dose absorbed (Fa) in humans were estimated. Human intestinal tissues taken from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease patients were mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber and transport studies were performed to evaluate the permeation of drugs, including FD-4, a very low permeable marker, atenolol, a low permeable marker, and metoprolol, a high permeable marker. Although apparent permeability coefficients calculated by the conventional equation did not reflect human Fa values for FD-4, atenolol, and metoprolol, TI values were well correlated with Fa values, which are described by 100 · [1 - e (- f · (TI - α)) ]. Based on this equation, Fa values in humans for other test drugs were predicted successfully, indicating that our new system utilizing human intestinal tissues would be valuable for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

  12. Persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk from Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shinsuke; Kunisue, Tatsuya

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we concisely reviewed the contamination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in human breast milk collected from Asian countries such as Japan, China, Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, and Indonesia during 1999-2003. Dioxins, PCBs, CHLs in Japanese, and DDTs in Vietnamese, Chinese, Cambodian, Malaysian, and HCHs in Chinese, Indian, and HCB in Chinese breast milk were predominant. In India, levels of dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) in the mothers living around the open dumping site were notably higher than those from the reference site and other Asian developing countries, indicating that significant pollution sources of DRCs are present in the dumping site of India and the residents there have been exposed to relatively higher levels of these contaminants possibly via bovine milk.

  13. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0616 TITLE: From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a... Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging 5b. GRANT... Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer -related death in women worldwide, and metastasis is responsible for the majority of these deaths. Triple

  14. From morphologic to molecular: established and emerging molecular diagnostics for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Portier, Bryce P; Gruver, Aaron M; Huba, Michael A; Minca, Eugen C; Cheah, Alison L; Wang, Zhen; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2012-09-15

    Diagnostics in the field of breast carcinoma are constantly evolving. The recent wave of molecular methodologies, both microscope and non-microscope based, have opened new ways to gain insight into this disease process and have moved clinical diagnostics closer to a 'personalized medicine' approach. In this review we highlight some of the advancements that laboratory medicine technology is making toward guiding the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection for patients affected by breast carcinoma. The content of the article is largely structured by methodology, with a distinct emphasis on both microscope based and non-microscope based diagnostic formats. Where possible, we have attempted to emphasize the potential benefits as well as limitations to each of these technologies. Successful molecular diagnostics, applied in concert within the morphologic context of a patient's tumor, are what will lay the foundation for personalized therapy and allow a more sophisticated approach to clinical trial stratification. The future of breast cancer diagnostics looks challenging, but it is also a field of great opportunity. Never before have there been such a plethora of new tools available for disease investigation or candidate therapy selection.

  15. Prediction of metastatic relapse in node-positive breast cancer: establishment of a clinicogenomic model after FEC100 adjuvant regimen.

    PubMed

    Campone, Mario; Campion, Loïc; Roché, Henry; Gouraud, Wilfried; Charbonnel, Catherine; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stéphane; Genève, Jean; Martin, Anne-Laure; Bataille, Régis; Jézéquel, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease, and markers for disease subtypes and therapy response remain poorly defined. For that reason, we employed a retrospective study in node-positive breast cancer to identify molecular signatures of gene expression correlating with metastatic free survival. Patients were primarily included in FEC100 (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 100 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2)) arms of two multicentric prospective adjuvant clinical trials (PACS01 and PEGASE01-FNCLCC cooperative group). Data from nylon microarrays containing 8,032 cDNA unique sequences, representing 5,776 distinct genes, have been used to develop a predictive model for treatment outcome. We obtained the gene expression profiles for 150 of these patients, and used stringent univariate selection techniques based on Cox regression combined with principal component analysis to identify a genomic signature of metastatic relapse after adjuvant FEC100 regimen. Most of the 14 selected genes have a clear role in breast cancer, carcinogenesis or chemotherapy resistance. Six genes have been previously described in other genomic studies (UBE2C, CENPF, C16orf61 [DC13], STMN1, CCT5 and BCL2A1). Furthermore, we showed the interest of combining transcriptomic data with clinical data into a clinicogenomic model for patients subtyping. The described model adds predictive accuracy to that provided by the well-established Nottingham prognostic index or by our genomic signature alone.

  16. Inhibition of angiogenic initiation and disruption of newly established human vascular networks by juice from Morinda citrifolia (noni).

    PubMed

    Hornick, Conrad A; Myers, Amy; Sadowska-Krowicka, Halina; Anthony, Catherine T; Woltering, Eugene A

    2003-01-01

    noni, the juice of the fruit from the Morinda citrifolia plant, has been used for centuries as a medicinal agent. We tested the effects of noni juice in a three-dimensional fibrin clot matrix model using human placental vein and human breast tumor explants as sources for angiogenic vessel development. Noni in concentrations of 5% (vol/vol) or greater was highly effective in inhibiting the initiation of new vessel sprouts from placental vein explants, compared with initiation in control explants in media supplemented with an equivalent amount of saline. These concentrations of noni were also effective in reducing the growth rate and proliferation of newly developing capillary sprouts. When used at a concentration of 10% in growth media, noni was able to induce vessel degeneration and apoptosis in wells with established capillary networks within a few days of its application. We also found that 10% noni juice in media was an effective inhibitor of capillary initiation in explants from human breast tumors. In tumor explants which did show capillary sprouting, the vessels rapidly degenerated (2-3 days) in those exposed to media supplemented with 10% noni.

  17. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...; Processing Requirements § 381.152 Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food. (a... being limited to, animal food) that is not for use as human food is prepared in any room or compartment...

  18. Establishment, operation and development of a donor human milk bank.

    PubMed

    Biasini, Augusto; Stella, Marcello; Malaigia, Laura; China, Mariachiara; Azzalli, Milena; Laguardia, Maria Chiara; Rizzo, Vittoria

    2013-10-01

    Human milk is very valuable in premature infant nutrition. The collection, screening, processing and distribution of donor human milk are described in this report. These activities take place in the Donor Human Milk Bank (DHMB) of the Large Romagna Area (LRA) in Italy, the development of which is also described here. Over the years, the activities of this bank, which is located in Cesena Hospital, in the center of the LRA, have developed from an informal and domestic-level activity to become a multistep controlled process designed to prevent the possibility of disease transmission. This little food-supply industry, run by a multi-disciplinary team with strict rules and diverse responsibilities, complies with the Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) system.

  19. Development and characterisation of a 3D multi-cellular in vitro model of normal human breast: a tool for cancer initiation studies.

    PubMed

    Nash, Claire E; Mavria, Georgia; Baxter, Euan W; Holliday, Deborah L; Tomlinson, Darren C; Treanor, Darren; Novitskaya, Vera; Berditchevski, Fedor; Hanby, Andrew M; Speirs, Valerie

    2015-05-30

    Multicellular 3-dimensional (3D) in vitro models of normal human breast tissue to study cancer initiation are required. We present a model incorporating three of the major functional cell types of breast, detail the phenotype and document our breast cancer initiation studies. Myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and immortalised from breast reduction mammoplasty samples. Tri-cultures containing non-tumorigenic luminal epithelial cells HB2, or HB2 overexpressing different HER proteins, together with myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts were established in collagen I. Phenotype was assessed morphologically and immunohistochemically and compared to normal breast tissue. When all three cell types were present, polarised epithelial structures with lumens and basement membrane production were observed, akin to normal human breast tissue. Overexpression of HER2 or HER2/3 caused a significant increase in size, while HER2 overexpression resulted in development of a DCIS-like phenotype. In summary, we have developed a 3D tri-cellular model of normal human breast, amenable to comparative analysis after genetic manipulation and with potential to dissect the mechanisms behind the early stages of breast cancer initiation.

  20. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Establishment and characterization of a reconstructed Chinese human epidermis model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Zhong, L; Zhou, M; Chen, D; Huang, X; Chen, J; Chen, M; Ni, H; Cai, Z

    2016-02-01

    In vitro reconstructed human epidermis is a powerful tool for both basic research and industrial applications in dermatology, pharmacology and the cosmetic field. By growing keratinocytes of Chinese origin on a collagen matrix after a submerged culture followed by an air-liquid interface culture, an in vitro reconstructed Chinese human epidermis model was obtained. This Chinese epidermis model was further characterized. The reconstructed human epidermis model (China EpiSkin model) exhibits morphological features similar to native skin and shows similar expression profile of proliferation (Ki67) and differentiation (K14 and K10 cytokeratins, filaggrin) markers. Corneodesmosomes, lamellar lipids, desmosomes, keratohyalin granules, keratin filaments and membrane-coating granules are also observed at the ultrastructure level. Moreover, China EpiSkin model contains most of the major lipid classes normally found in the native skin and potentially could present the properties of skin barrier. More importantly, the model production achieves high reproducibility and low intra- and inter-batch variations. This is the first reconstructed Chinese human epidermis model reported to meet the high quality standard with industrialized production criteria. This China EpiSkin model can be used for both skin research and safety assessment in vitro. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  2. Establishing a human research protection program in a combatant command.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Laura R; Holcomb, John B; Thompson, Jennifer C; Cordts, Paul R

    2008-02-01

    Extensive United States combat operations commenced for the first time in over decade in 2003. Early in 2004 there was no human research protection regulatory review and approval mechanism based in a deployed military combatant command. The absence of such a system presented a critical impediment to implementation of the time-honored tradition of a robust combat casualty care research effort. A coalition of concerned military medical personnel from the US Army proposed a novel mechanism to meet Department of Defense (DOD) requirements for the human research protection oversight of studies conducted in the combat theater of operations. In 2005, the Commander of Task Force 44 Medical Command (44th MEDCOM), who was serving as the Multi-National Corps Iraq (MNC-I) Surgeon, was charged with negotiating a DOD Assurance and implementing a new system of research review and protections. He deployed an Army Medical Department Medical Corps officer to assist in this endeavor and operationalize the plan. On March 19, 2005, the Multi-National Corps Iraq Commander signed a historic agreement with the US Army Surgeon General who developed a regulatory support and oversight mechanism to conduct research in theater. This innovative system not only honored the Army's commitment to human research protections, but also provided much needed support in the form of scientific and ethical review and compliance oversight to those deployed medical personnel with the vision to conduct healthcare studies in the combat environment. On July 20, 2005, the first DOD Assurance of Compliance for the Protection of Human Research Subjects was approved for MNC-I. This assurance allows the conduct of human subjects research in full compliance with all Federal, DOD, and Army regulatory requirements. This article describes that unique process.

  3. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Analysis of DLC-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Plaumann, Marlies; Seitz, Susanne; Frege, Renate; Estevez-Schwarz, Lope; Scherneck, Siegfried

    2003-06-01

    The chromosome region 8p12-p22 shows frequent allelic loss in many neoplasms, including breast cancer (BC). The DLC-1 gene, located on 8p21-p22, might be a candidate tumor suppressor gene in this region. To evaluate the involvement of DLC-1 in breast carcinogenesis we studied DLC-1 mRNA expression in a panel of 14 primary human BC and the corresponding normal breast cells as well as 8 BC cell lines. Low levels or absence of DLC-1 mRNA were observed in 57% of primary BC and 62.5% of BC cell lines, respectively. We could not find any correlation between DLC-1 mRNA expression and deletions at the DLC-1 locus. Transfection of the gene into DLC-1 deficient T-47D cells raised the DLC-1 mRNA level and resulted in inhibition of cell growth and reduced colony-forming capacity. Our results indicate a role of DLC-1 in BC carcinogenesis.

  5. Mathematical analysis of mammary ducts in lactating human breast.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S Negin; Geddes, Donna; Hassiotou, Foteini; Hassanipour, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    This work studies a simple model for milk transport through lactating human breast ducts, and describes mathematically the mass transfer from alveolar sacs through the mammary ducts to the nipple. In this model both the phenomena of diffusion in the sacs and conventional flow in ducts have been considered. The ensuing analysis reveals that there is an optimal range of bifurcation numbers leading to the easiest milk flow based on the minimum flow resistance. This model formulates certain difficult-to-measure values like diameter of the alveolar sacs, and the total length of the milk path as a function of easy-to-measure properties such as milk fluid properties and macroscopic measurements of the breast. Alveolar dimensions from breast tissues of six lactating women are measured and reported in this paper. The theoretically calculated alveoli diameters for optimum milk flow (as a function of bifurcation numbers) show excellent match with our biological data on alveolar dimensions. Also, the mathematical model indicates that for minimum milk flow resistance the glandular tissue must be within a short distance from the base of the nipple, an observation that matches well with the latest anatomical and physiological research.

  6. Inverse relationship between estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA levels in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Hall, R E; Alexander, I E; Koga, M; Shine, J; Sutherland, R L

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) are present in a number of human breast cancer cell lines and tumor biopsies. Furthermore, it has been suggested that EGF-R levels are higher in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) than in ER+ human breast tumors and that EGF-R status may be a prognostic indicator in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to establish whether there is a quantitative relationship between EGF-R and ER mRNA concentrations in a series of 10 well-characterized human breast cancer cell lines. All cell lines expressed detectable quantities of EGF-R mRNA by Northern analysis but the relative abundance of EGF-R mRNA varied more than 50-fold. Two transcripts corresponding to the 10.5- and 5.8-kb mRNAs described in other cell types were present but in different relative proportions in different cell lines. When these lines were divided into an ER+ and an ER- group based on their ability to bind estradiol, ER- cell lines were shown to express significantly higher concentrations of EGF-R mRNA than did ER+ cell lines (p less than 0.005). Furthermore, linear-regression analysis revealed a significant inverse relationship between ER and EGF-R mRNA concentrations both within the group of 10 human breast cancer cell lines as a whole (r = 0.66) and within the 6 functionally ER + lines (r = 0.77). This demonstration of a significant (p less than 0.005) inverse relationship between the concentrations of ER and EGF-R mRNAs in ER + cell lines raises the possibility of reciprocal regulation of the expression of these genes in human breast cancer.

  7. Enhanced expression and secretion of an epithelial membrane antigen (MA5) in a human mucinous breast tumor line (BT549).

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Major, P P; Dion, A S

    1990-01-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA5, generated versus a membrane-enriched extract of breast cancer metastatic to liver, detects one or two high molecular weight species (greater than 200 kD) in breast tumor membranes, human milk fat globule membranes, and various breast tumor cell lines. From comparative studies of five breast carcinoma lines (BT20, BT549, MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1), as well as an epithelial line established from milk (HBL-100), we report the stimulation of expression of MA5-reactive antigen in a mucinous breast tumor cell line (BT549) through the use of a culture medium supplemented with charcoal-absorbed fetal calf serum, insulin, and hydrocortisone. Large amounts of aggregated MA5-reactive antigen are secreted into the culture medium and can be recovered from the media for further purification by centrifugation. These findings suggest that BT549 cells, grown in the special nutritive medium, may be useful in providing an ample source of epithelial membrane antigen (also termed polymorphic epithelial mucin) for standardization of clinical assay protocols, as well as provide a model system for studies of the regulation of expression for this class of antigens in breast carcinoma.

  8. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  9. Human papillomaviruses and carcinogenesis: well-established and novel models.

    PubMed

    Viarisio, Daniele; Gissmann, Lutz; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the cutaneous or mucosal epithelia and are classified phylogenetically as genera and species. Persistent infections by the mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types from genus alpha are associated with cancer development of the genital and upper respiratory tracts. The products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the major HR HPV oncoproteins, being essential in all steps of the carcinogenic process. Cutaneous beta HPV types are proposed, together with ultraviolet (UV) radiation, to promote non-melanoma skin cancer development. However, in contrast to the HR HPV types, beta HPV types appear to be required only at an early stage of carcinogenesis, facilitating the accumulation of UV-induced DNA mutations. Although findings in experimental models also suggest that beta HPV types and other carcinogens may synergize in the induction of malignancies, these possibilities need to be confirmed in human studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hieken, Tina J.; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C.; Knutson, Keith L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Yao, Janet Z.; Baddour, Larry M.; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  11. Rapid Extravasation and Establishment of Breast Cancer Micrometastases in the Liver Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Michelle D.; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Short, Kurt W.; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Xu, Lei; Piston, David W.; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Gorden, D. Lee

    2010-01-01

    To examine the interplay between tumor cells and the microenvironment during early breast cancer metastasis, we developed a technique for ex vivo imaging of murine tissue explants using two-photon microscopy. Cancer cells in the liver and the lung were compared by imaging both organs at specific time points after the injection of the same polyoma middle T-initiated murine mammary tumor cell line. Extravasation was greatly reduced in the lung compared to the liver, with 56% of tumor cells in the liver having extravasated by 24 hours, while only 22% of tumor cells in the lung had done so. In the liver, imaged cells continually transitioned from an intravascular location to an extravascular site, while in the lung extravasation rates slowed after 6 hours. Within the liver microenvironment, the average size of the imaged micrometastatic lesions increased 4-fold between days 5 and 12. Histologic analysis of these lesions determined that by day 12 the micrometastases were heterogenous, consisting of both tumor cells and von Willebrand Factor-positive endothelial cells. Further analysis with iv-administered lectin indicated that vessels within the micrometastatic tumor foci were patent by day 12. These data present the use of two-photon microscopy to directly compare extravasation times in metastatic sites using the same tumor cell line, and highlight the differences in early events and metastatic patterns between two important secondary sites of breast cancer progression with implications for future therapy. PMID:20724460

  12. Human cysticercosis of the breast mimicking breast cancer: a report of a case from Ile-Ife, Nigeria. .

    PubMed

    Omonisi, A E; Odujoko, O O; Aluko, J A; Akinyemi, H A; Alatishe, O I; Omoniyi-Esan, G O

    2014-01-01

    Human cystericosis is the infection caused by the larvae of pork tapeworm Taeniasolium. The infection commonly affects the muscle, the central nervous system and subcutaneous tissues. The involvement of the breast is unusual. To present a 54 years old postmenopausal woman, a petty trader and a Jehovah witness who presented with a painless lump in the right breast which was increasing in size. The mass was clinically diagnosed by the Surgeon who examined her as a case of right breast cancer and an excisional biopsy was done. A review of the case note, autopsy findings including gross and microscopic examinations and literature was done. A histopathological appraisal of biopsy revealed the presence of the typical cysticercus larva and a definitive diagnosis of right breast Cystericosis was made. The diagnosis of cysticercosis in unusual sites such as breast may be clinically difficult and this supports why all biopsies must be sent to the pathologists for definitive diagnosis. Human cystericosis of the breast is rare, nevertheless, this should be considered as a differential diagnosis for amass in the breast particularly in the tropics and developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case from our centre.

  13. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A; Hopper, John L; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Southey, Melissa C; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine M; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4)). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85) in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5)), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  14. Evidence of Gene–Environment Interactions between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Established Environmental Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John L.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; The GENICA Network; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Management; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine M.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene–environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4×10−6) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1×10−4). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01–1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96–1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16–1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85–0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14–1.85) in those who drank ≥20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3×10−5), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11–1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92–1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors

  15. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid) and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15%) from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%). Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers. PMID:22937830

  16. Regulation of Cell Survival and Motility in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Sphingosine Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    human breast cancer cell lines did not reveal a correlation between levels of SPHK1 and cell growth or invasive phenotype. MCF-7 human breast cancer ( HBC ...Stam, J.C., van der Kammen, R.A., and Collard, J.G. (1995) A role for Rac in Tiaml-induced membrane ruffling and invasion. Nature 375, 338- 340 51. Stam

  17. The role of semaphorin 4D in tumor development and angiogenesis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongchao; Chen, Ceshi; Sun, Qiangming; Wu, Jing; Qiu, Lijuan; Gao, Change; Liu, Weiqing; Yang, Jun; Jun, Nie; Dong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is highly expressed in certain types of tumors and functions in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and growth. However, it is still not clear regarding the roles of Sema4D in breast cancer. This study was designed to explore the effects of Sema4D on proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, invasion, migration, tumor growth, and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Materials and methods The expression level of Sema4D was investigated in MCF10A, 184A1, HCC1937, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, Hs578T, BT474, MCF-7, and T47D breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting analysis. Sema4D downregulation or overexpression was established by infection with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or Sema4D. To evaluate the effects of Sema4D on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, invasion, and migration of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, methods including MTT assay, flow cytometry, wound healing assay, and transwell experiments were applied. BALB/c nude mice were injected with MDA-MB-231 cells, which were respectively infected with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D, Sema4D shRNA, and GFP, followed by tumor angiogenesis assay. Results Sema4D was expressed at higher levels in breast cancer cell lines compared with the normal human breast epithelial cell lines, especially in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Cell proliferation ability was remarkably inhibited in Sema4D downregulated condition, whereas the proportions of cells in the G0/G1 phase and apoptosis increased in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. In addition, the invasion and migration abilities of these cells were obviously reduced. Xenograft growth as well as angiogenesis was inhibited when infected with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D shRNA in vivo. Conclusion Downregulation of Sema4D had notable influence on cell proliferation ability, invasion, migration, and apoptosis of both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Furthermore, infection with lentiviruses

  18. Establishment of the DU.528 human lymphohemopoietic stem cell line

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have established the DU.528 cell line from the pretreatment leukemia cells of a patient who underwent a T lymphoblastic-to-promyelocytic phenotype conversion during treatment with the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformycin. The cell line and clones obtained from it by limiting dilution have the same karyotype previously found in the patient's pretreatment T lymphoblasts and post-deoxycoformycin treatment promyelocytes. DU.528 cells in continuous culture for greater than 2 yr display a predominant undifferentiated T lymphoblastoid phenotype. These cells spontaneously generate progeny of at least three lineages, T lymphoid, granulocytic/monocytic, and erythroid. The surface marker most consistently expressed by DU.528 cells in the undifferentiated state is the 3A1 antigen, which has been found on prothymocytes in the embryonic thymus. Some undifferentiated DU.528 cells also expressed the IL-2 receptor, but no other T cell differentiation antigens. Exposure of DU.528 cells to a variety of agents induced myeloid maturation; adenosine and deoxyadenosine, in the presence of deoxycoformycin, induced expression of myeloid differentiation antigens. Our results suggest that DU.528 is a lymphohematopoietic stem cell line and support the hypothesis that differentiation of pluripotent stem cells may be altered by genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase. DU.528 cells may provide a useful model for examining factors that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:4056659

  19. Re-characterization of established human retinoblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busch, Maike; Philippeit, Claudia; Weise, Andreas; Dünker, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common malignant intraocular childhood tumor. Forty years after their first description, in the present study, we re-characterized seven established retinoblastoma cell lines with regard to their RB1 mutation status, morphology, growth pattern, endogenous apoptosis levels, colony formation efficiency in soft agar and invasiveness and dissemination capacity in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. All RB cell lines predominantly resemble small epithelioid cells with little cytoplasm and large nucleus, which mainly grow in cell clusters, but sometimes form chain-like structures with incident loops or three-dimensional aggregates. We observed different growth rates for the different retinoblastoma cells investigated. RBL-30, RBL-13 and RBL 383 cells grew very slowly, whereas Y-79 cells grew fastest under our culture conditions. Apoptosis rates likewise differed with highest cell death levels in RB 383 and RB 355 and lowest in WERI-Rb1 and RBL-15. Contradicting former reports, six of the seven RB cell lines analyzed were able to form colonies in soft agarose after single cell seeding within 3 weeks of incubation. Upon inoculation of four out of seven RB cell lines on the dorsal CAM, GFP-positive cells were detectable in the ventral CAM and two RB cell lines caused tumor development, indicating their intravasation and dissemination potential. All RB cell lines exhibited the potential to extravasate from the capillary system after intravenous CAM injection. Our study provides valuable new details for future therapy-related retinoblastoma basic research in vitro.

  20. Endothelial protein C receptor function in murine and human breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Florence; Yokota, Naho; Carneiro-Lobo, Tatiana; Kitano, Maki; Schaffer, Michael; Anderson, G Mark; Mueller, Barbara M; Esmon, Charles T; Ruf, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Several markers identify cancer stem cell-like populations, but little is known about the functional roles of stem cell surface receptors in tumor progression. Here, we show that the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), a stem cell marker in hematopoietic, neuronal and epithelial cells, is crucial for breast cancer growth in the orthotopic microenvironment of the mammary gland. Mice with a hypomorphic allele of EPCR show reduced tumor growth in the PyMT-model of spontaneous breast cancer development and deletion of EPCR in established PyMT tumor cells significantly attenuates transplanted tumor take and growth. We find expansion of EPCR(+) cancer stem cell-like populations in aggressive, mammary fat pad-enhanced human triple negative breast cancer cells. In this model, EPCR-expressing cells have markedly increased mammosphere- and tumor-cell initiating activity compared to another stable progenitor-like subpopulation present at comparable frequency. We show that receptor blocking antibodies to EPCR specifically attenuate in vivo tumor growth initiated by either EPCR(+) cells or the heterogenous mixture of EPCR(+) and EPCR(-) cells. Furthermore, we have identified tumor associated macrophages as a major source for recognized ligands of EPCR, suggesting a novel mechanism by which cancer stem cell-like populations are regulated by innate immune cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Patient-Derived Xenograft Establishment from Human Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Licun; Allo, Ghassan; John, Thomas; Li, Ming; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Opitz, Isabelle; Anraku, Masaki; Yun, Zhihong; Pintilie, Melania; Pitcher, Bethany; Liu, Geoffrey; Feld, Ron; Johnston, Michael R; de Perrot, Marc; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but aggressive disease with few therapeutic options. The tumor-stromal interface is important in MPM, but this is lost in cell lines, the main model used for preclinical studies. We sought to characterize MPM patient-derived xenografts (PDX) to determine their suitability as preclinical models and whether tumors that engraft reflect a more aggressive biological phenotype.Experimental Design: Fresh tumors were harvested from extrapleural pneumonectomy, decortication, or biopsy samples of 50 MPM patients and implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice and serially passaged for up to five generations. We correlated selected mesothelioma biomarkers between PDX and patient tumors, and PDX establishment with the clinical pathologic features of the patients, including their survival. DNA of nine PDXs was profiled using the OncoScan FFPE Express platform. Ten PDXs were treated with cisplatin and pemetrexed.Results: A PDX was formed in 20 of 50 (40%) tumors implanted. Histologically, PDX models closely resembled the parent tumor. PDX models formed despite preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In multivariable analysis, patients whose tumors formed a PDX had significantly poorer survival when the model was adjusted for preoperative treatment (HR, 2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.52; P = 0.028). Among 10 models treated with cisplatin, seven demonstrated growth inhibition. Genomic abnormalities seen in nine PDX models were similar to that previously reported.Conclusions: Patients whose tumors form PDX models have poorer clinical outcomes. MPM PDX tumors closely resemble the genotype and phenotype of parent tumors, making them valuable models for preclinical studies. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 1060-7. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Establishing Criteria for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potency

    PubMed Central

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M.; Rai, Bina; Sathiyanathan, Padmapriya; Puan, Kia Joo; Rötzschke, Olaf; Hui, James H.; Raghunath, Michael; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Nurcombe, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study sought to identify critical determinants of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) potency using in vitro and in vivo attributes of cells isolated from the bone marrow of age‐ and sex‐matched donors. Adherence to plastic was not indicative of potency, yet capacity for long‐term expansion in vitro varied considerably between donors, allowing the grouping of MSCs from the donors into either those with high‐growth capacity or low‐growth capacity. Using this grouping strategy, high‐growth capacity MSCs were smaller in size, had greater colony‐forming efficiency, and had longer telomeres. Cell‐surface biomarker analysis revealed that the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) criteria did not distinguish between high‐growth capacity and low‐growth capacity MSCs, whereas STRO‐1 and platelet‐derived growth factor receptor alpha were preferentially expressed on high‐growth capacity MSCs. These cells also had the highest mean expression of the mRNA transcripts TWIST‐1 and DERMO‐1. Irrespective of these differences, both groups of donor MSCs produced similar levels of key growth factors and cytokines involved in tissue regeneration and were capable of multilineage differentiation. However, high‐growth capacity MSCs produced approximately double the volume of mineralized tissue compared to low‐growth capacity MSCs when assessed for ectopic bone‐forming ability. The additional phenotypic criteria presented in this study when combined with the existing ISCT minimum criteria and working proposal will permit an improved assessment of MSC potency and provide a basis for establishing the quality of MSCs prior to their therapeutic application. Stem Cells 2015;33:1878–1891 PMID:25752682

  3. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Establishment of a Human Thymic Myoid Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wakkach, Abdel; Poea, Sandrine; Chastre, Eric; Gespach, Christian; Lecerf, Florence; De la Porte, Sabine; Tzartos, Socrates; Coulombe, Alain; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    1999-01-01

    The subset of myoid cells is a normal component of the thymic stroma. To characterize these cells, we immortalized stromal cells from human thymus by using a plasmid vector encoding the SV40 T oncogene. Among the eight cell lines obtained, one had myoid characteristics including desmin and troponin antigens. This new line was designated MITC (myoid immortalized thymic cells). These cells expressed both the fetal and adult forms of muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the mRNA level, as well as the myogenic transcription factor MyoD1. α-Subunit AChR protein expression was detected by flow cytometry and the AChR was functional in patch-clamp studies. In addition, AChR expression was down-modulated by myasthenia gravis sera or by monoclonal antibody anti-AChR on MITC line similarly to TE671 rhabdomyosarcoma cells, making the MITC line an interesting tool for AChR antigenic modulation experiments. Finally, the MITC line expressed LFA-3, produced several cytokines able to act on T cells, and protected total thymocytes from spontaneous apoptosis in vitro. These results are compatible with a role of thymic myoid cells in some steps of thymocyte development. Therefore MITC line appears to be a useful tool to investigate the physiological role of thymic myoid cells. PMID:10514405

  5. 9 CFR 381.152 - Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establishment of articles not for human food. 381.152 Section 381.152 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT...; Processing Requirements § 381.152 Preparation in an official establishment of articles not for human food....

  6. NF-κB activation in human breast cancer specimens and its role in cell proliferation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debajit K.; Shi, Qian; Baily, Shanon; Strickland, Ian; Ghosh, Sankar; Pardee, Arthur B.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Lack of molecular targets in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-negative) breast cancer is a major therapeutic hurdle. We studied NF-κB activation in human breast tumors and in carcinoma cell lines. Activated NF-κB was detected predominantly in ER-negative vs. ER-positive breast tumors and mostly in ER-negative and ErbB2-positive tumors (86%). These in vivo results demonstrate association of activated NF-κB with a subgroup of human breast tumors and are consistent with previously reported in vitro observations using similar classes of human breast cancer cell lines. Finding such an association suggested functional and biological significance. Immunofluorescence demonstrated increased nuclear p65, a component of the active NF-κB complex, in cytokeratin 19 (CK19)-positive epithelial cells of ER-negative/ErbB2-positive tumor samples. In contrast, nuclear NF-κB was detected mostly in stroma of ER-negative and ErbB2-negative tumors, suggesting a role of activated NF-κB in intercellular signaling between epithelial and stromal cells in this type of breast cancers. To elucidate roles of activated NF-κB, we used an ER-negative and ErbB2-positive human breast tumor cell line (SKBr3). The polypeptide heregulin β1 stimulated, and herceptin, the anti-ErbB2 antibody, inhibited, NF-κB activation in SKBr3 cells. The NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) peptide, an established selective inhibitor of IκB-kinase (IKK), blocked heregulin-mediated activation of NF-κB and cell proliferation, and simultaneously induced apoptosis only in proliferating and not resting cells. These results substantiate the hypothesis that certain breast cancer cells rely on NF-κB for aberrant cell proliferation and simultaneously avoid apoptosis, thus implicating activated NF-κB as a therapeutic target for distinctive subclasses of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:15220474

  7. Experimental immunotherapy of human breast carcinomas implanted in nude mice with a mixture of monoclonal antibodies against human milk fat globule components.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, R L; Blank, E W; Peterson, J A

    1987-01-15

    Immunological therapy of BALB/c nude mice (nu/nu) implanted with human breast tumors, estrogen receptor negative MX-1 and estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7, was carried out with four monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) raised against human milk fat globule membrane glycoproteins also present on normal breast epithelial cells. MoAbs injected singly or as a partial mixture arrested growth of the tumors but to a lesser extent than a mixture ("cocktail") of all four MoAbs. Two model systems were developed in order to examine the capabilities of the four MoAbs to arrest human mammary tumor growth. In the first model the ability of these MoAbs to arrest tumor growth during a 6- to 8-week period was tested by injection of the MoAbs immediately before and after implantation (passive immunization) and thereafter every other day. In the second model the effect of these MoAbs on established and growing tumors was tested. Using the cocktail in the passive immunization protocol, human mammary tumor growth in nu/nu mice was arrested either completely or averaging to one-tenth the size of the controls for those mice in which the tumors had taken. Other human carcinomas, colon and lung, under the same protocol, were not affected. Injection of cocktail every 2 days into nu/nu mice with established and growing human breast tumors (both estrogen receptor positive and negative) produced arrests of tumor growth of 44.1, 45.2, 49.8% of their controls after 7 to 8 days of treatment. Previously, it has been established that human mammary tumors are heterogeneous in expression of the human milk fat globule antigens recognized by our antibodies to the extent that some cells may have large amounts and others no detectable amount of a particular antigen. Those MX-1 tumors treated for a prolonged time with the cocktail of MoAbs that survived and continued to grow could be the result of the preferential multiplication of those cells in the heterogeneous population which had low or no antigen content

  8. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  9. Blockade of MUC1 expression by glycerol guaiacolate inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Colon, J; Madero-Visbal, R; Isley, B; Konduri, S D; Baker, C H

    2010-10-01

    We sought to determine whether administration of glycerol guaiacolate at an optimal biological dose inhibits human breast cancer cell growth. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with glycerol guaiacolate and the therapeutic efficacy and biological activity of this drug was investigated on breast cancer cell growth. MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of overectamized female athymic nude mice. Ten days later, animals were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of glycerol guaiacolate for six weeks. Tumor size and volume was monitored and immunohistochemistry analysis on MUC1, p21 and ki-67 was performed. Glycerol guaiacolate decreased breast cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, decreased cell migration, and caused G1 cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate inhibits MUC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and significantly increased p21 expression in human breast cancer cells as well as induced PARP cleavage. Similarly, glycerol guaiacolate inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo as well as enhanced p21 expression and decreased breast tumor cell proliferation (ki-67 expression). Collectively, our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate decreased MUC1 expression and enhanced cell growth inhibition by inducing p21 expression in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that glycerol guaiacolate may provide a novel and effective approach for the treatment of human breast cancer.

  10. Lectin histochemistry of murine WAP-T mammary cancer reveals similar glycoconjugate changes to those in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Steffen; Gocht, Andreas; Wegwitz, Florian; Deppert, Wolfgang; Schumacher, Udo

    2014-12-01

    The WAP-T mouse model is an established clinically relevant model of breast cancer. Lectins have been used to study malignant progression in clinical studies. We investigated lectin binding sites to test for the clinical relevance of this model. Samples of the WAP-T mouse mammary tissues, from normal tissues to undifferentiated higher tumor grades were stained using an indirect technique with nine different lectins for intensity of lectin binding. HPA bound to the luminal epithelium in higher tumor grades in a similar pattern to that in human breast cancer. BSA-IB4 bound to luminal epithelium in hyperplasia and increased towards higher grades, comparable to previous clinical studies. PHA-L-binding to myoepithelium and luminal epithelium increased from hyperplasia to higher grades, comparable to findings in human breast cancer. The results of our study support the hypothesis that lectin binding sites change similarly in WAP-T and human breast cancer, stressing the similarity of this model with the clinical setting. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Recombinant Human Prolactin on Breast Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Camille E.; Puopolo, Karen M.; Newburg, David S.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Chen, Ceng; Allen, Maureen; Merewood, Anne; Worden, Susan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the impact of recombinant human prolactin (r-hPRL) on the nutritional and immunologic composition of breast milk. METHODS: We conducted 2 trials of r-hPRL treatment. In the first study, mothers with documented prolactin deficiency were given r-hPRL every 12 hours in a 28-day, open-label trial. In the second study, mothers with lactation insufficiency that developed while they were pumping breast milk for their preterm infants were given r-hPRL daily in a 7-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Breast milk characteristics were compared before and during 7 days of treatment. RESULTS: Among subjects treated with r-hPRL (N = 11), milk volumes (73 ± 36 to 146 ± 54 mL/day; P < .001) and milk lactose levels (155 ± 15 to 184 ± 8 mmol/L; P = .01) increased, whereas milk sodium levels decreased (12.1 ± 2.0 to 8.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L; P = .02). Milk calcium levels increased in subjects treated with r-hPRL twice daily (2.8 ± 0.6 to 5.0 ± 0.9 mmol/L; P = .03). Total neutral (1.5 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 g/L; P = .04) and acidic (33 ± 4 to 60 ± 6 mg/L; P = .02) oligosaccharide levels increased in r-hPRL-treated subjects, whereas total daily milk immunoglobulin A secretionwas unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: r-hPRL treatment increased milk volume and induced changes in milk composition similar to those that occur during normal lactogenesis. r-hPRL also increased antimicrobially active oligosaccharide concentrations. These effects were achieved for women with both prolactin deficiency and lactation insufficiency. PMID:21262884

  12. Establishment of a Reverse Genetics System for Studying Human Bocavirus in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Luo, Yong; Shen, Weiran; Lei-Butters, Diana C. M.; Chen, Aaron Yun; Li, Yi; Tang, Liang; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Engelhardt, John F.; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) has been identified as one of the etiological agents of wheezing in young children with acute respiratory-tract infections. In this study, we have obtained the sequence of a full-length HBoV1 genome (including both termini) using viral DNA extracted from a nasopharyngeal aspirate of an infected patient, cloned the full-length HBoV1 genome, and demonstrated DNA replication, encapsidation of the ssDNA genome, and release of the HBoV1 virions from human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The HBoV1 virions generated from this cell line-based production system exhibits a typical icosahedral structure of approximately 26 nm in diameter, and is capable of productively infecting polarized primary human airway epithelia (HAE) from the apical surface. Infected HAE showed hallmarks of lung airway-tract injury, including disruption of the tight junction barrier, loss of cilia and epithelial cell hypertrophy. Notably, polarized HAE cultured from an immortalized airway epithelial cell line, CuFi-8 (originally derived from a cystic fibrosis patient), also supported productive infection of HBoV1. Thus, we have established a reverse genetics system and generated the first cell line-based culture system for the study of HBoV1 infection, which will significantly advance the study of HBoV1 replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22956907

  13. Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum.

    PubMed

    Barr, L; Metaxas, G; Harbach, C A J; Savoy, L A; Darbre, P D

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of five esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) were measured using HPLC-MS/MS at four serial locations across the human breast from axilla to sternum using human breast tissue collected from 40 mastectomies for primary breast cancer in England between 2005 and 2008. One or more paraben esters were quantifiable in 158/160 (99%) of the tissue samples and in 96/160 (60%) all five esters were measured. Variation was notable with respect to individual paraben esters, location within one breast and similar locations in different breasts. Overall median values in nanograms per gram tissue for the 160 tissue samples were highest for n-propylparaben [16.8 (range 0-2052.7)] and methylparaben [16.6 (range 0-5102.9)]; levels were lower for n-butylparaben [5.8 (range 0-95.4)], ethylparaben [3.4 (range 0-499.7)] and isobutylparaben 2.1 (range 0-802.9). The overall median value for total paraben was 85.5 ng g(-1) tissue (range 0-5134.5). The source of the paraben cannot be identified, but paraben was measured in the 7/40 patients who reported never having used underarm cosmetics in their lifetime. No correlations were found between paraben concentrations and age of patient (37-91 years), length of breast feeding (0-23 months), tumour location or tumour oestrogen receptor content. In view of the disproportionate incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant, paraben concentrations were compared across the four regions of the breast: n-propylparaben was found at significantly higher levels in the axilla than mid (P = 0.004 Wilcoxon matched pairs) or medial (P = 0.021 Wilcoxon matched pairs) regions (P = 0.010 Friedman ANOVA).

  14. Temporal Changes of Human Breast Milk Lipids of Chinese Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Bertschy, Emmanuelle; Fontannaz, Patric; Masserey Elmelegy, Isabelle; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Marmet, Cynthia; Sanchez-Bridge, Belén; Thakkar, Sagar K.; De Castro, Carlos Antonio; Vinyes-Pares, Gerard; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA), phospholipids (PL), and gangliosides (GD) play a central role in infant growth, immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to determine FA, PL, and GD compositional changes in human milk (HM) during lactation in a large group of Chinese lactating mothers (540 volunteers) residing in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Suzhou. HM samples were collected after full expression from one breast and while the baby was fed on the other breast. FA were assessed by direct methylation followed by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. PL and GD were extracted using chloroform and methanol. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and with time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry was used to quantify PL and GD classes in HM, respectively. Saturated FA (SFA), mono-unsaturated FA (MUFA), and PL content decreased during lactation, while polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) and GD content increased. Among different cities, over the lactation time, HM from Beijing showed the highest SFA content, HM from Guangzhou the highest MUFA content and HM from Suzhou the highest n-3PUFA content. The highest total PL and GD contents were observed in HM from Suzhou. In order to investigate the influence of the diet on maternal milk composition, a careful analyses of dietary habits of these population needs to be performed in the future. PMID:27834894

  15. Temporal Changes of Human Breast Milk Lipids of Chinese Mothers.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Bertschy, Emmanuelle; Fontannaz, Patric; Masserey Elmelegy, Isabelle; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Marmet, Cynthia; Sanchez-Bridge, Belén; Thakkar, Sagar K; De Castro, Carlos Antonio; Vynes-Pares, Gerard; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2016-11-10

    Fatty acids (FA), phospholipids (PL), and gangliosides (GD) play a central role in infant growth, immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to determine FA, PL, and GD compositional changes in human milk (HM) during lactation in a large group of Chinese lactating mothers (540 volunteers) residing in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Suzhou. HM samples were collected after full expression from one breast and while the baby was fed on the other breast. FA were assessed by direct methylation followed by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. PL and GD were extracted using chloroform and methanol. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and with time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry was used to quantify PL and GD classes in HM, respectively. Saturated FA (SFA), mono-unsaturated FA (MUFA), and PL content decreased during lactation, while polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) and GD content increased. Among different cities, over the lactation time, HM from Beijing showed the highest SFA content, HM from Guangzhou the highest MUFA content and HM from Suzhou the highest n-3PUFA content. The highest total PL and GD contents were observed in HM from Suzhou. In order to investigate the influence of the diet on maternal milk composition, a careful analyses of dietary habits of these population needs to be performed in the future.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Human MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Srustidhar Das CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center...Characterization of Human MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...understand the role and implications of MUC16 cytoplasmic tail in breast cancer pathogenesis. We would like to update our findings with respect to it since

  17. Molecular Characterization of Human MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Srustidhar Das CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Nebraska Medical Center...Characterization of Human MUC16 (CA125) in Breast Cancer . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...designed to understand the role and implications of MUC16 cytoplasmic tail in breast cancer pathogenesis. We would like to update our findings with

  18. The human chemokine receptor CCRL2 suppresses chemotaxis and invasion by blocking CCL2-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei-Ping; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Bi-Yun; Hu, Xi-Chun; Shao, Zhi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Hua; Ou, Zhou-Luo

    2015-11-01

    The human chemokine receptor CCRL2 is a member of the atypical chemokine receptor family. CCRL2 is unable to couple with G-proteins and fails to induce classical chemokine signaling for the highly conserved DRYLAIV motif essential for signaling has been changed to QRYLVFL. We investigated whether CCRL2 is involved in the chemotaxis, invasion, and proliferation of human breast cancer cells. Firstly, expression of CCRL2 was determined in six breast cancer cell lines by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. Then, we established stable cell lines overexpressing CCRL2 to explore the function of CCRL2 in chemotaxis and invasion by transwell assays, and the signaling downstream was further investigated. The effect of CCRL2 on proliferation was detected by colony formation assays and tumor xenograft study. We found that stable overexpression of CCRL2 in MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells attenuated the chemotaxis and invasion stimulated by its ligand CCL2. CCRL2 inhibits p38 MAPK (p38) phosphorylation and up-regulates the expression of E-cadherin. This effect was eliminated by the inhibitor of p38 MAPK. CCRL2 inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that CCRL2 functions as a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer cells.

  19. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S

    2013-02-08

    The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F+RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F+RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F+RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F+RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F+RT was 0.885±0.013 vs. 0.622±0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599±0.045 vs. 0.475±0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472±0.021 vs. 0.380±0.018 @6 Gy RT (p=0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F+RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p<0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F+RT compared with irradiation alone. F+RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F+RT increases breast cancer cell radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. These findings have salient implications for designing clinical trials using fulvestrant and radiation therapy.

  20. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  1. Salinomycin exerts anticancer effects on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cancer stem cells via modulation of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Ma, Wei; Mao, Jun; Yu, Xiaotang; Hou, Zhenhuan; Fan, Shujun; Song, Bo; Wang, Huan; Li, Jiazhi; Kang, Le; Liu, Pixu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Lianhong

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer tissue contains a small population of cells that have the ability to self-renew, these cells are known as breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The Hedgehog signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, its aberrant activation has been shown to contribute to the development of breast cancer, making this pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Salinomycin (Sal) is a novel identified cancer stem cells (CSCs) killer, however, the molecular basis for its anticancer effects is not yet clear. In the current study, Sal's ability to modulate the activity of key elements in the Hedgehog pathway was examined in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, as well as in a subpopulation of cancer stem cells identified within this cancer cell line. We show here that Sal inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration while also inducing apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, in a subpopulation of MCF-7 cells with the CD44(+)/CD24(-) markers and high ALDH1 levels indicative of BCSCs, modulators of Hedgehog signaling Smo and Gli1 were significantly down-regulated upon treatment with Sal. These results demonstrate that Sal also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of BCSCs, further establishing it as therapeutically relevant in the context of breast cancers and also indicating that modulation of Hedgehog signaling is one potential mechanism by which it exerts these anticancer effects.

  2. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees...

  3. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for...

  4. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for...

  5. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... committees for human prescription drugs. 14.160 Section 14.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Advisory Committees for Human Prescription Drugs § 14.160 Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for...

  6. Impact of progesterone on stem/progenitor cells in the human breast.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Heidi N; Clarke, Christine L

    2015-06-01

    The epithelium of the human breast is made up of a branching ductal-lobular system, which is lined by a single layer of luminal cells surrounded by a contractile basal cell layer. The co-ordinated development of stem/progenitor cells into these luminal and basal cells is fundamentally important for breast morphogenesis. The ovarian steroid hormone, progesterone, is critical in driving proliferation and normal breast development, yet progesterone analogues have also been shown to be a major driver of breast cancer risk. Studies in recent years have revealed an important role for progesterone in stimulating the mammary stem cell compartment in the mouse mammary gland, and growing evidence supports the notion that progesterone also stimulates progenitor cells in both the normal human breast and in breast cancer cells. As changes in cell type composition are one of the hallmark features of breast cancer progression, these observations have critical implications in discerning the mechanisms of how progesterone increases breast cancer risk. This review summarises recent work regarding the impact of progesterone action on the stem/progenitor cell compartment of the human breast.

  7. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  8. Retinoids interfere with the AP1 signalling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Stephane; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    Retinoic acid and its synthetic analogs exert major effects on many biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation and are now considered as promising pharmacological agents for prevention and treatment of various cancers. The capacity of retinoids to inhibit AP1-responsive genes seems to be the basis for the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of these agents against hyperproliferative diseases. However, the molecular basis of retinoid antiproliferative properties remains to this day largely unknown. Here, we showed that retinoids inhibit phorbol ester-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression in human breast cancer cells. Transcriptional interference was observed for both retinoid agonist and antagonist treatments, revealing separated transactivation and transrepression functions of retinoids. In addition, we examined MAP kinases as potential targets of retinoid signalling in human breast cancer cells and demonstrated that retinoids repress AP1-responsive gene expression by inhibiting MKK6/p38 and mainly MEK/ERK signalling pathways. On the contrary, the JNK-dependent pathway was not identified as a molecular relay for AP1 activity and was insensitive to retinoid treatments. Finally, we established that overexpressed c-fos and c-jun partially abolished the ability of retinoids to inhibit AP1 activity, suggesting that c-jun and/or c-fos containing dimers may constitute one target of retinoids for transrepression of AP1. All together, our data help to improve our understanding of how retinoids antagonize AP1 activity and may regulate tumoral cell proliferation.

  9. Noninvasive Surface Imaging of Breast Cancer in Humans using a Hand-held Optical Imager.

    PubMed

    Erickson-Bhatt, Sarah J; Roman, Manuela; Gonzalez, Jean; Nunez, Annie; Kiszonas, Richard; Lopez-Penalver, Cristina; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2015-12-01

    X-ray mammography, the current gold standard for breast cancer detection, has a 20% false-negative rate (cancer is undetected) and increases in younger women with denser breast tissue. Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a safe (nonionizing), and relatively inexpensive method for noninvasive imaging of breast cancer in human subjects (including dense breast tissues) by providing physiological information (e.g. oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin concentration). At the Optical Imaging Laboratory, a hand-held optical imager has been developed which employs a breast contourable probe head to perform simultaneous illumination and detection of large surfaces towards near real-time imaging of human breast cancer. Gen-1 and gen-2 versions of the handheld optical imager have been developed and previously demonstrated imaging in tissue phantoms and healthy human subjects. Herein, the hand-held optical imagers are applied towards in vivo imaging of breast cancer subjects in an attempt to determine the ability of the imager to detect breast tumors. Five female human subjects (ages 51-74) diagnosed with breast cancer were imaged with the gen-1 optical imager prior to surgical intervention. One of the subjects was also imaged with the gen-2 optical imager. Both imagers use 785 nm laser diode sources and ICCD camera detectors to generate 2D surfaces maps of total hemoglobin absorption. The subjects lay in supine position and images were collected at various locations on both the ipsilateral (tumor-containing) and contralateral (non-tumor containing) breasts. The optical images (2D surface maps of optical absorption due to total hemoglobin concentration) show regions of higher intensity at the tumor location, which is indicative of increased vasculature and higher blood content due to the presence of the tumor. Additionally, a preliminary result indicates the potential to image lymphatic spread. This study demonstrates the potential of the hand-held optical devices to noninvasively image

  10. Noninvasive Surface Imaging of Breast Cancer in Humans using a Hand-held Optical Imager

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Bhatt, Sarah J.; Roman, Manuela; Gonzalez, Jean; Nunez, Annie; Kiszonas, Richard; Lopez-Penalver, Cristina; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    X-ray mammography, the current gold standard for breast cancer detection, has a 20% false-negative rate (cancer is undetected) and increases in younger women with denser breast tissue. Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a safe (nonionizing), and relatively inexpensive method for noninvasive imaging of breast cancer in human subjects (including dense breast tissues) by providing physiological information (e.g. oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin concentration). At the Optical Imaging Laboratory, a hand-held optical imager has been developed which employs a breast contourable probe head to perform simultaneous illumination and detection of large surfaces towards near real-time imaging of human breast cancer. Gen-1 and gen-2 versions of the handheld optical imager have been developed and previously demonstrated imaging in tissue phantoms and healthy human subjects. Herein, the hand-held optical imagers are applied towards in vivo imaging of breast cancer subjects in an attempt to determine the ability of the imager to detect breast tumors. Five female human subjects (ages 51–74) diagnosed with breast cancer were imaged with the gen-1 optical imager prior to surgical intervention. One of the subjects was also imaged with the gen-2 optical imager. Both imagers use 785 nm laser diode sources and ICCD camera detectors to generate 2D surfaces maps of total hemoglobin absorption. The subjects lay in supine position and images were collected at various locations on both the ipsilateral (tumor-containing) and contralateral (non-tumor containing) breasts. The optical images (2D surface maps of optical absorption due to total hemoglobin concentration) show regions of higher intensity at the tumor location, which is indicative of increased vasculature and higher blood content due to the presence of the tumor. Additionally, a preliminary result indicates the potential to image lymphatic spread. This study demonstrates the potential of the hand-held optical devices to noninvasively image

  11. Identification of differentially expressed microRNAs in human male breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The discovery of small non-coding RNAs and the subsequent analysis of microRNA expression patterns in human cancer specimens have provided completely new insights into cancer biology. Genetic and epigenetic data indicate oncogenic or tumor suppressor function of these pleiotropic regulators. Therefore, many studies analyzed the expression and function of microRNA in human breast cancer, the most frequent malignancy in females. However, nothing is known so far about microRNA expression in male breast cancer, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Methods The expression of 319 microRNAs was analyzed in 9 primary human male breast tumors and in epithelial cells from 15 male gynecomastia specimens using fluorescence-labeled bead technology. For identification of differentially expressed microRNAs data were analyzed by cluster analysis and selected statistical methods. Expression levels were validated for the most up- or down-regulated microRNAs in this training cohort using real-time PCR methodology as well as in an independent test cohort comprising 12 cases of human male breast cancer. Results Unsupervised cluster analysis separated very well male breast cancer samples and control specimens according to their microRNA expression pattern indicating cancer-specific alterations of microRNA expression in human male breast cancer. miR-21, miR519d, miR-183, miR-197, and miR-493-5p were identified as most prominently up-regulated, miR-145 and miR-497 as most prominently down-regulated in male breast cancer. Conclusions Male breast cancer displays several differentially expressed microRNAs. Not all of them are shared with breast cancer biopsies from female patients indicating male breast cancer specific alterations of microRNA expression. PMID:20331864

  12. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Alpha Cyano-4-Hydroxy-3-Methoxycinnamic Acid Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. PMID:24039831

  14. Alpha cyano-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer.

  15. From bench to bedside: What do we know about hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e., estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR-) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease.

  16. From bench to bedside: what do we know about Hormone Receptor-positive and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e. estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2−) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR−) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease. PMID:25998416

  17. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  18. Development of anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms with accurate dielectric properties for modeling microwave interactions with the human breast.

    PubMed

    Zastrow, Earl; Davis, Shakti K; Lazebnik, Mariya; Kelcz, Frederick; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2008-12-01

    Computational electromagnetics models of microwave interactions with the human breast serve as an invaluable tool for exploring the feasibility of new technologies and improving design concepts related to microwave breast cancer detection and treatment. In this paper, we report the development of a collection of anatomically realistic 3-D numerical breast phantoms of varying shape, size, and radiographic density which can readily be used in finite-difference time-domain computational electromagnetics models. The phantoms are derived from T1-weighted MRIs of prone patients. Each MRI is transformed into a uniform grid of dielectric properties using several steps. First, the structure of each phantom is identified by applying image processing techniques to the MRI. Next, the voxel intensities of the MRI are converted to frequency-dependent and tissue-dependent dielectric properties of normal breast tissues via a piecewise-linear map. The dielectric properties of normal breast tissue are taken from the recently completed large-scale experimental study of normal breast tissue dielectric properties conducted by the Universities of Wisconsin and Calgary. The comprehensive collection of numerical phantoms is made available to the scientific community through an online repository.

  19. Development of Anatomically Realistic Numerical Breast Phantoms with Accurate Dielectric Properties for Modeling Microwave Interactions with the Human Breast

    PubMed Central

    Zastrow, Earl; Davis, Shakti K.; Lazebnik, Mariya; Kelcz, Frederick; Van Veen, Barry D.; Hagness, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Computational electromagnetics models of microwave interactions with the human breast serve as an invaluable tool for exploring the feasibility of new technologies and improving design concepts related to microwave breast cancer detection and treatment. In this paper we report the development of a collection of anatomically realistic 3D numerical breast phantoms of varying shape, size, and radiographic density which can be readily used in FDTD computational electromagnetics models. The phantoms are derived from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of prone patients. Each MRI is transformed into a uniform grid of dielectric properties using several steps. First, the structure of each phantom is identified by applying image processing techniques to the MRI. Next, the voxel intensities of the MRI are converted to frequency-dependent and tissue-dependent dielectric properties of normal breast tissues via a piecewise-linear map. The dielectric properties of normal breast tissue are taken from the recently completed large-scale experimental study of normal breast tissue dielectric properties conducted by the Universities of Wisconsin and Calgary. The comprehensive collection of numerical phantoms is made available to the scientific community through an online repository. PMID:19126460

  20. Role of Nuclear Matrix in Estrogen Regulated Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    A novel retinoic acid receptor alpha gene in human breast carcinoma fusion between MOZ and the nuclear receptor coactivator TIF2 cells is mediated...Gene Expression in Human Breast DAMD17-96-1-6269 Cancer Cells 6 . AUTHORIS) Laurel T. Holth, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...kinases (serine/threonine or tyrosine) (99). Criteria for selection NMBCs 1-5 in ER+ human breast tumours and NMBC 6 in were similar to that of the 10T

  1. "A novel in vivo model for the study of human breast cancer metastasis using primary breast tumor-initiating cells from patient biopsies"

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study of breast cancer metastasis depends on the use of established breast cancer cell lines that do not accurately represent the heterogeneity and complexity of human breast tumors. A tumor model was developed using primary breast tumor-initiating cells isolated from patient core biopsies that would more accurately reflect human breast cancer metastasis. Methods Tumorspheres were isolated under serum-free culture conditions from core biopsies collected from five patients with clinical diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Isolated tumorspheres were transplanted into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice to establish tumorigenicity in vivo. Tumors and metastatic lesions were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin (H+E) staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Tumorspheres were successfully isolated from all patient core biopsies, independent of the estrogen receptor α (ERα)/progesterone receptor (PR)/Her2/neu status or tumor grade. Each tumorsphere was estimated to contain 50-100 cells. Transplantation of 50 tumorspheres (1-5 × 103 cells) in combination with Matrigel into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice resulted in small, palpable tumors that were sustained up to 12 months post-injection. Tumors were serially transplanted three times by re-isolation of tumorspheres from the tumors and injection into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. At 3 months post-injection, micrometastases to the lung, liver, kidneys, brain and femur were detected by measuring content of human chromosome 17. Visible macrometastases were detected in the lung, liver and kidneys by 6 months post-injection. Primary tumors variably expressed cytokeratins, Her2/neu, cytoplasmic E-cadherin, nuclear β catenin and fibronectin but were negative for ERα and vimentin. In lung and liver metastases, variable redistribution of E-cadherin and β catenin to the membrane of tumor cells was observed. ERα was re-expressed in lung metastatic cells in two of five samples. Conclusions

  2. Exploring the stem cell and non-stem cell constituents of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Indumathi, S; Dhanasekaran, M; Rajkumar, J S; Sudarsanam, D

    2013-05-01

    The immense potency of nutritional components of human breast milk and importance of breastfeeding is known worldwide. Recent researches had identified stem cells as integral component of human breast milk. Nevertheless, there is little proof of evidence on the stem cell constituents of breast milk. It is imperative to explore the cellular constituents of human breast milk, including of stem cells, to open new avenue in child's development and regeneration. Thus, we aimed at identifying the cellular constituents of human breast milk by phenotypic characterisation of diverse cell surface markers of hematopoietic stem cells (CD 34, CD 133, CD 117), mesenchymal stem cells (CD 90, CD 105, CD 73), myoepithelial cells (CD 29, CD 44), Immune cells (CD 209, CD 86, CD 83, CD 14, CD 13, HLADR, CD 45), as well as cell adhesion molecules (CD 31, CD 54, CD 166, CD 106, CD 49d), and other markers (ABCG2, CD140b) using flowcytometry. We found a lower expression of CD 34 (13.07 ± 2.0 %), CD 90 (7.79 ± 0.8 %) and CD 73 (2.19 ± 0.41 %), indicating scanty hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell population in human breast milk. On contrary, myoepithelial progenitors, cell adhesion molecules, immune cells and growth factors were identified as the major constituents of breast milk. Overall, this study illuminates the benefits of breast feeding as breast milk encompasses heterogeneous cellular components that benefits child's growth, immunity and development. However, further research on these constituents of human breast milk will widen their applicability in treatment of neonatal disorders.

  3. Human chorionic gonadotropin decreases human breast cancer cell proliferation and promotes differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Yue; Wang, Nan; Yan, Ting-Bao; Xing, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Dong-Wei; Li, Yan-Qi; Liu, Long-Yue; Sun, Xue-Guang; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2014-05-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein produced by placental trophoblasts. Previous studies indicated that hCG could be responsible for the pregnancy-induced protection against breast cancer in women. It is reported that hCG decreases proliferation and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Our research also demonstrates that hCG can reduce the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by downregulating the expression of proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and proliferation-related Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67). Interestingly, we find here that hCG elevates the state of cellular differentiation, as characterized by the upregulation of differentiation markers, β-casein, cytokeratin-18 (CK-18), and E-cadherin. Inhibition of hCG secretion or luteinizing hormone/hCG receptors (LH/hCGRs) synthesis can weaken the effect of hCG on the induction of cell differentiation. Furthermore, hCG can suppress the expression of estrogen receptor alpha. hCG activated receptor-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A signaling pathway. These findings indicated that a protective effect of hCG against breast cancer may be associated with its growth inhibitory and differentiation induction function in breast cancer cells.

  4. Free β-human chorionic gonadotropin, total human chorionic gonadotropin and maternal risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toriola, Adetunji T; Tolockiene, Egle; Schock, Helena; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Wadell, Goran; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva; Grankvist, Kjell; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) would provide additional information to that provided by total hCG alone and thus be useful in future epidemiological studies relating hCG to maternal breast cancer risk. Materials & methods Cases (n = 159) and controls (n = 286) were a subset of our previous study within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort on total hCG during primiparous pregnancy and breast cancer risk. Results The associations between total hCG (hazard ratio: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.27), free β-hCG (hazard ratio: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.33–2.18) and maternal risk of breast cancer were very similar in all analyses and mutual adjustment for either one had minor effects on the risk estimates. Conclusion In the absence of a reliable assay on intact hCG, total hCG alone can be used in epidemiological studies investigating hCG and breast cancer risk, as free β-hCG does not appear to provide any additional information. PMID:24559445

  5. Absence of human papillomavirus sequences in epithelial breast cancer in a Mexican female population.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Romano, Lisbeth; Fernández-Tamayo, Nora; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Reyes-Cardoso, Juan M; Ortiz-Gutierrez, Felipe; Ceballos, Guillermo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Piña, Patricia; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2012-09-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in breast cancer is controversial. We evaluated 118 breast carcinomas and two paraffin-embedded tissues of lesions of the nipple of Mexican patients for HPV sequences. No carcinoma sample exhibited koilocytosis, in contrast to lesions of the nipple. We subjected purified DNAs to PCR employing two HPV16/E6 or GP5/6 primer set oligonucleotides. Results showed that HPV DNA sequences were absent in the breast tissues. Absence of HPV in breast carcinoma failed to support an association between HPV infection and this carcinoma.

  6. Cadmium malignantly transforms normal human breast epithelial cells into a basal-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Tokar, Erik J; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Dill, Anna L; Coppin, Jean-François; Waalkes, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Breast cancer has recently been linked to cadmium exposure. Although not uniformly supported, it is hypothesized that cadmium acts as a metalloestrogenic carcinogen via the estrogen receptor (ER). Thus, we studied the effects of chronic exposure to cadmium on the normal human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, which is ER-negative but can convert to ER-positive during malignant transformation. Cells were continuously exposed to low-level cadmium (2.5 muM) and checked in vitro and by xenograft study for signs of malignant transformation. Transformant cells were molecularly characterized by protein and transcript analysis of key genes in breast cancer. Over 40 weeks of cadmium exposure, cells showed increasing secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9, loss of contact inhibition, increased colony formation, and increasing invasion, all typical for cancer cells. Inoculation of cadmium-treated cells into mice produced invasive, metastatic anaplastic carcinoma with myoepithelial components. These cadmium-transformed breast epithelial (CTBE) cells displayed characteristics of basal-like breast carcinoma, including ER-alpha negativity and HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) negativity, reduced expression of BRCA1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 1), and increased CK5 (cytokeratin 5) and p63 expression. CK5 and p63, both breast stem cell markers, were prominently overexpressed in CTBE cell mounds, indicative of persistent proliferation. CTBE cells showed global DNA hypomethylation and c-myc and k-ras overexpression, typical in aggressive breast cancers. CTBE cell xenograft tumors were also ER-alpha negative. Cadmium malignantly transforms normal human breast epithelial cells-through a mechanism not requiring ER-alpha-into a basal-like cancer phenotype. Direct cadmium induction of a malignant phenotype in human breast epithelial cells strongly fortifies a potential role in breast cancer.

  7. Individual characterisation of the metastatic capacity of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heimann, R; Hellman, S

    2000-08-01

    The clinical implications of understanding the invasive and metastatic proclivities of an individual patient's tumour are substantial because the choice of systemic therapy needs to be guided by the likelihood of occult metastasis as well as by knowing when the metastases will become overt. Malignant potential is dynamic, progressing throughout the natural history of a tumour. Required of tumours is the development of critical phenotypic attributes: growth, angiogenesis, invasion and metastagenicity. Characterisation of the extent of tumour progression with regard to these major tumour phenotypes should allow the fashioning of individual therapy for each patient. To examine the clinical parameters and molecularly characterise the metastatic proclivity we have been studying a series of regionally treated breast cancer patients who received no systemic therapy and have long follow-up. Clinically we describe two parameters: metastagenicity - the metastatic proclivity of a tumour, and virulence--the rate at which these metastases appear. Both attributes increase with tumour size and nodal involvement. However, within each clinical group there is a cured population, even in those with extensive nodal involvement, underscoring the heterogeneity of breast cancers within each group and the need for further molecular characterisation. Using biomarkers that characterise the malignant phenotype we have determined that there is progression in the phenotypic changes. Angiogenesis and loss of nm23 are earlier events than the loss of E-cadherin, or abnormalities in TP53. The strongest biomarkers of poor prognosis are p53 and E-cadherin, but even when both are abnormal 42% of node-negative patients are cured indicating that other determinative steps need to occur before successful metastases are established. Identification of these critical later events will further increase the efficacy of determining the malignant capacities of individual tumours.

  8. Organochlorine residues in human breast milk: analysis through a sentinel practice network.

    PubMed Central

    Schlaud, M; Seidler, A; Salje, A; Behrendt, W; Schwartz, F W; Ende, M; Knoll, A; Grugel, C

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to assess through a sentinel practice network the validity of data on levels of organochlorine residues in human milk along with personal, lifestyle, and exposure variables of breastfeeding women; to compare the results of this new approach with those of the Lower Saxony breast milk surveillance programme; and to test hypotheses on potential determinants of contamination levels. DESIGN--Eligible women were enrolled into this cross sectional study by a network of 51 paediatric practices when bringing their babies for a U3 infant screening examination (4th to 6th week after delivery). Lifestyle and exposure factors were obtained by questionnaire. All milk samples were analysed for hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorbenzole, DDT, dieldrin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and heptachlor; half the samples were also analysed for dioxin. Analytic statistics were computed using polychotomous logistic regression (PLR). SETTING--The study was conducted in Lower Saxony, Germany, from summer 1992 to summer 1993. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 156 primiparous, breast feeding German women, aged 25-35 years, who had been born and had grown up in West Germany, were studied. MAIN RESULTS--Compared with the regular programme, participants in this study had their milk analysed sooner after delivery and were more likely to have grown up in rural areas, less likely to have been exposed to hazardous substances, less likely to have a diet of health food, and slightly less likely to be a smoker at the time of the study. Breast milk contamination levels were comparable in both studies, and in all but two cases well below the tolerable concentrations established by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Fellowship). After adjustment for potential confounders using polychotomous logistic regression, there were statistically significant positive associations between breast milk contamination and age (PCB, test for trend: p = 0.006), average dietary fat

  9. Human Adipocytes Stimulate Invasion of Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells by Secreting IGFBP-2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Gao, Chao; Meng, Kui; Qiao, Haishi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims A better understanding of the effects of human adipocytes on breast cancer cells may lead to the development of new treatment strategies. We explored the effects of adipocytes on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods To study the reciprocal effects of adipocytes and cancer cells, we co-cultured human mature adipocytes and breast cancer cells in a system devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To analyze the factors that were secreted from adipocytes and that affected the invasive abilities of breast cancer cells, we detected different cytokines in various co-culture media. To study the communication of mature adipocytes and breast cancer cells in vivo, we chose 10 metastatic pathologic samples and 10 non-metastatic pathologic samples to do immunostaining. Results The co-culture media of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human mature adipocytes increased motility of MCF-7 cells. In addition, MMP-2 was remarkably up-regulated, whereas E-cadherin was down-regulated in these MCF-7 cells. Based on our co-culture medium chip results, we chose four candidate cytokines and tested their influence on metastasis individually. We found that IGFBP-2 enhanced the invasion ability of MCF-7 cells in vitro more prominently than did the other factors. In vivo, metastatic human breast tumors had higher levels of MMP-2 than did non-metastatic tumor tissue, whereas adipocytes around metastatic breast tumors had higher levels of IGFBP-2 than did adipocytes surrounding non-metastatic breast tumors. Conclusions IGFBP-2 secreted by mature adipocytes plays a key role in promoting the metastatic ability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PMID:25747684

  10. Multinutrient fortification of human breast milk for preterm infants following hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Young, Lauren; Embleton, Nicholas D; McCormick, Felicia M; McGuire, William

    2013-02-28

    Preterm infants are usually growth restricted at hospital discharge. Feeding preterm infants after hospital discharge with multinutrient fortified breast milk rather than unfortified breast milk may facilitate more rapid catch-up growth and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. To determine the effect of feeding preterm infants following hospital discharge with multinutrient fortified human breast milk versus unfortified breast milk on growth and development. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL (until August 2012), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm infants following hospital discharge with multinutrient fortified breast milk compared with unfortified human breast milk. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two review authors and synthesis of data using risk ratio, risk difference and mean difference. We identified two small trials involving a total of 246 infants. These did not provide evidence that multinutrient fortification of breast milk for three to four months after hospital discharge affected rates of growth during infancy. One trial assessed infants at 18 months corrected age and did not find any statistically significant effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes. The limited available data do not provide convincing evidence that feeding preterm infants with multinutrient fortified breast milk compared with unfortified breast milk following hospital discharge affects important outcomes including growth rates during infancy. There are no data on long-term growth. Since fortifying breast milk for infants fed directly from the breast is logistically difficult

  11. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  12. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  13. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer.

  14. Potential Angiogenic Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Sapino, Anna; Bussolati, Benedetta; Ghisolfi, Gianpiero; Rizea-Savu, Simona; Silvestro, Luigi; Lupia, Enrico; Camussi, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34- and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested. PMID:9811351

  15. Potential angiogenic role of platelet-activating factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Sapino, A; Bussolati, B; Ghisolfi, G; Rizea-Savu, S; Silvestro, L; Lupia, E; Camussi, G

    1998-11-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34-and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested.

  16. A prospective assessment of surgical risk factors in 400 cases of skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with implants to establish selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Woerdeman, Leonie A E; Hage, J Joris; Hofland, Marjolein M I; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2007-02-01

    Although attempts have been made to identify the risk factors leading to complications after combined skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction, hardly any criteria are available to preoperatively distinguish patients in whom such an eventful postoperative course may be expected. Therefore, the authors wanted to establish which factors increase the risk of surgical complications to such a level as to adjust their indications for immediate breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy. The authors prospectively studied the clinical relevance of six patient-related and nine procedure-related characteristics as potential risk factors for a complicated surgical outcome in 400 combined procedures in 309 patients by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Risk factors that proved significantly correlated with loss of implant by both analyses were accepted as clinical selection criteria that distinguish potential candidates with an unacceptably high risk of such loss. Mild complications occurred significantly more often in patients who were older than the mean age of 43 years and in breasts that were more than average sized or operated on by a fellow in oncologic surgery. Implants were lost significantly more often in patients who were obese or smoked and in breasts that were more than average sized. The clinically relevant increase of risk of implant loss should lead to reluctance to perform combined skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction in obese patients who smoke (32 percent loss) and in those with more than average sized breasts (27 percent loss).

  17. Epidermal growth factor-like proteins in breast fluid and human milk.

    PubMed

    Connolly, J M; Rose, D P

    1988-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), and the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) family of proteins, which also bind to the EGF receptor, have been associated with human breast cancer. The total EGF-like proteins were determined by a radioreceptor assay, and TGF-alpha by radioimmunoassay, in human milk and breast fluid samples. The breast fluids were collected by nipple aspiration from healthy premenopausal women. Both the 24 milks and 18 breast fluids assayed contained EGF-like proteins, at concentrations ranging from 32-600 ng/ml (median, 140 ng/ml), and 62-654 ng/ml (median, 205 ng/ml) respectively. Immunoreactive TGF-alpha proteins were detected at higher levels in 21 breast fluids (range, 0-50.0; median 5.1 ng/ml) than in 24 milk samples (range, 0-8.4; median, 0.8 ng/ml).

  18. A Renewable Tissue Resource of Phenotypically Stable, Biologically and Ethnically Diverse, Patient-derived Human Breast Cancer Xenograft (PDX) Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Claerhout, Sofie; Pratt, Aleix; Dobrolecki, Lacey E.; Petrovic, Ivana; Lai, Qing; Landis, Melissa D.; Wiechmann, Lisa; Schiff, Rachel; Giuliano, Mario; Wong, Helen; Fuqua, Suzanne W.; Contreras, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Carolina; Huang, Jian; Mao, Sufeng; Pavlick, Anne C.; Froehlich, Amber M.; Wu, Meng-Fen; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Chen, Edward S.; Zuloaga, Pavel; Shaw, Chad A.; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chang, Jenny C.; Lewis, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer research is hampered by difficulties in obtaining and studying primary human breast tissue, and by the lack of in vivo preclinical models that reflect patient tumor biology accurately. To overcome these limitations, we propagated a cohort of human breast tumors grown in the epithelium-free mammary fat pad of SCID/Beige and NOD/SCID/IL2γ-receptor null (NSG) mice, under a series of transplant conditions. Both models yielded stably transplantable xenografts at comparably high rates (~21% and ~19%, respectively). Of the conditions tested, xenograft take rate was highest in the presence of a low-dose estradiol pellet. Overall, 32 stably transplantable xenograft lines were established, representing 25 unique patients. Most tumors yielding xenografts were “triple-negative” (ER-PR-HER2+) (n=19). However, we established lines from three ER-PR-HER2+ tumors, one ER+PR-HER2−, one ER+PR+HER2− and one “triple-positive” (ER+PR+HER2+) tumor. Serially passaged xenografts show biological consistency with the tumor of origin, are phenotypically stable across multiple transplant generations at the histologic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and genomic levels, and show comparable treatment responses as those observed clinically. Xenografts representing 12 patients, including two ER+ lines, showed metastasis to the mouse lung. These models thus serve as a renewable, quality-controlled tissue resource for preclinical studies investigating treatment response and metastasis. PMID:23737486

  19. Establishment of human tumoral ependymal cell lines and coculture with tubular-like human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C; Lelong-Rebel, I; Mottolèse, C; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Saint Pierre, G; Rebel, G; Belin, M F

    2002-10-01

    Ependymomas, rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, occur predominantly in children. They are highly vascularized, and histological findings show many perivascular rosettes of tumoral cells radially organized around capillaries. Treatment of ependymomas relies on surgery combined with radio- or chemotherapy, but the efficiency of chemotherapy is limited, probably because of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Progress in the therapy of these neoplasms is dramatically limited by the absence of cell line models. We established conditions for the long-term culture of human tumoral ependymocytes and their 3D coculture in Matrigel with endothelial cells. Histological, immunological, and ultrastructural studies showed that the morphological features (microvilli, cilia, and caveolae) of these cultured cells were similar to those of the tumor in vivo. The cells expressed potential oncological markers related to the immature state of tumoral cells (nestin and Notch-1), their tumorigenicity [caveolae and epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)], or the MDR phenotype [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. The expression of P-gp, EGF-R, and caveolin-1 by these tumoral ependymocytes could be useful in studies on new drugs. This coculture model might represent a new powerful tool to study new therapeutic delivery strategies in tumoral cells.

  20. Differential transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Helene; Bredie, Wender L P; Mølgaard, Christian; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Møller, Per

    2008-09-03

    Transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human milk is believed to constitute the infant's early flavour experiences. This study reports on the time-dependent transfer of flavour compounds from the mother's diet to her breast milk using a within-subject design. Eighteen lactating mothers completed three test days on which they provided a baseline milk sample prior to ingestion of capsules containing 100 mg d-carvone, l-menthol, 3-methylbutyl acetate and trans-anethole. Milk samples were collected 2, 4, 6 and 8 h post-ingestion and analysed by a dynamic headspace method and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The recovery quantities were adjusted for variations in milk fat content. Concentration-time profiles for d-carvone and trans-anethole revealed a maximum around 2 h post-ingestion, whereas the profile for l-menthol showed a plateau pattern. The ester 3-methylbutyl acetate could not be detected in the milk, but a single determination showed traces (<0.4 ppb) in a 1 h milk collection. Flavour compounds appeared to be transmitted differentially from the mother's diet to her milk. The results imply that human milk provides a reservoir for time-dependent chemosensory experiences to the infant; however, volatiles from the diet are transferred selectively and in relatively low amounts.

  1. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  2. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K. V.; Schrey, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  3. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  4. Ultra-small volume interdigital sensors for the measurement of human breast milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, A.; Pang, W. W.; Lai, C. T.; Hartmann, P.

    2007-12-01

    A palm-size interdigital impedance sensor incorporating a 10 μL sample reservoir, temperature sensor and hybrid heater was fabricated to determine the feasibility of measuring macronutrients in ultra-small volumes of human breast milk. Comparisons with previous measurements of homogenized cows milk show excellent agreement with fat measurement. Human breast milk however shows no correlation with fat but a surprising correlation with protein. Our investigations and proposed methods to improve the correlation and measurement accuracy are discussed.

  5. Polyamine Analogues as Novel Anti-HER Family Agents in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining...protein in multiple human breast cancer cell lines. This suppression is both time and dose dependent. A relationship between oligoamine structure, growth...EGFR and HER2 protein in several human breast cancer cell lines as documented by Western blot analysis. These studies were extended to evaluate the time

  6. The Impact of Epithelial Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0357 TITLE: The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2013 – 14 Sept 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0357 The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast...crista.thompson@mail.mcgill.ca 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Royal

  7. Iron sufficiency in breast-fed infants and the availability of iron from human milk.

    PubMed

    McMillan, J A; Landaw, S A; Oski, F A

    1976-11-01

    Four infants were studied who had been exclusively breast-fed for periods varying from 8 to 18 months. All had grown sufficiently to have exhausted their prenatally acquired iron endowment with respect to meeting current needs for maintaining normal hemoglobin levels. All infants had normal hemoglobin values and normal serum iron values. Studies of iron absorption from breast milk and cow's milk were performed in ten normal adults. The absorption of iron from the human milk was significantly higher. These findings suggest that the iron present in human milk is sufficient to meet the iron requirements of the exclusively breast-fed infant until he approximately triples his birthweight.

  8. Comparison of methods for the isolation of human breast epithelial and myoepithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zubeldia-Plazaola, Arantzazu; Ametller, Elisabet; Mancino, Mario; Prats de Puig, Miquel; López-Plana, Anna; Guzman, Flavia; Vinyals, Laia; Pastor-Arroyo, Eva M.; Almendro, Vanessa; Fuster, Gemma; Gascón, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Two lineages, epithelial, and myoepithelial cells are the main cell populations in the normal mammary gland and in breast cancer. Traditionally, cancer research has been performed using commercial cell lines, but primary cell cultures obtained from fresh breast tissue are a powerful tool to study more reliably new aspects of mammary gland biology, including normal and pathological conditions. Nevertheless, the methods described to date have some technical problems in terms of cell viability and yield, which hamper work with primary mammary cells. Therefore, there is a need to optimize technology for the proper isolation of epithelial and myoepithelial cells. For this reason, we compared four methods in an effort to improve the isolation and primary cell culture of different cell populations of human mammary epithelium. The samples were obtained from healthy tissue of patients who had undergone mammoplasty or mastectomy surgery. We based our approaches on previously described methods, and incorporated additional steps to ameliorate technical efficiency and increase cell survival. We determined cell growth and viability by phase-contrast images, growth curve analysis and cell yield, and identified cell-lineage specific markers by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence in 3D cell cultures. These techniques allowed us to better evaluate the functional capabilities of these two main mammary lineages, using CD227/K19 (epithelial cells) and CD10/K14 (myoepithelial cells) antigens. Our results show that slow digestion at low enzymatic concentration combined with the differential centrifugation technique is the method that best fits the main goal of the present study: protocol efficiency and cell survival yield. In summary, we propose some guidelines to establish primary mammary epithelial cell lines more efficiently and to provide us with a strong research instrument to better understand the role of different epithelial cell types in the origin of breast cancer. PMID

  9. Breast-milk infectivity in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Barbra A; John-Stewart, Grace C; Hughes, James P; Nduati, Ruth; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Overbaugh, Julie; Kreiss, Joan K

    2003-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is transmitted through blood, genital secretions, and breast milk. The probability of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 per sex act is.0003-.0015, but little is known regarding the risk of transmission per breast-milk exposure. We evaluated the probability of breast-milk transmission of HIV-1 per liter of breast milk ingested and per day of breast-feeding in a study of children born to HIV-1-infected mothers. The probability of breast-milk transmission of HIV-1 was.00064 per liter ingested and.00028 per day of breast-feeding. Breast-milk infectivity was significantly higher for mothers with more-advanced disease, as measured by prenatal HIV-1 RNA plasma levels and CD4 cell counts. The probability of HIV-1 infection per liter of breast milk ingested by an infant is similar in magnitude to the probability of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 per unprotected sex act in adults.

  10. Apoptotic effect of tannic acid on fatty acid synthase over-expressed human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fangyuan; Liang, Yan; Jiang, Bing; Li, Xiabing; Xun, Hang; He, Wei; Lau, Hay Tong; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Novel therapies and chemo-therapeutic drugs are urgently needed to be developed for the treatment of breast cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that fatty acid synthase (FAS) plays an important role in breast cancer, for the expression of FAS is significantly higher in human breast cancer cells than in normal cells. Tannic acid (TA), a natural polyphenol, possesses significant biological functions, including bacteriostasis, hemostasis, and anti-oxidant. Our previous studies demonstrated that TA is a natural FAS inhibitor whose inhibitory activity is stronger than that of classical FAS inhibitors, such as C75 and cerulenin. This study further assessed the effect and therapeutic potential of TA on FAS over-expressed breast cancer cells, and as a result, TA had been proven to possess the functions of inhibiting intracellular FAS activity, down-regulating FAS expression in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Since high-expressed FAS is recognized as a molecular marker for breast cancer and plays an important role in cancer prognosis, these findings suggest that TA is a potential drug candidate for treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Expected resolution and detectability of adenocarcinoma tumors within human breast in time-resolved images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Nossal, Ralph J.; Dadmarz, Roya; Schwartzentruber, Douglas; Bonner, Robert F.

    1995-04-01

    The prospects for time-resolved optical mammography rests on the ability to detect adenocarcinoma within the breast with sufficient resolution and specificity to compete with X-ray mammography. We characterized the optical properties of an unusually large (6 cm diameter) fresh adenocarcinoma and normal breast tissue (determined by histology to be predominantly adipose tissue) obtained from a patient undergoing mastectomy. Large specimens (5 mm thick and 3 cm wide) allowed the determination of absorption and scattering coefficients and their spatial heterogeneity as probed with a 1 mm diameter laser beam at 633 nm and 800 nm utilizing total reflectance and transmittance measure with integrating spheres. The difference between scattering coefficients of the malignant tumor and those of normal (principally adipose) breast tissue at 633 nm was much greater than the heterogeneity within each sample. This scattering difference is the principal source of contrast, particularly in time-resolved images. However, the high scattering coefficient of normal breast tissue at 633 nm limits the practicality of time-resolved mammography of a human breast compressed to 5 cm. Although the scattering coefficient of the normal breast tissue decreases at 800 nm, the differences between the optical properties of normal and abnormal breast tissue also are reduced. We used these empirical results in theoretical expressions obtained from random walk theory to quantify the expected resolution, contrast, and the detected intensity of 3, 6, and 9 mm tumors within otherwise homogeneous human breasts as a function of the gating-time of time-resolved optical mammography.

  12. Methylation of the DFNA5 increases risk of lymph node metastasis in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Lebron, Cinthia; Nagpal, Jatin K; Chae, Young Kwang; Chang, Xiaofei; Huang, Yiping; Chuang, Tony; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A; Califano, Joseph A; Sidransky, David

    2008-05-23

    The pathogenesis of breast cancer involves multiple genetic and epigenetic events. In this study, we report an epigenetic alteration of DFNA5 in human breast cancer. DFNA5 gene was silenced in breast cancer cell lines that were methylated in the DFNA5 promoter, and restored by treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-dC, and gene knock-down of DFNA5 increased cellular invasiveness in vitro. The mRNA expression of DFNA5 in breast cancer tissues was down-regulated as compared to normal tissues. Moreover, the DFNA5 promoter was found to be methylated in primary tumor tissues with high frequency (53%, 18/34). Quantitative methylation-specific PCR of DFNA5 clearly discriminated primary breast cancer tissues from normal breast tissues (15.3%, 2/13). Moreover, methylation status of DFNA5 was correlated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Our data implicate DFNA5 promoter methylation as a novel molecular biomarker in human breast cancer.

  13. Methylation of the DFNA5 increases risk of lymph node metastasis in human breast cancer ☆

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Lebron, Cinthia; Nagpal, Jatin K.; Chae, Young Kwang; Chang, Xiaofei; Huang, Yiping; Chuang, Tony; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sidransky, David

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of breast cancer involves multiple genetic and epigenetic events. In this study, we report an epigenetic alteration of DFNA5 in human breast cancer. DFNA5 gene was silenced in breast cancer cell lines that were methylated in the DFNA5 promoter, and restored by treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-dC, and gene knock-down of DFNA5 increased cellular invasiveness in vitro. The mRNA expression of DFNA5 in breast cancer tissues was down-regulated as compared to normal tissues. Moreover, the DFNA5 promoter was found to be methylated in primary tumor tissues with high frequency (53%, 18/34). Quantitative methylation-specific PCR of DFNA5 clearly discriminated primary breast cancer tissues from normal breast tissues (15.3%, 2/13). Moreover, methylation status of DFNA5 was correlated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Our data implicate DFNA5 promoter methylation as a novel molecular biomarker in human breast cancer. PMID:18346456

  14. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  15. Human breast cancer associated fibroblasts exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which prognosis and treatment strategies are largely governed by the receptor status (estrogen, progesterone and Her2) of the tumor cells. Gene expression profiling of whole breast tumors further stratifies breast cancer into several molecular subtypes which also co-segregate with the receptor status of the tumor cells. We postulated that cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) within the tumor stroma may exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles and thus contribute to the biology of the disease in a subtype specific manner. Several studies have reported gene expression profile differences between CAFs and normal breast fibroblasts but in none of these studies were the results stratified based on tumor subtypes. Methods To address whether gene expression in breast cancer associated fibroblasts varies between breast cancer subtypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of early passage primary CAFs isolated from twenty human breast cancer samples representing three main subtypes; seven ER+, seven triple negative (TNBC) and six Her2+. Results We observed significant expression differences between CAFs derived from Her2+ breast cancer and CAFs from TNBC and ER + cancers, particularly in pathways associated with cytoskeleton and integrin signaling. In the case of Her2+ breast cancer, the signaling pathways found to be selectively up regulated in CAFs likely contribute to the enhanced migration of breast cancer cells in transwell assays and may contribute to the unfavorable prognosis of Her2+ breast cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in addition to the distinct molecular profiles that characterize the neoplastic cells, CAF gene expression is also differentially regulated in distinct subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:22954256

  16. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  17. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Zach S; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V; Tamaresis, John S; Bachmann, Michael H; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J; Contag, Christopher H; King, Bonnie L

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  19. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Mahmoud M; Wu, Weijuan; Cao, Amy; Mondalek, Fadee G; Fung, Kar-Ming; Shih, Pin-Tsen; Fang, Yu-Ting; Woolley, Cole; Young, Gary; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2011-12-15

    Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 °C for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 °C hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra essential oil

  20. Collaborative study to establish human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2006-11-01

    A study was carried out by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) as part of the joint Biological Standardisation Programme of the Council of Europe and the European Commission with the aim to establish replacement batches of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) human immunoglobulin Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 2. Twenty-eight laboratories participated in this study. The suitability of the candidate reference preparations to serve as working references in the tests for distribution of the molecular size, anticomplementary activity and Fc function, in accordance with the specifications of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918), Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Anti-T lymphocyte immunoglobulin for human use, animal (1928) was demonstrated. The candidates were therefore established as human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and Human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1. The prescribed use of the latter BRP is limited to the test for distribution of molecular size.

  1. Intratumoral oestrone sulphatase activity as a prognostic marker in human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. R.; Rowlands, M. G.; Law, M.; Coombes, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Oestrone sulphatase is an important source of local synthesis of biologically active oestrogens in human breast cancer. The oestrone sulphatase enzyme in the particulate fraction of human breast carcinoma was characterised. The Km was 8.91 microM, and the Vmax was 0.022 nmol min-1 mg-1. Oestrone sulphatase activity was detected in 93 of 104 human breast carcinoma samples (89%), and mean activity was 0.041 nmol min-1 mg-1 (range 0-0.399 nmol min-1 mg-1). There was no significant correlation between intratumoral oestrone sulphatase activity and oestrogen receptor status, or with any other prognostic factors. Intratumoral enzyme levels were not associated with time to recurrence or with overall survival time. It thus appears that, although a useful source of intratumoral oestrogens, oestrone sulphatase activity is not of prognostic significance in breast carcinoma. PMID:8123487

  2. A new cell line (8701-BC) from primary ductal infiltrating carcinoma of human breast.

    PubMed Central

    Minafra, S.; Morello, V.; Glorioso, F.; La Fiura, A. M.; Tomasino, R. M.; Feo, S.; McIntosh, D.; Woolley, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    A cell line, designated 8701-BC, was established in culture from tissue fragments of primary ductal infiltrating carcinoma of human breast. The cell cultures after the sixth passage were devoid of contaminating fibroblasts as judged by the positive staining of all cells with the specific epithelial cell markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) and cytokeratin 8. The epithelial nature of these cells was confirmed by ultrastructural analyses which demonstrated the retention of specific structural properties characteristic of the original tumour. The cells possessed an abnormal karyotype with 55-60 chromosomes per cell with numerous rearrangements. They do not express HLA antigens and the c-myc gene was not amplified. The 8701-BC cells have a doubling time of approx. 29h and have been maintained in culture for more than 100 passages. These properties suggest the establishment of a human neoplastic cell line which, with its ability to produce homotrimer collagen in vitro, will provide a useful model system for the study of tumour cell:stromal matrix interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2548558

  3. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer.

  4. Episome-Based Gene Therapy Strategy for Treatment of Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Levitssky HI, Jaffee LM, Karasuyama H , Baker M and Pardoll DM (1991). Treatment of established renal cancer by tumor cells engineered to secrete...Osteolytic bone metastasis in breast cancer. Breast Can Res Trest 32: 73-84. 24 Appendix I M Figure 1A. Apoptosis of non-adherent antisense IGF-IR...al., 1996). The labeled DNA was electrophoresed on a 1.5% agarose gel and visualized by autoradiography. Lane M : Molecular marker XEcoKUHindlll

  5. American Ginseng in the Prevention and Treatment of Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    The effects of ginseng on the prevention and treatment of breast cancer has not been studied. This research project was designed to examine the...effects of American ginseng on breast cancer using well-established in vitro and in vivo experimental models. It is our hypothesis that ginseng , and its... ginseng inhibited MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ginseng extract in the drinking water of female

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Sabbaj, Steffanie; Edwards, Bradley H.; Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Semrau, Katherine; Cheelo, Sanford; Thea, Donald M.; Kuhn, Louise; Ritter, G. Douglas; Mulligan, Mark J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2002-01-01

    Breast-feeding infants of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women ingest large amounts of HIV, but most escape infection. While the factors affecting transmission risk are poorly understood, HIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses play a critical role in controlling HIV levels in blood. We therefore investigated the ability of breast milk cells (BMC) from HIV-infected women from the United States and Zambia to respond to HIV-1 peptides in a gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay. All (n = 11) HIV-infected women had responses to pools of Gag peptide (range, 105 to 1,400 spot-forming cells/million; mean = 718), 8 of 11 reacted to Pol, 7 reacted to Nef, and 2 of 5 reacted to Env. Conversely, of four HIV-negative women, none responded to any of the tested HIV peptide pools. Depletion and tetramer staining studies demonstrated that CD8+ T cells mediated these responses, and a chromium-release assay showed that these BMC were capable of lysing target cells in an HIV-specific manner. These data demonstrate the presence of HIV-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CD8+ CTLs in breast milk. Their presence suggests a role in limiting transmission and provides a rationale for vaccine strategies to enhance these responses. PMID:12097549

  7. [Levels of mineral elements composition and heavy metal pollution in human breast milk in Shenzhen City].

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Zhang, Huimin; Yan, Chunrong; Zhang, Lishi

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the levels of some mineral elements composition and heavy metal in human breast milk in Shenzhen, and estimate the status of infant with breast feeding. ICP-MS and ICP-AES instruments were used to detect the levels of four macroelements of Ca, K, Na, Mg and four microelements of Zn, Fe, Se, Cu, totally eight minerals as well as three heavy metal of Pb, As and Cd in human breast milk. 60 breast milk samples were collected from the women aged 20-35, lived in Shenzhen over 5 years, postdelivery 3 weeks to 2 months from Jul. to Nov. 2007. Average concentration for four kinds of macroelement of Ca, K, Na, Mg was 280.22, 498.61, 188.65 and 28.31 mg/L respectively, that for four kinds of microelements of Zn, Fe, Se, Cu was 2.29 mg/L, 358.88 microg/L, 8.28 microg/L and 339.16 microg/L respectively in 60 human breast milk samples. Average concentration of Pb was 2.13 microg/L in 60 human breest milk samples, and heavy metal As and Cd were non-detected. The nutrition status of four kinds of macroelement of Ca, K, Na, Mg and three kinds of microelements of Zn, Fe, Cu in 60 human breast milk samples were reasonable, but the lack of microelement Se and the pollution of the heavy metal should been taken into account.

  8. Contamination status of persistent organochlorines in human breast milk from Japan: recent levels and temporal trend.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Muraoka, Masayoshi; Ohtake, Masako; Sudaryanto, Agus; Minh, Nguyen Hung; Ueno, Daisuke; Higaki, Yumi; Ochi, Miyuki; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Kamikawa, Satoko; Tonegi, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yumi; Shimomura, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Junya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-08-01

    Contamination levels of persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and chlordane compounds (CHLs) was examined in human breast milk collected during 2001-2004 from Fukuoka prefecture in Japan. The concentrations of OCs such as dioxins and related compounds, DDTs, CHLs and HCB in human breast milk from primiparae were comparable to or slightly higher than the data obtained during 1998, indicating that the levels of these contaminants in Japanese human breast milk have not decreased since 1998 and Japanese are continuously exposed to these chemicals, presumably via fish intake. In addition, OC levels in human breast milk from primiparae were significantly higher than those from multiparae, implying elimination of OCs via lactation. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between levels of OCs in human breast milk and the age of primiparae. These results indicate that the mothers with higher age may transfer higher amounts of OCs to the first infant than to the infants born afterwards through breast-feeding, and hence the first born children might be at higher risk by OCs.

  9. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  10. Native MAG-1 antibody almost destroys human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Pang, Roy H L; Gao, Guohong; Memoli, Vincent A; Cole, Bernard F

    2011-06-01

    A native form of mouse monoclonal IgG1 antibody called MAG-1, which recognizes an epitope on provasopressin, has been found to shrink and produce extensive necrosis of human breast tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice. We examined the ability of (90)Yttrium-labeled and native MAG-1 to affect the growth in nu/nu mice of cancer xenografts that were estrogen-responsive (from MCF-7 cells) and triple-negative (from MDA-MB231 cells). The growth rates of treated cells were compared to those receiving saline vehicle and those receiving (90)Yttrium-labeled and native forms of the ubiquitous antibody, MOPC21. Short-term treatments (4 doses over 6 days) not only with (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 but also native MAG-1 produced large reductions in size of rapidly growing tumors of both types, while both (90)Yttrium- MOPC21 and native MOPC21 had no effect. Native and (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 effects were similar, and arrested tumors recommenced growing soon after treatments stopped. Increasing native MAG-1 treatment to single dosing for 16 consecutive days shrank tumors of both types with no regrowth apparent over a 20-day post-treatment period of observation. Pathological examination of such tumors revealed they had undergone very extensive (>66%) necrosis.

  11. Nimodipine transfer into human breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Carcas, A J; Abad-Santos, F; de Rosendo, J M; Frias, J

    1996-02-01

    To report nimodipine concentrations in breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a lactating woman who was given the drug to prevent a vascular spasm secondary to angiographic examination. A 36-year-old woman received a total dose of nimodipine 46 mg iv over 24 hours. She extracted milk when she noted mammary tightness, and blood samples were taken simultaneously by venipuncture in the arm contralateral to that of the nimodipine infusion. A CSF sample also was taken in a diagnostic lumbar puncture. Nimodipine concentration in milk was much lower than that in serum, with a milk/serum ratio of 0.06-0.15. The CSF/serum ratio was 0.01. We estimate that the infant would have received between 0.008% and 0.092% of the weight-adjusted dose that was administered to the mother if the baby had been nursed. Nimodipine is transferred to human milk in a lower proportion than are other calcium-channel blockers. These results suggest that treating the mother with nimodipine would entail no risk to the nursing infant.

  12. Weightlessness acts on human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Vassy, J; Portet, S; Beil, M; Millot, G; Fauvel-Lafève, F; Gasset, G; Schoevaert, D

    2003-01-01

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress-dependent cell changes. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1 g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labeling was performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Several main phenomena were observed in weightlessness: The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser; More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation was reduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade; Microtubules were altered in many cells. The results reported in the first point are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubules. We discuss here the different mechanisms involved in weightlessness alteration of microtubules: i) alteration of their self-organization by reaction-diffusion processes, and a mathematical model is proposed, ii) activation or deactivation of microtubules stabilizing proteins, acting on both microtubule and microfilament networks in cell cortex. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  14. Development, fabrication and evaluation of a novel biomimetic human breast tissue derived breast implant surface.

    PubMed

    Barr, S; Hill, E W; Bayat, A

    2017-02-01

    Breast implant use has tripled in the last decade with over 320,000 breast implant based reconstructions and augmentations performed in the US per annum. Unfortunately a considerable number of women will experience capsular contracture, the irrepressible and disfiguring, tightening and hardening of the fibrous capsule that envelops the implant. Functionalising implant surfaces with biocompatible tissue-specific textures may improve in vivo performance. A novel biomimetic breast implant is presented here with anti-inflammatory in vitro abilities. Topographical assessment of native breast tissue facilitated the development of a statistical model of adipose tissue. 3D grayscale photolithography and ion etching were combined to successfully replicate a surface modelled upon the statistics of breast tissue. Pro-inflammatory genes ILβ1, TNFα, and IL6 were downregulated (p<0.001) and anti-inflammatory gene IL-10 were upregulated on the novel surface. Pro-inflammatory cytokines Gro-Alpha, TNFα and neutrophil chemoattractant IL8 were produced in lower quantities and anti-inflammatory IL-10 in higher quantities in culture with the novel surface (p<0.01). Immunocytochemistry and SEM demonstrated favourable fibroblast and macrophage responses to these novel surfaces. This study describes the first biomimetic breast tissue derived breast implant surface. Our findings attest to its potential translational ability to reduce the inflammatory phase of the implant driven foreign body reaction.

  15. VIS-NIR spectrum analysis for distinguishing tumor and normal human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yuan; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Xiang; Liu, Caihua; Wang, Jing; Xue, Xingbo; Zhu, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer require an effective method for early breast diagnosis. In order to investigate the optical differences among malignant tumor, benign tumor and normal human breast tissue, a commercial spectrophotometer combined with single integrating sphere was used to measure the optical properties of different types of breast tissue in the wavelength range of 400 nm to 2200 nm in vitro. The hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) are used as the standard, and to find the find possible optical markers from the corresponding absorption or scattering spectra. This work is not only used for in vitro rapid optical diagnosis, but very helpful to develop innovative optical diagnosis of breast tumor in vivo.

  16. [Establishment of murine cell line transfected with human CD14 gene].

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo-Tao; Tang, Yong-Min; Xu, Yan; Chen, Yan-Fei; Cao, Jiang

    2006-04-01

    This study was aimed to construct the CD14 eukaryotic expression vector, establish the transgeneic CD14 positive cell line in order to facilitate the establishment of a mouse model of antibody targeting therapy for human acute monocytic leukemia (AML-M(5)). Total RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was treated with RNAase-free DNAase, the human CD14 gene was cloned and sequenced through the RT-PCR and T-A clone techniques. Eukaryotic expressional vector pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 was constructed by cleaving with double restriction endonuleases and ligating with T4 ligase. A murine melanoma cell line B16 was transfected with the pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 recombinant with Superfect transfection reagent. Positive clones were selected by G418 and the expression of human CD14 on the transfectant was confirmed by flow cytometry (FCM). The results indicated that the sequence of the human CD14 cDNA cloned was exact to be same as the one from GenBank database. The recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 was identified with double-enzyme cleaving. The expression of the human CD14 on the transfectant (B16/CD14) was confirmed by FCM. In conclusion, the murine cell line B16/CD14 fransfected with human CD14 gene has been established which can be used for the study of human AML-M(5) antibody targeting therapy with mouse model.

  17. Identification of vitamin D3 target genes in human breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lei; Anderson, Paul H; Turner, Andrew G; Pishas, Kathleen I; Dhatrak, Deepak J; Gill, Peter G; Morris, Howard A; Callen, David F

    2016-11-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies have shown that high vitamin D3 status is strongly associated with improved breast cancer survival. To determine the molecular pathways influenced by 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) in breast epithelial cells we isolated RNA from normal human breast and cancer tissues treated with 1,25D in an ex vivo explant system. RNA-Seq revealed 523 genes that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissues in response to 1,25D treatment, and 127 genes with altered expression in normal breast tissues. GoSeq KEGG pathway analysis revealed 1,25D down-regulated cellular metabolic pathways and enriched pathways involved with intercellular adhesion. The highly 1,25D up-regulated target genes CLMN, SERPINB1, EFTUD1, and KLK6were selected for further analysis and up-regulation by 1,25D was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis in breast cancer cell lines and in a subset of human clinical samples from normal and cancer breast tissues. Ketoconazole potentiated 1,25D-mediated induction of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 mRNA through inhibition of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) activity. Elevated expression levels of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 are associated with prolonged relapse-free survival for breast cancer patients. The major finding of the present study is that exposure of both normal and malignant breast tissue to 1,25D results in changes in cellular adhesion, metabolic pathways and tumor suppressor-like pathways, which support epidemiological data suggesting that adequate vitamin D3 levels may improve breast cancer outcome.

  18. Hormone Receptor and ERBB2 Status in Gene Expression Profiles of Human Breast Tumor Samples

    PubMed Central

    Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of large publically available repositories of human breast tumor gene expression profiles provides an important resource to discover new breast cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. For example, knowledge of the expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors (ER and PR), and that of the ERBB2 in breast tumor samples enables choice of therapies for the breast cancer patients that express these proteins. Identifying new biomarkers and therapeutic agents affecting the activity of signaling pathways regulated by the hormone receptors or ERBB2 might be accelerated by knowledge of their expression levels in large gene expression profiling data sets. Unfortunately, the status of these receptors is not invariably reported in public databases of breast tumor gene expression profiles. Attempts have been made to employ a single probe set to identify ER, PR and ERBB2 status, but the specificity or sensitivity of their prediction is low. We enquired whether estimation of ER, PR and ERBB2 status of profiled tumor samples could be improved by using multiple probe sets representing these three genes and others with related expression. We used 8 independent datasets of human breast tumor samples to define gene expression signatures comprising 24, 51 and 14 genes predictive of ER, PR and ERBB2 status respectively. These signatures, as demonstrated by sensitivity and specificity measures, reliably identified hormone receptor and ERBB2 expression in breast tumors that had been previously determined using protein and DNA based assays. Our findings demonstrate that gene signatures can be identified which reliably predict the expression status of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and that of ERBB2 in publically available gene expression profiles of breast tumor samples. Using these signatures to query transcript profiles of breast tumor specimens may enable discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for particular subtypes of

  19. Tumorigenic transformation of human breast epithelial cells induced by mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Kulawiec, Mariola; Safina, Alfiya; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Still, Ivan; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Bakin, Andrei; Singh, Keshav K

    2008-11-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In order to investigate the role of mitochondrial OXPHOS genes in breast tumorigenesis, we have developed a breast epithelial cell line devoid of mtDNA (rho(0) cells). Our analysis revealed that depletion of mtDNA in breast epithelial cells results in in vitro tumorigenic phenotype as well as breast tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. We identified two major gene networks which were differentially regulated between parental and rho(0) epithelial cells. The focal proteins in these networks include (i) FN1 (fibronectin) and (ii) p53. Bioinformatic analyses of FN1 network identified laminin, integrin and 3 of 6 members of peroxiredoxin whose expression were altered in rho(0) epithelial cells. In the p53 network, we identified SMC4 and WRN whose changes in expression suggest that this network may affect chromosomal stability. Consistent with above finding our study revealed an increase in DNA double strand breaks and unique chromosomal rearrangements in rho(0) breast epithelial cells. Additionally, we identified tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-7 in p53 network. To determine the functional relevance of altered gene expression, we focused on detailed analyses of claudin-1 and -7 proteins in breast tumorigenesis. Our study determined that (i) claudin-1 and 7 were indeed downregulated in rho(0) breast epithelial cells, (ii) downregulation of claudin-1 or -7 led to neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells, and (iii) claudin-1 and -7 were also downregulated in primary breast tumors. Together, our study suggest that mtDNA encoded OXPHOS genes play a key role in transformation of breast epithelial cells and that multiple pathway involved in mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde regulation contribute to transformation of breast epithelial cells.

  20. Analysis of HOX gene expression patterns in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Hyo Jung; Park, Byeong Woo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are highly conserved transcription factors that determine the identity of cells and tissues along the anterior-posterior body axis in developing embryos. Aberrations in HOX gene expression have been shown in various tumors. However, the correlation of HOX gene expression patterns with tumorigenesis and cancer progression has not been fully characterized. Here, to analyze putative candidate HOX genes involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis and progression, the expression patterns of 39 HOX genes were analyzed using breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived breast tissues. In vitro analysis revealed that HOXA and HOXB gene expression occurred in a subtype-specific manner in breast cancer cell lines, whereas most HOXC genes were strongly expressed in most cell lines. Among the 39 HOX genes analyzed, 25 were chosen for further analysis in malignant and non-malignant tissues. Fourteen genes, encoding HOXA6, A13, B2, B4, B5, B6, B7, B8, B9, C5, C9, C13, D1, and D8, out of 25 showed statistically significant differential expression patterns between non-malignant and malignant breast tissues and are putative candidates associated with the development and malignant progression of breast cancer. Our data provide a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of HOX gene expression in breast cancer and the possible involvement of HOX genes in tumor progression.

  1. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J

    2004-01-01

    This issue of Journal of Applied Toxicology publishes the paper Concentrations of Parabens in Human Breast Tumours by Darbre et al. (2004), which reports that esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) can be detected in samples of tissue from human breast tumours. Breast tumour samples were supplied from 20 patients, in collaboration with the Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, and analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in underarm deodorants and antiperspirants and in a wide range of other consumer products. The parabens also have inherent oestrogenic and other hormone related activity (increased progesterone receptor gene expression). As oestrogen is a major aetiological factor in the growth and development of the majority of human breast cancers, it has been previously suggested by Darbre that parabens and other chemicals in underarm cosmetics may contribute to the rising incidence of breast cancer. The significance of the finding of parabens in tumour samples is discussed here in terms of 1). Darbre et al's study design, 2). what can be inferred from this type of data (and what can not, such as the cause of these tumours), 3). the toxicology of these compounds and 4). the limitations of the existing toxicology database and the need to consider data that is appropriate to human exposures. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Potential use of humanized antibodies in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Niklaus G; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph

    2006-07-01

    With the growing knowledge of key cellular pathways in tumor induction and evolution, targeted therapies make up an increasing proportion of new drugs entering clinical testing. In the treatment of breast cancer, humanized antibodies have become a major option. The humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin); Genentech, Inc., CA, USA) for HER2-overexpressing, metastatic breast cancer, represents a successful agent associated with impressive survival benefits when combined with chemotherapy. Based on impressive results, trastuzumab will become a standard in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The role of trastuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting is promising, but must be further evaluated in large prospective, randomized trials. However, there is still a large proportion of patients overexpressing HER2 that do not respond to trastuzumab. Regarding this patient cohort, the optimal combination of trastuzumab with other agents needs further evaluation. In breast cancer lacking HER2 amplification, the role of the new antibody pertuzumab remains to be defined. The role of antibodies interfering with angiogenesis, tumor stroma or glycoproteins is of a preliminary nature and warrants further investigation. Here, an overview of humanized antibodies in human breast cancer is provided, with emphasis on the recent advances and future prospects in treating malignant breast cancer.

  3. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  4. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-10-20

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer.

  5. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcus Nascimento; Facina, Gil; Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrin Guerreiro; Waitzberg, Angela Flávia Logullo; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13) in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75) was statistically larger (P < 0.001). Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042). The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  6. Overexpression of NSUN2 by DNA hypomethylation is associated with metastatic progression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jie; Gao, Ran; Chen, Yu; Yang, Zhuo; Han, Pei; Zhang, Hui; Dou, Yaling; Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Wengong; Du, Guanhua; Xu, Yingchun; Wang, Jinhua

    2017-03-28

    NSUN2 is a RNA methyltransferase that has been shown to be implicated in development of human cancer. However, the functional role of NSUN2, mechanism of NSUN2 overexpression and its association with clinicopathologic features in breast cancer remain unclear. To investigate alterations in the expression and functional role of NSUN2 in breast cancer, NSUN2 expression was assessed in breast cancer cells and tissues obtained from cancers at different American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages, and its functions were investigated using breast cancer cells. NSUN2 expression was shown to be significantly higher in breast cancer cells and tissues than in normal breast epithelial cells and tissues, at both mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of NSUN2 was shown to promote cell proliferation, migration, and invasion while NSUN2 knockdown inhibited these processes in vitro and in vivo. NSUN2 expression level was associated with the methylation level of its promoter. Our results demonstrated that the overall expression of NSUN2 significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.027), tumor classification (P=0.012), pathological differentiation (P=0.023), as well as with the expression levels of estrogen receptor (P<0.001), progesterone receptor (P=0.001), and Ki-67 (P<0.001). Our findings provide a unique insight into the roles and effects of NSUN2 overexpression in breast cancer cells, and highlight the necessity of the investigation of novel therapeutic targets, such as NSUN2, for the improvement of breast cancer treatments.

  7. Establishing minimum performance standards, calibration intervals, and optimal exposure values for a whole breast digital mammography unit.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Lewis, C; Beifuss, M; Williams, M B; Bassett, L W

    1998-12-01

    Methods are developed to establish minimum performance standards, calibration intervals, and criteria for exposure control for a whole breast digital mammography system. A prototype phantom was designed, and an automatic method programmed, to analyze CNR, resolution, and dynamic range between CCD components in the image receptor and over time. The phantom was imaged over a 5 month period and the results are analyzed to predict future performance. White field recalibration was analyzed by subtracting white fields obtained at different intervals. Exposure effects were compared by imaging the prototype phantom at different kVp, filtration (Mo vs Rh) and mAs. Calcification detection tests showed that phantom images, obtained at 28 kVp with a Mo/Mo anode/filter and low mAs technique, often could not depict Al2O3 specks 0.24 mm in diameter, while a 28 kVp Mo/Rh, higher mAs technique usually could. Stability of the system tested suggests that monthly phantom imaging may suffice. Differences in CCD performance are greater (12%) than differences in a single CCD over time (6%). White field recalibration is needed weekly because of pixel variations in sensitivity which occur if longer intervals between recalibration occur. When mean glandular dose is matched, Rh filtration gives better phantom performance at 28 kVp than Mo filtration at 26 kVp and is recommended for clinical exposures. An aluminum step wedge shows markedly increased dynamic range when exit exposure is increased by using a higher energy spectrum beam. Phantoms for digital mammography units should cover the entire image receptor, should test intersections between components of the receptor, and should be automatically analyzed.

  8. Detection of dicofol and related pesticides in human breast milk from China, Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Harada, Kouji H; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Inoue, Kayoko; Itoh, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Takao; Takenaka, Katsunobu; Uehara, Shigeki; Yang, Hye-Ran; Kim, Min-Young; Moon, Chan-Seok; Kim, Hae-Sook; Wang, Peiyu; Liu, Aiping; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Koizumi, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the concentrations of DDTs were greater in breast milk collected from Chinese mothers than from Japanese and Korean mothers. To investigate dicofol as a possible source of the DDTs in human breast milk, we collected breast milk samples from 2007 to 2009 in China (Beijing), Korea (Seoul, Busan) and Japan (Sendai, Takarazuka and Takayama). Using these breast milk samples, we quantified the concentrations of dichlorobenzophenone, a pyrolysis product of dicofol (simply referred to as dicofol hereafter), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) using GC-MS. Overall, 12 of 14 pooled breast milk samples from 210 mothers contained detectable levels of dicofol (>0.1 ng g⁻¹ lipid). The geometric mean concentration of dicofol in the Japanese breast milk samples was 0.3 ng g⁻¹ lipid and significantly lower than that in Chinese (9.6 ng g⁻¹ lipid) or Korean breast milk samples (1.9 ng g⁻¹ lipid) (p<0.05 for each). Furthermore, the ΣDDT levels in breast milk from China were 10-fold higher than those from Korea and Japan. The present results strongly suggest the presence of extensive emission sources of both dicofol and DDTs in China. However, exposure to dicofol cannot explain the large exposure of Chinese mothers to DDTs because of the trace levels of dicofol in the ΣDDTs. In the present study, dicofol was confirmed to be detectable in human breast milk. This is the first report to identify dicofol in human samples.

  9. Exploiting for Breast Cancer Control a Proposed Unified Mechanism for Reduction of Human Breast Cancer Risk by the Hormones of Pregnancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Twenty-one days after carcinogen administration, 30 female rats received an intra-peritoneal injection of...estriol (E3) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), are at a reduced risk of developing carcinogen induced breast cancer (1-4). On the other hand...was decreased by 27% (p< 0.026). Figure 1b. Breast Cancer Incidence in Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Treated Rats. Thirty Sprague-Dawley

  10. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  11. The determination of short-term breast volume changes and the rate of synthesis of human milk using computerized breast measurement.

    PubMed

    Daly, S E; Kent, J C; Huynh, D Q; Owens, R A; Alexander, B F; Ng, K C; Hartmann, P E

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using sequential breast volume measurements as a method of studying short-term rates of milk synthesis in women has been established. We have developed a rapid Computerized Breast Measurement system for the determination of breast volume, based upon the Shape Measurement System. A circle encompassing all the breast tissue is drawn in black face paint on the subject's skin. Six patterns of sixty-four horizontal light stripes are projected onto the breast and chest wall surface. A CCD camera relays video images to a computer, which produces a model of the chest by active triangulation. The volume of the breast and the chest wall segment enclosed by the circle is then calculated. The precision of the method was dependent upon the subject repositioning carefully. The coefficient of variation of replicate measurements was 1.6%. The accuracy of the method was established by comparing the change in breast volume before and after a breast-feed with the amount of milk removed by the infant as determined by test weighing. There was a close relationship between the removal of milk by the infant (x) and the change in breast volume (y), (r = 0.93, n = 73, y = 1.10x - 3.25). The rates of milk synthesis between breast-feeds, for six women determined on one to eight occasions, varied from 11 to 58 ml/h. The results show that the amount of milk available in the breast is not necessarily an important determinant of the amount of milk removed by the infant at a breast-feed.

  12. Expression of Axl and its prognostic significance in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Like; Chen, Yanbin; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and its prevalence continues to increase. Axl overexpression has been identified in the many types of human cancer, and it has been demonstrated to participate in signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis and cancer development. In the present study, Axl expression was examined by performing immunohistochemical staining in 60 breast cancer tumors and 40 benign breast lesions (25 mammary dysplasia and 15 breast fibroadenoma). In total, 34 (56.67%) cancer tissues and 13 (32.5%) benign breast lesions were classified as exhibiting high levels of Axl expression, indicating a significant association between malignancy and high Axl expression. High Axl expression was also associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity (P=0.028), progesterone receptor (PR) positivity (P=0.007), and poor tumor differentiation (P=0.033). No significant associations were observed between Axl expression and age, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, tumor node metastasis staging, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 antigen. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model both demonstrated that there was no statistical difference between Axl expression and breast cancer prognosis. However, it remains unclear whether the expression of Axl is correlated with the prognosis of luminal type breast cancer patients. PMID:28356938

  13. Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fa-Ke F.; Calligaris, David; Suo, Yuanzhen; Santagata, Sandro; Golby, Alexandra J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Mallory, Melissa A.; Golshan, Mehra; Dillon, Deborah A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

  14. Identification and functional characterization of breast cancer resistance protein in human bronchial epithelial cells (Calu-3)

    PubMed Central

    Paturi, Durga Kalyani; Kwatra, Deep; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a 72 kDa protein belongs to the subfamily G of the human ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily. Overexpression of BCRP was found to play a major role in the development of resistance against various chemotherapeutic agents. BCRP plays an important role in absorption, distribution and elimination of several therapeutic agents. BCRP expression and functional activity across human bronchial epithelium and its impact on pulmonary drug accumulation has not been established. The objective of this study is to identify and characterize the BCRP efflux transporter across human bronchial epithelium. Calu-3, a human bronchial epithelial cell line was employed as a model for this study. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunocytochemical studies were performed to identify and characterize the expression of BCRP. RT-PCR studies detected ABCG2 mRNA levels in Calu-3 cells. A strong band for BCRP with a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa was observed in Western blot analysis. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed the presence of BCRP on the apical membrane of human bronchial epithelium. Functional activity of BCRP was determined by performing uptake of radioactive substrate [3H]-mitoxantrone in the presence and absence of BCRP inhibitors. Uptake of [3H]-mitoxantrone was elevated significantly in the presence of GF120918 and fumitremorgin C. An increase in the accumulation of Hoechst 33342, a fluorescent dye was also detected in the presence of BCRP inhibitors when compared to control. In summary, this study provides evidence for the presence of an ATP dependent, membrane bound efflux transporter BCRP across human bronchial epithelial cell line, Calu-3. PMID:19782742

  15. The distribution of tissue fibronectin and sialic acid in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Süer, S; Baloğlu, H; Güngör, Z; Sönmez, H; Kökoğlu, E

    1998-06-01

    Our findings indicate that sialic acid and fibronectin levels in breast tumors are higher than those in normal tissues. The mean tissue fibronectin and sialic acid concentrations for patients with breast cancer were 30.90 +/- 9.68 microg/mg protein and 21.60 +/- 9.35 microg/mg protein, respectively, and for normal controls were 12.47 +/- 5.69 microg/mg protein, respectively. Tissue fibronectin and sialic acid can be important markers for human breast cancer.

  16. Flaxseed cotyledon fraction reduces tumour growth and sensitises tamoxifen treatment of human breast cancer xenograft (MCF-7) in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmin; Saggar, Jasdeep K; Corey, Paul; Thompson, Lilian U

    2011-02-01

    Dietary flaxseed (FS) inhibited the growth of human breast tumours and enhanced the effectiveness of tamoxifen (TAM) in athymic mice with low oestradiol (E2) levels. The present study determined whether the n-3 fatty acid-rich cotyledon fraction of FS (FC), alone or in combination with TAM, has a similar effect and thus can substitute for FS. In a 2 × 2 factorial design, ovariectomised mice with established oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumours (MCF-7) were treated as follows: groups 1 and 2 were fed the basal diet (BD, control) and FC diet (82 g FC/kg), respectively. Groups 3 and 4 with TAM implants (5 mg) were fed the BD and FC diet, respectively. At 8 weeks post-treatment, mice were euthanised, and tumours were analysed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. BD, FC and FC/TAM groups significantly decreased tumour area, but the TAM group did not. Tumour regression in the FC/TAM group was greater compared to the TAM group. FC lowered cell proliferation but had no effect on apoptosis; the opposite was observed with TAM. FC suppressed mRNA expressions of pS2 and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and protein expressions of ERα, phosphospecific ERα, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), phosphospecific HER2 (pHER2) and amplified in breast 1 (AIB1), while TAM up-regulated mRNA expressions of Bcl2, progesterone receptor and IGF-1R and protein expression of pHER2, and down-regulated ERβ mRNA. FC modulated the effect of TAM on tumour growth biomarkers. In conclusion, FC reduced the growth of ER+ human breast tumours at low circulating E2, alone and combined with TAM, in part through modulation of ER- and growth factor-mediated signalling pathways; it may substitute for FS in increasing the effectiveness of TAM.

  17. Human T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression reflect ERα/ERβ ratios in rat and human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Evers, N M; van de Klundert, T M C; van Aesch, Y M; Wang, S; de Roos, W K; Romano, A; de Haan, L H J; Murk, A J; Ederveen, A G H; Rietjens, I M C M; Groten, J P

    2013-09-01

    T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression and constant ERα expression can be used to investigate effects of varying ERα/ERβ ratios on estrogen-induced cellular responses. This study defines conditions at which ERα/ERβ ratios in T47D-ERβ cells best mimic ERα/ERβ ratios in breast and other estrogen-sensitive tissues in vivo in rat as well as in human. Protein and mRNA levels of ERα and ERβ were analyzed in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to a range of tetracycline concentrations and compared to ERα and ERβ levels found in breast, prostate, and uterus from rat and human origin. The ERα/ERβ ratio in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to >150ng/ml tetracycline is comparable to the ratio found in rat mammary gland and in human breast tissue. The ERα/ERβ ratio of other estrogen-sensitive rat and human tissues can also be mimicked in T47D-ERβ cells. The ERα/ERβ ratio found in MCF-7 and native T47D breast cancer cell lines did not reflect ratios in analyzed rat and human tissues, which further supports the use of T47D-ERβ cells as model for estrogen-responsive tissues. Using 17β-estradiol and the T47D-ERβ cells under the conditions defined to mimic various tissues it could be demonstrated how these different tissues vary in their proliferative response.

  18. Exploiting for Breast Cancer Control a Proposed Unified Mechanism for Reduction of Human Breast Cancer Risk by the Hormones of Pregnancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    breast cancer cases are diagnosed annually, and thousands die of the disease , often because the malignancy has become refractory to the treatment...Mammary Carcinogensis by Short-Term Estrogen and Progestin Treaments . 2004. Breast Cancer Res 6 (1): 31-37. Russo I.H., M. Koszalla and J. Russo. Human

  19. Modulation of the Proliferation and Metastasis of Human Breast Tumor Cells by SLUG (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    E-cadherin preserved tumors is related to prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, Clin. Cancer Res. 11 (2005) 1174–1180. [2] A... human breast cells . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer , SLUG, transcriptional silencing, molecular decoys, metastasis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...SLUG activity and to evaluate the effects of this ablation on the proliferation, invasiveness and metastasis of these cancer cells in 3D-tissue culture

  20. Myiasis secondary to Sermatobia hominis (human botfly) presenting as a long-standing breast mass.

    PubMed

    Kahn, D G

    1999-09-01

    A case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with a breast mass is reported. Histologically, a chronic granulomatous inflammatory response was observed. The response was associated with an organism diagnosed as a fly larva, Dermatobia hominis (human botfly). The incidence of myiasis, infestation by fly larvae, presenting as a long-standing breast mass and mimicking a neoplasm is extremely rare, especially in the United States.

  1. Anti-Cancer Effect of IN-2001 in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Nan; Joung, Ki Eun; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, inhibition of HDACs has emerged as a potential strategy to reverse aberrant epigenetic changes associated with cancer, and several classes of HDAC inhibitors have been found to have potent and specific anticancer activities in preclinical studies. But their precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, a novel synthetic inhibitor of HDAC, 3-(4-dimethylamino phenyl)-N-hydroxy-2-propenamide [IN-2001] was examined for its antitumor activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms of any such activity on human breast cancer cell lines. IN-2001 effectively inhibited cellular HDAC activity (IC50 = 0.585 nM) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. IN-2001 caused a significant dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in estrogen receptor (ER) negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the gowth inhibitory effects of IN-2001 might be attributed to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and/or G2/Mphase and subsequent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. These events are accompanied by modulating several cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes such as CDK inhibitors p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) cyclin D1, and other tumor suppressor genes such as cyclin D2. Collectively, IN-2001 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and these findings may provide new therapeutic approaches, combination of antiestrogen together with a HDAC inhibitor, in the hormonal therapy-resistant ER-negative breast cancers. In summary, our data suggest that this histone deacetylase inhibitor, IN-2001, is a novel promising therapeutic agent with potent antitumor effects against human breast cancers.

  2. Sex steroids in human brain tumors and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    von Schoultz, E; Bixo, M; Bäckström, T; Silfvenius, H; Wilking, N; Henriksson, R

    1990-02-15

    The concentrations of three sex steroids, estradiol, progesterone and testosterone, were analyzed by radioimmunoassay after celite chromatography in brain tumor and breast cancer tissues. The concentrations in malignant gliomas and breast cancers showed interindividual variations, especially evident with regard to estradiol. High estradiol concentrations were recorded in two patients with malignant astrocytoma. The concentrations of 1.00 pg/mg and 3.32 pg/mg were 10 to 30 times as high as in normal female brain. In five of ten astrocytomas the estradiol concentration was higher than the lowest breast cancer value. The distribution of progesterone seemed more even, and the level was significantly lower in brain tumors and breast cancers as compared with female brain, perhaps indicating an increased metabolism. Testosterone levels were somewhat higher in brain tumors, as compared with breast cancers, but not different from values in brain tissue. There were no significant age or sex correlation or differences in the concentrations of steroids in the brain tumors. The results suggest that manipulation of sex steroid metabolism in malignant brain tumors can be of beneficial therapeutic value as has been shown for breast cancer and prostatic carcinoma.

  3. 21 CFR 14.160 - Establishment of standing technical advisory committees for human prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... established to advise the Commissioner: (a) Generally on the safety and effectiveness, including the labeling and advertising, and regulatory control of the human prescription drugs falling within the... determination of safety and effectiveness in that class of drugs. (b) Specifically on any particular...

  4. Human CTLs to wild-type and enhanced epitopes of a novel prostate and breast tumor-associated protein, TARP, lyse human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, SangKon; Terabe, Masaki; Pendleton, C David; Bhattacharyya, Anu; Bera, Tapan K; Epel, Malka; Reiter, Yoram; Phillips, John; Linehan, W Marston; Kasten-Sportes, Claude; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2004-04-01

    Vaccine therapy for prostate and breast cancer may have potential for treating these major causes of death in males and females, respectively. Critical to the development of tumor-specific vaccines is finding and characterizing novel antigens to be recognized by CD8(+) T cells. To define new CD8(+) T-cell tumor antigens, we determined two wild-type HLA-A2 epitopes from a recently found tumor-associated protein, TARP (T-cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein), expressed in prostate and breast cancer cells. We were also able to engineer epitope-enhanced peptides by sequence modifications. Both wild-type and enhanced epitopes induced peptide-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in A2K(b) transgenic mice. In vitro restimulation of human CD8(+) T cells from a prostate cancer patient resulted in CD8(+) T cells reactive to the peptide epitopes that could lyse HLA-A2(+) human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) expressing TARP. Epitope-specific human CD8(+) T cells were also enumerated in patients' peripheral blood by tetramer staining. Our data suggest that HLA-A2-binding TARP epitopes and enhanced epitopes discovered in this study could be incorporated into a potential vaccine for both breast and prostate cancer.

  5. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  6. Inactivation of Zika virus in human breast milk by prolonged storage or pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Stephanie; Vielle, Nathalie J; Ebert, Nadine; Steinmann, Eike; Alves, Marco P; Thiel, Volker

    2017-01-15

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy poses a serious risk for pregnant women as it can cause severe birth defects. Even though the virus is mainly transmitted via mosquitos, human-to-human transmission has been described. Infectious viral particles have been detected in breast milk of infected women which raised concerns regarding the safety of breastfeeding in areas of Zika virus transmission or in case of a suspected or confirmed Zika virus infection. In this study, we show that Zika virus is effectively inactivated in human breast milk after prolonged storage or upon pasteurization of milk.

  7. Radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells to ultraviolet light by 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    SASAKI, KAZUHITO; TSUNO, NELSON H.; SUNAMI, EIJI; KAWAI, KAZUSHIGE; SHUNO, YASUTAKA; HONGO, KUMIKO; HIYOSHI, MASAYA; KANEKO, MANABU; MURONO, KOJI; TADA, NORIKO; NIREI, TAKAKO; KITAYAMA, JOJI; TAKAHASHI, KOKI; NAGAWA, HIROKAZU

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB) phototherapy is widely used to treat dermatological diseases and therefore may be a potential optional strategy in the treatment of a skin lesion infiltrated by a malignant tumor. Currently, little is known regarding the effect of UVB phototherapy on human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of UVB phototherapy, as well as the potential effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the first-line anticancer drug for breast cancer, on radiosensitizing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, in an attempt to develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. MCF-7 cells were incubated in the presence of 5-FU for 48 h, and UVB irradiation at 750 mJ/cm2 was administered in the midterm of 5-FU treatment. The viability of MCF-7 cells was analyzed by the trypan blue staining method. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry after the staining of cells with propidium iodide. The combination treatment of 5-FU and UVB resulted in a strong potentiation of the inhibitory effect of MCF-7 cell growth, dependent on the intra-S phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, when compared to treatment with 5-FU or UVB alone. In conclusion, 5-FU sensitized human breast cancer cells to UVB phototherapy, and this combination therapy is an effective and promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer, particularly for locoregional recurrence. PMID:22866105

  8. Multiple Lineages of Human Breast Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells Identified by Profiling with Stem Cell Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W.; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, Po-Hao; Pan, Chi-Chun; Wang, Hsing-Hui; Tsai, Sheng-Ta; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Shew, Jin-Yu; Kung, John T.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lee, Eva Y.-H. P.; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity of cancer stem/progenitor cells that give rise to different forms of cancer has been well demonstrated for leukemia. However, this fundamental concept has yet to be established for solid tumors including breast cancer. In this communication, we analyzed solid tumor cancer stem cell markers in human breast cancer cell lines and primary specimens using flow cytometry. The stem/progenitor cell properties of different marker expressing-cell populations were further assessed by in vitro soft agar colony formation assay and the ability to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the expression of stem cell markers varied greatly among breast cancer cell lines. In MDA-MB-231 cells, PROCR and ESA, instead of the widely used breast cancer stem cell markers CD44+/CD24-/low and ALDH, could be used to highly enrich cancer stem/progenitor cell populations which exhibited the ability to self renew and divide asymmetrically. Furthermore, the PROCR+/ESA+ cells expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers. PROCR could also be used to enrich cells with colony forming ability from MB-361 cells. Moreover, consistent with the marker profiling using cell lines, the expression of stem cell markers differed greatly among primary tumors. There was an association between metastasis status and a high prevalence of certain markers including CD44+/CD24−/low, ESA+, CD133+, CXCR4+ and PROCR+ in primary tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that similar to leukemia, several stem/progenitor cell-like subpopulations can exist in breast cancer. PMID:20027313

  9. A new marker for breast cancer diagnosis, human epididymis protein 4: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Gündüz, Umut Riza; Gunaldi, Meral; Isiksacan, Nilgun; Gündüz, Seyda; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Kocoglu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer type in women. Tumor markers have been widely used for assessing the treatment response and early diagnosis of recurrence. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is expressed in ductal carcinoma of the breast tissue; however, its serum levels and their diagnostic and prognostic potential in breast cancer have not been investigated, which was therefore the aim of the present study. The serum levels of HE4 were determined in 36 breast cancer patients, 11 ovarian cancer patients and 16 healthy volunteers. The association between clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer and serum HE4 levels was investigated. A significant difference in the median serum levels of HE4 was identified between breast cancer patients, ovarian cancer patients and healthy volunteers (P=0.013). The cutoff value for the prediction of breast cancer was determined at >13.24 pmol/l for HE4, with a sensitivity of 61.11%, specificity of 68.75%, positive predictive value of 81.48%, negative predictive value of 44.0% and accuracy of 63.46%. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the serum levels of HE4 and cancer antigen 15–3 was determined (r=0.399, P=0.026). To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to determine the diagnostic value of serum HE4 for breast cancer. A significant elevation of serum HE4 levels in patients with breast cancer compared with that in healthy controls was identified. HE4 may serve as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:27446579

  10. Human biliverdin reductase promotes EMT through the ERK1/2 signal pathway in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Song, Shasha; Yi, Zhi; Zhao, Xijuan; Fu, Li; Wang, Lin; Ma, Cui; Mao, Min; Xing, Yan; Zhu, Daling

    2016-10-05

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in the development of the invasive and metastatic potentials of breast cancer cells during progression. Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), an enzyme in the heme metabolism pathway, is involved in hypoxia-induced renal tubular EMT. However, whether hBVR contributes to the EMT of breast cancer remains unclear. Here, we used breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D) and normal breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) to explore the potential role of hBVR in the EMT of breast cancer. Western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were employed to test the expression and location of hBVR in the cell lines. Small interfering RNA of hBVR (si-hBVR) was used to knockdown the expression of hBVR, and U0126 was applied to inhibit the ERK1/2 signaling in MCF-7, T-47D cells. We found that hBVR highly expressed in MCF-7 and T-47D cells compared with MCF-10A cells, and had different cellular locations between them. Our results revealed that EMT occurred in tissues from breast cancer patients and breast cancer cell lines. However, the EMT in MCF-7 and T-47D cells was suppressed by si-hBVR and U0126. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 was down-regulated by si-hBVR. In addition, hBVR regulated EMT through the ERK1/2 signaling, but bilirubin, which is a product of hBVR in the heme metabolism pathway in breast cancer, did not. Taken together, these findings provide new evidence that hBVR plays an important role in promoting EMT in human breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and hBVR may be a therapeutic target for this disease.

  11. Population of 224 realistic human subject-based computational breast phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David W.; Wells, Jered R.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T.; Segars, W. Paul; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To create a database of highly realistic and anatomically variable 3D virtual breast phantoms based on dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) data. Methods: A tissue classification and segmentation algorithm was used to create realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on 230 + dedicated bCT datasets from normal human subjects. The breast volume was identified using a coarse three-class fuzzy C-means segmentation algorithm which accounted for and removed motion blur at the breast periphery. Noise in the bCT data was reduced through application of a postreconstruction 3D bilateral filter. A 3D adipose nonuniformity (bias field) correction was then applied followed by glandular segmentation using a 3D bias-corrected fuzzy C-means algorithm. Multiple tissue classes were defined including skin, adipose, and several fractional glandular densities. Following segmentation, a skin mask was produced which preserved the interdigitated skin, adipose, and glandular boundaries of the skin interior. Finally, surface modeling was used to produce digital phantoms with methods complementary to the XCAT suite of digital human phantoms. Results: After rejecting some datasets due to artifacts, 224 virtual breast phantoms were created which emulate the complex breast parenchyma of actual human subjects. The volume breast density (with skin) ranged from 5.5% to 66.3% with a mean value of 25.3% ± 13.2%. Breast volumes ranged from 25.0 to 2099.6 ml with a mean value of 716.3 ± 386.5 ml. Three breast phantoms were selected for imaging with digital compression (using finite element modeling) and simple ray-tracing, and the results show promise in their potential to produce realistic simulated mammograms. Conclusions: This work provides a new population of 224 breast phantoms based on in vivo bCT data for imaging research. Compared to previous studies based on only a few prototype cases, this dataset provides a rich source of new cases spanning a wide range

  12. Population of 224 realistic human subject-based computational breast phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, David W.; Wells, Jered R.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Dobbins, James T.; Segars, W. Paul; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create a database of highly realistic and anatomically variable 3D virtual breast phantoms based on dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) data. Methods: A tissue classification and segmentation algorithm was used to create realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on 230 + dedicated bCT datasets from normal human subjects. The breast volume was identified using a coarse three-class fuzzy C-means segmentation algorithm which accounted for and removed motion blur at the breast periphery. Noise in the bCT data was reduced through application of a postreconstruction 3D bilateral filter. A 3D adipose nonuniformity (bias field) correction was then applied followed by glandular segmentation using a 3D bias-corrected fuzzy C-means algorithm. Multiple tissue classes were defined including skin, adipose, and several fractional glandular densities. Following segmentation, a skin mask was produced which preserved the interdigitated skin, adipose, and glandular boundaries of the skin interior. Finally, surface modeling was used to produce digital phantoms with methods complementary to the XCAT suite of digital human phantoms. Results: After rejecting some datasets due to artifacts, 224 virtual breast phantoms were created which emulate the complex breast parenchyma of actual human subjects. The volume breast density (with skin) ranged from 5.5% to 66.3% with a mean value of 25.3% ± 13.2%. Breast volumes ranged from 25.0 to 2099.6 ml with a mean value of 716.3 ± 386.5 ml. Three breast phantoms were selected for imaging with digital compression (using finite element modeling) and simple ray-tracing, and the results show promise in their potential to produce realistic simulated mammograms. Conclusions: This work provides a new population of 224 breast phantoms based on in vivo bCT data for imaging research. Compared to previous studies based on only a few prototype cases, this dataset provides a rich source of new cases spanning a wide range

  13. Population of 224 realistic human subject-based computational breast phantoms.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David W; Wells, Jered R; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T; Segars, W Paul; Lo, Joseph Y

    2016-01-01

    To create a database of highly realistic and anatomically variable 3D virtual breast phantoms based on dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) data. A tissue classification and segmentation algorithm was used to create realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on 230 + dedicated bCT datasets from normal human subjects. The breast volume was identified using a coarse three-class fuzzy C-means segmentation algorithm which accounted for and removed motion blur at the breast periphery. Noise in the bCT data was reduced through application of a postreconstruction 3D bilateral filter. A 3D adipose nonuniformity (bias field) correction was then applied followed by glandular segmentation using a 3D bias-corrected fuzzy C-means algorithm. Multiple tissue classes were defined including skin, adipose, and several fractional glandular densities. Following segmentation, a skin mask was produced which preserved the interdigitated skin, adipose, and glandular boundaries of the skin interior. Finally, surface modeling was used to produce digital phantoms with methods complementary to the XCAT suite of digital human phantoms. After rejecting some datasets due to artifacts, 224 virtual breast phantoms were created which emulate the complex breast parenchyma of actual human subjects. The volume breast density (with skin) ranged from 5.5% to 66.3% with a mean value of 25.3% ± 13.2%. Breast volumes ranged from 25.0 to 2099.6 ml with a mean value of 716.3 ± 386.5 ml. Three breast phantoms were selected for imaging with digital compression (using finite element modeling) and simple ray-tracing, and the results show promise in their potential to produce realistic simulated mammograms. This work provides a new population of 224 breast phantoms based on in vivo bCT data for imaging research. Compared to previous studies based on only a few prototype cases, this dataset provides a rich source of new cases spanning a wide range of breast types, volumes, densities, and

  14. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) in human breast milk from several Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Isobe, Tomohiko; Muto, Mamoru; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Prudente, Maricar; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the concentrations of 10 organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) were determined in 89 human breast milk samples collected from Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. Among the targeted PFRs, tris(2-chloroexyl) phosphate (TCEP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the predominant compounds and were detected in more than 60% of samples in all three countries. The concentrations of PFRs in human breast milk were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the Philippines (median 70 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) than those in Japan (median 22 ng g(-1) lipid wt.) and Vietnam (median 10 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). The present results suggest that the usage of products containing PFRs in the Philippines is higher than those of Japan and Vietnam. Comparing with a previous literature survey in Sweden, the levels of PFRs in human breast milk from the Philippines were 1.5-2 times higher, whereas levels in Japan and Vietnam were 4-20 times lower, suggesting that these differences might be due to their variation in the usage of flame-retarded products utilized in each country. When daily intake of PFRs to infants via human breast milk was estimated, some individuals accumulated tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and TCEP were close to reference dose (RfD). This is the first report to identify PFRs in human breast milk samples from Asian countries.

  15. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  16. Genome Sequence of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Bottacini, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the draft genome of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, isolated from human milk. This species, usually isolated from caries lesions, is taxonomically related to the genus Bifidobacterium. The genetic information of IPLA 20019 enhances our understanding of the adaptation of this P. denticolens strain from human breast milk. PMID:22887674

  17. Impact of human milk bacteria and oligosaccharides on neonatal gut microbiota establishment and gut health.

    PubMed

    Jost, Ted; Lacroix, Christophe; Braegger, Christian; Chassard, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal gut microbiota establishment represents a crucial stage for gut maturation, metabolic and immunologic programming, and consequently short- and long-term health status. Human milk beneficially influences this process due to its dynamic profile of age-adapted nutrients and bioactive components and by providing commensal maternal bacteria to the neonatal gut. These include Lactobacillus spp., as well as obligate anaerobes such as Bifidobacterium spp., which may originate from the maternal gut via an enteromammary pathway as a novel form of mother-neonate communication. Additionally, human milk harbors a broad range of oligosaccharides that promote the growth and activity of specific bacterial populations, in particular, Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides spp. This review focuses on the diversity and origin of human milk bacteria, as well as on milk oligosaccharides that influence neonatal gut microbiota establishment. This knowledge can be used to develop infant formulae that more closely mimic nature's model and sustain a healthy gut microbiota.

  18. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Boone, J M; Abbey, C K; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, K K; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast.The percent correct of the human observer's responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist's performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends

  19. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Boone, J. M.; Abbey, C. K.; Hargreaves, J.; Bateni, C.; Lindfors, K. K.; Yang, K.; Nosratieh, A.; Hernandez, A.; Gazi, P.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist

  20. Cancer stemness in bone marrow micrometastases of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Marissa C; Kothari, Anai N; Kuo, Paul C; Mi, Zhiyong

    2017-10-05

    Cancer cells metastasize to the bone marrow to create the premetastatic niche. Cancer stemness (expression of stem cell characteristics) is regulated by the tumor microenvironment and associated with self-renewal and poor clinical outcomes. Osteopontin induces mesenchymal stem cells in the tumor microenvironment to adopt a cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype to potentiate cancer growth and metastasis. The mechanisms by which cancer cells and tumor microenvironment regulate stemness in the bone marrow premetastatic niche is unknown. Human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 were used in an orthotopic murine xenograft model. NOD-scid mice were implanted with 2 × 10(6) tumor cells in the presence and absence of human mesenchymal stem cells-green fluorescent protein cells and/or osteopontin aptamer, which blocks and inactivates extracellular osteopontin, or mutant aptamer (osteopontin mutant aptamer). In select instances, MCF-7 cells transfected to express osteopontin were coimplanted instead of MCF-7. Stemness markers (Nanog, Oct4, Sox2) in the tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin, Vimentin) markers in the mesenchymal stem cells were measured in femoral bone marrow via real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell number was determined by titrating cell number to Ct value in vitro. Tumor cells and mesenchymal stem cells migrate from the primary tumor site to the bone marrow. Migration of mesenchymal stem cells is osteopontin dependent. In both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines, levels of both cancer-associated fibroblast and stemness markers were 3 to 4 times greater under conditions wherein mesenchymal stem cells were present with osteopontin. Inactivation of extracellular osteopontin with an aptamer decreased migration of mesenchymal stem cells and expression of both cancer-associated fibroblast and stemness markers. Cancer cells exhibited a significantly increased stem cell profile in the presence of cancer

  1. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID

  2. Quantitative study of the drug efflux kinetics from sensitive and MDR human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenguang; Shen, Peng; Cheng, Yiyu

    2007-07-01

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to effective chemotherapy in human cancer, in which P-glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated protein figure prominently. Design and exploitation of novel clinical MDR inhibitors is greatly hindered by a lack of understanding of drug efflux dynamics in drug-sensitive and resistant cells. The aim of our study was to provide a microelectrode method for measuring the multidrug transporter mediated efflux of doxorubicin as well as a corresponding data analysis method for quantifying the efflux kinetic parameters. We performed experiments using carbon fiber microelectrode to detect doxorubicin efflux from a monolayer of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and derived MDR cells (MCF-7/ADR), established a material transport model and proposed a novel inverse method to quantitatively characterize the diffusion dynamics. The kinetic parameters of doxorubicin efflux from MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR cells in the presence or absence of MDR inhibitors were estimated. Our investigations showed the average initial doxorubicin efflux rate of MCF-7/ADR that was 5.2 times faster than of MCF-7. After treatment by tetramethylpyrazine or verapamil, the drug efflux rate of the MCF-7/ADR cells was reduced by about half that of those without inhibitors. The novel methodology presented suggests new and expanded applications for computer-aided reconstruction of the drug efflux process, microelectrode design, and high-throughput drug screening.

  3. Anticancer activity of some polyamine derivatives on human prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szumilak, Marta; Galdyszynska, Malgorzata; Dominska, Kamila; Stanczak, Andrzej; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to expand our knowledge about anticancer activity of some polyamine derivatives with quinoline or chromane as terminal moieties. Tested compounds were evaluated in vitro towards metastatic human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3), human carcinoma (DU145) and mammary gland adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines. Cell viability was estimated on the basis of mitochondrial metabolic activity using water-soluble tetrazolium WST1 to establish effective concentrations of the tested compounds under experimental conditions. Cytotoxic potential of polyamine derivatives was determined by the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase activity released from damaged cells, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, the cell cycle distribution analysis and apoptosis assay. It was revealed that the tested polyamine derivatives differed markedly in their antiproliferative activity. Bischromane derivative 5a exhibited a rather cytostatic than cytotoxic effect on the tested cells, whereas quinoline derivative 3a caused changes in cell membrane integrity, inhibited cell cycle progression, as well as induced apoptosis of prostate and breast cancer cells which suggest its potential application in cancer therapy.

  4. Amyloid precursor protein in human breast cancer: an androgen-induced gene associated with cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kiyoshi; Ito, Shigehiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Shibahara, Yukiko; Ishida, Takanori; Watanabe, Mika; Inoue, Satoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in brain tissue. Recently, APP has been implicated in some human malignancies, and its regulation by androgens has also been demonstrated. Such findings suggest the importance of APP in hormone-dependent breast carcinoma, but APP has not yet been examined in breast carcinoma tissues. Therefore, in this study, we examined the biological and clinical significance of APP in breast carcinoma using immunohistochemistry and in vitro studies. APP immunoreactivity was detected in 57 out of 117 (49%) breast carcinoma tissues examined, and it was positively associated with androgen receptor (AR) expression. APP immunoreactivity was also significantly associated with Ki-67 LI and increased risk of recurrence in the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases, and was an independent prognostic factor in these patients. Subsequent in vitro experiments demonstrated that APP mRNA expression was significantly induced by biologically active androgen dihydrotestosterone in both a dose-dependent and a time-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, which was potently suppressed by an AR blocker hydroxyflutamide. Moreover, cell proliferation activity of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was significantly associated with their APP expression level. These findings suggest that APP is an androgen-induced gene that promotes proliferation activity of breast carcinoma cells. Moreover, APP immunohistochemical status is considered a potent prognostic factor in ER-positive breast cancer patients. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MUTAGENIC ARYL AMINES IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND DNA ADDUCTS IN EXFOLIATED BREAST-DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatic (AA) and heterocyclic amines (HAA) are ubiquitous environmental mutagens present in combustions emissions, fried meats, tobacco smoke, etc., and are suspect human mammary carcinogens. To determine the presence of aryl amines in breast tissue and fluid, we examined exfol...

  7. EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MUTAGENIC ARYL AMINES IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND DNA ADDUCTS IN EXFOLIATED BREAST-DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatic (AA) and heterocyclic amines (HAA) are ubiquitous environmental mutagens present in combustions emissions, fried meats, tobacco smoke, etc., and are suspect human mammary carcinogens. To determine the presence of aryl amines in breast tissue and fluid, we examined exfol...

  8. Anatomy of the lactating human breast redefined with ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, D T; Kent, J C; Hartmann, R A; Hartmann, P E

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to use ultrasound imaging to re-investigate the anatomy of the lactating breast. The breasts of 21 fully lactating women (1-6 months post partum) were scanned using an ACUSON XP10 (5-10 MHz linear array probe). The number of main ducts was measured, ductal morphology was determined, and the distribution of glandular and adipose tissue was recorded. Milk ducts appeared as hypoechoic tubular structures with echogenic walls that often contained echoes. Ducts were easily compressed and did not display typical sinuses. All ducts branched within the areolar radius, the first branch occurring 8.0 +/- 5.5 mm from the nipple. Duct diameter was 1.9 +/- 0.6 mm, 2.0 +/- 90.7 mm and the number of main ducts was 9.6 +/- 2.9, 9.2 +/- 2.9, for left and right breast, respectively. Milk ducts are superficial, easily compressible and echoes within the duct represent fat globules in breastmilk. The low number and size of the ducts, the rapid branching under the areola and the absence of sinuses suggest that ducts transport breastmilk, rather than store it. The distribution of adipose and glandular tissue showed wide variation between women but not between breasts within women. The proportion of glandular and fat tissue and the number and size of ducts were not related to milk production. This study highlights inconsistencies in anatomical literature that impact on breast physiology, breastfeeding management and ultrasound assessment.

  9. Involvement of Human Estrogen Related Receptor Alpha 1 (hERR 1) in Breast Cancer and Hormonally Insensitive Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    Coutts, A., and Watson , P. The pathophysiological role of estrogen receptor variants in human breast cancer, J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 65: 175-80, 1998...breast cancer, Clin Cancer Res. 6: 512-8, 2000. 37. Leygue, E., Dotzlaw, H., Watson , P. H., and Murphy, L. C. Altered estrogen receptor alpha and beta...amphiregulin and CRIPTO in human normal and malignant breast tissues, Int J Cancer. 65: 51-6, 1996. 124. Depowski, P. L., Brien, T. P., Sheehan, C. E

  10. Elucidation of Chromatin Remodeling Machinery Involved in Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    in human breast cancer. Endocrine-Related Cancer 2003; 10:517-536. 10. Shiau AK, Barstad D, Loria PM, et al. The structural basis of estrogen...positive breast cancers? Invasion and Metastasis 1995; 14:329-36. 22. Price JE, Polyzos A, Zhang RD, Daniels MD. Tumorigenicity and metastasis of...Oesterreich S. Estrogen receptor corepressors—a role in human breast cancer. Endocr Relat Cancer 2003;10:517–36. 10. Shiau AK, Barstad D, Loria PM, et

  11. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines.

  12. Developing Breast Cancer Program at Xavier; Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Signaling Pathways Involved in Xenohormone and MEK5 Regulation of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    supporting two junior faculty members to develop BC research projects with a TCC mentor. The third objective will support research training of XU...breast carcinoma expressing activated Erk5 or not existed among clinical breast cancer samples. To determine if well established breast cancer cell lines ...number of human breast carcinoma cell lines (Figure 2). In addition to MCF-7 cells, both T47D and ZR-75 cells are model of ER-positive breast

  13. Sensitizing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Taxol with Shikonin in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Joan; Jackson, Kasey; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Shikonin, a small-molecule natural product which inhibits the activity of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), has been studied as an anti-cancer drug candidate in human cancer models. Here, our results demonstrate that shikonin is able to sensitize human breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by paclitaxel (taxol). Human breast adenocarcinoma MBA-MD-231 cells, which have higher levels of PKM2 expression and activity compared with MCF-7 cells, were selected to study further. The concentrations of shikonin and taxol were first selected at which they did not significantly induce cytotoxicity when treated alone, whereas the combination induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, PKM2 activity was decreased by shikonin, but not by the combination treatment. To identify the potential targets of this combination, human phospho-kinase antibody array analysis was performed and results indicated that the combination treatment inhibited the activation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6 kinases, which are known to contribute to breast cancer progression. Finally, how the combination affects breast cancer cell growth in vivo was tested using a xenograft tumor model. The results indicated that shikonin plus taxol prolonged animal survival and reduced tumor size than the vehicle treatment group. In summary, our results suggest that shikonin has a potential as an adjuvant for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24710512

  14. Sensitizing the therapeutic efficacy of taxol with shikonin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Joan; Jackson, Kasey; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Shikonin, a small-molecule natural product which inhibits the activity of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), has been studied as an anti-cancer drug candidate in human cancer models. Here, our results demonstrate that shikonin is able to sensitize human breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by paclitaxel (taxol). Human breast adenocarcinoma MBA-MD-231 cells, which have higher levels of PKM2 expression and activity compared with MCF-7 cells, were selected to study further. The concentrations of shikonin and taxol were first selected at which they did not significantly induce cytotoxicity when treated alone, whereas the combination induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, PKM2 activity was decreased by shikonin, but not by the combination treatment. To identify the potential targets of this combination, human phospho-kinase antibody array analysis was performed and results indicated that the combination treatment inhibited the activation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6 kinases, which are known to contribute to breast cancer progression. Finally, how the combination affects breast cancer cell growth in vivo was tested using a xenograft tumor model. The results indicated that shikonin plus taxol prolonged animal survival and reduced tumor size than the vehicle treatment group. In summary, our results suggest that shikonin has a potential as an adjuvant for breast cancer therapy.

  15. Degradation of endothelial basement membrane by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C.; Shiu, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    During metastasis, it is believed that tumor cells destroy the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels in order to disseminate through the circulatory system. By radioactively labeling the extracellular matrix produced by primary endothelial cells in vitro, the ability of human breast cancer cells to degrade BM components was studied. We found that T-47D, a human breast cancer line, was able to degrade significant amounts of (35S)methionine-labeled and (3H)proline-labeled BM, but not 35SO4-labeled BM. Six other tumor cell lines of human breast origin were assayed in the same manner and were found to degrade BM to varying degrees. Several non-tumor cell lines tested showed relatively little degrading activity. The use of serum-free medium greatly enhanced degradation of the BM by tumor cells, suggesting a role for naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors in the serum. Direct cell contact with the BM was required for BM degradation, suggesting that the active enzymes are cell associated. The addition of hormones implicated in the etiology of breast cancer did not significantly alter the ability of T-47D cells to degrade the BM. The use of this assay affords future studies on the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  16. Determination of optical parameters of human breast tissue from spatially resolved fluorescence: a diffusion theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Maya S.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Raju, Narisetti Sundar; Pradhan, Asima

    2002-07-01

    We report the measurement of optical transport parameters of pathologically characterized malignant tissues, normal tissues, and different types of benign tumors of the human breast in the visible wavelength region. A spatially resolved steady-state diffuse fluorescence reflectance technique was used to estimate the values for the reduced-scattering coefficient (mu's) and the absorption coefficient (mua) of human breast tissues at three wavelengths (530, 550, and 590 nm). Different breast tissues could be well differentiated from one another, and different benign tumors could also be distinguished by their measured transport parameters. A diffusion theory model was developed to describe fluorescence light energy distribution, especially its spatial variation in a turbid and multiply scattering medium such as human tissue. The validity of the model was checked with a Monte Carlo simulation and also with different tissue phantoms prepared with polystyrene microspheres as scatterers, riboflavin as fluorophores, and methylene blue as absorbers.

  17. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, F.; Pagliazzi, M.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy.

  18. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer.

  19. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  20. Combined photoacoustic and acoustic imaging of human breast specimens in the mammographic geometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    A photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of near-infrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photoacoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression.

  1. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro.

  2. Triple negative tumors accumulate significantly less methylglyoxal specific adducts than other human breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Durieux, Florence; Bianchi, Elettra; Turtoi, Andrei; Peulen, Olivier; Peixoto, Paul; Irigaray, Philippe; Uchida, Koji; Belpomme, Dominique; Delvenne, Philippe; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of breast cancer development and progression. Methylglyoxal (MG), a glycolysis by-product, is generated through a non-enzymatic reaction from triose-phosphate intermediates. This dicarbonyl compound is highly reactive and contributes to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine, a MG-arginine adduct, in human breast adenocarcinoma and we observed a consistent increase of Arg-pyrimidine in cancer cells when compared with the non-tumoral counterpart. Further immunohistochemical comparative analysis of breast cancer subtypes revealed that triple negative lesions exhibited low accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine compared with other subtypes. Interestingly, the activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1), an enzyme that detoxifies MG, was significantly higher in triple negative than in other subtype lesions, suggesting that these aggressive tumors are able to develop an efficient response against dicarbonyl stress. Using breast cancer cell lines, we substantiated these clinical observations by showing that, in contrast to triple positive, triple negative cells induced Glo-1 expression and activity in response to MG treatment. This is the first report that Arg-pyrimidine adduct accumulation is a consistent event in human breast cancer with a differential detection between triple negative and other breast cancer subtypes. PMID:24978626

  3. A comparison of vitamin D activity in paired non-malignant and malignant human breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Suetani, Rachel J; Ho, Kristen; Jindal, Shalini; Manavis, Jim; Neilsen, Paul M; Pishas, Kathleen I; Rippy, Elisabeth; Bochner, Melissa; Kollias, James; Gill, P Grantley; Morris, Howard A; Callen, David F

    2012-10-15

    Links between a low vitamin D status and an increased risk of breast cancer have been observed in epidemiological studies. These links have been investigated in human tissue homogenates and cultured cell lines. We have used non-malignant, malignant and normal reduction mammoplasty breast tissues to investigate the biological and metabolic consequences of the application of vitamin D to intact ex vivo human breast tissue. Tissues were exposed to 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) (1,25D; active metabolite) and 25(OH)D (25D; pre-metabolite). Changes in mRNA expression and protein expression after vitamin D exposure were analysed. Results indicate that while responses in normal and non-malignant breast tissues are similar between individuals, different tumour tissues are highly variable with regards to their gene expression and biological response. Collectively, malignant breast tissue responds well to active 1,25D, but not to the inactive pre-metabolite 25D. This may have consequences for the recommendation of vitamin D supplementation in breast cancer patients.

  4. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites. PMID:23118918

  5. Triple negative tumors accumulate significantly less methylglyoxal specific adducts than other human breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chiavarina, Barbara; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Durieux, Florence; Bianchi, Elettra; Turtoi, Andrei; Peulen, Olivier; Peixoto, Paul; Irigaray, Philippe; Uchida, Koji; Belpomme, Dominique; Delvenne, Philippe; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2014-07-30

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of breast cancer development and progression. Methylglyoxal (MG), a glycolysis by-product, is generated through a non-enzymatic reaction from triose-phosphate intermediates. This dicarbonyl compound is highly reactive and contributes to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine, a MG-arginine adduct, in human breast adenocarcinoma and we observed a consistent increase of Arg-pyrimidine in cancer cells when compared with the non-tumoral counterpart. Further immunohistochemical comparative analysis of breast cancer subtypes revealed that triple negative lesions exhibited low accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine compared with other subtypes. Interestingly, the activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1), an enzyme that detoxifies MG, was significantly higher in triple negative than in other subtype lesions, suggesting that these aggressive tumors are able to develop an efficient response against dicarbonyl stress. Using breast cancer cell lines, we substantiated these clinical observations by showing that, in contrast to triple positive, triple negative cells induced Glo-1 expression and activity in response to MG treatment. This is the first report that Arg-pyrimidine adduct accumulation is a consistent event in human breast cancer with a differential detection between triple negative and other breast cancer subtypes.

  6. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogan-Ryan, A; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-04-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone and liver involvement. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was also measured. Significantly elevated serum sialic acid concentrations were found in breast cancer, and showed correlation with tumour stage. Serum sialic acid values did not correlate with CEA values. The results suggest that measurement of serum sialic acid concentrations may be of adjunctive value in assessing tumour stage.

  7. Raman microspectroscopy of Hematoporphyrins. Imaging of the noncancerous and the cancerous human breast tissues with photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozek-Pluska, B.; Kopec, M.

    2016-12-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with fluorescence were used to study the distribution of Hematoporphyrin (Hp) in noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues. The results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissue and to identify differences in the distribution and photodegradation of Hematoporphyrin, which is a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT), photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of cancer. Presented results show that Hematoporphyrin level in the noncancerous breast tissue is lower compared to the cancerous one. We have proved also that the Raman intensity of lipids and proteins doesn't change dramatically after laser light irradiation, which indicates that the PDT treatment destroys preferably cancer cells, in which the photosensitizer is accumulated. The specific subcellular localization of photosensitizer for breast tissues samples soaked with Hematoporphyrin was not observed.

  8. [Menstrual blood and human milk. Reflections and new proposals on breast-feeding in ancient Greece].

    PubMed

    Pedrucci, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Within a larger study on breast-feeding in ancient Greece, we dwelt on four subjects (the superstitions concerning menstrual blood, milk and dairy products consumption by the Athenians, different kinds of milk and beliefs related to the transmission of hereditary characteristics through human milk, the connection between milk, breast and madness) on which we have identified a certain number of neglected sources. Starting from these, we can gain not only some mosaic tiles of the overall fragmentary view on habits and beliefs about breast-feeding, but also, more generally, helpful hints on some aspects of the Greek world and mentality that we barely know. In attempting to reach some general conclusions, we have also considered the iconographic sources, trying to explain, in part at least, the reason for the almost complete absence of scenes of breast-feeding in the archaic and classical art.

  9. Disposition of soy isoflavones in normal human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Bolca, Selin; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Blondeel, Phillip; Roche, Nathalie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Possemiers, Sam; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Botting, Nigel; De Keukeleire, Denis; Bracke, Marc; Heyerick, Arne; Manach, Claudine; Depypere, Herman

    2010-04-01

    Despite decades of research on the relation between soy and breast cancer, questions regarding the absorption, metabolism, and distribution of isoflavones in breast tissue largely remain unanswered. We evaluated the potential health effects of isoflavone consumption on normal breast tissue; isoflavone concentrations, metabolites, and biodistribution were investigated and compared with 17beta-estradiol exposure. In this dietary intervention study, healthy women were randomly allocated to a soy milk (n = 11; 16.98-mg genistein and 5.40-mg daidzein aglycone equivalents per dose), soy supplement (n = 10; 5.27-mg genistein and 17.56-mg daidzein aglycone equivalents per dose), or control (n = 10) group. After a run-in period > or = 4 d, 3 doses of soy milk or soy supplements were taken daily for 5 d before an esthetic breast reduction. Blood and breast biopsies were collected during surgery and analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After soy administration, genistein and total daidzein concentrations, which were expressed as aglycone equivalents, ranged from 135.1 to 2831 nmol/L and 105.1 to 1397 nmol/L, respectively, in hydrolyzed serum and from 92.33 to 493.8 pmol/g and 22.15 to 770.8 pmol/g, respectively, in hydrolyzed breast tissue. The major metabolites identified in nonhydrolyzed samples were genistein-7-O-glucuronide and daidzein-7-O-glucuronide, with an overall glucuronidation of 98%. Total isoflavones showed a breast adipose/glandular tissue distribution of 40:60, and their mean (+/-SEM) derived 17beta-estradiol equivalents toward estrogen receptor beta were 21 +/- 4-fold and 40 +/- 10-fold higher than the 17beta-estradiol concentrations in adipose (0.283 +/- 0.089 pmol/g, P < 0.001) and glandular (0.246 +/- 0.091 pmol/g, P = 0.001) fractions, respectively. After intake of soy milk and soy supplements, isoflavones reach exposure levels in breast tissue at which potential health effects may occur.

  10. Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    ligands which bind to EGFR, including EGF, TGF- 4 a a a, amphiregulin, and cripto - 1, and by the capability of EGFR to transactivate other type-I tyrosine...amplification in breast cancer was recently reported by Watson et al. (69). In this analysis, encompassing over 5,000 breast tumors, the amplification rate was...activation of c-myc oncogene expression. Oncogene 7: 1587-1594. 58. Shiu, R., Watson , P. and Dubik, D. (1993) C-myc oncogene expression in estrogen

  11. Precancerous model of human breast epithelial cells induced by NNK for prevention.

    PubMed

    Siriwardhana, Nalin; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations have suggested that exposure to tobacco and environmental carcinogens increase the risk of developing human breast cancer. In light of the chronic exposure of human breast tissues to tobacco and environmental carcinogens, we have taken an approach of analyzing cellular changes of immortalized non-cancerous human breast epithelial MCF10A cells during the acquisition of cancerous properties induced by repeated exposure to the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) at a low concentration of 100 pM. We found that accumulated exposures of MCF10A cells to NNK result in progressive development of cellular carcinogenesis from a stage of immortalization to precancerous sub-stages of acquiring a reduced dependence on growth factors and acquiring anchorage-independent growth. Using Matrigel for MCF10A cells to form size-restricted acini, we detected that exposures to NNK resulted in altered acinar conformation. Analysis of gene expression profiles by cDNA microarrays revealed up- and down-regulated genes associated with NNK-induced carcinogenesis. Using this cellular carcinogenesis model as a target system to identify anticancer agents, we detected that grape seed proanthocyanadin extract significantly suppressed NNK-induced carcinogenesis of MCF10A cells. Our studies provide a carcinogenesis-cellular model mimicking the accumulative exposure to carcinogens in the progression of human breast epithelial cells to increasingly acquire cancerous properties, as likely occurs in the development of precancerous human breast cells. Our cellular model also serves as a cost-efficient, in vitro system to identify preventive agents that inhibit human breast cell carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposures to carcinogens.

  12. Human mitochondrial pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 promotes invasiveness and impacts survival in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiefeng; Kuo, Mei-Ling; Su, Leila; Xue, Lijun; Luh, Frank; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Jianghai; Lin, Tiffany G; Zhang, Keqiang; Chu, Peiguo; Zheng, Shu; Liu, Xiyong; Yen, Yun

    2017-04-03

    Human mitochondrial pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PYCR) is a house-keeping enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to proline. This enzymatic cycle plays pivotal roles in amino acid metabolism, intracellular redox potential and mitochondrial integrity. Here, we hypothesize that PYCR1 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, breast cancer tissue samples were obtained from Zhejiang University (ZJU set). Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to detect the protein level of PYCR1, and Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional analyses were employed in this outcome study. The prognostic significance and performance of PYCR1 mRNA were validated on 13 worldwide independent microarray data sets, composed of 2500 assessable breast cancer cases. Our findings revealed that both PYCR1 mRNA and protein expression were significantly associated with tumor size, grade and invasive molecular subtypes of breast cancers. Independent and pooled analyses verified that higher PYCR1 mRNA levels were significantly associated with poor survival of breast cancer patients, regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. For in vitro studies, inhibition of PYCR1 by small-hairpin RNA significantly reduced the growth and invasion capabilities of the cells, while enhancing the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 (ER positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER negative). Further population study also validated that chemotherapy significantly improved survival in early-stage breast cancer patients with low PYCR1 expression levels. Therefore, PYCR1 might serve as a prognostic biomaker for either ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer subtypes and can also be a potential target for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain LC33 Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Jéssica B.; de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimarães, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain LC33, isolated from human breast milk in Brazil. This microorganism has been typed as ST1/t127/sccmecV. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome sequence of a methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain isolated from human breast milk. PMID:28408673

  14. Constitutive expression of hZnT4 zinc transporter in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Agnes A; Allen, Justin; Blomeley, Rachael C; Ackland, M Leigh

    2002-05-15

    Zinc is an essential trace element required by all living organisms. An adequate supply of zinc is particularly important in the neonatal period. Zinc is a significant component of breast milk, which is transported across the maternal epithelia during lactation. The mechanisms by which zinc becomes a constituent of breast milk have not been elucidated. The function of the zinc transporter ZnT4 in the transport of zinc into milk during lactation was previously demonstrated by studies of a mouse mutant, the 'lethal milk' mouse, where a mutation in the ZnT4 gene decreased the transport of zinc into milk. In the present study, we have investigated the expression of the human orthologue of ZnT4 (hZnT4) in the human breast. We detected hZnT4 mRNA expression in the tissue from the resting and lactating human breast, using reverse-transcriptase PCR. Western-blot analysis using antibodies to peptide sequences of hZnT4 detected a major band of the predicted size of 47 kDa and a minor band of 77 kDa, in extracts from the resting and lactating breast tissues. There was no difference in the hZnT4 expression levels between lactating and resting breasts. The hZnT4 protein was present in the luminal cells of the ducts and alveoli where it had a granular distribution. A cultured human breast epithelial cell line PMC42 was used to investigate the subcellular distribution of hZnT4 and this showed a granular label throughout the cytoplasm, consistent with a vesicular localization. The presence of zinc-containing intracellular vesicles was demonstrated by using the zinc-specific fluorphore Zinquin (ethyl-[2-methyl-8-p-toluenesulphonamido-6-quinolyloxy]acetate). Double labelling indicated that there was no obvious overlap between Zinquin and the hZnT4 protein, suggesting that hZnT4 was not directly involved in the transport of zinc into vesicles. We detected expression of two other members of the hZnT family, hZnT1 and hZnT3, in human breast epithelial cells. We conclude that hZnT4 is

  15. Relevance of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance genes in human breast cancer progression and tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Ton; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; Look, Maxime P; Smid, Marcel; Veldscholte, Jos; Sleijfer, Stefan; Foekens, John A; Dorssers, Lambert C J

    2009-02-01

    We have previously identified a set of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance (BCAR) genes causing estrogen independence and tamoxifen resistance in vitro using a functional genetic screen. Here, we explored whether these BCAR genes provide predictive value for tamoxifen resistance and prognostic information for tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients. mRNA levels of 10 BCAR genes (AKT1, AKT2, BCAR1, BCAR3, EGFR, ERBB2, GRB7, SRC, TLE3, and TRERF1) were measured in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Normalized mRNA levels were evaluated for association with progression-free survival (PFS) in 242 patients receiving tamoxifen as first-line monotherapy for recurrent disease, and with distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) in 413 lymph node-negative (LNN) primary breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Concerning tamoxifen resistance, BCAR3, ERBB2, GRB7, and TLE3 mRNA levels were predictive for PFS, independent of traditional predictive factors. By combining GRB7 (or ERBB2) and TLE3 mRNA levels, patients could be classified in three subgroups with distinct PFS. For the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness, AKT2, EGFR, and TRERF1 mRNA levels were all significantly associated with MFS, independent of traditional prognostic factors. Using the combined AKT2 and EGFR mRNA status, four prognostic groups were identified with different MFS outcomes. The majority of BCAR genes, which were revealed to confer tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independence in vitro by functional screening, have clinical relevance, and associate with tamoxifen resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients.

  16. Current state of mTOR targeting in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Wazir, Ali; Khanzada, Zubair S; Jiang, Wen G; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian, or mechanistic, target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in several models of human oncogenesis. Research in the role of mTOR in human oncogenesis remains a field of intense activity. In this mini-review, we intend to recount our current understanding of the mTOR pathway, its interactions, and its role in human carcinogenesis in general, and breast cancer in particular. We herein outline the discrete components of the two complexes of mTOR, and attempt to define their distinct roles and interactions. Furthermore, we review current developments in the therapeutic targeting of mTOR in human breast cancer. Our understanding of the organisation and interactions of the mTOR pathway continues to evolve. There has been significant incremental, albeit slow, progress in the therapeutic targeting of the mTOR pathway in human breast cancer. Continued progress in the field would require a better understanding of the role of the mTOR pathway in human breast cancer. By summarizing the current literature, this review will provide useful information on the topic. Copyright© 2014, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Roles and regulation of stat family transcription factors in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Charles V

    2004-11-01

    Stats (for signal transducers and activators of transcription) are a family of transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Their activity is latent until phosphorylation by receptor-associated kinases. A sizable body of data from cell lines, mouse models, and human tissues now implicates these transcription factors in the oncogenesis of breast cancer. Because Stat activity is modulated by several posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions, these transcription factors are capable of integrating inputs from multiple signaling networks. Given this, the future utilization of Stats as prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in human breast cancer appears likely.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by a pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    By using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz, we were able to induce apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The apoptotic changes in cells with plasma treatment were detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence staining assay. A significant portion of these cells was observed to exhibit the apoptotic fragmentation. Helium plasma with additive O2 gas was found to be effective in the induction of apoptosis. This plasma jet provides an effective mode of human breast cancer cell therapy.

  19. Identification Of Molecular Structures Of Normal And Pathological Human Breast Tissue Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    Scattering profiles of human breast tissues were measured by x-ray diffraction using a synchrotron radiation source in order to identify their structural features at molecular level (0.70≤q≤70.55 nm-1). Several parameters were extracted from these scattering profiles and statistically assessed using discriminant analysis. From this analysis, only the ratio between the peak intensities at q = 19.8 nm-1 and at q = 13.9 nm-1, as well as the FWHM were statistically significant and allowed distinguishing the human breast tissues with high accuracy, mainly for benign samples where it was found values of sensitivity and specificity of 100%.

  20. American Ginseng in the Prevention and Treatment of Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    This study is examining the effects of American ginseng on human breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. An extract of American... ginseng was shown to significantly decrease MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 for... ginseng extract on MCF-7 cell proliferation was 1.1 x 10(exp -3) g/ml, and for MDA-MB-231 cells the IC50 was 2.3 x 10(exp -3) g/ml. The ginseng extract

  1. Evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in normal and breast tumor tissues and their link with breast cancer prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Furrer, Daniela; Lemieux, Julie; Côté, Marc-André; Provencher, Louise; Laflamme, Christian; Barabé, Frédéric; Jacob, Simon; Michaud, Annick; Diorio, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene is associated with worse prognosis and decreased overall survival in breast cancer patients. The HER2 gene contains several polymorphisms; two of the best-characterized HER2 polymorphisms are Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these two HER2 polymorphisms in normal breast and breast cancer tissues and known breast cancer prognostic factors in a retrospective cohort study of 73 women with non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. HER2 polymorphisms were assessed in breast cancer tissue and normal breast tissue using TaqMan assay. Ala1170Pro polymorphism in normal breast tissue was associated with age at diagnosis (p = 0.007), tumor size (p = 0.004) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.06). Similar significant associations in cancer tissues were observed. No association between the Ile655Val polymorphism and prognostic factors were observed. However, we found significant differences in the distribution of Ile655Val (p = 0.03) and Ala1170Pro (p = 0.01) genotypes between normal breast and breast tumor tissues. This study demonstrates that only the Ala1170Pro polymorphism is associated with prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Moreover, our results suggest that both HER2 polymorphisms could play a significant role in carcinogenesis in non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer women.

  2. Nuclear detection of Y-box protein-1 (YB-1) closely associates with progesterone receptor negativity and is a strong adverse survival factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Edgar; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Wiesmann, Frank; Krings, Renate; Djudjaj, Sonja; Breuer, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Thomas; Wild, Peter J; Hartmann, Arndt; Dunn, Sandra E; Mertens, Peter R

    2009-11-24

    Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is the prototypic member of the cold shock protein family that fulfills numerous cellular functions. In the nucleus YB-1 protein orchestrates transcription of proliferation-related genes, whereas in the cytoplasm it associates with mRNA and directs translation. In human tumor entities, such as breast, lung and prostate cancer, cellular YB-1 expression indicates poor clinical outcome, suggesting that YB-1 is an attractive marker to predict patients' prognosis and, potentially, is suitable to individualize treatment protocols. Given these predictive qualities of YB-1 detection we sought to establish a highly specific monoclonal antibody (Mab) for diagnostic testing and its characterization towards outcome prediction (relapse-free and overall survival). Hybridoma cell generation was carried out with recombinant YB-1 protein as immunogen and Mab characterization was performed using immunoblotting and ELISA with recombinant and tagged YB-1 proteins, as well as immunohistochemistry of healthy and breast cancer specimens. Breast tumor tissue array staining results were analyzed for correlations with receptor expression and outcome parameters. YB-1-specific Mab F-E2G5 associates with conformational binding epitopes mapping to two domains within the N-terminal half of the protein and detects nuclear YB-1 protein by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Prognostic evaluation of Mab F-E2G5 was performed by immunohistochemistry of a human breast cancer tissue microarray comprising 179 invasive breast cancers, 8 ductal carcinoma in situ and 37 normal breast tissue samples. Nuclear YB-1 detection in human breast cancer cells was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.0046). We observed a close correlation between nuclear YB-1 detection and absence of progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.002), indicating that nuclear YB-1 detection marks a specific subgroup of breast cancer. Likely due to limitation of sample size

  3. Novel Angiogenic Domains: Use in Identifying Unique Transforming and Tumor Promoting Pathways in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)bz !and thus of the PTN signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Objective I...activated protein kinase C (PKC)-d was found in MCF-7-Ptn and the CAF-like cells and both human and murine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 was...7], summarized in [8]). The human , bovine, mouse, and rat PTN proteins are very highly conserved and share over 50% identity in amino acid se- quence

  4. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  5. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  6. Lactation and stress: protective effects of breast-feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Markus; Neumann, Inga; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2002-09-01

    Whilst most research on breast-feeding has been designed to assess its importance for infant health or to find a human nutrient replacement for infant formula, the effects of breast-feeding on maternal health have received little scientific attention. In several animal studies lactation has been shown to be associated with a marked blunting of physiological and behavioral responses to physical and psychological stress. However, the literature on the effects of lactation on stress in humans remains limited. This review focuses primarily on recent findings on the effects of breast-feeding on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to acute stress exposure in lactating women. The available data suggest that breast-feeding suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to physical and psychosocial stress. However, lactation in women, in contrast to lactating rats, does not seem to result in a general restraint of the endocrine stress response during the whole period of lactation. Recent data strongly suggest that the blunted HPA axis response to stress in women seems to be counterbalanced if the acute stressor, at least when of a psychosocial nature, occurs later than 1 h after suckling. Further elucidation of the underlying psychobiological mechanisms involved in suppressed stress responses during lactation will no doubt lead to new insights into improved health sequelae of breast-feeding in women and to a better understanding of the psychobiology of human stress protection in general.

  7. Quercetin inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via Bcl-2 and Bax regulation.

    PubMed

    Duo, Jian; Ying, Guo-Guang; Wang, Guo-Wen; Zhang, Li

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the breast. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the flavonoid compound quercetin on the growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. Varying concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200 µM) of quercetin were applied to cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells for defined lengths of time. At 50 to 200 µM doses, quercetin significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells assessed by MTT colorimetry, in both dose- and time-dependent manners (P<0.05). The compound also increased apoptosis after 48 h of exposure (P<0.05). Furthermore, following quercetin treatment Bcl-2 expression decreased significantly while Bax expression increased significantly (P<0.05). In brief, quercetin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The mechanisms behind these effects may stem from the downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression and upregulation of Bax expression.

  8. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  9. Complement inhibitor CSMD1 acts as tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Okroj, Marcin; Owen, Sioned; Jirström, Karin; Orimo, Akira; Jiang, Wen G.; Pietras, Kristian; Blom, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a membrane-bound complement inhibitor suggested to act as a putative tumor suppressor gene, since allelic loss of this region encompassing 8p23 including CSMD1 characterizes various malignancies. Here, we assessed the role of CSMD1 as a tumor suppressor gene in the development of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that human breast tumor tissues expressed CSMD1 at lower levels compared to that in normal mammary tissues. The decreased expression of CSMD1 was linked to a shorter overall survival of breast cancer patients. We also revealed that expression of CSMD1 in human breast cancer cells BT-20 and MDA-MB-231 significantly inhibited their malignant phenotypes, including migration, adhesion and invasion. Conversely, stable silencing of CSMD1 expression in T47D cells enhanced cancer cell migratory, adherent and clonogenic abilities. Moreover, expression of CSMD1 in the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells diminished their signaling potential as well as their stem cell-like properties as assessed by measurement of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. In a xenograft model, expression of CSMD1 blocked the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to secondary sites in vivo, likely via inhibiting local invasion but not the extravasation into distant tissues. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the role of CSMD1 as a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer. PMID:27764775

  10. Establishment of a novel human medulloblastoma cell line characterized by highly aggressive stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Pereira, Márcia Cristina Leite; Matushita, Hamilton; Costa, Silvia Souza da; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive brain tumor and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality related to childhood cancer. These tumors display differential ability to metastasize and respond to treatment, which reflects their high degree of heterogeneity at the genetic and molecular levels. Such heterogeneity of medulloblastoma brings an additional challenge to the understanding of its physiopathology and impacts the development of new therapeutic strategies. This translational effort has been the focus of most pre-clinical studies which invariably employ experimental models using human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, compared to other cancers, relatively few cell lines of human medulloblastoma are available in central repositories, partly due to the rarity of these tumors and to the intrinsic difficulties in establishing continuous cell lines from pediatric brain tumors. Here, we report the establishment of a new human medulloblastoma cell line which, in comparison with the commonly used and well-established cell line Daoy, is characterized by enhanced proliferation and invasion capabilities, stem cell properties, increased chemoresistance, tumorigenicity in an orthotopic metastatic model, replication of original medulloblastoma behavior in vivo, strong chromosome structural instability and deregulation of genes involved in neural development. These features are advantageous for designing biologically relevant experimental models in clinically oriented studies, making this novel cell line, named USP-13-Med, instrumental for the study of medulloblastoma biology and treatment.

  11. Identification and quantification of innate immune system mediators in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Armogida, Sheila A; Yannaras, Niki M; Melton, Alton L; Srivastava, Maya D

    2004-01-01

    Breast-feeding decreases the risk of breast cancer in mothers and infection, allergy, and autoimmunity in infants. The presence of mediators of the innate immune system in human milk, including soluble defensins, cathelicidins, and toll-like receptors (TLRs), has not been researched thoroughly. The whey fractions of colostrum and transitional and mature milk (n = 40) from normal mothers (n = 18) and from mothers with autoimmune or allergic diseases (n = 22) were analyzed for defensins by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for defensins, TLRs, and cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide (LL-37) by cells in breast milk was determined by semiquantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In whey, human neutrophil-derived a-defensin 1 (HNP-1) and human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2) were present in the highest concentrations (median, 33.0 and 31.3 microg/mL, respectively), human alpha-defensin 6 (HD-6) was present in moderate amounts (3.1 microg/mL), and HD-5 and HBD-1 were present in the lowest concentrations (2.4 and 1.7 microg/mL, respectively). There was great variability of defensin levels between subjects, but there was no relation to autoimmune or allergic diagnosis. HNP-1, HD-5, and HD-6 were present in significantly higher levels in colostrum than in mature milk. Regarding defensin mRNA expression in the breast milk cells, 95% of the samples (n = 41) were positive for HBD-1, 68% were positive for HD-5, 22% were positive for HBD-3, 15% were positive for HBD-2, 5% were positive for HBD-4, and 2% were positive for HD-6; 88% (14/16) were positive for HNP-1. Breast milk cells also expressed mRNA for TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, TLR9, CD14, and LL-37. Human breast milk contains high concentrations of multiple defensin proteins and cells in breast milk express mRNA for these defensins, multiple TLRs, and LL-37. The innate immune system in breast milk is complex and likely provides protection

  12. Anatomy of the lactating human breast redefined with ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, DT; Kent, JC; Hartmann, RA; Hartman, PE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use ultrasound imaging to re-investigate the anatomy of the lactating breast. The breasts of 21 fully lactating women (1–6 months post partum) were scanned using an ACUSON XP10 (5–10 MHz linear array probe). The number of main ducts was measured, ductal morphology was determined, and the distribution of glandular and adipose tissue was recorded. Milk ducts appeared as hypoechoic tubular structures with echogenic walls that often contained echoes. Ducts were easily compressed and did not display typical sinuses. All ducts branched within the areolar radius, the first branch occurring 8.0 ± 5.5 mm from the nipple. Duct diameter was 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, 2.0 ± 90.7 mm and the number of main ducts was 9.6 ± 2.9, 9.2 ± 2.9, for left and right breast, respectively. Milk ducts are superficial, easily compressible and echoes within the duct represent fat globules in breastmilk. The low number and size of the ducts, the rapid branching under the areola and the absence of sinuses suggest that ducts transport breastmilk, rather than store it. The distribution of adipose and glandular tissue showed wide variation between women but not between breasts within women. The proportion of glandular and fat tissue and the number and size of ducts were not related to milk production. This study highlights inconsistencies in anatomical literature that impact on breast physiology, breastfeeding management and ultrasound assessment. PMID:15960763

  13. A genomic analysis of mouse models of breast cancer reveals molecular features of mouse models and relationships to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hollern, Daniel P; Andrechek, Eran R

    2014-06-05

    Genomic variability limits the efficacy of breast cancer therapy. To simplify the study of the molecular complexity of breast cancer, researchers have used mouse mammary tumor models. However, the degree to which mouse models model human breast cancer and are reflective of the human heterogeneity has yet to be demonstrated with gene expression studies on a large scale. To this end, we have built a database consisting of 1,172 mouse mammary tumor samples from 26 different major oncogenic mouse mammary tumor models. In this dataset we identified heterogeneity within mouse models and noted a surprising amount of interrelatedness between models, despite differences in the tumor initiating oncogene. Making comparisons between models, we identified differentially expressed genes with alteration correlating with initiating events in each model. Using annotation tools, we identified transcription factors with a high likelihood of activity within these models. Gene signatures predicted activation of major cell signaling pathways in each model, predictions that correlated with previous genetic studies. Finally, we noted relationships between mouse models and human breast cancer at both the level of gene expression and predicted signal pathway activity. Importantly, we identified individual mouse models that recapitulate human breast cancer heterogeneity at the level of gene expression. This work underscores the importance of fully characterizing mouse tumor biology at molecular, histological and genomic levels before a valid comparison to human breast cancer may be drawn and provides an important bioinformatic resource.

  14. Does Dietary Iodine Regulate Oxidative Stress and Adiponectin Levels in Human Breast Milk?

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 847–853. PMID:24001137

  15. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  16. Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0056 TITLE: Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression PRINCIPAL...to 09-29-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...previously established a positive correlation between a fibrotic phenotype in human breast tumors — especially the HER2 and Basal-like breast cancer subtypes

  17. Establishment and characterization of a new highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line derived from Saos2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Fan, Qiming; Tu, Bing; Yan, Wei; Tang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone in adolescents and young adults. There is a shortage of tumorigenic and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell lines that can be used for metastasis study. Here we establish and characterize a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that is derived from Saos2 cell line based on bioluminescence. The occasional pulmonary metastatic cells developed from Saos2 were isolated, harvested, characterized and named Saos2-l. The parental Saos2 and Saos2-l cells were further characterized both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that Saos2-l cells demonstrated increased cell adhesion, migration and invasion compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Conversely, Saos2-l cells grew at a slightly slower rate than that of the parental cells. When injected into nude mice, Saos2-l cells had a greater increase in developing pulmonary metastases compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Further transcriptional profiling analysis revealed that some gene expression were up-regulated or down-regulated in the highly metastatic Saos2-l cells, indicating possible influencing factors of metastasis. Thus, we have established and characterized a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that should serve as a valuable tool for future investigations on the pathogenesis, metastasis and potential treatments of human osteosarcoma. PMID:25031706

  18. Establishment of a Novel Primary Human Skeletal Myoblast Cellular Model for Chikungunya Virus Infection and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khairunnisa' Mohamed; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-02-19

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus known to cause chronic myalgia and arthralgia and is now considered endemic in countries across Asia and Africa. The tissue tropism of CHIKV infection in humans remains, however, ill-defined. Due to the fact that myositis is commonly observed in most patients infected with CHIKV, we sought to develop a clinically relevant cellular model to better understand the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection. In this study, primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) were established as a novel human primary cell line that is highly permissive to CHIKV infection, with maximal amounts of infectious virions observed at 16 hours post infection. Genome-wide microarray profiling analyses were subsequently performed to identify and map genes that are differentially expressed upon CHIKV infection. Infection of HSMM cells with CHIKV resulted in altered expressions of host genes involved in skeletal- and muscular-associated disorders, innate immune responses, cellular growth and death, host metabolism and virus replication. Together, this study has shown the establishment of a clinically relevant primary human cell model that paves the way for the further analysis of host factors and their involvement in the various stages of CHIKV replication cycle and viral pathogenesis.

  19. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Establish Human System Interface Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Across all fields of human-system interface design it is vital to posses a sound methodology dictating the constraints on the system based on the capabilities of the human user. These limitations may be based on strength, mobility, dexterity, cognitive ability, etc. and combinations thereof. Data collected in an isolated environment to determine, for example, maximal strength or maximal range of motion would indeed be adequate for establishing not-to-exceed type design limitations, however these restraints on the system may be excessive over what is basally needed. Resources may potentially be saved by having a technique to determine the minimum measurements a system must accommodate. This paper specifically deals with the creation of a novel methodology for establishing mobility requirements for a new generation of space suit design concepts. Historically, the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station vehicle and space hardware design requirements documents such as the Man-Systems Integration Standards and International Space Station Flight Crew Integration Standard explicitly stated that the designers should strive to provide the maximum joint range of motion capabilities exhibited by a minimally clothed human subject. In the course of developing the Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) for the new space exploration initiative (Constellation), an effort was made to redefine the mobility requirements in the interest of safety and cost. Systems designed for manned space exploration can receive compounded gains from simplified designs that are both initially less expensive to produce and lighter, thereby, cheaper to launch.

  20. Establishment of a Novel Primary Human Skeletal Myoblast Cellular Model for Chikungunya Virus Infection and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khairunnisa’ Mohamed; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus known to cause chronic myalgia and arthralgia and is now considered endemic in countries across Asia and Africa. The tissue tropism of CHIKV infection in humans remains, however, ill-defined. Due to the fact that myositis is commonly observed in most patients infected with CHIKV, we sought to develop a clinically relevant cellular model to better understand the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection. In this study, primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) were established as a novel human primary cell line that is highly permissive to CHIKV infection, with maximal amounts of infectious virions observed at 16 hours post infection. Genome-wide microarray profiling analyses were subsequently performed to identify and map genes that are differentially expressed upon CHIKV infection. Infection of HSMM cells with CHIKV resulted in altered expressions of host genes involved in skeletal- and muscular-associated disorders, innate immune responses, cellular growth and death, host metabolism and virus replication. Together, this study has shown the establishment of a clinically relevant primary human cell model that paves the way for the further analysis of host factors and their involvement in the various stages of CHIKV replication cycle and viral pathogenesis. PMID:26892458

  1. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  2. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  3. Collaborative study for the establishment of replacement batches for human coagulation factor IX concentrate reference standards.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; Pickering, W; Hockley, J; Rigsby, P; Weinstein, M; Terao, E; Buchheit, K-H

    2008-12-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 1, the World Health Organisation (WHO) 3rd International Standard, Human (IS, 96/854) and the FDA Standard for human blood coagulation Factor IX concentrate have been available since 1996, following their establishment by a common collaborative study. Due to dwindling stocks of all three standards, a new WHO-EDQM-FDA tri-partite collaborative study was launched to establish replacement batches. Thirty laboratories from fourteen countries took part in the collaborative study to assign potency values to candidate preparations. Three candidates, one of recombinant and two of human plasma-derived origins, were assayed against the 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factor IX, Concentrate, Human (96/854). The 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factors II, VII, IX and X, Plasma, Human (99/826) was also included to evaluate the relationship between the factor IX plasma and concentrate unitage. Thirty-two sets of clotting assay results and two sets of chromogenic assay data were analysed. There was a significant difference in potency estimates by these two methods for the recombinant candidate (sample B) and the plasma IS (sample P). Similar potency values were obtained for the plasma derived products (monoclonal antibody- and chromatography-purified factor IX, samples C and D) by clotting and chromogenic assays. For the clotting assays, intra-laboratory variability (GCV) was found to range from 0.5 - 21.7%, with the GCV for the majority of laboratories being less than 10%. Good inter-laboratory agreement, with the majority of the GCV being less than 10% (GCV range = 4.7 - 10.6 %) was also obtained. The mean potency values estimated by the clotting assay using plasma as pre-diluent (as directed by the Ph. Eur. general chapter method) did not differ from values obtained using buffer. Taking into account the preliminary stability data, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, and the differences

  4. [Establishment of human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line XPTS-1 and animal model of human infancy hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Xiao, Xiao-e; Xu, Quan; Guo, Zheng-tuan

    2011-03-01

    To establish an immortalized human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line (HemEC) and animal model of human infancy hemangioma. Hemangioma-derived endothelial cells from specimen of human infancy hemangioma were cultured in vitro and monocloed, and then its growth curve was made, karyomorphism of chromosome analyzed, morphologic characteristics observe, factor VIII related antigen identified by immunohistochemical method.Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) was detected by flow cytometry. HemEC were inoculated subcutaneously in athymic mouse to establish animal model of infancy hemangioma. The animal model was observed closely and its pathological characteristic was also studied. The cultural cells grew active, and immortalized spontaneously when they were subcultured on sixteenth generation. This cell line was cultivated for more than 70 times within one year and in good condition after freezing and resuscitating once and again, and had the morphologic character of HemEC. The cell population doubling time was 22 h. Factor VIII and VEGFR-2 were expressed positively. Karyo type analysis of the cell line showed abnormal diploid with the modal chromosomal number varying between diploid and triploid. The cell line was then named XPTS-1. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and its character of histopathology was similar with that of infancy hemangioma. The cell line of HemEC was successfully established and immortalized spontaneously, and had the morphologic and biological character of HemEC. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and showed the character of histopathology similar with that of infancy hemangioma.

  5. Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) in fibroadenoma breast--a immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruchi; Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Tandon, Ashwani; Godbole, Madan M; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Vinita; Dwivedi, Varsha; Pal, Lily

    2011-02-01

    Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), responsible for the active transport of iodine is an integral plasma membrane glycoprotein present in the thyroid cells and extrathyroid tissues like breast and salivary glands. If its functional form is unequivocally shown in benign or malignant breast tissues, then it may serve as a basis for diagnosis and treatment using radioactive iodine. With an aim to analyze the hNIS expression in a distinct benign breast condition of fibroadenoma, biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, normal non-lactating breast tissue and biopsy proven infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues were examined for hNIS expression using immunohistochemistry. Out of 20 biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, 19 (95%) showed positivity for hNIS protein and only one was negative. Of these 10% were mildly positive, 50% cases were moderately positive and 35% showed intense positivity. None of the control tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty specimens or normal breast tissues samples (5 cms away from the tumor) were positive, hNIS was also intensely positive in 9 out of 10 (90%) infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues and moderately positive in one case. These preliminary results show that hNIS was present in high frequency as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in fibroadenoma breast.

  6. Osteopontin knockdown suppresses tumorigenicity of human metastatic breast carcinoma, MDA-MB-435

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Paik, Jason C.; Metge, Brandon J.; Chambers, Ann F.; Casey, Graham; Frost, Andra R.; Welch, Danny R.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated expression of osteopontin (OPN), a secreted phosphoglycoprotein, is frequently associated with many transformed cell lines. Various studies suggest that OPN may contribute to tumor progression as well as metastasis in multiple tumor types. High levels of OPN have been reported in patients with metastatic cancers, including breast. We found that the expression of OPN corroborates with the aggressive phenotype of the breast cancer cells i.e. the expression of OPN is acquired as the breast cancer cells become more aggressive. To assess the role(s) of OPN in breast carcinoma, expression of endogenous OPN was knocked down in metastatic MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells using RNA interference. We targeted multiple regions of the OPN transcript for RNA interference, along with ‘scrambled’ and ‘non-targeting siRNA pool’ controls to distinguish between target-specific and potential off-target effects including interferon-response gene (PeIF2-α) induction. The OPN knockdown by shRNA suppressed tumor take in immunocompromised mice. The ‘silenced’ cells also showed significantly lower invasion and migration in modified Boyden chamber assays and reduced ability to grow in soft agar. Thus, in addition to the widely reported roles of OPN in late stages of tumor progression, these results provide functional evidence that OPN contributes to breast tumor growth as well. PMID:16830223

  7. Plasma membrane calcium-ATPase 2 and 4 in human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Jae; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R. . E-mail: G.Monteith@pharmacy.uq.edu.au

    2005-11-25

    There is evidence to suggest that plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) isoforms are important mediators sssof mammary gland physiology. PMCA2 in particular is upregulated extensively during lactation. Expression of other isoforms such as PMCA4 may influence mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation and aberrant regulation of PMCA isoform expression may lead or contribute to mammary gland pathophysiology in the form of breast cancers. To explore whether PMCA2 and PMCA4 expression may be deregulated in breast cancer, we compared mRNA expression of these PMCA isoforms in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell lines using real time RT-PCR. PMCA2 mRNA has a higher level of expression in some breast cancer cell lines and is overexpressed more than 100-fold in ZR-75-1 cells, compared to non-tumorigenic 184B5 cells. Although differences in PMCA4 mRNA levels were observed between breast cell lines, they were not of the magnitude observed for PMCA2. We conclude that PMCA2 mRNA can be highly overexpressed in some breast cancer cells. The significance of PMCA2 overexpression on tumorigenicity and its possible correlation with other properties such as invasiveness requires further study.

  8. Presence of human papillomavirus in breast cancer and its association with prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andreína; Bianchi, Gino; Feltri, Adriana Pesci; Pérez, Marihorgen; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer accounts for 16% of all female cancers worldwide, and in Venezuela, it is the leading cause of death among women. Recently, the presence of high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated in breast cancer and has been associated with histopathological features of the tumours. In Venezuela, there is no study which determines the association between the presence of HPV in breast cancer and the histopathological features. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the presence of HPV in the different types of breast cancer, according to their molecular classification, based on the expression of ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67. With this purpose in mind, we assessed the presence of the HPV genome in 24 breast cancer samples diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma, by the INNO-LIPA genotyping extra kit and the evaluation of the markers ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67 by immunohistochemistry. The viral genome was found in 41.67% of the total number of samples, 51 being the most frequent genotype with 30.77%, followed by types 18 and 33, with 23.08%, respectively. Most tumours were found in the group of luminal A, with a low range of Ki67 expression. The presence of HPV in breast tumours could affect their growth pattern and metastatic power. PMID:26180547

  9. Presence of Human Papilloma Virus in a Series of Breast Carcinoma from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Suarez, Ana Laura; Lorenzetti, Mario Alejandro; Gonzalez Lucano, Rene; Cohen, Melina; Gass, Hugo; Vazquez, Paula Martinez; Gonzalez, Pedro; Preciado, Maria V.; Chabay, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology and the molecular mechanisms related to breast carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Some recent reports have examined the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in breast cancer. Methods Sixty one fresh frozen breast cancers samples were analyzed. Samples were tested for HPV by PCR, and products were automatically sequenced. Findings were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics. Results The HPV DNA prevalence in the breast cancer samples was 26% (16/61). Clinical parameters were not statistically associated with HPV presence (p>0.05 χ2 test). Sequence analysis in a subgroup of cases indicates the prevalence of low risk HPV11, followed by high risk HPV16. We found no HPV transcriptional activity. Conclusion The present study demonstrated for the first time in Argentina the presence of HPV in a proportion of the malignant breast tissues. This finding suggests that HPV may have a biological significance in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:23637866

  10. NRF2 immunolocalization in human breast cancer patients as a prognostic factor.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Yoshiaki; Motohashi, Hozumi; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Shibahara, Yukiko; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 (NFE2L2)) is an important transcriptional activator involved in the cellular defense mechanisms against electrophilic and oxidative stress. Recent studies have demonstrated that the expression of NRF2 protein is upregulated in several human malignancies and is associated with worse prognosis in these patients. However, the pathological and clinical significance of NRF2 has remained largely unknown in breast cancer patients. Therefore, in this study, we immunolocalized NRF2 in 106 breast carcinoma cases. NRF2 immunoreactivity was mainly detected in the nucleus of the breast carcinoma cells and it was positive in 44% of the cases. NRF2 status was significantly associated with histological grade, Ki-67 labeling index, p62 immunoreactivity, and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) immunoreactivity, and the results of multivariate analyses revealed that NRF2 status was an independent adverse prognostic factor for both recurrence and disease-free survival of the patients. Subsequent in vitro studies demonstrated that the expression of NRF2 significantly increased the proliferation activity of MCF7 and SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells. These results indicate that nuclear NRF2 protein plays important roles in the proliferation and/or progression of breast carcinoma, and nuclear NRF2 immunoreactivity is therefore considered a potent prognostic factor in breast cancer patients.

  11. Selective human Estrogen Receptor Partial Agonists (ShERPAs) for Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutgesell, Lauren M.; Zhao, Jiong; Delgado-Rivera, Loruhama; Pham, Thao N.D.; Zhao, Huiping; Carlson, Kathryn; Martin, Teresa; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Moore, Terry W.; Tonetti, Debra A.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Almost 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), represents the standard of care for many patients; however, 30-50% develop resistance, underlining the need for alternative therapeutics. Paradoxically, agonists at ERα such as estradiol (E2), have demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with heavily-treated breast cancer, although side effects in gynecological tissues are unacceptable. A drug that selectively mimics the actions of E2 in breast cancer therapy, but minimizes estrogenic effects in other tissues is a novel, therapeutic alternative. We hypothesized that a selective human estrogen receptor partial agonist (ShERPA) at ERα would provide such an agent. Novel benzothiophene derivatives with nanomolar potency in breast cancer cell cultures were designed. Several showed partial agonist activity, with potency of 0.8-76 nM, mimicking E2 in inhibiting growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Three ShERPAs were tested and validated in xenograft models of endocrine-independent and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer, and, in contrast to E2, ShERPAs did not cause significant uterine growth. PMID:26681208

  12. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for human breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototype of the newly developed, second-generation, hybrid polar compounds. It is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with high potency for inducing cell differentiation of cultured murine erythroleukemia cells. Studies with SAHA have primarily been performed with hematopoietic tumor cells. Here we extent these studies with SAHA to human breast cancer cell lines in an attempt to find better therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435, as well as normal cells, including the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, and fibroblasts, were treated with SAHA. Cells assayed for cell survival by using trypan blue exclusion assay, colony formation assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. The effects of SAHA on cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins were examined by Western blots analysis. The identification of additional target genes was carried out by differential display (DD) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: SAHA inhibited clonogenic growth of MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These cells were more sensitive to SAHA-mediated cytotoxic effects than normal breast epithelial cells and fibroblasts. The cytotoxic effects of SAHA on breast cancer cells were manifested by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. The pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, blocked SAHA-induced cell death, DNA laddering, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of caspases in SAHA-mediated apoptosis. In addition, SAHA modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins. For example, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were induced, and retinoblastoma protein pRb was hypophosphorylated. Moreover, SAHA induced several genes associated with differentiation and/ or growth inhibition. These genes encode gelsolin

  13. Human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in human breast cancer: clinical significance and prognostic associations.

    PubMed

    Hanamura, Toru; Ito, Tokiko; Kanai, Toshiharu; Maeno, Kazuma; Shimojo, Yasuyo; Uehara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Ken-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    Active sex steroids including estrogens and androgens are locally produced from circulating inactive steroids by various steroid-metabolizing enzymes, and play pivotal roles in the progression of hormone-dependent breast cancers. Human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3β-HSD type 1) is a critical enzyme in the formation of all classes of active steroid hormones, and is also involved in the inactivation of potent androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Therefore, this enzyme is suggested to modulate active sex steroid production or inactivation, with a role in hormone-dependent breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of 3β-HSD type 1 in human breast cancer. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we evaluated 3β-HSD type 1 expression in 161 human breast cancers and analyzed correlations of 3β-HSD type 1 expression with various clinicopathological factors. Of 161 breast cancer cases, 3β-HSD type 1 expression in cancer cells was detected in 119 cases (73.9%), and was positively correlated with estrogen receptor (ER)-positivity but not HER-2 status. In ER-positive cases (n = 130), 3β-HSD type 1 expression was inversely correlated with invasive tumor size (P = 0.0009), presence of invasive region (P = 0.0107), and lymphatic involvement (P = 0.0004). 3β-HSD type 1 expression was significantly associated with decreased risk of recurrence or improved prognosis by both univariate (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.009, respectively) and multivariate (P = 0.027 and P = 0.023, respectively) analyses. Our findings indicate that this enzyme is a prognostic factor in hormone-dependent breast cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Expression of TRPC6 channels in human epithelial breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Arnaud; Dhennin-Duthille, Isabelle; Hiani, Yassine EL; Haren, Nathalie; Khorsi, Hafida; Sevestre, Henri; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-01-01

    Background TRP channels have been shown to be involved in tumour generation and malignant growth. However, the expression of these channels in breast cancer remains unclear. Here we studied the expression and function of endogenous TRPC6 channels in a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), a human breast cancer epithelial primary culture (hBCE) and in normal and tumour breast tissues. Methods Molecular (Western blot and RT-PCR), and immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate TRPC6 expression. To investigate the channel activity in both MCF-7 cells and hBCE we used electrophysiological technique (whole cell patch clamp configuration). Results A non selective cationic current was activated by the oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) in both hBCE and MCF-7 cells. OAG-inward current was inhibited by 2-APB, SK&F 96365 and La3+. TRPC6, but not TRPM7, was expressed both in hBCE and in MCF-7 cells. TRPC3 was only expressed in hBCE. Clinically, TRPC6 mRNA and protein were elevated in breast carcinoma specimens in comparison to normal breast tissue. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of TRPC6 protein levels were not correlated with tumour grades, estrogen receptor expression or lymph node positive tumours. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPC6 channels are strongly expressed and functional in breast cancer epithelial cells. Moreover, the overexpression of these channels appears without any correlation with tumour grade, ER expression and lymph node metastasis. Our findings support the idea that TRPC6 may have a role in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18452628

  15. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiulong Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A.

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  16. A 3D in vitro model of the human breast duct: a method to unravel myoepithelial-luminal interactions in the progression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carter, Edward P; Gopsill, James A; Gomm, Jennifer J; Jones, J Louise; Grose, Richard P

    2017-04-21

    3D modelling fulfils a critical role in research, allowing for complex cell behaviour and interactions to be studied in physiomimetic conditions. With tissue banks becoming established for a number of cancers, researchers now have access to primary patient cells, providing the perfect building blocks to recreate and interrogate intricate cellular systems in the laboratory. The ducts of the human breast are composed of an inner layer of luminal cells supported by an outer layer of myoepithelial cells. In early-stage ductal carcinoma in situ, cancerous luminal cells are confined to the ductal space by an intact myoepithelial layer. Understanding the relationship between myoepithelial and luminal cells in the development of cancer is critical for the development of new therapies and prognostic markers. This requires the generation of new models that allows for the manipulation of these two cell types in a physiological setting. Using access to the Breast Cancer Now Tissue Bank, we isolated pure populations of myoepithelial and luminal cells from human reduction mammoplasty specimens and placed them into 2D culture. These cells were infected with lentiviral particles encoding either fluorescent proteins, to facilitate cell tracking, or an inducible human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression construct. Myoepithelial and luminal cells were then recombined in collagen gels, and the resulting cellular structures were analysed by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Myoepithelial and luminal cells isolated from reduction mammoplasty specimens can be grown separately in 2D culture and retain their differentiated state. When recombined in collagen gels, these cells reform into physiologically reflective bilayer structures. Inducible expression of HER2 in the luminal compartment, once the bilayer has formed, leads to robust luminal filling, recapitulating ductal carcinoma in situ, and can be blocked with anti-HER2 therapies. This model allows for the interaction

  17. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Vaapil, Marica; Helczynska, Karolina; Villadsen, René; Petersen, Ole W; Johansson, Elisabet; Beckman, Siv; Larsson, Christer; Påhlman, Sven; Jögi, Annika

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis. Normal human primary breast epithelial cells and immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells were grown in a three-dimensional overlay culture on laminin-rich extracellular matrix for up to 21 days at normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Acinar morphogenesis and expression of markers of epithelial differentiation and cell polarization were analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and immunoblot. In large ductal carcinoma in situ patient-specimens, we find that epithelial cells with high HIF-1α levels and multiple cell layers away from the vasculature are immature compared to well-oxygenated cells. We show that hypoxic conditions impaired acinar morphogenesis of primary and immortalized breast epithelial cells grown ex vivo on laminin-rich matrix. Normoxic cultures formed polarized acini-like spheres with the anticipated distribution of marker proteins associated with mammary epithelial polarization e.g. α6-integrin, laminin 5 and Human Milk Fat Globule/MUC1. At hypoxia, cells were not polarized and the sub-cellular distribution pattern of the marker proteins rather resembled that reported in vivo in breast cancer. The hypoxic cells remained in a mitotic state, whereas proliferation ceased with acinar morphogenesis at normoxia. We found induced expression of the differentiation repressor ID1 in the undifferentiated hypoxic MCF-10A cell structures. Acinar morphogenesis was associated with global histone deacetylation

  18. Prolactin Receptor Expression is an Independent Favorable Prognostic Marker in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hachim, Ibrahim Y; Hachim, Mahmood Y; Lopez, Vanessa M; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Ali, Suhad

    2016-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) hormone plays an important role in the development of the mammary gland and terminal differentiation of the mammary epithelial cells. While initial studies suggested that PRL may contribute to the development of breast cancer through PRL/prolactin receptor (PRLR) autocrine function, mounting evidence indicate a different role for PRL, highlighting this hormone as a regulator of epithelial plasticity and as a potential tumor suppressor. To gain further insights into the role of PRL in human breast carcinogenesis, immunohistochemistry analyses of PRLR protein expression levels using tissue microarray of 102 cases were done in comparison with various clinical/pathologic parameters and molecular subtypes. In addition, gene expression level of PRLR was also evaluated in relation to intrinsic molecular subtypes, tumor grade, and patient outcome using GOBO database for 1881 breast cancer patients. Interestingly, PRLR expression was found to be significantly downregulated in invasive breast cancer (21.4%) in comparison with normal/benign (80%) and in situ carcinoma (60%) (P=0.003498). Moreover, PRLR expression was associated with lymph node negativity and low-grade well-differentiated tumors. PRLR expression was strongest in luminal A subtype, and was virtually undetectable in the worse prognosis triple-negative breast cancer subtype (P=0.00001). Furthermore, PRLR expression was independent of ER, PR, HER-2, and P53 status. Finally, PRLR expression was significantly (P<0.01) associated with prolonged distant metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, our results highlight PRLR as an independent predictor of favorable prognosis in human breast cancer.

  19. Transforming growth factor-β signalling controls human breast cancer metastasis in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Drabsch, Yvette; He, Shuning; Zhang, Long; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway is known to control human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that the zebrafish xenograft assay is a robust and dependable animal model for examining the role of pharmacological modulators and genetic perturbation of TGF-β signalling in human breast tumour cells. We injected cancer cells into the embryonic circulation (duct of cuvier) and examined their invasion and metastasis into the avascular collagenous tail. Various aspects of the TGF-β signalling pathway were blocked by chemical inhibition, small interfering RNA (siRNA), or small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Analysis was conducted using fluorescent microscopy. Breast cancer cells with different levels of malignancy, according to in vitro and in vivo mouse studies, demonstrated invasive and metastatic properties within the embryonic zebrafish model that nicely correlated with their differential tumourigenicity in mouse models. Interestingly, MCF10A M2 and M4 cells invaded into the caudal hematopoietic tissue and were visible as a cluster of cells,