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Sample records for establishing exchange bias

  1. Exchange-biased magnetic vortices.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.; Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Nogues, J.; Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2008-07-01

    This paper reviews our work on the interplay between exchange bias due to the coupling of a ferromagnet to an antiferromagnet and the formation of magnetic vortices, which occur due to the patterning of a ferromagnet. Depending on the thermal and magnetic history, a variety of different effects can be observed. Thermal annealing in a saturating magnetic field establishes a spatially homogeneous exchange bias with a uniform unidirectional anisotropy. This results in an angular dependence of the magnetization reversal mode, which can be either via magnetization rotation or vortex nucleation and annihilation. In contrast, thermal annealing in a field smaller than the vortex annihilation field imprints the ferromagnetic vortex configuration in the antiferromagnet with high fidelity resulting in unusual asymmetric hysteresis loops. Furthermore, we discuss how the interfacial nature of the exchange bias can modify the vortex magnetization along the thickness of the ferromagnet.

  2. The Electrically Controlled Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jacob

    Controlling magnetism via voltage in the virtual absence of electric current is the key to reduce power consumption while enhancing processing speed, integration density and functionality in comparison with present-day information technology. Almost all spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is therefore a key challenge to better spintronics. However, there is no direct interaction between magnetization and electric fields, thus making voltage control of magnetism in general a scientific challenge. The significance of controlled interface magnetism started with the exchange-bias effect. Exchange bias is a coupling phenomenon at magnetic interfaces that manifests itself prominently in the shift of the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop along the magnetic-field axis. Various attempts on controlling exchange bias via voltage utilizing different scientific principles have been intensively studied recently. The majority of present research is emphasizing on various complex oxides. Our approach can be considered as a paradigm shift away from complex oxides. We focus on a magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic simple oxide Cr2O3. From a combination of experimental and theoretical efforts, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This is a significant scientific breakthrough providing a new route towards potentially revolutionizing information technology. In addition, a second path of electrically controlled exchange bias is introduced by exploiting the piezoelectric property of BaTiO3. An exchange-bias Co

  3. Magnetization Reversal in Exchange Biased Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Katzgraber, H. G.; Pike, C. R.; Zhao, L.; Scalettar, R. T.; Verosub, K. L.; Zimanyi, G. T.; Schuller, I. K.

    2003-03-01

    Magnetization reversal processes have been investigated by a first order reversal curve (FORC) technique^1,2 in an exchange biased Fe (27nm) / FeF2 (20nm) thin film. This technique allows us to map out the distribution of coercivity and exchange field in a FORC diagram. At 100K, above the FeF2 Néel temperature of 80K, the FORC diagram shows a narrow distribution of coercivity with zero bias, centered at the major loop coercivity value. However, there is a small tail in the FORC diagram due to regions in the sample with higher coercivity. After an exchange bias is established, at 50 K, the FORC diagram shows a distribution of coercivity and exchange field that are consistent with the major-loop values. Surprisingly, the tail of higher coercivity regions bends towards lower exchange fields, contrary to the belief that the exchange field measured in a major loop is the lower limit of the exchange field across the sample. ^1 C. R. Pike, et al. JAP 85, 6660 (1999). ^2 H. G. Katzgraber, et al. PRL 89, 257202 (2002).

  4. Exchange biasing of magnetoelectric composites.

    PubMed

    Lage, Enno; Kirchhof, Christine; Hrkac, Viktor; Kienle, Lorenz; Jahns, Robert; Knöchel, Reinhard; Quandt, Eckhard; Meyners, Dirk

    2012-04-22

    Magnetoelectric composite materials are promising candidates for highly sensitive magnetic-field sensors. However, the composites showing the highest reported magnetoelectric coefficients require the presence of external d.c. magnetic bias fields, which is detrimental to their use as sensitive high-resolution magnetic-field sensors. Here, we report magnetoelectric composite materials that instead rely on intrinsic magnetic fields arising from exchange bias in the device. Thin-film magnetoelectric two-two composites were fabricated by magnetron sputtering on silicon-cantilever substrates. The composites consist of piezoelectric AlN and multilayers with the sequence Ta/Cu/Mn(70)Ir(30)/Fe(50)Co(50) or Ta/Cu/Mn(70)Ir(30)/Fe(70.2)Co(7.8)Si(12)B(10) serving as the magnetostrictive component. The thickness of the ferromagnetic layers and angle dependency of the exchange bias field are used to adjust the shift of the magnetostriction curve in such a way that the maximum piezomagnetic coefficient occurs at zero magnetic bias field. These self-biased composites show high sensitivity to a.c. magnetic fields with a maximum magnetoelectric coefficient of 96 V cm(-1) Oe(-1) at mechanical resonance.

  5. Exchange biasing of magnetoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Enno; Kirchhof, Christine; Hrkac, Viktor; Kienle, Lorenz; Jahns, Robert; Knöchel, Reinhard; Quandt, Eckhard; Meyners, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    Magnetoelectric composite materials are promising candidates for highly sensitive magnetic-field sensors. However, the composites showing the highest reported magnetoelectric coefficients require the presence of external d.c. magnetic bias fields, which is detrimental to their use as sensitive high-resolution magnetic-field sensors. Here, we report magnetoelectric composite materials that instead rely on intrinsic magnetic fields arising from exchange bias in the device. Thin-film magnetoelectric two-two composites were fabricated by magnetron sputtering on silicon-cantilever substrates. The composites consist of piezoelectric AlN and multilayers with the sequence Ta/Cu/Mn70Ir30/Fe50Co50 or Ta/Cu/Mn70Ir30/Fe70.2Co7.8Si12B10 serving as the magnetostrictive component. The thickness of the ferromagnetic layers and angle dependency of the exchange bias field are used to adjust the shift of the magnetostriction curve in such a way that the maximum piezomagnetic coefficient occurs at zero magnetic bias field. These self-biased composites show high sensitivity to a.c. magnetic fields with a maximum magnetoelectric coefficient of 96 V cm-1 Oe-1 at mechanical resonance.

  6. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  7. Study on the occurrence of spontaneously established perpendicular exchange bias in Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51}/IrMn bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. Y.; Lin, K. F.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Saravanan, P.

    2014-05-07

    In this study, perpendicular exchange bias (PEB) effect in the as-grown Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51}/IrMn bilayers was demonstrated at room temperature using single-layered Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51} alloy thin film as ferromagnetic (FM) layer. Several unusual features were observed in this system, viz.,: (i) the PEB was spontaneously established without any external magnetic field treatments, (ii) single-shifted loops were obtained rather than double-shifted ones, and (iii) the spontaneous PEB effect was accompanied by a reduction in perpendicular coercivity, H{sub c⊥} from 1024 to 632 Oe. The results of x–ray diffraction revealed the formation of IrMn (111) texture. Training effect studies indicate that the PEB effect is stable in this system with less than 5% variation in PEB value within 15 repetitive scans. Significant reduction in the PEB effect was found for the CoPt/IrMn films either grown or subjected to post-annealing under external magnetic field (H{sub ind}). The thickness dependence of PEB effect with respect to the FM and antiferromagnetic layers were also investigated and a largest PEB value of 533 Oe was obtained for the sample grown with 3-nm thick CoPt and 10-nm thick IrMn layers. The results of present study thus establish an opportunity to realize PEB effect in the absence of external field during fabrication.

  8. New Trends in Magnetic Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Alexandra; Mangin, Stéphane; Bobo, Jean-Francois; Loidl, Alois

    2005-05-01

    -of-plane exchange bias, depending on the field cooling direction. This is of particular interest since it allows probing of the three-dimensional spin structure of the AF layer. The interface magnetic configuration is extremely important in the perpendicular geometry, as the short-range exchange coupling competes with a long-range dipolar interaction; the induced uniaxial anisotropy must overcome the demagnetization energy to establish perpendicular anisotropy films. Those new studies are of primary importance for the magnetic media industry as perpendicular recording exhibits potential for strongly increased storage densities. 3. Parameters tuning exchange bias in polycrystalline samples and magnetic configurations: Different parameters can be used to tune the exchange bias coupling in polycrystalline samples similar to those used in devices. Particularly fascinating aspects are the questions of the appearance of exchange bias or coercivity in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet heterostructures, and its relation to magnetic configurations formed on either side of the interface. Several papers report on either growth choices or post preparation treatments that enable tuning of the exchange bias in bilayers. The additional complexity and novel features of the exchange coupled interface make the problem particularly rich. 4. Dynamics and magnetization reversal: Linear response experiments, such as ferromagnetic resonance, have been used with great success to identify interface, surface anisotropies and interlayer exchange in multilayer systems. The exchange bias structure is particularly well suited to study because interface driven changes in the spin wave frequencies in the ferromagnet can be readily related to interlayer exchange and anisotropy parameters associated with the antiferromagnet. Because the exchange bias is intimately connected with details of the magnetization process during reversal and the subsequent formation of hysteresis, considerations of time dependence and

  9. Magnetoelectric switching of exchange bias.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Pavel; Hochstrat, Andreas; Chen, Xi; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Binek, Christian

    2005-03-25

    The perpendicular exchange bias field, H(EB), of the magnetoelectric heterostructure Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)(3) changes sign after field cooling to below the Néel temperature of Cr2O3 in either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric freezing fields. The switching of H(EB) is explained by magnetoelectrically induced antiferromagnetic single domains which extend to the interface, where the direction of their end spins controls the sign of H(EB). Novel applications in magnetoelectronic devices seem possible.

  10. Electric control of exchange bias training.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, W; Binek, Ch

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3), and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  11. Electric Control of Exchange Bias Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, W.; Binek, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr2O3, and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  12. Summary of relationships between exchangeability, biasing paths and bias.

    PubMed

    Flanders, William Dana; Eldridge, Ronald Curtis

    2015-10-01

    Definitions and conceptualizations of confounding and selection bias have evolved over the past several decades. An important advance occurred with development of the concept of exchangeability. For example, if exchangeability holds, risks of disease in an unexposed group can be compared with risks in an exposed group to estimate causal effects. Another advance occurred with the use of causal graphs to summarize causal relationships and facilitate identification of causal patterns that likely indicate bias, including confounding and selection bias. While closely related, exchangeability is defined in the counterfactual-model framework and confounding paths in the causal-graph framework. Moreover, the precise relationships between these concepts have not been fully described. Here, we summarize definitions and current views of these concepts. We show how bias, exchangeability and biasing paths interrelate and provide justification for key results. For example, we show that absence of a biasing path implies exchangeability but that the reverse implication need not hold without an additional assumption, such as faithfulness. The close links shown are expected. However confounding, selection bias and exchangeability are basic concepts, so comprehensive summarization and definitive demonstration of links between them is important. Thus, this work facilitates and adds to our understanding of these important biases.

  13. Full Electric Control of Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. M.; Cybart, Shane A.; Yi, D.; Parker, James M.; Ramesh, R.; Dynes, R. C.

    2013-02-01

    We report the creation of a multiferroic field effect device with a BiFeO3 (BFO) (antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric) gate dielectric and a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) (ferromagnetic) conducting channel that exhibits direct, bipolar electrical control of exchange bias. We show that exchange bias is reversibly switched between two stable states with opposite exchange bias polarities upon ferroelectric poling of the BFO. No field cooling, temperature cycling, or additional applied magnetic or electric field beyond the initial BFO polarization is needed for this bipolar modulation effect. Based on these results and the current understanding of exchange bias, we propose a model to explain the control of exchange bias. In this model the coupled antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric order in BFO along with the modulation of interfacial exchange interactions due to ionic displacement of Fe3+ in BFO relative to Mn3+/4+ in LSMO cause bipolar modulation.

  14. Full Electric Field Control of Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Exchange bias is the shift of a magnetic hysteresis curve due to interfacial magnetic coupling between a ferromagnet (FM) and an antiferromagnet (AFM). This ubiquitous effect has long been used in the electronics industry to bias the magnetization of FM layers in magnetic devices. Its continued understanding is of critical importance to advance the development of future high-density magnetic storage media and other novel magnetic devices. However, due to the technological limitations of manipulating and observing an atomically thin interface, exchange bias is not well understood. In this talk we present a multiferroic field effect device with BiFeO3 (BFO) (antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric) as the gate dielectric and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) (ferromagnetic) as the conducting channel, which exhibits the direct, bipolar electric control of exchange bias. Here the magnetic states at the AFM/FM interface can be directly manipulated with electric fields and the results can be observed as a change in exchange bias polarity and magnitude. Control of exchange bias at this level has significant implications because it represents a form of electric field control of magnetism and may potentially offer a route toward the eventual full electric field control of magnetization. In this device, exchange bias is reversibly switched between two stable states with opposite exchange bias polarities upon ferroelectric poling of the BFO. No field cooling, temperature cycling, or additional applied magnetic or electric field beyond BFO poling is needed for this bipolar modulation effect. Detailed temperature dependent measurements and a model will be presented which will attribute this effect to the coupled antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric order in BFO along with the modulation of interfacial exchange interactions due to ionic displacement of Fe3+ in BFO relative to Mn3 + / 4 + in LSMO.

  15. Antiferromagnetic spin flop and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogués, J.; Morellon, L.; Leighton, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of the antiferromagnetic spin flop on exchange bias has been investigated in antiferromagnetic (MnF2)-ferromagnetic (Fe) bilayers. Cooling and measuring in fields larger than the antiferromagnetic spin-flop field, HSF, causes an irreversible reduction of the magnitude of the exchange bias field, HE. This indicates that, contrary to what is normally assumed, the interface spin structure does not remain ``frozen in'' below TN if large enough fields are applied.

  16. Exchange bias studied with polarized neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    te Velthuis, S. G. E.

    2000-01-05

    The role of Polarized Neutron Reflectivity (PNR) for studying natural and synthetic exchange biased systems is illustrated. For a partially oxidized thin film of Co, cycling of the magnetic field causes a considerable reduction of the bias, which the onset of diffuse neutron scattering shows to be due to the loosening of the ferromagnetic domains. On the other hand, PNR measurements of a model exchange bias junction consisting of an n-layered Fe/Cr antiferromagnetic (AF) superlattice coupled with an m-layered Fe/Cr ferromagnetic (F) superlattice confirm the predicted collinear magnetization in the two superlattices. The two magnetized states of the F (along or opposite to the bias field) differ only in the relative orientation of the F and adjacent AF layer. The possibility of reading clearly the magnetic state at the interface pinpoints the commanding role that PNR is having in solving this intriguing problem.

  17. Antiferromagnetic spin flop and exchange bias

    SciTech Connect

    Nogues, J.; Morellon, L.; Leighton, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of the antiferromagnetic spin flop on exchange bias has been investigated in antiferromagnetic (MnF{sub 2})-ferromagnetic (Fe) bilayers. Cooling and measuring in fields larger than the antiferromagnetic spin-flop field, H{sub SF}, causes an irreversible reduction of the magnitude of the exchange bias field, H{sub E}. This indicates that, contrary to what is normally assumed, the interface spin structure does not remain ''frozen in'' below T{sub N} if large enough fields are applied. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Correlation between exchange bias and pinned interfacialspins

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; Scholl, A.; Nolting, F.; Arenholz, E.; Maat, S.; Young, A.T.; Carey, M.; Stohr, J.

    2003-07-01

    Using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, we have detectedthe very interfacial spins that are responsible for the horizontal loopshift in three different exchange bias sandwiches, chosen because oftheir potential for device applications. The "pinned" uncompensatedinterfacial spins constitute only a fraction of a monolayer and do notrotate in an external magnetic field since they are tightly locked to theantiferromagnetic lattice. A simple extension of the Meiklejohn and Beanmodel is proposed to account quantitatively for the exchange bias fieldsin the three studied systems from the experimentally determined number ofpinned moments and their sizes.

  19. Pseudo exchange bias due to rotational anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, A.; Komraus, S.; Blachowicz, T.; Domino, K.; Nees, M. K.; Jakobs, P. J.; Leiste, H.; Mathes, M.; Schaarschmidt, M.

    2016-08-01

    Ferromagnetic nanostructure arrays with particle dimensions between 160 nm and 400 nm were created by electron-beam lithography. The permalloy structures consist of rectangular-shaped walls around a square open space. While measuring their magnetic properties using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), in some angular regions an exchange bias (EB) seemed to appear. This paper gives an overview of possible reasons for this "pseudo exchange bias" and shows experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulations that this effect can be attributed to unintentionally measuring minor loops.

  20. Exchange bias in nano-ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of investigations of the effect of cooling in an external magnetic field starting from the temperature over superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB on the shift of magnetic hysteresis loops in systems of ferrihydrite nanoparticles from ˜2.5 to ˜5 nm in size with different TB values. In virtue of high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite nanoparticles and open hysteresis loops in the range of experimentally attainable magnetic fields, the shape of hysteresis loops of such objects in the field-cooling mode is influenced by the minor hysteresis loop effect. A technique is proposed for distinguishing the exchange bias effect among the effects related to the minor hysteresis loops caused by high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite particles. The exchange bias in ferrihydrite is stably observed for particles not less than 3 nm in size or with TB over 40 K, and its characteristic value increases with the particle size.

  1. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1998-07-21

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bias layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200 C, the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 {angstrom}/sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous. 4 figs.

  2. HAMR media based on exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphick, K.; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.; Klemmer, T. J.; Thiele, J.-U.; O'Grady, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we describe an alternative strategy for the development of heat assisted magnetic recording media. In our approach, the need for a storage material with a temperature dependent anisotropy and to provide a read out signal is separated so that each function can be optimised independently. This is achieved by the use of an exchange bias structure where a conventional CoCrPt-SiO2 recording layer is exchange biased to an underlayer of IrMn such that heating and cooling in the exchange field from the recording layer results in a shifted loop. This strategy requires the reorientation of the IrMn layer to allow coupling to the recording layer. This has been achieved by the use of an ultrathin (0.8 nm) layer of Co deposited beneath the IrMn layer. In this system, the information is in effect stored in the antiferromagnetic layer, and hence, there is no demagnetising field generated by the stored bits. A loop shift of 688 Oe has been achieved where both values of coercivity lie to one side of the origin and the information cannot be erased by a magnetic field.

  3. Experimental comparison of exchange bias measurement methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Friedman, Gary

    2007-05-01

    Measurements performed on all-ferromagnetic bilayer systems and supported by model calculation results are used to compare different exchange bias characterization methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the conventional two-point technique based on measuring the sum of the coercive fields depends on the symmetry properties of hysteresis loops. On the other hand, the recently proposed center of mass method yields results independent of the hysteresis loop type and coincides with the two-point measurement only if the loops are symmetric. Our experimental and simulation results clearly demonstrate a strong correlation between loop asymmetry and the difference between these methods.

  4. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, Alison; Michel, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bia layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200.degree. C., the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 .ANG./sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous.

  5. Double exchange bias in ferrimagnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebler, B.; Reinhardt, P.; Katona, G. L.; Hellwig, O.; Albrecht, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the magnetic reversal characteristics of exchange coupled ferrimagnetic (FI) T b19F e81/T b36F e64 heterostructures. Both layers are amorphous and exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The investigated heterostructures consist of a Tb-dominated and a Fe-dominated FI layer. Thus, in the magnetic ground state the net moments of the individual layers are oppositely aligned due to antiferromagnetic coupling of Fe and Tb moments. By cooling the system below 160 K, a large positive and negative exchange bias (EB) effect appears for the Tb- and Fe-dominated layers, respectively. The biasing depends only on the initial magnetization state and is neither affected by a cooling field nor by loop cycling. The phenomenon can be explained by the presence of a hard magnetic Fe-dominated interfacial layer, which forms during the sputter deposition process due to interface mixing and resputtering effects. This interfacial layer acts as a pinning layer below a certain temperature, where its coercivity increases to values larger than the accessible magnetic field range. This assumption is further supported by introducing a 0.9-nm-thick Ru spacer layer, which causes the EB effect to vanish. The EB effect was further investigated for a sample series, where the thickness ratio of the two Tb-Fe layers was varied, while keeping the total thickness of the bilayers constant. Only samples where the individual layers are sufficiently thick reveal double shifted loops, indicating the high sensitivity of the observed bias effect with respect to the magnetic properties of the individual layers and their interfacial area.

  6. From exchange bias to magnetic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnel, Karine; Kevan, Steve; Fullerton, Eric; Kortright, Jeff; Hellwig, Olav; Wilcken, Brian; Nelson, Joe

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic memory, the ability of a material to remember its magnetic domains spatial configuration throughout magnetization cycling, is a key feature in ferromagnetic materials and offers potential technological interest for the data storage industry. One way to quantify the magnetic memory is to use Coherent X-ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering (XRMS) tools, at synchrotron facilities. The light is tuned to the resonant edge of the magnetic element to optimize the magneto-optical contrast. When illuminated by the coherent beam the sample produces speckle patterns that are collected on two dimensional detectors. Our approach is to cross-correlate patterns recorded at different field values throughout the magnetization cycle, and at different temperatures. We are particularly interested in the return point memory (RPM) and the conjugate point memory (CPM) that characterize the memory after a full, or half cycle respectively. We will give here an overview of different type of memory behaviors, first showing disorder induced memory in thin CoPt films and the influence of the film roughness, then demonstrating the ability to control the magnetic memory by inducing exchange bias. We will see how the local exchange couplings pin the magnetic domain in the ferromagnetic layer and lead the large memory enhancement.

  7. Electrically controlled exchange bias for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Electrically controlled exchange bias (EB) is proposed for novel spintronic applications [1]. Basic effects of electrically controlled EB and its magnetoelectric (ME) switching are studied in a Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)3 heterostructure. Exchange coupling between the ME antiferromagnet Cr2O3 and a ferromagnetic CoPt multilayer exhibits perpendicular EB. The latter is controlled by applied axial electric fields inducing excess magnetization at the interface. The enhancement of this hitherto weak tuning effect is explored when replacing ME bulk pinning systems by epitaxal thin films. Recently, the sign of the EB field has been tuned via field cooling the system in either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric fields [2].Here, the crossover from bulk to thin film ME pinning systems is studied and spintronic applications are suggested based on the electrically controlled EB. Pure voltage control of magnetic configurations of tunneling magnetoresistance spin valves is proposed as an alternative to current-induced magnetization switching. In addition we suggest an XOR operation realized in a MEally pinned giant magneto resistance structure. [1] Ch. Binek, B.Doudin, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, L39 (2005). [2] P. Borisov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005).

  8. Exchange bias training effect in coupled all ferromagnetic bilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Binek, Ch; Polisetty, S; He, Xi; Berger, A

    2006-02-17

    Exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic thin films show remarkable analogies to conventional antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange bias heterostructures. Not only do all these ferromagnetic bilayers exhibit a tunable exchange bias effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. In contrast with conventional exchange bias systems, such all ferromagnetic bilayer structures allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting hardmagnetic layer by means of simple magnetometry. Our experiments show unambiguously that the exchange bias training effect is driven by deviations from equilibrium in the pinning layer. A comparison of our experimental data with predictions from a theory based upon triggered relaxation phenomena shows excellent agreement.

  9. Exchange Bias Training Effect in Coupled All Ferromagnetic Bilayer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Ch.; Polisetty, S.; He, Xi; Berger, A.

    2006-02-01

    Exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic thin films show remarkable analogies to conventional antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange bias heterostructures. Not only do all these ferromagnetic bilayers exhibit a tunable exchange bias effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. In contrast with conventional exchange bias systems, such all ferromagnetic bilayer structures allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting hardmagnetic layer by means of simple magnetometry. Our experiments show unambiguously that the exchange bias training effect is driven by deviations from equilibrium in the pinning layer. A comparison of our experimental data with predictions from a theory based upon triggered relaxation phenomena shows excellent agreement.

  10. Longitudinal and perpendicular exchange bias in FeMn/(FeNi/FeMn)n multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Zhou, S. M.; Searson, P. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2003-05-01

    Exchange bias in ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AF) bilayers is usually investigated in the longitudinal configuration with the exchange coupling established in the film plane. In this work, we report on the perpendicular exchange bias in FeMn(8 nm)/[FeNi(2 nm)/FeMn(8 nm)]n multilayers induced by perpendicular field cooling. The thin FeNi layers give rise to large values of the exchange field and coercivity, and n=15 allows a sufficiently large magnetization for the measurements. Even though the soft FeNi layers have an intrinsic in-plane anisotropy, perpendicular exchange bias has been observed after cooling in a perpendicular external field. The exchange field in the perpendicular configuration is about 0.85 that of the longitudinal case. In both the longitudinal and perpendicular configurations, the exchange field decreases quasilinearly with temperature. The squareness of perpendicular hysteresis loops decreases with increasing temperature.

  11. Piezoelectric tuning of exchange bias from negative to positive bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian; Sahoo, Sarbeswar

    2010-03-01

    Tuning of the exchange bias has been attempted using magnetoelectric and multiferroic systems. Alternatively, we propose tuning of the exchange bias via the piezoelectric property of ferroelectric material. A ferromagnetic Co thin film is deposited on top of a ferroelectric tetragonal BaTiO3 (001) by using MBE at a base pressure of 1.5x10^10 m bar. An ex-situ antiferromagnetic CoO film is naturally formed on top of the Co Hereby, the piezoelectric BaTiO3 induced electrically tunable stress in the adjacent Co film. The stress induced strain alters the magnetic anisotropy of the Co film and by that the magnetization at the Co/CoO-interface modifying the exchange bias field. This includes sign change of the exchange bias from negative to positive bias fields by increasing electric field applied on BaTiO3. The observed complex electric field dependence of the exchange bias is interpreted through competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange at the rough Co/CoO interface. The competition involves weakening of negative exchange bias through deviations from collineraity of the Co and CoO interface magnetization and simultaneous activation of antiferromagnetic exchange giving rise to a crossover into positive exchange bias.

  12. Enhanced exchange bias fields for CoO/Co bilayers: influence of antiferromagnetic grains and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Chang, Shin-Chen; Tsay, Jyh-Shen; Yao, Yeong-Der

    2017-05-01

    The emergence and optimization of devices that can be applied to spintronics have attracted considerable interest, and both experimental and theoretical approaches have been used in studies of exchange bias phenomena. A survey of the literature indicates that great efforts have been devoted to improving exchange bias fields, while only limited attempts have been made to controll the temperature dependence of exchange bias. In this study, the influence of antiferromagnetic grains on exchange bias phenomena in CoO/Co bilayers on a semiconductor surface was investigated. Based on an antiferromagnetic grain model, a correlation between grain size, grain density, blocking temperature, and the exchange bias field was established. For crystallites with a smaller median diameter, the dependence of the thickness of the CoO layer on blocking temperature showed a less pronounced variation. This is due to the larger thermal agitation of the atomic spin moments in the grain, which causes a weaker exchange coupling between atomic spin moments. The enhanced density of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic pinning sites resulting from an increased grain density is responsible for the enhancement in the exchange bias fields. The results reported herein provide insights into our knowledge related to controlling the temperature dependence of exchange bias and related mechanisms.

  13. Exchange bias training effect in magnetically coupled bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas

    Interfaces in magnetically coupled bilayer heterostructures play a vital role in novel spintronics devices. Particularly, control of the interface spin structure enables the development of progressively down-scalable magnetic read-heads which are of major importance for non volatile magnetic recording media. Exchange bias and its accompanying training effect are fundamental magnetic coupling phenomena taking place at the interfaces of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic and hard/soft ferromagnetic bilayers. Here, in my thesis I present the experimental results of exchange bias training in the prototypical antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange bias system CoO/Co and the corresponding coupling and aging phenomena in the all ferromagnetic hard/soft bilayer CoPtCrB/CoCr. The latter system provides experimental access to its pinning layer magnetization thereby allowing to measure fundamental properties of exchange bias and its corresponding training phenomenon. A phenomenological theory is best fitted to all experimental training data of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic and hard/soft ferromagnetic bilayers evidencing the universality of the theory. My studies are further extended to the temperature dependence of the exchange bias training effect. Again, excellent agreement between experiment and theory confirms the remarkable universality of the underlying phenomenological approach. Furthermore, the dependence of the exchange bias training on the ferromagnetic film thickness is investigated in a CoO/Co-wedge sample. Scaling behavior with collapse of the temperature and thickness dependent parameters onto a single master curve is presented. Magnetotransport measurements are used for complementary studies of exchange bias in CoO/Co-heterostructures. Here, exchange bias produces a shift of the magnetoresistance curve along the magnetic field axis and an additional asymmetry along the resistance axis. The dynamic non-equilibrium properties of the exchange bias training effect

  14. Tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots using exchange bias.

    SciTech Connect

    Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Menendez, E.; Salazar-Alvarez, G.; Baro, M. D.; Miron, M.; Rodamcq, B.; Dieny, B.; ICREA; Univ. Autonoma of Barcelona; Insti. Catala de Nanotecnologia; SPINTEC

    2008-01-01

    Exchange bias effects have been studied in elliptical dots composed of ferromagnetic Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}-antiferromagnetic Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} bilayers. The magnetization reversal mechanisms and magnetic configurations have been investigated by magneto-optic Kerr effect and magnetic force microscopy. Although the obtained bias fields in these dots are relatively small, the magnetization reversal is found to be influenced by the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic coupling. Namely, for some off-axis angles of measurement, the magnetization reversal mechanism of the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}-Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} ellipses depends on whether exchange bias is induced along the minor or major axis of the ellipses. Hence, exchange bias is shown to be an effective means for tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots after sample fabrication.

  15. Correlation between antiferromagnetic interface coupling and positive exchange bias

    SciTech Connect

    Nogues, J.; Leighton, C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-01-01

    The induced moment in antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM) (FeF{sub 2}-Fe and MnF{sub 2}-Fe) bilayers has been studied from the shift along the magnetization axis of the exchange-biased hysteresis loops. The magnetization shift depends strongly on the cooling field and microstructure of the AFM layer. The shift for small cooling fields can be opposite to the cooling field, indicating that, in some cases, the presence of the FM layer induces an antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface. Samples with negative magnetization shifts (antiferromagnetic coupling) exhibit large changes in exchange bias H{sub E} as a function of cooling field and positive exchange bias. Samples with positive magnetization shifts (ferromagnetic coupling) show almost no change in H{sub E} with cooling field and the exchange bias field remains always negative. These results confirm the theoretical assumption that an antiferromagnetic interface coupling is necessary to observe positive exchange bias. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Scaling behavior of the exchange-bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The dependence of the exchange-bias training effect on temperature and ferromagnetic film thickness is studied in detail and scaling behavior of the data is presented.^ Thickness-dependent exchange bias and its training are measured using the magneto-optical Kerr effect. A focused laser beam is scanned across a Co wedge probing local hysteresis loops of the Co film which is pinned by an antiferromagnetic CoO layer of uniform thickness. A phenomenological theory is best fitted to the exchange-bias training data resembling the evolution of the exchange-bias field on subsequently cycled hysteresis loops. Best fits are done for various temperatures and Co thicknesses. Data collapse on respective master curves is achieved for the thickness and temperature-dependent fitting parameters as well as the exchange bias and coercive fields of the initial hysteresis loops. The scaling behavior is strong evidence for the validity and the universality of the underlying theoretical approach based on triggered relaxation of the pinning layer towards quasi-equilibrium. ^Srinivas Polisetty, Sarbeswar Sahoo, Christian Binek, Phys. Rev. B 76, 184423 (2007).

  17. Scaling behavior of the exchange-bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The dependence of the exchange-bias training effect on temperature and ferromagnetic film thickness is studied in detail and scaling behavior of the data is presented. Thickness-dependent exchange bias and its training are measured using the magneto-optical Kerr effect. A focused laser beam is scanned across a Co wedge probing local hysteresis loops of the Co film which is pinned by an antiferromagnetic CoO layer of uniform thickness. A phenomenological theory is best fitted to the exchange-bias training data resembling the evolution of the exchange-bias field on subsequently cycled hysteresis loops. Best fits are done for various temperatures and Co thicknesses. Data collapse on respective master curves is achieved for the thickness and temperature-dependent fitting parameters as well as the exchange bias and coercive fields of the initial hysteresis loops. The scaling behavior is strong evidence for the validity and the universality of the underlying theoretical approach based on triggered relaxation of the pinning layer towards quasiequilibrium.

  18. Perpendicularly magnetized exchange-biased magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Andreas; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Parkin, Stuart

    2005-03-01

    Exchange biased magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) have been studied. The ferromagnetic electrodes were fabricated from either Co/Pt or Co/Pd multilayers and the tunnel barriers were formed from Al2O3. In some cases one of the electrodes was exchange biased with either PtMn or IrMn. We discuss the dependence of the PMA and the exchange bias on the thickness of the Co, Pt and Pd layers. The properties of the MTJs are strongly influenced by the structural morphology of the Co/Pt and the Co/Pd multilayer electrodes, which appear to give rise to rough tunnel barriers with low resistance.

  19. Ferromagnetic behavior and exchange bias effect in akaganeite nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Tadic, Marin; Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence; Kralj, Slavko; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-04

    We report ferromagnetic-like properties and exchange bias effect in akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanorods. They exhibit a Néel temperature T{sub N} = 259 K and ferromagnetic-like hysteresis behavior both below and above T{sub N}. An exchange bias effect is observed below T{sub N} and represents an interesting behavior for akaganeite nanorods. These results are explained on the basis of a core-shell structure in which the core has bulk akaganeite magnetic properties (i.e., antiferromagnetic ordering) while the shell exhibits a disordered spin state. Thus, the nanorods show ferromagnetic properties and an exchange bias effect at the same time, increasing their potential for use in practical applications.

  20. Dynamic enhancement of the exchange bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Polisetty, S.; Binek, Ch.; Berger, A.

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias in coupled magnetic thin films and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena with significant impact in spintronic applications. Both effects are well known in heterosystems of ferro- and antiferromagnetic thin films. Here, we report on the dynamic enhancement of the training effect in an exchange coupled bilayer of soft and hard ferromagnetic materials. Training is referred to as a gradual change of the bias field, which evolves upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. Its dynamic enhancement is observed with increasing sweep rate of the applied magnetic field from quasistatic to the fully dynamic range. A dynamically generalized theory based on triggered relaxation is in excellent agreement with the training data. Additionally, we evidence the remarkable universality of our theoretical approach when applying it to the dynamically altered training effect of a conventional exchange bias system involving an antiferromagnetic pinning layer.

  1. Dynamic enhancement of the exchange bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Berger, Andreas; Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias in coupled magnetic films and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena which impact spintronic applications. Training is referred to as a gradual change of the bias field, which evolves upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. We report on its dynamic enhancement in exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic materials. Dynamic effects are induced with increasing sweep rate of the applied magnetic field from quasi-static to the fully dynamic range. A dynamically generalized theory based on triggered and partially truncated relaxation is in excellent agreement with the data. Remarkable universality of our theoretical approach is evidenced when applying the approach to the dynamic training effect of a conventional exchange bias system involving an antiferromagnetic pinning layer.

  2. Exchange bias mechanism at the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface with rotatable antiferromagnetic spins: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Wang, Yuying; Chi, Xiaodan; Li, Xuesi; Du, An; Shi, Feng

    2017-08-01

    We perform modified Monte Carlo simulations on a ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayer structure with adjustable antiferromagnetic anisotropy and degree of exchange coupling. Generally, both the antiferromagnetic anisotropy and the degree of exchange coupling at the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface are difficult to be directly detected experimentally. However, they may play crucial roles in establishing the exchange bias properties through determining whether the antiferromagnetic spins at the interface are rotatable or pinned. Therefore, we precisely calculated the numbers of rotatable and pinned antiferromagnetic spins at the interface and analyzed their contribution to exchange bias and coercivity in the specified ranges of antiferromagnetic anisotropy and degree of exchange coupling. The simulation results may help to clarify the experimental controversies concerning the occurrence of exchange bias effect prior to the detection of pinned uncompensated antiferromagnetic spins. They can also be used to properly interpret the dependence of exchange bias on several-nanometer antiferromagnetic layer thicknesses.

  3. Interfacial spin cluster effects in exchange bias systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R. Vallejo-Fernandez, G.; O'Grady, K.

    2014-05-07

    In this work, the effect of exchange bias on the hysteresis loop of CoFe is observed. The evolution of the coercivities and the shift of the hysteresis loop during the annealing process has been measured for films deposited on NiCr and Cu seed layers. Through comparison of the as deposited and field annealed loops, it is clear that for an exchange biased material, the two coercivities are due to different reversal processes. This behaviour is attributed to spin clusters at the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface, which behave in a similar manner to a fine particle system.

  4. Dynamic Response of Exchange Bias in Graphene Nanoribbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    1 Dynamic response of exchange bias in graphene nanoribbons S. Narayana Jammalamadaka a, b* , S. S. Rao c, d, e* , J. Vanacken a , V. V...investigated in exchange-coupled potassium split graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). We find that, at low field sweep rate, the pronounced absolute training... graphene nanoribbons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT

  5. Competing anisotropies in exchange-biased nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, F. J. T.; Paterson, G. W.; Stamps, R. L.; O'Reilly, S.; Bowman, R.; Gubbiotti, G.; Schmool, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic anisotropies of a patterned, exchange biased Fe50Mn50/Ni80Fe20 system are studied using ferromagnetic resonance, supplemented by Brillouin light scattering experiments and Kerr magnetometry. The exchange biased bilayer is partially etched into an antidot geometry so that the system approximates a Ni80Fe20 layer in contact with antidot structured Fe50Mn50 . Brillouin light scattering measurements of the spin wave frequency dependence on the wave vector reveal a magnonic band gap as expected for a periodic modulation of the magnetic properties. Analysis of the ferromagnetic resonance spectra reveals eightfold and fourfold contributions to the magnetic anisotropy. Additionally, the antidot patterning decreases the magnitude of the exchange bias and modifies strongly its angular dependence. Softening of all resonance modes is most pronounced for the applied magnetic field aligned within 10∘ of the antidot axis, in the direction of the bias. Given the degree to which one can tailor the ground state, the resulting asymmetry at low frequencies could make this an interesting candidate for applications such as selective/directional microwave filtering and multistate magnetic logic.

  6. Ultrafast Optical Magnetization Modulation in Exchange Biased Ferromagnetic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Ganping; Nurmikko, Arto; Farrow, R. F. C.

    1998-03-01

    We have recently shown how the use of femtosecond laser pulses can be employed to study the spin dynamics and magnetization kinetics associated with hot electrons in ferromagnetic thin films on a psec timescale. (G. Ju et al, Phys. Rev. B (Jan. 1998)) Briefly, energetic electrons are promoted by interband excitation and the relaxation process in the nonequilibrium spin system are probed via transient Kerr effect. Here we report our first observations in the MnPt/FeNi antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic bilayer system by such an experimental approach. The exchange biasing AF layer is selective optically excited with femtosecond laser pulses, while the induced changes in the magnetic properties of the FM layer are probed in real time. We have identified two types of effects: those ( ~300ps) intermediated by ultrafast lattice heating (unpinning of the exchange bias), and those ( ~10ps)which originate from ballistic electron transport within the bilayer. The preliminary results offer some insight for the dynamics of the exchange coupling and open up possibilities for ultrafast optical switching of the exchange biased system. Research supported by NSF.

  7. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  8. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  9. Exchange bias in barium ferrite/magnetite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, M. J.; Ataie, A.; Raygan, S.; Picken, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    Exchange bias which accompanies a magnetic hysteresis loop shift along field axis or increase in coercivity, occurs due to exchange interactions between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) or in ferrimagnetic nanoparticles/nanolayers systems. Mixture of barium ferrite (BaFe12O19) and graphite was mechanically milled for different times. Phase analysis, particles morphology, magnetic properties at room temperature and magnetic properties after field cooling at 4 k were measured via XRD, HRTEM, VSM and SQUID, respectively. A nanocomposite of BaFe12O19/Fe3O4 forms after 20 and 40 h of milling. HRTEM images revealed that the nanocomposite consists of crystallites of both phases in intimate contact with crystallite sizes below 20 nm after 20 h milling. Field cooling of the 20- and 40-h milled samples up to 4 k resulted in exchange bias phenomenon. The shift in hysteresis loop for 20- and 40-h milled samples was 204 and 254 Oe, respectively. In spite of the mostly observed exchange coupling systems being ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic systems, in this research the exchange coupling occurred between ferrimagnetic phases. The large difference between coercivity values at 300 and 4 k revealed that superparamagnetic particles constitute a large volume fraction of the milled nanocomposites.

  10. 45 CFR 155.100 - Establishment of a State Exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Establishment of a State Exchange. 155.100 Section 155.100 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE... a position to establish and operate only a SHOP for 2014 may elect to establish an Exchange that...

  11. Using magnetoresistance to probe reversal asymmetry in exchange biased bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, C.; Song, M.; Nogues, J.; Cyrille, M. C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-07-01

    We have measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance of Fe films exchange coupled to antiferromagnetic MnF{sub 2} layers. Exchange bias and coercivity obtained from magnetoresistance are in close agreement with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry data. In addition the magnetoresistance reveals an asymmetry in the magnetization reversal process, despite the fact that the magnetization hysteresis loops show little shape asymmetry. These results correlate well with an earlier study of magnetization reversal asymmetry by polarized neutron reflectometry. The data imply that the magnetization reverses by coherent rotation on one side of the loop and by nucleation and propagation of domain walls on the other. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, P. K.; Skoropata, E.; Ting, Y-W; Lin, K-W; Freeland, J. W.; van Lierop, J.

    2016-10-05

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(tCoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. But, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro-or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayer exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. Here, we also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.

  13. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems

    DOE PAGES

    Manna, P. K.; Skoropata, E.; Ting, Y-W; ...

    2016-10-05

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(tCoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. But, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro-or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayermore » exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. Here, we also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.« less

  14. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, P. K.; Skoropata, E.; Ting, Y.-W.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.; van Lierop, J.

    2016-12-01

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(t CoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. However, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro- or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayer exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. We also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.

  15. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems.

    PubMed

    Manna, P K; Skoropata, E; Ting, Y-W; Lin, K-W; Freeland, J W; van Lierop, J

    2016-12-07

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(t CoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. However, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro- or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayer exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. We also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.

  16. Vortex chirality in exchange-biased elliptical magnetic rings.

    PubMed

    Jung, W; Castaño, F J; Ross, C A

    2006-12-15

    The flux-closed or "vortex" state in thin-film magnetic rings has been proposed as a data storage token, but it has proven difficult to control the vortex chirality in a simple manner. Here, a model is described that predicts the vortex chirality of an elliptical magnetic ring as a function of the direction of the applied field and of the exchange bias, based on the change in energy of the system as the domain walls move. Experimental measurements of chirality in Co and Co/IrMn magnetic rings with 3.2 microm major axis are in excellent agreement with the model. The vortex circulation direction can therefore be tailored with an appropriate combination of applied field direction and exchange bias direction with respect to the major axis.

  17. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Morales, Rafael; Batlle, Xavier; Nowak, Ulrich; Güntherodt, Gernot

    2016-10-01

    This "Critical Focused Issue" presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice.

  18. Anisotropy engineering using exchange bias on antidot templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, F. J. T.; Desautels, R. D.; Su, S.; Drysdale, T.; van Lierop, J.; Lin, K.-W.; Schmool, D. S.; Stamps, R. L.

    2015-06-01

    We explore an emerging device concept based on exchange bias used in conjunction with an antidot geometry to fine tune ferromagnetic resonances. Planar cavity ferromagnetic resonance is used to study the microwave response of NiO/NiFe bilayers with antidot structuring. A large frequency asymmetry with respect to an applied magnetic field is found across a broad field range whose underlying cause is linked to the distribution of magnetic poles at the antidot surfaces. This distribution is found to be particularly sensitive to the effects of exchange bias, and robust in regards to the quality of the antidot geometry. The template based antidot geometry we study offers advantages for practical device construction, and we show that it is suitable for broadband absorption and filtering applications, allowing tunable anisotropies via interface engineering.

  19. Role of anisotropy configuration in exchange-biased systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Perna, P.; Mikuszeit, N.; Teran, F. J.; Sort, J.; Nogues, J.; Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Hoffmann, A.; Dieny, B.; Miranda, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the anisotropy configuration effects on the magnetic properties of exchange-biased ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AFM) Co/IrMn bilayers. The interfacial unidirectional anisotropy is set extrinsically via a field cooling procedure with the magnetic field misaligned by an angle {beta}{sub FC} with respect to the intrinsic FM uniaxial anisotropy. High resolution angular dependence in-plane resolved Kerr magnetometry measurements have been performed for three different anisotropy arrangements, including collinear {beta}{sub FC} = 0 and two opposite noncollinear cases. The symmetry breaking of the induced noncollinear configurations results in a peculiar nonsymmetric magnetic behavior of the angular dependence of magnetization reversal, coercivity, and exchange bias. The experimental results are well reproduced without any fitting parameter by using a simple model including the induced anisotropy configuration. Our finding highlights the importance of the relative angle between anisotropies in order to properly account for the magnetic properties of exchange-biased FM/AFM systems.

  20. Exchange biased anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/CoO bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Polisetty, S.; Wang, Yi; Mukherjee, T.; He, Xi; Binek, Ch.

    2008-03-01

    We measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance of a Co(11nm)/CoO bilayer in exchange biased and unbiased states. The bilayer was fabricated on a-Al2O3 substrate maintained at 300^oC by molecular beam epitaxy at a base pressure of 10-11mbar. θ-2θ X-ray diffraction scans reveal hcp (001) texture of the Co film. No peak associated with the naturally formed CoO top layer was identified. Small angle X-ray reflectivity scans yield the Co and CoO thicknesses as 11 and 2.4nm, respectively. Exchange bias was obtained from field cooled magnetoresistance measurements at various temperatures carried out in a closed cycle cryostat. Exchange bias varies quasi linearly with temperature and vanishes at the blocking temperature, TB=97K. The latter is less than 2/3 of the bulk N'eel temperature allowing to estimate the T=0 antiferromagnetic correlation length of CoO to be 1.84 nm in accordance with the geometrical confinement.

  1. Exchange bias training effect in coupled all ferromagnetic bilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; He, Xi; Binek, Christian; Berger, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    We study exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic (FM) thin films by means of Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometry. A CoCr thin film realizes the magnetically soft layer (SL) which is exchange coupled via a Ru-interlayer with a hard CoPtCrB pinning layer (HL). This new class of all FM bilayers shows remarkable analogies to conventional antiferromagnetic (AF)/FM exchange bias (EB) heterostructures. Not only do these all FM bilayers exhibit a tunable EB effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the SL through consecutive hysteresis loops. Training resembles the cycle dependent evolution of the bias field and is to a large extend analogous to the gradual degradation of the EB field observed upon cycling the FM top layer of a AF/FM EB heterostructure through consecutive hysteresis loops. However, in contrast to these conventional EB systems, our all FM bilayer structures allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting HL by means of simple magnetometry. Our experiments show unambiguously that the training effect is driven by deviations from equilibrium in the pinning layer. A comparison of the experimental data with predictions from a theory based upon triggered relaxation phenomena shows excellent agreement.

  2. Ferromagnetic resonance studies of exchange-biased Permalloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklein, W.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Scott, J. C.

    1988-10-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of Permalloy thin films exchange-coupled to iron-manganese films are analyzed. Studies were made on bilayer, ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FA) and trilayer (AFA) structures, as a function of both F and A layer thicknesses in the range 20-800 Å. Data are presented at a frequency of 9.3 GHz for both in-plane and perpendicular directions of the applied field, and at 34.1 GHz, in-plane. Analysis of these data enables extraction of the magnetization, gyromagnetic ratio, and an exchange shift due to spin-wave stiffness and perpendicular-surface anisotropy, as a function of layer thickness. The azimuthal dependence of the in-plane resonance is used to determine the magnitude of the exchange anisotropy (bias field). The magnetization and gyromagnetic ratio show little dependence on the thickness of either the F or A layer down to 50 Å, implying that the interfaces are sharp on a scale of a few lattice constants. Within this interfacial region the magnetization is reduced as a result of interaction with the antiferromagnet. We suggest that the perpendicular-surface anisotropy is created by exchange coupling to the antiferromagnet whose easy axes are not in the plane of the interface. Finally, we suggest a model for exchange anisotropy in which the antiferromagnetic domain pattern is not totally locked, but adjusts in response to the ferromagnetization. Such a model qualitatively explains the bias field exerted by the antiferromagnetic layer deposited before the ferromagnet, the field-training effect, the FMR linewidth, and the magnitude of the bias field.

  3. Magnetoelectricity coupled exchange bias in BaMnF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Ji; Chang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuangbao; Qian, Bin; Han, Zhida; Xu, Qingyu; Du, Jun; Wang, Peng; Dong, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic BaMnF4 powder was prepared by hydrothermal method. Hysteretic field dependent magnetization curve at 5 K confirms the weak ferromagnetism aroused from the canted antiferromagnetic spins by magnetoelectric coupling. The blocking temperature of 65 K for exchange bias coincides well with the peak at 65 K in the zero-field cooled temperature-dependent magnetization curve, which has been assigned to the onset temperature of two-dimensional antiferromagnetism. An upturn kink of exchange field and coercivity with decreasing temperature was observed from 40 K to 20 K, which is consistent with the two-dimensional to three-dimensional antiferromagnetic transition at Néel temperature (~26 K). In contrast to the conventional mechanism of magnetization pinned by interfacial exchange coupling in multiphases, the exchange bias in BaMnF4 is argued to be a bulk effect in single phase, due to the magnetization pinned by the polarization through magnetoelectric coupling. PMID:26671575

  4. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  5. Influence of magnetic annealing and interdiffusion on the exchange bias of CoFe/IrMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Waldemar; Fernandez-Outon, Luis; Araujo Filho, Mario; Araujo, Raphael; Ardisson, Jose

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic annealing is broadly used to set exchange bias (EB). The EB field depends on the magnetic field and the temperature at which the F/AF exchange interaction is set. Atomic interdiffusion is also expected to have strong influence on EB. For systems containing IrMn, different results have been reported regarding the effect of setting EB between 200 and 400 °C. We study the effect of atomic interdiffusion on the exchange bias of polycrystalline IrMn/(57Fe +CoFe) multilayers due to the magnetic annealing between 225 and 500 °C. The samples have been prepared by magnetron sputtering, and 57Fe probe layers (10 Å thick) were grown at the F/AF interface, and 1 nm and 2 nm above it, inside the CoFe layer. Depth-resolved 57Fe conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) was used to quantify atomic interdiffusion, and vibrating sample magnetometry was used to monitor the variation of exchange bias and magnetisation. We found that interface sharpness is only affected above ~350 °C. Three different stages for the setting of exchange bias can be inferred from our results. At temperatures < 350 °C, no interdiffusion is observed and the F/AF exchange coupling establishes partial spin alignment of interfacial and bulk AF spins. At intermediate setting temperatures (350-450 °C) interfacial spin order is dominant over chemical intermixing effects, and both exchange field and coercivity increase up to 450 °C. Above 450 °C, severe chemical intermixing reduces significantly (~50%) the F/AF coupling. Work supported by CAPES/PNPD, FAPEMIG, and CNPq

  6. Design of compensated ferrimagnetic Heusler alloys for giant tunable exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Nicklas, Michael; Chadov, Stanislav; Khuntia, Panchanana; Shekhar, Chandra; Kalache, Adel; Baenitz, Michael; Skourski, Yurii; Guduru, Veerendra K.; Puri, Alessandro; Zeitler, Uli; Coey, J. M. D.; Felser, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Rational material design can accelerate the discovery of materials with improved functionalities. This approach can be implemented in Heusler compounds with tunable magnetic sublattices to demonstrate unprecedented magnetic properties. Here, we have designed a family of Heusler alloys with a compensated ferrimagnetic state. In the vicinity of the compensation composition in Mn-Pt-Ga, a giant exchange bias (EB) of more than 3 T and a large coercivity are established. The large exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the compensated host and ferrimagnetic clusters that arise from intrinsic anti-site disorder. Our design approach is also demonstrated on a second material with a magnetic transition above room temperature, Mn-Fe-Ga, exemplifying the universality of the concept and the feasibility of room-temperature applications. These findings may lead to the development of magneto-electronic devices and rare-earth-free exchange-biased hard magnets, where the second quadrant magnetization can be stabilized by the exchange bias.

  7. Controllable positive exchange bias via redox-driven oxygen migration

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Olamit, Justin; Dumas, Randy K.; Kirby, B. J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Maranville, Brian B.; Arenholz, Elke; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2016-03-21

    We report that ionic transport in metal/oxide heterostructures offers a highly effective means to tailor material properties via modification of the interfacial characteristics. However, direct observation of ionic motion under buried interfaces and demonstration of its correlation with physical properties has been challenging. Using the strong oxygen affinity of gadolinium, we design a model system of GdxFe1-x/NiCoO bilayer films, where the oxygen migration is observed and manifested in a controlled positive exchange bias over a relatively small cooling field range. The exchange bias characteristics are shown to be the result of an interfacial layer of elemental nickel and cobalt, a few nanometres in thickness, whose moments are larger than expected from uncompensated NiCoO moments. This interface layer is attributed to a redox-driven oxygen migration from NiCoO to the gadolinium, during growth or soon after. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective path to tailoring the interfacial characteristics and interlayer exchange coupling in metal/oxide heterostructures.

  8. Controllable positive exchange bias via redox-driven oxygen migration

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Olamit, Justin; Dumas, Randy K.; Kirby, B. J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Maranville, Brian B.; Arenholz, Elke; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Ionic transport in metal/oxide heterostructures offers a highly effective means to tailor material properties via modification of the interfacial characteristics. However, direct observation of ionic motion under buried interfaces and demonstration of its correlation with physical properties has been challenging. Using the strong oxygen affinity of gadolinium, we design a model system of GdxFe1−x/NiCoO bilayer films, where the oxygen migration is observed and manifested in a controlled positive exchange bias over a relatively small cooling field range. The exchange bias characteristics are shown to be the result of an interfacial layer of elemental nickel and cobalt, a few nanometres in thickness, whose moments are larger than expected from uncompensated NiCoO moments. This interface layer is attributed to a redox-driven oxygen migration from NiCoO to the gadolinium, during growth or soon after. These results demonstrate an effective path to tailoring the interfacial characteristics and interlayer exchange coupling in metal/oxide heterostructures. PMID:26996674

  9. Exchange bias phenomenology and models of core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Some of the main experimental observations related to the occurrence of exchange bias in magnetic systems are reviewed, focusing the attention on the peculiar phenomenology associated to nanoparticles with core/shell structure as compared to thin film bilayers. The main open questions posed by the experimental observations are presented and contrasted to existing theories and models for exchange bias formulated up to date. We also present results of simulations based on a simple model of a core/shell nanoparticle in which the values of microscopic parameters such as anisotropy and exchange constants can be tuned in the core, shell and at the interfacial regions, offering new insight on the microscopic origin of the experimental phenomenology. A detailed study of the magnetic order of the interfacial spins shows compelling evidence that most of the experimentally observed effects can be qualitatively accounted within the context of this model and allows also to quantify the magnitude of the loop shifts in striking agreement with the macroscopic observed values.

  10. Controllable positive exchange bias via redox-driven oxygen migration

    DOE PAGES

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Olamit, Justin; Dumas, Randy K.; ...

    2016-03-21

    We report that ionic transport in metal/oxide heterostructures offers a highly effective means to tailor material properties via modification of the interfacial characteristics. However, direct observation of ionic motion under buried interfaces and demonstration of its correlation with physical properties has been challenging. Using the strong oxygen affinity of gadolinium, we design a model system of GdxFe1-x/NiCoO bilayer films, where the oxygen migration is observed and manifested in a controlled positive exchange bias over a relatively small cooling field range. The exchange bias characteristics are shown to be the result of an interfacial layer of elemental nickel and cobalt, amore » few nanometres in thickness, whose moments are larger than expected from uncompensated NiCoO moments. This interface layer is attributed to a redox-driven oxygen migration from NiCoO to the gadolinium, during growth or soon after. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective path to tailoring the interfacial characteristics and interlayer exchange coupling in metal/oxide heterostructures.« less

  11. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-11-23

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications.

  12. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; ...

    2016-11-23

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and relatedmore » phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications.« less

  13. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications. PMID:28335349

  14. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  15. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N.; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Dowben, Peter A.; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  16. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  17. Exchange bias properties of [Co/CoO]n multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, M.; Sınır, E.; Demirci, E.; Erkovan, M.; Öztürk, O.; Akdoǧan, N.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the exchange bias properties of four polycrystalline multilayer stack samples of antiferromagnetic (AF) CoO and ferromagnetic (FM) Co in the form of [CoO/Co]n with n = 1, 2, 3, and 5 are reported. The samples were grown on top of Si (001) substrates by using magnetron sputtering method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the structural properties of the samples. XPS measurements of cobalt oxide layer revealed the coexistence of different phases in cobalt oxide as CoO and Co3O4, the latter of which lowers the blocking temperature. The blocking temperature is also affected by the finite size scaling effects observed in AF layers. In-plane ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements revealed uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy for the samples. Low temperature vibrating sample magnetometer measurements provided exchange bias with a stepwise character. Observed steps are believed to be due to magnetization reversals of individual FM layers with varying thicknesses, each of which is pinned through two interfaces from above and below with two AFM layers, except the uppermost FM Co layer with a single AFM neighbor.

  18. Memory effect versus exchange bias for maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, K.; Krenn, H.; Szabó, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temperature dependence of memory and exchange bias effects and their dependence on each other in maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles by using magnetization studies. Memory effect in zero field cooled process in nanoparticles is a fingerprint of spin-glass behavior which can be due to i) surface disordered spins (surface spin-glass) and/or ii) randomly frozen and interacting nanoparticles core spins (super spin-glass). Temperature region (25-70 K) for measurements has been chosen just below the average blocking temperature (TB=75 K) of the nanoparticles. Memory effect (ME) shows a non-monotonous behavior with temperature. It shows a decreasing trend with decreasing temperature and nearly vanishes below 30 K. However it also decreased again near the blocking temperature of the nanoparticles e.g., 70 K. Exchange bias (EB) in these nanoparticles arises due to core/shell interface interactions. The EB increases sharply below 30 K due to increase in core/shell interactions, while ME starts vanishing below 30 K. We conclude that the core/shell interface interactions or EB have not enhanced the ME but may reduce it in these nanoparticles.

  19. Electric and Magnetic Field control of Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias (EB) and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena in coupled magnetic thin films with significant impact in spintronic applications. Here we report on the electric field control of the EB in innovative antiferromagnetic (AF)/ferromagnetic (FM) heterostructures and the magnetic field control of the EB training effect in exchange coupled all FM bilayer systems. Electric control of the EB is realized in Cr2O3 (111)/(Co/Pt)3 heterostructures by taking advantage of the magnetoelectric (ME) properties of the AF pinning layer [1]. An electric field induces excess magnetization in the ME Cr2O3 film. Exchange coupling between the induced magnetization and the CoPt thin film gives rise to electrically controlled perpendicular EB. Bias fields are measured by means of AGFM, SQUID-magnetometry and polar Kerr-rotation. Electrically controlled EB is proposed for novel spintronic applications such as pure voltage control of magnetic configurations in spin valve-type architectures. The latter provide an attractive alternative to current-induced switching of the magnetization [2]. In addition, training of the EB effect is studied in novel all FM heterostructures of exchange coupled soft and hard FM thin films [3]. FM bilayers show remarkable analogies to the conventional AF/FM EB systems. Not only do they exhibit a tunable EB effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. In contrast to conventional EB systems, all FM bilayers allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting hard layer by means of simple magnetometry. Initialization of the EB is achieved at constant temperature exclusively by means of magnetic fields. Our experiments show unambiguously that EB training is driven by deviations from the equilibrium spin configuration of the pinning layer. The experimental data show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions including the

  20. Magnetization reversal of an individual exchange-biased permalloy nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchter, A.; Wölbing, R.; Wyss, M.; Kieler, O. F.; Weimann, T.; Kohlmann, J.; Zorin, A. B.; Rüffer, D.; Matteini, F.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Heimbach, F.; Kleibert, A.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Poggio, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the magnetization reversal mechanism in an individual permalloy (Py) nanotube (NT) using a hybrid magnetometer consisting of a nanometer-scale SQUID (nanoSQUID) and a cantilever torque sensor. The Py NT is affixed to the tip of a Si cantilever and positioned in order to optimally couple its stray flux into a Nb nanoSQUID. We are thus able to measure both the NT's volume magnetization by dynamic cantilever magnetometry and its stray flux using the nanoSQUID. We observe a training effect and a temperature dependence in the magnetic hysteresis, suggesting an exchange bias. We find a low blocking temperature TB=18 ±2 K, indicating the presence of a thin antiferromagnetic native oxide, as confirmed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy on similar samples. Furthermore, we measure changes in the shape of the magnetic hysteresis as a function of temperature and increased training. These observations show that the presence of a thin exchange-coupled native oxide modifies the magnetization reversal process at low temperatures. Complementary information obtained via cantilever and nanoSQUID magnetometry allows us to conclude that, in the absence of exchange coupling, this reversal process is nucleated at the NT's ends and propagates along its length as predicted by theory.

  1. Perspectives of voltage control for magnetic exchange bias in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Zhou, Z.; Sun, N. X.; Liu, M.

    2017-04-01

    Exchange bias, as an internal magnetic bias induced by a ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic exchange coupling, is extremely important in many magnetic applications such as memories, sensors and other devices. Voltage control of exchange bias in multiferroics provides an energy-efficient way to achieve a rapidly 180° deterministic switching of magnetization, which has been considered as a key challenge in realizing next generation of fast, compact and ultra-low power magnetoelectric memories and sensors. Additionally, exchange bias can enhance dynamic magnetoelectric coupling strength in an external-field-free manner. In this paper, we provide a perspective on voltage control of exchange bias in different multiferroic heterostructures. Brief mechanization and related experiments are discussed as well as future trend and challenges that can be overcome by electrically tuning of exchange bias in state-of-the-art magnetoelectric devices.

  2. Exchange bias training relaxation in spin glass/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Xiaodan; Du, An; Rui, Wenbin; Du, Jun; Zhou, Shiming; Hu, Yong

    2016-04-25

    A canonical spin glass (SG) FeAu layer is fabricated to couple to a soft ferromagnet (FM) FeNi layer. Below the SG freezing temperature, exchange bias (EB) and training are observed. Training in SG/FM bilayers is insensitive to cooling field and may suppress the EB or change the sign of the EB field from negative to positive at specific temperatures, violating from the simple power-law or the single exponential function derived from the antiferromagnet based systems. In view of the SG nature, we employ a double decay model to distinguish the contributions from the SG bulk and the SG/FM interface to training. Dynamical properties during training under different cooling fields and at different temperatures are discussed, and the nonzero shifting coefficient in the time index as a signature of slowing-down decay for SG based systems is interpreted by means of a modified Monte Carlo Metropolis algorithm.

  3. Manipulation of competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domains in exchange-biased nanostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Fraile Rodríguez, Arantxa; Basaran, Ali C.; Morales, Rafael; ...

    2015-11-20

    In this work, using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism we show that a progressive spatial confinement of a ferromagnet (FM), either through thickness variation or laterally via patterning, actively controls the domains of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet (AF) in exchange-biased systems. Direct observations of the spin structure in both sides of the FM/AF interface in a model system, Ni/FeF2, show that the spin structure is determined by the balance between the competing FM and AF magnetic energies. Coexistence of exchange bias domains, with opposite directions, can be established in Ni/FeF2 bilayers for Ni thicknesses belowmore » 10 nm. Patterning the Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with antidots destabilizes the FM state, enhancing the formation of opposite exchange bias domains below a critical antidot separation of the order of a few FeF2 crystal domains. The results suggest that dimensional confinement of the FM may be used to manipulate the AF spin structure in spintronic devices and ultrahigh-density information storage media. Lastly, the underlying mechanism of the uncompensated AF domain formation in Ni/FeF2 may be generic to other magnetic systems with complex noncollinear FM/AF spin structures.« less

  4. Emergence of noncollinear anisotropies from interfacial magnetic frustration in exchange-bias systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Sort, J.; Nogues, J.; Mikuszeit, N.; Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Hoffmann, A.; Dieny, B.; Miranda, R.; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Inst. de Microelectronica de Madrid; SPINTEC

    2009-01-01

    Exchange bias, referred to the interaction between a ferromagnet (FM) and an antiferromagnet (AFM), is a fundamental interfacial magnetic phenomenon, which is key to current and future applications. The effect was discovered half a century ago, and it is well established that the spin structures at the FM/AFM interface play an essential role. However, currently, ad hoc phenomenological anisotropies are often postulated without microscopic justification or sufficient experimental evidence to address magnetization-reversal behavior in exchange-bias systems. We advance toward a detailed microscopic understanding of the magnetic anisotropies in exchange-bias FM/AFM systems by showing that symmetry-breaking anisotropies leave a distinct fingerprint in the asymmetry of the magnetization reversal and we demonstrate how these emerging anisotropies are correlated with the intrinsic anisotropy. Angular and vectorial resolved Kerr hysteresis loops from FM/AFM bilayers with varying degree of ferromagnetic anisotropy reveal a noncollinear anisotropy, which becomes important for ferromagnets with vanishing intrinsic anisotropy. Numerical simulations show that this anisotropy naturally arises from the inevitable spin frustration at an atomically rough FM/AFM interface. As a consequence, we show in detail how the differences observed for different materials during magnetization reversal can be understood in general terms as originating from the interplay between interfacial frustration and intrinsic anisotropies. This understanding will certainly open additional avenues to tailor future advanced magnetic materials.

  5. Manipulation of competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domains in exchange-biased nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fraile Rodríguez, Arantxa; Basaran, Ali C.; Morales, Rafael; Kovylina, Miroslavna; Llobet, Jordi; Borrisé, Xavier; Marcus, Matthew A.; Scholl, Andreas; Schuller, Ivan K.; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amílcar

    2015-11-20

    In this work, using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism we show that a progressive spatial confinement of a ferromagnet (FM), either through thickness variation or laterally via patterning, actively controls the domains of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet (AF) in exchange-biased systems. Direct observations of the spin structure in both sides of the FM/AF interface in a model system, Ni/FeF2, show that the spin structure is determined by the balance between the competing FM and AF magnetic energies. Coexistence of exchange bias domains, with opposite directions, can be established in Ni/FeF2 bilayers for Ni thicknesses below 10 nm. Patterning the Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with antidots destabilizes the FM state, enhancing the formation of opposite exchange bias domains below a critical antidot separation of the order of a few FeF2 crystal domains. The results suggest that dimensional confinement of the FM may be used to manipulate the AF spin structure in spintronic devices and ultrahigh-density information storage media. Lastly, the underlying mechanism of the uncompensated AF domain formation in Ni/FeF2 may be generic to other magnetic systems with complex noncollinear FM/AF spin structures.

  6. Modification of the saturation magnetization of exchange bias thin film systems upon light-ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckfeldt, Henning; Gaul, Alexander; Müglich, Nicolas David; Holzinger, Dennis; Nissen, Dennis; Albrecht, Manfred; Emmrich, Daniel; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Ehresmann, Arno

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic modification of exchange bias materials by ‘ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning’ has been established more than a decade ago. To understand these experimental findings several theoretical models were introduced. Few investigations, however, did focus on magnetic property modifications caused by effects of ion bombardment in the ferromagnetic layer. In the present study, the structural changes occurring under ion bombardment were investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations and in experiments. A strong reduction of the saturation magnetization scaling linearly with increasing ion doses is observed and our findings suggest that it is correlated to the swelling of the layer material based on helium implantation and vacancy creation.

  7. Exchange-biased hybrid ferromagnetic-multiferroic core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Da-Wei; Javed, Khalid; Ali, Syed Shahbaz; Chen, Jun-Yang; Li, Pei-Sen; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Han, Xiu-Feng

    2014-07-07

    Artificial exchange-biased two-phase core-shell nanostructures consisting of ferromagnetic (Ni) and multiferroic (BiFeO3) materials were manufactured by a two-step method. An exchange bias effect was observed and studied, which indicates that it is possible to fabricate ferromagnetic-multiferroic nanostructures to utilize the combined ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic functionalities of bismuth ferrite.

  8. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gaul, Alexander; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Ehresmann, Arno; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-07-21

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  9. Exotic exchange bias at epitaxial ferroelectric-ferromagnetic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amitesh Reitinger, Christoph; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter; Autieri, Carmine; Sanyal, Biplab; Jutimoosik, Jaru; Yimnirun, Rattikorn; Bern, Francis; Esquinazi, Pablo; Korelis, Panagiotis

    2014-07-14

    Multiferroics in spintronics have opened up opportunities for future technological developments, particularly in the field of ferroelectric (FE)-ferromagnetic (FM) oxide interfaces with functionalities. We find strong exchange bias shifts (up to 84 Oe) upon field cooling in metal-oxide (Fe/BaTiO{sub 3}) films combining FM and FE layers. The saturation magnetic moment of the FM layer is also significantly higher than in bulk (3.0 ± 0.2 μ{sub B}/atom) and the reversal mechanism occurs via a domain nucleation process. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge and Ba L3-edge indicate presence of few monolayers of antiferromagnetic FeO at the interface without the formation of any BaFeO{sub 3} layer. Polarized neutron reflectometry corroborates with our magnetization data as we perform depth profiling of the magnetic and structural densities in these bilayers. Our first principles density functional calculations support the formation of antiferromagnetic FeO layers at the interface along with an enhancement of Fe magnetic moments in the inner ferromagnetic layers.

  10. Lateral length scales and local character of exchange bias.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.

    2005-03-01

    Exchange bias (EB) is a ferromagnet (F) -- antiferromagnet (AF) proximity effect. EB manifests itself as a horizontal shift of a single hysteresis loop. In our studies, an untwinned 38--100 nm-thick layer of (110) FeF2 is epitaxially grown on (110) MgF2, followed by a 4--70 nm-thick layer of Co, Ni or Fe. Easy axis magnetization curves (SQUID and spatially resolved MOKE) for different cooling fields and remanent magnetizations for zero-field cooled samples exhibit negatively or positively shifted single or tunable double hysteresis loops (DHL). In the untwinned epitaxial FeF2, the AF domains can be much larger than the grains, and, hence, as large as the F domains. When each F domain is in contact with only one AF domain, it does not average the direction and the magnitude of EB. In this regime, inhomogeneity of an AF-F sample, either structural or magnetic, can result in two subsystems formed upon cooling through the AF transition temperature. Each subsystem exhibits EB of the same magnitude but of the opposite sign, which gives rise to DHL. We conclude that when the domain size in the AF is larger than or comparable to that in the F, the local, non-averaging character of EB can be observed. Work supported by DOE and AFOSR.

  11. Thickness dependence of the exchange bias in epitaxial manganite bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrinskii, Alexey; Varela, Maria; Goldman, Allen

    2008-03-01

    A series of thin ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) bilayers of doped lanthanum manganites La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (F) and La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 (AF) have been grown by ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OAMBE). The lattice of the substrate material (001) SrTiO3 is a good match to that of the manganites. Growth by the OAMBE method results in samples with sharp interfaces, which are suitable systems to study the interfacial phenomenon of exchange bias (EB). We present STEM and high-resolution X-ray diffraction data that verify the high structural quality of the samples. We have studied EB as a function of the AF layer thickness and determined two critical values of the thickness for the onset and for the saturation of the hysteresis loop shift which is traditionally used to measure the effect. The observed dependence of EB on the AF layer thickness can be described within the original or generalized Meiklejohn-Bean model. Using this simple approach we have estimated the interfacial coupling energy and the antiferromagnetic anisotropy constant.

  12. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Alexander; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Ehresmann, Arno

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  13. Texture and magnetic properties of exchange bias systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aley, N. P.; Bowes, M.; Kroeger, R.; O'Grady, K.

    2010-05-15

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of IrMn/CoFe exchange bias systems deposited onto a dual seed layer of NiCr(X)/Ru(5 nm), with X=2, 6, and 20 nm. Samples with the structure NiCr (Xnm)/IrMn (7 nm)/CoFe (3 nm)/Ta (10 nm) with X=2, 6, and 20 nm were prepared by dc sputtering for magnetic characterization. A second set of samples with structure NiCr (Xnm)/IrMn (10 nm) with X=2, 6, and 20 nm were deposited onto TEM grids for structural characterization by TEM. A method of manipulating of the TEM grid to allow a qualitative analysis of the in-plane texture of the samples is described and used to analyze the microstructure of these samples. The microstructure and particularly the texture are correlated with the anisotropy constant (K{sub AF}) of the antiferromagnet (AF) layer, with an optimum NiCr seed layer of 6 nm to give a maximum value of K{sub AF} of 1.2x10{sup 7} ergs/cc.

  14. Texture and magnetic properties of exchange bias systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aley, N. P.; Bowes, M.; Kröger, R.; O'Grady, K.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of IrMn/CoFe exchange bias systems deposited onto a dual seed layer of NiCr(X)/Ru(5 nm), with X=2, 6, and 20 nm. Samples with the structure NiCr (Xnm)/IrMn (7 nm)/CoFe (3 nm)/Ta (10 nm) with X=2, 6, and 20 nm were prepared by dc sputtering for magnetic characterization. A second set of samples with structure NiCr (Xnm)/IrMn (10 nm) with X=2, 6, and 20 nm were deposited onto TEM grids for structural characterization by TEM. A method of manipulating of the TEM grid to allow a qualitative analysis of the in-plane texture of the samples is described and used to analyze the microstructure of these samples. The microstructure and particularly the texture are correlated with the anisotropy constant (KAF) of the antiferromagnet (AF) layer, with an optimum NiCr seed layer of 6 nm to give a maximum value of KAF of 1.2×107 ergs/cc.

  15. Exotic exchange bias at epitaxial ferroelectric-ferromagnetic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Amitesh; Reitinger, Christoph; Autieri, Carmine; Sanyal, Biplab; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Jutimoosik, Jaru; Yimnirun, Rattikorn; Bern, Francis; Esquinazi, Pablo; Korelis, Panagiotis; Böni, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Multiferroics in spintronics have opened up opportunities for future technological developments, particularly in the field of ferroelectric (FE)-ferromagnetic (FM) oxide interfaces with functionalities. We find strong exchange bias shifts (up to 84 Oe) upon field cooling in metal-oxide (Fe/BaTiO3) films combining FM and FE layers. The saturation magnetic moment of the FM layer is also significantly higher than in bulk (3.0 ± 0.2 μB/atom) and the reversal mechanism occurs via a domain nucleation process. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge and Ba L3-edge indicate presence of few monolayers of antiferromagnetic FeO at the interface without the formation of any BaFeO3 layer. Polarized neutron reflectometry corroborates with our magnetization data as we perform depth profiling of the magnetic and structural densities in these bilayers. Our first principles density functional calculations support the formation of antiferromagnetic FeO layers at the interface along with an enhancement of Fe magnetic moments in the inner ferromagnetic layers.

  16. Strain-mediated multiferroic control of spontaneous exchange bias in Ni-NiO heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, John P.; Sun, Wei-Yang; Schelhas, Laura T.; Carman, Greg P.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the measurement of strain-mediated multiferroic control of spontaneous exchange bias (SEB) in magnetostrictive nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) bilayers on ferroelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). Electric field control of a positive to negative exchange bias shift was measured, with an overall shift of 40.5 Oe, corresponding to a 325% change. Observed changes in coercivity are also reported and provide insight into the role of competing anisotropies in these structures. The findings in this paper provide evidence that magnetoelastic anisotropy can be utilized to control spontaneous exchange bias (SEB). This control of SEB is accomplished by modifying a bulk anisotropy (magnetoelasticity) that adjusts the mobility of interfacial anti-ferromagnetic spins and, therefore, the magnitude of the exchange bias. The demonstrated magnetoelastic control of exchange bias provides a useful tool in the creation of future magnetoelectric devices.

  17. Angular dependence of exchange bias and magnetization reversal controlled by electric-field-induced competing anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonggang; Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Zhang, Xu; Peng, Renci; Huang, Haoliang; Zou, Lvkuan; Zheng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Sen; Miao, Peixian; Lu, Yalin; Cai, Jian; Nan, Ce-Wen

    Combination of exchange-biased systems and FE materials gives a new avenue to study angular dependence of exchange bias and achieve reversible electric-field-controlled magnetization reversal. We study the angular dependence of electric-field-controlled exchange bias and magnetization reversal in CoFeB/IrMn/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7 Ti0.3O3. It is demonstrated that the ratio of the exchange-coupled unidirectional anisotropy and the uniaxial anisotropy of the FM layer, as well as their relative orientation can be dramatically and continuously tuned via electric fields. Simulations confirm that the electric-field-controlled exchange bias originates from the competition between the uniaxial anisotropy induced by the piezostrain and the exchange-coupled unidirectional anisotropy. Moreover, electric-field-controlled magnetization reversal was realized at zero magnetic field.

  18. Microscopic nature of ferro- and antiferromagnetic interface coupling of uncompensated magnetic moments in exchange bias systems.

    PubMed

    Gruyters, M; Schmitz, D

    2008-02-22

    Exchange bias in layered CoO/Fe structures is investigated by x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity (XRMR) measurements. Element-specific hysteresis loops are obtained from x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effects in the XRMR spectra. Evidence is provided for the existence of different types of uncompensated moments in the antiferromagnetic material. Explanations are given for the microscopic nature of these moments and the complex exchange interactions that determine the magnetization reversal in exchange bias systems.

  19. 75 FR 45584 - Planning and Establishment of State-Level Exchanges; Request for Comments Regarding Exchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... likely to establish related to operating Exchanges (e.g., legal structure (such as placement in State... certification criteria include, at a minimum: Meeting marketing requirements; ensuring a sufficient choice of... providers? b. What issues need to be considered in establishing appropriate minimum standards for...

  20. Isothermal low-field tuning of exchange bias in epitaxial Fe /Cr2O3/Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Belashchenko, K. D.; Binek, Ch.

    2007-10-01

    Moderate dc magnetic fields of less than 1T allow tuning the exchange bias in an epitaxially grown Fe 10nm/Cr2O3 2.7nm/Fe 10nm trilayer between negative and positive bias fields. Remarkably, this tunable exchange bias is observed at least up to 395K which exceeds the Néel temperature of bulk Cr2O3 (307K). The presence of spontaneous exchange bias and the absence of training effects at room temperature suggest the existence of stable interface moments independent of antiferromagnetic long range order in Cr2O3. Furthermore, the coercivity remains constant, independent of the exchange bias field. In contrast, large training associated with nonequilibrium spin configurations of antiferromagnetically ordered Cr2O3 appears below 50K.

  1. Influence of growth conditions on exchange bias of NiMn-based spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Wienecke, Anja; Kruppe, Rahel; Rissing, Lutz

    2015-05-07

    As shown in previous investigations, a correlation between a NiMn-based spin valve's thermal stability and its inherent exchange bias exists, even if the blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet is clearly above the heating temperature and the reason for thermal degradation is mainly diffusion and not the loss of exchange bias. Samples with high exchange bias are thermally more stable than samples with low exchange bias. Those structures promoting a high exchange bias are seemingly the same suppressing thermally induced diffusion processes (A. Wienecke and L. Rissing, “Relationship between thermal stability and layer-stack/structure of NiMn-based GMR systems,” in IEEE Transaction on Magnetic Conference (EMSA 2014)). Many investigations were carried out on the influence of the sputtering parameters as well as the layer thickness on the magnetoresistive effect. The influence of these parameters on the exchange bias and the sample's thermal stability, respectively, was hardly taken into account. The investigation described here concentrates on the last named issue. The focus lies on the influence of the sputtering parameters and layer thickness of the “starting layers” in the stack and the layers forming the (synthetic) antiferromagnet. This paper includes a guideline for the evaluated sputtering conditions and layer thicknesses to realize a high exchange bias and presumably good thermal stability for NiMn-based spin valves with a synthetic antiferromagnet.

  2. Controllable exchange bias in Fe/metamagnetic FeRh bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Ippei; Hamasaki, Yosuke; Itoh, Mitsuru; Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2014-10-27

    We report the studies of tuning the exchange bias at ferromagnetic Fe/metamagnetic FeRh bilayer interfaces. Fe/FeRh(111) bilayers show exchange bias in the antiferromagnetic state of FeRh while no exchange bias occurs at Fe/FeRh(001) interface. The contrasting results are attributed to the spin configurations of FeRh at the interface, i.e., the uncompensated ferromagnetic spin configuration of FeRh appears exclusively for (111) orientation. The exchange bias disappears as the bilayers are warmed above the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition temperature. The direction of the exchange bias for Fe/FeRh(111) is also found to be perpendicular to the cooling-field direction, in contrast to the commonly observed direction of exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfaces. In view of these results, the exchange bias in Fe/FeRh bilayers with the (111) crystallographic orientation should be useful for the design of rapid writing technology for magnetic information devices.

  3. Thickness dependent exchange bias in martensitic epitaxial Ni-Mn-Sn thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Behler, Anna; Teichert, Niclas; Auge, Alexander; Hütten, Andreas; Dutta, Biswanath; Hickel, Tilmann; Waske, Anja; Eckert, Jürgen

    2013-12-15

    A thickness dependent exchange bias in the low temperature martensitic state of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Sn thin films is found. The effect can be retained down to very small thicknesses. For a Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 32}Sn{sub 18} thin film, which does not undergo a martensitic transformation, no exchange bias is observed. Our results suggest that a significant interplay between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions, which is the origin for exchange bias, is only present in the martensite. The finding is supported by ab initio calculations showing that the antiferromagnetic order is stabilized in the phase.

  4. Exchange bias and anisotropy analysis of nano-composite Co84Zr16N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Taube, William Ringal; Ansari, Akhtar Saleem; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Akhtar, Jamil

    2015-03-01

    Nano-composite Co84Zr16N (CZN) films were prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition. As-deposited CZN films have not shown any exchange bias effect. But annealed (390 K) and field cooled samples have shown exchange bias phenomena. The observed exchange bias is attributed to inter-cluster exchange coupling between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nano-composite phase. High resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that, the CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-clusters embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix. X-ray diffraction confirms the poly-crystalline growth of the CZN films with a preferred fcc (622) phase formation. In-plane anisotropy of the exchange biased films was investigated by rotational magnetization curve, and the analysis shows that the magnetization reversal behaves according to the coherent rotation of the magnetic moment vector. Effectively, exchange bias effect in such single layer films could be attributed to co-existing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phase within the single layer. Such single layer nano-composite films can be a possible alternative to the bilayer combination of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange biased films and are ideally suited for spintronics and tunnel junction applications.

  5. Study of exchange bias in NiCr2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H.; Chakraborty, T.; Srikanth, K.; Chandra, R.; Mitra, C.; Kumar, U.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated exchange bias as a function of temperature in nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic normal spinel NiCr2O4. The studied bulk compound exhibits ferrimagnetic and canted antiferromagnetic ordering at 68 K and 30 K respectively. Sample characterization was carried out using X-Ray, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements. Magnetization measurements as a function of temperature has revealed interesting features. Magnetic isotherms of bulk and nanoparticle sample were also investigated at different temperatures. It was found that in nanoparticles, with decrease in temperature, exchange bias first increases, attains maximum value and then subsequently decreases. We argue that in nanoparticles, the higher exchange bias at 68 K is because of coexistence of ferrimagnetic and surface spin effect. However, the presence of glassy spin state may be the reason for decreasing exchange bias effect below Tc down to 5 K.

  6. Exchange Bias Realignment Using a Laser-based Direct-write Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, I.; Löschner, U.; Schille, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    We report on selective realignment of the exchange biased magnetization direction in spintronic layer stacks using rapidly deflected focused laser radiation in a direct-write technique. Laser-based magnetic field cooling by applying either pulsed or continuous wave laser radiation was investigated. The magnetic properties of laser-based field cooled layer stacks were investigated by using magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. The dependencies of the processing parameters peak intensity and external magnetic field strength on the resulting exchange bias field strength were evaluated. In addition, temperature field simulations gain deeper insights into the mechanisms of laser-based field cooling. Our results show significant influence of the laser processing regime. Field cooling induced by continuous laser radiation caused higher exchange bias field strengths, compared to pulsed laser radiation. Moreover, the external magnetic field strength affected the resulting exchange bias field strength only by irradiating low-intensity laser beams.

  7. Angular Dependence of Exchange Bias and Magnetization Reversal Controlled by Electric-Field-Induced Competing Anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aitian; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Peisen; Zhang, Xu; Peng, Renci; Huang, Haoliang; Zou, Lvkuan; Zheng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Sen; Miao, Peixian; Lu, Yalin; Cai, Jianwang; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-13

    The combination of exchange-biased systems and ferroelectric materials offers a simple and effective way to investigate the angular dependence of exchange bias using one sample with electric-field-induced competing anisotropies. A reversible electric-field-controlled magnetization reversal at zero magnetic field is also realized through optimizing the anisotropy configuration, holding promising applications for ultralow power magnetoelectric devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Piezoelectric tuning of exchange bias in a BaTiO3/Co/CoO heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, S.; Echtenkamp, W.; Jones, K.; He, X.; Sahoo, S.; Binek, Ch.

    2010-10-01

    Piezoelectrically controlled strain is used for electric tuning of exchange-bias fields. A generic exchange-bias Co/CoO bilayer is deposited on the surface of a ferroelectric and thus piezoelectric BaTiO3 substrate which allows to apply electrically and thermally tunable stress in the adjacent ferromagnetic Co thin film. The stress-induced strain alters foremost the magnetic anisotropy of the Co film and by that the magnetization orientation at the Co/CoO interface modifying the exchange-bias field. This results in a pronounced electrically induced weakening of the exchange bias but also includes the possibility of tuning the exchange-bias field through a subtle sign change from regular negative to positive values. The electrically controlled crossover from negative to positive exchange bias is consistently observed at various temperatures in the rhombohedral phase of BaTiO3 . This complex electric field dependence of the exchange-bias field is the result of the long-range nature of strain and interpreted through competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange at the Co/CoO interface. Our data suggest competition between regular negative and positive exchange bias. Weakening of negative exchange bias originates from noncollinear alignment of the Co and CoO interface magnetizations. Positive exchange bias is activated when stress induces antiferromagnetic exchange through atomic displacements changing the exchange paths at the Co/CoO interface.

  9. Voltage Control of Exchange Bias in a Chromium Oxide Based Thin Film Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, Will; Street, Mike; Mahmood, Ather; Binek, Christian

    Controlling magnetism by electrical means is a key challenge in the field of spintronics, and electric control of exchange bias is one of the most promising routes to address this challenge. Isothermal electric control of exchange bias has been achieved near room temperature using bulk, single crystal, magnetoelectric Cr2O3. In this study the electrically-controlled exchange bias is investigated in an all thin film Cr2O3/PdCo exchange bias heterosystem where an MBE grown ferromagnetic and perpendicular anisotropic Pd/Co multilayer has been deposited on a PLD grown (0001) Cr2O3 thin film. Prototype devices are fabricated using lithography techniques. Using a process of magnetoelectric annealing, voltage control of exchange bias in Cr2O3 heterostructures is demonstrated with significant implications for scalability of ultra-low power memory and logical devices. In addition, the dependence of the exchange bias on the applied electric and magnetic fields are independently studied at 300K and isothermal voltage-controlled switching is investigated. This project was supported by SRC through CNFD, an SRC-NRI Center, by C-SPIN, part of STARnet, and by the NSF through MRSEC DMR-0820521.

  10. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    R, Lisha; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Anantharaman, M. R.; T, Hysen; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-06-24

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  11. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Lisha; T, Hysen; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  12. Antiferromagnetic exchange bias of a ferromagnetic semiconductor by a ferromagnetic metal

    SciTech Connect

    Olejnik, K.; Wadley, P.; Haigh, J.; Edmonds, K. W.; Campion, R. P.; Rushforth, A. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Foxon, C. T.; Jungwirth, T.; Wunderlich, J.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.

    2009-11-05

    We demonstrate an exchange bias in (Ga,Mn)As induced by antiferromagnetic coupling to a thin overlayer of Fe. Bias fields of up to 240 Oe are observed. Using element-specific x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements, we distinguish an interface layer that is strongly pinned antiferromagnetically to the Fe. The interface layer remains polarized at room temperature.

  13. Exchange bias in core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: experimental results and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle, Xavier

    2009-03-01

    In this talk, we will review some of the main experimental observations related to the occurrence of exchange bias in magnetic systems, focusing the attention on the phenomenology appearing in nanoparticles with core/shell structure as compared to thin film bilayers [1]. The main open questions posed by the experimental observations will be discussed and contrasted to existing theories and models for exchange bias [1]. We will also present some recent numerical simulations [2-4] based on a simple model of a core/shell nanoparticle, showing evidence that the magnetic order of interfacial spins accounts for most of the experimental observations. Finally, we will discuss the occurrence of exchange bias on laser-ablated granular thin films composed of Co nanoparticles embedded in amorphous zirconia matrix [5]. The deposition method allows controlling the degree of oxidation of the Co particles by tuning the oxygen pressure at the vacuum chamber. The nature of the nanoparticles embedded in the nonmagnetic matrix may be monitored from metallic, ferromagnetic (FM) Co to antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoOx, with a FM/AFM intermediate regime for which the percentage of the AFM phase can be increased at the expense of the FM phase, leading to the occurrence of exchange bias in particles of about 2 nm in size. This is a model system to study some of the features of exchange bias in nanoparticles, such as particle size dependence, induced exchange anisotropy on the FM leading to high irreversible hysteresis loops, and blocking of the AFM clusters due to proximity to the FM phase. [4pt] [1] For a recent review see, for example, ``Exchange bias phenomenology and models of core/shell nanoparticles''; Iglesias, O.; Labarta, A.; and Batlle, X. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 8, 2761 (2008). [0pt] [2] ``Microscopic origin of exchange bias in core/shell nanoparticles''; Iglesias, O.; Batlle, X.; Labarta, A.; Physical Review B 72, 212401 (2005). [0pt] [3] ``Modelling exchange bias

  14. Tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots using exchange bias (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Menéndez, E.; Salazar-Alvarez, G.; Baró, M. D.; Miron, M.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.; Nogués, J.

    2008-04-01

    Exchange bias effects have been studied in elliptical dots composed of ferromagnetic Ni80Fe20-antiferromagnetic Ir20Mn80 bilayers. The magnetization reversal mechanisms and magnetic configurations have been investigated by magneto-optic Kerr effect and magnetic force microscopy. Although the obtained bias fields in these dots are relatively small, the magnetization reversal is found to be influenced by the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic coupling. Namely, for some off-axis angles of measurement, the magnetization reversal mechanism of the Ni80Fe20-Ir20Mn80 ellipses depends on whether exchange bias is induced along the minor or major axis of the ellipses. Hence, exchange bias is shown to be an effective means for tailoring the magnetization reversal of elliptical dots after sample fabrication.

  15. Exchange biasing single molecule magnets: coupling of TbPc2 to antiferromagnetic layers.

    PubMed

    Lodi Rizzini, A; Krull, C; Balashov, T; Mugarza, A; Nistor, C; Yakhou, F; Sessi, V; Klyatskaya, S; Ruben, M; Stepanow, S; Gambardella, P

    2012-11-14

    We investigate the possibility to induce exchange bias between single molecule magnets (SMM) and metallic or oxide antiferromagnetic substrates. Element-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements reveal, respectively, the presence and absence of unidirectional exchange anisotropy for TbPc(2) SMM deposited on antiferromagnetic Mn and CoO layers. TbPc(2) deposited on Mn thin films present magnetic hysteresis and a negative horizontal shift of the Tb magnetization loop after field cooling, consistent with the observation of pinned spins in the Mn layer coupled parallel to the Tb magnetic moment. Conversely, molecules deposited on CoO substrates present paramagnetic magnetization loops with no indication of exchange bias. These experiments demonstrate the ability of SMM to polarize the pinned uncompensated spins of an antiferromagnet during field-cooling and realize metal-organic exchange-biased heterostructures using antiferromagnetic pinning layers.

  16. Evidence of exchange bias effect originating from the interaction between antiferromagnetic core and spin glass shell

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. K. Yuan, J. J.; Yu, H. J.; Zhu, X. R.; Xie, Y. M.; Tang, S. L.; Xu, L. Q.

    2014-07-14

    Spin glass behavior and exchange bias effect have been observed in antiferromagnetic SrMn{sub 3}O{sub 6−x} nanoribbons synthesized via a self-sacrificing template process. The magnetic field dependence of thermoremanent magnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization shows that the sample is good correspondence to spin glass and diluted antiferromagnetic system for the applied field H < 2 T and H > 2 T, respectively. By detailed analysis of training effect using Binek's model, we argue that the observed exchange bias effect in SrMn{sub 3}O{sub 6−x} nanoribbons arises entirely from an interface exchange coupling between the antiferromagnetic core and spin glass shell. The present study is useful for understanding the nature of shell layer and the origin of exchange bias effect in other antiferromagnetic nanosystems as well.

  17. Origin of the asymmetric magnetization reversal behavior in exchange-biased systems: competing anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Camarero, Julio; Sort, Jordi; Hoffmann, Axel; García-Martín, Jose Miguel; Dieny, Bernard; Miranda, Rodolfo; Nogués, Josep

    2005-07-29

    The magnetization reversal in exchange-biased ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) bilayers is investigated. Different reversal pathways on each branch of the hysteresis loop, i.e., asymmetry, are obtained both experimentally and theoretically when the magnetic field is applied at certain angles from the anisotropy direction. The range of angles and the magnitude of this asymmetry are determined by the ratio between the FM anisotropy and the interfacial FM-AFM exchange anisotropy. The occurrence of asymmetry is linked with the appearance of irreversibility, i.e., finite coercivity, as well as with the maximum of exchange bias, increasing for larger anisotropy ratios. Our results indicate that asymmetric hysteresis loops are intrinsic to exchange-biased systems and the competition between anisotropies determines the asymmetric behavior of the magnetization reversal.

  18. 77 FR 31513 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ...; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans; Exchange Standards for Employers; Correction AGENCY... of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans; Exchange Standards for Employers.'' DATES: Effective Date... Sec. 155.205(b), respectively, which are the provisions discussing the Exchange call center and Web...

  19. Exchange Biasing of the Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Ga_1-xMn_xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. B.; Eid, K. F.; Ku, K. C.; Schiffer, P.; Samarth, N.

    2004-03-01

    We demonstrate the successful exchange coupling of the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga_1-xMn_xAs with an epitaxially overgrown antiferromagnet (Mn). Unlike conventional exchange biased systems, the Néel temperature of the antiferromagnet is nominally higher than the Curie temperature of the ferromagnet. The resulting exchange bias manifests itself as a clear shift in the magnetization hysteresis loop when the heterostructure is cooled in the presence of an applied magnetic field. The exchange coupling also enhances the coercivity of the ferromagnetic semiconductor. The exchange field, H_E, and the coercive field, H_C, both decrease monotonically with increasing temperature and vanish at the TC of the ferromagnetic Ga_1-xMn_xAs layer.

  20. Tuning structure and roughness in exchange biased NiO/permalloy bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Luc; Negulescu, Béatrice; Dumont, Yves; Tessier, Michel; Keller, Niels; Wack, André; Guyot, Marcel

    2003-05-01

    Polycrystalline NiO thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on quartz substrates. These films exhibit a strong texture, which can be tuned by changing deposition parameters such as substrate temperature or oxygen partial pressure. By varying the deposition temperature from room temperature up to 900 °C, (220), (111), and (200) textured films are prepared. In the temperature zones separating these orientations, competition between different growth directions leads to smaller crystallites, characterized by broader diffraction lines. Surface roughness measured by atomic force microscopy is strongly correlated with these structural features. Roughness is minimum for highly textured samples (about 7Å for 500 Å thick films), and it exhibits two peaks in the intermediate zones, with maximum values of about 40 Å. In order to correlate exchange bias with these structural features, 100 Å thick FeNi layers were deposited by rf sputtering on top of the 500 Å thick NiO films. Hysteresis loops were measured at 10 K by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry after the samples were cooled in a 100 Oe magnetic field. Exchange bias is maximum for (111) oriented samples. No clear correlation between exchange bias and surface roughness is observed at low temperature. Exchange bias temperature dependence strongly depends upon NiO films deposition temperature. The blocking temperature, for which the exchange bias vanishes, varies between 150 K for (220) oriented samples and 250 K for (111) textured samples, and it exceeds room temperature for (200) films.

  1. Magnetic exchange bias of more than 1 Tesla in a natural mineral intergrowth.

    PubMed

    McEnroe, Suzanne A; Carter-Stiglitz, Brian; Harrison, Richard J; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; McCammon, Catherine

    2007-10-01

    Magnetic exchange bias is a phenomenon whereby the hysteresis loop of a 'soft' magnetic phase is shifted by an amount H(E) along the applied field axis owing to its interaction with a 'hard' magnetic phase. Since the discovery of exchange bias fifty years ago, the development of a general theory has been hampered by the uncertain nature of the interfaces between the hard and soft phases, commonly between an antiferromagnetic phase and a ferro- or ferrimagnetic phase. Exchange bias continues to be the subject of investigation because of its technological applications and because it is now possible to manipulate magnetic materials at the nanoscale. Here we present the first documented example of exchange bias of significant magnitude (>1 T) in a natural mineral. We demonstrate that exchange bias in this system is due to the interaction between coherently intergrown magnetic phases formed through a natural process of phase separation during slow cooling over millions of years. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that these intergrowths have a known crystallographic orientation with a known crystallographic structure and that the interfaces are coherent.

  2. Sign change of exchange bias in [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/IrMn multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Seungha; Kwon, Joonhyun; Cho, B. K.

    2014-05-07

    The properties of exchange bias in a multilayer of [Pt(1.0 nm)/Co(1.0 nm)]{sub 2}/Pt(t{sub Pt} nm)/Co(1.0 nm)/ IrMn(12.0 nm) were investigated with a variation of Pt layer thickness, t{sub Pt}. For t{sub Pt} ≤ 1.6 nm, it was typically observed that Co layers were ferromagnetically coupled while IrMn layer exhibited negative exchange bias. With increasing Pt thickness, antiferromagnetic (AF) interlayer coupling strength increased and caused AF spin configuration between the Co layers. With further increasing of Pt thickness (t{sub Pt} = 2.5 nm), the exchange bias between Co and IrMn layers was changed from negative to positive. Therefore, a large enhancement of AF interlayer coupling induced the sign change of exchange bias from negative to positive and resulted in a drastic change of switching behavior in a magnetization reversal. Both extraordinary Hall-effect and magnetoresistance were measured to verify the exchange bias direction and spin configurations upon magnetization reversal.

  3. Exchange biasing with multiferroic: electric field effects on magnetic and magnetotransport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontcuberta, J.

    2008-03-01

    Room-temperature multiferroic materials are scarce and display a weak magnetoelectric coupling and thus huge difficulties exist for controlling the magnetic state by using an electric field or viceversa. A possible alternative to circumvent this limitation is to exploit the clamping of ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domains in biferroic materials and use a suitable exchange-bias existing with ferromagnetic materials to tune the magnetic response of the ferromagnet. In this presentation we shall overview recent experiments on exchange-biasing using hexagonal YMnO3 biferroics and Permalloy as a soft-ferromagnet. Exchange-bias on ferromagnetic materials is most commonly evidenced by their magnetic response, although magnetotransport measurements are also very adequate to monitor the exchange bias. We will present and discus first how exchange-bias is manifested and monitored. Next, we will describe the effects of an electric field, biasing the ferroelectric (and antiferromagnetic) epitaxial layer, on the exchange bias. We will show that under appropriate conditions, magnetization can be switched by application of a suitable electric field. We will discuss the significance of the results with particular attention to role of current leakages across the ferroelectric. In collaboration with X. Mart'i, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Spain; V. Laukhin, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC and Institut Catalàde Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; V. Skumryev, Institut Catalàde Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Departament de F'isica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain; D. Hrabovsky and F. S'anchez, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Spain; M. Varela, Departament de F'isica Aplicada i Òptica, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain; U. Lüders and J.F. Bobo, LNMH ONERA-CNRS, France.

  4. Tunable giant exchange bias in the single-phase rare-earth-transition-metal intermetallics YM n12 -xF ex with highly homogenous intersublattice exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuanhua; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Shunquan; Du, Honglin; Han, Jingzhi; Wang, Changsheng; Chen, Xiping; Xie, Lei; Yang, Yingchang; Yang, Jinbo

    2017-08-01

    A tunable giant exchange bias effect is discovered in a family of bulk intermetallic compounds YM n12 -xF ex . Experimental data demonstrate that the exchange bias effect originates from global interactions among ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic sublattices but not the interfacial exchange coupling or inhomogeneous magnetic clusters. A giant exchange bias with a loop shift of up to 6.1 kOe has been observed in YM n4.4F e7.6 compound. In a narrow temperature range, the exchange bias field shows a sudden switching-off whereas the coercivity shows a sudden switching-on with increasing temperature. This unique feature indicates that the intersublattice exchange coupling is highly homogenous. Our theoretical calculations reveal this switching feature, which agrees very well with the experiments and provides insights into the physical underpinnings of the observed exchange bias and coercivity.

  5. Modelling exchange bias in core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Oscar; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amílcar

    2007-10-10

    We present an atomistic model of a single nanoparticle with core/shell structure that takes into account its lattice structure and spherical geometry, and in which the values of microscopic parameters such as anisotropy and exchange constants can be tuned in the core, shell and interfacial regions. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of the hysteresis loops based on this model, we have determined the range of microscopic parameters for which loop shifts after field cooling can be observed. The study of the magnetic order of the interfacial spins for different particle sizes and values of the interfacial exchange coupling have allowed us to correlate the appearance of loop asymmetries and vertical displacements to the existence of a fraction of uncompensated spins at the shell interface that remain pinned during field cycling, offering new insight on the microscopic origin of the experimental phenomenology.

  6. Wealth concentration in a biased asset-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt-Lee, Adrian

    Economic inequality is a significant and dynamic problem throughout the world. Asset-exchange models have been used to model macroeconomic systems based on microeconomic assumptions about how agents exchange wealth in an economy. Previous studies of a certain asset-exchange model, called the Yard-Sale model, have found that trade alone promotes the condensation of wealth to a single individual in an economy [Chakraborti, 2002, Moukarzel et al., 2007, Boghosian, 2014b]. A later study found that a slight modification of the Yard-Sale model seems to allow for the coexistence of both "condensed wealth" and a normal population in an economy [Boghosian et al., 2016a]. This work formalizes the notion of wealth condensation in a macroeconomic system. This can be done by extending Schwartz's theory of distributions to allow for objects which increase at most linearly at infinity, or by considering condensed wealth to be a nonstandard phenomenon, and describing it as such. Numerical simulations indicate that this continuous description of wealth concentration is a valid approximation of wealth concentration in discrete systems with as few as 256 agents. We then study the properties of the steady-state distribution of wealth in such a system, and mention the fit of our system to the distribution of wealth in the United States in 2016.

  7. Mapping motion of antiferromagnetic interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment in exchange-biased bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Fan, W. J.; Evans, R. F. L.; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Chantrell, R. W.; Mangin, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhou, S. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, disordered-IrMn3/insulating-Y3Fe5O12 exchange-biased bilayers are studied. The behavior of the net magnetic moment ΔmAFM in the antiferromagnet is directly probed by anomalous and planar Hall effects, and anisotropic magnetoresistance. The ΔmAFM is proved to come from the interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment. We demonstrate that the exchange bias and rotational hysteresis loss are induced by partial rotation and irreversible switching of the ΔmAFM. In the athermal training effect, the state of the ΔmAFM cannot be recovered after one cycle of hysteresis loop. This work highlights the fundamental role of the ΔmAFM in the exchange bias and facilitates the manipulation of antiferromagnetic spintronic devices.

  8. Antisite disorder-induced exchange bias effect in multiferroic Y2CoMnO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Chatterji, Tapan; Strydom, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Exchange bias effect in the ferromagnetic double perovskite compound Y2CoMnO6, which is also a multiferroic, is reported. The exchange bias, observed below 8 K, is explained as arising due to the interface effect between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic clusters created by antisite disorder in this material. Below 8 K, prominent ferromagnetic hysteresis with metamagnetic "steps" and significant coercive field, Hc ≈ 10 kOe are observed in this compound which has a Tc ≈ 75 K. A model based on growth of ferromagnetic domains overcoming the elastic energy of structurally pinned magnetic interfaces, which closely resembles martensitic-like transitions, is adapted to explain the observed effects. The role of antisite disorder in creating the domain structure leading to exchange bias effect is highlighted in the present work.

  9. Mapping motion of antiferromagnetic interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment in exchange-biased bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Fan, W. J.; Evans, R. F. L.; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Chantrell, R. W.; Mangin, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhou, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, disordered-IrMn3/insulating-Y3Fe5O12 exchange-biased bilayers are studied. The behavior of the net magnetic moment ΔmAFM in the antiferromagnet is directly probed by anomalous and planar Hall effects, and anisotropic magnetoresistance. The ΔmAFM is proved to come from the interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment. We demonstrate that the exchange bias and rotational hysteresis loss are induced by partial rotation and irreversible switching of the ΔmAFM. In the athermal training effect, the state of the ΔmAFM cannot be recovered after one cycle of hysteresis loop. This work highlights the fundamental role of the ΔmAFM in the exchange bias and facilitates the manipulation of antiferromagnetic spintronic devices. PMID:25777540

  10. Exchange Bias Optimization by Controlled Oxidation of Cobalt Nanoparticle Films Prepared by Sputter Gas Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Antón, Ricardo López; González, Juan A; Andrés, Juan P; Normile, Peter S; Canales-Vázquez, Jesús; Muñiz, Pablo; Riveiro, José M; De Toro, José A

    2017-03-11

    Porous films of cobalt nanoparticles have been obtained by sputter gas aggregation and controllably oxidized by air annealing at 100 °C for progressively longer times (up to more than 1400 h). The magnetic properties of the samples were monitored during the process, with a focus on the exchange bias field. Air annealing proves to be a convenient way to control the Co/CoO ratio in the samples, allowing the optimization of the exchange bias field to a value above 6 kOe at 5 K. The occurrence of the maximum in the exchange bias field is understood in terms of the density of CoO uncompensated spins and their degree of pinning, with the former reducing and the latter increasing upon the growth of a progressively thicker CoO shell. Vertical shifts exhibited in the magnetization loops are found to correlate qualitatively with the peak in the exchange bias field, while an increase in vertical shift observed for longer oxidation times may be explained by a growing fraction of almost completely oxidized particles. The presence of a hummingbird-like form in magnetization loops can be understood in terms of a combination of hard (biased) and soft (unbiased) components; however, the precise origin of the soft phase is as yet unresolved.

  11. Exchange Bias Optimization by Controlled Oxidation of Cobalt Nanoparticle Films Prepared by Sputter Gas Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Ricardo López; González, Juan A.; Andrés, Juan P.; Normile, Peter S.; Canales-Vázquez, Jesús; Muñiz, Pablo; Riveiro, José M.; De Toro, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Porous films of cobalt nanoparticles have been obtained by sputter gas aggregation and controllably oxidized by air annealing at 100 °C for progressively longer times (up to more than 1400 h). The magnetic properties of the samples were monitored during the process, with a focus on the exchange bias field. Air annealing proves to be a convenient way to control the Co/CoO ratio in the samples, allowing the optimization of the exchange bias field to a value above 6 kOe at 5 K. The occurrence of the maximum in the exchange bias field is understood in terms of the density of CoO uncompensated spins and their degree of pinning, with the former reducing and the latter increasing upon the growth of a progressively thicker CoO shell. Vertical shifts exhibited in the magnetization loops are found to correlate qualitatively with the peak in the exchange bias field, while an increase in vertical shift observed for longer oxidation times may be explained by a growing fraction of almost completely oxidized particles. The presence of a hummingbird-like form in magnetization loops can be understood in terms of a combination of hard (biased) and soft (unbiased) components; however, the precise origin of the soft phase is as yet unresolved. PMID:28336895

  12. Exchange bias effect modified asymmetric magnetization reversal in Ni/YMnO3 multiferroic bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Junlu; Zheng, Dongxing; Li, Dong; Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Feng, Liefeng; Bai, Haili

    2016-04-01

    Exchange bias (EB) effect modified asymmetric magnetization reversal in Ni/YMnO3 multiferroic bilayers was investigated by combining anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with free energy methods. The promotion and inhibition effects of EB field on magnetization rotation result in the asymmetry of magnetization reversal. The AMR curves exhibit shape transition from arc-like to sin2θH-dependence with increasing external fields due to the competition between Zeeman energy and interfacial coupling energy. The phase shift and asymmetric behaviors become weak as the EB field decreases. Our work suggests that controlling the EB effect can be an alternative way to manipulate the magnetization reversal in exchange biased systems.

  13. Magnetic ground state and giant spontaneous exchange bias in Ni46Mn43In11 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Mayukh K.; Maji, Bibekananda; Modak, M.; Banerjee, S.

    2017-05-01

    We report non-equilibrium dynamics and giant spontaneous exchange bias obtained in zero field cooled mode for Ni46Mn43In11 alloy. The dc magnetic measurements indicate a super spin glass type magnetic ground state in the system. This SSG state is formed when superparamagnetic domains are collectively frozen inside strong antiferromagnetic matrix at low temperature. The ZFCEB arises due to the development of strong superferromagnetic unidirectional anisotropy at the interface of SSG and AFM during the initial magnetization processes. The temperature variation of field cooled exchange bias and ZFCEB is almost similar whilst their field dependency is different. Possible reasons for observed behaviors are comprehensively discussed in this article.

  14. Effects of exchange bias on magnetotransport in permalloy kagome artificial spin ice

    DOE PAGES

    Le, B. L.; Rench, D. W.; Misra, R.; ...

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the magnetotransport properties of connected kagome artificial spin ice networks composed of permalloy nanowires. Our data show clear evidence of magnetic switching among the wires, both in the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance. An unusual asymmetry with field sweep direction appears at temperatures below about 20 K that appears to be associated with exchange bias resulting from surface oxidation of permalloy, and which disappears in alumina-capped samples. These results demonstrate that exchange bias is a phenomenon that must be considered in understanding the physics of such artificial spin ice systems, and that opens up new possibilities for their control.

  15. Ultrathin limit of exchange bias coupling at oxide multiferroic/ferromagnetic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Huijben, M; Yu, P; Martin, L W; Molegraaf, H J A; Chu, Y-H; Holcomb, M B; Balke, N; Rijnders, G; Ramesh, R

    2013-09-14

    Exchange bias coupling at the multiferroic- ferromagnetic interface in BiFeO₃ /La₀.₇ Sr₀.₃ MnO₃ heterostructures exhibits a critical thickness for ultrathin BiFeO₃ layers of 5 unit cells (2 nm). Linear dichroism measurements demonstrate the dependence on the BiFeO₃ layer thickness with a strong reduction for ultrathin layers, indicating diminished antiferromagnetic ordering that prevents interfacial exchange bias coupling. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Influence of ion bombardment induced patterning of exchange bias in pinned artificial ferrimagnets on the interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeink, V.; Schmalhorst, J.; Reiss, G.; Weis, T.; Lengemann, D.; Engel, D.; Ehresmann, A.

    2008-06-15

    Artificial ferrimagnets have many applications as, e.g., pinned reference electrodes in magnetic tunnel junctions. It is known that the application of ion bombardment (IB) induced patterning of the exchange bias coupling of a single layer reference electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions with He ions is possible. For applications as, e.g., special types of magnetic logic, a combination of the IB induced patterning of the exchange bias coupling and the implementation of an artificial ferrimagnet as reference electrode is desirable. Here, investigations for a pinned artificial ferrimagnet with a Ru interlayer, which is frequently used in magnetic tunnel junctions, are presented. It is shown that in this kind of samples the exchange bias can be increased or rotated by IB induced magnetic patterning with 10 keV He ions without a destruction of the antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling. An IrMn/Py/Co/Cu/Co stack turned out to be more sensitive to the influence of IB than the Ru based artificial ferrimagnet.

  17. Setting temperature effect in polycrystalline exchange-biased IrMn/CoFe bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Outon, L. E.; Araujo Filho, M. S.; Araujo, R. E.; Ardisson, J. D.; Macedo, W. A. A.

    2013-05-07

    We study the effect of atomic interdiffusion on the exchange bias of polycrystalline IrMn/({sup 57}Fe + CoFe) multilayers due to the thermal setting process of exchange coupling during field annealing. Depth-resolved {sup 57}Fe conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to quantify atomic interdiffusion. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to monitor the variation of exchange bias and magnetisation. It was found that interface sharpness is only affected above {approx}350 Degree-Sign C. Three different stages for the setting of exchange bias can be inferred from our results. At the lower setting temperatures (up to 350 Degree-Sign C), the effect of field annealing involves alignment of spins and interfacial coupling due to the setting of both antiferromagnetic (AF) bulk and interface without significant interdiffusion. At a second stage (350-450 Degree-Sign C), where AF ordering dominates over diffusion effects, atomic migration and increased setting of AF spins co-exist to produce a peak in exchange bias field and coercivity. On a third stage (>450 Degree-Sign C), severe chemical intermixing reduces significantly the F/AF coupling.

  18. Exchange bias of the interface spin system at the Fe/MgO interface.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Smith, K J; Lüpke, G; Hanbicki, A T; Goswami, R; Li, C H; Zhao, H B; Jonker, B T

    2013-06-01

    The ferromagnet/oxide interface is key to developing emerging multiferroic and spintronic technologies with new functionality. Here we probe the Fe/MgO interface magnetization, and identify a new exchange bias phenomenon manifested only in the interface spin system, and not in the bulk. The interface magnetization exhibits a pronounced exchange bias, and the hysteresis loop is shifted entirely to one side of the zero field axis. However, the bulk magnetization does not, in marked contrast to typical systems where exchange bias is manifested in the net magnetization. This reveals the existence of an antiferromagnetic exchange pinning layer at the interface, identified here as FeO patches that exist even for a nominally 'clean' interface. These results demonstrate that atomic moments at the interface are non-collinear with the bulk magnetization, and therefore may affect the net anisotropy or serve as spin scattering sites. We control the exchange bias magnitude by varying the interface oxygen concentration and Fe-O bonding.

  19. Exchange bias effect in BiFeO{sub 3}-NiO nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kaushik; Sarkar, Babusona; Dev Ashok, Vishal; Das, Kajari; De, S. K.; Sinha Chaudhuri, Sheli; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-07

    Ferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals of average size 11 nm were used to form nanocomposites (x)BiFeO{sub 3}/(100 − x)NiO, x = 0, 20, 40, 50, 60, 80, and 100 by simple solvothermal process. The ferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals embedded in antiferromagnetic NiO nanostructures were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope studies. The modification of cycloidal spin structure of bulk BiFeO{sub 3} owing to reduction in particle size compared to its spin spiral wavelength (62 nm) results in ferromagnetic ordering in pure BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals. High Neel temperature (T{sub N}) of NiO leads to significant exchange bias effect across the BiFeO{sub 3}/NiO interface at room temperature. A maximum exchange bias field of 123.5 Oe at 300 K for x = 50 after field cooling at 7 kOe has been observed. The exchange bias coupling causes an enhancement of coercivity up to 235 Oe at 300 K. The observed exchange bias effect originates from the exchange coupling between the surface uncompensated spins of BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals and NiO nanostructures.

  20. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaopu Ma, Chung T.; Poon, S. Joseph; Lu, Jiwei; Devaraj, Arun; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B.

    2016-01-04

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth.

  1. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopu; Ma, Chung T.; Lu, Jiwei; Devaraj, Arun; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth.

  2. Mircomagnetic Simulation of Amorphous TbFeCo Thin Films with Self Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chung; Li, Xiaopu; Lu, Jiwei; Poon, Joseph

    Amorphous ferrimagnetic TbFeCo thin films are found to exhibit self exchange bias effect near compensation temperature by magnetic hysteresis loop measurement. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb concentrations distributed within the amorphous films. The observed exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the two nanoscale amorphous phases. Here, we present a computational model of TbFeCo with two nanoscale amorphous phases using micromagnetic simulation. To obtain a structure similar to the two nanoscale amorphous phases, two kinds of cells with different Tb concentration are distributed within the simulated space. Each cell contains separated Tb and FeCo components, forming two antiferromagnetically coupled sublattices. Using this model, we show exchange bias effect near compensation temperature, in agreement with experimental results. The effect can be tuned by controlling the microstructure and composition. The work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency grant.

  3. Exchange bias through a Cu interlayer in an IrMn/Co system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshev, J.; Nicolodi, S.; Pereira, L. G.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Schmidt, J. E.; Deranlot, C.; Petroff, F.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Azevedo, A.

    2007-06-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetization (MAG) measurements were used to study the exchange interaction between the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers in an IrMn/Cu/Co system as a function of the Cu spacer thickness. Although the experimental angular variations of the exchange-bias fields HebFMR and HebMAG coincide, the coupling strengths J and the Co layers’ anisotropy fields HU , obtained via numerical simulations, are different. For all Cu thicknesses JFMR>JMAG and HUFMRexchange coupling decreases exponentially with the spacer thickness and is a short-range interaction. These characteristics were explained in the framework of a model considering polycrystalline magnetic layers with independent easy axis distributions, taking into account the rotatable anisotropy. The role of antiferromagnetic grains at the interface with different sizes and different magnetic stabilities is essential for understanding the behavior of this exchange-biased system.

  4. Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal in Exchange-Biased Hysteresis Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Yashar, P.; Leighton, C.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Nogues, J.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Dura, J. A.

    2000-04-24

    Polarized neutron reflectometry is used to probe the in-plane projection of the net-magnetization vector M(vector sign) of polycrystalline Fe films exchange coupled to twinned (110) MnF{sub 2} or FeF{sub 2} antiferromagnetic (AF) layers. The magnetization reversal mechanism depends upon the orientation of the cooling field with respect to the twinned microstructure of the AF, and whether the applied field is increased to (or decreased from) a positive saturating field; i.e., the magnetization reversal is asymmetric. The reversal of the sample magnetization from one saturated state to the other occurs via either domain wall motion or magnetization rotation on opposite sides of the same hysteresis loop. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Domain-size-dependent exchange bias in Co/LaFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, A.; Nolting, F.; Seo, J.W.; Ohldag, H.; Stohr, J.; Raoux,S.; Locquet, J.-P.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2004-09-22

    X-ray microscopy using magnetic linear dichroism of a zero-field-grown, multi-domain Co/LaFeO{sub 3} ferromagnet/antiferromagnet sample shows a local exchange bias of random direction and magnitude. A statistical analysis of the local bias of individual, micron-size magnetic domains demonstrates an increasing bias field with decreasing domain size as expected for a random distribution of pinned, uncompensated spins, which are believed to mediate the interface coupling. A linear dependence with the inverse domain diameter is found.

  6. Exchange bias effect in CoCr2O4/NiO system prepared by two-step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. G.; Zhu, C. M.; Chen, L.; Yuan, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    CoCr2O4/NiO has been successfully synthesized through two-step method. X-ray diffraction results present the coexistence of CoCr2O4 and NiO with pure formation. Micrographs measured with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display the homogeneous and dense morphology with two kinds of nanoparticles. Exchange bias effect is observed in the sample. The exchange bias field is about 872 Oe at 10 K. As measuring temperature increases, exchange bias effect is weakened with decreasing coercive field. In addition, exchange bias field and the shift of magnetization show the linear relationship with increasing cooling field. The exchange bias behavior can be attributed to the exchange coupling at the disordered interfaces in the sample.

  7. Ultrathin Limit of Exchange Bias Coupling at Oxide Multiferroic/Ferromagnetic Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-12

    control of exchange bias was also shown for an all oxide heterostructure consisting of BFO and La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO), [ 22 , 23 ] where epitaxial...drastically. This is generally interpreted by considering a strain-induced distortion of MnO 6 octahedra based on the Jahn-Teller distortion theory. [ 39

  8. Epitaxial exchange-bias systems: From fundamentals to future spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2016-07-01

    Exchange bias has been investigated for more than half a century and several insightful reviews, published around the year 2000, have already summarized many key experimental and theoretical aspects related to this phenomenon. Since then, due to developments in thin-film fabrication and sophisticated characterization methods, exchange bias continues to show substantial advances; in particular, recent studies on epitaxial systems, which is the focus of this review, allow many long-standing mysteries of exchange bias to be unambiguously resolved. The advantage of epitaxial samples lies in the well-defined interface structures, larger coherence lengths, and competing magnetic anisotropies, which are often negligible in polycrystalline samples. Beginning with a discussion of the microscopic spin properties at the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface, we correlate the details of spin lattices with phenomenological anisotropies, and finally connect the two by introducing realistic measurement approaches and models. We conclude by providing a brief perspective on the future of exchange bias and related studies in the context of the rapidly evolving interest in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  9. Size-dependent exchange bias in single phase Mn3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song-Wei; Zhang, Xin; Yao, Rong; Rao, Guang-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Glassy magnetic behavior and exchange bias phenomena are observed in single phase Mn3O4 nanoparticles. Dynamics scaling analysis of the ac susceptibility and the Henkel plot indicate that the observed glassy behavior at low temperature can be understood by taking into account the intrinsic behavior of the individual particles consisting of a ferrimagnetic (FIM) core and a spin-glass surface layer. Field-cooled magnetization hysteresis loops display both horizontal and vertical shifts. Dependence of the exchange bias field (H E) on the cooling field shows an almost undamped feature up to 70 kOe, indicating the stable exchange bias state in Mn3O4. H E increases as the particle size decreases due to the higher surface/volume ratio. The occurrence of the exchange bias can be attributed to the pinning effect of the frozen spin-glass surface layer upon the FIM core. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11464007), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi, China (Grant Nos. 2012GXNSFGA060002 and 2014GXNSFBA118241), the Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Material Foundation, China (Grant No. 131021-Z), and the Guangxi Department of Education Foundation, China (Grant Nos. YB2014120 and KY2015YB104).

  10. Voltage controlled exchange bias in an all-thin-film Cr2O3 based heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, Will; Binek, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Spintronics utilizes the electron's spin degree of freedom for an advanced generation of electronic devices with novel functionalities. Controlling magnetism by electrical means has been identified as a key challenge in the field of spintronics, and electric control of exchange bias is one of the most promising routes to address this challenge. Previously, robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias has been achieved near room temperature utilizing a bulk single crystal of Cr2O3. In this study electric control of exchange bias in an all-thin-film system is demonstrated with significant implications for device realization. In particular, voltage controlled switching of exchange bias in a Cr2O3 based magnetoelectric magnetic tunnel junction enables nonvolatile memory storage with virtually dissipationless writing at, or above, room temperature. Additionally, unique physical properties which arise due to the Cr2O3 thin film geometry are highlighted. This project is supported by NSF through MRSEC DMR 0213808, by the NRC/NRI supplement to MRSEC, and by CNFD and C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program.

  11. Field dependence of switching currents in an exchange biased spin valve.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang Yen Thi; Joo, Sung-Jung; Jung, Kuyoul; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Current induced magnetic reversal due to spin transfer torque is a promising candidate in advanced information storage technology. It has been intensively studied. This work reports the field-dependence of switching-currents for current induced magnetization switching in a uncoupled nano-sized cobalt-based spin valve of exchange biased type. The dependency is investigated in hysteretic regime at room temperature, in comparison with that of a trilayer simple spin valve. In the simple spin valve, the switching currents behave to the positive and the negative applied magnetic field symmetrically. In the exchange biased type, in contrast, the switching currents respond to the negative field in a quite unusual and different manner than to the positive field. A negative magnetic field then can shift the switching-currents into either negative or positive current range, dependently on whether a parallel or an antiparallel state of the spin valve was produced by that field. This different character of switching currents in the negative field range can be explained by the effect of the exchange bias pinning field on the spin-polarizer (the fixed Co layer) of the exchange biased spin valve. That unidirectional pinning filed could suppress the thermal magnetization fluctuation in the spin-polarizer, leading to a higher spin polarization of the current, and hence a lower switching current density than in the simple spin valve.

  12. Closely linear temperature dependence of exchange bias and coercivity in out-of-plane exchange-biased [Pt/Co]3/NiO (11 Å) multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Adenwalla, S.

    2003-07-01

    Strong out-of-plane exchange biasing has been observed in out-of-plane exchange biased [Pt (5 Å)/Co (4 Å)]3/NiO (11 Å) multilayer with perpendicular easy axis. Both the exchange field HE and coercivity HC display a closely linear temperature dependence except at very low temperatures. A thin NiO layer coated on the top of a Pt/Co multilayer has a great effect on the domain pattern of the Pt/Co multilayer, which is in a more irregular configuration with much smaller domain sizes than the uncoupled Pt/Co multilayer. A simulation according to Malozemoff's random field model gives a good agreement to the experimental temperature dependence of HE and HC, suggesting that the closely linear temperature dependences of HE and HC are strongly related to the behavior of the temperature of anisotropies and of the spin rotation inside the domain walls of a thin NiO layer. The blocking temperature of TB=220 K is much higher than that observed in ferromagnetic/thin NiO systems with in-plane anisotropy.

  13. Determination of rotatable and frozen CoO spins and their relationship to exchange bias in CoO/Fe/Ag(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Park, J.; Kim, W.; Arenholz, E.; Liberati, M.; Scholl, A.; Wu, Y.; Hwang, C.; Qiu, Z.

    2010-02-10

    The exchange bias of epitaxially grown CoO/Fe/Ag(001) was investigated using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) and X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD) techniques. A direct XMLD measurement on the CoO layer during the Fe magnetization reversal shows that the CoO compensated spins are rotatable at thinner thickness and frozen, i.e. fixed in direction to the lattice, at larger thickness. By a quantitative determination of the rotatable and frozen CoO spins as a function of the CoO film thickness, we find the remarkable result that the exchange bias is well established before frozen spins are detectable in the CoO film, contrary to the common assumption that the majority of antiferromagnetic spins need to be frozen to generate the exchange bias. We further show that the rotatable/frozen CoO spins are uniformly distributed in the CoO film.

  14. Role of interface coupling inhomogeneity in domain evolution in exchange bias

    PubMed Central

    Benassi, Andrea; Marioni, Miguel A.; Passerone, Daniele; Hug, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    Models of exchange-bias in thin films have been able to describe various aspects of this technologically relevant effect. Through appropriate choices of free parameters the modelled hysteresis loops adequately match experiment, and typical domain structures can be simulated. However, the use of these parameters, notably the coupling strength between the systems' ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) layers, obscures conclusions about their influence on the magnetization reversal processes. Here we develop a 2D phase-field model of the magnetization process in exchange-biased CoO/(Co/Pt)×n that incorporates the 10 nm-resolved measured local biasing characteristics of the antiferromagnet. Just three interrelated parameters set to measured physical quantities of the ferromagnet and the measured density of uncompensated spins thus suffice to match the experiment in microscopic and macroscopic detail. We use the model to study changes in bias and coercivity caused by different distributions of pinned uncompensated spins of the antiferromagnet, in application-relevant situations where domain wall motion dominates the ferromagnetic reversal. We show the excess coercivity can arise solely from inhomogeneity in the density of biasing- and anti-biasing pinned uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet. Counter to conventional wisdom, irreversible processes in the latter are not essential. PMID:24676050

  15. Exchange bias effect in Ti doped nanocrystalline SrFeO{sub 3-δ}

    SciTech Connect

    Sendil Kumar, A. Srinath, S.

    2014-08-15

    Materials of Ti doped nanocrystalline SrFeO{sub 3-δ} were synthesized through solid state reaction. Detailed magnetization measurements were carried out in zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) conditions. Compounds of SrFe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-δ} (x = 0.1 to 0.3) are found to be spin glass and parent compound is a helical antiferromagnet. Non magnetic Ti{sup 4+} reduces the strength of exchange interactions and the curvature of hysteresis is changed towards concave nature. Exchange bias is observed below the peak temperature (irreversibility in magnetization (T{sub Irr})) in ZFC-FC of SrFe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-δ} (x = 0 to 0.3). The coercivity and exchange bias field values are found to be decreases with increase in temperature. Observed exchange bias effect is attributed to competition between antiferromagnetic superexchange and ferromagnetic double exchange interactions.

  16. Observation of an atomic exchange bias effect in DyCo4 film

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Lott, Dieter; Radu, Florin; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental important and technologically widely employed exchange bias effect occurs in general in bilayers of magnetic thin films consisting of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers where the hard magnetization behavior of an antiferromagnetic thin film causes a shift in the magnetization curve of a soft ferromagnetic film. The minimization of the single magnetic grain size to increase the storage density and the subsequent demand for magnetic materials with very high magnetic anisotropy requires a system with high HEB. Here we report an extremely high HEB of 4 Tesla observed in a single amorphous DyCo4 film close to room temperature. The origin of the exchange bias can be associated with the variation of the magnetic behavior from the surface towards the bulk part of the film revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism techniques utilizing the bulk sensitive transmission and the surface sensitive total electron yield modes. The competition between the atomic exchange coupling in the single film and the Zeeman interaction lead to an intrinsic exchanged coupled system and the so far highest exchange bias effect HEB = 4 Tesla reported in a single film, which is accommodated by a partial domain wall formation. PMID:26675537

  17. Observation of an atomic exchange bias effect in DyCo4 film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Lott, Dieter; Radu, Florin; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2015-12-17

    The fundamental important and technologically widely employed exchange bias effect occurs in general in bilayers of magnetic thin films consisting of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers where the hard magnetization behavior of an antiferromagnetic thin film causes a shift in the magnetization curve of a soft ferromagnetic film. The minimization of the single magnetic grain size to increase the storage density and the subsequent demand for magnetic materials with very high magnetic anisotropy requires a system with high HEB. Here we report an extremely high HEB of 4 Tesla observed in a single amorphous DyCo4 film close to room temperature. The origin of the exchange bias can be associated with the variation of the magnetic behavior from the surface towards the bulk part of the film revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism techniques utilizing the bulk sensitive transmission and the surface sensitive total electron yield modes. The competition between the atomic exchange coupling in the single film and the Zeeman interaction lead to an intrinsic exchanged coupled system and the so far highest exchange bias effect HEB = 4 Tesla reported in a single film, which is accommodated by a partial domain wall formation.

  18. Symmetry and asymmetry during magnetization reversal in exchange biased multilayers and bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amitesh; Kentzinger, Emmanuel; Ruecker, Ulrich; Brueckel, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the magnetization reversal process in continuous: [Co/CoO]{sub 20} and separated: [Co/CoO/Au]{sub 20} exchange-biased polycrystalline multilayers (MLs). For continuous ML, reversal proceeds sequentially starting with the bottom (top) Co layer for increasing (decreasing) field. Each Co layer remagnetizes symmetrically for both field branches in a nonuniform mode similarly as we have observed earlier for [IrMn/CoFe]{sub 3/10} MLs [Phys. Rev. B. 70, 224410 (2004)]. By polarized neutron reflectivity, we observe increasing exchange bias field strengths down the stack. However, usual asymmetric reversal is observed for the separated ML. We explain the different magnetization behavior within a simple and general model. The increased anisotropy energy for continuous ML is responsible for the nonuniform symmetric reversal as the angular dependencies for reversal are guided by the relative strengths of exchange, anisotropy, and Zeeman energies.

  19. Study of exchange bias and training effect in NiCr2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Junmoni; Bora, Tribedi; Ravi, S.

    2015-07-01

    Single phase sample of NiCr2O4 crystallized in a tetragonal structure of I41/amd space group was prepared. Ferrimagnetic transition at TC=73 K along with a large irreversibility has been observed from the magnetization measurement. The sample exhibits exchange bias phenomenon and it is explained by considering the anisotropic exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and the antiferromagnetic components of magnetic moment. Presence of training effect is also observed. The exchange bias field (HEB) is found to decay exponentially with increase in temperature and however, the coercive field (HCeff) follows the empirical relation HCeff = HCeff [ 1 - T/TC']2 . The maximum experimental values of HEB and HCeff are found to be 313 Oe and 4839 Oe respectively.

  20. Giant exchange bias in Mn2FeGa with hexagonal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, H. G.; Zhang, X. J.; Ma, X. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present the experimental observation that polycrystalline Mn2+xFe1-xGa (x = -0.2, 0, 0.2, 0.4) compounds can be synthesized to be D019-type (Ni3Sn-type) hexagonal structure with space group P63/mmc. A giant exchange bias field up to 1.32 kOe was achieved in hexagonal Mn2FeGa alloy at 5 K. A cluster glass state is confirmed by ac susceptibility measurement under different driving frequencies. Interestingly, robust horizontal and vertical shifts in magnetic hysteresis loop were simultaneously observed at 5 K under high cooling field up to 90 kOe. The large exchange bias is originated from the large exchange anisotropy between cluster glass phase and ferrimagnetic matrix. The vertical shift is thought to be attributed to the incomplete reversal of frozen cluster spins.

  1. Ultra-low-pressure sputtering to improve exchange bias and tune linear ranges in spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, XiaoLi; Yu, You; Liu, Ru; Su, Hua; Zhang, HuaiWu; Zhong, ZhiYong; Jing, YuLan

    2017-05-01

    A series of CoFe/IrMn exchange bilayers was grown by DC-sputtering at different ultra-low argon pressures ranging from 0.008 to 0.1 Pa. This pressure range was one to two orders lower than the normal sputtering pressure. Results revealed that the exchange bias increased from 140 to 250 Oe in CoFe(10 nm)/IrMn (15 nm) bilayers of fixed thickness because of the improved crystalline structure and morphological uniformity of films. Since ferromagnetic /antiferromagnetic (FM/AF) bilayers are always used in linear magnetic sensors as detection layers, the varying exchange bias can successfully achieve tunable linear range in a crossed pinning spin valve. The linear range could be adjustable from -80 Oe - +80 Oe to -150 Oe - +150 Oe on the basis of giant magnetoresistance responses. Therefore, this method provides a simple method to tune the operating range of magnetic field sensors.

  2. Positive exchange bias between permalloy and twined (10 1 bar 0)-Cr2O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Wang, Tianyu; Su, Tang; Song, Qi; Xing, Wenyu; Chen, Yangyang; Han, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of a positive exchange bias between Ni80Fe20 (Py) and twined (10 1 bar 0)-Cr2O3 film near its blocking temperature (TB) when it is cooled in an in-plane magnetic field applied along 45 degrees from the two spin configurations of the Cr atoms. This is an abnormal behavior compared to the negative exchange bias at all temperatures below TB when the cooling and measuring magnetic fields are applied along one of the two spin configurations of the Cr atoms. We speculate these results could be related to the exchange interactions between the twined structure of the (10 1 ̅ 0)-Cr2O3 film epitaxially grown on the rutile (001)-TiO2 substrate.

  3. Spin-Hall Switching of In-plane Exchange Biased Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayers generates a pure transverse spin current from in-plane charge current, allowing for efficient switching of spintronic devices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Here, we demonstrate that an AFM deposited adjacent to the FM establishes a large in-plane exchange bias field, allowing operation at zero HIP. We sputtered Pt(3nm)/Co(0.9nm)/Ni80Co20O(tAF) stacks at room-temperature in an in-plane magnetic field of 3 kOe. The current-induced effective field was estimated in Hall cross devices by measuring the variation of the out-of-plane switching field as a function of JIP and HIP. The spin torque efficiency, dHSL/dJIP, is measured versus HIP for a sample with tAF =30 nm, and for a control in which NiCoO is replaced by TaOx. In the latter, dHSL/dJIP varied linearly with HIP. In the former, dHSL/dJIP varied nonlinearly with HIP and exhibited an offset indicating nonzero spin torque efficiency with zero HIP. The magnitude of HEB was 600 Oe in-plane.

  4. Exchange-biased spin valves with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy based on (Co/Pt) multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, F.; Fettar, F.; Auffret, S.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.

    2003-05-01

    We have prepared spin valves exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy [perpendicular spin valves (PSVs)] by sputtering. These PSVs associate a "free" (Co/Pt) multilayer with a "pinned" (Co/Pt)/FeMn multilayer separated by various spacer materials (Pt, Cu, Al2O3). We carried out a comprehensive study of the magnetic and magnetotransport properties of the biased multilayers and of the complete spin valves. When the number of repeats in the (Co/Pt) exchange-biased multilayer is larger than 3, the samples present 100% remnant magnetization in the perpendicular configuration. The major hysteresis cycles exhibit two well-separated loops associated with the free and the exchange-biased (Pt/Co) multilayers. When optimized, the exchange-bias field can be larger than the coercivity of the pinned layer. Metallic PSVs with Cu spacers exhibit giant magnetoresistance but the amplitude is only of the order of 1% due to significant current shunting. In contrast, perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions are very promising.

  5. Shape-dependent exchange bias effect in magnetic nanoparticles with core-shell morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, V.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Tsiantos, V.

    2015-08-01

    We study the low-temperature isothermal magnetic hysteresis of cubical and spherical nanoparticles with ferromagnetic-core/antiferromagnetic-shell morphology, in order to elucidate the sensitivity of the exchange bias effect to the shape of the particles and the structural imperfections at the core-shell interface. We model the magnetic structure using a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with uniaxial anisotropy and simulate the hysteresis loop using the metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm. For nanoparticles with geometrically sharp interfaces, we find that cubes exhibit a higher coercivity and lower exchange bias field than spheres of the same size. With increasing interface roughness, the shape dependence of the characteristic fields gradually decays, and eventually, the distinction between cubical and spherical particles is lost for moderately rough interfaces. The sensitivity of the exchange bias field to the microstructural details of the interface is quantified by a scaling factor (b ) relating the bias field to the net moment of the antiferromagnetic shell (Heb=b MAF+Ho) . Cubical particles exhibit a lower sensitivity to the dispersed values of the net interfacial moment.

  6. Exchange bias in bulk layered hydroxylammonium fluorocobaltate (NH₃OH)₂CoF₄.

    PubMed

    Jagličić, Z; Zentková, M; Mihalik, M; Arnold, Z; Drofenik, M; Kristl, M; Dojer, B; Kasunič, M; Golobič, A; Jagodič, M

    2012-02-08

    The magnetic properties of layered hydroxylammonium fluorocobaltate (NH(3)OH)(2)CoF(4) were investigated by measuring its dc magnetic susceptibility in zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes, its frequency dependent ac susceptibility, its isothermal magnetization curves after ZFC and FC regimes, and its heat capacity. Effects of pressure and magnetic field on magnetic phase transitions were studied by susceptibility and heat capacity measurements, respectively. The system undergoes a magnetic phase transition from a paramagnetic state to a canted antiferromagnetic state exhibiting a weak ferromagnetic behavior at T(C) = 46.5 K and an antiferromagnetic transition at T(N) = 2.9 K. The most spectacular manifestation of the complex magnetic behavior in this system is a shift of the isothermal magnetization hysteresis loop in a temperature range below 20 K after the FC regime-an exchange bias phenomenon. We investigated the exchange bias as a function of the magnetic field during cooling and as a function of temperature. The observed exchange bias was attributed to the large exchange anisotropy which exists due to the quasi-2D structure of the layered (NH(3)OH)(2)CoF(4) material.

  7. Exchange bias magnetism in films of NiFe/(Ni,Fe)O nanocrystallite dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, C.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Wang, S.; Ouyang, H.; Desautels, R. D.; Lierop, J. van; Lin, K.-W.; Lin, T.-L.

    2014-05-07

    Ni{sub 3}Fe/(Ni,Fe)O thin films having a nanocrystallite dispersion morphology were prepared by a reactive ion beam-assisted deposition technique. The crystallite sizes of these dispersion-based films were observed to decrease from 8.4 ± 0.3 nm to 3.4 ± 0.3 nm as the deposition flow-rate increased from 2.78% to 7.89% O{sub 2}/Ar. Thin film composition was determined using selective area electron diffraction images and Multislice simulations. Through a detailed analysis of high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, the nanocrystallites were determined to be Ni{sub 3}Fe (a ferromagnet), NiO, and FeO (both antiferromagnets). It was determined that the interfacial molar Ni{sub 3}Fe ratio in the nanocrystallite dispersions increased slightly at first, then decreased as the oxygen content was increased; at 7.89% O{sub 2}/Ar, the interfacial molar ratio was essentially zero (only NiO and FeO remained). For nanocrystallite dispersion films grown with O{sub 2}/Ar flow-rate greater than 7.89%, no interfacial (intermixed) Ni{sub 3}Fe phase was detected, which resulted in no measurable exchange bias. Comparing the exchange bias field between the nanocrystallite dispersion films at 5 K, we observed a decrease in the magnitude of the exchange bias field as the nanocrystallite size decreased. The exchange bias coupling for all samples measured set in at essentially the same temperature (i.e., the exchange bias blocking temperature). Since the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic (FM/AFM) contact area in the nanocrystallite dispersion films increased as the nanocrystallite size decreased, the increase in the magnitude of the exchange bias could be attributed to larger regions of defects (vacancies and bond distortions) which occupied a significant portion of the FM/AFM interfaces in the nanocrystallite dispersion films.

  8. 45 CFR 155.1050 - Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards. 155.1050 Section 155.1050 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS... Exchange network adequacy standards. (a) An Exchange must ensure that the provider network of each QHP...

  9. 45 CFR 155.1050 - Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards. 155.1050 Section 155.1050 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS... Exchange network adequacy standards. (a) An Exchange must ensure that the provider network of each QHP...

  10. 45 CFR 155.1050 - Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Establishment of Exchange network adequacy standards. 155.1050 Section 155.1050 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS... Exchange network adequacy standards. (a) An Exchange must ensure that the provider network of each QHP...

  11. Establishing Data-Exchange Networks Through Data Management & Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Evan C., III

    This paper describes several pilot systems of data management using telecommunications links, which have been tested by the Navy during an 8-year period in which emphasis has been on the development of relational database management systems, exchange protocols, and man-machine interface. An introduction discusses the background of the project,…

  12. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  13. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-07-04

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies.

  14. Synthesis and tuning the exchange bias in Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Vargas, J. M.; Knobel, M.; Pirota, K. R.; Meneses, C. T.; Kumar, Shalendra; Lee, C. G.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Rettori, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    We report studies on exchange bias effects in Ni-NiO nanoparticles with different particle diameters/distributions and concentration of metallic nickel, which vary from 0% to 32%. The exchange bias field, Hex, depends strongly upon both particle size and the concentration of metallic Ni, being maximum (˜2.2 kOe) at 5 K for the sample with almost negligible concentration of metallic Ni, whereas the corresponding value for the sample with highest concentration of metallic Ni (˜32±5.0%) is about 0.07 kOe. The structural features of the samples have been investigated thoroughly by using the Reitveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, where as the magnetic properties using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

  15. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies. PMID:27384565

  16. Effect of misaligned unidirectional and uniaxial anisotropies on angular dependence of exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoling; Jia, Ning; Liu, Yan; Du, An

    2015-01-01

    We report a numerical study of the angular dependences of low-temperature exchange bias field (ADEB) and coercivity in the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers with misaligned unidirectional and uniaxial anisotropies. Through choosing a proper antiferromagnet the conventional symmetry in the ADEB may be broken, while the novel behaviors are also dependent on the angle between induced unidirectional and intrinsic uniaxial anisotropies. Finally, we draw conclusions that the two anisotropies with a small misalignment together determine the asymmetric ADEB properties around the easy axis. In contrast, after the magnetically hysteretic measurement rotating through the hard axis, a large misalignment between the anisotropies may change the magnetization reversal mode at the decreasing branch of loop, besides weakening the positive loop shift. Thus the strength of exchange bias field is suppressed while the coercivity is enhanced.

  17. Large exchange-bias in Ni55Mn19Al24Si2 polycrystalline ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohit; Ingale, Babita; Varga, Lajos K.; Khovaylo, Vladimir V.; Chatterjee, Ratnamala

    2014-09-01

    The crystal structure, phase transition and exchange bias effect in induction melted polycrystalline ribbons of Ni55Mn19Al24Si2 have been studied using room temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and magnetic measurements. The sample was found to show structural transformation temperatures such as austenite start (As)=306 K, austenite finish (Af)=316 K, martensite start (Ms)=305 K and martensite finish (Mf)=294 K all above room temperature. The room temperature structure evaluated as orthorhombic 14 M with lattice parameters a=4.14 Å, b=29.84 Å, and c=5.72 Å. Importantly at 2 K, the sample showed a large exchange bias field of about 2520 Oe, which is the maximum value ever reported among the Heusler alloy samples.

  18. Observation of tunable exchange bias in Sr2YbRuO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Tomy, C. V.; Grover, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    The double perovskite compound, Sr2YbRuO6, displays reversal in the orientation of magnetic moments along with negative magnetization due to an underlying magnetic compensation phenomenon. The exchange bias (EB) field below the compensation temperature could be the usual negative or the positive depending on the initial cooling field. This EB attribute has the potential of getting tuned in a preselected manner, as the positive EB field is seen to crossover from positive to negative value above Tcomp.

  19. Temperature evolution of nickel sulphide phases from thiourea complex and their exchange bias effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nitesh; Raman, N.; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-12-15

    Considering the very complex phase diagram of nickel sulphide, it is quite challenging to stabilize pure phases from a single precursor. Here, we obtain nanoparticles of various phases of nickel sulphide by decomposing nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. The first phase in the evolution is the one with the maximum sulphur content, namely, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles obtained at 400 °C. As the temperature is increased, nanoparticles of phases with lesser sulphur content, NiS (600 °C) and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} (800 °C) are formed. NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetic transition at 30 K and show a large exchange bias at 2 K. NiS nanoparticles are antiferromagnetic and show relatively smaller exchange bias effect. On the other hand, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit very weak temperature dependent magnetization. Electrical measurements show that both NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconductors whereas Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} is a metal. - Graphical abstract: Pure phases of NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} have been obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex wherein, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit remarkable exchange bias effect at 2 K. - Highlights: • NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles are obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. • As the temperature is increased, nickel sulphide phase with lesser sulphur content is obtained. • NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles show good exchange bias property which can be explained by antiferromagnetic core and ferromagnetic shell model. • NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconducting while Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} shows metallic behavior.

  20. Exchange-bias-like coupling in a Cu-diluted-Fe/Tb multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Saumya; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Stahn, Jochen; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Bauer, Andreas; Böni, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2015-03-01

    Transition metal-rare earth (TM-RE) Fe/Tb-multilayer systems have been known to show exchange-bias-like shifts in the form of double hysteresis loop (DHL) along and opposite to the field cooling axis. Planar domain walls, with opposite handedness at the interfaces, are held responsible for such DHL. Here, we report on the formation of nanoparticulated Fe layers in the Cu-matrix within a Fe-Cu/Tb multilayer and their eventual low-temperature characteristics. AC susceptibility measurements indicate that these diluted magnetic clusters have a superspin-glass-type of freezing behavior. Eventually, this Fe-cluster/Tb interlayer interaction, which is conjectured to be mediated by the pinned moments within the individual clusters, has helped in increasing the exchange bias field in the system to a high value of ≈1.3 kOe, which gradually vanishes around 50 K. Polarized neutron reflectivity confirms a very strong antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling between the individual layers. The magnitude of the magnetic moment of each of the individual Tb or Fe-Cu layer remains similar, but due to the strong AF-coupling at the interfaces, the entire ferrimagnetic Fe-Cu/Tb entity flips its direction at a compensation field of around 3.7 kOe. This study shows that magnetic dilution can be an effective way to manipulate the possible domain walls or the clusters in TM and thereby the exchange bias in TM-RE systems.

  1. Exchange-bias-like coupling in a ferrimagnetic Fe/Tb multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Amitesh; Mukherjee, Saumya; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Field cooling of a transition metal-rare earth (TM-RE) Fe/Tb-multilayer system is shown to form a double hysteresis loop with exchange-bias-like shifts along and opposite to the field cooling axis below the ordering temperature of the RE. The measurement of the polarized neutron reflectivity at various applied fields confirms an antiferromagnetic alignment between the individual layers of Fe and Tb associated with a significant value of the magnetic moment for the Tb layers, even at room temperature. We attribute the shifts of the hysteresis loops to the formation of 2π-domain walls by the interface moments that are pinned by the magnetically hard Tb layers forming bidomainlike states in this layered artificial ferrimagnetic system. We conclude that the exchange bias in Fe/Tb-multilayers, the RE layers being on either sides of the TM layers, is caused by the formation of 2π-domain walls in the Fe layers thus excluding an explanation in terms of π-domain walls, which are believed to be responsible for the exchange bias in other RE-TM bilayer systems.

  2. Super spin-glass state and exchange bias in Fe/CoO hybrid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Uhlig, M; Wiedwald, U; Han, L; Ziemann, P; Albrecht, M

    2013-04-19

    Fe/CoO heterostructures were realized by depositing Fe thin films on CoO nanoparticle arrays. Magnetization measurements revealed that 1 nm Fe exhibits a superparamagnetic behavior at 300 K and a super spin-glass state at temperatures below 80 K. The superparamagnetic as well as super spin-glass state vanishes for higher Fe film thicknesses once Fe starts to form a continuous layer across the CoO nanoparticle arrays. Furthermore, all samples exhibit an exchange bias effect at 6 K after field cooling, with a maximum exchange bias field of about 60 Oe for a Fe thickness of 2 nm. M-H loops of thicker Fe samples show a two-step magnetization reversal where Fe in the area in between CoO nanoparticles reverses at low fields, while, in proximity to the CoO nanoparticles, Fe switches at substantially higher fields. Both reversals are exchange biased.

  3. The fabrication of ordered arrays of exchange biased Ni/FeF2 nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kovylina, M; Erekhinsky, M; Morales, R; Schuller, I K; Labarta, A; Batlle, X

    2010-04-30

    The fabrication of ordered arrays of exchange biased Ni/FeF(2) nanostructures by focused ion beam lithography is reported. High quality nano-elements, with controlled removal depth and no significant re-deposition, were carved using small ion beam currents (30 pA), moderate dwell times (1 micros) and repeated passages over the same area. Two types of nanostructures were fabricated: square arrays of circular dots with diameters from 125 +/- 8 to 500 +/- 12 nm and periodicities ranging from 200 +/- 8 to 1000 +/- 12 nm, and square arrays of square antidots (207 +/- 8 nm in edge length) with periodicities ranging from 300 +/- 8 to 1200 +/- 12 nm. The arrays were characterized using scanning ion and electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The effect of the patterning on the exchange bias field (i.e., the shift in the hysteresis loop of ferromagnetic Ni due to proximity to antiferromagnetic FeF(2)) was studied using magneto-transport measurements. These high quality nanostructures offer a unique method to address some of the open questions regarding the microscopic origin of exchange bias. This is not only of major relevance in the fabrication and miniaturization of magnetic devices but it is also one of the important proximity phenomena in nanoscience and materials science.

  4. Enhancement of exchange bias and ferromagnetic resonance frequency by using multilayer antidot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Lim, S. L.; Xu, F.; Ma, Y. G.; Ong, C. K.

    2008-11-01

    A systematic investigation of the dependences of the exchange bias and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency on the pore size of the antidot arrays fabricated by depositing Permalloy-FeMn multilayer thin films onto self-organized porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes was carried out. The magnetic and microwave properties of the antidot arrays with different pore sizes ranging from 30 to 80 nm are characterized and compared with that of the continuous thin films. It was found that the exchange bias field and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency are increased with the increase of the pore size, which may tentatively be interpreted in the framework of the random field model. It was also found that by using the antidot arrays in the best condition (the FeNi thickness is 20 nm and the pore size is 80 nm), one can enhance the exchange bias field from 65 to 135 Oe and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency from 3.1 to 4.1 GHz accordingly.

  5. Voltage Controlled Exchange Bias in a Cr2O3 based heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, Will; Street, Mike; Binek, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Controlling magnetism by electrical means is a key challenge in the field of spintronics, and electric control of exchange bias is one of the most promising routes to address this challenge. Isothermal electric control of exchange bias has been achieved near room temperature using bulk, single crystal, magnetoelectric Cr2O3, which has a voltage controlled net magnetization at the (0001) surface. Voltage control of magnetism in a Cr2O3 thin film system has presented significant challenges. In this study we explore the electric control of exchange bias in an all-thin-film system of decreasing chromia film thickness with significant implications for scalability of ultra-low power memory and logical devices. Cross-sectional HRTEM indicates that grain boundaries in the metallic bottom electrode propagate into the Cr2O3 thin film with detrimental effects on leakage currents. We address this issue via a three-step growth method for the deposition of epitaxial Pd on sapphire. The resulting microstructure of the films is analyzed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, tunneling electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. This project was supported by SRC through CNFD, an SRC-NRI Center, by C-SPIN, part of STARnet, and by the NSF through MRSEC DMR-0820521.

  6. Exchange bias of Ni nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic IrMn matrix.

    PubMed

    Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Wiedwald, Ulf; Haering, Felix; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Ziemann, Paul; Herr, Ulrich

    2013-11-15

    The magnetic properties of Ni nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) embedded in an antiferromagnetic IrMn matrix were investigated. The Ni-NPs of 8.4 nm mean diameter were synthesized by inert gas aggregation. In a second processing step, the Ni-NPs were in situ embedded in IrMn films or SiOx films under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Findings showed that Ni-NPs embedded in IrMn have an exchange bias field HEB = 821 Oe at 10 K, and 50 Oe at 300 K. The extracted value of the exchange energy density is 0.06 mJ m(-2) at 10 K, which is in good accordance with the results from multilayered thin film systems. The Ni-NPs embedded in SiOx did not show exchange bias. As expected for this particle size, they are superparamagnetic at T = 300 K. A direct comparison of the Ni-NPs embedded in IrMn or SiOx reveals an increase of the blocking temperature from 210 K to around 400 K. The coercivity of the Ni-NPs exchange coupled to the IrMn matrix at 10 K is 8 times larger than the value for Ni-NPs embedded in SiOx. We studied time-dependent remanent magnetization at different temperatures. The relaxation behavior is described by a magnetic viscosity model which reflects a rather flat distribution of energy barriers. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of different field cooling processes on the magnetic properties of the embedded Ni-NPs. Exchange bias values fit to model calculations which correlate the contribution of the antiferromagnetic IrMn matrix to its grain size.

  7. Tuning the Effective Anisotropy in a Voltage-Susceptible Exchange-Bias Heterosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, Will; Street, Mike; Mahmood, Ather; Binek, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Voltage- and temperature-tuned ferromagnetic hysteresis is investigated by a superconducting quantum-interference device and Kerr magnetometry in a thin-film heterostructure of a perpendicular anisotropic Co/Pd ferromagnet exchange coupled to the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3 . An abrupt disappearance of exchange bias with a simultaneous more than twofold increase in coercivity is observed and interpreted as a competition between the effective anisotropy of Cr2O3 and the exchange-coupling energy between boundary magnetization and the adjacent ferromagnet. The effective anisotropy energy is given by the intrinsic anisotropy energy density multiplied by the effective volume separated from the bulk through a horizontal antiferromagnetic domain boundary. Kerr measurements show that the anisotropy of the interfacial Cr2O3 can be tuned isothermally and in the absence of an external magnetic field by application of an electric field. A generalized Meiklejohn-Bean model accounts for the change in exchange bias and coercivity as well as the asymmetric evolution of the hysteresis loop. In support of this model, the reversal of the boundary magnetization is experimentally confirmed as a contribution to the magnetic hysteresis loop.

  8. Positive exchange bias observed in Pt-inserted Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co exchange coupled bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, T. Oida, M.; Ashida, T.; Shimomura, N.; Sahashi, M.; Shibata, T.

    2014-11-24

    We investigated the effect of Pt insertion on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co exchange coupling system. The perpendicular exchange bias μ{sub 0}H{sub ex} decreased with increasing Pt insertion layer thickness, and we observed positive μ{sub 0}H{sub ex} for samples with relatively thick Pt insertion layers. We also examined the cooling field μ{sub 0}H{sub fc} dependence of μ{sub 0}H{sub ex} for the samples. At small μ{sub 0}H{sub fc}, all samples exhibited negative μ{sub 0}H{sub ex}. With increasing μ{sub 0}H{sub fc}, a shift of μ{sub 0}H{sub ex} from negative to positive was observed. In the past, similar behaviors were observed for FeF{sub 2}/Fe systems exhibiting positive μ{sub 0}H{sub ex}. In addition, the μ{sub 0}H{sub fc} dependence of μ{sub 0}H{sub ex} was well fitted by an equation taking into account the Zeeman energy at the surface of an antiferromagnet as well as an antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. The results strongly suggest that (1) Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface spin is affected by the external magnetic field and (2) the coupling at the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt/Co interface is antiferromagnetic.

  9. Joule Heating Effect on Field-Free Magnetization Switching by Spin-Orbit Torque in Exchange-Biased Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Seyed Armin; Wu, Di; Yu, Guoqiang; Lau, Yong-Chang; Wong, Kin L.; Zhu, Weihua; He, Congli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, Plamen; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-02-01

    Switching of magnetization via spin-orbit torque provides an efficient alternative for nonvolatile memory and logic devices. However, to achieve deterministic switching of perpendicular magnetization, an external magnetic field collinear with the current is usually required, which makes these devices inappropriate for practical applications. In this work, we examine the current-induced magnetization switching in a perpendicularly magnetized exchange-biased Pt /CoFe /IrMn system. A magnetic field annealing technique is used to introduce in-plane exchange biases, which are quantitatively characterized. Under proper conditions, field-free current-driven switching is achieved. We study the Joule heating effect, and we show how it can decrease the in-plane exchange bias and degrade the field-free switching. Furthermore, we discuss that the exchange-bias training effect can have similar effects.

  10. The effects of exchange bias on Fe-Co/MgO magnetic nanoparticles with core/shell morphology.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Boubeta, C; Balcells, Ll; Monty, C; Martínez, B

    2010-01-20

    The effects of exchange bias on core/shell structured nanoparticles are analyzed. Nanoparticles are integrated with high moment Fe-Co crystallites covered epitaxially with MgO shells. It is observed that the coercive field H(C)(FeCo)>H(C)(Co)>H(C)(Fe); however, the exchange bias field H(E) of the Co sample is higher than that of the FeCo one, while H(E)=0 for the Fe sample. It is suggested that the exchange bias is induced by the formation of a (Co, Mg)O solid solution. In fact, we show that it is possible to modify the exchange bias properties by manipulating the level of Mg dusting at the interface, as recently reported for thin films.

  11. Effect of mechanical strain on magnetic properties of flexible exchange biased FeGa/IrMn heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zhan, Qingfeng; Dai, Guohong; Liu, Yiwei; Zuo, Zhenghu; Yang, Huali; Chen, Bin; Li, Run-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated flexible exchange biased heterostructures with magnetostrictive Fe81Ga19 alloy as the ferromagnetic layer and Ir20Mn80 as the antiferromagnetic layer on polyethylene terephthalate substrates. The mechanical strain can modify both the strength and the orientation of the uniaxial anisotropy, giving rise to the switching between the easy and hard magnetization directions. Different from the previously reported works on rigid exchange biased systems, a drastic decrease in exchange bias field was observed under a compressive strain with magnetic field parallel to the pinning direction, but only a slightly decrease was shown under a tensile strain. Based on a Stoner-Wohlfarth model calculation, we suggested that the distributions of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic anisotropies be the key to induce the mechanically tunable exchange bias.

  12. Simultaneous achievement of high perpendicular exchange bias and low coercivity by controlling ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratsuchi, Yu; Kuroda, Wataru; Nguyen, Thi Van Anh; Kotani, Yoshinori; Toyoki, Kentaro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Motohiro; Nakamura, Kohji; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of Pt and Au spacer layers on the perpendicular exchange bias field and coercivity of Pt/Co/(Pt or Au)/Cr2O3/Pt films. When using a Pt-spacer, the perpendicular exchange bias was highly degraded to less than 0.1 erg/cm2, which was about half that of the Au-spacer system. The Au spacer also suppressed the enhancement in coercivity that usually occurs at around room temperature when using Pt. It is suggested that this difference in exchange bias field is due to in-plane interfacial magnetic anisotropy at the Pt/Cr2O3 interface, which cants the interfacial Cr spin from the surface normal and results in degradation in the perpendicular exchange bias.

  13. Fingerprints of surface magnetism in Cr2O3 based exchange bias heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Binek, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetoelectric materials experienced a recent revival as promising components of novel spintronic devices [1, 2, 3]. Since the magnetoelectric (ME) effect is relativistically small in traditional antiferromagnetic (AF) compounds like Cr2O3 (max. αzz 4ps/m) and also cross-coupling between ferroic order parameters is typically small in the modern multiferroics, it is a challenge to electrically induce sufficient magnetization required for the envisioned device applications. In exchange bias systems the bias field depends critically on the AF interface magnetization. Hence, a strong relation between the latter and the surface magnetization of the free Cr2O3 pinning layer can be expected. Our recent research indicates that there are surface magnetic phase transitions in free Cr2O3 (111) films accompanying surface structural phase transitions. Well defined AF interface magnetization is initialized through ME annealing to T=20K. Subsequently, the interface magnetization is thermally driven through phase transitions at T=120 and 210K. Their effects on the exchange bias are studied in Cr2O3 (111)/CoPt films with the help of polar Kerr and SQUID magnetometry. [1] P. Borisov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005). [2] Ch. Binek, B.Doudin, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, L39 (2005). [3] R. Ramesh et al. 2007 Nature Materials 6 21. Financial support by NSF through Career DMR-0547887, MRSEC DMR-0820521 and the NRI.

  14. Exchange biasing in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet Fe/KMnF 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celinski, Z.; Lucic, D.; Cramer, N.; Camley, R. E.; Goldfarb, R. B.; Skrzypek, D.

    1999-08-01

    A new ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayer system, Fe/KMnF 3, exhibits interesting interfacial exchange properties. The bulk antiferromagnet KMnF 3 has three possible magnetic states: paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and weakly ferromagnetic spin-canted. Consequently, the exchange anisotropy in Fe/KMnF 3 is unusual. We examine the exchange bias in Fe/KMnF 3 as a function of the magnetic state. Monocrystalline Fe(0 0 1) and polycrystalline Fe films, 3 nm thick, were grown epitaxially on Ag(0 0 1) templates on GaAs(0 0 1) substrates. Epitaxial KMnF 3 was then grown on both the single-crystal and polycrystal Fe. We measured the low-field, zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations as functions of temperature. The zero-field-cooled single-crystal Fe magnetization is greatly reduced at liquid-helium temperatures. We see the influence of the transition from the antiferromagnetic to the spin-canted state on the exchange coupling. The blocking temperature is close to the Néel temperature (89 K). From the shift in the hysteresis loop, we estimate the strength of the interfacial exchange coupling to be 4.5×10 -5 J/m 2.

  15. Electric field induced reversible 180° magnetization switching through tuning of interfacial exchange bias along magnetic easy-axis in multiferroic laminates

    DOE PAGES

    Xue, Xu; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; ...

    2015-11-18

    E-field control of interfacial exchange coupling and deterministic switching of magnetization have been demonstrated in two sets of ferromagnetic(FM)/antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferroelectric(FE) multiferroic heterostructures, including NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011) and NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011). We designed this experiment to achieve exchange bias tuning along the magnetic easy axis, which is critical for realizing reversible 180° magnetization deterministic switching at zero or small magnetic bias. Strong exchange coupling were established across AFM-FM interfaces, which plays an important role in voltage control of magnetization switching. Through the competition between the E-field induced uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic layer and unidirectional anisotropy in antiferromagnetic layer, the exchange bias was significantly shiftedmore » by up to |ΔHex|/Hex=8% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011) and 13% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011). In addition, the square shape of the hysteresis loop, as well as a strong shape tunability of |ΔHex|/Hc=67.5~125% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT and 30~38% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT were achieved, which lead to a near 180° magnetization switching. Lastly, electrical tuning of interfacial exchange coupling in FM/AFM/FE systems paves a new way for realizing magnetoelectric random access memories and other memory technologies.« less

  16. Electric field induced reversible 180° magnetization switching through tuning of interfacial exchange bias along magnetic easy-axis in multiferroic laminates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xu; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; Zhu, Mingmin; Zhang, Yijun; Ren, Wei; Ren, Tao; Yang, Xi; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian X; Liu, Ming

    2015-11-18

    E-field control of interfacial exchange coupling and deterministic switching of magnetization have been demonstrated in two sets of ferromagnetic(FM)/antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferroelectric(FE) multiferroic heterostructures, including NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011) and NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011). We designed this experiment to achieve exchange bias tuning along the magnetic easy axis, which is critical for realizing reversible 180° magnetization deterministic switching at zero or small magnetic bias. Strong exchange coupling were established across AFM-FM interfaces, which plays an important role in voltage control of magnetization switching. Through the competition between the E-field induced uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic layer and unidirectional anisotropy in antiferromagnetic layer, the exchange bias was significantly shifted by up to |∆Hex|/Hex = 8% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011) and 13% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011). In addition, the square shape of the hysteresis loop, as well as a strong shape tunability of |∆Hex|/Hc = 67.5 ~ 125% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT and 30 ~ 38% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT were achieved, which lead to a near 180° magnetization switching. Electrical tuning of interfacial exchange coupling in FM/AFM/FE systems paves a new way for realizing magnetoelectric random access memories and other memory technologies.

  17. Electric field induced reversible 180° magnetization switching through tuning of interfacial exchange bias along magnetic easy-axis in multiferroic laminates

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xu; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; Zhu, Mingmin; Zhang, Yijun; Ren, Wei; Ren, Tao; Yang, Xi; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian X.; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    E-field control of interfacial exchange coupling and deterministic switching of magnetization have been demonstrated in two sets of ferromagnetic(FM)/antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferroelectric(FE) multiferroic heterostructures, including NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011) and NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011). We designed this experiment to achieve exchange bias tuning along the magnetic easy axis, which is critical for realizing reversible 180° magnetization deterministic switching at zero or small magnetic bias. Strong exchange coupling were established across AFM-FM interfaces, which plays an important role in voltage control of magnetization switching. Through the competition between the E-field induced uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic layer and unidirectional anisotropy in antiferromagnetic layer, the exchange bias was significantly shifted by up to |∆Hex|/Hex = 8% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011) and 13% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011). In addition, the square shape of the hysteresis loop, as well as a strong shape tunability of |∆Hex|/Hc = 67.5 ~ 125% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT and 30 ~ 38% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT were achieved, which lead to a near 180° magnetization switching. Electrical tuning of interfacial exchange coupling in FM/AFM/FE systems paves a new way for realizing magnetoelectric random access memories and other memory technologies. PMID:26576658

  18. Electrical control of exchange bias via oxygen migration across CoO-ZnO nanocomposite barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Yan, S. S.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Zhao, G. X.; Long, Y. Z.; Shen, T. T.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, J.

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a nanocomposite barrier CoO-ZnO for magnetism manipulation in Co/CoO-ZnO/Ag heterojunctions. Both electrical control of magnetism and resistive switching were realized in this junction. An electrical tunable exchange bias of CoO1-v (v denotes O vacancies) on Co films was realized using voltages below 1 volt. The magnetism modulation associated with resistive switching can be attributed to the oxygen ions migration between the insulating CoO1-v layer and the semiconductive ZnO1-v layer, which can cause both ferromagnetic phase and resistance switching of CoO1-v layer.

  19. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2017-02-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of 100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix.

  20. Exchange-bias reversal in magnetically compensated ErFe O3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fita, I.; Wisniewski, A.; Puzniak, R.; Markovich, V.; Gorodetsky, G.

    2016-05-01

    An exchange-bias (EB) effect observed in single crystal ErFe O3 compensated ferrimagnet, exhibiting the EB field HEB increasing and diverging upon approaching compensation temperature Tcomp=45 K , and changing sign with crossing Tcomp, is reported. The EB sign may be changed to the opposite one by varying the field-cooling protocol, depending on whether Tcomp is crossed with decreasing or increasing temperature. Namely, a different EB sign with the same | HEB| and coercive field HC values is obtained approaching a given T with increasing and decreasing temperature and the HEB(T ) dependence completed in one way is a mirror image of that completed in another way.

  1. Properties of the roughness in NiFe/FeMn exchange-biased system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Biondo, A.; Nunes, V. B.; Saitovitch, E. Baggio

    2007-05-01

    X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy analyses were performed in the Si/WTi (7 nm)/NiFe (5 nm)/FeMn (13 nm)/WTi (7 nm) exchange-biased system prepared by magnetron sputtering. Layer-by-layer analyses were done in order to have interfacial roughness parameters quantitatively. X-ray reflectivity results indicate that the successive layer deposition gives rise to a cumulative roughness. In addition, the atomic force microscopic images analyses have revealed that the roughness enhancement caused by the successive layer deposition can be associated with an appearance of a longer wavelength roughness induced by the NiFe layer deposition.

  2. Magnetic field dependence of threshold electric field for magnetoelectric switching of exchange-bias polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Van Anh; Shiratsuchi, Yu; Kobane, Atsushi; Yoshida, Saori; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2017-08-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of the threshold electric field Eth for the magnetoelectric switching of the perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/Au/Cr2O3/Pt stacked films using a reversible isothermal electric tuning approach. The Eth values for the positive-to-negative and negative-to-positive switching are different because of the unidirectional nature of the interfacial exchange coupling. The Eth values are inversely proportional to the magnetic-field strength, and the quantitative analysis of this relationship suggests that the switching is driven by the nucleation and growth of the antiferromagnetic domain. We also find that the magnetic-field dependence of Eth exhibits an offset electric field that might be related to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic moments located mainly at the interface.

  3. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sayan; Frey Huls, N. A.; Phan, M. H.; Srinath, S.; Garcia, M. A.; Lee, Youngmin; Wang, Chao; Sun, Shouheng; Iglesias, Òscar; Srikanth, H.

    2014-02-01

    We report exchange bias (EB) effect in the Au-Fe3O4 composite nanoparticle system, where one or more Fe3O4 nanoparticles are attached to an Au seed particle forming ‘dimer’ and ‘cluster’ morphologies, with the clusters showing much stronger EB in comparison with the dimers. The EB effect develops due to the presence of stress at the Au-Fe3O4 interface which leads to the generation of highly disordered, anisotropic surface spins in the Fe3O4 particle. The EB effect is lost with the removal of the interfacial stress. Our atomistic Monte Carlo studies are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. These results show a new path towards tuning EB in nanostructures, namely controllably creating interfacial stress, and opens up the possibility of tuning the anisotropic properties of biocompatible nanoparticles via a controllable exchange coupling mechanism.

  4. Spin-flop tendencies in exchange-biased Co/CoO thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G. P.; Borchers, J. A.; Ijiri, Y.; Lee, S.-H.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Takano, K.

    1997-12-02

    In order to study the antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin structure near the interface of exchange-biased bilayers, polarized neutron diffraction measurements were performed on a series of (111) Co(7.5 nm)/CoO(X nm) and CoO(X nm) thin films where X = 20, 40 and 100 nm. In these samples, field cooling through the Neel temperature of the AFM increases the component of the CoO moment perpendicular to the applied field, relative to the parallel component. The subsequent application of a 500 Oe field perpendicular to the cooling direction rotates both the Co and CoO moments. Experiments on CoO films without Co showed a smaller difference between the parallel and perpendicular CoO moments in response to cooling and applied fields. Exchange coupling between the Co and CoO layers is apparently responsible for the increased projection of the AFM moments perpendicular to the cooling field.

  5. Interfacial Ferromagnetism and Exchange Bias in CaRuO3/CaMnO3 Superlattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-07

    and the interface region is consistent with double exchange interaction among the Mn ions at the interface. Polarized neutron reflectivity and the...CaMnO3 thickness dependence of the exchange bias field together indicate that the interfacial 1. REPORT DATE ( DD -MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13...consistent with double exchange interaction among the Mn ions at the interface. Polarized neutron reflectivity and the CaMnO3 thickness dependence of the

  6. Exchange bias in a mixed metal oxide based magnetocaloric compound YFe0.5Cr0.5O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mohit K.; Singh, Karan; Mukherjee, K.

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed investigation of magnetization, magnetocaloric effect and exchange bias studies on a mixed metal oxide YFe0.5Cr0.5O3 belonging to perovskite family. Our results reveal that the compound is in canted magnetic state (CMS) where ferromagnetic correlations are present in an antiferromagnetic state. Magnetic entropy change of this compound follows a power law (∆SM∼Hm) dependence of magnetic field. In this compound, inverse magnetocaloric effect (IMCE) is observed below 260 K while conventional magnetocaloric effect (CMCE) above it. The exponent 'm' is found to be independent of temperature and field only in the IMCE region. Investigation of temperature and magnetic field dependence studies of exchange bias, reveal a competition between effective Zeeman energy of the ferromagnetic regions and anisotropic exchange energy at the interface between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions. Variation of exchange bias due to temperature and field cycling is also investigated.

  7. NiO/Fe(001): Magnetic anisotropy, exchange bias, and interface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, E.; Luches, P.; Valeri, S.; Korecki, J.

    2013-06-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of NiO/Fe epitaxial bilayers grown on MgO(001) were studied using magnetooptic Kerr effect (MOKE) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The bilayers were prepared under ultra high vacuum conditions using molecular beam epitaxy with oblique deposition. Two systems were compared: one showing the exchange bias (100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe), ML stands for a monolayer, and another where the exchange bias was not observed (50ML-NiO/50ML-Fe). For both, the magnetic anisotropy was found to be complex, yet dominated by the growth-induced uniaxial anisotropy. The training effect was observed for the 100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe system and quantitatively described using the spin glass model. The composition and magnetic state of the interfacial Fe layers were studied using 57Fe-CEMS. An iron oxide phase (Fe3+4Fe2+1O7), as thick as 31 Å, was identified at the NiO/Fe interface in the as-deposited samples. The ferrimagnetic nature of the interfacial iron oxide film explains the complex magnetic anisotropy observed in the samples.

  8. Intermartensitic Transformation and Enhanced Exchange Bias in Pd (Pt) -doped Ni-Mn-Sn alloys

    PubMed Central

    Dong, S. Y.; Chen, J. Y.; Han, Z. D.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, C. L.; Qian, B.; Jiang, X. F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the phase transitions and exchange bias of Ni50−xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt; x = 0, 1, 2, 3) alloys. An intermartensitic transition (IMT), not observed in Ni50Mn36Sn14 alloy, was induced by the proper application of negative chemical pressure by Pd(Pt) doping in Ni50−xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt) alloys. IMT weakened and was suppressed with the increase of applied field; it also disappeared with further increase of Pd(Pt) content (x = 3 for Pd and x = 2 for Pt). Another striking result is that exchange bias effect, ascribed to the percolating ferromagnetic domains coexisting with spin glass phase, is notably enhanced by nonmagnetic Pd(Pt) addition. The increase of unidirectional anisotropy by the addition of Pd(Pt) impurities with strong spin-orbit coupling was explained by Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions in spin glass phase. PMID:27170057

  9. Optimization of exchange bias in Co/CoO magnetic nanocaps by tuning deposition parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tripathi, J.; Ugochukwu, K. C.; Tripathi, S.

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we report exchange bias tuning by varying thin film deposition parameters such as synthesis method and underlying layer patterning. The patterned substrates for this study were prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) latex spheres ( 530 nm) on Si (100) substrate. The desired magnetic nanocaps composed of CoO/Co bilayer film on these patterned substrates were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy technique under ultra-high vacuum conditions. For this, a Co layer of 10 nm thickness was deposited on the substrates and then oxidized in-situ to form CoO/Co/PS in-situ oxidized film or ex-situ in ambiance which also gives CoO/Co/PS naturally oxidized film. Simultaneously, reference thin films of Co ( 10 nm) were also prepared on plane Si substrate and similar oxidation treatments were performed on them respectively. The magnetic properties studied using SQUID technique revealed higher exchange bias ( 1736 Oe) in the in-situ oxidized Co/PS film as compared to that in naturally oxidized Co/PS film ( 1544 Oe) and also compared to the reference film. The observed variations in the magnetic properties are explained in terms of surface patterning induced structural changes of the deposited films and different oxidation methods.

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance of perpendicular CoFeB-based junctions with exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Orestis; Böhnke, Alexander; Bougiatioti, Panagiota; Klett, Robin; Rott, Karsten; Niesen, Alessia; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter

    2017-09-01

    Recently, magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetized electrodes combined with exchange bias films have attracted great interest. In this paper, we examine the tunnel magnetoresistance of Ta/Pd/IrMn/Co-Fe/Ta/Co-Fe-B/MgO/Co-Fe-B/capping/Pd magnetic tunnel junctions dependent on the capping layer, i.e., Hf or Ta. In these stacks, perpendicular exchange bias fields of -500 Oe along with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are combined. A tunnel magnetoresistance of (47.2 ± 1.4)% for the Hf-capped sample was determined compared to the Ta one (42.6 ± 0.7)% at room temperature. Interestingly, this observation is correlated with the higher boron absorption of Hf compared to Ta, which prevents the suppression of the Δ1 channel and leads to higher tunnel magnetoresistance values. Furthermore, the temperature dependent coercivities of the soft electrodes of both samples are mainly described by the Stoner-Wohlfarth model including thermal fluctuations. Slight deviations at low temperatures can be attributed to a torque on the soft electrode which is generated by the pinned magnetic layer system.

  11. Cooling field and temperature dependent exchange bias in spin glass/ferromagnet bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rui, W. B.; Hu, Y.; Du, A.; You, B.; Xiao, M. W.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, S. M.; Du, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental and theoretical studies of cooling field (HFC) and temperature (T) dependent exchange bias (EB) in FexAu1 − x/Fe19Ni81 spin glass (SG)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers. When x varies from 8% to 14% in the FexAu1 − x SG alloys, with increasing T, a sign-changeable exchange bias field (HE) together with a unimodal distribution of coercivity (HC) are observed. Significantly, increasing in the magnitude of HFC reduces (increases) the value of HE in the negative (positive) region, resulting in the entire HE ∼ T curve to move leftwards and upwards. In the meanwhile, HFC variation has weak effects on HC. By Monte Carlo simulation using a SG/FM vector model, we are able to reproduce such HE dependences on T and HFC for the SG/FM system. Thus this work reveals that the SG/FM bilayer system containing intimately coupled interface, instead of a single SG layer, is responsible for the novel EB properties. PMID:26348277

  12. Intermartensitic Transformation and Enhanced Exchange Bias in Pd (Pt) -doped Ni-Mn-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S. Y.; Chen, J. Y.; Han, Z. D.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, C. L.; Qian, B.; Jiang, X. F.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we studied the phase transitions and exchange bias of Ni50-xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt; x = 0, 1, 2, 3) alloys. An intermartensitic transition (IMT), not observed in Ni50Mn36Sn14 alloy, was induced by the proper application of negative chemical pressure by Pd(Pt) doping in Ni50-xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt) alloys. IMT weakened and was suppressed with the increase of applied field; it also disappeared with further increase of Pd(Pt) content (x = 3 for Pd and x = 2 for Pt). Another striking result is that exchange bias effect, ascribed to the percolating ferromagnetic domains coexisting with spin glass phase, is notably enhanced by nonmagnetic Pd(Pt) addition. The increase of unidirectional anisotropy by the addition of Pd(Pt) impurities with strong spin-orbit coupling was explained by Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions in spin glass phase.

  13. Intermartensitic Transformation and Enhanced Exchange Bias in Pd (Pt) -doped Ni-Mn-Sn alloys.

    PubMed

    Dong, S Y; Chen, J Y; Han, Z D; Fang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhang, C L; Qian, B; Jiang, X F

    2016-05-12

    In this work, we studied the phase transitions and exchange bias of Ni50-xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt; x = 0, 1, 2, 3) alloys. An intermartensitic transition (IMT), not observed in Ni50Mn36Sn14 alloy, was induced by the proper application of negative chemical pressure by Pd(Pt) doping in Ni50-xMn36Sn14Tx (T = Pd, Pt) alloys. IMT weakened and was suppressed with the increase of applied field; it also disappeared with further increase of Pd(Pt) content (x = 3 for Pd and x = 2 for Pt). Another striking result is that exchange bias effect, ascribed to the percolating ferromagnetic domains coexisting with spin glass phase, is notably enhanced by nonmagnetic Pd(Pt) addition. The increase of unidirectional anisotropy by the addition of Pd(Pt) impurities with strong spin-orbit coupling was explained by Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions in spin glass phase.

  14. NiO/Fe(001): Magnetic anisotropy, exchange bias, and interface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynczak, E.; Luches, P.

    2013-06-21

    The magnetic and structural properties of NiO/Fe epitaxial bilayers grown on MgO(001) were studied using magnetooptic Kerr effect (MOKE) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The bilayers were prepared under ultra high vacuum conditions using molecular beam epitaxy with oblique deposition. Two systems were compared: one showing the exchange bias (100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe), ML stands for a monolayer, and another where the exchange bias was not observed (50ML-NiO/50ML-Fe). For both, the magnetic anisotropy was found to be complex, yet dominated by the growth-induced uniaxial anisotropy. The training effect was observed for the 100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe system and quantitatively described using the spin glass model. The composition and magnetic state of the interfacial Fe layers were studied using {sup 57}Fe-CEMS. An iron oxide phase (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 4}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 1}O{sub 7}), as thick as 31 A, was identified at the NiO/Fe interface in the as-deposited samples. The ferrimagnetic nature of the interfacial iron oxide film explains the complex magnetic anisotropy observed in the samples.

  15. Temperature dependence of the training effect in a Co/CoO exchange-bias layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian; He, Xi; Polisetty, Srinivas

    2005-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the training effect is studied in a Co/CoO exchange-bias bilayer and a phenomenological theory is presented. After field cooling the sample to below its blocking temperature, the absolute value of the exchange-bias field decreases when cycling the heterostructure through consecutive hysteresis loops. This decrease is known as the training effect and is studied in the temperature range 5⩽T⩽120K . An implicit sequence, which has been recently derived using the Landau-Khalatnikov approach of relaxation, fits the respective data set for each individual temperature. The underlying discretized dynamic equation involves an expansion of the free energy in powers of the interface magnetization of the antiferromagnetic pinning layer. The particular structure of the free energy with a leading fourth-order term is derived in a mean-field approach. The explicit temperature dependence of the leading expansion coefficient explains the temperature dependence of the training effect. The analytic approach is confirmed by the result of a best fit, which condenses the data from more than 50 measured hysteresis loops.

  16. Angular dependent FORC and FMR of exchange-biased NiFe multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, R. A.; Khanal, S.; Vargas, J. M.; Spinu, L.; Ross, C. A.; Garcia, C.

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic ferromagnetic resonance (FMR, X-band 9.8 GHz) and static first-order reversal curve (FORC) techniques are combined to study the intrinsic exchange-bias distribution via measurements of in-plane angular variation in (FeNi/IrMn)n multilayers. The angular dependence of the exchange bias field was qualitatively and quantitatively investigated using both methods, which are sensitive to different couplings between the ferromagnetic layers. We have used the analysis of the angular dependence of first-order reversal curve (AFORC) data, extracted from FORC curves measured from {{0}\\circ} up to {{360}\\circ} in {{10}\\circ} steps. In addition, its counterpart angular dependence of FMR (AFMR) measurements were carried out and correlated with the AFORC results. The AFORC proved to be useful for simultaneously studying the magnetization reversal processes and magnetic interactions between the layers of the (FeNi/IrMn)n. These interactions are related to the structure and interfaces in the (FeNi/IrMn), and the results obtained by AFMR and AFORC are contrasted with a modified theoretical model for domain-wall formation.

  17. Exchange bias properties of [Co/CoO]{sub n} multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, M.; S Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r, E.; Demirci, E.; Erkovan, M.; Oeztuerk, O.; Akdogan, N.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the exchange bias properties of four polycrystalline multilayer stack samples of antiferromagnetic (AF) CoO and ferromagnetic (FM) Co in the form of [CoO/Co]{sub n} with n = 1, 2, 3, and 5 are reported. The samples were grown on top of Si (001) substrates by using magnetron sputtering method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the structural properties of the samples. XPS measurements of cobalt oxide layer revealed the coexistence of different phases in cobalt oxide as CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, the latter of which lowers the blocking temperature. The blocking temperature is also affected by the finite size scaling effects observed in AF layers. In-plane ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements revealed uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy for the samples. Low temperature vibrating sample magnetometer measurements provided exchange bias with a stepwise character. Observed steps are believed to be due to magnetization reversals of individual FM layers with varying thicknesses, each of which is pinned through two interfaces from above and below with two AFM layers, except the uppermost FM Co layer with a single AFM neighbor.

  18. Temperature evolution of nickel sulphide phases from thiourea complex and their exchange bias effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitesh; Raman, N.; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-12-01

    Considering the very complex phase diagram of nickel sulphide, it is quite challenging to stabilize pure phases from a single precursor. Here, we obtain nanoparticles of various phases of nickel sulphide by decomposing nickel-thiourea complex at different temperatures. The first phase in the evolution is the one with the maximum sulphur content, namely, NiS2 nanoparticles obtained at 400 °C. As the temperature is increased, nanoparticles of phases with lesser sulphur content, NiS (600 °C) and Ni3S2 (800 °C) are formed. NiS2 nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetic transition at 30 K and show a large exchange bias at 2 K. NiS nanoparticles are antiferromagnetic and show relatively smaller exchange bias effect. On the other hand, Ni3S2 nanoparticles exhibit very weak temperature dependent magnetization. Electrical measurements show that both NiS2 and NiS are semiconductors whereas Ni3S2 is a metal.

  19. A direct measurement of rotatable and frozen CoO spins in exchange bias system of CoO/Fe/Ag(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Park, J. S.; Kim, W.; Arenholz, E.; Liberati, M.; Scholl, A.; Wu, Y. Z.; Hwang, C.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-03-10

    The exchange bias of epitaxially grown CoO/Fe/Ag(001) was investigated using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) techniques. A direct XMLD measurement on the CoO layer during the Fe magnetization reversal shows that the CoO compensated spins are rotatable at thinner thickness and frozen at larger thickness. By a quantitative determination of the rotatable and frozen CoO spins as a function of the CoO film thickness, we find the remarkable result that the exchange bias is well established before frozen spins are detectable in the CoO film. We further show that the rotatable and frozen CoO spins are uniformly distributed in the CoO film.

  20. Left cheek bias for emotion perception, but not expression, is established in children aged 3-7 years.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Annukka K; Tenenbaum, Harriet R; Aznar, Ana

    2017-01-01

    As the left hemiface is controlled by the emotion-dominant right hemisphere, emotion is expressed asymmetrically. Portraits showing a model's left cheek consequently appear more emotive. Though the left cheek bias is well established in adults, it has not been investigated in children. To determine whether the left cheek biases for emotion perception and expression are present and/or develop between the ages of 3 and 7 years, 145 children (71 male, 74 female; M age = 65.49 months) completed two experimental tasks: one assessing biases in emotion perception, and the other assessing biases in emotion expression. Regression analysis confirmed that children aged 3-7 years find left cheek portraits happier than right cheek portraits, and age does not predict the magnitude of the bias. In contrast when asked to pose for a photo expressing happiness children did not show a left cheek bias, with logistic regression confirming that age did not predict posing orientations. These findings indicate that though the left cheek bias for emotion perception is established by age 3, a similar bias for emotion expression is not evident by age 7. This implies that tacit knowledge of the left cheek's greater expressivity is not innate but develops in later childhood/adolescence.

  1. Triggering of spin-flipping-modulated exchange bias in FeCo nanoparticles by electronic excitation

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Debalaya; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Srivastava, Pankaj; Ghosh, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    The exchange coupling between ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AF) interfaces is a key element of modern spintronic devices. We here introduce a new way of triggering exchange bias (EB) in swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated FeCo-SiO2 films, which is a manifestation of spin-flipping at high irradiation fluence. The elongation of FeCo nanoparticles (NPs) in SiO2 matrix gives rise to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at intermediate fluence. However, a clear shift in hysteresis loop is evident at the highest fluence. This reveals the existence of an AF exchange pinning domain in the NPs, which is identified not to be oxide shell from XANES analysis. Thermal spike calculations along with first-principles based simulations under the framework of density functional theory (DFT) demonstrate that spin flipping of 3d valence electrons is responsible for formation of these AF domains inside the FM NPs. EXAFS experiments at Fe and Co K-edges further unravel that spin-flipping in highest fluence irradiated film results in reduced bond lengths. The results highlight the possibility of miniaturization of magnetic storage devices by using irradiated NPs instead of conventionally used FM-AF multilayers. PMID:27991552

  2. Triggering of spin-flipping-modulated exchange bias in FeCo nanoparticles by electronic excitation.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Debalaya; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Srivastava, Pankaj; Ghosh, Santanu

    2016-12-19

    The exchange coupling between ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AF) interfaces is a key element of modern spintronic devices. We here introduce a new way of triggering exchange bias (EB) in swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated FeCo-SiO2 films, which is a manifestation of spin-flipping at high irradiation fluence. The elongation of FeCo nanoparticles (NPs) in SiO2 matrix gives rise to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at intermediate fluence. However, a clear shift in hysteresis loop is evident at the highest fluence. This reveals the existence of an AF exchange pinning domain in the NPs, which is identified not to be oxide shell from XANES analysis. Thermal spike calculations along with first-principles based simulations under the framework of density functional theory (DFT) demonstrate that spin flipping of 3d valence electrons is responsible for formation of these AF domains inside the FM NPs. EXAFS experiments at Fe and Co K-edges further unravel that spin-flipping in highest fluence irradiated film results in reduced bond lengths. The results highlight the possibility of miniaturization of magnetic storage devices by using irradiated NPs instead of conventionally used FM-AF multilayers.

  3. Exchange bias effect in NiMnSb/CrN heterostructures deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma Akkera, Harish; Barman, Rahul; Kaur, Navjot; Choudhary, Nitin; Kaur, Davinder

    2013-05-01

    Exchange bias has been studied in various Ni50Mn36.8Sb13.2/CrN heterostructures with different CrN thicknesses (15 nm-80 nm), grown on Si (100) substrate using magnetron sputtering. The shift in hysteresis loop up to 51 Oe from the origin was observed at 10 K for Ni-Mn-Sb film without CrN layer. On the other hand, a significant shifting of hysteresis loop was observed with antiferromagnetic (AFM) CrN layer in Ni50Mn36.8Sb13.2/CrN heterostructure. The exchange coupled 140 nm Ni50Mn36.8Sb13.2/35 nm CrN heterostructure exhibited a relatively large exchange coupling field of 148 Oe at 10 K compared to other films, which may be related to uncompensated and pinned AFM spins at FM-AFM interface and different AFM domain structures for different thicknesses of CrN layer. Further nanoindentation measurements revealed the higher values of hardness and elastic modulus of about 12.7 ± 0.38 GPa and 179.83 ± 1.24 GPa in Ni50Mn36.8Sb13.2/CrN heterostructures making them promising candidate for various multifunctional MEMS devices.

  4. Triggering of spin-flipping-modulated exchange bias in FeCo nanoparticles by electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Debalaya; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Srivastava, Pankaj; Ghosh, Santanu

    2016-12-01

    The exchange coupling between ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AF) interfaces is a key element of modern spintronic devices. We here introduce a new way of triggering exchange bias (EB) in swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated FeCo-SiO2 films, which is a manifestation of spin-flipping at high irradiation fluence. The elongation of FeCo nanoparticles (NPs) in SiO2 matrix gives rise to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at intermediate fluence. However, a clear shift in hysteresis loop is evident at the highest fluence. This reveals the existence of an AF exchange pinning domain in the NPs, which is identified not to be oxide shell from XANES analysis. Thermal spike calculations along with first-principles based simulations under the framework of density functional theory (DFT) demonstrate that spin flipping of 3d valence electrons is responsible for formation of these AF domains inside the FM NPs. EXAFS experiments at Fe and Co K-edges further unravel that spin-flipping in highest fluence irradiated film results in reduced bond lengths. The results highlight the possibility of miniaturization of magnetic storage devices by using irradiated NPs instead of conventionally used FM-AF multilayers.

  5. Exchange bias study of epitaxial LSMO/Cr2O3 thin film heterostructures integrated on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punugupati, Sandhyarani; Hunte, Frank; Narayan, Jagdish

    2015-03-01

    FM/AFM exchange bias continues to be an interesting phenomenon from both a fundamental physics and an applications point of view. Recent studies of multiferroic materials have also seen a revival of interest in the magnetoelectric (ME) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) material Cr2O3. The study of exchange bias in heterostructures consisting of ferromagnet (FM) and ME thin films provides an additional mechanism of switching the magnetization of the FM by the application of an electric field. La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) is a FM material with TC above room temperature and shows colossal magnetoresistance. We have studied exchange bias in epitaxial thin film heterostructures of LSMO/Cr2O3 grown on C-YSZ/Si(100) by the PLD technique. We present a detailed structural characterization of the films by XRD (2O and Φ) and TEM which confirm that the films were grown epitaxially. The heterostructures exhibited exchange bias as measured by SQUID magnetometry. The effects of LSMO deposition conditions, crystal orientation, temperature, and cooling field on the exchange bias will be discussed. Part of this research is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office.

  6. Unwanted spatial bias in predicting establishment of an invasive insect based on simulated demographics.

    PubMed

    Gray, David R

    2014-07-01

    A strategy to estimate the probability of successful establishment of the invasive gypsy moth (given an introduction) is growing in popularity. The strategy calls for an examination of the demographic output of a phenology model of the complete life-cycle to estimate the generational success under the climate of the location under consideration. The probability is maximal where the climate satisfies the life-cycle requirements of all life-stages of 100% of the population every year. The probability decreases where a smaller proportion of the population has its requirements satisfied every year, or where the frequency of unsatisfactory years increases. The strategy can give an unbiased and objective estimate of the probability. However, implementation of the strategy has most often forced unnatural and overly simplistic modifications onto the demographic structure that is simulated by the phenology model, and used an inappropriate and arbitrary calendar date to estimate demographic changes from winter mortality. This produces pronounced spatial bias in the estimates of generational success, and therefore in the estimates of climate-mediated establishment probability. In an examination of the strategy, as implemented in New Zealand, one demographic simplification caused an overestimate of 21% in a southern location; a second simplification caused an overestimate of 17% in a northern location. One hundred percent of the generations were incorrectly considered to have failed in a northern location because of the arbitrary calendar date that was used; and 78% of the generations were incorrectly considered successful in a southern location because of the arbitrary date.

  7. Unwanted spatial bias in predicting establishment of an invasive insect based on simulated demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David R.

    2014-07-01

    A strategy to estimate the probability of successful establishment of the invasive gypsy moth (given an introduction) is growing in popularity. The strategy calls for an examination of the demographic output of a phenology model of the complete life-cycle to estimate the generational success under the climate of the location under consideration. The probability is maximal where the climate satisfies the life-cycle requirements of all life-stages of 100 % of the population every year. The probability decreases where a smaller proportion of the population has its requirements satisfied every year, or where the frequency of unsatisfactory years increases. The strategy can give an unbiased and objective estimate of the probability. However, implementation of the strategy has most often forced unnatural and overly simplistic modifications onto the demographic structure that is simulated by the phenology model, and used an inappropriate and arbitrary calendar date to estimate demographic changes from winter mortality. This produces pronounced spatial bias in the estimates of generational success, and therefore in the estimates of climate-mediated establishment probability. In an examination of the strategy, as implemented in New Zealand, one demographic simplification caused an overestimate of 21 % in a southern location; a second simplification caused an overestimate of 17 % in a northern location. One hundred percent of the generations were incorrectly considered to have failed in a northern location because of the arbitrary calendar date that was used; and 78 % of the generations were incorrectly considered successful in a southern location because of the arbitrary date.

  8. The Origin of Enhanced Coercivity in Exchange-Biased NiCoO/Py/MgO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, D. V.; Prados, C.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Xiao, J. Q.

    1998-03-01

    We have studied the long-standing problem of the origin of enhanced coercivity in exchange coupled ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF) films in sputtered Si/NiCoO/FeNi/MgO thin films. The angular dependence of the exchange bias and coercivity was studied using magnetometry with two mutually orthogonal pick-up coils. The exchange bias (H_e) was found to follow a simple harmonic angular dependence: H_e=Hm × cos (α). The coercivity (H_c) showed sharp peaks centered at 0, 180, 360^circ, superimposed on a flat background of 27 Oe. Measurements of both the longitudinal and orthogonal magnetization during the hysteresis cycle indicated that the magnetization reversal occurs by magnetization rotation instead of domain wall motion, which is usually observed in magnetically soft films. The random exchange field at the FM/AF boundary may cause the changes in the mechanism of magnetization reversal. We proposed a simple model to explain the angular dependence of H_e, based on the assumption that there is an angular spread in the exchange bias directions. A spread in the local exchange bias leads to uniaxial anisotropy in a narrow angular range and as a consequence to an enhancement in the coercivity. Numerical calculations based on this model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Exchange bias coupling in NiO/Ni bilayer tubular nanostructures synthetized by electrodeposition and thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, T.; Zhang, Z. W.; Xu, Y. H.; Liu, Y.; Li, W. J.; Nie, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xiang, G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we reported the synthesis of NiO/Ni bilayer nanotubes by electrodeposition and thermal oxidation using anodic aluminum oxide templates. The morphology, structure, chemical composition and magnetic properties, especially magnetic exchange bias induced by subsequent magnetic field cooling, in this one-dimensional antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic hybrid system were investigated. It was found that the effect of the annealing temperature, which mainly dominated the thickness of the NiO layer, and the annealing time, which mainly dominated the grain size of the NiO, on the exchange bias field showed competitive relationship. The optimized exchange bias field was achieved by the combination of the shorter annealing time and higher annealing temperature.

  10. Connection between orbital moment enhancement and exchange bias in a [Ni80Fe20/Mn]3 multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.-C.; Huang, M.-J.; Lin, H.-J.; Lee, C.-H.; Chen, C.-T.; Liu, C.-H.; Hsu, H.-F.; Lin, K.-W.; van Lierop, J.

    2013-01-01

    The overall and element specific magnetism in an exchange biased [Ni80Fe20/Mn]3 film system, with film layers 3.5 nm thick, has been studied to examine the magnetism between interfacial Mn, Ni, and Fe spins. Field-cooling the film results in large exchange bias loop shifts at temperatures from 2 to 30 K, and an enhanced coercivity remains until 75 K. The elemental magnetism ascertained from x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements shows that Mn appears to be a fully compensated antiferromagnet down to 20 K, and there is clear evidence of an enhanced orbital moment for both Fe and Ni from 20 to 300 K. This magnetism is likely due to overlapping d orbitals between Fe-Mn and Ni-Mn, with this coupling increasing the local anisotropy resulting in the enhanced coercivity and enabling exchange bias.

  11. Training effects and the microscopic magnetic structure of exchange biased Co/CoO bilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Felcher, G. P.; Hill, B. K.; te Velthius, S. G. E.

    1999-09-01

    Exchange bias of a partially oxidized thin film of ferromagnetic Co was studied by magnetization measurements and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). The magnetization curve shows strong effects of training with cycling of the magnetic field. Reflectivity measurements with the field parallel to the cooling field showed the onset of spin-dependent diffuse scattering--off the specular reflection--after a training cycle. Such scattering, of the Yoneda type, is due to misaligned Co domains possibly close to the Co/CoO interface. Subjecting the field cooled Co/CoO pair to a field perpendicular to the cooling field causes a rotation of the magnetization. PNR measurements confirmed earlier susceptibility studies by indicating that the rotation of the magnetization is reversible in fields up to 400 Oe. The rotation of the magnetization of Co is uniform across the film thickness.

  12. Defect-tuning exchange bias of ferromagnet/antiferromagnet core/shell nanoparticles by numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhongquan; Zhan, Xiaozhi; Chen, Xi

    2012-07-11

    The influence of non-magnetic defects on the exchange bias (EB) of ferromagnet (FM)/antiferromagnet (AFM) core/shell nanoparticles is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the EB can be tuned by defects in different positions. Defects at both the AFM and FM interfaces reduce the EB field while they enhance the coercive field by decreasing the effective interface coupling. However, the EB field and the coercive field show respectively a non-monotonic and a monotonic dependence on the defect concentration when the defects are located inside the AFM shell, indicating a similar microscopic mechanism to that proposed in the domain state model. These results suggest a way to optimize the EB effect for applications.

  13. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ∼6 nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  14. The wasp-waisted hysteresis loop and exchange bias in multiferroic BaNiF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Ji; Xu, Qingyu; Du, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Multiferroic BaNiF4 has been fabricated by hydrothermal method. The bifurcation between zero field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) temperature dependent magnetization (M-T) curves starts at 150 K, indicating the 2D antiferromagnetic (FM) transition. A further upturn of magnetization has been observed below 68 K in FC M-T curve, corresponding to the emergence of 3D AFM structure. Wasp-waisted hysteresis loop was observed under 130 K, which is explained by that the AFM aligned net spins from the canting of neighboring AFM spins due to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be easily aligned by the magnetic field. Exchange bias effect was detected below 70 K, which has been interpreted by the magnetization pinned by the spontaneous polarization through magnetoelectric coupling.

  15. Selective realignment of the exchange biased magnetization direction in spintronic layer stacks using continuous and pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, I.; Müller, M.; Ebert, R.; Schille, J.; Löschner, U.; Exner, H.; Matthes, P.; Albrecht, M.

    2014-03-01

    We report on selective realignment of the magnetization direction of the exchange biased ferromagnetic layer in two different spintronic layer stacks using laser radiation. The exchange bias effect occurs in an antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic bilayer system when cooled in an external magnetic field below the Néel temperature and results in a shift of the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop with increased coercivity. The effect is utilized to pin the magnetization direction of the reference ferromagnetic layer in spin valve systems. We investigated the realignment of the pinned magnetization direction in a spin valve system with in plane exchange bias and in a Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular exchange bias. The layer stacks were heated above the Néel temperature in a defined lateral area by using rapidly deflected laser radiation. Two different laser assisted annealing techniques were investigated applying either continuous or pulsed laser radiation. During laser annealing, the sample was subjected to an external magnetic field in order to selectively realign the magnetization direction of the pinned ferromagnetic layer. Magnetic structuring was performed by heating narrow single tracks as well as irradiating single pulses. By using a magneto optical sensor in combination with a polarization microscope, the magnetic structures have been visualized. After laser annealing of larger-scaled areas, the exchange bias field strength and the coercive field strength were analyzed using a magneto optical Kerr effect set up (MOKE). The impact of the processing parameters laser peak intensity, laser pulse duration, scan speed (continuous wave) and magnetic field strength on the resulting reversed exchange bias field was evaluated.

  16. Boundary Magnetization and Exchange Bias of Boron Doped Cr2O3 Pinning Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Michael; Echtenkamp, Will; Dowben, Peter; Binek, Christian

    2014-03-01

    This research is part of an effort to utilize voltage-controlled boundary magnetization (BM) in the magnetoelectric (ME) Cr2O3 for spintronic applications. We exploit the electric switchable boundary magnetic moment (MM) of Cr2O3. The net MM at the interface can be useful to manipulate the magnetic states of an adjacent ferromagnetic (FM) material. Using a FM Pd/Co multilayer deposited on Cr2O3, reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange bias field has been achieved by reversing the electric field. The voltage-controlled magnetization of the FM layer can be utilized as a state variable. However, to use voltage-controlled BM as a key spintronic material for devices operating at room temperature, the Néel temperature TN of the ME antiferromagnet must be increased above the bulk value of TN = 307 K of pure Cr2O3. First principles calculations show that boron doping of Cr2O3 can increase TN. We diagram structural and magnetic characterizations of pure and B-Cr2O3 grown on Al2O3. An increase in TN of 120 K is achieved making Cr2O3 suitable for room temperature spintronic applications. Further, we attempt to create an exchange bias (EB) system using a FM Pd/Co multilayer on B-doped Cr2O3. From this, we attempt to switch the EB field via the electric field. This project is supported by NSF through MRSEC DMR 0213808, by the NRC/NRI supplement to MRSEC, and by STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  17. Exchange bias in ferrite hollow nanoparticles originated by complex internal magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasi, Emilio; Lima, Enio, Jr.; Vargas, Jose M.; Zysler, Roberto D.; Arbiol, Jordi; Ibarra, Alfonso; Goya, Gerardo F.; Ibarra, M. Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Iron-oxide hollow nanospheres (HNS) may present unusual magnetic behavior as a consequence of their unique morphology. Here, we report the unusual magnetic behavior of HNS that are 9 nm in diameter. The magnetic properties of HNS originate in their complex magnetic structure, as evidenced by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. We observe a bias in the hysteresis when measured at very low temperature in the field cooling protocol (10 kOe). In addition, dc (static) and ac (dynamic) magnetization measurements against temperature and applied field reveal a frustrated order of the system below 10 K. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies reveal that the HNS are composed of small crystalline clusters of about 2 nm in diameter, which behave as individual magnetic entities. Micromagnetic simulations (using conjugate gradient in order to minimize the total energy of the system) reproduce the experimentally observed magnetic behavior. The model considers the hollow particles as constituted by small ordered clusters embedded in an antiferromagnetic environment (spins localized outside the clusters). In addition, the surface spins (in both inner and outer surfaces of the HNS) are affected by a local surface anisotropy. The strong effective magnetic anisotropy field of the clusters induces the bias observed when the system is cooled in the presence of a magnetic external field. This effect propagates through the exchange interaction into the entire particle.

  18. The antiferromagnetic structures of IrMn3 and their influence on exchange-bias

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, A.; Kovács, A.; Fan, R.; McIntyre, G. J.; Ward, R. C. C.; Goff, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the magnetic structures of single-crystal thin-films of IrMn3 for the crystallographic phases of chemically-ordered L12, and for chemically-disordered face-centred-cubic, which is the phase typically chosen for information-storage devices. For the chemically-ordered L12 thin-film, we find the same triangular magnetic structure as reported for the bulk material. We determine the magnetic structure of the chemically-disordered face-centred-cubic alloy for the first time, which differs from theoretical predictions, with magnetic moments tilted away from the crystal diagonals towards the face-planes. We study the influence of these two antiferromagnetic structures on the exchange-bias properties of an epitaxial body-centred-cubic Fe layer showing that magnetization reversal mechanism and bias-field in the ferromagnetic layer is altered significantly. We report a change of reversal mechanism from in-plane nucleation of 90° domain-walls when coupled to the newly reported cubic structure towards a rotational process, including an out-of-plane magnetization component when coupled to the L12 triangular structure. PMID:23934541

  19. Suppression of exchange bias effect in maghemite nanoparticles functionalized with H2Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guivar, Juan A. Ramos; Morales, M. A.; Litterst, F. Jochen

    2016-12-01

    The structural, vibrational, morphological and magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles functionalized with polar molecules EDTA(or H4Y) and H2Y are reported. The samples were functionalized before and after total synthesis of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The molecules are anchored on the monodentate mode on the nanoparticles surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with small diameter of 4 nm for the sample functionalized upon synthesis and 7.6 and 6.9 nm for the samples functionalized with EDTA and H2Y after the formation of nanoparticles. Exchange bias phenomena were observed in some of the samples functionalized with EDTA at temperatures below 70 K. The presence of the bias effect was discussed in terms of the formation of a thin layer of a secondary phase like lepidocrocite, and the absence of this effect was explained in terms of the chemisorption of carboxylic groups from EDTA which suppressed the canting. Studies of Mössbauer spectroscopy as a function of temperature showed slow relaxation effects and allowed discussion of the secondary phase. In the M-T curves a maximum around 116 K was associated with this secondary phase also in agreement with the Mössbauer studies. The dynamic properties were studied by AC susceptibility, the out of phase signal revealed a spin glass like regime below 36.5 K.

  20. The exchange bias phenomenon in uncompensated interfaces: theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Billoni, O V; Cannas, S A; Tamarit, F A

    2011-09-28

    We performed Monte Carlo simulations of a bilayer system composed of two thin films, one ferromagnetic (FM) and the other antiferromagnetic (AFM). Two lattice structures for the films were considered: simple cubic and body centered cubic (bcc). We imposed an uncompensated interfacial spin structure in both lattice structures; in particular we emulated an FeF2-FM system in the case of the bcc lattice. Our analysis focused on the incidence of the interfacial strength interactions between the films, J(eb), and the effect of thermal fluctuations on the bias field, H(EB). We first performed Monte Carlo simulations on a microscopic model based on classical Heisenberg spin variables. To analyze the simulation results we also introduced a simplified model that assumes coherent rotation of spins located on the same layer parallel to the interface. We found that, depending on the AFM film anisotropy to exchange ratio, the bias field is controlled either by the intrinsic pinning of a domain wall parallel to the interface or by the stability of the first AFM layer (quasi-domain wall) near the interface.

  1. Current-driven non-linear magnetodynamics in exchange-biased spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Tsoi, Maxim

    2015-05-07

    This work investigates the excitation of parametric resonance in exchange-biased spin valves (EBSVs). Using a mechanical point contact, high density dc and microwave currents were injected into the EBSV sample. Observing the reflected microwave power and the small rectification voltage that develops across the contact allows detecting the current-driven magnetodynamics not only in the bulk sample but originating exclusively from the small contact region. In addition to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), parametric resonance at twice the natural FMR frequency was observed. In contrast to FMR, this non-linear resonance was excited only in the vicinity of the point contact where current densities are high. Power-dependent measurements displayed a typical threshold-like behavior of parametric resonance and a broadening of the instability region with increasing power. Parametric resonance showed a linear shift as a function of applied dc bias which is consistent with the field-like spin-transfer torque induced by current on magnetic moments in EBSV.

  2. Enhanced exchange bias in IrMn/CoFe deposited on self-organized hexagonally patterned nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Shi, D. W.; Greene, Peter K.; Javed, K.; Liu, Kai; Han, X. F.

    2015-02-01

    Exchange biased nanostructures of IrMn/CoFe were deposited on anodized alumina with hexagonally patterned nanodot surface structures. Nanodots with diameters of 20, 70, and 100 nm were fabricated to investigate the size effect on the magnetic properties. Magnetometry and the first-order reversal curve method revealed significant enhancements of the exchange bias and coercivity in the nanodots compared with flat films. The enhancements can be attributed to the effective reduction of ferromagnet domain sizes and increased random fields due to the nanostructure morphology and domain wall pinning by the boundaries between adjacent nanodots.

  3. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance characterization of anisotropies and relaxation in exchange-biased IrMn/CoFe bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beik Mohammadi, Jamileh; Jones, Joshua Michael; Paul, Soumalya; Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mewes, Claudia K. A.; Mewes, Tim; Kaiser, Christian

    2017-02-01

    The magnetization dynamics of exchange-biased IrMn/CoFe bilayers have been investigated using broadband and in-plane angle-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The interface energy of the exchange bias effect in these bilayers exceeds values previously reported for metallic antiferromagnets. A strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a small in-plane uniaxial anisotropy are also observed in these films. The magnetization relaxation of the bilayers has a strong unidirectional contribution, which is in part caused by two-magnon scattering. However, a detailed analysis of in-plane angle- and thickness-dependent linewidth data strongly suggests the presence of a previously undescribed unidirectional relaxation mechanism.

  4. Exchange bias in (FeNi/IrMn)n multilayer films evaluated by static and dynamic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Shankar; Diaconu, Andrei; Vargas, Jose M.; Lenormand, Denny R.; Garcia, Carlos; Ross, C. A.; Spinu, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Exchange bias properties of [FeNi/IrMn]n multilayer films with variable thickness of the ferromagnetic layers and different repetitions n were determined by using static and dynamic measurement techniques. The static magnetic properties were revealed through magnetometry measurements at room temperature following major hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves protocols. Room temperature x-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and vector network analyser (VNA)-FMR experiments were used to determine dynamically the exchange anisotropy in the FeNi/IrMn multilayers. From the static measurements the exchange anisotropy was determined while dynamic measurements allowed the determination of additional parameters including anisotropy field, saturation magnetization and rotatable anisotropy. The differences between the values of the exchange biased obtained from each technique are discussed.

  5. Eliminating leakage current in voltage-controlled exchange-bias devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Ather; Echtenkamp, Will; Street, Michael; Binek, Christian; Magnetic Heterostructures Team

    Manipulation of magnetism by electric field has drawn much attention due to the technological importance for low-power devices, and for understanding fundamental magnetoelectric phenomena. A manifestation of electrically controlled magnetism is voltage control of exchange bias (EB). Robust isothermal voltage control of EB was demonstrated near room temperature using a heterostructure of Co/Pd thin film and an exchange coupled single crystal of the antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 (Chromia). A major obstacle for EB in lithographically patterned Chromia based thin-film devices is to minimize the leakage currents at high electric fields (>10 kV/mm). By combining electrical measurements on patterned devices and conductive Atomic Force Microscopy of Chromia thin-films, we investigate the defects which form conducting paths impeding the application of sufficient voltage for demonstrating the isothermal EB switching in thin film heterostructures. Technological challenges in the device fabrication will be discussed. This project was supported by SRC through CNFD, an SRC-NRI Center, by C-SPIN, part of STARnet, and by the NSF through MRSEC Abstract DMR-0820521.

  6. Strain engineering induced interfacial self-assembly and intrinsic exchange bias in a manganite perovskite film.

    PubMed

    Cui, B; Song, C; Wang, G Y; Mao, H J; Zeng, F; Pan, F

    2013-01-01

    The control of complex oxide heterostructures at atomic level generates a rich spectrum of exotic properties and unexpected states at the interface between two separately prepared materials. The frustration of magnetization and conductivity of manganite perovskite at surface/interface which is inimical to their device applications, could also flourish in tailored functionalities in return. Here we prove that the exchange bias (EB) effect can unexpectedly emerge in a (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSMO) "single" film when large compressive stress imposed through a lattice mismatched substrate. The intrinsic EB behavior is directly demonstrated to be originating from the exchange coupling between ferromagnetic LSMO and an unprecedented LaSrMnO4-based spin glass, formed under a large interfacial strain and subsequent self-assembly. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing a new class of delicately functional interface by strain engineering, but also shed promising light on fabricating the EB part of spintronic devices in a single step.

  7. Comment on ``Size-dependent scaling of perpendicular exchange bias in magnetic nanostructures''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, V.; Bollero, A.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.; Sort, J.

    2008-01-01

    From results at one given temperature (300K) , Malinowski [Phys. Rev. B 75, 012413 (2007)] draw the conclusion that lateral confinement of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic exchange-biased structures does not enhance thermally activated unpinning of the antiferromagnetic spins, which would thus contrast with a recent report [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117201 (2005)], as explicitly mentioned in their manuscript. In this Comment, we discuss why such a conclusion might need revision above a “crossover temperature,” as evidenced in the literature. The value of such a crossover temperature certainly depends on the magnetic parameters of each system studied, e.g., anisotropy and exchange stiffness. From the above reasons, and contrary to the statement of Malinowski , we rather think that their results might well agree with the report to which they refer to. In our Comment we notably aim at complementing the conclusion of Malinowski by explaining why some differences between the two studies are observed at one given temperature, and why it might be expected to observe similar trends over a whole range of temperatures.

  8. GMR in Exchange-Biased Spin Valves with Current Perpendicular to the Plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenwyk, S. D.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Bass, J.; Loloee, R.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements at 4.2 K of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in exchange-biased spin valves with current perpendicular to the plane (CPP). The spin valves, sandwiched between superconducting crossed Nb strips, consist of a magnetically free Ni_84Fe_16 permalloy (Py) layer (thickness t=6-12 nm) separated by a noble metal layer (t=10 to 20 nm) from a second Py layer of equal thickness with its magnetization pinned by exchange coupling to an antiferromagnetic FeMn layer. The 8 nm FeMn layer is aligned either during deposition in a magnetic field or by subsequent magnetic field annealing after deposition. Magnetometry in modest magnetic fields confirms that the two Py layers are fully saturated in both antiparallel (AP) and parallel (P) alignments. The reversible CPP resistance changes between the P and AP states are on the order of 7%, much larger than the 1-2% observed in the concomitantly measured ``current in plane'' (CIP) geometry. * Work supported by NSF DMR grants 9423795 & 9400417 (MRSEC) and MSU CFMR. ** Permanent address: Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI.

  9. Origin of spontaneous exchange bias in Co/NiMn bilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, A.; Akbulut, S.; Yildiz, F.

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous exchange bias (EB) is reported for as deposited Si/Pt(tPt)/Ni45Mn55(tAFM/Co(tFM)/Pt(30 Å) thin film system without requiring any post annealing, deposition with field or field cooling procedures. Magnetic properties of this system were investigated with respect to thicknesses of buffer Pt layer (tPt), antiferromagnetic NiMn layer (tAFM) and ferromagnetic Co layer (tFM). Exchange coupling between NiMn and Co layers enhanced considerably by increasing tPt. In order to observe a spontaneous EB in the system, Pt buffer layer must be thicker than a certain thickness, and NiMn layer must be grown directly on the buffer layer. On the other hand, significant increments in the coercive fields (HC) were reported for thinner Pt buffer layers. The thickness ranges for Co and NiMn layers were also determined to obtain spontaneous EB. This spontaneous EB is discussed to be a result of NiMn (111) texture which is induced by Pt buffer layer. Greater EB fields (HEB) are measured for the samples in the negative field direction by the effect of annealing and field cooling (from 400 K to 300 K at 2 kOe).

  10. Magnetoelectric thin films for electrically controlled exchange bias in spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Polisetty, Srinivas; Wang, Yi; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Binek, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Epitaxial (111) oriented thin films of magnetoelectric (ME) Cr2O3 are grown by MBE. These films are the key component of Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)3 heterostructures allowing for electrically controlled exchange bias (EB) and novel spintronic applications [1]. Pure voltage control of magnetic configurations in TMR-type devices is proposed as an alternative to current-induced switching. Basic effects of electrically controlled EB and its ME switching are studied by magnetometry and polar Kerr rotation. Exchange coupling between the ME antiferromagnet Cr2O3 and the ferromagnetic CoPt multilayer gives rise to perpendicular EB. The latter is controlled by axial electric fields inducing excess magnetization at the interface which controlls the EB field. Recently, the sign of the EB field has been tuned via a field cooling procedure where a Cr2O3(111) bulk/(Co/Pt)3 system is exposed to either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric fields [2]. Here we study this ME switching effect in an all thin film heterostructure. [1] Ch.Binek, B.Doudin, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, L39 (2005). [2] P.Borisov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005).

  11. Biased thermohaline exchanges with the Arctic across the Iceland-Faroe Ridge in ocean climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, S. M.; Hansen, B.; Østerhus, S.; Quadfasel, D.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2016-04-01

    The northern limb of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and its transport of heat and salt towards the Arctic strongly modulate the climate of the Northern Hemisphere. The presence of warm surface waters prevents ice formation in parts of the Arctic Mediterranean, and ocean heat is directly available for sea-ice melt, while salt transport may be critical for the stability of the exchanges. Through these mechanisms, ocean heat and salt transports play a disproportionally strong role in the climate system, and realistic simulation is a requisite for reliable climate projections. Across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) this occurs in three well-defined branches where anomalies in the warm and saline Atlantic inflow across the shallow Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) have been shown to be particularly difficult to simulate in global ocean models. This branch (IF-inflow) carries about 40 % of the total ocean heat transport into the Arctic Mediterranean and is well constrained by observation during the last 2 decades but associated with significant inter-annual fluctuations. The inconsistency between model results and observational data is here explained by the inability of coarse-resolution models to simulate the overflow across the IFR (IF-overflow), which feeds back onto the simulated IF-inflow. In effect, this is reduced in the model to reflect only the net exchange across the IFR. Observational evidence is presented for a substantial and persistent IF-overflow and mechanisms that qualitatively control its intensity. Through this, we explain the main discrepancies between observed and simulated exchange. Our findings rebuild confidence in modelled net exchange across the IFR, but reveal that compensation of model deficiencies here through other exchange branches is not effective. This implies that simulated ocean heat transport to the Arctic is biased low by more than 10 % and associated with a reduced level of variability, while the quality of the simulated salt

  12. Electric field induced reversible 180° magnetization switching through tuning of interfacial exchange bias along magnetic easy-axis in multiferroic laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xu; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; Zhu, Mingmin; Zhang, Yijun; Ren, Wei; Ren, Tao; Yang, Xi; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian X.; Liu, Ming

    2015-11-18

    E-field control of interfacial exchange coupling and deterministic switching of magnetization have been demonstrated in two sets of ferromagnetic(FM)/antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferroelectric(FE) multiferroic heterostructures, including NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011) and NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011). We designed this experiment to achieve exchange bias tuning along the magnetic easy axis, which is critical for realizing reversible 180° magnetization deterministic switching at zero or small magnetic bias. Strong exchange coupling were established across AFM-FM interfaces, which plays an important role in voltage control of magnetization switching. Through the competition between the E-field induced uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic layer and unidirectional anisotropy in antiferromagnetic layer, the exchange bias was significantly shifted by up to |ΔHex|/Hex=8% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT (011) and 13% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT (011). In addition, the square shape of the hysteresis loop, as well as a strong shape tunability of |ΔHex|/Hc=67.5~125% in NiFe/FeMn/glass/PZN-PT and 30~38% in NiFe/NiCoO/glass/PZN-PT were achieved, which lead to a near 180° magnetization switching. Lastly, electrical tuning of interfacial exchange coupling in FM/AFM/FE systems paves a new way for realizing magnetoelectric random access memories and other memory technologies.

  13. Implications of room temperature oxidation on crystal structure and exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Formo, Eric V.; Freeman, Katherine; Schieber, Natalie P.; Gai, Zheng; Rondinone, Adam J.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we describe how the exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles depends on the size focusing and temperature treatment of precursor Co nanoparticles before oxidation at ambient conditions. By appealing to magnetization, microscopy, neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements we found that as-synthesized Co nanoparticles readily oxidize in air only after 20 days. The highest exchange bias field of 814 Oe is observed at T = 2K. When the same nanoparticles are centrifuged and annealed at 70 °C in vacuum prior to oxidation, the exchange bias field is increased to 2570 Oe. Annealing of Co nanoparticles in vacuum improves their crystallinity and prevents complete oxidation, so that Co-core/CoO-shell structure is preserved even after 120 days. The crystal structure of CoO shell in both samples is different from its bulk counterpart. Implications of such distorted CoO shells on exchange bias are discussed. Coating of Co nanoparticles with amorphous silica shell makes them resistant to oxidation, but ultimately modifies the crystal structure of both Co core and SiO2 shell.

  14. Implications of room temperature oxidation on crystal structure and exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Formo, Eric V.; Freeman, Katherine; ...

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we describe how the exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles depends on the size focusing and temperature treatment of precursor Co nanoparticles before oxidation at ambient conditions. By appealing to magnetization, microscopy, neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements we found that as-synthesized Co nanoparticles readily oxidize in air only after 20 days. The highest exchange bias field of 814 Oe is observed at T = 2K. When the same nanoparticles are centrifuged and annealed at 70 °C in vacuum prior to oxidation, the exchange bias field is increased to 2570 Oe. Annealing of Co nanoparticles in vacuum improvesmore » their crystallinity and prevents complete oxidation, so that Co-core/CoO-shell structure is preserved even after 120 days. The crystal structure of CoO shell in both samples is different from its bulk counterpart. Implications of such distorted CoO shells on exchange bias are discussed. Coating of Co nanoparticles with amorphous silica shell makes them resistant to oxidation, but ultimately modifies the crystal structure of both Co core and SiO2 shell.« less

  15. Seeking to quantify the ferromagnetic-to-antiferromagnetic interface coupling resulting in exchange bias with various thin-film conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, C. H.; Wang, S.; Ouyang, H.; Desautels, R. D.; Lierop, J. van; Lin, K. W.

    2014-08-07

    Ni{sub 3}Fe/(Ni, Fe)O thin films with bilayer and nanocrystallite dispersion morphologies are prepared with a dual ion beam deposition technique permitting precise control of nanocrystallite growth, composition, and admixtures. A bilayer morphology provides a Ni{sub 3}Fe-to-NiO interface, while the dispersion films have different mixtures of Ni{sub 3}Fe, NiO, and FeO nanocrystallites. Using detailed analyses of high resolution transmission electron microscopy images with Multislice simulations, the nanocrystallites' structures and phases are determined, and the intermixing between the Ni{sub 3}Fe, NiO, and FeO interfaces is quantified. From field-cooled hysteresis loops, the exchange bias loop shift from spin interactions at the interfaces are determined. With similar interfacial molar ratios of FM-to-AF, we find the exchange bias field essentially unchanged. However, when the interfacial ratio of FM to AF was FM rich, the exchange bias field increases. Since the FM/AF interface ‘contact’ areas in the nanocrystallite dispersion films are larger than that of the bilayer film, and the nanocrystallite dispersions exhibit larger FM-to-AF interfacial contributions to the magnetism, we attribute the changes in the exchange bias to be from increases in the interfacial segments that suffer defects (such as vacancies and bond distortions), that also affects the coercive fields.

  16. Kerr microscopy study of thermal and athermal training effects in a Co/CoO exchange bias system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zaineb; Raghavendra Reddy, V.

    2017-09-01

    The present work reports the magnetic domain evolution during the magnetization reversal and the training effect in a polycrystalline Co/CoO exchange bias system. Co/CoO bilayers with different cobalt (Co) layer thicknesses are being studied. The measurements are carried out using the Kerr microscopy at different temperatures ( ≥ 80 K) after the field-cooling across the Néel temperature of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoO layer. It is observed that with the increasing ferromagnetic (FM) Co layer thickness, the exchange bias reduces and the training effect becomes weaker. Analysis of the temperature variation of the exchange bias field indicates an increasing disorder at the FM-AFM interface with the decreasing FM thickness. Two different training effects, viz., athermal and thermal mechanisms, are observed depending on the thickness of the FM layer. For the lower FM thickness an athermal training effect is observed, whereas for the thicker FM layer thermal training effect is dominated. The domain structure of FM layers drastically changes during the athermal training effect with the cycling and domain size significantly decreasing during the magnetization reversal process below blocking temperature (TB), whereas in the thermal training mechanism no significant changes are found in the magnetic domain evolution throughout the temperature range with cycling. These results are expected to provide key inputs to various theoretical models that are being used to study the exchange bias phenomena in the recent literature.

  17. Antisite disorder induced spin glass and exchange bias effect in Nd2NiMnO6 epitaxial thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Chauhan, Samta; Chandra, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    We report the observation of the exchange bias effect and spin glass behaviour at low temperature in a ferromagnetic Nd2NiMnO6 epitaxial thin film. Along with the ferromagnetic transition at ˜194 K, an additional transition is observed at lower temperature (˜55 K) as seen from M-T curves of the sample. A shift in the ac susceptibility peak with frequency has been observed at low temperature, which is a signature of a glassy phase within the sample. The detailed investigation of the memory effect and time dependent magnetic relaxation measurements reveals the presence of a spin glass phase in the Nd2NiMnO6 thin film. The exchange bias effect observed at low temperature in the sample has been associated with an antisite disorder induced spin glass phase, which results in a ferromagnetic/spin glass interface at low temperature. The exchange bias behaviour has been further confirmed by performing cooling field and temperature dependence of exchange bias along with training effect measurements.

  18. Magnetic entropy changes and exchange bias effects associated with phase transitions in ferromagnetic Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mahmud

    Magnetic entropy changes and exchange bias effect associated with magnetostructural phase transitions of several Mn based ferromagnetic Heusler alloys have been investigated by x-ray diffraction, magnetization, thermal expansion, and electrical resistivity measurements. The alloys include Ni2+xMn1-xGa (0.16 ≤ x ≤ 0.20), Ni2Mn1-xCuxGa (0.245 ≤ x ≤ 0.26), Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25-xCo xGa (0.245 ≤ x ≤ 0.26), Ni2Mn0.71Cu 0.27Fe0.02Ga, Ni2Mn0.70Cu0.30 Ga0.95Ge0.05, Ni50Mn25+xSb 25-x (0 ≤ x ≤ 15), and Ni50Mn50-xSn x (10 ≤ x ≤ 17). The study of the Ga based Heusler alloys listed above shows that the alloys possess the cubic Heusler L21 structure or the lower symmetry martensitic structure (tetragonal/orthorhombic) at room temperature. Each alloy undergoes a first order martensitic structural phase transition and a second order ferromagnetic phase transition at the same temperature. This coupled magnetostructural phase transition occurs at different temperatures ranging from 295 K to 375 K. In the vicinity of each of these transitions large magnetic entropy changes have been observed. The maximum peak magnetic entropy change value, DeltaSM, is found to be around -64 J/kg.K. Except the Ni2+xMn1-xGa alloys, all of the other alloys exhibit the large magnetic entropy changes at temperatures near room temperature. The study of the Ni50Mn25+xSb25-x and Ni50Mn50-xSnx reveals many interesting properties of the alloys. For some critical Sb and Sn concentrations, martensitic transitions are observed in the samples, in the vicinity of which large inverse magnetic entropy changes have been observed. X-ray diffraction patterns of the alloys suggest that the martensitic phases possess 10M modulated orthorhombic structures, while the high temperature phase is purely cubic with the L21 structure. The martensitic phases in these alloys are found to host both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling. Due to this coexistence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling

  19. NiO exchange bias layers grown by direct ion beam sputtering of a nickel oxide target

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.P.; Chaiken, A.; Johnson, L.E.; Kim, Y.K.

    1996-03-01

    A new process for fabricating NiO exchange bias layers has been developed. The process involves the direct ion beam sputtering (IBS) of a NiO target. The process is simpler than other deposition techniques for producing NiO buffer layers, and facilitates the deposition of an entire spin-valve layered structure using IBS without breaking vacuum. The layer thickness and temperature dependence of the exchange field for NiO/NiFe films produced using IBS are presented and are similar to those reported for similar films deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering. The magnetic properties of highly textured exchange couples deposited on single crystal substrates are compared to those of simultaneously deposited polycrystalline films, and both show comparable exchange fields. These results are compared to current theories describing the exchange coupling at the NiO/NiFe interface.

  20. Temperature- and magnetic field-dependence of exchange bias in SrCoO2.29 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Huang, H. L.; Lu, Y. L.

    2017-01-01

    A cation's oxidation state in a transition metal oxide may significantly change its physical and chemical properties. In this work, magnetic properties of both cubic SrCoO2.29 and hexagonal SrCoO2.50 ceramics, annealed following a selected yet simple process, have been studied. The SrCoO2.50 ceramics annealed in air displays an unusual paramagnetic property, and the SrCoO2.29 quenched into water shows a short-range ferromagnetic coupling in the antiferromagnetic background. Exchange coupling at the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfaces brings out an obvious exchange bias effect in the SrCoO2.29 sample. Due to its complicated magnetic states, the exchange bias effect presents strong temperature and cooling field dependences.

  1. Self-establishing communities enable cooperative metabolite exchange in a eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Mülleder, Michael; Malmsheimer, Silke; Lawrence, Nicola; Calvani, Enrica; Miller-Fleming, Leonor; Alam, Mohammad T; Christen, Stefan; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-10-26

    Metabolite exchange among co-growing cells is frequent by nature, however, is not necessarily occurring at growth-relevant quantities indicative of non-cell-autonomous metabolic function. Complementary auxotrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid and nucleotide metabolism regularly fail to compensate for each other's deficiencies upon co-culturing, a situation which implied the absence of growth-relevant metabolite exchange interactions. Contrastingly, we find that yeast colonies maintain a rich exometabolome and that cells prefer the uptake of extracellular metabolites over self-synthesis, indicators of ongoing metabolite exchange. We conceived a system that circumvents co-culturing and begins with a self-supporting cell that grows autonomously into a heterogeneous community, only able to survive by exchanging histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine. Compensating for the progressive loss of prototrophy, self-establishing communities successfully obtained an auxotrophic composition in a nutrition-dependent manner, maintaining a wild-type like exometabolome, growth parameters, and cell viability. Yeast, as a eukaryotic model, thus possesses extensive capacity for growth-relevant metabolite exchange and readily cooperates in metabolism within progressively establishing communities.

  2. Self-establishing communities enable cooperative metabolite exchange in a eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Mülleder, Michael; Malmsheimer, Silke; Lawrence, Nicola; Calvani, Enrica; Miller-Fleming, Leonor; Alam, Mohammad T; Christen, Stefan; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite exchange among co-growing cells is frequent by nature, however, is not necessarily occurring at growth-relevant quantities indicative of non-cell-autonomous metabolic function. Complementary auxotrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid and nucleotide metabolism regularly fail to compensate for each other's deficiencies upon co-culturing, a situation which implied the absence of growth-relevant metabolite exchange interactions. Contrastingly, we find that yeast colonies maintain a rich exometabolome and that cells prefer the uptake of extracellular metabolites over self-synthesis, indicators of ongoing metabolite exchange. We conceived a system that circumvents co-culturing and begins with a self-supporting cell that grows autonomously into a heterogeneous community, only able to survive by exchanging histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine. Compensating for the progressive loss of prototrophy, self-establishing communities successfully obtained an auxotrophic composition in a nutrition-dependent manner, maintaining a wild-type like exometabolome, growth parameters, and cell viability. Yeast, as a eukaryotic model, thus possesses extensive capacity for growth-relevant metabolite exchange and readily cooperates in metabolism within progressively establishing communities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09943.001 PMID:26499891

  3. Doping dependent magnetism and exchange bias in CaMn1-xWxO3 manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, V.; Fita, I.; Wisniewski, A.; Puzniak, R.; Mogilyansky, D.; Naumov, S. V.; Mostovshchikova, E. V.; Telegin, S. V.; Gorodetsky, G.; Jung, G.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic properties of CaMn1-xWxO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) have been investigated, and the research was focused on the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon in CaMn0.93W0.07O3. Magnetic ground state was found to be dependent on tungsten doping level and the following states were distinguished: (i) G-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state with a weak ferromagnetic (FM) component at x = 0 and 0.04; (ii) mostly orbitally ordered C-type AFM at x = 0.07 and 0.1. For the studied manganites, spontaneous magnetization increases sharply with increasing doping level reaching M0 ≈ 9.5 emu/g at T = 10 K for x = 0.04, and then decreases rapidly reaching zero for x = 0.1. Exchange bias effect, manifested by vertical and horizontal shifts in the hysteresis loop for field cooled sample, has been observed in CaMn0.93W0.07O3. Exchange bias field, coercivity, remanence asymmetry, and magnetic coercivity depend strongly on temperature, cooling field, and maximal measuring field. Horizontal and vertical shifts of magnetization loop sharply decrease with increasing temperature and vanish above 70 K, whereas coercivity and magnetic coercivity disappear only above 100 K (temperature of transition to the G-type AFM state). The exchange bias field HEB increases with increasing cooling field Hcool and goes through a broad maximum at 40 kOe, while the remanence asymmetry increases monotonously in the entire investigated cooling field range, up to 50 kOe. For the compound with x = 0.07, the size of the FM regions ≈2 nm was estimated from the dependence of exchange bias field HEB upon Hcool. It is suggested that the exchange bias originates from interface exchange coupling between small FM clusters and the G-type AFM phase inside the primary C-type orbitally ordered AFM phase.

  4. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-03-04

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  5. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  6. Contribution of aboveground biomass uncertainty to bias in modeled global net ecosystem exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulter, B.; Delbart, N.; Maignan, F.; Saatchi, S. S.; Sitch, S.; Ciais, P.

    2011-12-01

    Biomass is a key ecosystem property that links biogeochemical fluxes with the accumulation of carbon. The spatial and temporal dynamics of biomass have implications for climate stability and other ecosystem services. Globally, terrestrial forest ecosystems store approximately 383 Pg C in aboveground biomass, about 45% compared to the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Model-data comparisons of aboveground biomass have so far been limited by a lack of wall-to-wall coverage, which has recently been resolved from satellite remote sensing. These recent satellite products use lidar to measure forest structure directly or have developed novel data-fusion techniques. Here, we compare biomass estimates among terrestrial carbon cycle models, and benchmark these estimates with inventory and satellite-based estimates. Using an ensemble of dynamic global vegetation model simulations from the TRENDY archive, we then use the distribution of biomass estimates to evaluate bias in net ecosystem exchange caused by uncertainty from carbon turnover. By identifying detailed model structure and parameters that are linked to carbon turnover, targeted improvements can be made to more realistically simulate aboveground biomass.

  7. Manipulation of Superparamagnetic Beads on Patterned Exchange-Bias Layer Systems for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, Arno; Koch, Iris; Holzinger, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    A technology platform based on a remotely controlled and stepwise transport of an array arrangement of superparamagnetic beads (SPB) for efficient molecular uptake, delivery and accumulation in the context of highly specific and sensitive analyte molecule detection for the application in lab-on-a-chip devices is presented. The near-surface transport of SPBs is realized via the dynamic transformation of the SPBs’ magnetic potential energy landscape above a magnetically stripe patterned Exchange-Bias (EB) thin film layer systems due to the application of sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. In this concept, the SPB velocity is dramatically influenced by the magnitude and gradient of the magnetic field landscape (MFL) above the magnetically stripe patterned EB substrate, the SPB to substrate distance, the magnetic properties of both the SPBs and the EB layer system, respectively, as well as by the properties of the external magnetic field pulses and the surrounding fluid. The focus of this review is laid on the specific MFL design in EB layer systems via light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP). A numerical approach is introduced for the theoretical description of the MFL in comparison to experimental characterization via scanning Hall probe microscopy. The SPB transport mechanism will be outlined in terms of the dynamic interplay between the EB substrate’s MFL and the pulse scheme of the external magnetic field. PMID:26580625

  8. Exchange bias in (La,Ca)MnO3 bilayers: influence of cooling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Parra, E.; Agudelo, J. D.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The exchange bias (EB) phenomenon in La2/3Ca1/3MnO3/La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 bilayers was studied using Monte Carlo simulations combined with the Heisenberg model and the Metropolis algorithm. These simulations were carried out using the model proposed by Kiwi for an uncompensated interface. The Hamiltonian considered several terms corresponding to the nearest neighbor interaction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy and Zeeman effect. Several interactions in the ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AFM) and FM/AFM interface were considered, depending on the type of interacting ion (Mn3+eg, Mn3+eg‧ or Mn4+d3). The influence of field cooling and cooling temperature on the EB was analyzed and discussed. Regarding the field cooling, it caused an increase in the EB until a certain critical value was reached. After that, its effect was almost negligible. On the other hand, at low values of cooling temperature, not only the EB but also the coercive field were enhanced.

  9. Monte Carlo investigation of how interfacial magnetic couplings affect blocking temperature distributions in exchange bias bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhoutellier, G.; Ledue, D.; Patte, R.; Baltz, V.

    2016-11-01

    Exchange bias in ferromagnetic (F)/antiferromagnetic (AF) bilayers is a function of both the bulk properties of the AF layer and the interfacial properties determining the effective interfacial couplings between the F and AF layers. The distinction between bulk and interface can be clearly revealed in blocking temperature distributions, where AF grain volume distribution results in a high-temperature peak while disordered interfacial magnetic phases produce a low-temperature contribution. However, the coupling conditions producing such bimodal blocking temperature distributions remain to be specified. In this article, we use a granular model which accounts for the disordered interfacial phases by considering small magnetic grains (SGs) with weaker anisotropy and coupling with the F grains at the F/AF interface. The SG are included in the AF material. The coupling conditions producing bimodal blocking temperature distributions were determined. Then, using Monte Carlo simulations, these conditions were validated and the effect of interfacial F-SG coupling on distributions was investigated. We next determined how the ratio between F-SG and F-AF couplings could be used to estimate the surface coverage of the disordered interfacial phases from experimental data.

  10. Quenching of the Exchange Bias Training in Fe/Cr2O3/Fe Trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Exchange bias (EB) and its associated training effects are studied in an epitaxial Fe(10 nm)/Cr2O3(2.7 nm)/Fe(10 nm) trilayer heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The EB decreases linearly with increasing temperature from T = 5 K to T = 50 K. It changes sign and becomes positive within 50 K < T < 200 K, finally changing back to regular EB for T<200K up to the highest measured temperature of T = 395 K. Remarkably, the latter is far above the bulk Néel temperature TN = 307 K. EB training effects occur only at 5 K < T < 50 K. We show that this training can be quenched by subjecting the system to DC magnetic field, μ0HDC ⩽ 7 T. The applied field most likely induces a temperature dependent spin-flop transition. Upon its removal the antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 pinning layer evolves uniformly into its quasi-equilibrium spin configuration thus leading to quasi-equilibrium EB.

  11. Asymmetric magnetoresistance in an exchange bias Co/CoO bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Polisetty, Srinivas; Wang, Yi; Mukherjee, Tathagata; He, Xi; Jaswal, Sitaram S.; Binek, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements are carried out on a Co(8 nm)/CoO(3.5 nm) bilayer in the exchange bias (EB) state prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. With the applied magnetic field parallel to the current, the EB MR curves show an asymmetric behavior about the minimum, in contrast to the symmetric one for non-EB systems. We generalize a well-known analytical expression used for the field dependence of the MR of paramagnets. Our generalization incorporates coercivity and EB in a new phenomenological MR expression. Excellent fits of the latter to the experimental MR data are achieved, showing the way to use MR techniques for the quantitative characterization of EB systems. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the EB field obtained from MR loops can be described with a power law, which yields a value of 96.6 K for the EB blocking temperature, which is significantly below the Néel temperature of 293 K for bulk CoO.

  12. Asymmetric magnetoresistance in an exchange bias Co/CoO bilayer.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Polisetty, Srinivas; Wang, Yi; Mukherjee, Tathagata; He, Xi; Jaswal, Sitaram S; Binek, Christian

    2012-03-07

    Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements are carried out on a Co(8 nm)/CoO(3.5 nm) bilayer in the exchange bias (EB) state prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. With the applied magnetic field parallel to the current, the EB MR curves show an asymmetric behavior about the minimum, in contrast to the symmetric one for non-EB systems. We generalize a well-known analytical expression used for the field dependence of the MR of paramagnets. Our generalization incorporates coercivity and EB in a new phenomenological MR expression. Excellent fits of the latter to the experimental MR data are achieved, showing the way to use MR techniques for the quantitative characterization of EB systems. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the EB field obtained from MR loops can be described with a power law, which yields a value of 96.6 K for the EB blocking temperature, which is significantly below the Néel temperature of 293 K for bulk CoO.

  13. Thermal stability of exchange-biased NiFe/FeMn multilayered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. Y.; Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Ong, C. K.

    2012-09-01

    A systematic study of the effect of ferromagnetic thickness on magnetic and microwave properties of exchange-biased NiFe/FeMn multilayered thin films was carried out with regards to thermal stability. The temperature-dependent microwave characteristics of the films were obtained from the near-field microwave microscopy technique and analysed based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The complex microwave permeability spectra of the magnetic thin films up to 5 GHz in the temperature range from room temperature to 420 K were measured. It was found that thicker ferromagnetic layers helped to reduce the dependence of the magnetic properties on temperature, leading to better thermal stability. The saturation magnetization MS, dynamic magnetic anisotropy field HKdyn, and ferromagnetic resonance frequency fFMR were found to decrease with temperature, while the effective damping coefficient αeff was increased with temperature. We also investigate the rotational magnetic anisotropy field HKrot with temperature which gives a measure of the rotatable magnetization of the antiferromagnetic layers and its thermal stability.

  14. Probing boundary magnetization through exchange bias in heterostructures with competing anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Binek, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Cr2O3 (chromia) is a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet with a bulk TN of 307 K. It has been utilized for electrically controlled exchange bias (EB) by taking advantage of voltage-controllable boundary magnetization (BM) occurring as a generic property in magnetoelectric single domain antiferromagnets.[2] In the perpendicular Cr2O3(0001)/CoPd EB system the EB-field shows an order parameter type T-dependence close to TN reflecting the T-dependence of the BM. At about 150 K a decrease of the EB-field sets in with decreasing temperature suggesting canting of the BM. To evidence this mechanism we use EB as a probe. Specifically, we investigate EB in Permalloy(5nm)/Cr2O3 (0001)(100nm) with Permalloy and chromia having competing anisotropies. We measure easy axis magnetic hysteresis loops via longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect for various temperatures after perpendicular and in-plane magnetic field-cooling. The T-dependence of the EB field supports the canting mechanism. In addition to the all thin film EB system, we explore a Permalloy(10nm)/Cr2O3(0001 single crystal) heterostructure where magnetoelectric annealing allows selecting Cr2O3 single domain states. Here the effect of T-dependent canting of the BM is compared with findings in the complementary perpendicular EB system. Financial support by NSF through MRSEC and the Nanoelectronic Research Initiative.

  15. Switching of perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/Pt/α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt layered structure using magneto-electric effect

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu Kobane, Atsushi; Harimoto, Shotaro; Onoue, Satoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2015-05-07

    Switching of the perpendicular exchange bias polarity using a magneto-electric (ME) effect of α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated. From the change in the exchange bias field with the electric field during the ME field cooling, i.e., the simultaneous application of both magnetic and electric fields during the cooling, we determined the threshold electric field to switch the perpendicular exchange bias polarity. It was found that the threshold electric field was inversely proportional to the magnetic field indicating that the EH product was constant. The high EH product was required to switch the exchange bias for the film possessing the high exchange anisotropy energy density, which suggests that the energy gain by the ME effect has to overcome the interfacial exchange coupling energy to reverse the interfacial antiferromagnetic spin.

  16. The Effect of Interface Texture on Exchange Biasing in Ni(80)Fe(20)/Ir(20)Mn(80) System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Tsung

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-biasing phenomenon can induce an evident unidirectional hysteresis loop shift by spin coupling effect in the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) interface which can be applied in magnetoresistance random access memory (MRAM) and recording-head applications. However, magnetic properties are the most important to AFM texturing. In this work, top-configuration exchange-biasing NiFe/IrMn(x A) systems have been investigated with three different conditions. From the high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR X-TEM) and X-ray diffraction results, we conclude that the IrMn (111) texture plays an important role in exchange-biasing field (H(ex)) and interfacial exchange energy (J(k)). H(ex) and J(k) tend to saturate when the IrMn thickness increases. Moreover, the coercivity (H(c)) dependence on IrMn thickness is explained based on the coupling or decoupling effect between the spins of the NiFe and IrMn layers near the NiFe/IrMn interface. In this work, the optimal values for H(ex) and J(k) are 115 Oe and 0.062 erg/cm(2), respectively.

  17. The Effect of Interface Texture on Exchange Biasing in Ni80Fe20/Ir20Mn80System

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-biasing phenomenon can induce an evident unidirectional hysteresis loop shift by spin coupling effect in the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) interface which can be applied in magnetoresistance random access memory (MRAM) and recording-head applications. However, magnetic properties are the most important to AFM texturing. In this work, top-configuration exchange-biasing NiFe/IrMn(x Å) systems have been investigated with three different conditions. From the high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR X-TEM) and X-ray diffraction results, we conclude that the IrMn (111) texture plays an important role in exchange-biasing field (Hex) and interfacial exchange energy (Jk).HexandJktend to saturate when the IrMn thickness increases. Moreover, the coercivity (Hc) dependence on IrMn thickness is explained based on the coupling or decoupling effect between the spins of the NiFe and IrMn layers near the NiFe/IrMn interface. In this work, the optimal values forHexandJkare 115 Oe and 0.062 erg/cm2, respectively. PMID:20596365

  18. Giant Perpendicular Exchange Bias in a Subnanometer Inverted (Co /Pt )n/Co /IrMn Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiafeng; Liu, H. F.; Wei, H. X.; Zhang, X.-G.; Ren, Yong; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Wang, J. P.; Han, X. F.

    2017-05-01

    We report a giant perpendicular exchange bias Hexper exhibited in the R -H curves of an inverted (Co /Pt )n/Co /IrMn multilayer and an inverted (Co /Pt )n/Co /Cu /(Co /Pt )4/Co /IrMn spin-valve structure, in which the Pt layers are only 1 /4 nm in thickness and thinner than the Co layers. Hexper shows an unusual linear scaling with the repetition n +1 of the (Co /Pt )n/Co free layer, reaching 792 Oe for n +1 =9 . In contrast, the in-plane exchange bias Hexin is almost constant. This effect originates from Co /IrMn interfacial magnetic coupling in the inverted (Co /Pt )4/Co /IrMn reference layer and is magnified by a near-perpendicular exchange coupling between the interface Co layer and the multilayer (Co /Pt )n (n =4 for the spin-valve structures) in the reference layer. The latter also leads to a linear scaling of the exchange bias with the number of repetitions of Co /Pt in the reference layer.

  19. Martensitic transition, magnetic, magnetocaloric and exchange bias properties of Fe-substituted Mn-Ni-Sn Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Suresh, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    In this report, effect of Fe substitution on martensitic transition, magnetic, magnetocaloric and exchange bias (EB) properties of Mn50Ni40-xFexSn10 (x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 3) Heusler alloys series has been investigated systematically. Fe substitution has been found to affect the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interactions significantly in both the martensite and austenite phases. Martensitic transition temperature decreases with increasing Fe content, which is attributed to the decrease in number of average valence electrons per atom (e/a ratio) of these alloys. Large magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) and refrigerant capacity (RC) have been observed in these alloys, as a maximum ΔSM of 12.6 J/kg. K is observed for composition x=0.5. Present alloys have also been found to show large exchange bias properties, as maximum exchange bias fields (HEB) of 890 Oe and 810 Oe are observed for x=0 and 0.5, respectively at 5 K. Composition and temperature dependencies of EB are associated with the change in exchange anisotropy at interfaces of competing magnetic phases. Study of minor loop and training effect also corroborates with the presence of EB in these alloys.

  20. Negative magnetization and exchange bias effect in Ni1.4Mn2Ga0.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagami, Abdullah; Khan, Mahmud

    Ni-Mn-X based Heusler alloys have attracted significant interest in recent years due to their multifunctional properties. Exchange bias (EB) is one such property that results from competing magnetic interactions in these alloys. The EB effect is typically observed in materials where ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions co-exist. Since the discovery of EB effect in CoO (AFM) coated Co (FM) nanoparticles by Meikle John and Bean in 1956, a significant amount of research efforts have been made on this subject. Here, we have performed an experimental study on the magnetic and exchange bias properties of polycrystalline Ni1.4Mn2Ga0.6 alloy by X-ray diffraction, dc magnetization, and ac susceptibility measurements. The material exhibits a ferromagnetic Curie temperature of ~300 K. The magnetization versus field data obtained at 5 K under zero field condition exhibits a double shifted hysteresis loop that disappears at higher temperatures. When the sample is cooled from room temperature to 5 K in applied magnetic fields, exchange bias is observed, whose magnitude is strongly dependent on the cooling field. A maximum exchange bias field of 730 Oe is observed under field cooling condition at 5 K. A negative magnetization is observed in the magnetization versus temperature data obtained at magnetic fields smaller than 75 Oe. The experimental results are explained in terms of the competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interaction that exist in the materials due to the Mn atoms occupying multiple crystalline sites resulting in a spin glass-type frustrated ground state.

  1. Disambiguation of Necker cube rotation by monocular and binocular depth cues: relative effectiveness for establishing long-term bias.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Sarah J; Backus, Benjamin T; Jain, Anshul

    2011-05-11

    The apparent direction of rotation of perceptually bistable wire-frame (Necker) cubes can be conditioned to depend on retinal location by interleaving their presentation with cubes that are disambiguated by depth cues (Haijiang, Saunders, Stone, & Backus, 2006; Harrison & Backus, 2010a). The long-term nature of the learned bias is demonstrated by resistance to counter-conditioning on a consecutive day. In previous work, either binocular disparity and occlusion, or a combination of monocular depth cues that included occlusion, internal occlusion, haze, and depth-from-shading, were used to control the rotation direction of disambiguated cubes. Here, we test the relative effectiveness of these two sets of depth cues in establishing the retinal location bias. Both cue sets were highly effective in establishing a perceptual bias on Day 1 as measured by the perceived rotation direction of ambiguous cubes. The effect of counter-conditioning on Day 2, on perceptual outcome for ambiguous cubes, was independent of whether the cue set was the same or different as Day 1. This invariance suggests that a common neural population instantiates the bias for rotation direction, regardless of the cue set used. However, in a further experiment where only disambiguated cubes were presented on Day 1, perceptual outcome of ambiguous cubes during Day 2 counter-conditioning showed that the monocular-only cue set was in fact more effective than disparity-plus-occlusion for causing long-term learning of the bias. These results can be reconciled if the conditioning effect of Day 1 ambiguous trials in the first experiment is taken into account (Harrison & Backus, 2010b). We suggest that monocular disambiguation leads to stronger bias either because it more strongly activates a single neural population that is necessary for perceiving rotation, or because ambiguous stimuli engage cortical areas that are also engaged by monocularly disambiguated stimuli but not by disparity-disambiguated stimuli

  2. Disambiguation of Necker cube rotation by monocular and binocular depth cues: Relative effectiveness for establishing long-term bias

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Benjamin T.; Jain, Anshul

    2011-01-01

    The apparent direction of rotation of perceptually bistable wire-frame (Necker) cubes can be conditioned to depend on retinal location by interleaving their presentation with cubes that are disambiguated by depth cues (Haijiang, Saunders, Stone & Backus, 2006; Harrison & Backus, 2010a). The long-term nature of the learned bias is demonstrated by resistance to counter-conditioning on a consecutive day. In previous work, either binocular disparity and occlusion, or a combination of monocular depth cues that included occlusion, internal occlusion, haze, and depth-from-shading, were used to control the rotation direction of disambiguated cubes. Here, we test the relative effectiveness of these two sets of depth cues in establishing the retinal location bias. Both cue sets were highly effective in establishing a perceptual bias on Day 1 as measured by the perceived rotation direction of ambiguous cubes. The effect of counter-conditioning on Day 2, on perceptual outcome for ambiguous cubes, was independent of whether the cue set was the same or different as Day 1. This invariance suggests that a common neural population instantiates the bias for rotation direction, regardless of the cue-set used. However, in a further experiment where only disambiguated cubes were presented on Day 1, perceptual outcome of ambiguous cubes during Day 2 counter-conditioning showed that the monocular-only cue set was in fact more effective than disparity-plus-occlusion for causing long-term learning of the bias. These results can be reconciled if the conditioning effect of Day 1 ambiguous trials in the first experiment is taken into account (Harrison & Backus, 2010b). We suggest that monocular disambiguation leads to stronger bias either because it more strongly activates a single neural population that is necessary for perceiving rotation, or because ambiguous stimuli engage cortical areas that are also engaged by monocularly disambiguated stimuli but not by disparity-disambiguated stimuli

  3. Crystal-Orientation-Modulated Exchange Bias in Orthorhombic-YMnO3/La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 Multiferroic Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongxing; Gong, Junlu; Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Bai, Haili

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic properties of the all-oxide multiferroic heterostructures composed of orthorhombic YMnO3 (YMO) with E-type antiferromagnetic and double-exchange ferromagnetic (FM) La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (LSMO) were studied. An orientation-modulated exchange bias effect, which is related to the interfacial Mn-O-Mn bond angle, was discovered. Because of the large bond angle in YMO/LSMO(100) heterostructures, a strong exchange coupling at the interface is formed. This strong exchange coupling sustains an FM phase in YMO at the interface region. The FM phase with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy contributes to the vertical shift and exchange bias effect in (100) orientation heterostructures. When LSMO (110) and (111) were layered with YMO, the Mn-O-Mn bond angle was reduced, leading to a weakened exchange coupling at the interface, and only a relatively small exchange bias at low temperatures was visible.

  4. Spinel ferrite/MnO core/shell nanoparticles: chemical synthesis of all-oxide exchange biased architectures.

    PubMed

    Masala, Ombretta; Seshadri, Ram

    2005-07-06

    In this communication, we report the synthesis and characterization of organic-capped core/shell CoFe2O4/MnO nanoparticles. Magnetic properties of the core/shell nanoparticles were compared to those of individual CoFe2O4 and MnO nanoparticles prepared with similar methods. Magnetic measurements revealed that the core/shell nanoparticles displayed a shift in the hysteresis loops corresponding to exchange biasing exchange fields of about 0.6 kOe, due to the ferrimagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface.

  5. Compensation temperatures and exchange bias in La1.5Ca0.5CoIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrim, L. T.; Bittar, E. M.; Stavale, F.; Garcia, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Abbate, M.; Mossanek, R. J. O.; Martins, H. P.; Tobia, D.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Bufaiçal, L.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the study of magnetic properties of the La1.5Ca0.5CoIrO6 double perovskite. Via ac magnetic susceptibility we have observed evidence of weak ferromagnetism and reentrant spin glass behavior on an antiferromagnetic matrix. Regarding the magnetic behavior as a function of temperature, we have found that the material displays up to three inversions of its magnetization, depending on the appropriate choice of the applied magnetic field. At low temperature, the material exhibits exchange bias effect when it is cooled in the presence of a magnetic field. Also, our results indicate that this effect may be observed even when the system is cooled at zero field. Supported by other measurements and also by electronic structure calculations, we discuss the magnetic reversals and spontaneous exchange bias effect in terms of magnetic phase separation and magnetic frustration of Ir4 + ions located between the antiferromagnetically coupled Co ions.

  6. Size dependent training of exchange bias effect in CuFe2O4/CuO nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. X.; Zhu, C. M.; Huang, S.; Tian, Z. M.; Yuan, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependent training of exchange bias effect in CuFe2O4/CuO nanocomposites has been investigated in this report. The analysis of coercive field versus cycle numbers predict two mechanisms (athermal effect and conventional thermal activation) exist in the training process. The athermal effect is concerned to result the abrupt decrease at first cycle, while the conventional thermal activation is responsible for the gradual reduction of the subsequent cycles. Size depends on relative change of exchange bias field (HEB) and enhancement of coercivity (ΔHC) show a nonmonotonic change. The decay rate of normalized HEB and ΔHC with field cycles are different, supporting dual behaviors of uncompensated spins at the interface. The frozen uncompensated antiferromagnetic spins are responsible for the HEB reduction, while the ΔHC change has correlation to the rotatable uncompensated antiferromagnetic spins at the FM/AFM interface.

  7. Imaging and Electric Control of Boundary Magnetization and Exchange Bias in Chromia and Chromia/CoPd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yi; Wysocki, Alekasander; Komesu, Takashi; Belashchenko, Kirill; Dowben, Peter; Binek, Christian; Lanke, Uday; Caruso, Anthony; Vescovo, Elio

    2011-03-01

    Promising spintronic concepts utilize electric control of boundary magnetization. Symmetry arguments predict that the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet (AF) Cr 2 O3 , has a roughness insensitive surface magnetization which is coupled to the bulk AF order parameter. We provide macroscopic and microscopic evidence for this surface magnetization and its electric control. The latter is exploited in perpendicular exchange bias heterostructures where a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer is deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr 2 O3 single crystal. These heterostructures show reversible, room-temperature voltage-controlled switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values. This work is supported by NSF Career, NSF MRSEC, NRI, and Research Corporation. Xi He, et al. Nature Materials 9, 579 (2010)

  8. Large spontaneous exchange bias in a weak ferromagnet Pb6Ni9(TeO6)5.

    PubMed

    Koteswararao, B; Chakrabarty, Tanmoy; Basu, Tathamay; Hazra, Binoy Krishna; Srinivasarao, P V; Paulose, P L; Srinath, S

    2017-08-15

    We report the magnetic and dielectric behavior of Pb6Ni9(TeO6)5, a new compound comprising the honeycomb-like layers of S = 1 spins, through detailed structural, magnetic and dielectric investigation. An antiferromagnetic-type transition at 25 K (T N ) with weak-ferromagnetic behavior is revealed. Interestingly, a large value of coercive field of 1.32 T at 2 K is observed. The isothermal magnetization after zero-field-cooled condition, it exhibits the presence of large spontaneous exchange bias (SEB) with a magnitude of 0.19 T at 2 K; which is rare in single bulk materials, especially without external doping. The value of |H EB| further enhances to 0.24 T under 16 T field-cooled condition, confirming the presence of large exchange bias in the material.

  9. Observation of pure inverse spin Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals via ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic exchange-bias structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Wan, C. H.; Yuan, Z. H.; Zhang, X.; Jiang, J.; Zhang, Q. T.; Wen, Z. C.; Han, X. F.

    2015-08-01

    We report that the spin current generated by the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) can be detected by a ferromagnetic metal (NiFe). By using the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AFM) exchange bias structure (NiFe/IrMn), the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and planar Nernst effect (PNE) of NiFe can be unambiguously separated, allowing us to observe a pure ISHE signal. After eliminating the in-plane temperature gradient in NiFe, we can even observe a pure ISHE signal without PNE from NiFe itself. It is worth noting that a large spin Hall angle (0.098) of NiFe is obtained, which is comparable with Pt. This work provides a kind of FM/AFM exchange bias structure to detect the spin current by charge signals, and highlights that ISHE in ferromagnetic metals can be used in spintronic research and applications.

  10. Effect of pulsed laser irradiation on the structural and the magnetic properties of NiMn/Co exchange bias system

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanan, Senthilnathan; Diebolder, Rolf; Hibst, Raimund; Herr, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    We report about the influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the structural and magnetic properties of NiMn/Co thin films. Rocking curve measurements showed a significant improvement of the (111) texture of NiMn after laser irradiation which was accompanied by grain growth. We have studied the ordering transition in as-prepared and irradiated (laser fluence of 0.15 J/cm{sup 2}) samples during subsequent annealing. The onset of the fcc to fct phase transformation occurs at 325 deg. C irrespective of laser irradiation. Exchange bias fields for the laser irradiated samples are higher than those of the as-prepared samples. The observed increase in the exchange bias field for laser irradiated samples has been attributed to the increased grain size and the improved (111) texture of the NiMn layer after laser irradiation.

  11. Experimental evidence of spin glass and exchange bias behavior in sputtered grown α-MnO2 nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Sanger, Amit; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Mohit; Chandra, Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    Here, we present a single-step process to synthesize the α-MnO2 nanorods forest using reactive DC magnetron sputtering for the application of magnetic memories. The structural and morphological properties of the α-MnO2 nanorods were systematically studied using numerous analytical techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The magnetic measurements suggest that the α-MnO2 nanorods exhibit spin glass and exchange bias behaviour at low temperature. Such low temperature behaviour is explained by the core-shell type structure of nanorods. Antiferromagnetic core and shell of uncompensated ferromagnetic spins leads to the formation of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (AFM/FM) interfaces, which originates exchange bias in the sample.

  12. 47 CFR 63.66 - Closure of or reduction of hours of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... telephone exchanges at military establishments. 63.66 Section 63.66 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS..., REDUCTION, OUTAGE AND IMPAIRMENT OF SERVICE BY COMMON CARRIERS; AND GRANTS OF RECOGNIZED PRIVATE OPERATING... of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments. Where a carrier desires to close...

  13. 47 CFR 63.66 - Closure of or reduction of hours of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments. Where a carrier desires to close or reduce hours of service at a telephone exchange located at a military establishment because of the... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Closure of or reduction of hours of service...

  14. Enhanced Conformational Sampling Using Replica Exchange with Concurrent Solute Scaling and Hamiltonian Biasing Realized in One Dimension

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Replica exchange (REX) is a powerful computational tool for overcoming the quasi-ergodic sampling problem of complex molecular systems. Recently, several multidimensional extensions of this method have been developed to realize exchanges in both temperature and biasing potential space or the use of multiple biasing potentials to improve sampling efficiency. However, increased computational cost due to the multidimensionality of exchanges becomes challenging for use on complex systems under explicit solvent conditions. In this study, we develop a one-dimensional (1D) REX algorithm to concurrently combine the advantages of overall enhanced sampling from Hamiltonian solute scaling and the specific enhancement of collective variables using Hamiltonian biasing potentials. In the present Hamiltonian replica exchange method, termed HREST-BP, Hamiltonian solute scaling is applied to the solute subsystem, and its interactions with the environment to enhance overall conformational transitions and biasing potentials are added along selected collective variables associated with specific conformational transitions, thereby balancing the sampling of different hierarchical degrees of freedom. The two enhanced sampling approaches are implemented concurrently allowing for the use of a small number of replicas (e.g., 6 to 8) in 1D, thus greatly reducing the computational cost in complex system simulations. The present method is applied to conformational sampling of two nitrogen-linked glycans (N-glycans) found on the HIV gp120 envelope protein. Considering the general importance of the conformational sampling problem, HREST-BP represents an efficient procedure for the study of complex saccharides, and, more generally, the method is anticipated to be of general utility for the conformational sampling in a wide range of macromolecular systems. PMID:26082676

  15. Exchange bias beyond the superparamagnetic blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet in a Ni-NiO nanoparticulate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Aparna; De Toro, J. A.; Amaral, V. S.; Muniz, P.; Riveiro, J. M.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2014-02-01

    We report magnetic and exchange bias studies on Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems synthesized by a two-step process, namely, chemical reduction of a Ni salt followed by air annealing of the dried precipitate in the temperature range 400-550 °C. Size of Ni and NiO crystallites as estimated from X-ray diffraction line broadening ranges between 10.5-13.5 nm and 2.3-4 nm, respectively. The magneto-thermal plots (M-T) of these bi-magnetic samples show a well developed peak in the vicinity of 130 K. This has been identified as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature "TB" of NiO. Interestingly, all samples exhibit exchange bias even above their respective NiO blocking temperatures, right up to 300 K, the maximum temperature of measurement. This is in contrast to previous reports since exchange bias requires the antiferromagnetic NiO to have a stable direction of its moment in order to pin the ferromagnet (Ni) magnetization, whereas such stability is unlikely above TB since the NiO is superparamagnetic, its moment flipping under thermal activation. Our observation is elucidated by taking into account the core-shell morphology of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles whereby clustering of some of these nanoparticles connects their NiO shells to form extended continuous regions of NiO, which because of their large size remain blocked at T > TB, with thermally stable spins capable of pinning the Ni cores and giving rise to exchange bias. The investigated samples may thus be envisaged as being constituted of both isolated core-shell Ni-NiO nanoparticles as well as clustered ones, with TB denoting the blocking temperature of the NiO shell of the isolated particles.

  16. Exchange bias beyond the superparamagnetic blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet in a Ni-NiO nanoparticulate system

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Aparna E-mail: aparnaroy15@gmail.com; Ferreira, J. M. F.; De Toro, J. A.; Muniz, P.; Riveiro, J. M.; Amaral, V. S.

    2014-02-21

    We report magnetic and exchange bias studies on Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems synthesized by a two-step process, namely, chemical reduction of a Ni salt followed by air annealing of the dried precipitate in the temperature range 400–550 °C. Size of Ni and NiO crystallites as estimated from X–ray diffraction line broadening ranges between 10.5–13.5 nm and 2.3–4 nm, respectively. The magneto-thermal plots (M-T) of these bi-magnetic samples show a well developed peak in the vicinity of 130 K. This has been identified as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature “T{sub B}” of NiO. Interestingly, all samples exhibit exchange bias even above their respective NiO blocking temperatures, right up to 300 K, the maximum temperature of measurement. This is in contrast to previous reports since exchange bias requires the antiferromagnetic NiO to have a stable direction of its moment in order to pin the ferromagnet (Ni) magnetization, whereas such stability is unlikely above T{sub B} since the NiO is superparamagnetic, its moment flipping under thermal activation. Our observation is elucidated by taking into account the core-shell morphology of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles whereby clustering of some of these nanoparticles connects their NiO shells to form extended continuous regions of NiO, which because of their large size remain blocked at T > T{sub B}, with thermally stable spins capable of pinning the Ni cores and giving rise to exchange bias. The investigated samples may thus be envisaged as being constituted of both isolated core-shell Ni-NiO nanoparticles as well as clustered ones, with T{sub B} denoting the blocking temperature of the NiO shell of the isolated particles.

  17. Exchange bias between ferromagnetic metals and multiferroic BiFeO3, LuMnO3, and TbMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Makoto; Fujino, S.; Hattrick-Simpers, J.; Lim, S.-H.; Salamanca-Riba, L.; Kundaliya, D.; Ogale, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Higgins, J.; Wuttig, M.; Takeuchi, I.; Lofland, S.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2007-03-01

    We are using exchange bias at ferromagnet layer/multiferroic interfaces to study the nature of magnetism in multiferroic materials. Co 5 nm layers have been deposited by sputtering on surfaces of epitaxial BiFeO3 and TbMnO3 thin films and on LuMnO3 single crystals. Epitaxial BiFeO3 and TbMnO3 films were prepared by PLD. Magnetic properties of the Co/multiferroic bilayers are measured using SQUID, VSM, MOKE and XMCD. In BiFeO3, we find that the bilayers exhibit exchange bias even at room temperature. In the TbMnO3 system, increasing of coercive field and exchange bias was also clearly observed below the N'eel temperature. In LuMnO3, we observe positive exchange bias as well as switching of the sign of the exchange bias depending on the cooling procedure. This behavior may be related to the frustration in Mn spins. Difference in the exchange bias behavior between different multiferroic materials will be discussed. The effect of electric field on exchange bias is currently under investigation. Supported by ONR N000140110761, ONR N000140410085, NSF DMR 0094265, DMR 0231291, MRSEC DMR-00-0520471, and the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Bias-Exchange Metadynamics Simulations: An Efficient Strategy for the Analysis of Conduction and Selectivity in Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Domene, Carmen; Barbini, Paolo; Furini, Simone

    2015-04-14

    Conduction through ion channels possesses two interesting features: (i) different ionic species are selected with high-selectivity and (ii) ions travel across the channel with rates approaching free-diffusion. Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to reveal how these processes take place at the atomic level. However, analysis of conduction and selectivity at atomistic detail is still hampered by the short time scales accessible by computer simulations. Several algorithms have been developed to "accelerate" sampling along the slow degrees of freedom of the process under study and thus to probe longer time scales. In these algorithms, the slow degrees of freedom need to be defined in advance, which is a well-known shortcoming. In the particular case of ion conduction, preliminary assumptions about the number and type of ions participating in the permeation process need to be made. In this study, a novel approach for the analysis of conduction and selectivity based on bias-exchange metadynamics simulations was tested. This approach was compared with umbrella sampling simulations, using a model of a Na(+)-selective channel. Analogous conclusions resulted from both techniques, but the computational cost of bias-exchange simulations was lower. In addition, with bias-exchange metadynamics it was possible to calculate free energy profiles in the presence of a variable number and type of permeating ions. This approach might facilitate the definition of the set of collective variables required to analyze conduction and selectivity in ion channels.

  19. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.

  20. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    DOE PAGES

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; ...

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatchmore » between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.« less

  1. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wustite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite

  2. Origin of the exchange bias training effects in magnetically coupled soft/hard synthetic bilayers at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalçın, Orhan; Ünlüer, Şahin; Kazan, Sinan; Şahingöz, Recep

    2015-02-01

    Hysteresis loops of the nanoscale magnetic layer Co90Fe10 and Ni81Fe19 and bilayer Co90Fe10/Ni81Fe19 and Ni81Fe19/Co90Fe10 films were measured as a function of external dc magnetic field and the thickness dependence of these films were plotted as a function of temperature. Time evolution of the minor/middle/major hysteresis loops of 5/5 nm-thick Ni81Fe19/Co90Fe10 monolayer have been observed at 10 K. The spin valve, exchange bias training and Barkhausen effects for magnetic layer and bilayer films have been analysed at various temperatures, thicknesses and different orientations according to the substrate. The exchange-bias training effects have been observed only in positive magnetization region. Origin of the exchange-bias training effects and asymmetric hysteresis loops are related to the relaxation mechanism of a pinning layer in magnetically coupled soft/hard bilayers.

  3. Exchange bias induced at a Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/Cr interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. N. T.; Vick, A. J.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Frost, W.; Hirohata, A.

    2017-03-01

    In order to engineer the strength of an exchange bias in a cubic Heusler alloy layer, crystalline strain has been induced at a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface by their lattice mismatch in addition to the conventional interfacial exchange coupling between them. Such interfaces have been formed in (Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5(CFAS)/Cr)3 structures grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The magnetic and structural properties have been characterised to investigate the exchange interactions at the CFAS/Cr interfaces. Due to the interfacial lattice mismatch of 1.4%, the maximum offset of 18 Oe in a magnetisation curve has been measured for the case of a CFAS (2 nm)/Cr (0.9 nm) interface at 193 K. The half-metallic property of CFAS has been observed to remain unchanged, which agrees with the theoretical prediction by Culbert et al (2008 J. Appl. Phys. 103 07D707). Such a strain-induced exchange bias may provide insight of the interfacial interactions and may offer a wide flexibility in spintronic device design.

  4. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics in crystalline ferromagnets and exchange-biased systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David Michael

    Time-resolved ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements are performed using a pump-probe technique with a non-optical pump to observe precession and relaxation of the magnetization in epitaxial magnetic thin films at temperatures down to 5 K. Spatial localization achieved through use of an optical probe allows a direct measurement of spin relaxation, reducing the effects of inhomogeneous dephasing relative to probes of larger areas, while the use of low fields allows a study of dynamics throughout the entire magnetization reversal process. The reversal mechanism of FexCo1-x is probed as a function of cubic and uniaxial anisotropy strengths, using FMR as a direct probe of the free energy surface. A coherent rotation model describes the reversal for fields up through 700 Oe, failing only for fields near 105 Oe applied along the GaAs [01 1¯] direction where nucleation of nearly perpendicular domains is observed. Measurements of the Gilbert damping parameter alpha indicate that it is smaller for fields applied along the [01 1¯] direction than for fields along [011] or [010]. Dynamic interactions between local moments and itinerant carriers are examined in the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMn xAs. Holes and local moments are found to precess together on timescales greater than 50 ps. Although previous experiments by other groups have observed a change in the magnetization due to introduction of photoexcited carriers, our measurements indicate no dynamical change in magnetization due to additional optically pumped carriers. The Gilbert damping parameter alpha is observed to increase more than twofold as temperature is raised from 20 K to the Curie temperature, although the decay time remains nearly independent of temperature over this range. Exchange-biased Fe/FeF2 is found to exhibit temperature-dependent anisotropy above its Neel temperature (78 K), while the anisotropy of structurally similar Fe/MnF2 remains independent of temperature above TN = 67 K. Dynamic

  5. Positive exchange-bias and giant vertical hysteretic shift in La0.3Sr0.7FeO3/SrRuO3 bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Rakesh; Pandey, Parul; Singh, R. P.; Rana, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The exchange-bias effects in the mosaic epitaxial bilayers of the itinerant ferromagnet (FM) SrRuO3 and the antiferromagnetic (AFM) charge-ordered La0.3Sr0.7FeO3 were investigated. An uncharacteristic low-field positive exchange bias, a cooling-field driven reversal of positive to negative exchange-bias and a layer thickness optimised unusual vertical magnetization shift were all novel facets of exchange bias realized for the first time in magnetic oxides. The successive magnetic training induces a transition from positive to negative exchange bias regime with changes in domain configurations. These observations are well corroborated by the hysteretic loop asymmetries which display the modifications in the AFM spin correlations. These exotic features emphasize the key role of i) mosaic disorder induced subtle interplay of competing AFM-superexchange and FM double exchange at the exchange biased interface and, ii) training induced irrecoverable alterations in the AFM spin structure. PMID:24569516

  6. Monte Carlo study of the exchange bias effect in Co/CoO core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsopoulos, A.; Kechrakos, D.

    2017-07-01

    We study the magnetic properties of cylindrical ferromagnetic core—antiferromagnetic shell nanowires using Monte Carlo simulations and a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian in order to elucidate the impact of the oxidized shell on the magnetic properties and the magnetization reversal mechanism. We find that the coupling to the antiferromagnetic shell leads to suppression of the coercivity and emergence of a weak exchange bias effect. Comparison of the magnetization reversal mechanism in the bare and the surface-oxidized nanowire reveals that the domain wall propagation and annihilation remains the dominant reversal mechanism in surface oxidized nanowires as in their ferromagnetic counterparts. However, the interface exchange coupling introduces a secondary reversal mechanism activated in the central part of the wire with characteristics of coherent rotation, which acts in synergy to wall propagation leading to enhancement of the wall mobility. This effect is more pronounced in nanowires with large exchange bias values and is attributed to the uncompensated interface moments that act as nucleation centers for magnetization reversal. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements in Co and Co/CoO nanowires.

  7. Off-easy-plane antiferromagnetic spin canting in coupled FePt/NiO bilayer structure with perpendicular exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tenghua; Itokawa, Nobuhide; Wang, Jian; Yu, Youxing; Harumoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2016-08-01

    We report on the investigation of perpendicular exchange bias in FePt (001 ) /NiO (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) orthogonal exchange couple with FePt partially L 10 ordered. From initial magnetization curve measurement and magnetic domain imaging, we find that, for the as-grown bilayer structure, the FePt layer experiences a small-angle magnetization rotation when it is magnetized near to saturation in film normal direction. After field cooling, the bilayer structure shows a significant enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, indicating the field mediated coupling between the spins across the FePt/NiO interface. According to Koon's theoretical calculation on the basis of lowest energy ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling configuration for compensated spins at antiferromagnetic side, we consider slightly slanted Ni spins at the interface off the (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) easy plane can stabilize the spin coupling between FePt and NiO and result in the observed exchange bias in this paper. This consideration was further confirmed by stripe domain width calculation.

  8. Exchange-biased SiO2/Co/CoO granular multilayers deposited by sequential sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamino, M.; Michea, S.; Denardin, J. C.; Schelp, L. F.; Correa, M. A.; Bohn, F.; Dorneles, L. S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties in a system engineered to present Co grains laterally surrounded by a CoO matrix. By considering ferromagnetic SiO2/Co/CoO granular multilayers produced by sequential sputtering deposition, we verify that the Co grains present strong interfacial exchange coupling with the CoO matrix, assigned by the exchange bias effect as well as the raise of the Co blocking temperature. Morever, through magnetization and Hall resistivity experiments, we observe that the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and exchange bias are dependent on the thickness of the antiferromagnetic material, attributed to finite size effects, as well as we find that the Co blocking temperature is raised as the CoO layer becomes thicker. We discuss the experimental results in terms of the growth mode of the layers, morphological properties of the multilayers, and temperature dependence of the magnetic behavior. The results place the sequential sputtering deposition as a promising alternative technique to produce Co/CoO granular multilayers.

  9. Exchange bias effect and glassy-like behavior of EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} nano-powders

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M. Razavi, F. S.; Kremer, R. K.; Trudel, S.

    2015-09-28

    The magnetic properties of nano-sized EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} powders, synthesized by a solution combustion method, were investigated using DC/AC magnetization measurements. An exchange bias effect, magnetization irreversibility and AC susceptibility dispersion in these samples provided evidence for the presence of the spin disorder magnetic phase. The exchange bias phenomenon, which is assigned to the exchange coupling between the glassy-like shell and canted antiferromagnetic core, showed the opposite sign in EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} at low temperatures, suggesting different exchange interactions at the interfaces in these compounds. We also observed a sign reversal of exchange bias in CeCrO{sub 3} at different temperatures.

  10. The Influence of temperature and applied magnetic field on the exchange bias effect of La1.5Ca0.5CoIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrim, L. T.; Bittar, E. M.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bufaiçal, L.

    2017-04-01

    La1.5Ca0.5CoIrO6 is a re-entrant spin-glass double-perovskite that exhibits a non-negligible spontaneous exchange bias effect at low temperatures. When performing magnetization as a function of applied field [M(H)] measurements after cooling the sample in the presence of a magnetic field, the exchange bias is greatly enhanced. In this work we report a detailed investigation of the influence of the maximum applied field (Hm) on the exchange bias effect for M (H) curves measured with and without the presence of an applied field on cooling. In both cases the shift in the hysteresis loops decreases for increasing Hm. We have also investigated the influence of the cooling field on the exchange bias effect. By increasing the applied field on cooling there is an initial increase of the exchange bias, followed by a decrease of the effect for larger cooling fields. A detailed study of the magnetic evolution of the system with temperature showed that despite the enhancement of the coercive field observed at temperatures above the freezing of the spin-glass phase, there is no trace of exchange bias effect at these temperatures. We discuss our results in terms of the pinning of the spins at the magnetic interfaces.

  11. Large exchange bias effect in LaCr0.9Ru0.1O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Babusona; Dalal, Biswajit; De, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    The incorporation of tetravalent Ru (10%) into antiferromagnetic spin structure of LaCrO3 leads to mixed valence states of Cr (Cr2+ and Cr3+). Highly delocalized 4d orbital of Ru induces prominent ferromagnetic (FM) component in antiferromagnetic (AFM) matrix of parent compound. The complex magnetic interaction across the interface of FM and AFM regions gives rise to large exchange bias field (HEB) of about 10 kOe. The inverse and normal magnetocaloric effect for magnetic field up to 50 kOe coexists in a single material due to multiple magnetic phase transitions with temperature.

  12. Exchange bias effect in Co(Cr0.925Fe0.075)2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padam, R.; Pandya, Swati; Ravi, S.; Grover, A. K.; Pal, D.

    2013-02-01

    Single phase sample of 7.5% Fe doped CoCr2O4 i.e. Co(Cr0.925Fe0.075)2O4 was prepared. Temperature and field variation of magnetization shows that the sample exhibits the novel phenomenon of magnetization reversal at compensation temperature Tcomp ˜ 67.8 K. In addition to this, sample is found to exhibit positive and negative exchange bias (EB) at T > Tcomp and T < Tcomp respectively. This is explained in terms of presence of competing interactions.

  13. Current-driven switching of exchange biased spin-valve giant magnetoresistive nanopillars using a conducting nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, J.; Ito, K.; Fujimori, M.; Heike, S.; Hashizume, T.; Steen, J.; Brugger, J.; Ohno, H.

    2004-09-01

    An array of exchange biased spin-valve giant-magnetoresistance nanopillars was fabricated and the current I dependence of the resistance R was investigated using an electrically conducting atomic-force microscope (AFM) probe contact at room temperature. We observed current induced switching in a MnIr /CoFe/Cu/CoFe/NiFe nanopillar using the AFM probe contact. Current-driven switching using nanoprobe contact is a powerful method for developing nonvolatile and rewritable magnetic memory with high density.

  14. Exchange bias effect in Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}AlO{sub 9} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.; Shi, L. R.; Sun, H. G.; Zhu, C. M.; Tian, Z. M.; Yuan, S. L.

    2014-11-10

    The exchange bias (EB) effect is observed in Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}AlO{sub 9} polycrystalline ceramics. The EB field (H{sub EB}), vertical magnetization shift, and coercive field show a strong dependence on the cooling fields. When a larger applied field is used to measure the hysteresis loop, the EB effect is suppressed. The induced spin-glass-like phase via Al{sup 3+} doping is responsible for the EB effect below the spin-glass temperature (T{sub SG}) of ∼25 K. Moreover, the H{sub EB} varies nonmonotonically with temperature above T{sub SG}, which is interpreted using a random field model with the exchange coupling between ferromagnetic clusters and an antiferromagnetic phase.

  15. Enhancing the blocking temperature of perpendicular-exchange biased Cr2O3 thin films using buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Naoki; Pati, Satya Prakash; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sahashi, Masashi

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of buffer layers on the blocking temperature (TB) of perpendicular exchange bias of thin Cr2O3/Co exchange coupled films with a Ru spacer and revealed a high TB of 260 K for 20-nm-thick Cr2O3 thin films. By comparing the TB values of the 20-nm-thick Cr2O3 films on Pt and α-Fe2O3 buffers, we investigated the lattice strain effect on the TB. We show that higher TB values can be obtained using an α-Fe2O3 buffer, which is likely because of the lattice strain-induced increase in Cr2O3 magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  16. Anisotropic behavior of exchange bias effect in tensile-deformed Pt{sub 3}Fe single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Satoru Morita, Ryo

    2015-05-07

    Plastic strain in Pt{sub 3}Fe causes changes in the atomic arrangement around the (111) glide plane and induces ferromagnetism even at room temperature. We have performed detailed magnetization measurements on a Pt{sub 3}Fe single crystal with plastic strains of 11.6% under magnetic fields in various directions with respect to the [100] strain axis in order to elucidate the reversal mechanism of induced ferromagnetic domains. We observed that by decreasing the angle between the magnetization direction and strain axis, hysteresis loops are strongly sheared, which is associated with a large increase in coercivity. We also observed that an exchange bias effect appears for all field orientations, but the exchange field maximizes for an intermediate field direction. On the other hand, both phenomena are insensitive to magnetic fields perpendicular to the [100] strain axis. These observations were explained by a single-domain model with uniaxial anisotropy along the [100] strain axis.

  17. Sign reversal of magnetization and exchange bias in Ni(Cr1-xAlx)2O4 (x=0-0.50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Junmoni; Ravi, S.

    2017-03-01

    Ni(Cr1-xAlx)2O4 (x=0-0.50) samples were prepared in single phase form by using sol-gel method and their structural and magnetic properties were studied. Al substitution transforms the crystal structure of NiCr2O4 from tetragonal cell with space group I41/amd to cubic cell of Fd 3 barm space group. Magnetization measurements by varying the temperature and magnetic field were carried out to investigate the interesting magnetization reversal and exchange bias behaviors. Magnetization reversal is observed for x=0.10 sample with a magnetic compensation temperature of 40 K and it is explained by considering different temperature dependences of magnetic moments of the two sublattices. Shifting of magnetic hysteresis loops towards the negative magnetic field axis and hence the presence of negative exchange bias field is observed for x=0.15 sample. The x=0.10 sample exhibits the tunable positive and negative exchange bias field. Exchange bias in these samples is explained considering the anisotropic exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and the antiferromagnetic components of magnetic spins. However, the sign reversal of exchange bias field is due to the change in domination of one ferrimagnetic sublattice over the other with variation in temperature. Both normal and inverse magnetocaloric effects are observed for x=0.10 sample.

  18. Sign reversal of magnetization and tunable exchange bias field in NdCr1-xFexO3 (x=0.05-0.2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Tribedi; Ravi, S.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetization reversal and tunable exchange bias behavior are observed in NdCr1-xFexO3 compounds for x=0.05-0.20. The magnetic compensation temperature (Tcomp) is found to increase with increase in Fe concentration and its maximum value is 198 K for x=0.15 sample. The observed magnetization reversal is explained by considering the competition between the weak ferromagnetic component of Cr3+ ions and the paramagnetic moments of Nd3+ and Fe3+ ions under the influence of negative internal magnetic field. The exchange anisotropy between the above two components of magnetic moments give rise to tunable positive and negative exchange bias fields. The sign reversal of exchange bias field also coincides with Tcomp. Bipolar switching of magnetization is demonstrated at T

  19. Probing core and shell contributions to exchange bias in Co /Co3O4 nanoparticles of controlled size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, D.; Iglesias, Óscar; Majumdar, S.; Giri, Saurav

    2016-11-01

    Coupling at the interface of core/shell magnetic nanoparticles is known to be responsible for exchange bias (EB) and the relative sizes of core and shell components are supposed to influence the associated phenomenology. In this work, we have prepared core/shell structured nanoparticles with a total average diameter around ˜27 nm and a wide range of shell thicknesses through the controlled oxidation of Co nanoparticles well dispersed in an amorphous silica host. Structural characterizations give compelling evidence of the formation of Co3O4 crystallite phase at the shells surrounding the Co core. Field cooled hysteresis loops display nonmonotonous dependence of the exchange bias HE and coercive HC fields, that become maximum for a sample with an intermediate shell thickness, at which lattice strain is also maximum for both phases. The EB effects persist up to temperatures above the ordering temperature of the oxide shell. Results of our atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of particles with the same size and composition as in experiments are in agreement with the experimental observations and have allowed us to identify a change in the contribution of the interfacial surface spins to the magnetization reversal, giving rise to the observed maximum in HE and HC.

  20. Isothermal electric field-tuning of Exchange bias training in Cr2O3/PdCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, Will; Binek, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias (EB) is investigated in a Cr2O3/PdCo EB heterosystem where a ferromagnetic and perpendicular anisotropic Pd/Co multilayer has been deposited on a (0001) Cr2O3 (chromia) single crystal. The EB of the system arises from chromia's electrically controllable boundary magnetization (BM) which is switched isothermally and at room temperature by magnetoelectric means. The BM couples to the bulk AF order parameter and follows the latter during switching. In the work reported here, we electrically and isothermally tune chromia into distinct AF multi-domain states. As a result, exchange bias training, which originates from triggered rearrangements of the AF domain state of the pinning system during consecutively cycled hysteresis loops, can be tuned in a controlled manner between zero and sizable effects. We quantify the training effect through best fits of our Landau-Khalatnikov analytic expression to the EB vs loop number. The electric field dependence of the fitting parameters is interpreted in terms of the hysteretic E-field dependence of the AF order parameter. This work is supported through the Nebraska Research Initiative (NRI) and by the MRSEC Program of the NSF.

  1. Giant zero field cooled spontaneous exchange bias effect in phase separated La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Venimadhav, A.

    2013-12-16

    We report a giant zero field cooled exchange bias (ZEB) effect (∼0.65 T) in La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} sample. Magnetic study has revealed a reentrant spin glass ∼90 K, phase separation to spin glass and ferromagnetic phases below 50 K and canted antiferromagnetic transition ∼10 K. A small conventional exchange bias (CEB) is established with the advent of spontaneous phase separation down to 10 K. Giant ZEB and enhanced CEB effects are found only below 10 K and are attributed to the large unidirectional anisotropy at the interface of isothermally field induced ferromagnetic phase and canted antiferromagnetic background.

  2. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2013-03-05

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and z but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles a and g. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes.

  3. Methods for preparing polymer-decorated single exchange-biased magnetic nanoparticles for application in flexible polymer-based films

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) must not only be well-defined in composition, shape and size to exhibit the desired properties (e.g., exchange-bias for thermal stability of the magnetization) but also judiciously functionalized to ensure their stability in air and their compatibility with a polymer matrix, in order to avoid aggregation which may seriously affect their physical properties. Dipolar interactions between NPs too close to each other favour a collective magnetic glass state with lower magnetization and coercivity because of inhomogeneous and frustrated macrospin cluster freezing. Consequently, tailoring chemically (through surface functionalization) and magnetically stable NPs for technological applications is of primary importance. Results: In this work, well-characterized exchange-biased perfectly epitaxial CoxFe3− xO4@CoO core@shell NPs, which were isotropic in shape and of about 10 nm in diameter, were decorated by two different polymers, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or polystyrene (PS), using radical-controlled polymerization under various processing conditions. We compared the influence of the synthesis parameters on the structural and microstructural properties of the resulting hybrid systems, with special emphasis on significantly reducing their mutual magnetic attraction. For this, we followed two routes: the first one consists of the direct grafting of bromopropionyl ester groups at the surface of the NPs, which were previously recovered and redispersed in a suitable solvent. The second route deals with an “all in solution” process, based on the decoration of NPs by oleic acid followed by ligand exchange with the desired bromopropionyl ester groups. We then built various assemblies of NPs directly on a substrate or suspended in PMMA. Conclusion: The alternative two-step strategy leads to better dispersed polymer-decorated magnetic particles, and the resulting nanohybrids can be considered as valuable building blocks for

  4. Quantifying biases in non-steady state chamber measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limitations of non-steady state (NSS) chamber methods for determining soil-to-atmosphere trace gas exchange rates have been recognized for several decades. Of these limitations, the so-called “chamber effect” is one of the most challenging to overcome. The chamber effect can be defined as the inhere...

  5. Epitaxial Growth of Intermetallic MnPt Films on Oxides and Large Exchange Bias

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiqi; Biegalski, Michael D; Hsu, Mr. S. L.; Shang, Dr. Shunli; Marker, Cassie; Liu, Jian; Li, Li; Fan, Lisha; Meyer, Tricia L; Wong, Anthony T; Nichols, John A; Chen, Deyang; You, Long; Chen, Zuhuang; Wang, Kai; Wang, Kevin; Ward, Thomas Zac; Gai, Zheng; Lee, Ho Nyung; Sefat, Athena Safa; Lauter, Valeria; Liu, Zi-Kui; Christen, Hans M.

    2015-11-05

    We achieved a high-quality epitaxial growth of inter­metallic MnPt films on oxides, with potential for multiferroic heterostructure applications. Also, antisite-stabilized spin-flipping induces ferromagnetism in MnPt films, although it is robustly antiferromagnetic in bulk. Moreover, highly ordered antiferromagnetic MnPt films exhibit superiorly large exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic layer.

  6. Training-induced inversion of spontaneous exchange bias field on La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufaiçal, L.; Finkler, R.; Coutrim, L. T.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Grossi, C.; Stavale, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    In this work we report the synthesis and structural, electronic and magnetic properties of La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 double-perovskite. This is a re-entrant spin cluster material which exhibits a non-negligible negative exchange bias effect when it is cooled in zero magnetic field from an unmagnetized state down to low temperature. X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and magnetometry results indicate mixed valence state at Co site, leading to competing magnetic phases and uncompensated spins at the magnetic interfaces. We compare the results for this Ca-doped material with those reported for the resemblant compound La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6, and discuss the much smaller spontaneous exchange bias effect observed for the former in terms of its structural and magnetic particularities. For La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6, when successive magnetization loops are carried, the spontaneous exchange bias field inverts its sign from negative to positive from the first to the second measurement. We discuss this behavior based on the disorder at the magnetic interfaces, related to the presence of a glassy phase. This compound also exhibits a large conventional exchange bias, for which there is no sign inversion of the exchange bias field for consecutive cycles.

  7. Effect of shell thickness on the exchange bias blocking temperature and coercivity in Co-CoO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Reethu, K.; Thanveer, T.; Myint, M. T. Z.; Al-Harthi, S. H.

    2017-08-01

    The exchange bias blocking temperature distribution of naturally oxidized Co-CoO core-shell nanoparticles exhibits two distinct signatures. These are associated with the existence of two magnetic entities which are responsible for the temperature dependence of an exchange bias field. One is from the CoO grains which undergo thermally activated magnetization reversal. The other is from the disordered spins at the Co-CoO interface which exhibits spin-glass-like behavior. We investigated the oxide shell thickness dependence of the exchange bias effect. For particles with a 3 nm thick CoO shell, the predominant contribution to the temperature dependence of exchange bias is the interfacial spin-glass layer. On increasing the shell thickness to 4 nm, the contribution from the spin-glass layer decreases, while upholding the antiferromagnetic grain contribution. For samples with a 4 nm CoO shell, the exchange bias training was minimal. On the other hand, 3 nm samples exhibited both the training effect and a peak in coercivity at an intermediate set temperature Ta. This is explained using a magnetic core-shell model including disordered spins at the interface.

  8. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs, are assessed using a robust data set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (ΔC) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM systems. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069 + 0.022C. During the campaigns, 57 and 62 % of the individual vertical gradient measurements are found to be significantly different from 0, while for the REA technique, the percentage of significant observations is lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few night-time periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentrations. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10, and ~ 85% of the flux bias is within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute terms. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely affected by the forced temperature and irradiation bias in the chambers. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of 2 between the campaigns, while that in ΔC measurement is fairly consistent. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA methods, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient-based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux

  9. Magnetoelectric switching of perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt stacked films

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu Kobane, Atsushi; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Kotani, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Tetsuya

    2015-04-20

    We report the realization of magnetoelectric switching of the perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt stacked films. The perpendicular exchange bias was switched isothermally by the simultaneous application of magnetic and electric fields. The threshold electric field required to switch the perpendicular exchange bias was found to be inversely proportional to the magnetic field, which confirmed the magnetoelectric mechanism of the process. The observed temperature dependence of the threshold electric field suggested that the energy barrier of the antiferromagnetic spin reversal was significantly lower than that assuming the coherent rotation. Pulse voltage measurements indicated that the antiferromagnetic domain propagation dominates the switching process. These results suggest an analogy of the electric-field-induced magnetization with a simple ferromagnet.

  10. Orbital Reconstruction Enhanced Exchange Bias in La0.6Sr0.4MnO3/Orthorhombic YMnO3 Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongxing; Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Wang, Liyan; Feng, Liefeng; Mi, Wenbo; Bai, Haili

    2016-01-01

    The exchange bias in ferromagnetic/multiferroic heterostructures is usually considered to originate from interfacial coupling. In this work, an orbital reconstruction enhanced exchange bias was discovered. As La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (LSMO) grown on YMnO3 (YMO) suffers a tensile strain (a > c), the doubly degenerate eg orbital splits into high energy 3z2 − r2 and low energy x2 − y2 orbitals, which makes electrons occupy the localized x2 − y2 orbital and leads to the formation of antiferromagnetic phase in LSMO. The orbital reconstruction induced antiferromagnetic phase enhances the exchange bias in the LSMO/YMO heterostructures, lightening an effective way for electric-field modulated magnetic moments in multiferroic magnetoelectric devices. PMID:27090614

  11. Effect of antiferromagnetic layer thickness on exchange bias, training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic antidot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W. J.; Liu, W. Feng, J. N.; Zhang, Z. D.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, C. J.

    2014-04-07

    The effect of antiferromagnetic (AFM) layer on exchange bias (EB), training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic (FM) /AFM nanoscale antidot arrays and sheet films Ag(10 nm)/Co(8 nm)/NiO(t{sub NiO})/Ag(5 nm) at 10 K is studied. The AFM layer thickness dependence of the EB field shows a peak at t{sub NiO} = 2 nm that is explained by using the random field model. The misalignment of magnetic moments in the three-dimensional antidot arrays causes smaller decrease of EB field compared with that in the sheet films for training effect. The anomalous magnetotransport properties, in particular positive magnetoresistance (MR) for antidot arrays but negative MR for sheet films are found. The training effect and magnetotransport properties are strongly affected by the three-dimensional spin-alignment effects in the antidot arrays.

  12. Low-temperature synthesis of K0.5FeF3 with tunable exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiao-Ru; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Yu-Di; Rui, Wenbin; Sheng, Yan; Shen, Xuan; Du, Jun; Xu, Mingxiang; Dong, Shuai; Wu, Di; Xu, Qingyu

    2013-09-01

    Fluorides K0.5FeF3 with tetragonal tungsten bronze structure have been fabricated by solid state reaction at low sintering temperature in the range between 150 °C and 400 °C with the assistance of crystal water during the grinding and sintering processes. Unusual magnetic properties have been observed, including positive exchange bias field (HE) with negative vertical magnetization shift (Mshift), and smaller field cooling (FC) magnetization than the zero field cooling one below 53 K. The results are explained by a core-shell structure consisting of antiferromagnetic core and spin glass (SG) shell with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling between the pinned interface spins and the SG shell spins. The sign of HE and Mshift can be changed by increasing the cooling field in the FC process, which is attributed to the competition between the antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling and the Zeeman energy of magnetization of the SG shell.

  13. Magnetic properties of exchange biased and of unbiased oxide/permalloy thin layers: a ferromagnetic resonance and Brillouin scattering study.

    PubMed

    Zighem, F; Roussigné, Y; Chérif, S-M; Moch, P; Ben Youssef, J; Paumier, F

    2010-10-13

    Microstrip ferromagnetic resonance and Brillouin scattering are used to provide a comparative determination of the magnetic parameters of thin permalloy layers interfaced with a non-magnetic (Al(2)O(3)) or with an antiferromagnetic oxide (NiO). It results from our microstructural study that no preferential texture is favoured in the observed polycrystalline sublayers. It is shown that the perpendicular anisotropy can be monitored using an interfacial surface energy term which is practically independent of the nature of the interface. In the interval of thicknesses investigated (5-25 nm) the saturation magnetization does not significantly differ from the reported one in bulk permalloy. In-plane uniaxial anisotropy and exchange bias anisotropy are also derived from the study of the dynamic magnetic excitations and compared with our independent evaluations using conventional magnetometry.

  14. Permalloy-FeMn exchange-biased multilayers grown on flexible substrates for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Xu, Feng; Ma, Yungui; Ong, C. K.

    2009-09-01

    Permalloy-FeMn multilayers deposited onto flexible substrates oriented for wide-band absorber applications were fabricated using RF sputtering deposition. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency was tuned by changing the thickness of the Permalloy layers. Plural FMR frequencies appeared in the multilayer film due to the difference in exchange couple energies at their interfaces. A multilayer thin film with varying thickness of Permalloy layers was also fabricated with the properties of a wide-band absorber. Its range of 1-4 GHz (the absorption width where the reflection loss is less than 10 dB) appears promising for future applications.

  15. Positive exchange bias in a Ni 80Fe 20/Ni xFe 1-xO thin-film bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K.-W.; Tzeng, Y.-M.; Guo, Z.-Y.; Liu, C.-Y.; van Lierop, J.

    2006-09-01

    We have measured positive exchange bias in a Ni 80Fe 20/Ni xFe 1-xO thin-film nanocrystallite system. A series of solid solution Ni xFe 1-xO 40 nm thick films capped with 25 nm thick Ni 80Fe 20 were deposited using a range of %O 2/Ar bombardment energies (i.e. End-Hall voltages). Proper tuning of the deposition conditions results in a Ni 80Fe 20/Ni xFe 1-xO (30%O 2/Ar) based bilayer that exhibits a positive exchange bias loop shift of Hex˜60 Oe at 150 K.

  16. Self Exchange Bias and Bi-stable Magneto-Resistance States in Amorphous TbFeCo and TbSmFeCo Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chung; Li, Xiaopu; Lu, Jiwei; Poon, Joseph; Comes, Ryan; Devaraj, Arun; Spurgeon, Steven

    Amorphous ferrimagetic TbFeCo and TbSmFeCo thin films are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Self exchange bias effect and bi-stable magneto-resistance states are observed near compensation temperature by magnetic hysteresis loop, anomalous Hall effect and transverse magneto-resistance measurements. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb concentration distributed within the amorphous films. The observed exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the two nanoscale amorphous phases. Exchange bias effect is used for increasing stability in spin valves and magnetic tunneling junctions. This study opens up a new platform for using amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth in nanodevices.. The work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Grant and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. 77 FR 18309 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ...This final rule will implement the new Affordable Insurance Exchanges (``Exchanges''), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for individuals and small employers to directly compare available private health insurance options on the basis of price, quality, and other factors. The Exchanges, which will become operational by January 1, 2014, will help enhance competition in the health insurance market, improve choice of affordable health insurance, and give small businesses the same purchasing clout as large businesses.

  18. Temperature dependent exchange bias training effect in single-crystalline BiFeO{sub 3}/Co bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    He, M. C.; You, B.; Tu, H. Q.; Rui, W. B.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Sheng, Y.; Xu, Q. Y. E-mail: jdu@nju.edu.cn; Xu, Y. B.; Du, J. E-mail: jdu@nju.edu.cn

    2015-05-07

    Single-crystalline BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO)/Co bilayers were prepared by combined pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. Exchange bias (EB) and accompanying training effect have been studied as a function of temperature (T) between 5 K and 300 K. A non-monotonic exchange field variation with sharp increase below 100 K has been observed. In the meanwhile, strong training effect was recorded when T < 100 K and it weakens monotonically with increasing T up to 300 K. These temperature dependent EB and training effect may be caused by the uncompensated spins in both the interfacial spin-glass (SG) phase at low temperature and the antiferromagnetic BFO layer at higher temperature. The low temperature EB training results can be well fitted by a modified Binek's model considering asymmetric changes of the pinning SG spins at the descending and the ascending branches.

  19. Tunable exchange bias in dilute magnetic alloys – chiral spin glasses

    PubMed Central

    Hudl, Matthias; Mathieu, Roland; Nordblad, Per

    2016-01-01

    A unidirectional anisotropy appears in field cooled samples of dilute magnetic alloys at temperatures well below the cusp temperature of the zero field cooled magnetization curve. Magnetization measurements on a Cu(13.5 at% Mn) sample show that this anisotropy is essentially temperature independent and acts on a temperature dependent excess magnetization, ΔM. The anisotropy can be partially or fully transferred from being locked to the direction of the cooling field at lower fields to becoming locked to the direction of ΔM at larger fields, thus instead appearing as a uniaxial anisotropy. This introduces a deceiving division of the anisotropy into a superposition of a unidirectional and a uniaxial part. This two faced nature of the anisotropy has been empirically scrutinized and concluded to originate from one and the same exchange mechanism: the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. PMID:26817418

  20. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs is assessed using a robust data-set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (Δ C) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM system. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069+0.022C. 57 and 62% of the individual vertical gradient measurements were found to be significantly different from zero during the campaigns, while for the REA-technique the percentage of significant observations was lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few nighttime periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentration. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10%, and ~ 85% of the flux bias are within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute term. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely dictated by temperature controls on the enclosed volume. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of two between the campaigns, while that in Δ C measurements is fairly stable. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM-techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA method, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux measurement systems investigated

  1. Extensive and biased intergenomic nonreciprocal DNA exchanges shaped a nascent polyploid genome, Gossypium (cotton).

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Wang, Xiyin; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F X; Peterson, Daniel G; Scheffler, Brian E; Chee, Peng W; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    Genome duplication is thought to be central to the evolution of morphological complexity, and some polyploids enjoy a variety of capabilities that transgress those of their diploid progenitors. Comparison of genomic sequences from several tetraploid (AtDt) Gossypium species and genotypes with putative diploid A- and D-genome progenitor species revealed that unidirectional DNA exchanges between homeologous chromosomes were the predominant mechanism responsible for allelic differences between the Gossypium tetraploids and their diploid progenitors. Homeologous gene conversion events (HeGCEs) gradually subsided, declining to rates similar to random mutation during radiation of the polyploid into multiple clades and species. Despite occurring in a common nucleus, preservation of HeGCE is asymmetric in the two tetraploid subgenomes. At-to-Dt conversion is far more abundant than the reciprocal, is enriched in heterochromatin, is highly correlated with GC content and transposon distribution, and may silence abundant A-genome-derived retrotransposons. Dt-to-At conversion is abundant in euchromatin and genes, frequently reversing losses of gene function. The long-standing observation that the nonspinnable-fibered D-genome contributes to the superior yield and quality of tetraploid cotton fibers may be explained by accelerated Dt to At conversion during cotton domestication and improvement, increasing dosage of alleles from the spinnable-fibered A-genome. HeGCE may provide an alternative to (rare) reciprocal DNA exchanges between chromosomes in heterochromatin, where genes have approximately five times greater abundance of Dt-to-At conversion than does adjacent intergenic DNA. Spanning exon-to-gene-sized regions, HeGCE is a natural noninvasive means of gene transfer with the precision of transformation, potentially important in genetic improvement of many crop plants.

  2. Unexpected magnetism, Griffiths phase, and exchange bias in the mixed lanthanide Pr0.6Er0.4Al2

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, D.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Calder, S.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, Alan I.; Gschneidner, Karl A.

    2014-06-01

    We report an unusual coexistence of ferromagnetism and ferrimagnetism, and metamagnetism in Pr0.6Er0.4Al2. In addition, this compound retains a clear Griffiths phase behavior even at 1 kOe magnetic field and shows a large exchange bias after field cooling from the paramagnetic state. The crystal-field excitations and opposite exchange interactions between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor rare earth sites explain these behaviors.

  3. Unexpected magnetism, Griffiths phase, and exchange bias in the mixed lanthanide Pr0.6Er0.4Al2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, D.; Jayasekara, W. T.; Calder, S.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    We report an unusual coexistence of ferromagnetism and ferrimagnetism, and metamagnetism in Pr0.6Er0.4Al2. In addition, this compound retains a clear Griffiths phase behavior even at 1 kOe magnetic field and shows a large exchange bias after field cooling from the paramagnetic state. The crystal-field excitations and opposite exchange interactions between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor rare earth sites explain these behaviors.

  4. Establishing and Enriching School-Community Ties in Small Schools. Small Schools Network Information Exchange Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Laboratory for Educational Improvement of the Northeast & Islands, Andover, MA.

    This information packet contains 14 articles reprinted from various books and journals. Establishing and enriching school-community ties in small schools is the theme for this "Information Exchange Packet," the sixth in a series developed for Small Schools Network members. The articles and their authors are: "Skills in Building Support for…

  5. Accelerated flexible protein-ligand docking using Hamiltonian replica exchange with a repulsive biasing potential

    PubMed Central

    Ostermeir, Katja; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    A molecular dynamics replica exchange based method has been developed that allows rapid identification of putative ligand binding sites on the surface of biomolecules. The approach employs a set of ambiguity restraints in replica simulations between receptor and ligand that allow close contacts in the reference replica but promotes transient dissociation in higher replicas. This avoids long-lived trapping of the ligand or partner proteins at nonspecific, sticky, sites on the receptor molecule and results in accelerated exploration of the possible binding regions. In contrast to common docking methods that require knowledge of the binding site, exclude solvent and often keep parts of receptor and ligand rigid the approach allows for full flexibility of binding partners. Application to peptide-protein, protein-protein and a drug-receptor system indicate rapid sampling of near-native binding regions even in case of starting far away from the native binding site outperforming continuous MD simulations. An application on a DNA minor groove binding ligand in complex with DNA demonstrates that it can also be used in explicit solvent simulations. PMID:28207811

  6. Lamellar magnetism and exchange bias in billion-year-old metamorphic titanohematite with nanoscale ilmenite exsolution lamellae - II: exchange-bias at 5 K after field-free cooling of NRM and after cooling in a +5 T field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Jackson, Mike

    2017-02-01

    This is the second of three papers investigating properties of titanohematite-bearing quartzo-feldspathic rocks that create a significant remanent magnetic anomaly in the Modum District, South Norway. The first paper provided initial magnetic results, mineralogical characterization and evidence for the presence of lamellar magnetism. In this paper, knowledge of lamellar magnetic properties is explored through experiments where ilmenite lamellae were magnetized below 57 K, and interact magnetically along interfaces with the titanohematite host. Samples with known NRM directions were placed in specific orientations in an MPMS then cooled in zero field to 5 K, where hysteresis loops were measured in fields up to 5 Tesla. This assured that results were ultimately related to the natural lamellar magnetism produced during cooling ˜1 billion years ago. In a second set of experiments the same oriented samples, were subjected to a +5 Tesla (T) field then field cooled to 5 K before hysteresis experiments. The first experiments consistently produced asymmetric shifted hysteresis loops with two loop separations, one in a positive field and one in a negative field. Without exception, when the NRM was oriented toward the negative field end of the MPMS, the bimodal loop showed a dominant loop separation in a positive field. By contrast, when the NRM was oriented toward the positive field end of the MPMS, the bimodal loop showed a dominant loop separation in a negative field. Both observations are consistent with antiferromagnetic coupling between the hard magnetization of ilmenite and the more easily shifted lamellar magnetism of the hematite. The bimodal nature of the loops indicates that the NRMs are vector sums of natural lamellar moments, which are oriented both positively and negatively, and that these opposite moments control the orientations of ilmenite magnetizations when cooling through 57 K. Here, extreme exchange biases up to 1.68 T were measured. The second set of

  7. Lamellar magnetism and exchange bias in billion-year-old metamorphic titanohematite with nanoscale ilmenite exsolution lamellae: II. Exchange-bias at 5 K after field-free cooling of NRM and after cooling in a +5 T field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Jackson, M.

    2016-11-01

    This is the second of three papers investigating properties of titanohematite-bearing quartzo-feldspathic rocks that create a significant remanent magnetic anomaly in the Modum District, South Norway. The first paper provided initial magnetic results, mineralogical characterization and evidence for the presence of lamellar magnetism. In this paper, knowledge of lamellar magnetic properties is explored through experiments where ilmenite lamellae were magnetized below 57 K, and interact magnetically along interfaces with the titanohematite host. Samples with known NRM directions were placed in specific orientations in an MPMS then cooled in zero field to 5 K, where hysteresis loops were measured in fields up to 5 Tesla. This assured that results were ultimately related to the natural lamellar magnetism produced during cooling ˜ 1 billion years ago. In a second set of experiments the same oriented samples, were subjected to a +5 Tesla field then field cooled to 5 K before hysteresis experiments. The first experiments consistently produced asymmetric shifted hysteresis loops with two loop separations, one in a positive field and one in a negative field. Without exception, when the NRM was oriented toward the negative field end of the MPMS, the bimodal loop showed a dominant loop separation in a positive field. By contrast, when the NRM was oriented toward the positive field end of the MPMS, the bimodal loop showed a dominant loop separation in a negative field. Both observations are consistent with antiferromagnetic coupling between the hard magnetization of ilmenite and the more easily shifted lamellar magnetism of the hematite. The bimodal nature of the loops indicates that the NRMs are vector sums of natural lamellar moments, which are oriented both positively and negatively, and that these opposite moments control the orientations of ilmenite magnetizations when cooling through 57 K. Here, extreme exchange biases up to 1.68 Tesla were measured. The second set of

  8. Strong perpendicular exchange bias in epitaxial La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3:BiFeO3 nanocomposite films through vertical interfacial coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenrui; Chen, Aiping; Jian, Jie; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Li; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-09-07

    An exchange bias effect with perpendicular anisotropy is of great interest owing to potential applications such as read heads in magnetic storage devices with high thermal stability and reduced dimensions. Here we report a novel approach for achieving perpendicular exchange bias by orienting the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling in the vertical geometry through a unique vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) design. Our results demonstrate robust perpendicular exchange bias phenomena in micrometer-thick films employing a prototype material system of antiferromagnetic BiFeO3 and ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3. The unique response of exchange bias to a perpendicular magnetic field reveals the existence of exchange coupling along their vertical heterointerfaces, which exhibits a strong dependence on their strain states. This VAN approach enables a large selection of material systems for achieving perpendicular exchange bias, which could lead to advanced spintronic devices.

  9. Perpendicular Exchange-Biased Magnetotransport at the Vertical Heterointerfaces in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3:NiO Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Leigang; Lu, Ping; Fan, Meng; Su, Qing; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chen, Aiping; Jia, Quanxi; Zhang, Xinghang; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-10-07

    Heterointerfaces in manganite-based heterostructures in either layered or vertical geometry control their magnetotransport properties. Instead of using spin-polarized tunneling across the interface, a unique approach based on the magnetic exchange coupling along the vertical interface to control the magnetotransport properties has been demonstrated. By coupling ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and antiferromagnetic NiO in an epitaxial vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) architecture, a dynamic and reversible switch of the resistivity between two distinct exchange biased states has been achieved. This study explores the use of vertical interfacial exchange coupling to tailor magnetotransport properties, and demonstrates their viability for spintronic applications.

  10. Influence of different stoichiometric Cr-oxides created via oxygen ion-beam bombardment on the magnetism of the NiFe/Cr-oxide exchange-biased systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Lo, Wen-Tzu; Hsu, Hsun-Feng; Wroczynskyj, Yaroslav; Lin, Ko-Wei; van Lierop, Johan; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2017-09-01

    In exchange-biased systems, antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 has drawn intensive attention because of its highly anisotropic structure. However, other Cr-oxide phases can be formed during fabrication. The influence of different stoichiometric Cr-oxides on the magnetism of the NiFe/Cr-oxide bilayers was studied. We find that paramagnetic CrO3 grains could promote the formation of domain states in the Cr-oxide layer by magnetically isolating antiferromagnetic domains. These domain states gave rise to an excess of irreversible magnetic moments at the NiFe/Cr-oxide interface, causing a nontrivial increase in the exchange bias. The presence of ferromagnetic CrO2 grains in the Cr-oxide layer introduced abundant magnetic disorders. These magnetic disorders acted as pinning sites and impeded the domain-wall motion, which resulted in an increase of the coercivity. These results indicate that the magnetism of the NiFe/Cr-oxide bilayers can be remarkably affected by different Cr-oxide phases, enabling control of both the coercivity and exchange bias and providing a possible route to improve the performance of exchange-biased devices.

  11. Positive and negative exchange bias effects from magnetization reversal in Ho3+ doped YFe0.5Cr0.5O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L. R.; Wei, C. X.; Wang, Z.; Ju, L.; Xu, T. S.; Li, T. X.; Yan, X. W.; Xia, Z. C.

    2017-07-01

    The polycrystalline ceramics of Y1-xHoxFe0.5Cr0.5O3 (x = 0, 0.05 and 0.1) are synthesized by a sol-gel method. The magnetization reversal and exchange bias effect are investigated in single phase bulk Y1-xHoxFe0.5Cr0.5O3. Magnetic Ho3+ ion as a dopant is introduced into the system to confirm the influence of A-site ion on the magnetic interactions. The dual reversal of exchange bias field for x = 0.05 is observed, and its characteristic temperatures are corresponding to the compensation temperatures of magnetization reversal. The exchange bias field of x = 0.1 is found to be ∼10.03 kOe at 4 K, revealing a large value compared with that of x = 0. A schematic diagram based on the competition between the single ion anisotropy and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction, and the antiparallel coupling between the Ho3+ moments and the canted Cr3+/Fe3+ moments, is used to understand the dual reversal phenomenon of magnetization and exchange bias effect.

  12. Direct imaging of thermally-activated grain-boundary diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange-bias structures using atom-probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Letellier, F.; Lardé, R.; Le Breton, J.-M.; Akmaldinov, K.; Auffret, S.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    2014-11-28

    Magnetic devices are often subject to thermal processing steps, such as field cooling to set exchange bias and annealing to crystallize amorphous magnetic electrodes. These processing steps may result in interdiffusion and the subsequent deterioration of magnetic properties. In this study, we investigated thermally-activated diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange biased polycrystalline thin-film structures using atom probe tomography. Images taken after annealing at 400 °C for 60 min revealed Mn diffusion into Co grains at the Co/IrMn interface and along Pt grain boundaries for the IrMn/Pt stack, i.e., a Harrison type C regime. Annealing at 500 °C showed further Mn diffusion into Co grains. At the IrMn/Pt interface, annealing at 500 °C led to a type B behavior since Mn diffusion was detected both along Pt grain boundaries and also into Pt grains. The deterioration of the films' exchange bias properties upon annealing was correlated to the observed diffusion. In particular, the topmost Pt capping layer thickness turned out to be crucial since a faster deterioration of the exchange bias properties for thicker caps was observed. This is consistent with the idea that Pt acts as a getter for Mn, drawing Mn out of the IrMn layer.

  13. Direct imaging of thermally-activated grain-boundary diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange-bias structures using atom-probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, F.; Lechevallier, L.; Lardé, R.; Le Breton, J.-M.; Akmaldinov, K.; Auffret, S.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic devices are often subject to thermal processing steps, such as field cooling to set exchange bias and annealing to crystallize amorphous magnetic electrodes. These processing steps may result in interdiffusion and the subsequent deterioration of magnetic properties. In this study, we investigated thermally-activated diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange biased polycrystalline thin-film structures using atom probe tomography. Images taken after annealing at 400 °C for 60 min revealed Mn diffusion into Co grains at the Co/IrMn interface and along Pt grain boundaries for the IrMn/Pt stack, i.e., a Harrison type C regime. Annealing at 500 °C showed further Mn diffusion into Co grains. At the IrMn/Pt interface, annealing at 500 °C led to a type B behavior since Mn diffusion was detected both along Pt grain boundaries and also into Pt grains. The deterioration of the films' exchange bias properties upon annealing was correlated to the observed diffusion. In particular, the topmost Pt capping layer thickness turned out to be crucial since a faster deterioration of the exchange bias properties for thicker caps was observed. This is consistent with the idea that Pt acts as a getter for Mn, drawing Mn out of the IrMn layer.

  14. Room temperature magnetoresistance and exchange bias in "314-type" oxygen-vacancy ordered SrCo0.85Fe0.15O2.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Prachi; Marik, Sourav; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Ravi P.

    2017-07-01

    Herein, we report the magneto-transport and exchange bias effect in a "314-type" oxygen vacancy ordered material with composition SrCo0.85Fe0.15O2.62. This material exhibits a ferrimagnetic transition above room temperature, at 315 K. The negative magnetoresistance starts to appear from room temperature (-1.3% at 295 K in 70 kOe) and reaches a sizable value of 58% at 4 K in 70 kOe. A large exchange bias effect is observed below 315 K when the sample is cooled in the presence of a magnetic field. The coexistence of nearly compensated and ferrimagnetic regions in the layered structure leads to a magnetoresistance and an exchange bias in this sample. The appearance of a sizable magnetoresistance and a giant exchange bias effect, especially near room temperature, indicates that "314-type" cobaltates are a promising class of material systems for the exploration of materials with potential applications as magnetic sensors or in the area of spintronics.

  15. A conceptual model for establishing tolerance limits for analytic bias and imprecision based on variations in population test distributions.

    PubMed

    Klee, G

    1997-04-25

    A conceptual model is proposed for defining analytic bias limits utilizing the variations found in cumulative test value distributions. The model is based on the propositions that changes in analytic bias are more important than analytic imprecision in medical diagnoses and that analytic bias alters clinical specificity more than clinical sensitivity. The rationale for these propositions are presented along with a step-by-step procedure for estimating bias tolerance limits. These concepts are illustrated with an example using prostate-specific antigen. A second protocol is provided to define analytic imprecision tolerance limits, based on the quality control performance characteristics required to maintain the bias tolerance limits. This model can be applied to most chemistry, immunoassay, and hematologic quantitative assays. The relationship of this procedure to the published procedures using biologic variation for defining analytic tolerance limits is discussed.

  16. 76 FR 41865 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ...This proposed rule would implement the new Affordable Insurance Exchanges (``Exchanges''), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-148) as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-152), referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for individuals and small employers to directly compare available private health insurance options on the basis of price, quality, and other factors. The Exchanges, which will become operational by January 1, 2014, will help enhance competition in the health insurance market, improve choice of affordable health insurance, and give small businesses the same purchasing clout as large businesses. A detailed Preliminary Regulatory Impact Analysis associated with this proposed rule is available at http://cciio.cms.gov under ``Regulations and Guidance.'' A summary of the aforementioned analysis is included as part of this proposed rule.

  17. Exchange bias induced by the fully strained La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} dead layers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Q. Y.; Wu, X. S.; Gao, J.; Jia, Q. J.

    2014-05-07

    A pure compressively strained La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) dead layer grown on (001)-oriented LaAlO{sub 3} substrate can show all the rich phenomenon of large bias field shift, coercive field enhancement, and high blocking temperature. The obtained exchange bias field (∼350 Oe) and the enhanced coercivity of about 1160 Oe at 5 K under 500 Oe cooling field are superior to that have been reported in LCMO-based ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic superlattices or nanoscale systems. Our results clearly demonstrate that the inhomogeneous magnetic dead layer of LCMO can induce a strong exchange bias effect, which may be exploited as a very simple structure for spin-valve device application.

  18. Tunability of exchange bias in Ni@NiO core-shell nanoparticles obtained by sequential layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    D'Addato, Sergio; Spadaro, Maria Chiara; Luches, Paola; Valeri, Sergio; Grillo, Vincenzo; Rotunno, Enzo; Roldan Gutierrez, Manuel A.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Capetti, Elena; Ponti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Films of magnetic Ni@NiO core–shell nanoparticles (NPs, core diameter d ≅ 12 nm, nominal shell thickness variable between 0 and 6.5 nm) obtained with sequential layer deposition were investigated, to gain insight into the relationships between shell thickness/morphology, core-shell interface, and magnetic properties. Different values of NiO shell thickness ts could be obtained while keeping the Ni core size fixed, at variance with conventional oxidation procedures where the oxide shell is grown at the expense of the core. Chemical composition, morphology of the as-produced samples and structural features of the Ni/NiO interface were investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy) techniques, and related with results from magnetic measurements obtained with a superconducting quantum interference device. The effect of the shell thickness on the magnetic properties could be studied. The exchange bias (EB) field Hbias is small and almost constant for ts up to 1.6 nm; then it rapidly grows, with no sign of saturation. This behavior is clearly related to the morphology of the top NiO layer, and is mostly due to the thickness dependence of the NiO anisotropy constant. The ability to tune the EB effect by varying the thickness of the last NiO layer represents a step towards the rational design and synthesis of core–shell NPs with desired magnetic properties.

  19. Room temperature exchange bias in multiferroic BiFeO3 nano- and microcrystals with antiferromagnetic core and two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnetic shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Wang, Shou Yu; Liu, Wei Fang; Xu, Xun Ling; Li, Xiu; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Ju; Li, De Jun

    2017-05-01

    Exchange bias (EB) of multiferroics presents many potential opportunities for magnetic devices. However, instead of using low-temperature field cooling in the hysteresis loop measurement, which usually shows an effective approach to obtain obvious EB phenomenon, there are few room temperature EB. In this article, extensive studies on room temperature EB without field cooling were observed in BiFeO3 nano- and microcrystals. Moreover, with increasing size the hysteresis loops shift from horizontal negative exchange bias (NEB) to positive exchange bias (PEB). In order to explain the tunable EB behaviors with size dependence, a phenomenological qualitative model based on the framework of antiferromagnetic (AFM) core-two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet in a field (2D-DAFF) shell structure was proposed. The training effect (TE) ascertained the validity of model and the presence of unstable magnetic structure using Binek's model. Experimental results show that the tunable EB effect can be explained by the competition of ferromagnetic (FM) exchange coupling and AFM exchange coupling interaction between AFM core and 2D-DAFF shell. Additionally, the local distortion of lattice fringes was observed in hexagonal-shaped BiFeO3 nanocrystals with well-dispersed behavior. The electrical conduction properties agreed well with the space charge-limited conduction mechanism.

  20. Enhanced exchange bias effect in size modulated Sm{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} phase separated manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, S. K.; Nath, T. K.; Yusuf, S. M.; Mukadam, M. D.

    2014-03-07

    The effect of grain size modulation on exchange bias effect in CE-type antiferromagnetic Sm{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} phase separated manganite is reported here. With the reduction of particle size, ferromagnetic clusters are found to form in the charge ordered antiferromagnetic matrix and gradually become larger. The horizontal and vertical shifts of the magnetic hysteresis loops in the field cooled magnetization process clearly indicate the size dependent exchange bias effect and it can be tuned with the reduction of particle sizes. The values of exchange bias parameter, i.e., exchange bias field (H{sub E}), coercivity (H{sub C}), remanence asymmetry (M{sub E}), and magnetic coercivity (M{sub C}) are found to depend strongly on the particle size. The variations of H{sub E} follow non-monotonic dependencies with reduction in particle size and show maximum (1205 Oe) at particle size of 150 nm at T = 5 K, which can be ascribed due to the changes in uncompensated surface spins. The values of H{sub E} and M{sub E} are found to decrease exponentially with increasing temperature below the spin- or cluster-glass like freezing temperature. The spin relaxation model has been employed for analysis of large magnetic training effect. The linear relationship between H{sub E} and M{sub E} further confirms the role of uncompensated surface spins. In view of spintronics application of manganites, the present observation of large exchange bias shift in this half-doped manganite may have great technological importance.

  1. Optimizing the performance of bias-exchange metadynamics: folding a 48-residue LysM domain using a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Laio, Alessandro; Pietrucci, Fabio

    2010-03-11

    Computer simulation of complex conformational transitions in biomolecules, such as protein folding, is considered one of the main goals of computational chemistry. A recently developed methodology, bias-exchange metadynamics, was successfully used to reversibly fold some small globular proteins. The objective of this work is to further improve this promising technique. This is accomplished by searching for the optimal set of parameters that enable folding a 48 amino acid protein, 1E0G , in the shortest possible time, using a coarse-grained force field UNRES. It is shown that bias-exchange metadynamics, if appropriately optimized, allows finding the folded state of 1E0G significantly faster than normal replica exchange.

  2. Doping dependent magnetism and exchange bias in CaMn{sub 1−x}W{sub x}O{sub 3} manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Markovich, V. Gorodetsky, G.; Fita, I.; Wisniewski, A.; Puzniak, R.; Naumov, S. V.; Mostovshchikova, E. V.; Telegin, S. V.; Jung, G.

    2014-09-07

    Magnetic properties of CaMn{sub 1−x}W{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) have been investigated, and the research was focused on the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon in CaMn{sub 0.93}W{sub 0.07}O{sub 3}. Magnetic ground state was found to be dependent on tungsten doping level and the following states were distinguished: (i) G-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state with a weak ferromagnetic (FM) component at x = 0 and 0.04; (ii) mostly orbitally ordered C-type AFM at x = 0.07 and 0.1. For the studied manganites, spontaneous magnetization increases sharply with increasing doping level reaching M{sub 0} ≈ 9.5 emu/g at T = 10 K for x = 0.04, and then decreases rapidly reaching zero for x = 0.1. Exchange bias effect, manifested by vertical and horizontal shifts in the hysteresis loop for field cooled sample, has been observed in CaMn{sub 0.93}W{sub 0.07}O{sub 3}. Exchange bias field, coercivity, remanence asymmetry, and magnetic coercivity depend strongly on temperature, cooling field, and maximal measuring field. Horizontal and vertical shifts of magnetization loop sharply decrease with increasing temperature and vanish above 70 K, whereas coercivity and magnetic coercivity disappear only above 100 K (temperature of transition to the G-type AFM state). The exchange bias field H{sub EB} increases with increasing cooling field H{sub cool} and goes through a broad maximum at 40 kOe, while the remanence asymmetry increases monotonously in the entire investigated cooling field range, up to 50 kOe. For the compound with x = 0.07, the size of the FM regions ≈2 nm was estimated from the dependence of exchange bias field H{sub EB} upon H{sub cool}. It is suggested that the exchange bias originates from interface exchange coupling between small FM clusters and the G-type AFM phase inside the primary C-type orbitally ordered AFM phase.

  3. Fe/CoO(001) and Fe/CoO(111) bilayers: Effect of crystal orientation on the exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, E.; Matlak, B.; Kozioł-Rachwał, A.; Gurgul, J.; Spiridis, N.; Korecki, J.

    2013-08-01

    A comparative study of the structure and magnetism of Fe/CoO(111) and Fe/CoO(001) epitaxial bilayers was performed to investigate the role of uncompensated spins in the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon. Low-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), and the magneto-optic Kerr effect were used to characterize the structural and magnetic properties of the bilayers. Magnetically compensated and uncompensated CoO films were prepared using molecular beam epitaxy through the evaporation of single Co atomic layers and their subsequent oxidation (layer-by-layer technique) on MgO crystals with (001) and (111) orientations. Two-monolayer-thick 57Fe probes located on top of the oxide films and covered with 56Fe allowed for an analysis of the interfacial chemical and magnetic structure using CEMS. For both structures, submonolayer oxidation of the iron detected at the Fe/CoO interface was found to be accompanied by the formation of a mixed FeCo region. The Fe layers showed fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy when grown on CoO(001) and weak uniaxial anisotropy when grown on CoO(111). Although the structural quality and composition of the two structures were comparable, they exhibited distinct EB properties. A hysteresis loop shift as high as 354 Oe at 80 K was obtained for the Fe/CoO(111) bilayer, compared to only 37 Oe for the magnetically compensated Fe/CoO(001).

  4. Interfaces exchange bias and magnetic properties of ordered CoFe2O4/Co3O4 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B. B.; Xu, J. C.; Wang, P. F.; Han, Y. B.; Hong, B.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Li, J.; Yang, Y. T.; Gong, J.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt ferrites (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were implanted into the ordered mesoporous cobaltosic oxide (Co3O4) nanowires to synthesize magnetic CoFe2O4/Co3O4 nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 physical absorption-desorption, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the microstructure of mesoporous Co3O4 and CoFe2O4/Co3O4 nanocomposites. The percent of pore-volume of mesoporous Co3O4 nanowires was calculated to be about 41.99% and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were revealed to exist in the mesopores of Co3O4. The magnetic behavior of both samples were investigated with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Magnetization increased with the doping CoFe2O4 and decreasing temperature, while coercivity hardly changed. The exchange bias effect was obviously observed at 100 K and enhanced with the doping CoFe2O4. CoFe2O4 nanoparticles reinforced the interfaces magnetic interaction between antiferromagnetic Co3O4 and ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4.

  5. Exchange bias and crystal structure of epitaxial (111) FePt/BiFeO3 sputtered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Shang-Jui; Huang, Li-Chun; Hsiao, Shih-Nan; Chang, Huang-Wei; Yu, Ge-Ping; Lee, Hsin-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of the epitaxial FePt (10 nm)/BiFeO3 (BFO) (10 nm) bilayer films grown on (111) SrTiO3 (STO) substrates with different deposition temperatures of FePt layers (Td) have been investigated using magnetron sputtering. Out-of-plane radial scan along (111) direction and off-normal (002) azimuthal scan, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry, evidence that the FePt layers were well epitaxially grown on the (111) epitaxial BFO layers for the samples with Td = 300 and 700 °C. On the contrary, for the bilayer films with Td = 500 °C, the FePt and BFO layers exhibit low epitaxial quality. Large in-plane exchange bias field (Heb) values of 45-412 Oe are obtained for the L10-FePt/BFO bilayer films measured with applied field of 12 kOe at room temperature. The change of effective interfacial area, observed by scanning electron microscopy, between FePt island-like particles and BFO continuous layers, and epitaxiality of the bilayer were correlated with the evolution of Heb.

  6. Magnetization reversal in Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with the coexistence of positive and negative exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovylina, Miroslavna; Morales, Rafael; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Magnetization reversal mechanisms are studied in Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with the coexistence of positive and negative exchanged bias (PEB/NEB), showing single and double hysteresis loops (DHL) in magnetoresistance measurements. Micromagnetic simulations show that PEB and NEB domains of a minimum critical size must be introduced in order to reproduce the occurrence of DHLs. The simulations reveal that different magnetic configurations and, hence, different magnetization reversal processes take place in a ferromagnet (FM) on top of minority PEB domains that are either greater or smaller than the critical size. In particular, for the case of DHLs, core reversal of a depthwise domain wall is observed over minority PEB domains when the magnetic field is decreased from positive saturation. As the field is further decreased, a complex domain-wall evolution takes place in the FM, including the dependences of the domain-wall width and domain size on the magnetic field and distance from the antiferromagnet (AF). These effects should be taken into account when the domain size is estimated from data measured by depth-dependent techniques since they average the distribution of domain sizes in the FM for different distances from the AF.

  7. Negative magnetization and exchange bias in Y1 - x Prx CrO3 with (0>x>0.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, E.; Duran, A.; Morales, F.; Escudero, E.

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth orthochromites compounds with perovskite structure have attracted great interest because its potential applications as data storage and spintronic. We report studies of the crystalline structure, thermal, and magnetic properties performed in the compound Y1-xPrxCrO3with 0exchange bias and magnetization reversal when the magnetization-temperature (M-T) curves were measured in field cooled mode (FC). All those changes are attributed to the influence of the Dzialoshinskii-Moriya indirect interaction that we related to the octahedral distortion, because the Pr substitution affecting the Cr-O bond lengths. This work was partially supported by DGAPA-UNAM, IN103213, IN10014, CONACyT-Mexico, Project 129293, BISSNANO, and by the Institute of Sciences Project PICCO 11-7, Distrito Federal, Mexico.

  8. Tuning the Granular Contribution to Exchange Bias by Varying the Antiferromagnetic Material but Without Affecting the Ferromagnetic/Antiferromagnetic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangou, L.; Akmaldinov, K.; Ducruet, C.; Joumard, I.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    The exchange bias properties of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) bilayers depend strongly on both the F and AF bulk properties, and the interfacial uncompensated AF spins that magnetically couple the F and the AF materials. Whether it is possible to adjust the bulk properties of the AF layer by changing the nature of the AF material but without affecting the interface is one of the challenges raised by the development of some spintronic devices. In this context, we engineered composite AF materials whose basic composition is: (FeMn/Pt/AF). These structures are made of FeMn and IrMn alloys with the insertion of a thin Pt diffusion/trap barrier to Mn in order to ensure as much as possible the integrity of the AF layer at the interface. Magnetic measurements evidenced that, by changing the nature of the AF material, it remains possible to tune the thermal stability of the AF grains without affecting much the interface.

  9. Néel walls between tailored parallel-stripe domains in IrMn/CoFe exchange bias layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ueltzhöffer, Timo Schmidt, Christoph; Ehresmann, Arno; Krug, Ingo; Nickel, Florian; Gottlob, Daniel

    2015-03-28

    Tailored parallel-stripe magnetic domains with antiparallel magnetizations in adjacent domains along the long stripe axis have been fabricated in an IrMn/CoFe Exchange Bias thin film system by 10 keV He{sup +}-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning. Domain walls between these domains are of Néel type and asymmetric as they separate domains of different anisotropies. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism asymmetry images were obtained by x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy at the Co/Fe L{sub 3} edges at the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II. They revealed Néel-wall tail widths of 1 μm in agreement with the results of a model that was modified in order to describe such walls. Similarly obtained domain core widths show a discrepancy to values estimated from the model, but could be explained by experimental broadening. The rotation senses in adjacent walls were determined, yielding unwinding domain walls with non-interacting walls in this layer system.

  10. Exchange bias training effect in Co/CoO heterostructures with variation of the ferromagnetic film thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2007-03-01

    The exchange bias (EB) training effect is studied in a Co/CoO heterostructure using low temperature longitudinal Kerr rotation. After field cooling the sample to below the N'eel temperature of CoO the EB training effect manifests itself by a decrease of the EB field upon cycling the Co film through consecutive hysteresis loops. We explore the temperature dependence of the training effect and its dependence on the Co-thickness, tCo. The latter is studied by locally probing the EB in a wedge Co/CoO system. The gradient of the Co film thickness allows to measure local tCo-dependences in a range of δtCo = 23.6nm varying over the substrate length of 8.5mm. The Co wedge is prepared by MBE taking advantage of the steep decrease of the Co flux when leaving the center of the Co beam. A wedge angle of 1.6x10-4;^ois revealed by local small angle X-ray reflectivity. We compare the measured tCo-dependence with our phenomenological theory predicting a tCo^2-increase of the leading fitting parameter. This behavior is clearly distinguishable from the 1/tCo -decrease of the equilibrium EB field.

  11. Calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions using biased replica-exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of a biomolecule, such as a peptide or protein, to a functionalized surface is of fundamental importance for a broad range of applications in biotechnology. The adsorption free energy for these types of interactions can be determined from a molecular dynamics simulation using the partitioning between adsorbed and nonadsorbed states, provided that sufficient sampling of both states is obtained. However, if interactions between the solute and the surface are strong, the solute will tend to be trapped near the surface during the simulation, thus preventing the adsorption free energy from being calculated by this method. This situation occurs even when using an advanced sampling algorithm such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fundamental basis of this problem using a model system consisting of one sodium ion (Na+) as the solute positioned over a surface functionalized with one negatively charged group (COO−) in explicit water. With this simple system, the authors show that sufficient sampling in the coordinate normal to the surface cannot be obtained by conventional REMD alone. The authors then present a method to overcome this problem through the use of an adaptive windowed-umbrella sampling technique to develop a biased-energy function that is combined with REMD. This approach provides an effective method for the calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions. PMID:19768127

  12. Exchange bias and crystal structure of epitaxial (111) FePt/BiFeO{sub 3} sputtered thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shang-Jui; Hsiao, Shih-Nan Lee, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Li-Chun; Yu, Ge-Ping; Chang, Huang-Wei

    2014-05-07

    Crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of the epitaxial FePt (10 nm)/BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) (10 nm) bilayer films grown on (111) SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates with different deposition temperatures of FePt layers (T{sub d}) have been investigated using magnetron sputtering. Out-of-plane radial scan along (111) direction and off-normal (002) azimuthal scan, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry, evidence that the FePt layers were well epitaxially grown on the (111) epitaxial BFO layers for the samples with T{sub d} = 300 and 700 °C. On the contrary, for the bilayer films with T{sub d} = 500 °C, the FePt and BFO layers exhibit low epitaxial quality. Large in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) values of 45–412 Oe are obtained for the L1{sub 0}-FePt/BFO bilayer films measured with applied field of 12 kOe at room temperature. The change of effective interfacial area, observed by scanning electron microscopy, between FePt island-like particles and BFO continuous layers, and epitaxiality of the bilayer were correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  13. Tunability of exchange bias in Ni@NiO core-shell nanoparticles obtained by sequential layer deposition

    DOE PAGES

    D'Addato, Sergio; Spadaro, Maria Chiara; Luches, Paola; ...

    2015-01-01

    Films of magnetic Ni@NiO core–shell nanoparticles (NPs, core diameter d ≅ 12 nm, nominal shell thickness variable between 0 and 6.5 nm) obtained with sequential layer deposition were investigated, to gain insight into the relationships between shell thickness/morphology, core-shell interface, and magnetic properties. Different values of NiO shell thickness ts could be obtained while keeping the Ni core size fixed, at variance with conventional oxidation procedures where the oxide shell is grown at the expense of the core. Chemical composition, morphology of the as-produced samples and structural features of the Ni/NiO interface were investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopymore » (scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy) techniques, and related with results from magnetic measurements obtained with a superconducting quantum interference device. The effect of the shell thickness on the magnetic properties could be studied. The exchange bias (EB) field Hbias is small and almost constant for ts up to 1.6 nm; then it rapidly grows, with no sign of saturation. This behavior is clearly related to the morphology of the top NiO layer, and is mostly due to the thickness dependence of the NiO anisotropy constant. The ability to tune the EB effect by varying the thickness of the last NiO layer represents a step towards the rational design and synthesis of core–shell NPs with desired magnetic properties.« less

  14. Effect of morphology on exchange bias in NiMnSn and NiCoMnIn magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapa, Pavel N.; Monroe, James A.; Franco, Brian E.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Roshchin, Igor V.

    2014-03-01

    Exchange bias (EB) is one of puzzling magnetic properties of magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMA). Despite a few attempts to explain the mechanism, there is no comprehensive model describing it. The main obstacle is the lack of information about the magnetic structure of martensitic and austenite phases. In contrast to classical EB systems where the exchange coupling happens at the interface between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic layers, the EB in MSMA is attributed to coexistence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions. We report the results of structural analysis obtained using wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) and magnetic characterization of these samples. We observe a correlation of EB with the secondary heat treatment for NiCoMnIn alloys. Comparative first order reversal curve (FORC) analysis for NiMnSn samples with different heat treatment suggests a correlation between morphology and distribution of exchange bias values. Additionally, exchange bias in these alloys can be induced even after zero-field cooling by applying a constant field for 2 hours before measuring the magnetization curve. This behavior is consistent with magnetic glassiness observed in these alloys at low temperatures. The work is funded by TAMU and US NSF-DMR MMN program/MWN initiative grant 1108396.

  15. Correlation between Barrier Width, Barrier Height, and DC Bias Voltage Dependences on the Magnetoresistance Ratio in Ir-Mn Exchange Biased Single and Double Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Amano, Minoru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Takahashi, Shigeki; Sagoi, Masayuki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2000-10-01

    Dual spin-valve-type double tunnel junctions (DTJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/Co90Fe10/AlOx/CoFe/Ir-Mn and spin-valve-type single tunnel junctions (STJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/CoFe/Ni-Fe were fabricated using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system, conventional photolithography and ion-beam milling. The STJs could be fabricated with various barrier heights by changing the oxidization conditions during deposition and changing the annealing temperature after deposition, while the AlOx layer thickness remained unchanged. There was a correlation between barrier width, height estimated using Simmons’ expressions, and dc bias voltage dependence on the MR ratio. The VB dependence on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio was mainly related to the barrier width, and the decrease in the TMR ratio with increasing bias voltage is well explained, taking into account the spin-independent two-step tunneling via defect states in the barrier, as a main mechanism, at room temperature. Under optimized oxidization and annealing conditions, the maximum TMR ratio at a low bias voltage, and the dc bias voltage value at which the TMR ratio decreases in value by half (V1/2) were 42.4% and 952 mV in DTJs, and 49.0% and 425 mV in STJs, respectively.

  16. Reentrant spin-glass behavior and bipolar exchange-bias effect in "Sn" substituted cobalt-orthotitanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S.; Joshi, D. C.; Krautz, M.; Waske, A.; Eckert, J.; Thota, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the co-existence of longitudinal ferrimagnetic behavior with Néel temperature TN ˜ 46.1 K and reentrant transverse spin-glass state at 44.05 K in Tin (Sn) doped cobalt-orthotitanate (Co2TiO4). The ferrimagnetic ordering is resulting from different magnetic moments of Co2+ on the A-sites (3.87 μB) and B-sites (5.069 μB). The magnetic compensation temperature (TCOMP) shifts from 31.74 K to 27.1 K when 40 at. % of "Sn4+" substitutes "Ti4+" at B-sites where the bulk-magnetization of two-sublattices balance each other. For T > TN, the dc-magnetic susceptibility (χdc = M/Hdc) fits well with the Néel's expression for the two-sublattice model with antiferromagnetic molecular field constants NBB ˜ 15.44, NAB ˜ 32.01, and NAA ˜ 20.88. The frequency dependence of ac-magnetic susceptibility χac data follows the Vogel-Fulcher law, and the power-law of critical slowing-down with "zν" = 6.01 suggests the existence of spin-clusters (where "z" and "ν" being dynamic critical-exponent and correlation length of critical-exponent, respectively). This system exhibits unusual hysteresis loops with large bipolar exchange-bias effect (HEB ˜ 13.6 kOe at 7 K) after zero-field cooling process from an un-magnetized state, and a dramatic collapse of remanence (MR) and coercive field (HC) across TCOMP. The possible origins of such anomalous characteristics were discussed.

  17. Giant spontaneous exchange bias triggered by crossover of superspin glass in Sb-doped Ni50Mn38Ga12 Heusler alloys

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fanghua; Cao, Kaiyan; Zhang, Yin; Zeng, Yuyang; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Tieyan; Zhou, Chao; Xu, Minwei; Song, Xiaoping; Yang, Sen

    2016-01-01

    A spontaneous exchange bias (SEB) discovered by Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 077203.] after zero-field cooling (ZFC) has attracted recent attention due to its interesting physics. In this letter, we report a giant SEB tuned by Sb-doping in Ni50Mn38Ga12-xSbx Heusler alloys. Such an SEB was switched on below the blocking temperature of approximately 50 K. The maximum exchange bias HE can arrive at 2930 Oe in a Ni50Mn38Ga10Sb2 sample after ZFC to 2 K. Further studies showed that this SEB was attributable to interaction of superspin glass (SSG) and antiferromagnetic matix, which was triggered by the crossover of SSG from canonical spin glass to a cluster spin glass. Our results not only explain the underlying physics of SEB, but also provide a way to tune and control the SEB performance. PMID:27478090

  18. Magnetic properties of epitaxial CoO/Fe(001) bilayers: The onset of exchange bias as a function of sublayer thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgul, Jacek; Młyńczak, Ewa; Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna; Matlak, Krzysztof; Freindl, Kinga; Madej, Ewa; Spiridis, Nika; Ślezak, Tomasz; Korecki, Józef

    2017-09-01

    We study the magnetic properties of epitaxial double-wedge CoO/Fe bilayers grown on MgO(001). We present a comprehensive set of data derived from the hysteresis loops measured as a function of temperature in a wide range of CoO and Fe thicknesses using Kerr microscopy imaging. We focus on relatively high temperatures and CoO layers with small thicknesses to address the onset of the exchange bias. We identify a characteristic CoO thickness of 30-40 Å, above which the films can be considered bulklike. However, a considerable exchange bias is still observed even for CoO films as thin as 12 Å if the temperature is sufficiently low. From the results of the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we deduce the presence of an interfacial iron oxide layer of mixed stoichiometry and a uniform composition of the CoO layer along the CoO wedge.

  19. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect

    Vinai, G.; Moritz, J.; Bandiera, S.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  20. Co nanoparticles inserted into a porous carbon amorphous matrix: the role of cooling field and temperature on the exchange bias effect.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, María Paz; Gorria, Pedro; Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B; Boada, Roberto; Chaboy, Jesús; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Blanco, Jesús A

    2011-01-21

    We report unusual cooling field dependence of the exchange bias in oxide-coated cobalt nanoparticles embedded within the nanopores of a carbon matrix. The size-distribution of the nanoparticles and the exchange bias coupling observed up to about 200 K between the Co-oxide shell (∼3-4 nm) and the ferromagnetic Co-cores (∼4-6 nm) are the key to understand the magnetic properties of this system. The estimated values of the effective anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization obtained from the fit of the zero-field cooling and field cooling magnetization vs. temperature curves agree quite well with those of the bulk fcc-Co.

  1. Charge transfer-induced magnetic exchange bias and electron localization in (111)- and (001)-oriented LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoming; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose Luis; Yang, Chang; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Esquinazi, Pablo; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    High-quality lattice-matched LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices with monolayer terrace structure have been grown on both (111)- and (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. In contrast to the previously reported experiments, a magnetic exchange bias is observed that reproducibly occurs in both (111)- and (001)-oriented superlattices with the thin single layers of 5 and 7 unit cells, respectively. The exchange bias is theoretically explained by charge transfer-induced magnetic moments at Ni atoms. Furthermore, magnetization data at low temperature suggest two magnetic phases in the superlattices, with Néel temperature around 10 K. Electrical transport measurements reveal a metal-insulator transition with strong localization of electrons in the superlattices with the thin LaNiO3 layers of 4 unit cells, in which the electrical transport is dominated by two-dimensional variable range hopping.

  2. Influence of time dependent longitudinal magnetic fields on the cooling process, exchange bias and magnetization reversal mechanism in FM core/AFM shell nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Akıncı, Ümit

    2016-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the dynamic phase transition properties of magnetic nanoparticles with ferromagnetic core coated by an antiferromagnetic shell structure. Effects of field amplitude and frequency on the thermal dependence of magnetizations, magnetization reversal mechanisms during hysteresis cycles, as well as on the exchange bias and coercive fields have been examined, and the feasibility of applying dynamic magnetic fields on the particle have been discussed for technological and biomedical purposes.

  3. Influence of time dependent longitudinal magnetic fields on the cooling process, exchange bias and magnetization reversal mechanism in FM core/AFM shell nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Akıncı, Ümit

    2016-12-07

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the dynamic phase transition properties of magnetic nanoparticles with ferromagnetic core coated by an antiferromagnetic shell structure. Effects of field amplitude and frequency on the thermal dependence of magnetizations, magnetization reversal mechanisms during hysteresis cycles, as well as on the exchange bias and coercive fields have been examined, and the feasibility of applying dynamic magnetic fields on the particle have been discussed for technological and biomedical purposes.

  4. Study of angular dependence of exchange bias and misalignment in uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy in NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Braj Bhusan; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-07-01

    We report the investigation of the in-plane azimuthal angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in the ion beam sputtered exchanged biased NiFe(111)/FeMn(111)/CoFeB(amorphous) stack. Compared to the as-deposited case, the magnetic annealing resulted in 3 fold enhancement in exchange bias but decrease in coercivity. The observed cosine dependence of exchange biased CoFeB layer on the in-plane azimuthal angle of applied field is corroborated with Meiklejohn and Bean model. The training effect associated with the exchange bias showed unconventional increase in coercivity after first cycle of hysteresis loop, while the exchange bias decreases sharply, and for subsequent cycles the exchange bias follows the empirical relation based on the energy dissipation in the AF layer. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements also exhibited the in-plane azimuthal angle dependence of the magnetic resonance field indicating that the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropies are not collinear, although they lie in the same plane. However, no misalignment between the unidirectional anisotropy and the exchange bias direction is observed. The misalignment angle between the uniaxial and unidirectional anisotropy, as measured by FMR, is found to be 10° and 14° for CoFeB and NiFe, respectively. This misalignment is attributed to the interface roughness as revealed by x-ray reflectance measurements.

  5. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.

  6. Modulated exchange bias in NiFe/CoO/α-Fe2O3 trilayers and NiFe/CoO bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Lin, K.-W.; Yeh, W.-C.; Desautels, R. D.; van Lierop, J.; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2017-02-01

    While the exchange bias in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF) bilayer and FM1/AF/FM2 trilayer configurations has been widely investigated, the role of an AF2 layer in FM/AF1/AF2 trilayer configurations is still not well understood. In this work, the magnetic properties of NiFe/CoO, NiFe/α-Fe2O3 bilayers, and NiFe/CoO/α-Fe2O3 trilayer were studied comparatively. The microstructure and chemical composition were characterized. Temperature dependent magnetometry reveals increased irreversibility temperature in NiFe/CoO/α-Fe2O3 trilayer compared with NiFe/CoO bilayer. The magnetic hysteresis loops show that the exchange bias (Hex) and coercivity (Hc) depend strongly on the anisotropy of AF layer (CoO, α-Fe2O3 and CoO/α-Fe2O3). Our work shows that the AF1/AF2 interfacial interactions can be used effectively for tuning the exchange bias in FM/AF1/AF2 trilayers.

  7. Synthesis and controllable oxidation of monodisperse cobalt-doped wüstite nanoparticles and their core-shell stability and exchange-bias stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2015-09-14

    Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ∼4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (H(E)), an enhanced coercivity field (H(C)), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus indicating the presence of a strong exchange bias coupling effect. More importantly, the onset temperature of H(E) was found to be higher than 200 K, which suggests that cobalt doping increases the Néel temperature (T(N)) of the CWT core. In general, the results show that the homogeneous dispersion of Co in iron precursors improves the stability of the final CWT nanoparticles. Moreover, the CoFe2O4 shells formed following oxidation increase the oxidation resistance of the CWT cores and enhance their anisotropy energy.

  8. 76 FR 60788 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 153, 155 and 156 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment... proposed rules published in the Federal Register on July 15, 2011. One proposed rule would implement the... comment period for both proposed rules, which would have ended on September 28, 2011, is extended to...

  9. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  10. Reentrant spin-glass behavior and bipolar exchange-bias effect in “Sn” substituted cobalt-orthotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, S.; Joshi, D. C.; Thota, S.; Krautz, M.; Waske, A.; Eckert, J.

    2016-01-28

    We report the co-existence of longitudinal ferrimagnetic behavior with Néel temperature T{sub N} ∼ 46.1 K and reentrant transverse spin-glass state at 44.05 K in Tin (Sn) doped cobalt-orthotitanate (Co{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}). The ferrimagnetic ordering is resulting from different magnetic moments of Co{sup 2+} on the A-sites (3.87 μ{sub B}) and B-sites (5.069 μ{sub B}). The magnetic compensation temperature (T{sub COMP}) shifts from 31.74 K to 27.1 K when 40 at. % of “Sn{sup 4+}” substitutes “Ti{sup 4+}” at B-sites where the bulk-magnetization of two-sublattices balance each other. For T > T{sub N}, the dc-magnetic susceptibility (χ{sub dc} = M/H{sub dc}) fits well with the Néel's expression for the two-sublattice model with antiferromagnetic molecular field constants N{sub BB} ∼ 15.44, N{sub AB} ∼ 32.01, and N{sub AA} ∼ 20.88. The frequency dependence of ac-magnetic susceptibility χ{sub ac} data follows the Vogel-Fulcher law, and the power-law of critical slowing-down with “zν” = 6.01 suggests the existence of spin-clusters (where “z” and “ν” being dynamic critical-exponent and correlation length of critical-exponent, respectively). This system exhibits unusual hysteresis loops with large bipolar exchange-bias effect (H{sub EB} ∼ 13.6 kOe at 7 K) after zero-field cooling process from an un-magnetized state, and a dramatic collapse of remanence (M{sub R}) and coercive field (H{sub C}) across T{sub COMP}. The possible origins of such anomalous characteristics were discussed.

  11. Establishing a Markerless Genetic Exchange System for Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1 for Constructing Chromosomal Mutants of Small RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Claudia; Jäger, Dominik; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    A markerless genetic exchange system was successfully established in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using the hpt gene coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. First, a chromosomal deletion mutant of the hpt gene was generated conferring resistance to the purine analog 8-aza-2,6-diaminopurine (8-ADP). The nonreplicating allelic exchange vector (pRS345) carrying the pac-resistance cassette for direct selection of chromosomal integration, and the hpt gene for counterselection was introduced into this strain. By a pop-in and ultimately pop-out event of the plasmid from the chromosome, allelic exchange is enabled. Using this system, we successfully generated a M. mazei deletion mutant of the gene encoding the regulatory non-coding RNA sRNA154. Characterizing M. mazeiΔsRNA 154 under nitrogen limiting conditions demonstrated differential expression of at least three cytoplasmic proteins and reduced growth strongly arguing for a prominent role of sRNA154 in regulation of nitrogen fixation by posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:21941461

  12. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; establishment of the multi-state plan program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges.

    PubMed

    2013-03-11

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final regulation establishing the Multi-State Plan Program (MSPP) pursuant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. Through contracts with OPM, health insurance issuers will offer at least two multi-State plans (MSPs) on each of the Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges). One of the issuers must be non-profit. Under the law, an MSPP issuer may phase in the States in which it offers coverage over 4 years, but it must offer MSPs on Exchanges in all States and the District of Columbia by the fourth year in which the MSPP issuer participates in the MSPP. This rule aims to balance adhering to the statutory goals of MSPP while aligning its standards to those applying to qualified health plans to promote a level playing field across health plans.

  13. A Proposal for Establishing a Free Market Basis for Plant Genome Information Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T.

    2001-09-26

    The current situation of genomics information exchange is reminiscent of some Third World cities, where residents despair they will ever get official utility service and therefore tap into power, phone, and gas sources with makeshift connections. Thus, each genomics grant spawns yet another idiosyncratic Web site, with makeshift links to whatever random Web sites the PI is most familiar with. There are few standards for semantics of data, and fewer standards for automating the interchange or integration of these autonomous Web sites. The US Plant Genome Initiative (PGI) has been enthusiastic contributor to this proliferation of chaotic Web sites, but to its credit it appears to be the first major program to attempt to find a solution. Some of us from the earliest days of the Human Genome Program have been acutely aware of the problems of genomic data integration, since long before the Web appeared and made the problem exponentially harder to resolve. We have seen large scale attempts, and subsequent failures or inadequacies, of many potential solution approaches (i.e., database federation, classical data warehousing, centralized data, etc.) and believe we know at least some of the reasons they still remain inadequate. It is our opinion that the only solution that has a chance of succeeding is one that considers the overall economics of genomics data production, sharing, and integration. We believe that attempting to create a kind of Free Market for data created under the Plant Genome Initiative will represent the most practical, powerful, and cost-effective approach to dealing with the broad range of plant genome information that has been unleashed.

  14. Positive to negative zero-field cooled exchange bias in La0.5Sr0.5Mn0.8Co0.2O3 ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Cui; Guo, Shaopu; Wang, Ruilong; Sun, Zhigang; Xiao, Haibo; Xu, Lingfang; Yang, Changping; Xia, Zhengcai

    2016-01-01

    Exchange bias effect obtained after zero-field cooling from unmagnetized state usually exhibits a shift of hysteresis loop negative to the direction of the initial magnetic field, known as negative zero-field cooled exchange bias. Here, positive zero-field cooled exchange bias is reported in La0.5Sr0.5Mn0.8Co0.2O3 ceramics. In addition, a transition from positive to negative exchange bias has been observed with increasing initial magnetization field and measurement temperature. Based on a simple spin bidomain model with variable interface, two type of interfacial spin configuration formed during the initial magnetization process are proposed to interpret the observed phenomenon. PMID:27168382

  15. Transversion-enriched sequence saturation mutagenesis (SeSaM-Tv+): a random mutagenesis method with consecutive nucleotide exchanges that complements the bias of error-prone PCR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tuck Seng; Roccatano, Danilo; Loakes, David; Tee, Kang Lan; Schenk, Alexander; Hauer, Bernhard; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The sequence saturation mutagenesis (SeSaM) method has been advanced to a random mutagenesis method with adjustable mutational biases. SeSaM offers, for example, a bias that is complementary to error-prone (ep) PCR and is enriched in transversions (SeSaM-Tv(+)). dNTP alpha S and three degenerate bases (P, K and I) are used to control mutational bias flexibly. After quantifying incorporation rates of dPTP, dKTP and dITP by terminal transferase using a luciferase-based assay and investigating the read and/or write activities of eight DNA polymerases, a transversion-enriched protocol has been developed. In a mutant library generated using dGTP alpha S and dPTP, transversion frequencies of 16.22-22.58% (G-->T) and 6.38-9.69% (G-->C) were achieved. These mutational spectra are complementary and occur twice as frequently in comparison to standard epPCR methods employing Taq DNA polymerase. For generating more complex mutant libraries, the occurrence of consecutive nucleotide exchanges was increased by 10(5)-10(6)-fold compared to epPCR. Finally, 16.7% of all sequenced mutants contained consecutive nucleotide exchanges composed mainly of a transversion followed by a transition.

  16. Tuning the exchange bias in NiFe/Fe-oxide bilayers by way of different Fe-oxide based mixtures made with an ion-beam deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, K W; Kol, P H; Guo, Z Y; Ouyang, H; van Lierop, J

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and magnetic properties of ion-beam deposited polycrystalline NiFe (25 nm)/Fe-oxide (35 nm) bilayers. A film prepared with an assist beam O2 to Ar gas ratio of 0% during deposition had a bottom layer that consisted of pure b.c.c. Fe (a = 2.87 A) whereas films prepared with 19%O2/Ar and 35%O2/Ar had either Fe3O4 (a = 8.47 angstroms) or alpha-Fe2O3 (a = 5.04 angstroms, c = 13.86 angstroms) bottom layers, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a smooth interface between the top nano-columnar NiFe and bottom nano-columnar Fe-oxide layer for all films. At room temperature, the observed coercivity (Hc approximately 25 Oe) for a film prepared with 19% O2/Ar indicates the existence of a magnetically hard ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 phase that is enhancing the plain NiFe (Hc approximately 2 Oe) by way of exchange coupling. A significant amount of exchange bias is observed below 50 K, and at 10 K the size of exchange bias hysteresis loops shift increases with increasing oxygen in the films. Furthermore, the strongest exchange coupling (H(ex) approximately 135 Oe at 10 K) is with alpha-Fe2O3 (35% O2/Ar) as the bottom film layer. This indicates that the pure antiferromagnetic phases work better than ferrimagnetic phases when in contact with ferromagnetic NiFe. H(ex) (T) is well described by an effective AF domain wall energy that creates an exchange field with a (1 - T/T(crit)) temperature dependence. Hc (T) exhibits three distinct regimes of constant temperature that may indicate the existence of different AF spin populations that couple to the FM layer at different temperatures.

  17. Microscopic model for exchange bias from grain-boundary disorder in a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet thin film with a nanocrystalline microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cortie, D. L.; Biternas, A. G.; Chantrell, R. W.; Wang, X. L.; Klose, F.

    2014-07-21

    Monte Carlo spin simulations were coupled to a Voronoi microstructure-generator to predict the magnitude and behavior of exchange bias in a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet (AF) thin film bilayer with a nanocrystalline microstructure. Our model accounts for the effects of irregular grain-shapes, finite-sized particles, and the possible presence of local random-fields originating from the antiferromagnet's grain-boundary regions. As the grain-boundary represents a crystal-structure distortion, we model the local effect on the exchange constants in the Gaussian approximation which can cause regions resembling a spin glass confined to an unusual 2D topology. Although an ensemble of completely disconnected AF grains isolated by non-magnetic barriers provides a small exchange bias, the introduction of a spin-glass network at the boundaries causes a four-fold enhancement in the magnitude of the loop-shift. This implies the importance of local grain-boundary behavior in defect-engineered antiferromagnets.

  18. Magnetic structures at the ferromagnetic NiFe and antiferromagnetic NiMn interface in exchange-biased films: Role of noncollinear magnetism and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kohji; Freeman, A. J.; Wang, Ding-Sheng; Zhong, Lieping; Fernandez-de-Castro, Juan

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic structures at the compensated ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AFM) interface of exchange bias FM NiFe/AFM NiMn films were determined with first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave calculations including noncollinear magnetism. The results predict that the magnetic moments of the FM NiFe layer lie perpendicular to those of the AFM NiMn layer. The intra-atomic noncollinear magnetism that arises near the interface is found to play an important role in stabilizing the perpendicular coupling that leads to a large biquadratic exchange energy (BEE). The BEE is large enough to require formation of a magnetic domain wall (with an estimated thickness ~370 Å) in the AFM NiMn layers, which may account for the observed large coercivity and exchange bias. We also discuss magnetic structures at a rough FM/AFM interface-as simulated in model calculations with the inclusion of line step defects-which may contribute to a unidirectional magnetic anisotropy.

  19. Exchange bias identifies lamellar magnetism as the origin of the natural remanent magnetization in titanohematite with ilmenite exsolution from Modum, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Karl; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Robinson, Peter; Shcherbakov, Valera P.

    2008-04-01

    Large and stable negative magnetic anomalies in southwestern Sweden, southern Norway, the Adirondacks, USA, and Quebec, Canada, are related to rock units with a magnetic fraction consisting primarily of ilmeno-hematite or hemo-ilmenite. It has been suggested that the unusual magnetic stability of these rocks results from lamellar magnetism. This is a type of magnetic remanence, carried by uncompensated magnetic layers at interfaces between nanoscale exsolution structures of antiferromagnetic (AFM) hematite and paramagnetic ilmenite. Here we present the first direct proof that this lamellar magnetism indeed is responsible for the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of a rock from Modum, Norway. Our argument expands a previous observation, that, in mineral grains from this rock, the cooling of a positive-induced remanence from room temperature to 5 K - which is well below the ordering temperature of ilmenite (57 K) - leads to a large negative shift of the low-temperature (LT) hysteresis loop. This can only be explained by exchange bias due to exchange coupling across the hematite-ilmenite interfaces. In a different experiment, we now have cooled the original NRM of untreated grains to 5 K, and then measured the hysteresis loop. Again, in several separate grains we observed large shifts of the hysteresis curves. This shows that exchange bias develops also from the untreated NRM. This observation proves that the moments, which carry the NRM, also participate in the exchange coupling at the hematite-ilmenite interfaces. Therefore, the NRM is not carried by defect moments or stress-induced moments, which occur in normal bulk hematite. A closer look at the NRM-induced LT loops shows that exchange bias acts in both field directions, though one direction is clearly predominant. This observation can be interpreted as a frozen equilibrium of different proportions of oppositely directed lamellar moments, a key feature of the original lamellar magnetism hypothesis. We discuss

  20. Monitoring of lateral hyporheic exchange fluxes and hyporheic travel times at the newly established Steinlach Test Site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osenbrück, K.; Lemke, D.; Schwientek, M.; Callisto Alvarez, M. C.; Wöhling, Th.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange is believed to significantly contribute to the retention and degradation of pollutants during downstream transport in surface waters. A better understanding of the relevant hydraulic drivers of stream water infiltration into the hyporheic zone in conjunction with the associated biogeochemical processes is needed in order to quantify the self-cleaning potential of rivers and to predict water quality changes. Key parameters include the spatial and temporal variation of stream water infiltration (i.e. hyporheic exchange) and the distribution of hyporheic travel times. In this study we present the setup, performance and first results of a multi-disciplinary hyporheic monitoring program at the newly established Steinlach Test Site (STS) near Tübingen in Southern Germany. The STS covers an area of about 0.6 ha and consists of a river loop located within a sub-catchment of the Neckar river. The main objective is the quantification and interrelation of hyporheic processes including hyporheic exchange, travel-time distributions, microbial community dynamics and biochemical pollutant turnover at the groundwater-surface water interface. Here we will focus on the extent and time scale of hyporheic exchange fluxes at the STS derived from time series of temperature (T), specific electrical conductivity (EC), and δ18O of water. The STS is equipped with more than 30 piezometers, most of them containing automatic water level, T and EC probes. Additional water samples for major ions, stable isotopes and other water quality parameters were taken in the course of flood events in summer 2011. The sand and gravel aquifer in the subsurface of the STS is characterised by a complex geometry with heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity. Low residence times in the southern part are confirmed by a small to negligible response in EC and T at the respective piezometers compared to the large variation of EC in the stream water. Using deconvolution techniques, a mean travel time

  1. Lamellar magnetism and exchange bias in billion-year-old titanohematite with nanoscale ilmenite exsolution lamellae: I. Mineral and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Robinson, Peter; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Fabian, Karl; Dyar, Darby; Sklute, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Recent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in South Norway have revealed numerous remanent anomalies over Mesoproterozoic metamorphic rocks. Studies on the nature of the minerals that are the remanent carriers has led to discoveries of titanohematite samples with unusual magnetic properties caused by nanoscale exsolution lamellae with their related lamellar magnetism. Here we focus on a rock unit dominated by quartz-plagioclase-biotite granulite containing titanohematite grains with a strong lattice-preferred orientation parallel to regional foliation. When samples with their natural remanent magnetization (NRM), acquired nearly 1 billion years ago, are cooled to 10 K and hysteresis loops measured, these loops show bi-modal exchange bias caused by the magnetism induced within the ilmenite by antiferromagnetic coupling with the adjacent lamellar NRM. By contrast when the samples are cooled in a strong magnetic field (1.5 Tesla), this results in unimodal lamellar magnetism, and, below the TN of ilmenite it adopts a consistent negative orientation, giving rise to unimodal negative exchange bias of >500 mT. The results presented here cover the chemical and magnetic properties, Mossbauer results and transmission electron microscopy of the titanohematite and ilmenite lamellae. Initial magnetic experiments indicated the shifts found in the exchange-bias experiments were directly related to the orientation of the sample to the applied field and the initial state of the NRM. In most samples with these unusual magnetic properties, ilmenite lamellae could not be seen in an optical or a scanning electron microscope. However magnetic experiments gave proof of the presence of ilmenite, later confirmed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Several attempts were made to identify ilmenite in TEM studies, finally successful in showing ilmenite lamellae parallel to (001) of hematite with thicknesses ˜1.2 to 1.7 nm and aspect ratios 7-13. Here we compare new TEM images and the magnetic

  2. Pulse-voltage-driven dynamical switching of perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/Au/Cr2O3/Pt thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Van Anh; Shiratsuchi, Yu; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the pulse-voltage-driven dynamical switching of perpendicular exchange bias in a Pt/Co/Au/Cr2O3/Pt thin film observed at pulse amplitudes exceeding the DC switching threshold is investigated. The switching time decreases with increasing pulse amplitude, reaching values below 10 ns at an amplitude two times higher than the above threshold. Conversely, several hundreds of nanoseconds is required for switching at amplitudes close to the threshold, suggesting that the switching mechanism is dominated by the motion of magnetic domains of the antiferromagnetic layer.

  3. Negative magnetization and the tunable exchange bias field in LaCr0.8Mn0.2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Tribedi; Ravi, S.

    2014-05-01

    Manganese substituted Lanthanum chromite LaCr0.8Mn0.2O3 exhibits negative magnetization with decrease in temperature under the field cooled (FC) condition for the applied field H≤2000 Oe. The maximum magnetic compensation temperature, (Tcomp) was 147 K. A reentrant positive magnetization was observed at T≤50 K due to low temperature transition. The negative magnetization is explained by considering the paramagnetic moment of Mn ions under the influence of negative internal field. Measurement of magnetic hysteresis loops under FC condition shows the presence of exchange bias field at T

  4. Thermally driven asymmetric responses of grains versus spin-glass related distributions of blocking temperature in exchange biased Co/IrMn bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, V.

    2013-02-11

    Controlling ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic blocking temperatures in exchange biased based devices appears crucial for applications. The blocking temperature is ascribed to the ability of both antiferromagnetic grains and interfacial spin-glass-like phases to withstand ferromagnetic magnetization reversal. To better understand the respective contributions of grains versus spin-glass, blocking temperature distributions were measured after various thermal treatments for cobalt/iridium-manganese bilayers. The high-temperature contribution linked to antiferromagnetic grains shifts towards lower temperatures above a threshold thermal annealing. In contrast, the occurrence and evolution of training effects for the low-temperature contribution only agree with its inferred interfacial spin-glass-like origin.

  5. Effect of ball milling and thermal treatment on exchange bias and magnetocaloric properties of Ni48Mn39.5Sn10.5Al2 ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, P.; Przewoźnik, J.; Fitta, M.; Bałanda, M.; Chrobak, A.; Kania, B.; Zackiewicz, P.; Wójcik, A.; Szlezynger, M.; Maziarz, W.

    2016-03-01

    The combined effect of ball milling and subsequent heat treatment on microstructure, magnetic, magnetocaloric and exchange bias properties of Ni48Mn39.5Sn10.5Al2 ribbons is reported. The annealing treatment results in the increase of the critical martensitic transformation temperature. The magnetic entropy change ΔSM of the order of 7.9 and -2.3 J kg K-1 for the annealed 50-32 μm powder fraction is determined. This is less than in the as melt spun ribbon but appears at a considerably higher temperature. At the same time EB is decreased due to annealing treatment. This decrease is attributed to the strengthened ferromagnetic exchange coupling due heat induced stress and structural relaxation.

  6. Exchange bias in Fe/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core-shell magnetic nanoparticles mediated by frozen interfacial spins.

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Q. K.; Wei, A.; Lin, X.-M.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Purdue Univ.

    2009-10-01

    The magnetization curves of monodisperse Fe/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core-shell and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow-shell nanoparticles reveal an unusual exchange-bias effect. Hysteresis measurements of core-shell particles at 5 K after field cooling exhibit a large loop shift associated with unidirectional anisotropy whereas Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow-shell nanoparticles support much smaller shifts. Both core-shell and hollow-shell particles exhibit sharp demagnetization jumps at low fields associated with a sudden switching of shell moments. Temperature-dependent magnetization of core-shell particles at high fields shows a deviation between field-cooled and zero-field-cooled curves below 30 K, suggesting the presence of frozen spins at the interface. These frozen interfacial spins play an important role in mediating the exchange coupling between the ferromagnetic core and ferrimagnetic shell.

  7. Observation of giant exchange bias in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Jyoti; Suresh, K. G.

    2015-02-16

    We report a giant exchange bias (EB) field of 3520 Oe in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy. The low temperature magnetic state of the martensite phase has been studied by DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements. Frequency dependence of spin freezing temperature (T{sub f}) on critical slowing down relation and observation of memory effect in zero field cooling mode confirms the super spin glass (SSG) phase at low temperatures. Large EB is attributed to the strong exchange coupling between the SSG clusters formed by small regions of ferromagnetic order embedded in an antiferromagnetic (AFM) matrix. The temperature and cooling field dependence of EB have been studied and related to the change in unidirectional anisotropy at SSG/AFM interface. The training effect also corroborates with the presence of frozen (SSG) moments at the interface and their role in EB.

  8. Exchange bias study of sub-100 nm-diameter CoFeB/IrMn antidot and nanodot arrays fabricated by nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Leung, C. W.; Chiu, C.-C.; Lin, K.-W.; Chan, Mansun; Zhou, Y.; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2017-09-01

    Exchange-coupled bilayers are widely used as pinned layers in nanometric spintronic devices. In this work, sub-100 nm-diameter CoFeB/IrMn antidot and nanodot arrays were patterned by nanosphere lithography. The exchange bias (Hex) and coercivity (Hc) of the nanostructures and continuous films exhibit similar exponential dependence on CoFeB layer thickness. Magnetic field annealing results in changed crystallinity, surface roughness, and magnetic properties. Reduced Hc and enhanced Hex are observed after annealing at low temperatures, while high-temperature annealing results in higher Hc and lower Hex. This work provides physical insights on the magnetization reversal response in nanosized spintronic devices involving CoFeB/IrMn reference layers.

  9. Wounds on Wheels: Implementing a Specialized Wound Clinic within an Established Syringe Exchange Program in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria Elisa; Serio-Chapman, Chris; Chaulk, Patrick; Johnson, Kristine E.

    2014-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience a high incidence of abscesses and chronic wounds. However, many PWID delay seeking care for their wounds. In 2012, the Baltimore Needle Exchange Program (BNEP) in Baltimore, Maryland, partnered with the Johns Hopkins Wound Healing Center to establish a mobile BNEP Wound Clinic. This clinic provided specialized wound care for BNEP patients. In sixteen months, the clinic treated 78 unique patients during 172 visits overall. On average, each visit cost the program $146.45, which was substantially less than clinic-based treatment. This program demonstrates that specialized wound care can be effectively provided through mobile outreach. A community-based service delivery approach might serve as a model for local health departments looking to improve the health of PWID. PMID:25211723

  10. Wounds on wheels: implementing a specialized wound clinic within an established syringe exchange program in Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Robinowitz, Natanya; Smith, Maria Elisa; Serio-Chapman, Chris; Chaulk, Patrick; Johnson, Kristine E

    2014-11-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience a high incidence of abscesses and chronic wounds. However, many PWID delay seeking care for their wounds. In 2012, the Baltimore Needle Exchange Program (BNEP) in Baltimore, Maryland, partnered with the Johns Hopkins Wound Healing Center to establish a mobile BNEP Wound Clinic. This clinic provided specialized wound care for BNEP patients. In sixteen months, the clinic treated 78 unique patients during 172 visits overall. On average, each visit cost the program $146.45, which was substantially less than clinic-based treatment. This program demonstrates that specialized wound care can be effectively provided through mobile outreach. A community-based service delivery approach might serve as a model for local health departments looking to improve the health of PWID.

  11. Effect of antiferromagnet on exchange bias in systems with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling and inverted ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic core-matrix morphology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Ma, Yan; Liu, Yan; Du, An

    2010-11-01

    A modified Monte Carlo Metropolis method is performed to simulate the effects of antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J(AF) and anisotropy K(AF) on exchange bias field H(E) and coercivity H(C) in the nanoparticle systems with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling and inverted ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic core-matrix morphology after cooling in weak and strong fields H(CF), respectively. The results show that the J(AF) dependence of H(E) is insensitive, except obvious changes occur at intermediate J(AF) for two H(CF). When the values of J(AF) are weak, the absolute values of H(E) may keep at a relatively large value. H(C) has a peak at approximately J(AF) = -0.6 with the increase of J(AF) for weak H(CF), while the opposite trend appears for the case of strong H(CF). H(E) is negative and its absolute value increases with the increase of K(AF) for weak H(CF), so does the trend of H(E) with K(AF) for strong H(CF) as K(AF) < or = 6. However, with further increase of K(AF) for strong H(CF), H(E) varies from the negative value to the positive value. Whereas H(C) for two values of H(CF) both decrease and finally level off with increasing K(AF). Variations of antiferromagnetic exchange interaction and anisotropy may alter the net magnetization and the pinning ability of spins on the surface of frustrated antiferromagnetic cores, resulting in the change of pinning configuration in the antiferromagnet during the magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic spins to influence the exchange bias.

  12. Exchange bias in sputtered FeNi/FeMn systems: Effect of short low-temperature heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Peter; Guzmán, Jorge; Lepalovskij, Vladimir; Svalov, Andrey; Kurlyandskaya, Galina; Asenjo, Agustina; Vas'kovskiy, Vladimir; Vazquez, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Short (5 min) post-deposition thermal treatments under magnetic field at low temperature (up to 200 °C) performed in exchange-coupled FeNi(40 nm)/FeMn(20 nm) bilayer thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are shown to be effective to significantly modify their exchange field (from around 40 Oe down to 27 Oe) between FeNi and FeMn layers. A similar exchange field decrease was observed for the first deposited FeNi layer of the FeNi(40 nm)/FeMn(20 nm)/FeNi(40 nm) trilayer films after the same thermal treatments. The exchange field value for the second FeNi layer was not substantially changed. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicates that such a heat treatment has no effect on the grain size and crystalline texture of the films, while atomic force microscope studies reveal an increase of the surface roughness after the treatment which is more noticeable in the case of the trilayer film. Analysis of the experimental results leads us to conclude that the variations of the exchange field after heat treatment are likely caused by a modification of interfacial roughness and/or interfacial magnetic structure, but unlikely by the changes in the microstructure and/or changes of composition of the antiferromagnetic FeMn layer.

  13. Intriguing photo-control of exchange bias in BiFeO3/La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 substrates.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kil Dong; Lee, Tae Kwon; Jung, Jong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To date, electric fields have been widely used to control the magnetic properties of BiFeO3-based antiferromagnet/ferromagnet heterostructures through application of an exchange bias. To extend the applicability of exchange bias, however, an alternative mechanism to electric fields is required. Here, we report the photo-control of exchange bias in BiFeO3/La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 thin films on an SrTiO3 substrate. Through an ex situ pulsed laser deposition technique, we successfully synthesized epitaxial BiFeO3/La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 substrates. By measuring magnetoresistance under light illumination, we investigated the effect of light illumination on resistance, exchange bias, and coercive field in BiFeO3/La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 thin films. After illumination of red and blue lights, the exchange bias was sharply reduced compared to that measured in the dark. With increasing light intensity, the exchange bias under red and blue lights initially decreased to zero and then appeared again. It is possible to reasonably explain these behaviors by considering photo-injection from SrTiO3 and the photo-conductivity of La2/3Sr1/3MnO3. This study may provide a fundamental understanding of the mechanism underlying photo-controlled exchange bias, which is significant for the development of new functional spintronic devices.

  14. Amorphous FeCoSiB for exchange bias coupled and decoupled magnetoelectric multilayer systems: Real-structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hrkac, V.; Strobel, J.; Kienle, L.; Lage, E.; Köppel, G.; McCord, J.; Quandt, E.; Meyners, D.

    2014-10-07

    The effect of field annealing for exchanged biased multilayer films is studied with respect to the resultant structural and magnetic film properties. The presented multilayer stacks comprise repeating sequences of Ta/Cu/(1 1 1) textured antiferromagnetic Mn₇₀Ir₃₀ /amorphous ferromagnetic Fe₇₀.₂Co₇.₈Si₂B₁₀. Within the ferromagnetic layers crystalline filaments are observed. An additional Ta layer between the antiferromagnet and ferromagnet is used in order to investigate and separate the influence of the common Mn₇₀Ir₃₀/Fe₇₀.₂Co₇.₈Si₁₂B₁₀ interface on the occurring filaments and structural changes. In situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy is used for a comprehensive structure characterization of multilayer stacks for selected temperature stages. Up to 250 °C, the multilayers are structurally unaltered and preserve the as-deposited condition. A deliberate increase to 350 °C exhibits different crystallization processes for the films, depending on the presence of crystal nuclei within the amorphous ferromagnetic layer. The influence of volume-to-surface ratio of the multilayer stacks to the crystallization process is emphasized by the comparison of in situ and ex situ investigations as the respective specimen thickness is changed. Complementary magnetic studies reveal a defined exchange bias obtained at the first annealing step and a decrease of total anisotropy field with partial crystallization after the subsequent annealing at 350 °C.

  15. Interfacial Spin Glass State and Exchange Bias in the Epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-wei; Guan, Xiao-fen; Bai, Yu-hao; Quan, Zhi-yong; Jiang, Feng-xian; Xu, Xiao-hong

    2017-05-01

    We study the magnetic properties of an epitaxial growth bilayer composed of ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and paramagnetic LaNiO3 (LNO) on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. We find that the stack order of the bilayer heterostructure plays a key role in the interfacial coupling strength, and the coupling at the LSMO(top)/LNO(bottom) interface is much stronger than that at the LNO(top)/LSMO(bottom). Moreover, a strong spin glass state has been observed at the LSMO/LNO interface, which is further confirmed by two facts: first, that the dependence of the irreversible temperature on the cooling magnetic field follows the Almeida-Thouless line and, second, that the relaxation of the thermal remnant magnetization can be fitted by a stretched exponential function. Interestingly, we also find an exchange bias effect at the LSMO/LNO bilayer below the spin glass freezing temperature, indicating that the exchange bias is strongly correlated with the spin glass state at its interface.

  16. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; establishment of exchanges and qualified health plans; exchange standards for employers. Final rule, Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-27

    This final rule will implement the new Affordable Insurance Exchanges ("Exchanges"), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for individuals and small employers to directly compare available private health insurance options on the basis of price, quality, and other factors. The Exchanges, which will become operational by January 1, 2014, will help enhance competition in the health insurance market, improve choice of affordable health insurance, and give small businesses the same purchasing clout as large businesses.

  17. The exchange bias in NiFe2O4-CoO nanocomposite prepared by polyol process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveena, Singh, M.; Sharma, S. K.

    2017-05-01

    Exchange coupled NiFe2O4-CoO nanocomposite (NFOC) was synthesized by polyol process using NiFe2O4 seed. The nanocomposite was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SQUID magnetometer. A Field cooled hysteresis curve of NFOC at 4 K is clear signature of strong internal interaction and co-existence of different magnetic phases into the individual particles. The strong interfacial exchange coupling between the AFM and FiM part results in high value of coercivity with completely shifted loop along negative field axis.

  18. Bias in the exchange of arguments: the case of scientists' evaluation of lay viewpoints on GM food.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, Eefje; Hisschemøller, Matthijs; Midden, Cees

    2009-09-01

    Most perspectives on public participation share the notion that dialogues should be open, allowing participants to articulate and evaluate different views and knowledge claims. We hypothesize that participants' evaluation of claims may be biased because participants have a preference for a particular type or source of a claim. This would hamper an open dialogue. We tested the effect of three variables on scientists' evaluation of claims of the general public about GM food: the claim's favorability towards GM food, the phrasing, and the source of the claim. Results are based on a survey-experiment among 73 biotechnology-scientists. Biased processing occurred when scientists evaluated claims. Claims that were corresponding with the attitude of the scientists and that were phrased in a cognitive way were evaluated more positively than claims that were contrasting the attitude of the scientists and that were phrased in an affective way. Contrary to our expectation, scientists evaluated claims of the public more positively than claims of experts.

  19. Brillouin Light Scattering study of the rotatable magnetic anisotropy in exchange biased bilayers of Ni81 Fe19 Ir20 Mn80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Roberto; Oliveira, Alexandre; Estrada, Francisco; Santos, Obed; Azevedo, Antonio; Rezende, Sergio

    It is known that when a ferromagnet (FM) is in atomic contact with an antiferromagnet (AF) the exchange coupling between the FM and AF spins at the interface induces a unidirectional anisotropy in the ferromagnetic film. This effect is known as exchange bias (EB). Despite the large amount of research on this topic there are still several aspects of the EB mechanism that are not well understood. One of this aspects is the origin of the rotatable anisotropy in polycrystalline AFs. By means of Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS) measurements, we investigated the dependence of the rotatable anisotropy field HRA and exchange field HE with the magnitude of the external magnetic field (Ho) in FM/AM bilayers of Ni81Fe19(10nm)/Ir20Mn80(tAF) . We developed an algorithm to numerically fit the in-plane angular dependence of the magnon frequency, at a fixed value of Ho measured by BLS. From the fit parameters we were able to investigate HRA and HE dependency on Ho. The results reveal that HRA value depends on Ho, so we argue that AF grain distribution at the interface is partially modified by the applied field strength. Contrary to this, the relation between HE and Ho is not straightforward, remaining constant at high values of Ho.

  20. Phase separation and exchange biasing in the ferromagnetic IV-VI semiconductor Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, R. T.; Springholz, G.; Hassan, M.; Groiss, H.; Kirchschlager, R.; Stangl, J.; Hrauda, N.; Bauer, G.

    2010-07-12

    Ferromagnetic Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te grown by molecular beam epitaxy with Mn content of x{sub Mn}approx =0.5 is shown to exhibit a strong tendency for phase separation. At higher growth temperatures apart from the cubic Ge{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}Te, a hexagonal MnTe and a rhombohedral distorted Ge{sub 0.83}Mn{sub 0.17}Te phase is formed. This coexistence of antiferromagnetic MnTe and ferromagnetic Ge{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}Te results in magnetic exchange-bias effects.

  1. Non-collinear magnetism and exchange bias at the FM NiFe/AFM NiMn interface: local spin density FLAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Freeman, A. J.; Wang, D.-S.; Zhong, L.; Fernandez-de-Castro, J.

    2001-03-01

    Magnetism at interfaces, such as the exchange bias between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, has attracted great attention because of technological applications. In order to investigate magnetic structures at the FM/AFM interface, we have implemented the FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, PRB 24, 864(1981)) methodologies including non-collinear magnetism, in which the magnetic moment direction as well as the magnitude can vary continuously all over space. We first demonstrate this approach to determine the structure of a magnetic structure at an interface between FM NiFe and AFM NiMn. Although both bulk systems each show collinear FM and AFM structures, we found that a perpendicular magnetic orientation at their interface is energetically favorable, where the magnetic moments of the FM NiFe tend to lie perpendicular to those of AFM NiMn.

  2. Probing the ground state and zero-field cooled exchange bias by magnetoresistance measurement in Mn50Ni41Sn9 ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiyun; Tu, Ruikang; Fang, Xiaoting; Gu, Quanchao; Zhou, Yanying; Cui, Rongjing; Han, Zhida; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Chengliang; Jiang, Xuefan

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a new type of exchange bias (EB) after zero-field cooling has attracted considerable interest mainly in bulk magnetic competing systems. Here, we use a detailed magnetotransport investigation to probe the ground state and zero-field cooled EB (ZEB) in Mn50Ni41Sn9 ribbon. Both ZEB and field cooled EB were detected in magnetoresistance results consistent with magnetic measurement. A pure spin-glass ground state is proposed based on parabolic shape of low-field magnetoresistance combined with AC magnetization, memory effect. The appearance of ZEB is attributed to the field-induced nucleation and growth of ferromagnetic domains in the spin glass matrix forming unidirectional anisotropy at the interface.

  3. Optimization of magneto-resistive response of ion-irradiated exchange biased films through zigzag arrangement of magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; McCord, Jeffrey; Langer, Manuel; Fassbender, Jürgen; Mönch, Ingolf; Mattheis, Roland

    2014-03-14

    Exchange coupled ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Ir{sub 23}Mn{sub 77} films with a zigzag alignment of magnetization are prepared by local ion irradiation. The anisotropic magneto-resistive behavior of the magnetic thin film structures is correlated to the magnetic structure and modeled. A unique uniaxial field sensitivity along the net magnetization alignment is obtained through the orthogonally modulated and magnetic domain wall stabilized magnetic ground state. Controlling local thin film magnetization distributions and, thus, the overall magnetization response opens unique ways to tailor the magneto-resistive sensitivity of functional magnetic thin film devices.

  4. Effect of L1{sub 2} ordering in antiferromagnetic Ir-Mn epitaxial layer on exchange bias of FePd films

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. C.; Duh, J. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsiao, S. N. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Liu, S. H.; Su, S. H.; Chiu, K. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lin, Y. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Lee, H. Y.; Sung, C. K.

    2015-05-07

    Two series of samples of single-layer IrMn and IrMn/FePd bilayer films, deposited on a single-crystal MgO substrate at different IrMn deposition temperatures (T{sub s} = 300–700 °C), were investigated using magnetron sputtering. L1{sub 2} ordering was revealed for the 30 nm-thick IrMn epitaxial (001) films with T{sub s} ≥ 400 °C, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD results also provide evidence of the epitaxial growth of the IrMn films on MgO substrate. Increasing T{sub s} from 400 to 700 °C monotonically increases the ordering parameter of L1{sub 2} phases from 0.17 to 0.81. An in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) of 22 Oe is obtained in a 10 nm-thick FePd film that is deposited on the disordered IrMn films. As the L1{sub 2} ordering of the IrMn layers increases, the H{sub eb} gradually decreases to 0 Oe, meaning that the exchange bias behavior vanishes. The increased surface roughness, revealed by atomic force microscopy, of the epitaxial IrMn layers with increasing T{sub s} cannot be the main cause of the decrease in H{sub eb} due to the compensated surface spins regardless of the disordered and ordered (001) IrMn layers. The change of antiferromagnetic structure from the A1 to the L1{sub 2} phase was correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  5. Simultaneous Kerr and Faraday investigations of boundary magnetization and order parameter switching in voltage-controllable exchange bias films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junlei; Echtenkamp, Will; Street, Mike; Binek, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetoelectric oxides are of great interest for ultra-low power spintronics with memory and logic function. A key property for the realization of electrically switchable state variables is the voltage-controlled boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. It allows electric switching of an adjacent exchange coupled ferromagnetic layer in the absence of dissipative currents. Previous surface sensitive measurements of boundary magnetization in thin films of the archetypical magnetoelectric antiferromagnet chromia lacked explicit demonstration of the predicted rigid coupling between the bulk antiferromagnetic order parameter and the boundary magnetization. We designed a magneto-optical setup allowing simultaneous measurement of Kerr and Faraday rotation. Our experiments correlate electric field induced bulk magneto-optical effects (non-reciprocal rotation), including the response on switching of the antiferromagnetic order parameter, with the boundary magnetization. Our results suggest that switching of a ferromagnetic film strongly exchange coupled to a magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic ultra-thin film allows switching of the antiferromagnetic order parameter. We investigate the possibility that this switching phenomenon might induce a voltage pulse via a generalized variation of the inverse linear magnetoelectric effect. This project was supported by SRC through CNFD, an SRC-NRI Center, by C-SPIN, part of STARnet, and by the NSF through MRSEC.

  6. Antisite-disorder driven large exchange bias effect in phase separated La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 double perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, R. C.; Paladhi, D.; Dasgupta, Papri; Poddar, A.; Singh, Ripandeep; Das, A.; Nath, T. K.

    2017-04-01

    Investigations of structural and magnetic properties of polycrystalline hole doped double perovskite La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 has clearly revealed the existence of structural antisite-disorder (either, Co-O-Co or Mn-O-Mn) in the system. The ordering of Co2+ and Mn4+ gives rise to a ferromagnetic transition around 157 K. A spin-canted antiferromagnetic transition is found in this material at TCAFM 9 K. The effect of antisite-disorder in the double perovskite structure is most likely the prime reason for antiferromagnetic interaction. The temperature dependent inverse susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss like behaviour and it yields an effective paramagnetic moment of 6.49 μB. At very low temperature (Texchange bias (EB) field of HEB 5.5 kOe and can be tuned by the cooling field. The presence of zero-field cooled spontaneous EB effect (P-type and N-type) is confirmed to be not an experimental artefact - an inherent property of this double perovskite material. A phenomenological model has been proposed to explain the exchange coupling between the ferromagnetic and canted-antiferromagnetic interfaces of antisite-disordered La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 mainly on the basis of uncompensated interface spins.

  7. Shape anisotropy and exchange bias in magnetic flattened nanospindles with metallic/oxide core/shell structures.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel; Luna, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    A preliminary study of the magnetic phenomenology of Fe and Fe90Co10 nanospindles with axial ratio equal to 5 is presented. These nanospindles are constituted by single-domains single-crystals coated by oxide surface layer and assembled in chains into the nanospindle. The thermal dependence of the coercive field and the saturation magnetization in the temperature range from 4 K up to room temperature indicates that the coercive field is roughly proportional to the saturation magnetization (which follows the T3/2 Bloch law) at temperatures above the blocking temperature of the oxide. This suggests that the predominant source of magnetic anisotropy in this temperature range is the shape anisotropy. However, at temperatures below the oxide blocking temperature, the magnetic coupling between the spins of the oxide and the nanocrystals is produced at the interface. This exchange coupling enhances the effective anisotropy of the nanospindles and the coercive field increases more abruptly than the saturation of magnetization as temperature decreases.

  8. Thermal nanoimprint process for high-temperature fabrication of mesoscale epitaxial exchange-biased metallic wire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Weiss, D. N.; Krishnan, K. M.

    2011-04-01

    A thermal nanoimprint process for the high-temperature (400 °C) fabrication of submicron, epitaxial, metallic wire arrays over areas > 1 × 1 cm2 is reported. Based on a method using an imprinted polymeric bilayer resist template that is transferred to a metallic (molybdenum) mask, this process is enabled by an appropriate undercut profile of the Mo mask. The undercut profile is obtained from a distinctive wedge-shaped profile of the polymeric resist layers by carefully controlling the etch parameters. Using flexible ethylene tetrafluoroethylene imprint molds, we demonstrate defect-free imprinting on MgO substrates. Epitaxial patterning is demonstrated with Fe/MnPd bilayer wire arrays subsequently grown along well-defined crystallographic orientations. X-ray diffraction of the patterned arrays reveals that the MnPd can be grown in two different crystallographic orientations (c-axis and a-axis normals). The epitaxial nature of the patterned arrays is further confirmed by magnetic measurements that demonstrate the competing effects of intrinsic (magnetocrystalline and exchange) and lithography-induced shape anisotropies on the magnetization reversal characteristics along different directions with respect to the axis of the wire arrays.

  9. Interface-induced spontaneous positive and conventional negative exchange bias effects in bilayer La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Eu0.45Sr0.55MnO3 heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J Krishna; Kumar, P S Anil

    2017-07-31

    We report zero-field-cooled spontaneous-positive and field-cooled conventional-negative exchange bias effects in epitaxial bilayer composed of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) with ferromagnetic (FM) and Eu0.45Sr0.55MnO3 (ESMO) with A-type antiferromagnetic (AF) heterostructures respectively. A temperature dependent magnetization study of LSMO/ESMO bilayers grown on SrTiO3 (001) manifest FM ordering (TC) of LSMO at ~320 K, charge/orbital ordering of ESMO at ~194 K and AF ordering (TN) of ESMO at ~150 K. The random field Ising model has demonstrated an interesting observation of inverse dependence of exchange bias effect on AF layer thickness due to the competition between FM-AF interface coupling and AF domain wall energy. The isothermally field induced unidirectional exchange anisotropy formed at the interface of FM-LSMO layer and the kinetically phase-arrested magnetic phase obtained from the metamagnetic AF-ESMO layer could be responsible for the spontaneous exchange bias effect. Importantly, no magnetic poling is needed, as necessary for the applications. The FM-AF interface exchange interaction has been ascribed to the AF coupling with [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text], coupling constant between AF spins) for the spontaneous positive hysteresis loop shift, and the field-cooled conventional exchange bias has been attributed to the ferromagnetically exchanged interface with [Formula: see text] (coupling constant between FM spins).

  10. Exchange bias and surface effects in bimagnetic CoO -core /Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 -shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavorato, Gabriel; Winkler, Elin; Ghirri, Alberto; Lima, Enio; Peddis, Davide; Troiani, Horacio E.; Fiorani, Dino; Agostinelli, Elisabetta; Rinaldi, Daniele; Zysler, Roberto D.

    2016-08-01

    Bimagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for the design of new materials with controlled properties, which requires a comprehensive investigation of their magnetic behavior due to multiple effects arising from their complex structure. In this work we fabricated bimagnetic core/shell nanoparticles formed by an ˜3 -nm antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoO core encapsulated within an ˜1.5 -nm ferrimagnetic (FiM) Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 shell, aiming at studying the enhancement of the magnetic anisotropy and the surface effects of a ferrimagnetic oxide shell. The magnetic properties of as-synthesized and annealed samples were analyzed by ac and dc magnetization measurements. The results indicate that the magnetic response of the as-synthesized particles is governed by the superparamagnetic behavior of the interacting nanoaggregates of spins that constitute the disordered ferrimagnetic shell, whose total moments block at =49 K and collectively freeze in a superspin-glass-type state at =3 K. On the other hand, annealed nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and behave as an exchange-coupled system below the blocking temperature =70 K, with enhanced coercivity HC(10 K) ˜14.6 kOe and exchange bias field HE B(10 K) ˜2.3 kOe, compared with the as-synthesized system where HC(10 K) ˜5.5 kOe and HE B(10 K) ˜0.8 kOe. Our results, interpreted using different models for thermally activated and surface relaxation processes, can help clarify the complex magnetic behavior of many core/shell and hollow nanoparticle systems.

  11. Magnetic compensation phenomenon and the sign reversal in the exchange bias field in a single crystal of Nd0.75Ho0.25Al2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P. D.; Thamizhavel, A.; Rakhecha, V. C.; Nigam, A. K.; Paulose, P. L.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    In the Nd0.75Ho0.25Al2 alloy system, the magnetic moments of Nd and Ho occupying the same crystallographic site randomly are antiferromagnetically coupled via long-range indirect exchange interaction mediated by the conduction electrons. A single crystal grown at this stoichiometry displays a magnetic compensation behavior (Tcomp~24 K) in all orientations. In the close vicinity of Tcomp, the magnetization hysteresis loops measured for H || [100] assume an asymmetric shape, and the notion of an exchange bias field (Hexch) surfaces. Hexch changes sign across Tcomp as the left shift of the loops transforms to the right shift. This phase reversal appears to correlate with the corresponding reversal in the directions of the local magnetic moments of Nd3+ and Ho3+ ions together with that of the conduction electron polarization (CEP). Near Tcomp, where the opposing contributions to the net magnetization from local magnetic moments are nearly equal, the contribution from CEP assumes an accentuated significance. Interestingly, the width of the M-H loop shows a divergence, followed by a collapse on approaching Tcomp from high- as well as low-temperature ends. The observed behavior confirms a long-standing prediction based on a phenomenological model for ferrimagnetic systems. The field-induced changes in the magnetization data leave an imprint of a quasi-phase transition in the heat capacity data. Magneto-resistance (ΔR/R vs. T) has an oscillatory response, in which onset of magnetic ordering and phase reversal in magnetic orientations can be recognized.

  12. Griffiths phase, spin-phonon coupling, and exchange bias effect in double perovskite Pr{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenjie; Shi, Lei Zhou, Shiming; Zhao, Jiyin; Li, Yang; Guo, Yuqiao

    2014-11-21

    The ceramic Pr{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} of double perovskite structure is prepared by a solid-state reaction and the magnetic properties, phonon behaviors are studied in detail. Two ferromagnetic transitions at T{sub C1} ∼ 172 K and T{sub C2} ∼ 140 K are observed in the temperature-dependent magnetization curves, respectively. Furthermore, a detail analysis on the magnetic susceptibility reveals that a short-range ferromagnetic clustered state exists above T{sub C1}, which can be well described as the Griffiths phase with a well-defined Griffiths temperature T{sub G} ∼ 210 K. The presence of the B-site antisite defects is considered to contribute to the observed Griffiths singularity. Temperature-dependent Raman scattering experiment reveals an obvious softening of the phonon mode involving stretching vibrations of the (Co/Mn)O{sub 6} octahedra in FM temperature regions, indicating a close correlation between magnetism and lattice in Pr{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6}. On the other hand, it is found that the phonon softening extends up to T{sub G}, which further confirms the preformation of the short-range ferromagnetic clusters up to T{sub G}. Moreover, the field-cooling magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that exchange bias phenomena is present, which is supposed to origin from the exchange coupling between Co/Mn ordered ferromagnetic phases with antiferromagnetic antiphase boundaries caused by the partially Co/Mn antisite disorders. These findings give a systematic understanding on the magnetic interaction in Pr{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} which is closely related to the lattice and atomic distribution, and add special interest for application of this material.

  13. The APHL/CDC Public Health Laboratory Interoperability Project Portal: A Web-based Collaborative Tool to Establish a National Harmonized Vocabulary for Public Health Data Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, Robert; Li, Wenkai; Meigs, Michelle; Abner, Sheila; Carroll, John; Miller, Charles; Zarcone, Patina; Hinrichs, Steven; Nordenberg, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Public health laboratories at all capacity levels are facing challenges in exchanging electronic data among themselves and with their partners. In response to this the Association of Public Health Laboratories working collaboratively with CDC launched an innovative portal development project in January 2006. This portal will enable public health laboratories to collaborate in a web-based environment to establish a standardized vocabulary for test identifications and test results, a cornerstone for creating interoperable information systems. PMID:17238618

  14. In-plane magnetic pattern separation in NiFe/NiO and Co/NiO exchange biased bilayers investigated by magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, A.; Krug, I.; Kronenberger, A.; Ehlers, A.; Engel, D.

    2004-09-01

    Ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP) was used to write in-plane magnetized micro and submicron patterns in exchange biased magnetic bilayers, where the magnetization directions of the adjacent patterns are antiparallel to each other in remanence. These magnetic patterns were investigated by non-contact magnetic force microscopy (MFM). It is shown that the recorded MFM images of the IBMP patterns in two exemplarily chosen standard layer systems (NiFe (4.8 nm)/NiO (68 nm) and Co (4.8 nm)/NiO (68 nm)) can be well described by a model within the point-dipole approximation for the tip magnetization. For 5 and 0.9 μm wide bar patterns the domain wall widths between adjacent magnetically patterned areas were determined to a≈1 μm. The minimum magnetically stable pattern width was estimated to be 0.7 μm in the standard system Co (4.8 nm)/NiO (68 nm).

  15. Bridging amount of spin-glasses over ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic thin films and bit-cell dispersion of exchange bias in corresponding TA-MRAM devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmaldinov, Kamil; Ducruet, Clarisse; Alvarez-Herault, Jeremy; Baltz, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    For thermally-assisted magnetic random access memories (TA-MRAM), lowering bit-cells dispersions of exchange bias is necessary. In this study, we prove that spin-glass-like phases (SG) spread over the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) storage layer are the main cause of such distributions once the film is nanofabricated into a device. In particular, we show that the less the SG, the lower the bit-cell dispersion. More precisely, the amount of SG was varied from sample to sample by sputtering various AFs: IrMn, FeMn and their alloys. Blocking temperature distributions were measured to quantify the amount of SG at the wafer level. The wafers were then patterned to obtain 1kb devices and all the cells were tested electrically. Finally, the resulting loop shift cumulative distribution functions accounting for the bit-cell dispersions were correlated to the initial amount of SG. In addition to bridging the gap between fundamental SG and a technological application, we also demonstrated that blocking temperature distributions are a versatile method to qualify TA-MRAM production batches before processing. Univ. Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/INAC-CEA, 38000 Grenoble, France.

  16. Mixing antiferromagnets to tune NiFe-[IrMn/FeMn] interfacial spin-glasses, grains thermal stability, and related exchange bias properties

    SciTech Connect

    Akmaldinov, K.; Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Joumard, I.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    2014-05-07

    Spintronics devices and in particular thermally assisted magnetic random access memories require a wide range of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) exchange bias (EB) properties and subsequently of AF materials to fulfil diverse functionality requirements for the reference and storage. For the reference layer, large EB energies and high blocking temperature (T{sub B}) are required. In contrast, for the storage layer, mostly moderate T{sub B} are needed. One of the present issues is to find a storage layer with properties intermediate between those of IrMn and FeMn and in particular: (i) with a T{sub B} larger than FeMn for better stability at rest-T but lower than IrMn to reduce power consumption at write-T and (ii) with improved magnetic interfacial quality, i.e., with reduced interfacial glassy character for lower properties dispersions. To address this issue, the EB properties of F/AF based stacks were studied for various mixed [IrMn/FeMn] AFs. In addition to EB loop shifts, the F/AF magnetic interfacial qualities and the AF grains thermal stability are probed via measurements of the low- and high-temperature contributions to the T{sub B} distributions, respectively. A tuning of the above three parameters is observed when evolving from IrMn to FeMn via [IrMn/FeMn] repetitions.

  17. Investigations on Ni-Co-Mn-Sn thin films: Effect of substrate temperature and Ar gas pressure on the martensitic transformations and exchange bias properties

    SciTech Connect

    Machavarapu, Ramudu Jakob, Gerhard

    2015-03-15

    We report the effect of substrate temperature (T{sub S}) and Ar gas pressure (P{sub D}) on the martensitic transformations, magnetic and exchange bias (EB) properties in Heusler type Ni-Co-Mn-Sn epitaxial thin films. Martensitic transformation temperatures and EB fields at 5 K were found to increase with increasing T{sub S}. The observed maximum EB value of 320 Oe after field cooling in the film deposited at 650 {sup ∘}C is high among the values reported for Ni-Mn-Sn thin films which is attributed to the coexistence of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases in the martensitic state. In the case of P{sub D} variation, with increase in P{sub D}, martensitic transformation temperatures were increased and a sharp transformation was observed in the film deposited at 0.06 mbar. Magnetization values at 5 K were higher for increasing P{sub D}. These observations are attributed to the compositional shift. EB effect is also present in these films. Microstructural features observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows a fine twinning and reduced precipitation with increase in P{sub D}, which is also confirmed from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. EB effects in both series were confirmed from the training effect. Target ageing effect has been observed in the films deposited before and after ninety days of time interval. This has been confirmed both on substrate temperature and Ar gas pressure variations.

  18. A CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction coupled to an in-plane exchange-biased magnetic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M. Chong, H.; Vu, Q. B.; Vo, T.; Brooks, R.; Stamper, H.; Bennett, S.; Piccirillo, J.

    2015-05-25

    We report a stack structure which utilizes an in-plane exchange-biased magnetic layer to influence the coercivity of the bottom CoFeB layer in a CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction. By employing a thickness wedge deposition technique, we were able to study various aspects of this stack using vibrating sample magnetometer including: (1) the coupling between two CoFeB layers as a function of MgO thickness; and (2) the coupling between the bottom CoFeB and the in-plane magnetic layer as a function of Ta spacer thickness. Furthermore, modification of the bottom CoFeB coercivity allows one to measure tunneling magnetoresistance and resistance-area product (RA) of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB in this pseudo-spin-valve format using current-in-plane-tunneling technique, without resorting to (Co/Pt){sub n} or (Co/Pd){sub n} multilayer pinning.

  19. Robust Interfacial Exchange Bias and Metal-Insulator Transition Influenced by the LaNiO3 Layer Thickness in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guowei; Song, Cheng; Bai, Yuhao; Quan, Zhiyong; Jiang, Fengxian; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Yongbing; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-01-25

    Artificial heterostructures based on LaNiO3 (LNO) have been widely investigated with the aim to realize the insulating antiferromagnetic state of LNO. In this work, we grew [(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)5-(LaNiO3)n]12 superlattices on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition and observed an unexpected exchange bias effect in field-cooled hysteresis loops. Through X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism experiments, we found that the charge transfer at the interfacial Mn and Ni ions can induce a localized magnetic moment. A remarkable increase of exchange bias field and a transition from metal to insulator were simultaneously observed upon decreasing the thickness of the LNO layer, indicating the antiferromagnetic insulator state in 2 unit cells LNO ultrathin layers. The robust exchange bias of 745 Oe in the superlattice is caused by an interfacial localized magnetic moment and an antiferromagnetic state in the ultrathin LNO layer, pinning the ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layers together. Our results demonstrate that artificial interface engineering is a useful method to realize novel magnetic and transport properties.

  20. Origin of spin-glass and exchange bias in La{sub 1∕3}Sr{sub 2∕3}FeO{sub 3−γ} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R. B. da; Araújo, J. H. de; Soares, J. M.; Machado, F. L. A.

    2014-03-21

    The structure and the magnetic properties of nanopowdered samples of La{sub 1∕3}Sr{sub 2∕3}FeO{sub 3−γ} with average particles size d in the range of 67-367 nm prepared by a sol-gel method were investigated in detail. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, specific heat, Mössbauer spectroscopy, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurements. Exchange bias with vertical magnetization shift was found in all samples. Charge ordering and antiferromagnetism were observed close to 200 K for large particles (d ≥ 304 nm) samples, while for particles with intermediated and smaller values (d ≤ 156 nm) a cluster-glass like behaviour and a short range charge ordering were seen near 115 K and 200 K, respectively. The spin-glass like and exchange bias behaviour in nanopowdered samples of La{sub 1∕3}Sr{sub 2∕3}FeO{sub 3−γ} are associated to compact Fe{sup 3+} antiferromagnetic (AF) clusters caused by an oxygen deficiency, which was found to be higher in the samples with the smallest average particles sizes. The effect of exchange bias and vertical magnetization shifts are explained by a simple model involving the interaction of one AF phase with a canted AF phase.

  1. Exchange bias in Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Prater, John T.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2017-05-01

    This work relates to the integration of the two-layer stack of the proposed multiferroic structure onto silicon substrates. Ba1-xSrxTiO3 is an excellent material for room-temperature voltage-tunable dielectric applications due to its high (ɛ=6000) dielectric constant. In this study we choose a composition of Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3 (BST), which is cubic and paraelectric at 300K, and transforms to a ferroelectric tetragonal phase upon cooling through the Curie temperature (TC) at 200K. The main focus of the present work is to study what happens when BST is placed in contact with a room temperature ferromagnetic layer such as La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO). In this study, the magnetic properties of a BST (200nm)/LSMO (63nm) heterostructure was compared to that of a single LSMO layer (63nm). Both films were deposited onto MgO/TiN buffered Si (100) using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and a domain matching epitaxy (DME) paradigm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that these films were of single phase and epitaxial in nature, with an unrelaxed lattice strain of ˜0.2% that was predominately composed of thermal and defect-induced strain. The magnetic measurements showed that the Curie temperature (TC) of LSMO remained unchanged at 350K when the BST was in contact with the LSMO layer. Interestingly, at 4K both the coercive field (Hc) and the exchange bias (HEB) of the BST/LSMO heterostructure as compared to the lone LSMO film increased significantly from 400 to 800 Oe and from 155 to 305 Oe, respectively. These differences were found to disappear above 200 K, the ferroelectric TC of the BST over-layer. This strongly suggests that the observed changes in the magnetic behavior of the heterostructure was the result of stress and/or charge redistributions that resulted when the BST layer transformed from the cubic (paraelectric) to tetragonal (ferroelectric) phase at low temperature.

  2. Manipulating the exchange bias effect of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3/CoFe2O4/NiO heterostructural films by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Chao; Pan, Dan-Feng; Wu, Jun; Li, Ying-bin; Wang, Guang-hou; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    The Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3/CoFe2O4/NiO heterostructural films with exchange bias (EB) effect have been prepared on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si wafers using a sol-gel process, and reversible manipulation of EB effect by electric fields has been realized. Compared with the exchange bias field (Heb = -75 Oe) at as-grown state, the modulation gain of Heb by electric fields can reach 83% (Heb = -12.5 Oe) in the case of +5.0 V and 283% (Heb = -287.5 Oe) in the case of -5.0 V, respectively. Moreover, such electrically tunable EB effect is repeatable and has good endurance and retention. Through analyzing the energy band structures in different electric treatment states, we discuss the mechanism of such electric-field-tunable EB effect. Two factors, i.e., the filling (or releasing) of electrons into (or from) the defect levels produced by oxygen vacancies at positive (or negative) electric voltages, and the redistribution of electrons due to the ferroelectric polarization, both of which give rise to the variation of the strength of exchange interaction in the CFO layer, have been revealed to be responsible for the electric modulation of EB effect. This work provides a promising avenue for electrically manipulating the EB effect and developing high-performance memory and storage devices with low power consumption.

  3. Enhancement of exchange bias and training effect in ion-beam sputtered Fe{sub 46}Mn{sub 54}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Fulara, Himanshu; Chaudhary, Sujeet Kashyap, Subhash C.; Granville, Simon

    2014-01-28

    We present a remarkable enhancement by 300% of the exchange-bias field at room temperature, without affecting the coercivity value, via optimum magnetic annealing (250 °C/3 kOe) in ion-beam sputtered FeMn(30 nm)/NiFe(10 nm) bilayers. This specific behavior has been attributed to a higher degree of γ-FeMn(111) orientation that offers more interfacial FeMn moments to get pinned with the moments of the adjacent NiFe layer. Unlike the absence of training effect at room temperature, a pronounced training effect and an accompanying magnetization reversal asymmetry are evidenced upon field cooling below 50 K due to the presence of biaxial exchange induced anisotropy across the interdiffused FeMn/NiFe interface. The present findings not only have technological significance but also are of relevance to the understanding of interfacial spin disorder and frustration in these exchange-biased systems.

  4. Photo-carrier control of exchange bias in BiFeO{sub 3}/La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, K. D.; Lee, T. K.; Park, Y. A.; Hur, N.; Jung, J. H.

    2014-06-23

    We report the facile control of exchange bias in BiFeO{sub 3}/La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} (BFO/LSMO) thin films on an SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrate using light irradiation. Illumination with weak red light (λ: 630 nm, intensity: ∼1 mW/cm{sup 2}) reduced the exchange bias field (H{sub E}) of BFO/LSMO from +30 Oe in the dark to −2 Oe with red light. In accompanying the decrease of H{sub E}, the resistance of BFO/LSMO significantly increased. These results were attributed to the reduction in the hole-doping ratio of LSMO and the weakened exchange coupling between Fe and Mn spins at the interface, resulting from photo-injected electrons from the STO substrate. Successive turning on/off of red light gives rise to cyclical change of corresponding H{sub E}, which should be useful for applications like photo-controlled tunneling magnetoresistance devices.

  5. The Rac-specific exchange factors Dock1 and Dock5 are dispensable for the establishment of the glomerular filtration barrier in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Mélanie; Dumouchel, Annie; Fukui, Yoshinori; Côté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are specialized kidney cells that form the kidney filtration barrier through the connection of their foot processes. Nephrin and Neph family transmembrane molecules at the surface of podocytes interconnect to form a unique type of cell-cell junction, the slit diaphragm, which acts as a molecular sieve. The cytoplasmic tails of Nephrin and Neph mediate cytoskeletal rearrangement that contributes to the maintenance of the filtration barrier. Nephrin and Neph1 orthologs are essential to regulate cell-cell adhesion and Rac-dependent actin rearrangement during Drosophila myoblast fusion. We hypothesized here that molecules regulating myoblast fusion in Drosophila could contribute to signaling downstream of Nephrin and Neph1 in podocytes. We found that Nephrin engagement promoted recruitment of the Rac exchange factor Dock1 to the membrane. Furthermore, Nephrin overexpression led to lamellipodia formation that could be blocked by inhibiting Rac1 activity. We generated in vivo mouse models to investigate whether Dock1 and Dock5 contribute to the formation and maintenance of the kidney filtration barrier. Our results indicate that while Dock1 and Dock5 are expressed in podocytes, their functions are not essential for the development of the glomerular filtration barrier. Furthermore, mice lacking Dock1 were not protected from LPS-induced podocyte effacement. Our data suggest that Dock1 and Dock5 are not the important exchange factors regulating Rac activity during the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular barrier. PMID:24365888

  6. Eliminating Bias

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how to eliminate bias from monitoring systems by instituting appropriate installation, operation, and quality assurance procedures. Provides links to download An Operator's Guide to Eliminating Bias in CEM Systems.

  7. Exchange-bias effect at La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/LaNiO3 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas Sánchez, J. C.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B.; Granada, M.; Arenholz, E.; Steren, L. B.

    2012-03-26

    In this paper, we show that ferromagnetic/paramagnetic La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/LaNiO3 multilayers present an unexpected magnetic exchange-bias effect (EBE), observed in field-cooled magnetization loops. The exchange-bias field and the enhancement of the coercivity vanish around 50 K. We demonstrate that the oxidation state of the Ni and Mn cations changes from Mn3+-Ni3+ to Mn4+-Ni2+ in the layers close to the interface probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The variation of the valence states is accompanied by a change in the magnetic behavior of the cations at the La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/LaNiO3 interface, possibly giving rise to the formation of magnetic or magnetically frustrated regions that may pin the ferromagnetic a0.75Sr0.25MnO3 layers and explain the EBE.

  8. Large coercivity and exchange bias in [Fe{sub 1-{delta}}(FeO){sub {delta}}]{sub x}(TiO{sub 2}){sub 1-x} granular films

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y. H.; Wang, C. H.; Luo, X. G.; Liu, Hui; Wang, W. H.; Zhang, X. H.; Li, L. Y.; Zheng, R. K.

    2013-05-13

    [Fe{sub 1-{delta}}(FeO){sub {delta}}]{sub x}(TiO{sub 2}){sub 1-x} (0{<=}{delta}{<=}0.91, 0.34{<=}x{<=}0.54) granular films were fabricated by magnetron sputtering. Large coercivity (H{sub C} = 10.5 kOe) and exchange-bias-field (H{sub E} = 6.5 kOe) at 5 K were found in the film with {delta}=0.84 and x = 0.48. AC susceptibility measurements exhibit a frequency (f) dependent peak T{sub f} in the in-phase susceptibility curve. The fitting of the relation of T{sub f} vs f with both the Vogel-Fulcher law and critical slowing down theory indicate that the evident enhancement of the H{sub C} and H{sub E} can be qualitatively ascribed to the existence of cluster-spin glass state. The results may help to deeply understand the origin of exchange bias and related effects.

  9. Identification and analysis of unitary loss of long-established protein-coding genes in Poaceae shows evidences for biased gene loss and putatively functional transcription of relics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Tang, Liang; Li, Zhe; Jin, Jinpu; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-04-18

    Long-established protein-coding genes may lose their coding potential during evolution ("unitary gene loss"). Members of the Poaceae family are a major food source and represent an ideal model clade for plant evolution research. However, the global pattern of unitary gene loss in Poaceae genomes as well as the evolutionary fate of lost genes are still less-investigated and remain largely elusive. Using a locally developed pipeline, we identified 129 unitary gene loss events for long-established protein-coding genes from four representative species of Poaceae, i.e. brachypodium, rice, sorghum and maize. Functional annotation suggested that the lost genes in all or most of Poaceae species are enriched for genes involved in development and response to endogenous stimulus. We also found that 44 mutated genomic loci of lost genes, which we referred as relics, were still actively transcribed, and of which 84% (37 of 44) showed significantly differential expression across different tissues. More interestingly, we found that there were totally five expressed relics may function as competitive endogenous RNA in brachypodium, rice and sorghum genome. Based on comparative genomics and transcriptome data, we firstly compiled a comprehensive catalogue of unitary gene loss events in Poaceae species and characterized a statistically significant functional preference for these lost genes as well showed the potential of relics functioning as competitive endogenous RNAs in Poaceae genomes.

  10. Intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  11. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S. Z.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Yan, W.; Reeve, R.; Zhang, X. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature. PMID:25752272

  12. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. Z.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Yan, W.; Reeve, R.; Zhang, X. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature.

  13. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Z; Miao, J; Xu, X G; Yan, W; Reeve, R; Zhang, X H; Jiang, Y

    2015-03-10

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature.

  14. Study of the sign change of exchange bias across the spin reorientation transition in Co(Cr1-x Fe x )2O4 (x  =  0.00-0.125).

    PubMed

    Padam, R; Pandya, Swati; Ravi, S; Ramakrishnan, S; Nigam, A K; Grover, A K; Pal, D

    2017-02-08

    We present the evolution of novel phenomena of magnetic compensation effect, exchange bias (EB) effect and the field induced anomalies in '[Formula: see text]' substituted multiferroic compound [Formula: see text]. A few percent of '[Formula: see text]' substitution for '[Formula: see text]' in [Formula: see text] results in the reversal of field cooled magnetization under low applied fields below compensation temperature T comp. Further, increase in the field leads to the spin reorientation transition (T SR). Signature of EB in a narrow temperature window in the vicinity of T SR and its sign change across T SR is observed. Magnitude of EB depends on the amount of compensation and rigidity of the spin reorientation. We also notice the appearance of positive EB below the lock-in transition (T L). Presence of unidirectional anisotropy developed in the commensurate spin-spiral below T L could be responsible for the appearance of EB below T L.

  15. Evidence of spin-glass like ordering and exchange bias effect in antisite-disordered nanometric La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 double perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, R. C.; Paladhi, D.; Nath, T. K.

    2017-08-01

    Single-phase polycrystalline La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 double perovskite nanoparticles (∼25 nm) have been synthesized by chemical sol-gel method. We report here the structural, magnetic and transport properties using X-ray diffraction, dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, exchange bias and dc resistivity measurements. The Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the La1.5Ca0.5CoMnO6 (LCCMO) system crystallizes in orthorhombic structure with pbnm space group. Mn and Co ions are not completely ordered on the B sites due to the presence of about 30% antisite-disorder in the system. The ordering of Co2+ and Mn4+ gives rise to the ferromagnetism below 145 K. A spin glass like ground state has also been observed near 37.6(4) K, arising mainly due to the presence of competing magnetic interactions and antisite-disorder in the LCCMO nanoparticles. The frequency dependence peak shift of the Ac-susceptibility peak in the glassy state follows the critical slowing down model. The observed memory effect in ac susceptibility data reveals the existence of interacting clusters in a competing magnetic interactions state. The presence of noticeable exchange bias effect can be best explained on the basis of uncompensated interface (ferromagnetic/spin-glass) spins of antisite-disordered LCCMO system. This anti-site disordered nanocompound exhibits semiconducting behavior with variable range hopping kind of electronic conduction mechanism in the temperature range of 200-300 K. We have also observed large negative magnetoresistance (-30% at 100 K and 60 kOe) mainly due to the spin-polarized transport across the grain boundaries.

  16. The reversal of the spontaneous exchange bias effect and zero-field-cooling magnetization in La1.5Sr0.5Co1-xFexMnO6: the effect of Fe doping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H G; Xie, L; Liu, X C; Xiong, M X; Cao, L L; Li, Y T

    2017-09-20

    The crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetic properties were systematically studied in a series of Fe-doped La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6 double perovskites. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples are all refined with a rhombohedral (R3[combining macron]c) structure. The parameters a and c continuously increase with increasing Fe doping concentration x. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the Mn, Co, and Fe 2p core levels, consistent with the soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of Mn, Co, and Fe L2,3 edges, indicate that their valence states are Mn(3+) and Mn(4+), Co(2+) and Co(3+), and Fe(3+), respectively. However, relative to samples with x ≤ 0.1, there is an abrupt change of photon energy in the Co- and Fe-2p XAS spectra for x ≥ 0.2, implying the spin state transition is from high to low. In addition, this is further confirmed by a comparison between the calculated effective spin moment from the paramagnetic data and the theoretical value. Interestingly, we demonstrate the reversal of both zero-field-cooling magnetization and the sign switching of the spontaneous exchange bias (SEB) with the doping concentration from magnetic measurements. The magnetization reverses from positive to negative with the temperature decreasing across the compensation temperature at the critical concentration x = 0.2. Meanwhile, the exchange bias field of the SEB reverses from large negative values to positive ones. Our findings allow us to propose that the spin state transition caused by inhomogeneity is considered to play an important role in the reversal of the magnetization and the SEB effect.

  17. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method

    PubMed Central

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Héroux, M È; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-01-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER1z). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER2z). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER2z and AER1z estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER2z was higher than AER1z. Overall, the AER1z estimates underestimated AER2z by approximately 16% (IQR: 5–32%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. PMID:25399878

  18. Exchange bias effect in epitaxial La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}/SrMnO{sub 3} thin film structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T.; Ning, X. K.; Liu, W. Feng, J. N.; Zhao, X. G.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2014-08-28

    Bilayers consisting of La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) and SrMnO{sub 3} (SMO) have been prepared by pulsed-laser deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Unconventional magnetic coupling was found after cooling in a small field. The LCMO/SMO bilayers exhibit an exchange bias field of 209 Oe, which vanishes as the temperature rises above 90 K. A small magnetization has been found above the Curie temperature of the pure LCMO thin films. Spin-cluster-like antiferromagnetic (AFM)/ferromagnetic (FM) clusters have been deduced to exist at the interface due to the competing types of magnetic order at the interface. The magnetic relaxation is found to follow a double-exponential equation and a slow relaxation process is observed due to the strong exchange coupling between AFM/FM clusters and the LCMO layer. We speculate that the short-range high-temperature FM order of the Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} moments above the Curie temperature at the interface gives rise to the magnetic regions that pin the FM LCMO layer as the temperature decreases.

  19. Proximity effects and exchange bias in Co/MnF2(111) heterostructures studied by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suturin, S. M.; Fedorov, V. V.; Banshchikov, A. G.; Baranov, D. A.; Koshmak, K. V.; Torelli, P.; Fujii, J.; Panaccione, G.; Amemiya, K.; Sakamaki, M.; Nakamura, T.; Tabuchi, M.; Pasquali, L.; Sokolov, N. S.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt nano-structured ultrathin films were grown on orthorhombic MnF2 by molecular beam epitaxy on CaF2 epitaxial layers deposited on Si(111) substrates. The Co film was grown at room temperature. It was found to be polycrystalline, forming nano-islands with height≈diameter≤10 nm. X-ray absorption evidences the chemical stability of the Co/MnF2 interface. Remarkably, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) demonstrates that the Co induces a net magnetization on the Mn ions close to the interface. The magnetic moments of these Mn ions couple antiparallel to the Co and rotate upon field reversal following the magnetization of the Co both below and high above the Néel temperature of MnF2 (TN = 67 K). The density of coupled Mn moments is found to be temperature dependent, with an equivalent thickness of ˜1.5 MnF2 monolayers at 20 K, decreasing to about ˜0.5 ML as the temperature is raised to 300 K. Interestingly, the intensity of the Mn XMCD signal appears to be related to the coercivity of the Co layer. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the competition between thermal fluctuations, exchange coupling between Co and Mn at the interface and, at low temperature, the antiferromagnetic order in MnF2.

  20. Proximity effects and exchange bias in Co/MnF2(111) heterostructures studied by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Suturin, S M; Fedorov, V V; Banshchikov, A G; Baranov, D A; Koshmak, K V; Torelli, P; Fujii, J; Panaccione, G; Amemiya, K; Sakamaki, M; Nakamura, T; Tabuchi, M; Pasquali, L; Sokolov, N S

    2013-01-30

    Cobalt nano-structured ultrathin films were grown on orthorhombic MnF(2) by molecular beam epitaxy on CaF(2) epitaxial layers deposited on Si(111) substrates. The Co film was grown at room temperature. It was found to be polycrystalline, forming nano-islands with height≈diameter≤10 nm. X-ray absorption evidences the chemical stability of the Co/MnF(2) interface. Remarkably, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) demonstrates that the Co induces a net magnetization on the Mn ions close to the interface. The magnetic moments of these Mn ions couple antiparallel to the Co and rotate upon field reversal following the magnetization of the Co both below and high above the Néel temperature of MnF(2) (T(N) = 67 K). The density of coupled Mn moments is found to be temperature dependent, with an equivalent thickness of ~1.5 MnF(2) monolayers at 20 K, decreasing to about ~0.5 ML as the temperature is raised to 300 K. Interestingly, the intensity of the Mn XMCD signal appears to be related to the coercivity of the Co layer. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the competition between thermal fluctuations, exchange coupling between Co and Mn at the interface and, at low temperature, the antiferromagnetic order in MnF(2).

  1. Short-term impacts of nutrient manipulations on leaf gas exchange and biomass partitioning in contrasting 2-year-old Pinus taeda clones during seedling establishment

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Tyree; John R. Seiler; Chris A. Maier

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a 1-year greenhouse experiment to assess the impact of nutrient manipulations on seedling growth, biomass partitioning, and leaf gas exchange between two fast growing Pinus taeda clones that differed in growth efficiency. After 1 year we observed significant treatment and treatment by clone effects on growth, biomass partitioning, and...

  2. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  3. Journal bias or author bias?

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian

    2016-01-01

    I read with interest the comment by Mark Wilson in the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics regarding bias and conflicts of interest in medical journals. Wilson targets one journal (the New England Journal of Medicine: NEJM) and one particular "scandal" to make his point that journals' decisions on publication are biased by commercial conflicts of interest (CoIs). It is interesting that he chooses the NEJM which, by his own admission, had one of the strictest CoI policies and had published widely on this topic. The feeling is that if the NEJM can be guilty, they can all be guilty.

  4. Magnetization jumps and exchange bias induced by a partially disordered antiferromagnetic state in (FeTiO{sub 3}){sub 0.9}-(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.1}

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Li, G. K.; Ma, L. Zhen, C. M.; Hou, D. L.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, E. K.; Chen, J. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2014-06-07

    Magnetization jumps (MJs) and the exchange bias (EB) effect are simultaneously observed in the mixed-spin oxide (FeTiO{sub 3}){sub 0.9}-(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.1} at 2.0 K. Dc and ac susceptibility measurements confirm a reentrant spin glass phase with a partially disordered antiferromagnetic (PDA) state below the irreversibility temperature (T{sub ir} = 60 K). Antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe{sup 3+} clusters are nested in AFM Fe{sup 2+} lattices forming a triangular lattice, in which 2/3 of the magnetic moments order antiferromagnetically with each other leaving the remaining 1/3 “confused.” This geometric frustration in the triangular lattice leads to a PDA state that is the ground state of the AFM triangular configuration. The PDA state, in the presence of a critical trigger field, evolves into a ferromagnetic (FM) state, and induces the AFM spins of the Fe{sup 2+} ions to enter a FM state, resulting in the MJs. Meanwhile, the FM spins of Fe{sup 2+} can serve as the pinned phase, and the AFM spins of Fe{sup 3+} can serve as the pinning phase, resulting in the EB effect. Thus, we point out that the PDA state is very likely to be at the origin of the MJs and the EB effect.

  5. Room temperature magnetic ordering, enhanced magnetization and exchange bias of GdMnO3 nanoparticles in (GdMnO3)0.70(CoFe2O4)0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, A.; Mahapatra, A. S.; Mallick, A.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles of GdMnO3 (GMO) are prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance the magnetic property and also to obtain the magnetic ordering at room temperature (RT), nanoparticles of GMO are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe2O4 (CFO). Desired crystallographic phases of CFO, GMO and GMO-CFO are confirmed by analyzing X-ray diffractrograms (XRD) using Rietveld method. The average size of nanoparticles and their distribution, crystallographic phase, nanocrystallinity etc. are studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Magnetic hysteresis loops (M-H) of GMO-CFO under zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) conditions are observed at different temperatures down to 5 K. Magnetization vs. temperature (M-T) under ZFC and FC conditions are also recorded. Interestingly, exchange bias (EB) is found at low temperature which suggests the encapsulation of the ferromagnetic (FM) nanoparticles of GMO by the ferrimagnetic nanoparticles of CFO below 100 K. Enhanced magnetization, EB effect and RT magnetic ordering of GMO-CFO would be interesting for both theoretical and experimental investigations.

  6. Cooling field tuned magnetic phase transition and exchange bias-like effect in Y{sub 0.9}Pr{sub 0.1}CrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Dongmei E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au Feng, Zhenjie; Jing, Chao; Ren, Wei; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au; Zheng, Jiashun; Yu, Dehong E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au Sun, Dehui; Avdeev, Maxim; Wang, Baomin; Lu, Bo

    2015-09-07

    Cooling magnetic field dependence of magnetic phase transition has been observed in Y{sub 0.9}Pr{sub 0.1}CrO{sub 3}. G{sub z}F{sub x} order (spin structure of PrCrO{sub 3}) is dominant after zero field cooling (ZFC), whereas G{sub x}F{sub z} order (spin structure of YCrO{sub 3}) is dominant after cooling under a field higher than 100 Oe. Positive/negative exchange bias-like effect, with large vertical shift and small horizontal shift, has been observed after FC/ZFC process. The vertical shift can be attributed to the frozen ordered Pr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} spins in magnetic domains, because of the strong coupling between Pr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} sublattices; while the horizontal shift is a result of the pinning of spins at the interfaces. The frozen structure is generated by the field used for the measurement of the initial magnetization curve of M(H) for the ZFC cooled sample, while it is generated by the cooling field for the sample cooled under a cooling field higher than 100 Oe.

  7. Study of the sign change of exchange bias across the spin reorientation transition in Co(Cr1-x Fe x )2O4 (x  =  0.00-0.125)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padam, R.; Pandya, Swati; Ravi, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Nigam, A. K.; Grover, A. K.; Pal, D.

    2017-02-01

    We present the evolution of novel phenomena of magnetic compensation effect, exchange bias (EB) effect and the field induced anomalies in ‘\\text{Fe} ’ substituted multiferroic compound \\text{CoC}{{\\text{r}}2}{{\\text{O}}4} . A few percent of ‘\\text{Fe} ’ substitution for ‘\\text{Cr} ’ in \\text{CoC}{{\\text{r}}2}{{\\text{O}}4} results in the reversal of field cooled magnetization under low applied fields below compensation temperature T comp. Further, increase in the field leads to the spin reorientation transition (T SR). Signature of EB in a narrow temperature window in the vicinity of T SR and its sign change across T SR is observed. Magnitude of EB depends on the amount of compensation and rigidity of the spin reorientation. We also notice the appearance of positive EB below the lock-in transition (T L). Presence of unidirectional anisotropy developed in the commensurate spin-spiral below T L could be responsible for the appearance of EB below T L.

  8. Establishing the next generation at work: leader generativity as a moderator of the relationships between leader age, leader-member exchange, and leadership success.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Hannes; Rosing, Kathrin; Henning, Thomas; Frese, Michael

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the authors investigated leader generativity as a moderator of the relationships between leader age, leader-member exchange, and three criteria of leadership success (follower perceptions of leader effectiveness, follower satisfaction with leader, and follower extra effort). Data came from 128 university professors paired with one research assistant each. Results showed positive relationships between leader age and leader generativity, and negative relationships between leader age and follower perceptions of leader effectiveness and follower extra effort. Consistent with expectations based on leadership categorization theory, leader generativity moderated the relationships between leader age and all three criteria of leadership success, such that leaders high in generativity were better able to maintain high levels of leadership success at higher ages than leaders low in generativity. Finally, results of mediated moderation analyses showed that leader-member exchange quality mediated these moderating effects. The findings suggest that, in combination, leader age and the age-related construct of generativity importantly influence leadership processes and outcomes.

  9. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  10. Solar array/spacecraft biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Biasing techniques and their application to the control of spacecraft potential is discussed. Normally when a spacecraft is operated with ion thrusters, the spacecraft will be 10-20 volts negative of the surrounding plasma. This will affect scientific measurements and will allow ions from the charge-exchange plasma to bombard the spacecraft surfaces with a few tens of volts of energy. This condition may not be tolerable. A proper bias system is described that can bring the spacecraft to or near the potential of the surrounding plasma.

  11. Solar array/spacecraft biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Biasing techniques and their application to the control of spacecraft potential is discussed. Normally when a spacecraft is operated with ion thrusters, the spacecraft will be 10-20 volts negative of the surrounding plasma. This will affect scientific measurements and will allow ions from the charge-exchange plasma to bombard the spacecraft surfaces with a few tens of volts of energy. This condition may not be tolerable. A proper bias system is described that can bring the spacecraft to or near the potential of the surrounding plasma.

  12. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-02-24

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final rule implementing modifications to the Multi-State Plan (MSP) Program based on the experience of the Program to date. OPM established the MSP Program pursuant to the Affordable Care Act. This rule clarifies the approach used to enforce the applicable standards of the Affordable Care Act with respect to health insurance issuers that contract with OPM to offer MSP options; amends MSP standards related to coverage area, benefits, and certain contracting provisions under section 1334 of the Affordable Care Act; and makes non-substantive technical changes.

  13. Kerr microscopy study of exchange-coupled FePt/Fe exchange spring magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zaineb; Kumar, Dileep; Reddy, V. Raghavendra; Gupta, Ajay

    2017-05-01

    Magnetization reversal and magnetic microstructure of top soft magnetic layer (Fe) in exchange spring coupled L10 FePt/Fe is studied using high resolution Kerr microscopy. With remnant state of the hard magnetic layer (L10 FePt) as initial condition, magnetization loops along with magnetic domains are recorded for the top soft magnetic layer (Fe) using Kerr microscopy. Considerable shifting of Fe layer hysteresis loop from center which is similar to exchange bias phenomena is observed. It is also observed that one can tune the magnitude of hysteresis shift by reaching the remanent state from different saturating fields (HSAT) and also by varying the angle between measuring field and HSAT. The hysteresis loops and magnetic domains of top soft Fe layer demonstrate unambiguously that soft magnetic layer at remanent state in such exchange coupled system is having unidirectional anisotropy. An analogy is drawn and the observations are explained in terms of established model of exchange bias phenomena framed for field-cooled ferromagnetic - antiferromagnetic bilayer systems.

  14. Berkson's bias, selection bias, and missing data.

    PubMed

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Although Berkson's bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2 × 2 tables illustrate how Berkson's bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random are less important than the causal structure of the missing data process. Although dealing with missing data always relies on strong assumptions about unobserved variables, the intuitions built with simple examples can provide a better understanding of approaches to missing data in real-world situations.

  15. Temperature trend biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  16. Experimental study of the microscopic mechanisms of magnetization reversal in FeNi/FeMn exchange-biased ferromagnet/antiferromagnet polycrystalline bilayers using the magneto-optical indicator film technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornakov, V. S.; Kabanov, Yu. P.; Tikhomirov, O. A.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Urazhdin, S. V.; Yang, F. Y.; Chien, C. L.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.

    2006-05-01

    Remagnetization of the FeNi/FeMn bilayer was investigated using the magneto-optical indicator film imaging technique. We show the formation and breakdown of the homogeneous exchange spring into exchange springs of opposite chiralities during reversal in a rotating magnetic field. In reversal with a linear field, contrary to theoretical predictions, the winding of the exchange spring occurs without net magnetization rotation. It initiates by the formation of local spin spirals with opposite chirality and terminates with the formation of a single chiral state through the propagation of a specific kind of boundary separating regions with this single chirality from those with the mixed chiral state.

  17. Correcting the bias against interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    When making decisions about funding and jobs the scientific community should recognise that most of the tools used to evaluate scientific excellence are biased in favour of established disciplines and against interdisciplinary research.

  18. Approach to Exchange Bias Effect in La2/3Ca1/3MnO3/BiFeO3 and BiFeO3/ La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Claribel; Ordonez, John; Diez, Sandra; Gomez, Maria; Guénon, Stefan; Schuller, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    We have grown bilayers of ferromagnetic La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO) and multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) on (100) SrTiO3 (STO) substrates, by DC- and magnetron RF -sputtering technique, respectively, at high-oxygen pressures. We maintain constant the thickness of the layers (tBFO=72nm; tLCMO=80nm). Temperature dependence of the resistivity indicates that the MI-transition temperature of the manganite in the BFO/LCMO/STO is affected by the presence of the BFO layer in comparison with TMI for the single LCMO layer. Furthermore, temperature dependence of magnetization shows that the BFO/LCMO/STO bilayer has higher Curie temperature than that for LCMO/BFO/STO, indicating a strong structural dependence of the LCMO layer with magnetic response. The dependence of the magnetic moment with magnetic field after field cooling gives indication of the existence of Exchange Bias effect in the LCMO/BFO/STO bilayer. Isothermal loops also display dependence of the Exchange Bias magnitude with field cooling. This work has been supported by UNIVALLE Research Project CI 7864, and ``El Patrimonio Autónomo Fondo Nacional de Financiamiento para CT&I FJC,'' Contract RC - No. 275-2011, COLCIENCIAS-CENM, Colombia

  19. Chromatography process development in the quality by design paradigm I: Establishing a high-throughput process development platform as a tool for estimating "characterization space" for an ion exchange chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, R; Rathore, A S

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of a high-throughput process development (HTPD) platform for developing chromatography steps. An assessment of the platform as a tool for establishing the "characterization space" for an ion exchange chromatography step has been performed by using design of experiments. Case studies involving use of a biotech therapeutic, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor have been used to demonstrate the performance of the platform. We discuss the various challenges that arise when working at such small volumes along with the solutions that we propose to alleviate these challenges to make the HTPD data suitable for empirical modeling. Further, we have also validated the scalability of this platform by comparing the results from the HTPD platform (2 and 6 μL resin volumes) against those obtained at the traditional laboratory scale (resin volume, 0.5 mL). We find that after integration of the proposed correction factors, the HTPD platform is capable of performing the process optimization studies at 170-fold higher productivity. The platform is capable of providing semi-quantitative assessment of the effects of the various input parameters under consideration. We think that platform such as the one presented is an excellent tool for examining the "characterization space" and reducing the extensive experimentation at the traditional lab scale that is otherwise required for establishing the "design space." Thus, this platform will specifically aid in successful implementation of quality by design in biotech process development. This is especially significant in view of the constraints with respect to time and resources that the biopharma industry faces today.

  20. Contextual Modulation of Biases in Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Felisberti, Fatima Maria; Pavey, Louisa

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. Methodology and Findings Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral) embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174). An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2). Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of “cooperative”, “cheating” and “neutral/indifferent” behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3). Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4). Conclusion The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context. PMID:20886086

  1. Knowledge Exchange and Discovery in the Age of Social Media: The Journey From Inception to Establishment of a Parent-Led Web-Based Research Advisory Community for Childhood Disability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    total of 58% (23/40) of parents and 56% (5/9) of researchers indicated they felt safe to share sensitive or personal information. While researchers shared evidence-based resources and consulted with families to get guidance on specific issues, there was an unexpected benefit of gaining an understanding of what issues were important to families in their daily lives. Parents felt a sense of belonging to this community where they could share their stories but also wanted more researcher participation and clarity on the purpose of the group. Conclusions The PPR community grew from inception to an established community with active engagement and knowledge exchange. Both parents and researchers described valuable experiences. Researchers should consider social media as a means of engaging families in all phases of research to ensure that research and its outcomes are meaningful to those who need it most. PMID:27836818

  2. Knowledge Exchange and Discovery in the Age of Social Media: The Journey From Inception to Establishment of a Parent-Led Web-Based Research Advisory Community for Childhood Disability.

    PubMed

    Russell, Dianne J; Sprung, Jennifer; McCauley, Dayle; Kraus de Camargo, Olaf; Buchanan, Francine; Gulko, Roman; Martens, Rachel; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2016-11-11

    % (5/9) of researchers indicated they felt safe to share sensitive or personal information. While researchers shared evidence-based resources and consulted with families to get guidance on specific issues, there was an unexpected benefit of gaining an understanding of what issues were important to families in their daily lives. Parents felt a sense of belonging to this community where they could share their stories but also wanted more researcher participation and clarity on the purpose of the group. The PPR community grew from inception to an established community with active engagement and knowledge exchange. Both parents and researchers described valuable experiences. Researchers should consider social media as a means of engaging families in all phases of research to ensure that research and its outcomes are meaningful to those who need it most.

  3. Recalibrating Academic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, George

    2012-01-01

    Whether political and/or religious academic bias exists is a question with important ramifications for the educational institutions. Those arguing for the presence of such bias contend that political conservatives and the highly religious in academia are marginalized and face discrimination. The question of academic bias tends to be cast in a…

  4. Oaths and hypothetical bias.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T H; Tabatabaei, Maryam; Lass, Daniel

    2013-09-30

    Results from experiments using an oath to eliminate hypothetical bias in stated preference valuation are presented. An oath has several potential advantages relative to other methods for reducing hypothetical bias. Our empirical results suggest that with an oath, mean hypothetical payments are not different from mean actual payments and that when controlling for experimental participants' characteristics using regression analyses, the oath eliminated hypothetical bias.

  5. Demonstrating the Correspondence Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Shepperd, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the best-known and most robust biases in person perception is the correspondence bias--the tendency for people to make dispositional, rather than situational, attributions for an actor's behavior. The correspondence bias appears in virtually every social psychology textbook and in many introductory psychology textbooks, yet the authors'…

  6. Demonstrating the Correspondence Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Shepperd, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the best-known and most robust biases in person perception is the correspondence bias--the tendency for people to make dispositional, rather than situational, attributions for an actor's behavior. The correspondence bias appears in virtually every social psychology textbook and in many introductory psychology textbooks, yet the authors'…

  7. Queries for Bias Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Diana F.

    1992-01-01

    Selecting a good bias prior to concept learning can be difficult. Therefore, dynamic bias adjustment is becoming increasingly popular. Current dynamic bias adjustment systems, however, are limited in their ability to identify erroneous assumptions about the relationship between the bias and the target concept. Without proper diagnosis, it is difficult to identify and then remedy faulty assumptions. We have developed an approach that makes these assumptions explicit, actively tests them with queries to an oracle, and adjusts the bias based on the test results.

  8. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  9. "Catching" Social Bias.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Allison L; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Olson, Kristina R

    2017-02-01

    Identifying the origins of social bias is critical to devising strategies to overcome prejudice. In two experiments, we tested the hypothesis that young children can catch novel social biases from brief exposure to biased nonverbal signals demonstrated by adults. Our results are consistent with this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, we found that children who were exposed to a brief video depicting nonverbal bias in favor of one individual over another subsequently explicitly preferred, and were more prone to behave prosocially toward, the target of positive nonverbal signals. Moreover, in Experiment 2, preschoolers generalized such bias to other individuals. The spread of bias observed in these experiments lays a critical foundation for understanding the way that social biases may develop and spread early in childhood.

  10. Long-range magnetic interactions and proximity effects in an amorphous exchange-spring magnet

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, F.; Brooks-Bartlett, M. E.; Moubah, R.; Procter, R. A.; Andersson, G.; Hase, T. P. A.; Banks, S. T.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Low-dimensional magnetic heterostructures are a key element of spintronics, where magnetic interactions between different materials often define the functionality of devices. Although some interlayer exchange coupling mechanisms are by now well established, the possibility of direct exchange coupling via proximity-induced magnetization through non-magnetic layers is typically ignored due to the presumed short range of such proximity effects. Here we show that magnetic order can be induced throughout a 40-nm-thick amorphous paramagnetic layer through proximity to ferromagnets, mediating both exchange-spring magnet behaviour and exchange bias. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations show that nearest-neighbour magnetic interactions fall short in describing the observed effects and long-range magnetic interactions are needed to capture the extent of the induced magnetization. The results highlight the importance of considering the range of interactions in low-dimensional heterostructures and how magnetic proximity effects can be used to obtain new functionality. PMID:27291298

  11. Long-range magnetic interactions and proximity effects in an amorphous exchange-spring magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Brooks-Bartlett, M. E.; Moubah, R.; Procter, R. A.; Andersson, G.; Hase, T. P. A.; Banks, S. T.; Hjorvarsson, B.

    2016-06-13

    Low-dimensional magnetic heterostructures are a key element of spintronics, where magnetic interactions between different materials often define the functionality of devices. Although some interlayer exchange coupling mechanisms are by now well established, the possibility of direct exchange coupling via proximity-induced magnetization through non-magnetic layers is typically ignored due to the presumed short range of such proximity effects. Here we show that magnetic order can be induced throughout a 40-nm-thick amorphous paramagnetic layer through proximity to ferromagnets, mediating both exchange-spring magnet behaviour and exchange bias. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations show that nearest-neighbour magnetic interactions fall short in describing the observed effects and long-range magnetic interactions are needed to capture the extent of the induced magnetization. Lastly, the results highlight the importance of considering the range of interactions in low-dimensional heterostructures and how magnetic proximity effects can be used to obtain new functionality.

  12. Attentional bias in math anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms. PMID:26528208

  13. Are all biases missing data problems?

    PubMed

    Howe, Chanelle J; Cain, Lauren E; Hogan, Joseph W

    2015-09-01

    Estimating causal effects is a frequent goal of epidemiologic studies. Traditionally, there have been three established systematic threats to consistent estimation of causal effects. These three threats are bias due to confounders, selection, and measurement error. Confounding, selection, and measurement bias have typically been characterized as distinct types of biases. However, each of these biases can also be characterized as missing data problems that can be addressed with missing data solutions. Here we describe how the aforementioned systematic threats arise from missing data as well as review methods and their related assumptions for reducing each bias type. We also link the assumptions made by the reviewed methods to the missing completely at random (MCAR) and missing at random (MAR) assumptions made in the missing data framework that allow for valid inferences to be made based on the observed, incomplete data.

  14. Bias correction with Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canter, Martin; Barth, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this work, we aim at developping a new method of bias correction using data assimilation. This method is based on the stochastic forcing of a model to correct bias. First, through a preliminary run, we estimate the bias of the model and its possible sources. Then, we establish a forcing term which is directly added inside the model's equations. We create an ensemble of runs and consider the forcing term as a control variable during the assimilation of observations. We then use this analysed forcing term to correct the bias of the model. Since the forcing is added inside the model, it acts as a source term, unlike external forcings such as wind. This procedure has been developed and successfully tested with a twin experiment on a Lorenz 95 model. Indeed, we were able to estimate and recover an artificial bias that had been added into the model. This bias had a spatial structure and was constant through time. The mean and behaviour of the corrected model corresponded to those the reference model. It is currently being applied and tested on the sea ice ocean NEMO LIM model, which is used in the PredAntar project. NEMO LIM is a global and low resolution (2 degrees) coupled model (hydrodynamic model and sea ice model) with long time steps allowing simulations over several decades. Due to its low resolution, the model is subject to bias in area where strong currents are present. We aim at correcting this bias by using perturbed current fields from higher resolution models and randomly generated perturbations. The random perturbations need to be constrained in order to respect the physical properties of the ocean, and not create unwanted phenomena. To construct those random perturbations, we first create a random field with the Diva tool (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis). Using a cost function, this tool penalizes abrupt variations in the field, while using a custom correlation length. It also decouples disconnected areas based on topography. Then, we filter

  15. Bias in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Theodorsson, Elvar; Magnusson, Bertil; Leito, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical chemistry uses automated measurement techniques and medical knowledge in the interest of patients and healthy subjects. Automation has reduced repeatability and day-to-day variation considerably. Bias has been reduced to a lesser extent by reference measurement systems. It is vital to minimize clinically important bias, in particular bias within conglomerates of laboratories that measure samples from the same patients. Small and variable bias components will over time show random error properties and conventional random-error based methods for calculating measurement uncertainty can then be applied. The present overview of bias presents the general principles of error and uncertainty concepts, terminology and analysis, and suggests methods to minimize bias and measurement uncertainty in the interest of healthcare.

  16. Bias in research.

    PubMed

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  17. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  18. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  19. The Bias Fallacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linvill, Darren L.

    2013-01-01

    Do those who complain about liberal bias in higher education have any actionable point at all? Critics of the politicization of higher education claim that political partisanship in the classroom is pervasive and that it affects student learning. Although the existence of such partisanship has not been empirically proven, allegations of bias are…

  20. A Review of Established Guidelines and Standards for International Education Travel and Exchange Programs for Students. Report of the Department of Education to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virgina. House Document No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. House.

    This study of existing guidelines and standards for international travel by students in local school divisions is the result of a Virginia Department of Education team effort over four months. The interdisciplinary team reviewed guidelines and standards for international travel and student exchange programs from major organizations and developed…