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  1. Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Connie W.; Kraus, William E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE While the impact of caloric restriction on human health is not fully understood, there is strong evidence to support further studies of its influence on cardiovascular health. The purpose of this review is to update the state of the science by examining the relevant literature regarding calorie restriction effects on aging and cardiovascular health and to discuss the possible role(s) of calorie restriction in preserving cardiovascular function in humans. METHODS For purpose of this review, we have defined calorie restriction as a reduction in energy intake well below the amount of calories that would be consumed ad libitum (≥ 10% in humans, ≥20% in animals). We examined the relevant literature on calorie restriction effects on longevity and cardiovascular health, with an emphasis on the state of the science regarding calorie restriction in humans. We have emphasized the importance of the preliminary and expected findings from the Comprehensive Assessment of the Long-term Effect of Reducing Intake of Energy (CALERIE) trial. RESULTS Evidence from animal studies and a limited number of human trials indicates that calorie restriction has the potential to both delay cardiac aging and help prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease via beneficial effects on blood pressure, lipids, inflammatory processes, and potentially other mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS Based upon its known benefits to cardiometabolic health, including modest calorie restriction in a combined lifestyle program is likely to improve heart health and prevent subsequent cardiovascular events in overweight and obese individuals. Additional study is needed to further illuminate its long-term applicability for older adults and for those with significant comorbidities such as heart failure. PMID:23748374

  2. [Caloric stimulation in infants].

    PubMed

    Zagólski, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Caloric stimulation is one of few clinically proven tests assessing the function of each vestibule separately in neonates. Its results represent the continuity of vestibulo-ocular reflex, beginning in the lateral vestibular canal. Vestibular disorders are diagnosed in 20 to even 70% neonates with sensorineural hearing loss with the prevalence of individuals with profound and acquired deafness. 58 high risk of hearing defect infants were included in the study. Their age ranged from 3 to 6 months. A group of 27 healthy controls with negative history concerning sensorineural hearing loss risk factors was also examined. Caloric stimulation was performed according to Veits. External ear canal was irrigated with 20 ml of water at the temperature of 20 degrees C and eye movements were watched indirectly. In about 34% infants the nystagmic reaction to cold water was weaker than in normal controls. The reaction was most frequently impaired in infants with perinatal pathology, multiple congenital defects and aminoglycoside administration. Caloric stimulation in infants should be performed with cold water and the syringe used in the test should be fitted with a soft hose enabling irrigation of the interior part of the external ear canal.

  3. Air as the caloric stimulus.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, G O

    1978-05-01

    The use of air as the caloric medium was investigated and compared to that of water. The ability of air and water to generate surface temperatures close to the fluid outlet temperature was studied by irrigation onto a thermocouple. Results of caloric tests performed with air and water are compared by calculating the average nystagmus response for the hot and cold stimuli for two groups of sixty patients. Also, the number of canal paresis, directional preponderance, mixed, bi-lateral canal paresis and normal responses are compared for each group. Finally, the effect of performing a bi-thermal air caloric on a patient having a unilateral drum perforation is discussed.

  4. The caloric calculator: average caloric impact of childhood obesity interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Claire; Hsiao, Amber; Orleans, C Tracy; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2013-08-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic reflects the daily accumulation of an "energy gap"-excess calories consumed over calories expended. Population-level interventions to reverse the epidemic can be assessed by the degree to which they increase energy expenditure and/or reduce caloric intake. However, no common metric exists for such comparative assessment. To develop a common metric, the Average Caloric Impact (ACI), for estimating and comparing population-level effect sizes of a range of childhood obesity interventions. An iterative, collaborative process was used to review literature from 1996 to 2012 and select illustrative interventions showing effects on youth diet and/or activity levels, energy balance, and weight. The ACIs of physical activity interventions were estimated based on program reach, frequency, duration, and intensity and mean body weight of the targeted age and gender group from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. ACIs of dietary interventions were based on reach and changes in foods and/or beverages consumed. Fifteen interventions informed by 29 studies were included, ranging from individual behavioral to population-level policies. A web tool, the Caloric Calculator, was developed to allow researchers and policymakers to estimate the ACIs of interventions on target populations with reference to energy gap reductions required to reach the nation's Healthy People childhood obesity goals. The Caloric Calculator and ACIs provide researchers and policymakers with a common metric for estimating the potential effect sizes of various interventions for reducing childhood obesity, providing a platform for evidence-based dialogues on new program or policy approaches as data emerge. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The CALOR93 code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a program package, CALOR93, that has been developed to design and analyze different detector systems, in particular, calorimeters which are used in high energy physics experiments to determine the energy of particles. One`s ability to design a calorimeter to perform a certain task can have a strong influence upon the validity of experimental results. The validity of the results obtained with CALOR93 has been verified many times by comparison with experimental data. The codes (HETC93, SPECT93, LIGHT, EGS4, MORSE, and MICAP) are quite generalized and detailed enough so that any experimental calorimeter setup can be studied. Due to this generalization, some software development is necessary because of the wide diversity of calorimeter designs.

  6. Mechano-caloric cooling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Luna, Jack; Abbassi, P.; Carandang, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The mechano-caloric effect is potentially useful in the He II temperature range. Aside from demonstration work, little quantification effort appears to have been known since other refrigeration possibilities have been available for some time. Successful He II use-related system examples are as follows: in space, the utilization of the latent heat of vaporization has been quite successful in vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) in conjunction with thermomechanical force application in plugs. In magnet cooling systems, the possibility of using the mechano-caloric cooling effect in conjunction with thermo-mechanical circulation pump schemes, has been assessed (but not quantified yet to the extent desirable). A third example is quoted in conjunction with superfluid wind tunnel studies and liquid helium tow tank for surface vessels respectively. In all of these (partially future) R and D areas, the question of refrigerator effectiveness using the mechano-caloric effect appears to be relevant, possibly in conjunction with questions of reliability and simplicity. The present work is concerned with quantification of phenomena including simplified thermodynamic cycle calculations.

  7. [Caloric substrates in postoperative parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    De Salvo, L; Romairone, E; Ansaldo, G L; Mattioli, G

    1991-05-31

    The paper describes the carbohydrate, lipidic and nitrogen metabolism of the postoperative period which is subdivided into an early and a late phase. Since the metabolism of caloric substrates in the early postoperative period is a stress metabolism with glucose intolerance and wide protein catabolism, the authors emphasise that an insufficient caloric intake is worse than the fasting state and suggest that alternative caloric sources, such as branched chain amino acids, fatty acids and, even, ketonic bodies, should be used.

  8. Carnot to Clausius: caloric to entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses how the Carnot engine led to the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics and entropy. The operation of the engine is analysed both in terms of heat as the caloric fluid and heat as a form of energy. A keystone of Carnot's thinking was the absolute conservation of caloric. Although the Carnot analysis was partly incorrect, Clausius showed that by reinterpreting Carnot's caloric as entropy he was able to formulate the second law.

  9. Caloric restriction, caloric restriction mimetics, and healthy aging in Okinawa: controversies and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Bradley J; Willcox, Donald C

    2014-01-01

    To examine the role of two nutritional factors implicated in the healthy aging of the Okinawans: caloric restriction; and traditional foods with potential caloric restriction-mimetic properties. Caloric restriction is a research priority for the US National Institute on Aging. However, little is known regarding health effects in humans. Some caloric restriction-related outcomes, such as cause-specific mortality and lifespan, are not practical for human clinical trials. Therefore, epidemiological data on older Okinawans, who experienced a caloric restriction-like diet for close to half their lives, are of special interest. The nutritional data support mild caloric restriction (10-15%) and high consumption of foods that may mimic the biological effects of caloric restriction, including sweet potatoes, marine-based carotenoid-rich foods, and turmeric. Phenotypic evidence is consistent with caloric restriction (including short stature, low body weight, and lean BMI), less age-related chronic disease (including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and dementia), and longer lifespan (mean and maximum). Both caloric restriction and traditional Okinawan functional foods with caloric restriction-mimetic properties likely had roles in the extended healthspan and lifespan of the Okinawans. More research is needed on health consequences of caloric restriction and foods with caloric restriction-mimetic properties to identify possible nutritional interventions for healthy aging.

  10. Carnot to Clausius: Caloric to Entropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses how the Carnot engine led to the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics and entropy. The operation of the engine is analysed both in terms of heat as the caloric fluid and heat as a form of energy. A keystone of Carnot's thinking was the absolute conservation of caloric. Although the Carnot analysis was partly…

  11. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  12. Carnot to Clausius: Caloric to Entropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses how the Carnot engine led to the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics and entropy. The operation of the engine is analysed both in terms of heat as the caloric fluid and heat as a form of energy. A keystone of Carnot's thinking was the absolute conservation of caloric. Although the Carnot analysis was partly…

  13. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  14. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  15. Caloric curve of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  16. Caloric beverage consumption patterns in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mexico has seen a very steep increase in child obesity level. Little is known about caloric beverage intake in this country as well as all other countries outside a few high income countries. This study examines overall patterns and trends in all caloric beverages from two nationally representative surveys from Mexico. Methods The two nationally representative dietary intake surveys (1999 and 2006) from Mexico are used to study caloric beverage intake in 17, 215 children. The volume (ml) and caloric energy (kcal) contributed by all beverages consumed by the sample subjects were measured. Results are weighted to be nationally representative. Results The trends from the dietary intake surveys showed very large increases in caloric beverages among pre-school and school children. The contribution of whole milk and sugar-sweetened juices was an important finding. Mexican pre-school children consumed 27.8% of their energy from caloric beverages in 2006 and school children consumed 20.7% of their energy from caloric beverages during the same time. The three major categories of beverage intake are whole milk, fruit juice with various sugar and water combinations and carbonated and noncarbonated sugared-beverages. Conclusion The Mexican government, greatly concerned about obesity, has identified the large increase in caloric beverages from whole milk, juices and soft drinks as a key target and is initiating major changes to address this problem. They have already used the data to shift 20 million persons in their welfare and feeding programs from whole to 1.5% fat milk and in a year will shift to nonfat milk. They are using these data to revise school beverage policies and national regulations and taxation policies related to an array of less healthful caloric beverages. PMID:20964842

  17. Caloric restriction, SIRT1 and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    More than 70 years after its initial report, caloric restriction stands strong as the most consistent non-pharmacological intervention increasing lifespan and protecting against metabolic disease. Among the different mechanisms by which caloric restriction may act, Sir2/SIRT1 (Silent information regulator 2/Silent information regulator T1) has gained major attention due to its ability to integrate the sensing of the metabolic status with adaptative transcriptional outputs. This review focuses on gathered evidence suggesting that Sir2/SIRT1 is a key mediator of the beneficial effects of caloric restriction and addresses the main questions that still need to be answered to consolidate this hypothesis. PMID:19713122

  18. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  19. Fasting or caloric restriction for Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a host of biological changes that contribute to a progressive decline in cognitive and physical function, ultimately leading to a loss of independence, and increased risk of mortality. To date, prolonged caloric restriction (i.e., a reduction in caloric intake without malnutrition) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been found to extend both mean and maximal life span across a variety of species. Most individuals have difficulty sustaining prolonged caloric restriction, which has led to a search for alternative approaches that can produce similar to benefits as caloric restriction. A growing body of evidence indicates that fasting periods and intermittent fasting regimens in particular can trigger similar biological pathways as caloric restriction. For this reason, there is increasing scientific interest in further exploring the biological and metabolic effects of intermittent fasting periods, as well as whether long-term compliance may be improved by this type of dietary approach. This special will highlight the latest scientific findings related to the effects of both caloric restriction and intermittent fasting across various species including yeast, fruit flies, worms, rodents, primates, and humans. A specific emphasis is placed on translational research with findings from basic bench to bedside reviewed and practical clinical implications discussed. PMID:23639403

  20. Caloric restriction mimetics: towards a molecular definition.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Frank; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Caloric restriction, be it constant or intermittent, is reputed to have health-promoting and lifespan-extending effects. Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) are compounds that mimic the biochemical and functional effects of caloric restriction. In this Opinion article, we propose a unifying definition of CRMs as compounds that stimulate autophagy by favouring the deacetylation of cellular proteins. This deacetylation process can be achieved by three classes of compounds that deplete acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA; the sole donor of acetyl groups), that inhibit acetyl transferases (a group of enzymes that acetylate lysine residues in an array of proteins) or that stimulate the activity of deacetylases and hence reverse the action of acetyl transferases. A unifying definition of CRMs will be important for the continued development of this class of therapeutic agents.

  1. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  2. New developments in caloric materials for cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, S.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-06-01

    Caloric materials are in the spotlight as candidates for future environmentally friendly cooling technologies. We describe stimulating recent developments in the three caloric strands that are now being studied collectively, namely magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric or barocaloric) effects.

  3. Caloric restriction, metabolic rate, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd

    2004-09-01

    Caloric restriction increases life span in many types of animals. This article proposes a mechanism for this effect based on the hypothesis that metabolic stability, the capacity of an organism to maintain steady state values of redox couples, is a prime determinant of longevity. We integrate the stability-longevity hypothesis with a molecular model of metabolic activity (quantum metabolism), and an entropic theory of evolutionary change (directionality theory), to propose a proximate mechanism and an evolutionary rationale for aging. The mechanistic features of the new theory of aging are invoked to predict that caloric restriction extends life span by increasing metabolic stability. The evolutionary model is exploited to predict that the large increases in life span under caloric restriction observed in rats, a species with early sexual maturity, narrow reproductive span and large litter size, and hence low entropy, will not hold for primates. We affirm that in the case of humans, a species with late sexual maturity, broad reproductive span and small litter size, and hence high entropy, the response of life span to caloric restriction will be negligible.

  4. Oxytocin reduces caloric intake in men

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Marengi, Dean A.; DeSanti, Rebecca L.; Holmes, Tara M.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Tolley, Christiane J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Preclinical studies indicate that oxytocin is anorexigenic and has beneficial metabolic effects. Oxytocin effects on nutrition and metabolism in humans are not well defined. We hypothesized that oxytocin would reduce caloric intake and appetite, and alter levels of appetite-regulating hormones. We also explored metabolic effects of oxytocin. Methods We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study of single-dose intranasal oxytocin (24 IU) in 25 fasting healthy men. After oxytocin/placebo, subjects selected breakfast from a menu, and were given double portions. Caloric content of food consumed was measured. Visual analogue scales were used to assess appetite and blood was drawn for appetite-regulating hormones, insulin, and glucose before and after oxytocin/placebo. Indirect calorimetry assessed resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate utilization. Results Oxytocin reduced caloric intake with a preferential effect on fat intake and increased levels of the anorexigenic hormone cholecystokinin without affecting appetite or other appetite-regulating hormones. There was no effect of oxytocin on REE. Oxytocin resulted in a shift from carbohydrate to fat utilization and improved insulin sensitivity. Conclusions Intranasal oxytocin reduces caloric intake and has beneficial metabolic effects in men without concerning side effects. The efficacy and safety of sustained oxytocin administration in the treatment of obesity warrants investigation. PMID:25865294

  5. Does the consumption of caloric and non-caloric beverages with a meal affect energy intake?

    PubMed

    DellaValle, Diane M; Roe, Liane S; Rolls, Barbara J

    2005-04-01

    Beverages are frequently consumed with meals, but their influence on meal energy intake is not understood. We hypothesized that differences in the energy, nutrient content, and sensory properties of beverages consumed with a meal would affect intake. Forty-four women ate lunch in the laboratory once a week for 6 weeks. Lunch was consumed ad libitum, and was served with one of five beverages that were consumed in full, or no beverage. The beverages were 360 g of water, diet cola, regular cola, orange juice, and 1% milk. Results showed an effect of beverage type on meal intake (p<0.0001). Energy intake did not differ among the non-caloric and no-beverage conditions. Similarly, energy intake from lunch (including beverage) did not differ among the caloric beverage conditions. When a caloric beverage (156 kcal; 653 kJ) was consumed with the meal, energy intake was 104+/-16 kcal (435+/-67 kJ) greater than when a non-caloric beverage or no beverage was consumed. Subjects' ratings of fullness after lunch did not differ among the beverage conditions, but were lower for the no-beverage condition. These results show that when caloric beverages are consumed with a meal they add to energy intake from food, without significantly affecting satiety ratings.

  6. On the characteristics of caloric nystagmus in healthy persons. [in response to caloric stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, D.; Baranova, V. P.; Matsnev, E. I.; Yakovleva, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The asymmetry of reflex activity of labyrinths and directional preponderance of the reaction were studied on healthy persons subjected to caloric tests. Calorization with hot water was accompanied by less pronounced reactions in all parameters of nystagmus than analogous indices at cold water stimulation. The symmetry of labyrinth function shifted to the right in individuals with greater activity of the left central vestibular formations, analogous to right handedness behavior. It is concluded that asymmetry of reflex nystagmus in healthy persons can be due to a certain preponderance of functional activity in structures of the left hemisphere of the brain.

  7. On the characteristics of caloric nystagmus in healthy persons. [in response to caloric stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, D.; Baranova, V. P.; Matsnev, E. I.; Yakovleva, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The asymmetry of reflex activity of labyrinths and directional preponderance of the reaction were studied on healthy persons subjected to caloric tests. Calorization with hot water was accompanied by less pronounced reactions in all parameters of nystagmus than analogous indices at cold water stimulation. The symmetry of labyrinth function shifted to the right in individuals with greater activity of the left central vestibular formations, analogous to right handedness behavior. It is concluded that asymmetry of reflex nystagmus in healthy persons can be due to a certain preponderance of functional activity in structures of the left hemisphere of the brain.

  8. Modeling microscale heat transfer using Calore.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Bainbridge, Bruce L.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2005-09-01

    Modeling microscale heat transfer with the computational-heat-transfer code Calore is discussed. Microscale heat transfer problems differ from their macroscopic counterparts in that conductive heat transfer in both solid and gaseous materials may have important noncontinuum effects. In a solid material, three noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of phonons across a thin film, scattering of phonons from surface roughness at a gas-solid interface, and scattering of phonons from grain boundaries within the solid material. These processes are modeled for polycrystalline silicon, and the thermal-conductivity values predicted by these models are compared to experimental data. In a gaseous material, two noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of gas molecules across a thin gap and accommodation of gas molecules to solid conditions when reflecting from a solid surface. These processes are modeled for arbitrary gases by allowing the gas and solid temperatures across a gas-solid interface to differ: a finite heat transfer coefficient (contact conductance) is imposed at the gas-solid interface so that the temperature difference is proportional to the normal heat flux. In this approach, the behavior of gas in the bulk is not changed from behavior observed under macroscopic conditions. These models are implemented in Calore as user subroutines. The user subroutines reside within Sandia's Source Forge server, where they undergo version control and regression testing and are available to analysts needing these capabilities. A Calore simulation is presented that exercises these models for a heated microbeam separated from an ambient-temperature substrate by a thin gas-filled gap. Failure to use the noncontinuum heat transfer models for the solid and the gas causes the maximum temperature of the microbeam to be significantly underpredicted.

  9. A new light on caloric test--what was disclosed by three dimensional analysis of caloric nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Y.

    2001-01-01

    For better understanding of caloric nystagmus, this phenomenon will be reviewed historically in three stages. 1) The first light on caloric nystagmus was thrown by Barany 1906. Through direct observation of eye movements, Barany established the caloric test as an important tool to determine the side of lesion for vertigo. 2) The second light is shed by electrooculogram (EOG) from the late 1950th. EOG enabled qualitative analysis of caloric nystagmus, and proved Barany's convection theory, but resulted in neglect of vertical and roll eye movements. 3) The third light is gained by 3D recording of eye movements started from the late 1980th. 3D recordings of eye movements enabled us to analyze the spatial orientation of caloric nystagmus, and disclose the close correlation of the nystagmus components in the head vertical and the space vertical planes, suggesting a contribution of the velocity storage integrator. The 3D property of caloric nystagmus will be explained in detail.

  10. A new light on caloric test--what was disclosed by three dimensional analysis of caloric nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Y.

    2001-01-01

    For better understanding of caloric nystagmus, this phenomenon will be reviewed historically in three stages. 1) The first light on caloric nystagmus was thrown by Barany 1906. Through direct observation of eye movements, Barany established the caloric test as an important tool to determine the side of lesion for vertigo. 2) The second light is shed by electrooculogram (EOG) from the late 1950th. EOG enabled qualitative analysis of caloric nystagmus, and proved Barany's convection theory, but resulted in neglect of vertical and roll eye movements. 3) The third light is gained by 3D recording of eye movements started from the late 1980th. 3D recordings of eye movements enabled us to analyze the spatial orientation of caloric nystagmus, and disclose the close correlation of the nystagmus components in the head vertical and the space vertical planes, suggesting a contribution of the velocity storage integrator. The 3D property of caloric nystagmus will be explained in detail.

  11. A new light on caloric test--what was disclosed by three dimensional analysis of caloric nystagmus?

    PubMed

    Arai, Y

    2001-12-01

    For better understanding of caloric nystagmus, this phenomenon will be reviewed historically in three stages. 1) The first light on caloric nystagmus was thrown by Barany 1906. Through direct observation of eye movements, Barany established the caloric test as an important tool to determine the side of lesion for vertigo. 2) The second light is shed by electrooculogram (EOG) from the late 1950th. EOG enabled qualitative analysis of caloric nystagmus, and proved Barany's convection theory, but resulted in neglect of vertical and roll eye movements. 3) The third light is gained by 3D recording of eye movements started from the late 1980th. 3D recordings of eye movements enabled us to analyze the spatial orientation of caloric nystagmus, and disclose the close correlation of the nystagmus components in the head vertical and the space vertical planes, suggesting a contribution of the velocity storage integrator. The 3D property of caloric nystagmus will be explained in detail.

  12. A Dissociation Between Recognition and Hedonic Value in Caloric and Non-caloric Carbonated Soft Drinks

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Franco; Huddas, Claire; Steven, Katelyn; Hachem, Souheila; Lodhia, Luv; Fernandez, Ryan; Logerstedt, Macee

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is considered to be a contributor to diabetes and the epidemic of obesity in many countries. The popularity of non-caloric carbonated soft drinks as an alternative to SSBs may be a factor in reducing the health risks associated with SSBs consumption. This study focuses on the perceptual discrimination of SSBs from artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Fifty-five college students rated 14 commercially available carbonated soft drinks in terms of sweetness and likeability. They were also asked to recognize, if the drinks contained sugar or a non-caloric artificial sweetener. Overall, participants showed poor accuracy in discriminating drinks’ sweeteners, with significantly lower accuracy for SSBs than ASBs. Interestingly, we found a dissociation between sweetener recognition and drink pleasantness. In fact, in spite of a chance-level discrimination accuracy of SSBs, their taste was systematically preferred to the taste of non-caloric beverages. Our findings support the idea that hedonic value of carbonated soft drinks is dissociable from its identification and that the activation of the pleasure system seems not to require explicit recognition of the sweetener contained in the soft drink. We hypothesize that preference for carbonated soft drinks containing sugar over non-caloric alternatives might be modulated by metabolic factors that are independent from conscious and rational consumers’ choices. PMID:26858681

  13. A Dissociation Between Recognition and Hedonic Value in Caloric and Non-caloric Carbonated Soft Drinks.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Franco; Huddas, Claire; Steven, Katelyn; Hachem, Souheila; Lodhia, Luv; Fernandez, Ryan; Logerstedt, Macee

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is considered to be a contributor to diabetes and the epidemic of obesity in many countries. The popularity of non-caloric carbonated soft drinks as an alternative to SSBs may be a factor in reducing the health risks associated with SSBs consumption. This study focuses on the perceptual discrimination of SSBs from artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Fifty-five college students rated 14 commercially available carbonated soft drinks in terms of sweetness and likeability. They were also asked to recognize, if the drinks contained sugar or a non-caloric artificial sweetener. Overall, participants showed poor accuracy in discriminating drinks' sweeteners, with significantly lower accuracy for SSBs than ASBs. Interestingly, we found a dissociation between sweetener recognition and drink pleasantness. In fact, in spite of a chance-level discrimination accuracy of SSBs, their taste was systematically preferred to the taste of non-caloric beverages. Our findings support the idea that hedonic value of carbonated soft drinks is dissociable from its identification and that the activation of the pleasure system seems not to require explicit recognition of the sweetener contained in the soft drink. We hypothesize that preference for carbonated soft drinks containing sugar over non-caloric alternatives might be modulated by metabolic factors that are independent from conscious and rational consumers' choices.

  14. Calorie anticipation alters food intake after low-caloric not high-caloric preloads.

    PubMed

    Hogenkamp, P S; Cedernaes, J; Chapman, C D; Vogel, H; Hjorth, O C; Zarei, S; Lundberg, L S; Brooks, S J; Dickson, S L; Benedict, C; Schiöth, H B

    2013-08-01

    Cognitive factors and anticipation are known to influence food intake. The current study examined the effect of anticipation and actual consumption of food on hormone (ghrelin, cortisol, and insulin) and glucose levels, appetite and ad libitum intake, to assess whether changes in hormone levels might explain the predicted differences in subsequent food intake. During four breakfast sessions, participants consumed a yogurt preload that was either low caloric (LC: 180 kcal/300 g) or high caloric (HC: 530 kcal/300 g) and was provided with either consistent or inconsistent calorie information (i.e., stating the caloric content of the preload was low or high). Appetite ratings and hormone and glucose levels were measured at baseline (t = 0), after providing the calorie information about the preload (t = 20), after consumption of the preload (t = 40), and just before ad libitum intake (t = 60). Ad libitum intake was lower after HC preloads (as compared to LC preloads; P < 0.01). Intake after LC preloads was higher when provided with (consistent) LC information (467±254 kcal) as compared to (inconsistent) HC information (346±210 kcal), but intake after the HC preloads did not depend on the information provided (LC information: 290±178 kcal, HC information: 333±179 kcal; caloric load*information P = 0.03). Hormone levels did not respond in an anticipatory manner, and the post-prandial responses depended on actual calories consumed. These results suggest that both cognitive and physiological information determine food intake. When actual caloric intake was sufficient to produce physiological satiety, cognitive factors played no role; however, when physiological satiety was limited, cognitively induced satiety reduced intake to comparable levels. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  15. Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Abete, Itziar; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Marti, Amelia; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease resulting from a chronic and long-term positive energy balance in which both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Weight-reduction methods are mainly focused on dietary changes and increased physical activity. However, responses to nutritional intervention programs show a wide range of interindividual variation, which is importantly influenced by genetic determinants. In this sense, subjects carrying several obesity-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) show differences in the response to calorie-restriction programs. Furthermore, there is evidence indicating that dietary components not only fuel the body but also participate in the modulation of gene expression. Thus, the expression pattern and nutritional regulation of several obesity-related genes have been studied, as well as those that are differentially expressed by caloric restriction. The responses to caloric restriction linked to the presence of SNPs in obesity-related genes are reviewed in this chapter. Also, the influence of energy restriction on gene expression pattern in different tissues is addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Caloric intake and expenditure of obese boys.

    PubMed

    Waxman, M; Stunkard, A J

    1980-02-01

    Caloric intake and expenditure of children in four families were assessed by nonparticipant observations of family dinners and school lunches. In each family there were one obese boy and one nonobese brother whose ages were within two years of each other. For family dinners the nonobese brother served as a control; for school lunches, a nonobese peer served as a control. The obese boys consumed more calories (766 +/- 290) than did their nonobese brothers at dinner (504 +/- 183) and far more (907 +/- 217) than their nonobese peers at lunch (500 +/- 386). The obese boys also ate faster (65.7 +/- 37.0 kcal/minute) than their brothers at dinner (31.7 +/- 13.8 kcal/minute) and far faster (103.5 +/- 40.9 kcal/minute) than their nonobese peers at lunch (46.2 +/- 22.5 kcal/minute). Time-sampled activity assessments showed the obese boys far less active than their controls inside the home, slightly less active outside the home, and equally active at school. When these activity values were converted into energy expenditure by measurement of oxygen consumption, obese boys expended more calories in moving than did their controls; as a result, there was no difference in energy expenditure between obese and nonobese boys at home and greater energy expenditure outside the home and at school. Increased intake, thus, and not decreased caloric output maintained the obesity of these four boys. In this respect, obesity in childhood may differ from obesity in adult life.

  17. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or water caloric stimulator is a device that delivers a stream of air...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  18. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or water caloric stimulator is a device that delivers a stream of air...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  19. Refeeding after caloric restriction reverses altered liver glucose release.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rosângela F; Mariano, Isabela R; Stolarz, Isabela C; Pedrosa, Maria Montserrat D

    2017-08-30

    Caloric restriction increases liver glucose release (LGR), but it is not known if this is a permanent condition. To investigate if refeeding after caloric restriction reverses the high LGR. Rats were organised in six-pups litters (GC); 12-pups litters with either 50% caloric restriction from 21 to 80 days of age (GR) or fed at will from 50 to 80 days of age (GRL). Liver perfusion was made at the age of 80 days. LGR was higher in the GR both during basal and adrenaline-stimulated conditions. Refeeding after caloric restriction decreased it to values close to those of GC rats. The altered LGR of GR rats was reversed by refeeding (group GRL). The influence of hypothalamic neuropetides on these hepatic changes is suggested. Enhanced LGR under caloric restriction is not programmed by early feeding; instead, it is determined by the current nutritional conditions.

  20. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Morris, Rachael; Milberg, William; Sakel, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for four consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and 1-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy. PMID:24391559

  1. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  2. Unix version of CALOR89 for calorimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Job, P.K.; Price, L.E. . High Energy Physics Div.); Gabriel, T.A. )

    1992-05-12

    CALOR89 is a system of coupled Monte Carlo particle transport computer codes which has been successfully employed for the estimation of calorimeter parameters in High Energy Physics. In the past CALOR89 has been running on various IBM machines and on CRAY X-MP at Lawrence Livermore Lab. These machines had non-unix operating systems. In this report we present a UNIX version of CALOR89, which is especially suited for the UNIX work stations. Moreover CALOR89 is also been supplemented with two new program packages which makes it more user friendly. CALPREP is a program for the preparation of the input files for CALOR89 in general geometry and ANALYZ is an analysis package to extract the final results from CALOR89 relevant to calorimeters. This report also provides two script files LCALOR and PCALOR. LCALOR runs CALOR89 sequences of programs and EGS4 for a given configuration sequentially on a single processor and PCALOR concurrently on a multiprocessor unix workstation.

  3. Unix version of CALOR89 for calorimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T.; Job, P.K.; Price, L.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1992-05-12

    CALOR89 is a system of coupled Monte Carlo particle transport computer codes which has been successfully employed for the estimation of calorimeter parameters in High Energy Physics. In the past CALOR89 has been running on various IBM machines and on CRAY X-MP at Lawrence Livermore Lab. These machines had non-unix operating systems. In this report we present a UNIX version of CALOR89, which is especially suited for the UNIX work stations. Moreover CALOR89 is also been supplemented with two new program packages which makes it more user friendly. CALPREP is a program for the preparation of the input files for CALOR89 in general geometry and ANALYZ is an analysis package to extract the final results from CALOR89 relevant to calorimeters. This report also provides two script files LCALOR and PCALOR. LCALOR runs CALOR89 sequences of programs and EGS4 for a given configuration sequentially on a single processor and PCALOR concurrently on a multiprocessor unix workstation.

  4. Some strategies for improving caloric responses with ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Scott, James F.; Dkhil, Brahim

    2016-06-01

    Many important breakthroughs and significant engineering developments have been achieved during the past two decades in the field of caloric materials. In this review, we address ferroelectrics emerging as ideal materials which permit both giant elastocaloric and/or electrocaloric responses near room temperature. We summarize recent strategies for improving caloric responses using geometrical optimization, maximizing the number of coexisting phases, combining positive and negative caloric responses, introducing extra degree of freedom like mechanical stress/pressure, and multicaloric effect driven by either single stimulus or multiple stimuli. This review highlights the promising perspective of ferroelectrics for developing next-generation solid-state refrigeration.

  5. Theory of giant-caloric effects in multiferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2013-08-01

    A generalized thermodynamic theory of giant-caloric effects in coupled multiferroic solids is introduced. The generalized theory allows analytical derivation of any caloric effect in solids displaying any type of cross coupling. In the particular cases of the non-coupled ferroic materials, the theory reproduces the well-known formulae describing magnetocaloric, electrocaloric or elastocaloric effects. This work facilitates adequate modeling tools and analytical relations capable of predicting caloric effects in complex coupled multiferroic materials, which is very beneficial to future developments in solid-state cooling technologies.

  6. Caloric balance during simulated and actual space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Reid, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The in-flight caloric intakes of all Apollo astronauts are examined and shown to average about 25 kcal per kg per day. Measurement of weight changes following recovery indicates that about 0.15 kg of fat was lost per man per day in-flight for an average deficit of about 19 kcal per kg per day. Measurement of the caloric intake of astronauts under ground-based conditions and during hypobaric exposure indicated a caloric requirement which was not significantly different from the in-flight requirement adjusted for weight loss. Partial metabolic balance data and measurements of bone loss and body volume revealed that protein and mineral losses also occurred to an extent which would reduce the size of estimated in-flight caloric deficits.

  7. [Caloric restriction: about its positive metabolic effects and cellular impact].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Raúl Julián; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos Alberto; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction, as a 30 to 60% decrease of ad libitum balanced caloric intake, without malnutrition, is the non-genetic strategy that has consistently extended the average and maximum lifespan of most living beings, and it has been tested from unicellular organisms like yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Rhesus primates. In addition, various genetic and pharmacological caloric restriction models have shown to protect against cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Primate studies suggest that this intervention delays the onset of age-related diseases; in humans, it has physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects decreasing diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factor. Although currently the mechanism by which caloric restriction has its positive effects at the cellular level is unknown, it has been reported to decrease oxidative stress and increase in mitochondrial biogenesis.

  8. [Correlation between bedside triple test by videonystagmoscope and caloric test].

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Jiang, H; Zhao, Y; Gao, Z Q

    2016-08-07

    To investigate the correlation between rapid bedside triple test and caloric test. We reviewed clinical records of 313 consecutive patients presenting with vertigo at our ear-nose-throat clinic.RESULTS of bedside vestibular tests in all patients were compared with caloric test. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the triple test relative to caloric test were calculated. Compared with the caloric test results, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value(PPV), and negative predictive value(NPV) of the triple test were 65.1%, 94.0%, 90.5% and 75.5%, respectively. As a predictive screening for patients with vertigo, the bedside triple test is a rapid, reliable tool for clinical diagnosis.

  9. Caloric balance during simulated and actual space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Reid, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The in-flight caloric intakes of all Apollo astronauts are examined and shown to average about 25 kcal per kg per day. Measurement of weight changes following recovery indicates that about 0.15 kg of fat was lost per man per day in-flight for an average deficit of about 19 kcal per kg per day. Measurement of the caloric intake of astronauts under ground-based conditions and during hypobaric exposure indicated a caloric requirement which was not significantly different from the in-flight requirement adjusted for weight loss. Partial metabolic balance data and measurements of bone loss and body volume revealed that protein and mineral losses also occurred to an extent which would reduce the size of estimated in-flight caloric deficits.

  10. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  12. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold-water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS, and to 1 hour after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated by either subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex. PMID:26282602

  13. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS and to 1 h after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated either by subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  14. Caloric restriction and Metabolism in Lean and Obese rats.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data related to obese and lean strains of rat commonly used in the laboratory that are calorically restricted and its effects on physiologic parameters (Body Composition and metabolism).This dataset is associated with the following publication:Aydin, C., K. Jarema , P. Phillips , and C. Gordon. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory Rat: Effects on Body Composition, Metabolism, Growth, and Overall Health. Experimental Physiology Journal. Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 100(1): 1280-97, (2015).

  15. Characteristics of vestibulosensory reactions studied by experimental caloric test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranov, V. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibulo-sensory reactions were studied in 135 workers who were in contact with nitroethers, by the method of an experimental caloric test. The response vestibulo-sensory reactions were recorded by means of an electroencephalograph. The changes in the sensory reaction depended on the duration of the workers' contact with toxic agents. A study of illusion reactions by the labyrinth calorization widens diagnostic possibilities in the examination of functional condition of the vestibular analyser considerably.

  16. Asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve for mononuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoel, C.; Sobotka, L. G.; Charity, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve, for mononuclear configurations, is studied as a function of neutron-to-proton asymmetry with a model that allows for independent variation of the neutron and proton surface diffusenesses. The evolution of the effective mass with density and excitation is included in a schematic fashion and the entropies are extracted in a local density approximation. The plateau in the caloric curve displays only a slight sensitivity to the asymmetry.

  17. Use of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners in US consumer packaged foods, 2005–9

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the use of caloric (CS) and non-caloric sweeteners (NCS) in the US food supply is limited. This study utilizes full ingredient list and nutrition facts panel (NFP) data from Gladson Nutrition Database, and nationally representative purchases of consumer packaged foods from Nielsen Homescan in 2005 through 2009 to understand the use of CS (including FJC) and NCS in CPG foods. Of the 85,451 uniquely formulated foods purchased during 2005–2009, 75% contain sweeteners (68% with CS only, 1% with NCS only, 6% with both CS and NCS). CS are in >95% of cakes/cookies/pies, granola/protein/energy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, sweet snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages. NCS are in >33% of yogurts and sports/energy drinks, 42% of waters (plain or flavored), and most diet sweetened beverages. Across unique products, corn syrup is the most commonly listed sweetener, followed by sorghum, cane sugar, high fructose corn syrup and FJC. Also, 77% of all calories purchased in the US in 2005–2009 contained CS and 3% contained NCS, while 73% of the volume of foods purchased contained CS and 15% contained NCS. Trends during this period suggest a shift towards the purchase of NCS-containing products.Our study poses a challenge toward monitoring sweetener consumption in the US by discussing the need and options available to improve measures of CS and NCS, and additional requirements on NFPs on CPG foods. PMID:23102182

  18. Analysis of caloric test responses in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Ping; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Chien; Lee, Jih-Chin; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by a rapid-onset hearing loss that develops within 3 days. Vertigo may also be present. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the severity of a loss of caloric function is associated with the initial hearing loss and with hearing recovery. Our study population was made up of 135 patients-67 men and 68 women, aged 25 to 71 years (mean: 50.9)-with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who had undergone bithermal caloric testing. We compared various patient factors according to patients' hearing level and their response to caloric testing. We also analyzed the canal paresis (CP) value in patients with an abnormal caloric response according to three factors: disease severity, vertigo, and hearing recovery, and we evaluated the correlation between the loss of caloric function and hearing outcomes. We found that an abnormal caloric response was significantly associated with a profound hearing loss at presentation, the presence of vertigo, and poor hearing recovery. Among patients with an abnormal caloric response, the CP value was significantly correlated with hearing recovery (r = 0.503, p = 0.001). Poor hearing recovery was seen in 80% of patients with a CP value of ≥40% but in only 25% of patients with a value of <40%; in addition, the degree of hearing recovery was worse in the patients with a CP value of ≥40% (p = 0.002). We conclude that a CP value of ≥40% is a significant prognostic factor for an unfavorable treatment outcome.

  19. Proximate composition and caloric content of eight Lake Michigan fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rottiers, Donald V.; Tucker, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    We measured the proximate composition (percentage lipid, water, fat-free dry material, ash) and caloric content of eight species of Lake Michigan fish: lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), and slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). Except for alewives, proximate composition and caloric content did not differ significantly between males and females. And, for coho salmon, there was no significant difference in composition between fish collected in different years. Lipid and caloric content of lake trout increased directly with age. In all species examined, lipids and caloric contents were significantly lower in small, presumably immature, fish than in larger, older fish. Lipid content of lake trout, lake whitefish, and bloaters (range of means, 16-22%) was nearly 3 times higher than that of coho salmon, sculpins, rainbow smelt, and alewives (range of means, 5.2-7.0%). The mean caloric content ranged from 6.9 to 7.1 kcal/g for species high in lipids and from 5.8 to 6.3 kcal/g for species low in lipids. Although the caloric content of all species varied directly with lipid content and inversely with water content, an increase in lipid content did not always coincide with a proportional increase in caloric content when other components of fish composition were essentially unchanged. This observation suggests that the energy content of fish estimated from the proximate composition by using universal conversion factors may not necessarily be accurate.

  20. Changes of ampulla pressure in the semicircular canal of pigeons by caloric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Satoru

    Still now several hypotheses about the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus have been in conclusive. In this study we confirmed the convection effect and the volume change effect of the endolymph in horizontal semicircular canal following the caloric stimulation using pigeons ( Columba livia). Although the direction of the caloric nystagmus depended on the head position and the stimulus site of calorization, the caloric nystagmus disappeared after plugging of horizontal semicircular canal. On the other hand, the ampulla pressure increased by cold calorization and decreased by hot calorization and these pressure changes had no relation to the head position. These results show that the main role of the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus under 1G is the convection effect but the volume change effect may act on the caloric nystagmus not only under 1G but also under microgravity.

  1. Meal timing influences daily caloric intake in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Baron, Kelly G; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-11-01

    The role that meal pattern plays in weight regulation is a popular topic of scientific and common debate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between meal timing with caloric intake and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that late meal timing and eating closer to sleep onset time would be associated with greater energy intake and higher BMI. Participants included 59 individuals recruited from the community. Rest/activity patterns were assessed using 7 days of wrist actigraphy, and caloric intake was evaluated using 7 days of diet logs. Results demonstrated that the timing of meals was associated with overall energy intake but not with BMI. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, sex, sleep duration, and timing, eating more frequently, later timing of the last meal, and a shorter duration between last meal and sleep onset predicted higher total caloric intake. In a mediational model, eating frequency explained the relationship between eating closer to sleep onset and total caloric intake. Results suggest that later relative timing of meals, particularly eating close to sleep, could lead to weight gain due to a greater number of eating occasions and higher total daily caloric intake. These findings have important implications for the development of novel, time-based interventions for weight management.

  2. Meal timing influences daily caloric intake in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kathryn J.; Baron, Kelly G.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2016-01-01

    The role that meal pattern plays in weight regulation is a popular topic of scientific and common debate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between meal timing with caloric intake and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that latemeal timing and eating closer to sleep onset time would be associated with greater energy intake and higher BMI. Participants included 59 individuals recruited from the community. Rest/activity patterns were assessed using seven days of wrist actigraphy, and caloric intake was evaluated using seven days of diet logs. Results demonstrated that the timing of meals was associated with overall energy intake but not with BMI. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, gender, sleep duration, and timing; eating more frequently, later timing of the last meal, and a shorter duration between last meal and sleep onset predicted higher total caloric intake. In a mediational model, eating frequency explained the relationship between eating closer to sleep onset and total caloric intake. Results suggest that later relative timing of meals, particularly eating close to sleep, could lead to weight gain due to a greater number of eating occasions and higher total daily caloric intake. These findings have important implications for the development of novel, time-based interventions for weight management. PMID:25439026

  3. Modeling and design aspects of active caloric regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    A cooling device based on a solid caloric material using, for example, the elastocaloric, magnetocaloric, barocaloric or electrocaloric effect has the potential to replace vapor-compression based systems for a variety of applications. Any caloric device using a solid refrigerant may benefit from using a regenerative cycle to increase the operating temperature span. This presentation shows how all active caloric regenerators can be modeled using similar techniques and how they are related to passive regenerator performance. The advantages and disadvantages of using a regenerative cycle are also discussed. The issue of hysteresis in caloric materials is investigated from a system/thermodynamic standpoint and the effects on cooling power and efficiency are quantified using a numerical model of an active regenerator using model caloric materials with assumed properties. The implementation in a working device will be discussed for elastocaloric and magnetocaloric cooling devices. It is shown that demagnetization effects for magnetocaloric systems and stress concentration effects in elastocaloric system reduce the overall effect in the regenerator and care must be taken in regenerator design for both technologies. Other loss mechanisms outside the regenerator such as heat leaks are also discussed. Finally, experimental results for active magnetic regenerative cooler are given for a range of operating conditions. The most recently published device uses a regenerator consisting of Gd and three alloys of GdY and has demonstrated a COP over 3.

  4. Comparison between caloric and canal impulse rotatory test.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B; Dobler, S; Sauron, B; Hazan, A; Peytral, C; Fombeur, J P

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that the rotatory test using videosnystagmoscopy can also be applied for identification of vestibular canal paresis. In this study, we test this hypothesis by comparing the results of a canal impulse rotatory test with those of the caloric test using the method described by Freyss. Our study indicates that only in 38% of all tested patients, the same results between the two tests have been obtained. Furthermore, which the group with abnormal findings is observed separately, in 24% patients only these two test methods lead to the same results. Consequently, the canal impulse rotatory test cannot replace the caloric test.

  5. Comparison between caloric and canal impulse rotatory test.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B; Dobler, S; Sauron, B; Hazan, A; Peytral, C; Fombeur, J P

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that the rotatory test using videonystagmoscopy can also be applied for identification of vestibular canal paresis. In this study, we test this hypothesis by comparing the results of a canal impulse rotatory test with those of the caloric test using the method described by Freyss. Our study indicates that only in 38% of all tested patients, the same results between the two tests have been obtained. Furthermore, when the group with abnormal findings is observed separately, in 24% patients only these two test methods lead to the same results. Consequently, the canal impulse rotatory test cannot replace the caloric test.

  6. The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala mediates caloric sugar preference over a non-caloric sweetener in mice.

    PubMed

    Yasoshima, Y; Yoshizawa, H; Shimura, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-04-16

    Neurobiological and genetic mechanisms underlying increased intake of and preference for nutritive sugars over non-nutritive sweeteners are not fully understood. We examined the roles of subnuclei of the amygdala in the shift in preference for a nutritive sugar. Food-deprived mice alternately received caloric sucrose (1.0 M) on odd-numbered training days and a non-caloric artificial sweetener (2.5 mM saccharin) on even-numbered training days. During training, mice with sham lesions of the basolateral (BLA) or central (CeA) nucleus of the amygdala increased their intake of 1.0 M sucrose, but not saccharin. Trained mice with sham lesions showed a significant shift in preference toward less concentrated sucrose (0.075 M) over the saccharin in a two-bottle choice test, although the mice showed an equivalent preference for these sweeteners before training. No increased intake of or preference for sucrose before and after the alternating training was observed in non-food-deprived mice. Excitotoxic lesions centered in the BLA impaired the increase in 1.0M sucrose intake and shift in preference toward 0.075 M sucrose over saccharin. Microlesions with iontophoretic excitotoxin injections into the CeA did not block the training-dependent changes. These results suggest that food-deprived animals selectively shift their preference for a caloric sugar over a non-caloric sweetener through the alternate consumption of caloric and non-caloric sweet substances. The present data also suggest that the BLA, but not CeA, plays a role in the selective shift in sweetener preference. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic effects of intermittent access to caloric or non-caloric sweetened solutions in mice fed a high-caloric diet.

    PubMed

    Soto, Marion; Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2017-03-24

    Human consumption of obesogenic diets and soft drinks, sweetened with different molecules, is increasing worldwide, and increases the risk of metabolic diseases. We hypothesized that the chronic consumption of caloric (sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), maltodextrin) and non-caloric (sucralose) solutions under 2-hour intermittent access, alongside the consumption of a high-fat high-sucrose diet, would result in differential obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice had ad libitum access to an HFHS diet and to water (water control group). In addition, some mice had access, 2h/day, 5days/week (randomly chosen) for 12weeks, to different solutions: i) a sucrose solution (2.1kJ/ml), ii) an HFCS solution (2.1kJ/ml), iii) a maltodextrin solution (2.1kJ/ml) and a sucralose solution (60mM) (n=15/group). Despite no changes in total caloric intake, 2h-intermittent access to the sucrose, HFCS or maltodextrin solutions led to increased body weight and accumulation of lipids in the liver when compared to the group consuming water only. The HFCS and sucrose solutions induced a higher fat mass in various fat depots, glucose intolerance, increased glucose oxidation at the expense of lipid oxidation, and a lower hypothalamic expression of NPY in the fasted state. HFCS also reduced proopiomelanocortin expression in the hypothalamus. 2h-intermittent access to sucralose did not result in significant changes in body composition, but caused a stronger expression of CART in the hypothalamus. Finally, sucrose intake showed a trend to increase the expression of various receptors in the nucleus accumbens, linked to dopamine, opioid and endocannabinoid signaling. In conclusion, 2h-intermittent access to caloric solutions (especially those sweetened with sucrose and HFCS), but not sucralose, resulted in adverse metabolic consequences in high-fat high-sucrose-fed mice.

  8. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  9. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs) of expected weight loss c...

  10. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs)of expected weight loss ca...

  11. Cupula dynamics under caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A. V.; Sirenko, S. P.

    Caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal SC is widely applied in studies of vestibular impairments Barany 1906 suggested that caloric response of SC results from mechanism of endolymph convection due to density changes of endolymph and therefore depends on the action of gravity forces However the Skylab experiments 1983 showed that the caloric reaction of SC can take place even under microgravity The studies of Scherer Clarke 1985 Harada Ariki 1985 Baumgarten et al 1985 considered the thermal expansion of endolymph to be a concurrent mechanism The model of caloric response based on the buoyancy force due to density change in the endolymph induced by thermal stimulation was proposed by Gentine et al 1990 1991 It should be noted that the first qualitative model that took into account the effect of endolymph thermal expansion under local heating to analyze the properties of primary afferents was proposed by Gusev Orlov 1977 However these models failed to answer the question which of the mentioned effects will be dominant under certain conditions The purpose of present study was to account for the expansion and convection of endolymph and to determine under which conditions one mechanism dominates over the other The consideration is based on the following model of SC Kondrachuk Sirenko 1990 an isolated torus filled by a compressible viscous Newton liquid endolymph the torus interior is plugged by an elastic body cupula the cupula surface in contact with endolymph is supposed to be stretched along the

  12. CALOR87: HETC87, MICAP, EGS4, and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Bishop, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Johnson, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    A brief history of CALOR (HETC, EGS, MICAP, SPECT) is presented to indicate the evolution of this code system. Details concerning the current modifications and additions to the high-energy transport code, HETC, are also presented and new comparisons with experimental data are included to verify the new physics improvements. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Caloric and entropic temperatures in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Restuccia, L.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the non-equilibrium consequences of two different definitions of temperature in systems out of equilibrium: one is based on the internal energy (caloric temperature), and the other one on the entropy (entropic temperature). We discuss the relation between the values obtained from these two definitions in ideal gases and in two-level systems.

  14. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. Charged and neutral particle transport methods and applications: The CALOR code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Charlton, L.A.

    1997-04-01

    The CALOR code system, which is a complete radiation transport code system, is described with emphasis on the high-energy (> 20 MeV) nuclear collision models. Codes similar to CALOR are also briefly discussed. A current application using CALOR which deals with the development of the National Spallation Neutron Source is also given.

  16. Caloric restriction as a mechanism mediating resistance to environmental disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, L T; Hart, R W; Leakey, J E

    1998-01-01

    It has been observed that susceptibility to many degenerative diseases increases concurrently with industrialization and rising living standards. Although epidemiologic studies suggest that specific environmental and dietary factors may be important, caloric intake alone (as reflected in body size) may account for much of the differential risk observed among diverse human populations. It has been suggested from animal studies that caloric intake may be the primary effector for many hormonal, metabolic, physiologic, and behavioral responses that coordinate reproductive strategy to apparent availability of food. When caloric intake is excessive, particularly at critical developmental stages, physiologic priorities are set for body growth and fecundity rather than for endurance and longevity. The converse occurs during periods of famine, thus increasing the probability that sufficient individuals survive to restore the population when conditions improve. Calorically restricted rodents have significantly longer reproductive and total life spans than their ad libitum-fed controls and exhibit a spectrum of biochemical and physiologic alterations that characterize their adaptation to reduced intake. These include reduced stature, hypercorticism in the absence of elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, increased metabolic efficiency, decreased mitogenic response coupled with increased rates of apoptosis, reduced inflammatory response, induction of stress proteins and DNA repair enzymes, altered drug-metabolizing enzyme expression, and modified cell-mediated immune function. The overall profile of these changes is one of improved defense against environmental stress. This has been suggested as the mechanistic basis for the protective effects of low body weight on radiation and chemically induced cancers in experimental animals. It may also explain the significantly higher thresholds of acute toxicity observed when calorically restricted rodents are exposed to certain

  17. The caloric vestibular nystagmus during short lasting microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterveld, W. J.; de Jong, H. A. A.; Kortschot, H. W.

    In human subjects the caloric vestibular test was conducted during parabolic flight. The ear irrigation was performed from 35 secs. till 5 secs. before the onset of microgravity. Nystagmography covered a 10-minutes period, including three parabolic manoeuvres of the aircraft. a. The slow phase velocity (SPV) of the caloric nystagmus increased proportionally with the value of the g-force. Introduction of microgravity induced an exponential decrease of the SPV decay. b. The nystagmus disappeared completely in microgravity, but SPV decay showed a specific time constant. c. The averaged time constant values of the caloric nystagmus SPV decay after sudden onset of microgravity and the averaged time constant of the SPV decay following a sudden stop after sustained rotation during 0-g appeared to be on the same level (10.2 s. and 10.6 s.). d. These two averaged time constant values obtained during shortlasting microgravity proved to be on a lower level than those time constants (15.5 secs.; 15.9 secs.) found in ground-based conditions. e. Because of the similarities in the characteristics of both SPV decay's and their accompanying time constants, a common working mechanism of cupular stimulation is likely. Most probably a fluid movement (or pressure) provokes a cupula deflexion followed by a cupula reflexion, either caused by a sudden stop after a sustained rotation or by a sudden onset of microgravity after g-load calorization. The present results support the Bárány convection theory with regard the endolymph stimulatory properties following the caloric test.

  18. Non-caloric sweeteners, sweetness modulators, and sweetener enhancers.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Grant E; Prakash, Indra

    2012-01-01

    For a new sweetness technology to realize strong commercial success, it must be safe, exhibit good taste quality, be sufficiently soluble and stable in food and beverage systems, and be cost effective and patentable. Assessments of the commercial promise of eight synthetic and eight natural non-caloric sweeteners are made relevant to these metrics. High-potency (HP) non-caloric sweeteners, both synthetic and natural, are generally limited in taste quality by (a) low maximal sweetness response, (b) "off" tastes, (c) slow-onset sweet tastes that linger, and (d) sweet tastes that adapt or desensitize the gustatory system. Formulation approaches to address these limitations are discussed. Enhancement of the normal sucrose sensory response by action of a sweetener receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) has been achieved with very significant calorie reduction and with retention of the taste quality of sucrose. Research on PAM discovery over the past decade is summarized.

  19. Metabolic Aspects of Caloric Restriction (500 Calories): Body Composition Changes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    liquid diets; Body weight losses; Body fat losses; Dry protein changes; Skinfold thicknesses ; Deuterium dilution; 4 OK counting; Body volumes and...indicates the water sparing and fat utilizing effects of limited carbohydrate and protein with mineral supplementation. The skinfold thicknesses of...The skinfold thicknesses of both groups were also decreased during * caloric restriction. Lesser changes were noted when minerals were in- cluded in

  20. Sleep, hunger, satiety, food cravings, and caloric intake in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Landis, Andrea M; Parker, Kathy P; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of adolescent obesity has increased worldwide. Although diet and exercise patterns are major determinants of weight, recent studies with adults and children have shown that total amount of sleep is inversely associated with body mass index (BMI). The purpose of this study was to examine associations among total sleep time (TST), hunger, satiety, food cravings, and caloric intake in a sample of healthy adolescents. DESIGN-METHODS: Participants were recruited from the community and a local high school. Demographic data such as sleeping habits, pubertal status, food cravings, caloric intake, physical activity, height, and weight were collected between October 2006 and April 2007. Participants also completed a 7-day sleep-hunger-satiety diary. Descriptive and parametric procedures were used for data analyses (alpha=.05). The sample (N=85) included 56% females (n=48), 76% African American (n=65) adolescents. Mean age was 15.6+/-1.4 years and mean BMI was 24.3+/-5.4 kg/m(2). Mean reported 7-day cumulative nocturnal sleep was 52.9 (+/-6.0) hours; mean reported cumulative daytime sleep (or napping) was 3.7 (+/-3.4) hours. Multiple regression analyses showed age, gender, and race were associated with feelings of hunger, satiety, total food cravings and caloric intake. A greater total food-cravings score was associated with increased daytime sleep. These findings indicate an unexpected association between increased daytime sleep and eating behaviors that potentially lead to obesity. Longitudinal studies using objective measures of sleep, appetite regulation, and caloric intake are needed to better understand relationships between appetite and sleep in adolescents from varying racial and gender groups. By carefully considering adolescent sleep (especially daytime sleep), race, and gender, clinicians and school health nurses in the US and other countries are in a unique position to develop novel approaches to prevent and reduce obesity.

  1. Status of selected nutrients in obese dogs undergoing caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that dog plasma concentrations of selected nutrients decrease after undergoing caloric restriction for weight loss. Thirty-one overweight dogs that had successfully lost at least 15% of initial body weight were included in the study. Nutrients that had been previously identified to be at potential risk of deficiency during caloric restriction were measured in plasma (choline, amino acids) and urine (selenium) at the initiation and completion of a standardized weight loss regimen in dogs. Results Dogs remained healthy throughout the study, and no signs attributable to nutrient deficiency were noted. Percentage weight loss was 28.3% (16.0-40.1%) starting body weight, over a period of 250 days (91–674 days). Median energy intake during the weight loss period was 62 (44 to 74) Kcal/kg0.75 target weight per day. Choline (P = 0.046) and threonine (P = 0.02) decreased after weight loss. Glycine (P = 0.041), and urinary selenium:creatinine ratio (P = 0.006) both increased after weight loss. There were no other significant differences in plasma nutrient concentrations. Conclusions Since concentrations of most measured nutrients did not change significantly, the data are not consistent with widespread nutrient deficiency in dogs undergoing caloric restriction using a diet formulated for weight loss. However, the significance of the decrease in plasma choline concentration requires further assessment. PMID:24156605

  2. Dietary fat dose dependently increases spontaneous caloric intake in rat.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Zoe S

    2003-07-01

    To characterize the dose-response relationship between dietary fat to carbohydrate ratio and spontaneous caloric intake. Male Long-Evans rats consumed milk-based liquid diets that differed in fat content (17% to 60% of kilocalories) but had equivalent protein content and energy density. In Experiment 1, rats consumed one of the diets (n = 9/diet group) as the sole source of nutrition for 16 days. In Experiment 2, diets were offered as an option to nutritionally complete chow for 4 days followed by a 3-day chow-only washout in a randomized within-subjects design (n = 30). In Experiment 3, nine rats received isocaloric intragastric infusions of diet overnight, with chow available ad libitum. At least two no-infusion days separated the different diet infusions, which were given in random order. Food intake was measured daily Dietary fat dose dependently increased total daily kilocalories in each of the three paradigms. These data imply that the postingestive effects of carbohydrate and fat differentially engage the physiological substrates that regulate daily caloric intake. These findings reiterate the importance of investigating macronutrient-specific controls of feeding, rather than prematurely concluding that dietary attributes that covary with fat content (e.g., caloric density and palatability) drive the overeating associated with a high-fat diet.

  3. The influence of caloric information on cafeteria food choices

    PubMed Central

    Dubbert, Patricia M.; Johnson, William G.; Schlundt, David G.; Montague, Noni Ward

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of posting caloric information on food purchases at a cafeteria. Purchases of more than 14,300 entrees, vegetables, and salads by 6,970 customers were unobtrusively monitored via the cash register inventory control system during 15 evening observations. A quasi-multiple-baseline design across food groups was used to test the additive effect of labeling the three lowest caloric choices for vegetables, salads, and entrees. A linear logit analysis confirmed that labeling increased the probability of low calorie selections for vegetables and salads, but not for entrees. Observations of meals purchased by a subsample of 413 customers indicated labeling did not change the total caloric content of meals. The number of customers and total sales per evening were unaffected by the labeling intervention. The results suggest that manipulating environmental cues may be an effective method for changing food purchases in a cafeteria, but labeling individual items may not be the best way to decrease total calories purchased. PMID:16795673

  4. Correlation between caloric and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential test results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Hsuan; Wang, Shou-Jen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2012-02-01

    The ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (o-VEMP) test results correlate significantly with caloric test results for patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), but not for patients with Meniere's disease (MD), indicating that the o-VEMP test may replace the caloric test for evaluating the vestibular nerve from which the AN arises. Conversely, the caloric, o-VEMP, and cervical VEMP (c-VEMP) tests should be performed to map lesion sites in the vestibular labyrinth. This study performed caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP tests on patients with central and peripheral vestibular disorders to investigate their relationships. In all, 66 patients comprising 16 with unilateral AN and 50 with unilateral definite MD were enrolled. All patients underwent caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP tests. In the AN group, the caloric test identified canal paresis and caloric areflexia in 10 ears, while the o-VEMP and c-VEMP tests identified abnormal (absent or delayed) responses in 12 and 11 ears, respectively. A significant correlation existed between caloric and o-VEMP test results, but not between caloric and c-VEMP test results, or between o-VEMP and c-VEMP test results. For the MD group, abnormal caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP test results were obtained for 24%, 44%, and 38% of hydropic ears, respectively. No correlation existed between any two test results.

  5. Role of caloric content on gastric emptying in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, J A; MacLean, D A

    1997-01-01

    1. This study examined the effects of caloric content (caloric density and the nature of calories) on the rate of gastric emptying using the double-sampling gastric aspiration technique. Four test meals of 600 ml (glucose, 0.1 kcal ml-1; pea and whey peptide hydrolysates, both 0.2 kcal ml-1; milk protein, 0.7 kcal ml-1) were tested in six healthy subjects in random order on four separate occasions. 2. The glucose solution was emptied the fastest with a half-time of 9.4 +/- 1.2 min (P < 0.05) and the milk protein the slowest with a half-time of 26.4 +/- 10.0 min (P < 0.05); the pea peptide hydrolysate and whey peptide hydrolysate solutions had half-times of emptying of 16.3 +/- 5.4 and 17.2 +/- 6.1 min, respectively. The rates of gastric emptying for the peptide hydrolysate solutions derived from different protein sources were not different. 3. Despite the lower rate of gastric emptying for the milk protein solution, the rate of caloric delivery to the duodenum during the early phase of the gastric emptying process was higher than that for the other three solutions (46.3 +/- 6, 63.5 +/- 22, 62.5 +/- 19 and 113.8 +/- 25 cal min-1 kg-1 for the glucose, pea peptide hydrolysate, whey peptide hydrolysate and milk protein meals, respectively; P < 0.05). The caloric density of the test solutions was linearly related to the half-time of gastric emptying (r = 0.96, P < 0.05) as well as to the rate at which calories were delivered to the duodenum (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). 4. This study demonstrates that the rate of gastric emptying is a function of the caloric density of the ingested meal and that a linear relationship exists between these variables. Furthermore, the nature of the calories seems to play a minor role in determining the rate of gastric emptying in humans. PMID:9032702

  6. Substitution and caloric regulation in a closed economy.

    PubMed

    Bauman, R A; Raslear, T G; Hursh, S R; Shurtleff, D; Simmons, L

    1996-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the effect of an imperfect substitute for food on demand for food in a closed economy. In Experiments 1 and 2, rats pressed a lever for their entire daily food ration, and a fixed ratio of presses was required for each food pellet. In both experiments, the fixed ratio was held constant during a daily session but was increased between sessions. The fixed ratio was increased over a series of daily sessions once in the absence of concurrently available sucrose and again when sucrose pellets were freely available. For both series, increases in the fixed ratio reduced food intake, but body weight was reduced only in the no-sucrose condition. In the sucrose condition, body weight and total caloric intake (sucrose plus food) were relatively unaffected by increases in the fixed ratio. At all fixed ratios, food intake was proportionally reduced by the intake of sucrose. In Experiment 3, monkeys obtained food or saccharin by pressing keys; the fixed ratio of presses per food pellet was increased once when tap water was each monkey's only source of fluid, again when each monkey's water was sweetened with saccharin, and a third time when each monkey had concurrent access to the saccharin solution and plain water. Increases in the fixed ratio, but not the intake of the saccharin solution, reduced each monkey's food intake. Because neither rats' sucrose nor monkeys' saccharin intakes affected the slope of the respective demand curves for food, monkeys and rats increased their daily output of presses and thereby defended their daily intake of those complementary elements of food. However, sucrose reduced rats' food intake. The relative constancy of body weight and total caloric intake in the sucrose condition is consistent with the possibility that rats tended to regulate caloric intake.

  7. Macronutrients and caloric intake in health and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Solon-Biet, Samantha M.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; de Cabo, Rafael; Raubenheimer, David; Le Couteur, David G.; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Both lifespan and healthspan are influenced by nutrition, with nutritional interventions proving to be robust across a wide range of species. However, the relationship between nutrition, health and aging is still not fully understood. Caloric restriction is the most studied dietary intervention known to extend life in many organisms, but recently the balance of macronutrients has been shown to play a critical role. In this review, we discuss the current understanding regarding the impact of calories and macronutrient balance in mammalian health and longevity and highlight the key nutrient-sensing pathways that mediate the effects of nutrition on health and ageing. PMID:26021555

  8. Aging, Neurogenesis, and Caloric Restriction in Different Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Ozdemir, A Tugrul; Adams, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is a multifactorial process that is occurring across multiple cognitive domains. A significant complaint that occurs in the elderly is a decrement in learning and memory ability. Both rodents and zebrafish exhibit a similar problem with memory during aging. The neurobiological changes that underlie this cognitive decline are complex and undoubtedly influenced by many factors. Alterations in the birth of new neurons and neuron turnover may contribute to age-related cognitive problems. Caloric restriction is the only non-genetic intervention that reliably increases life span and healthspan across multiple organisms although the molecular mechanisms are not well-understood. Recently the zebrafish has become a popular model organism for understanding the neurobiological consequences but to date very little work has been performed. Similarly, few studies have examined the effects of dietary restriction in zebrafish. Here we review the literature related to memory decline, neurogenesis, and caloric restriction across model organisms and suggest that zebrafish has the potential to be an important animal model for understanding the complex interactions between age, neurobiological changes in the brain, and dietary regimens or their mimetics as interventions. PMID:23936746

  9. Can vestibular caloric stimulation be used to treat apotemnophilia?

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; McGeoch, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Apotemnophilia, or body integrity image disorder (BIID), is characterised by a feeling of mismatch between the internal feeling of how one's body should be and the physical reality of how it actually is. Patients with this condition have an often overwhelming desire for an amputation- of a specific limb at a specific level. Such patients are not psychotic or delusional, however, they do express an inexplicable emotional abhorrence to the limb they wish removed. It is also known that such patients show a left-sided preponderance for their desired amputation. Often they take drastic action to be rid of the offending limb. Given the left-sided bias, emotional rejection and specificity of desired amputation, we suggest that there are clear similarities to be drawn between BIID and somatoparaphrenia. In this rare condition, which follows a right parietal stroke, the patient rejects (usually) his left arm as "alien". We go on to hypothesis that a dysfunction of the right parietal lobe is also the cause of BIID. We suggest that this leads to an uncoupling of the construct of one's body image in the right parietal lobe from how one's body physically is. This hypothesis would be amenable to testing by response to cold-water vestibular caloric stimulation, which is known to temporarily treat somatoparaphrenia. It could also be investigated using functional brain imaging and skin conductance response. If correct our hypothesis not only suggests why BIID arises, but also, in caloric stimulation a therapeutic avenue for this chronic and essentially untreatable condition.

  10. Patterns of intraspecific variability in the response to caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Kristin E; Kaido, Oksana; Jarvis, George; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-03-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is cited as the most robust means of increasing lifespan across a range of taxa, yet there is a high degree of variability in the response to CR, both within and between species. To examine the intraspecific evolutionary conservation of lifespan extension by CR, we tested the effects of chronic caloric restriction (CCR) at multiple food levels and of intermittent fasting (IF) in twelve isolates from the Brachionus plicatilis species complex of monogonont rotifers. While CCR generally increased or did not change lifespan and total fecundity, IF caused increased, unchanged, or decreased lifespan, depending upon the isolate, and decreased total fecundity in all but one isolate. Lifespan under ad libitum (AL) feeding varied among isolates and predicted the lifespan response to CR: longer-lived isolates under AL were less likely to have a significant increase in lifespan under CCR and were more likely to have a significantly shortened lifespan under IF. Lifespan under AL conditions and the response to CR were not correlated with hydroperiodicity of native habitat or with time in culture. Lack of trade-off between lifespan and fecundity under CCR, and differences in lifespan and fecundity under CCR and IF, even when average food intake was similar, suggest that longevity changes are not always directly determined by energy intake and that CCR and IF regimens extend lifespan through diverse genetic mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patterns of intraspecific variability in the response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E.; Kaido, Oksana; Jarvis, George; Mark Welch, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is cited as the most robust means of increasing lifespan across a range of taxa, yet there is a high degree of variability in the response to CR, both within and between species. To examine the intraspecific evolutionary conservation of lifespan extension by CR, we tested the effects of chronic caloric restriction (CCR) at multiple food levels and of intermittent fasting (IF) in twelve isolates from the Brachionus plicatilis species complex of monogonont rotifers. While CCR generally increased or did not change lifespan and total fecundity, IF caused increased, unchanged, or decreased lifespan, depending upon the isolate, and decreased total fecundity in all but one isolate. Lifespan under ad libitum (AL) feeding varied among isolates and predicted the lifespan response to CR: longer-lived isolates under AL were less likely to have a significant increase in lifespan under CCR and were more likely to have a significantly shortened lifespan under IF. Lifespan under AL conditions and the response to CR were not correlated with hydroperiodicity of native habitat or with time in culture. Lack of trade-off between lifespan and fecundity under CCR, and differences in lifespan and fecundity under CCR and IF, even when average food intake was similar, suggest that longevity changes are not always directly determined by energy intake and that CCR and IF regimens extend lifespan through diverse genetic mechanisms. PMID:24384399

  12. High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary rewards. In alternating blocks of this task, rewards were delivered at delays drawn randomly from distributions with either a lower or higher maximum reward rate. During some blocks participants received either a caloric drink or water. We used survival analysis to estimate participants' probability of quitting conditional on the delay distribution and the consumed liquid. Participants had a higher probability of quitting in blocks with the higher reward rate. Furthermore, participants who consumed the caloric drink had a higher probability of quitting than those who consumed water. Our results support the predictions from the theoretical models, and importantly, suggest that both higher monetary reward rates and physiologically relevant rewards can decrease temporal persistence, which is a crucial determinant for survival in many species. PMID:28228517

  13. Caloric restriction and physical activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Novak, Colleen M; Jiang, Xiaoling; Wang, Chuanfeng; Teske, Jennifer A; Kotz, Catherine M; Levine, James A

    Understanding the mechanism of energy flux may be critical for explaining how obesity has emerged as a public health epidemic. It is known that changes in caloric intake predictably alter physical activity levels (PA) in mammals. Here, our goal was to test the hypothesis that fasting induces a biphasic pattern of change in PA by measuring PA before and after long-term food deprivation in zebrafish. Compared to control-fed fish, food-deprived fish showed a significant increase in PA levels during the first 2 days of food deprivation. Subsequently, however, fasted fish showed a significant chronic decrease in PA compared to fish fed at weight-maintenance levels. These data are comparable to those seen with mammals, which also show a biphasic response of PA to caloric restriction. In a separate group of fish, long-term food deprivation, associated with decreases in PA, induced a significant increase in brain preproorexin mRNA levels compared to fed controls. No change in orexin mRNA was seen after 2 days of food deprivation. The finding that orexin mRNA expression is altered only after long-term starvation suggests that orexin may be coupled with the changes in PA seen at this time. Thus, the association between negative energy balance and reductions in PA occurs across genera in biology and is associated with predictable neurological changes in brain gene expression.

  14. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints.

    PubMed

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-08-01

    This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints.

  15. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints

    PubMed Central

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. METHODS: A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. RESULTS: Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints. PMID:28954005

  16. Caloric expenditure assessment among older adults: criterion validity of a novel accelerometry device.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Sarah T; Insana, Salvatore P

    2014-11-01

    Criterion validity of a novel accelerometry device that measures caloric expenditure (Fitbit) was evaluated against a self-report estimation of caloric expenditure (Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors) in older adults. Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors and Fitbit estimates of total caloric expenditure per day were significantly correlated (r = .61, p < .05). Bland-Altman plots indicated that 70 percent of participants' data were within 1 standard deviation of the mean difference between measures. These preliminary findings suggest that the Fitbit may be considered a viable instrument for measuring daily caloric expenditure among older adults. However, further work is required to determine the optimal measurement technique for caloric expenditure among older adults.

  17. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Julie A; Colman, Ricki J; Beasley, T Mark; Allison, David B; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Roth, George S; Ingram, Donald K; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M

    2017-01-17

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health.

  18. Imperfect information on physical activity and caloric intake.

    PubMed

    Harris, Matthew C

    2017-08-01

    Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data, I find that individuals who overestimate their activity level by one standard deviation consume 40-60 extra calories per day, or enough to gain five pounds per year. These extra calories are composed mainly of sugar and carbohydrate, and are concentrated among individuals in the 75th and 90th percentiles of caloric intake. The link between overeating and inaccurate estimation of physical activity is strongest among less educated individuals and individuals with high variance in their physical activity, suggesting that imperfect recall or information gaps explain at least part of the relationship of interest. These results imply the existence of a necessary condition for physical activity-based information treatments to be effective in changing health behaviors and obesity rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Caloric Restriction Promotes Structural and Metabolic Changes in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Peloggia, Julia; Braga, Tárcio T; Chinchilla, Jesús Eduardo Ortega; Shinohara, Jorge; Navas, Carlos Arturo; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2017-09-12

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the most effective intervention known to enhance lifespan, but its effect on the skin is poorly understood. Here, we show that CR mice display fur coat remodeling associated with an expansion of the hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) pool. We also find that the dermal adipocyte depot (dWAT) is underdeveloped in CR animals. The dermal/vennule annulus vasculature is enlarged, and a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) switch and metabolic reprogramming in both the dermis and the epidermis are observed. When the fur coat is removed, CR mice display increased energy expenditure associated with lean weight loss and locomotion impairment. Our findings indicate that CR promotes extensive skin and fur remodeling. These changes are necessary for thermal homeostasis and metabolic fitness under conditions of limited energy intake, suggesting a potential adaptive mechanism. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of rectilinear acceleration, optokinetic and caloric stimuli in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbaumgarten, R.

    1981-01-01

    The set of experiments comprising the Spacelab 1ES201 package designed to investigate the human vestibular system and equilibratory function in weightlessness are described. The specific objectives of the experiments include: (1) the determination of the threshold of perception of linear oscillatory motion; (2) measurement of physiological and subjective responses to supra threshold, linear and angular motion stimuli; (3) study of the postural adjustments, eye movements, and illusions of attitude and motion evoked by optokinetic stimuli, (i.e., moving visual patterns) in order to assess visual/vestibular interactions; (4) examination of the effect of thermal stimulations of the vestibular apparatus to determine if the eye movements elicited by the 'caloric test' are used by a density gradient in the semicircular canal; and (5) investigation of the pathogenesis of space motion sickness by recording signs and symptoms during the course of vestibular stimulation and, specifically, when the test subject is exposed to sustained, linear oscillatory motion.

  1. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Julie A.; Colman, Ricki J.; Beasley, T. Mark; Allison, David B.; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Roth, George S.; Ingram, Donald K.; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health. PMID:28094793

  2. Anomalies and synergy in the caloric effects of magnetoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Shashwat; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-12-01

    We determine isothermal entropy changes (Δ S) associated with electrocaloric, magnetocaloric, and the corresponding multicaloric effects in a model type-I multiferroic system using Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic analysis. We show that (a) the magnetocaloric effect exhibits an unexpected anomaly at the ferroelectric transition occurring at a high temperature, even in the absence of magnetic ordering, and (b) the synergy between electro- and magnetocaloric effects leads to a significantly enhanced multicaloric effect (\\mid Δ {{S}MultiCE}\\mid \\gt \\mid Δ {{S}ECE}\\mid +\\mid Δ {{S}MCE}\\mid ) over a wide temperature range when the difference in temperatures of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering (\\mid Δ {{T}C}\\mid =\\mid TCE-TCM\\mid ) is small. This result originate from the coupled thermal fluctuations of magnetic and electric order parameters. While the former is useful in detecting multiferroic materials from the measurements covering higher temperature transition alone, the latter augurs well for caloric applications of multiferroics.

  3. Role of sleep timing in caloric intake and BMI.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kelly G; Reid, Kathryn J; Kern, Andrew S; Zee, Phyllis C

    2011-07-01

    Sleep duration has been linked to obesity and there is also an emerging literature in animals demonstrating a relationship between the timing of feeding and weight regulation. However, there is a paucity of research evaluating timing of sleep and feeding on weight regulation in humans. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of sleep timing in dietary patterns and BMI. Participants included 52 (25 females) volunteers who completed 7 days of wrist actigraphy and food logs. Fifty-six percent were "normal sleepers" (midpoint of <5:30 AM) and 44% were "late sleepers" (midpoint of sleep ≥5:30 AM). Late sleepers had shorter sleep duration, later sleep onset and sleep offset and meal times. Late sleepers consumed more calories at dinner and after 8:00 PM, had higher fast food, full-calorie soda and lower fruit and vegetable consumption. Higher BMI was associated with shorter sleep duration, later sleep timing, caloric consumption after 8:00 PM, and fast food meals. In multivariate models, sleep timing was independently associated with calories consumed after 8:00 PM and fruit and vegetable consumption but did not predict BMI after controlling for sleep duration. Calories consumed after 8:00 PM predicted BMI after controlling for sleep timing and duration. These findings indicate that caloric intake after 8:00 PM may increase the risk of obesity, independent of sleep timing and duration. Future studies should investigate the biological and social mechanisms linking timing of sleep and feeding in order to develop novel time-based interventions for weight management.

  4. Development of liver fibrosis during aging: effects of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Horrillo, D; Gallardo, N; Lauzurica, N; Barrus, M T; San Frutos, M G; Andres, A; Ros, M; Fernandez-Agullo, T

    2013-01-01

    Liver is the central metabolic organ of the body and diet is considered one of the main environmental factors that can impact on aging liver. In the elderly stage liver function is relatively well conserved although there are a variety of not well defined morphological changes related to liver fibrosis which is commonly associated with an inflammatory state. The aim of this paper is to study these alterations during the physiological process of aging in Wistar rats and also test if caloric restriction (CR) could ameliorate them. As fibrosis is associated to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function we also analyzed these cells during aging. Livers from five groups of male Wistar rats (3-, 8-, 24-months old ad libitum and 8- and 24-months caloric restricted rats) were used in this study. Histological analysis, expression of genes implicated in liver fibrosis and the status of inflammatory step-pathways as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) isoforms, p50 and p65, in cytosolic and nuclear fractions were performed. During elderly, associated with morphological change of HSC, there is a progressive increase in collagen deposition due to an inhibition in collagen degradation. Higher expression of cytokines and the activation of inflammatory pathways are associated with aging. CR ameliorates these circumstances being more effective when it started in middle age. In conclusion elderly stage is associated to a mild fibrotic and inflammatory state in the liver which could be ameliorated after CR.

  5. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? How do lean and obese rats respond physiologically to caloric restriction? What is the main finding and its importance? Obese rats show marked benefits compared with lean animals. Reduced body fat is associated with improved longevity with caloric restriction (CR) in rodents. Little is known regarding effects of CR in genetically lean versus obese strains. Long-Evans (LE) and Brown Norway (BN) rats make an ideal comparison for a CR study because the percentage body fat of young adult LE rats is double that of BN rats. Male LE and BN rats were either fed ad libitum (AL) or were caloricallyrestricted to 80 or 90% of their AL weight. The percentages of fat, lean and fluid mass were measured non-invasively at 2- to 4-week intervals. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient were measured after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of CR. Overall health was scored monthly. The percentage of fat of the LE strain decreased with CR, whereas the percentage of fat of the BN strain remained above the AL group for several months. The percentage of lean mass increased above the AL for both strains subjected to CR. The percentage offluid was unaffected by CR. The average metabolic rate over 22 h of the BN rats subjected to CR was reduced, whereas that of LE rats was increased slightly above the AL group. The respiratory quotient of BN rats wasdecreased with CR. Overall health of the CR LE group was significantly improved compared with t

  6. Eating habits and caloric intake of physically active young boys, ages 10 to 14 years.

    PubMed

    Thomson, M J; Cunningham, D A; Wearring, G A

    1980-03-01

    Eating habits of 104 male participants (ages 10 to 14 years) in organized ice hockey were compared across age groups and levels of competition. The boys were members of either a highly skilled and intensively active competitive league group (CL) or a less skilled, moderately active house league group (HL). Eating habits were recorded during a school day from a 24 hour recall questionnaire administered by a trained interviewer. The types and amounts of foods eaten were recorded and caloric intake was calculated. The total caloric intakes were not significantly different by age or competitive group. The boys had higher caloric intakes by age (200 kcal day-1) than reported by other studies but the caloric intake by kilogram of body weight was similar. There was a trend towards larger caloric intake by the CL boys (ages 10 and 11 years), however when divided by body weight the differences were not significant suggesting that this trend was due to a greater body weight of the CL boys and not a significantly increased caloric expenditure. The types of foods eaten (fruit, vegetables, dairy, meat, bread or "empty calories") were similar for the two activity groups and across ages 10 to 14 years. The caloric intakes of dairy and meat products of both groups were significantly higher than for the other food groups.

  7. Net caloric cost of a 3-set flywheel ergometer resistance exercise paradigm.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Hernandez, Dan A

    2002-11-01

    Subjects (n = 23) performed three 3 x 8 seated leg press workouts on a flywheel ergometer to note the net caloric cost. This study's purpose was to examine net caloric cost as a function of total work on an inertial resistance exercise device offering more eccentric loading than conventional isotonic weight training equipment. High intraclass correlations for net caloric cost (0.89) and total work (0.94) result from data collected from 3 workouts. Average total work and net caloric cost values reveal a significant (r = 0.62, p < 0.05) correlation yielding the following equation: predicted net caloric cost = 33.2 + 0.006014331 (total work). Current study data also show favorable net caloric cost (1.24 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1)), exercise efficiency (9.48 kcal x 10(-3) per joule), and estimated mechanical loading (65 W min x kg(-1) LBM x d(-1)) values. The results of the current study serve as baseline knowledge for exercise prescriptions pertaining to net caloric cost, exercise efficiency, and mechanical loading using this device.

  8. Conjugate heat transfer analysis using the Calore and Fuego codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    Full coupling of the Calore and Fuego codes has been exercised in this report. This is done to allow solution of general conjugate heat transfer applications that require more than a fluid flow analysis with a very simple conduction region (solved using Fuego alone) or more than a complex conduction/radiation analysis using a simple Newton's law of cooling boundary condition (solved using Calore alone). Code coupling allows for solution of both complex fluid and solid regions, with or without thermal radiation, either participating or non-participating. A coupled physics model is developed to compare to data taken from a horizontal concentric cylinder arrangement using the Penlight heating apparatus located at the thermal test complex (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. The experimental set-up requires use of a conjugate heat transfer analysis including conduction, nonparticipating thermal radiation, and internal natural convection. The fluids domain in the model is complex and can be characterized by stagnant fluid regions, laminar circulation, a transition regime, and low-level turbulent regions, all in the same domain. Subsequently, the fluids region requires a refined mesh near the wall so that numerical resolution is achieved. Near the wall, buoyancy exhibits its strongest influence on turbulence (i.e., where turbulence conditions exist). Because low-Reynolds number effects are important in anisotropic natural convective flows of this type, the {ovr {nu}{sup 2}}-f turbulence model in Fuego is selected and compared to results of laminar flow only. Coupled code predictions are compared to temperature measurements made both in the solid regions and a fluid region. Turbulent and laminar flow predictions are nearly identical for both regions. Predicted temperatures in the solid regions compare well to data. The largest discrepancies occur at the bottom of the annulus. Predicted temperatures in the fluid region, for the most part, compare well to data. As before

  9. Caloric intake and Alzheimer's disease. Experimental approaches and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria; Zhao, Zhong; Qin, Weiping; Ho, Lap; Shrishailam, Yemul; Macgrogan, Donal; Ressmann, Wendy; Humala, Nelson; Liu, Xunxian; Romero, Carmen; Stetka, Breton; Chen, Linghong; Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Wang, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a rapidly growing public health concern with potentially devastating effects. Presently, there are no known cures or effective preventive strategies. While genetic factors are relevant in early-onset cases, they appear to play less of a role in late-onset sporadic AD cases, the most common form of AD. Due to the fact that the disease typically strikes very late in life, delaying symptoms could be as good as a cure for many people. For example, it is now widely accepted that if the onset of the disease could be delayed by even 5 years, the incidence could be cut in half. Both clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that modification of lifestyle factors such as nutrition may prove crucial to AD management given the mounting experimental evidence suggesting that brain cells are remarkably responsive to "what somebody is doing". Among other nongenetic factors influencing AD, recent studies strongly support the evidence that caloric intake may play a role in the relative risk for AD clinical dementia. Indeed, the effect of diet in AD has been an area of research that has produced promising results, at least experimentally. Most importantly, as mechanistic pathways are defined and their biochemical functions scrutinized, the evidence supporting a direct link between nutrition and AD neuropathology continues to grow. Our work, as well as that of others, has recently resulted in the development of experimental dietary regimens that might promote, attenuate or even reverse features of AD. Most remarkably, while we found that high caloric intake based on saturated fat promotes AD type Beta-amyloidosis, conversely we found that dietary restriction based on reduced carbohydrate intake is able to prevent it. This evidence is very exciting and is, in part, consistent with current epidemiological studies suggesting that obesity and diabetes are associated with a >4-fold increased risk of developing AD. The clarification of the mechanisms

  10. A randomized control trial for reduction of caloric and non-caloric sweetened beverages in young adults: effects in weight, body composition and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Durán, Marisela; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Cano-García, Ángeles; Téllez-Olvera, Laura; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2016-11-29

    Recently has been documented that the consumption of sweetened non-caloric beverages has increased as an option to weight control, however randomized control trials have demonstrated a modest weight loss. To evaluate the effect of reducing consumption of beverage with caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on weight, body composition and blood pressure in young Mexican adults. In an experimental study 148 nursing students were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: 1) no sweetened beverages were permitted, only plain water, tea or coffee without sugar; 2) consumption of beverages with non-caloric sweeteners was allowed; and 3) no restriction of sweetened beverages was imposed. All groups were given individualized isocaloric diets monitored by a 24-hour record of consumption and food frequency questionnaire and blood pressure, weight, waist circumference and body composition by tetrapolar bioelectric impedance were taken at the beginning of the study and three and six months later. Differences between groups were found in body mass index at 3 months that decrease in group 1 and 2 and increase in group 3 (-1.75 vs.-0.61 vs.0.54% of change, p < 0.001). At six months there were also statistical differences in waist circumference (-4.07 vs.-1.23 vs. 0.62% of change, p < 0.001) and sugar consumption (-62.0 vs.-54.61 vs.11.08% of change, p < 0.001) in groups 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The reduction in consumption of both caloric and non-caloric sweetened beverages contributes to signifi cant body mass index loss and waist circumference.

  11. Relationship of dieting and restrained eating to self-reported caloric intake in female college freshmen.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Katterman, Shawn N; Lowe, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    Evidence indicates that restrained eaters do not eat less than unrestrained eaters in the natural environment. However, no study has examined caloric intake in those who are currently dieting to lose, or avoid gaining, weight. The current study examined caloric intake using 24-hour food recalls among individuals dieting to lose weight, dieting to avoid weight gain, restrained nondieters, and unrestrained nondieters. Participants were 246 female college students participating in a weight gain prevention trial. The predicted significant difference in caloric intake across the four groups was found for beverage but not for food intake. Results reinforce past literature indicating that dieting/restraint status does not reflect hypo-caloric intake in naturalistic settings.

  12. Myocardial remodelling in left ventricular atrophy induced by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Carina; Nink, Nadine; Nikam, Sandeep; Magdowski, Gerd; Kripp, Gerhard; Voswinckel, Robert; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Changes in body weight due to changes in food intake are reflected by corresponding changes in the cardiac phenotype. Despite a growing body of literature on cardiac hypertrophy associated with obesity, little is known on the atrophic remodelling of the heart associated with calorie restriction. We hypothesized that, besides the cardiomyocyte compartment, capillaries and nerve fibres are involved in the atrophic process. C57Bl6 mice were kept on normal diet (control group) or at a calorie-restricted diet for 3 or 7 days (n = 5 each). At the end of the protocol, mice were killed and the hearts were processed for light and electron microscopic stereological analysis of cardiomyocytes, capillaries and nerve fibres. Body, heart and left ventricular weight were significantly reduced in the calorie-restricted animals at 7 days. Most morphological parameters were not significantly different at 3 days compared with the control group, but at 7 days most of them were significantly reduced. Specifically, the total length of capillaries, the volume of cardiomyocytes as well as their subcellular compartments and the interstitium were proportionally reduced during caloric restriction. No differences were observed in the total length or the mean diameter of axons between the cardiomyocytes. Our data indicate that diet-induced left ventricular atrophy leads to a proportional atrophic process of cardiomyocytes and capillaries. The innervation is not involved in the atrophic process. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society.

  13. Caloric restriction and longevity: effects of reduced body temperature.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Andres E; Flouris, Andreas D

    2011-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) causes a reduction in body temperature (T(b)) which is suggested to contribute to changes that increase lifespan. Moreover, low T(b) has been shown to improve health and longevity independent of CR. In this review we examine the connections between CR, T(b) and mechanisms that influence longevity and ageing. Recent findings regarding the overlapping mechanisms of CR and T(b) that benefit longevity are discussed, including changes in body composition, hormone regulation, and gene expression, as well as reductions in low-level inflammation and reactive oxygen species-induced molecular damage. This information is summarized in a model describing how CR and low T(b), both synergistically and independently, increase lifespan. Moreover, the nascent notion that the rate of ageing may be pre-programmed in response to environmental influences at critical periods of early development is also considered. Based on current evidence, it is concluded that low T(b) plays an integral role in mediating the effects of CR on health and longevity, and that low T(b) may exert independent biological changes that increase lifespan. Our understanding of the overlap between CR- and T(b)-mediated longevity remains incomplete and should be explored in future research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Caloric Beverage Intake Among Adult Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), alcohol, and other caloric beverage (juice and milk) consumption of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants with that of low-income nonparticipants. Methods. We used 1 day of dietary intake data from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 4594 adults aged 20 years and older with household income at or below 250% of the federal poverty line. We used bivariate and multivariate methods to compare the probability of consuming and the amount of calories consumed for each beverage type across 3 groups: current SNAP participants, former participants, and nonparticipants. We used instrumental variable methods to control for unobservable differences in participant groups. Results. After controlling for observable characteristics, SNAP participants were no more likely to consume SSBs than were nonparticipants. Instrumental variable estimates showed that current participants consumed fewer calories from SSBs than did similar nonparticipants. We found no differences in alcoholic beverage consumption, which cannot be purchased with SNAP benefits. Conclusions. SNAP participants are not unique in their consumption of SSBs or alcoholic beverages. Purchase restrictions may have little effect on SSB consumption. PMID:25033141

  15. Caloric restriction: Impact upon pituitary function and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Golden, Erin; Carlson, Olga D.; Egan, Josephine M.; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Reduced energy intake, or caloric restriction (CR), is known to extend life span and to retard age-related health decline in a number of different species, including worms, flies, fish, mice and rats. CR has been shown to reduce oxidative stress, improve insulin sensitivity, and alter neuroendocrine responses and central nervous system (CNS) function in animals. CR has particularly profound and complex actions upon reproductive health. At the reductionist level the most crucial physiological function of any organism is its capacity to reproduce. For a successful species to thrive, the balance between available energy (food) and the energy expenditure required for reproduction must be tightly linked. An ability to coordinate energy balance and fecundity involves complex interactions of hormones from both the periphery and the CNS and primarily centers upon the master endocrine gland, the anterior pituitary. In this review article we review the effects of CR on pituitary gonadotrope function and on the male and female reproductive axes. A better understanding of how dietary energy intake affects reproductive axis function and endocrine pulsatility could provide novel strategies for the prevention and management of reproductive dysfunction and its associated comorbidities. PMID:18329344

  16. Exercise and caloric restriction modify rat mammary carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennink, M.R.; Palmer, H.J.; Messina, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    This study was designed to determine the effect of energy expenditure and dietary restriction on tumorigenesis. Energy balance was altered in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment by: 1) exercising rats by running on a treadmill or 2) a 16% reduction in caloric intake. Treatments were begun 24 days after initiation and continued for 160 days. Mammary cancer was initiated with 10 mg of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene given intragastrically. All 4 groups received the same quantity of fat, protein vitamins, minerals and sucrose in the diet. Energy restriction (ER) was achieved by removing 15% of the corn starch from the diet fed to the ER groups. Energy content of the carcass (as a % of the ad lib., sedentary group) was: pair-fed, EX = 71; ER, sedentary = 75; ER, EX = 61. ER decreased total body protein by 6%. EX did not change body protein. EX reduced the rate constant (rate constant is the change in tumor incidence or size with time) of the cummulative mean tumor incidence by 16% and ER reduced the rate constant by 28%. EX decreased the rate constant of the cummulative mean tumor size by 23%; however, ER increased the rate constant by 46%. In this experiment, EX was equally or more effective than ER in reducing tumorigenesis.

  17. Electronic structure and the magneto-caloric effect.

    PubMed

    Gruber, C; Bedolla, P O; Mohn, P

    2013-10-30

    We present a theoretical investigation of the entropy changes upon the application of an external field leading to the magneto-caloric effect (MCE). The case of localized magnetic moments is treated within the Weiss molecular field model, but special emphasis is given to cases of itinerant electron magnetism. These are described within the Landau theory of phase transitions and the temperature dependence is included via spin fluctuations. Since the parameters of the Landau expansion can be calculated from first-principles calculations of the electronic and magnetic structure, an immediate connection to the electronic band structure and its properties becomes possible. We study ordinary ferromagnets, including magneto-volume coupling and itinerant electron metamagnets, where in a small external field range large changes of the magnetic moments occur. We find that such metamagnetic systems are the most promising candidates for a large MCE in itinerant electron systems. We apply our expressions to several transition metals and their alloys, as well as to the metamagnets YCo2 and Fe2P, and find reasonable agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Palatable Hyper-Caloric Foods Impact on Neuronal Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Ferreira, Guillaume; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity is an intrinsic and essential characteristic of the nervous system that allows animals "self-tuning" to adapt to their environment over their lifetime. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system is a form of neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory formation, as well as long-lasting, environmentally-induced maladaptive behaviors, such as drug addiction and overeating of palatable hyper-caloric (PHc) food. In western societies, the abundance of PHc foods has caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of overweight/obesity and related disorders. To this regard, it has been suggested that increased adiposity may be caused at least in part by behavioral changes in the affected individuals that are induced by the chronic consumption of PHc foods; some authors have even drawn attention to the similarity that exists between over-indulgent eating and drug addiction. Long-term misuse of certain dietary components has also been linked to chronic neuroimmune maladaptation that may predispose individuals to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In this review article, we discuss recent evidence that shows how consumption of PHc food can cause maladaptive neural plasticity that converts short-term ingestive drives into compulsive behaviors. We also discuss the neural mechanisms of how chronic consumption of PHc foods may alter brain function and lead to cognitive impairments, focusing on prenatal, childhood and adolescence as vulnerable neurodevelopmental stages to dietary environmental insults. Finally, we outline a societal agenda for harnessing permissive obesogenic environments.

  19. Molecular bases of caloric restriction regulation of neuronal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fontán-Lozano, Angela; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Delgado-García, José María; Navas, Placido; Carrión, Angel Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Aging is associated with the decline of cognitive properties. This situation is magnified when neurodegenerative processes associated with aging appear in human patients. Neuronal synaptic plasticity events underlie cognitive properties in the central nervous system. Caloric restriction (CR; either a decrease in food intake or an intermittent fasting diet) can extend life span and increase disease resistance. Recent studies have shown that CR can have profound effects on brain function and vulnerability to injury and disease. Moreover, CR can stimulate the production of new neurons from stem cells (neurogenesis) and can enhance synaptic plasticity, which modulate pain sensation, enhance cognitive function, and may increase the ability of the brain to resist aging. The beneficial effects of CR appear to be the result of a cellular stress response stimulating the production of proteins that enhance neuronal plasticity and resistance to oxidative and metabolic insults; they include neurotrophic factors, neurotransmitter receptors, protein chaperones, and mitochondrial biosynthesis regulators. In this review, we will present and discuss the effect of CR in synaptic processes underlying analgesia and cognitive improvement in healthy, sick, and aging animals. We will also discuss the possible role of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by CR in regulation of neuronal synaptic plasticity.

  20. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment.

  1. Caloric restriction enhances fear extinction learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Megan C; McKenna, Morgan C; Yoon, Yone J; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Santos, Patricia Mae G; Casey, B J; Glatt, Charles E

    2013-05-01

    Fear extinction learning, the ability to reassess a learned cue of danger as safe when it no longer predicts aversive events, is often dysregulated in anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) enhance neural plasticity and their ability to enhance fear extinction learning may explain their anxiolytic properties. Caloric restriction (CR) has SSRI-like effects on neural plasticity and anxiety-related behavior. We implemented CR in mice to determine its effects on conditioned-fear responses. Wild type and serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice underwent CR for 7 days leading to significant weight loss. Mice were then tested for cued fear learning and anxiety-related behavior. CR markedly enhanced fear extinction learning and its retention in adolescent female mice, and adults of both sexes. These effects of CR were absent in SERT knockout mice. Moreover, CR phenocopied behavioral and molecular effects of chronic fluoxetine, but there was no additive effect of CR in fluoxetine-treated mice. These results demonstrate that CR enhances fear extinction learning through a SERT-dependent mechanism. These results may have implications for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN), in which there is a high prevalence of anxiety before the onset of dietary restriction and support proposals that in AN, CR is a motivated effort to control dysregulated fear responses and elevated anxiety.

  2. Caloric restriction ameliorates cardiomyopathy in animal model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Keren; Waldman, Maayan; Abraham, Nader G; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Gurfield, Danny; Aravot, Dan; Arad, Michael; Hochhauser, Edith

    2017-01-01

    The db/db mouse is an animal model of diabetes in which leptin receptor activity is deficient resulting accelerated cardiomyopathy when exposed to angiotensin (AT). Toll-like receptors 4 and 2 (TLR4, TLR2) are pattern recognition receptors, that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and exacerbate and release inflammatory cytokines. Fetuin A (Fet A) is a fatty acid carrier which affects inflammation and insulin resistance in obese humans and animals through TLRs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of caloric restriction (CR) on free fatty acids (FFA) level and the inflammatory response in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Left ventricular hypertrophy, increased fibrosis and leukocytes infiltration were observed in db/db AT treated hearts. Serum glucose, FFA, and cholesterol levels were elevated in db/db AT treated mice. Cardiac expression of PPARα increased while AKT phosphorylation was decreased. Cumulatively, CR elevated cardiac PPARα improved the utilization of fatty acids, and reduced myocardial inflammation as seen by reduced levels of Fet A. Thus CR negated cardiomyopathy associated with AT in an animal model of diabetes suggesting that CR is an effective therapeutic approach in the treatment of diabetes and associated cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fasting and Caloric Restriction in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and among the leading major diseases in the world. It is anticipated to continue to increase because of the growth of the aging population and prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and/or poor dietary habits. Cancer treatment has remained relatively similar during the past 30 years with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in combination with surgery remaining the standard therapies although novel therapies are slowly replacing or complementing the standard ones. According to the American Cancer Society, the dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy is to increase calorie and protein intake. In addition, there are no clear guidelines on the type of nutrition that could have a major impact on cancer incidence. Yet, various forms of reduced caloric intake such as calorie restriction (CR) or fasting demonstrate a wide range of beneficial effects able to help prevent malignancies and increase the efficacy of cancer therapies. Whereas chronic CR provides both beneficial and detrimental effects as well as major compliance challenges, periodic fasting (PF), fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs), and dietary restriction (DR) without a reduction in calories are emerging as interventions with the potential to be widely used to prevent and treat cancer. Here, we review preclinical and preliminary clinical studies on dietary restriction and fasting and their role in inducing cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance.

  4. Caloric beverage intake among adult supplemental nutrition assistance program participants.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jessica E; Ver Ploeg, Michele

    2014-09-01

    We compared sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), alcohol, and other caloric beverage (juice and milk) consumption of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants with that of low-income nonparticipants. We used 1 day of dietary intake data from the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 4594 adults aged 20 years and older with household income at or below 250% of the federal poverty line. We used bivariate and multivariate methods to compare the probability of consuming and the amount of calories consumed for each beverage type across 3 groups: current SNAP participants, former participants, and nonparticipants. We used instrumental variable methods to control for unobservable differences in participant groups. After controlling for observable characteristics, SNAP participants were no more likely to consume SSBs than were nonparticipants. Instrumental variable estimates showed that current participants consumed fewer calories from SSBs than did similar nonparticipants. We found no differences in alcoholic beverage consumption, which cannot be purchased with SNAP benefits. SNAP participants are not unique in their consumption of SSBs or alcoholic beverages. Purchase restrictions may have little effect on SSB consumption.

  5. Redox-regulating sirtuins in aging, caloric restriction, and exercise.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Koltai, Erika; Taylor, Albert W; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Shuzo; Ohno, Hideki; Goto, Sataro; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-05-01

    The consequence of decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) levels as a result of oxidative challenge is altered activity of sirtuins, which, in turn, brings about a wide range of modifications in mammalian cellular metabolism. Sirtuins, especially SIRT1, deacetylate important transcription factors such as p53, forkhead homeobox type O proteins, nuclear factor κB, or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (which controls the transcription of pro- and antioxidant enzymes, by which the cellular redox state is affected). The role of SIRT1 in DNA repair is enigmatic, because it activates Ku70 to cope with double-strand breaks, but deacetylation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and probably of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 decreases the activity of these DNA repair enzymes. The protein-stabilizing effects of the NAD+-dependent lysine deacetylases are readily related to housekeeping and redox regulation. The role of sirtuins in caloric restriction (CR)-related longevity in yeast is currently under debate. However, in mammals, it seems certain that sirtuins are involved in many cellular processes that mediate longevity and disease prevention via the effects of CR through the vascular, neuronal, and muscular systems. Regular physical exercise-mediated health promotion also involves sirtuin-regulated pathways including the antioxidant-, macromolecular damage repair-, energy-, mitochondrial function-, and neuronal plasticity-associated pathways. This review critically evaluates these findings and points out the age-associated role of sirtuins.

  6. Increased caloric intake soon after exercise in cold water.

    PubMed

    White, Lesley J; Dressendorfer, Rudolph H; Holland, Eric; McCoy, Sean C; Ferguson, Michael A

    2005-02-01

    We examined the acute effect of cold-water temperature on post-exercise energy intake (EI) for 1 h. In a randomized, crossover design, 11 men (25.6 +/- 5 y) exercised for 45 min on a submersed cycle ergometer at 60 +/- 2% VO2max in 33 degrees C (neutral) and 20 degrees (cold) water temperatures, and also rested for 45 min (control). Energy expenditure (EE) was determined using indirect calorimetry before, during, and after each condition. Following exercise or rest, subjects had free access to a standard assortment of food items of known caloric value. EE was similar for the cold and neutral water conditions, averaging 505 +/- 22 (+/- standard deviation) and 517 +/- 42 kcal, respectively (P = NS). EI after the cold condition averaged 877 +/- 457 kcal, 44% and 41% higher (P < 0.05) than for the neutral and resting conditions, respectively. Cold-water temperature thus stimulated post-exercise EI. Water temperature warrants consideration in aquatic programs designed for weight loss.

  7. Caloric restriction augments radiation efficacy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Anthony D.; Simone, Brittany A.; Palazzo, Juan; Savage, Jason E.; Sano, Yuri; Dan, Tu; Jin, Lianjin; Champ, Colin E.; Zhao, Shuping; Lim, Meng; Sotgia, Frederica; Camphausen, Kevin; Pestell, Richard G.; Mitchell, James B.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary modification such as caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to decrease tumor initiation and progression. We sought to determine if nutrient restriction could be used as a novel therapeutic intervention to enhance cytotoxic therapies such as radiation (IR) and alter the molecular profile of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which displays a poor prognosis. In two murine models of TNBC, significant tumor regression is noted with IR or diet modification, and a greater regression is observed combining diet modification with IR. Two methods of diet modification were compared, and it was found that a daily 30% reduction in total calories provided more significant tumor regression than alternate day feeding. At the molecular level, tumors treated with CR and IR showed less proliferation and more apoptosis. cDNA array analysis demonstrated the IGF-1R pathway plays a key role in achieving this physiologic response, and multiple members of the IGF-1R pathway including IGF-1R, IRS, PIK3ca and mTOR were found to be downregulated. The innovative use of CR as a novel therapeutic option has the potential to change the biology of tumors and enhance the opportunity for clinical benefit in the treatment of patients with TNBC. PMID:23708519

  8. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment. PMID:26455575

  9. Caloric Restriction and Rapamycin Differentially Alter Energy Metabolism in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Hong, Seok-Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2017-03-08

    Rapamycin (RM), a drug that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and responds to nutrient availability, seemingly mimics the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on healthy life span. However, the extent of the mechanistic overlap between RM and CR remains incompletely understood. Here, we compared the impact of CR and RM on cellular metabolic status. Both regimens maintained intracellular ATP through the chronological aging process and showed enhanced mitochondrial capacity. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed that CR had a stronger impact on global gene expression than RM. We observed a like impact on the metabolome and identified distinct metabolites affected by CR and RM. CR severely reduced the level of energy storage molecules including glycogen and lipid droplets, whereas RM did not. RM boosted the production of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of glycogen and lipid droplets. Collectively, these results provide insights into the distinct energy metabolism mechanisms induced by CR and RM, suggesting that these two anti-aging regimens might extend life span through distinctive pathways.

  10. Medicinal Chemistry of the Epigenetic Diet and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S.L.; Hardy, T.M.; Tollefsbol, T.O.

    2013-01-01

    The pronounced effects of the epigenetic diet (ED) and caloric restriction (CR) have on epigenetic gene regulation have been documented in many pre-clinical and clinical studies. Understanding epigenetics is of high importance because of the concept that external factors such as nutrition and diet may possess the ability to alter gene expression without modifying the DNA sequence. The ED introduces bioactive medicinal chemistry compounds such as sulforaphane (SFN), curcumin (CCM), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol (RSV) that are thought to aid in extending the human lifespan. CR, although similar to ED in the target of longevity, mildly reduces the total daily calorie intake while concurrently providing all beneficial nutrients. Both CR and ED may act as epigenetic modifiers to slow the aging process through histone modification, DNA methylation, and by modulating microRNA expression. CR and ED have been proposed as two important mechanisms that modulate and potentially slow the progression of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, obesity, Alzheimer’s and osteoporosis to name a few. While many investigators have examined CR and ED as separate entities, this review will primarily focus on both as they relate to age-related diseases, their epigenetic effects and their medicinal chemistry. PMID:23895687

  11. Evolution of Human Longevity Uncoupled from Caloric Restriction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guodong; Guo, Song; Somel, Mehmet; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) and chemical agents, such as resveratrol and rapamycin that partially mimic the CR effect, can delay morbidity and mortality across a broad range of species. In humans, however, the effects of CR or other life-extending agents have not yet been investigated systematically. Human maximal lifespan is already substantially greater compared to that of closely related primate species. It is therefore possible that humans have acquired genetic mutations that mimic the CR effect. Here, we tested this notion by comparing transcriptome differences between humans and other primates, with the transcriptome changes observed in mice subjected to CR. We show that the human transcriptome state, relative to other primate transcriptomes, does not match that of the CR mice or mice treated with resveratrol, but resembles the transcriptome state of ad libitum fed mice. At the same time, the transcriptome changes induced by CR in mice are enriched among genes showing age-related changes in primates, concentrated in specific expression patterns, and can be linked with specific functional pathways, including insulin signalling, cancer, and the immune response. These findings indicate that the evolution of human longevity was likely independent of CR-induced lifespan extension mechanisms. Consequently, application of CR or CR-mimicking agents may yet offer a promising direction for the extension of healthy human lifespan. PMID:24400080

  12. Role of caloric homeostasis and reward in alcohol intake in Syrian golden hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gulick, Danielle; Green, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    The Syrian golden hamster drinks alcohol readily, but only achieves moderate blood alcohol levels, and does not go through withdrawal from alcohol. Because the hamster is a model of caloric homeostasis, both caloric content and reward value may contribute to the hamster’s alcohol consumption. The current study examines alcohol consumption in the hamster when a caloric or non-caloric sweet solution is concurrently available and caloric intake in the hamster before, during, and after exposure to either: alcohol, sucrose or saccharin. In Experiments 1 and 2, hamsters were given access to alcohol (15% v/v) and water; once alcohol consumption steadied, a bottle containing an ascending concentration of sucrose (99–614 mM) or saccharin (2–10 mM), or water was added. In Experiment 3, hamsters were given access to alcohol (15% v/v), sucrose (614 mM), saccharin (4 mM), or a second water bottle for 14 days. After the second bottle was removed, measurements continued for 14 days. Sucrose exposure suppressed alcohol consumption at concentrations lower in calories than the alcohol solution. Saccharin exposure failed to suppress alcohol consumption. Exposure to sucrose and alcohol but not saccharin decreased food intake. Decreased alcohol consumption in response to a caloric sweetener and decreased food intake during alcohol exposure support that alcohol consumption by the hamster is mediated by caloric content. However, suppression of alcohol intake by a sucrose solution of lower caloric content and the equivalent intake of individual alcohol, sucrose and saccharin solutions support a role for reward value in alcohol consumption. PMID:20688091

  13. Use of caloric and noncaloric sweeteners in US consumer packaged foods, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2012-11-01

    Our understanding of the use of caloric and noncaloric sweeteners in the US food supply is limited. This study uses full ingredient list and Nutrition Facts label data from Gladson Nutrition Database and nationally representative purchases of consumer packaged foods from Nielsen Homescan in 2005 through 2009 to understand the use of caloric sweeteners (including fruit juice concentrate) and noncaloric sweeteners in consumer packaged foods. Of the 85,451 uniquely formulated foods purchased during 2005 through 2009, 75% contain sweeteners (68% with caloric sweetener only, 1% with noncaloric sweetener only, 6% with both caloric and noncaloric sweeteners). Caloric sweetener are in >95% of cakes/cookies/pies, granola/protein/energy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, sweet snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Noncaloric sweetener are in >33% of yogurts and sport/energy drinks, 42% of waters (plain or flavored), and most dietetic sweetened beverages. Across unique products, corn syrup is the most commonly listed sweetener, followed by sorghum, cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and fruit juice concentrate. Also, 77% of all calories purchased in the United States in 2005-2009 contained caloric sweeteners and 3% contained noncaloric sweeteners, and 73% of the volume of foods purchased contained caloric sweetener and 15% contained noncaloric sweetener. Trends during this period suggest a shift toward the purchase of noncaloric sweetener-containing products. Our study poses a challenge toward monitoring sweetener consumption in the United States by discussing the need and options available to improve measures of caloric sweetener and noncaloric sweetener and additional requirements on Nutrition Facts labels on consumer packaged foods.

  14. Time-caloric restriction inhibits the neoplastic transformation of cirrhotic liver in rats treated with diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Molina-Aguilar, Christian; Guerrero-Carrillo, María de Jesús; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier; Olguin-Reyes, Sitlali; Castro-Belio, Thania; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Rivera-Zavala, Julieta Berenice; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2017-08-01

    Hepatocellular cancer is the most common type of primary liver cancer. Cirrhosis is the main risk factor that generates this malady. It has been proven that caloric restriction protocols and restricted feeding schedules are protective in experimental carcinogenic models. We tested the influence of a time-caloric restriction protocol (2 h of food access during the daytime for 18 weeks) in an experimental model of cirrhosis-hepatocarcinoma produced by weekly administration of diethylnitrosamine. Our results indicate that time-caloric restriction reduced hepatomegaly and prevented the increase in blood leukocytes promoted by diethylnitrosamine. Strikingly, time-caloric restriction preserved functional and histological characteristics of the liver in fibrotic areas compared to the cirrhotic areas of the Ad Libitum-fed group. Tumoural masses in the restricted group were well differentiated; consider a neoplastic or early stage of HCC. However, time-caloric restriction enhanced collagen deposits. With regard to the cancerous process, food restriction prevented systemic inflammation and an increase in carcinoembryonic antigen, and it favoured the occurrence of diffuse multinodular tumours. Histologically, it prevented hepatocyte inflammation response, the regenerative process, and neoplastic transformation. Time-caloric restriction stimulated circadian synchronization in fibrotic and cancerous liver sections, and it increased BMAL1 clock protein levels. We conclude that time-caloric restriction prevents fibrosis from progressing into cirrhosis, thus avoiding chronic inflammation and regenerative processes. It also prevents, probably through circadian entrainment and caloric restriction, the neoplastic transformation of tumoural lesions induced by diethylnitrosamine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Progress in constraining the asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alan B.; Yennello, Sherry J.

    2016-05-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a basic emergent property of nuclear material. Despite its importance in nuclear physics and astrophysics, aspects of it are still poorly constrained. Our research focuses on answering the question: How does the nuclear caloric curve depend on the neutron-proton asymmetry? We briefly describe our initial observation that increasing neutron-richness leads to lower temperatures. We then discuss the status of our recently executed experiment to independently measure the asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve.

  16. Comparison of standardized versus individualized caloric prescriptions in the nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Haynos, Ann F.; Snipes, Cassandra; Guarda, Angela; Mayer, Laurel E.; Attia, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sparse research informs how caloric prescriptions should be advanced during nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN). This study compared the impact of a standardized caloric increase approach, in which increases occurred on a predetermined schedule, to an individualized approach, in which increases occurred only following insufficient weight gain, on rate, pattern, and cumulative amount of weight gain and other weight restoration outcomes. Method This study followed a natural experiment design comparing AN inpatients consecutively admitted before (n = 35) and after (n = 35) an institutional change from individualized to standardized caloric prescriptions. Authors examined the impact of prescription plan on weekly weight gain in the first treatment month using multilevel modeling. Within a subsample remaining inpatient through weight restoration (n = 40), multiple regressions examined the impact of caloric prescription plan on time to weight restoration, length of hospitalization, maximum caloric prescription, discharge BMI, and incidence of activity restriction and edema. Results There were significant interactions between prescription plan and quadratic time on average weekly weight gain (p = .03) and linear time on cumulative weekly weight gain (p < .001). Under the standardized plan, patients gained in an accelerated curvilinear pattern (p = .04) and, therefore, gained cumulatively greater amounts of weight over time (p < .001). Additionally, 30% fewer patients required activity restriction under the standardized plan. Discussion Standardized caloric prescriptions may confer advantage by facilitating accelerated early weight gain and lower incidence of bed rest without increasing the incidence of refeeding syndrome. PMID:26769581

  17. A Human Thrifty Phenotype Associated With Less Weight Loss During Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Hohenadel, Maximilian G.; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Successful weight loss is variable for reasons not fully elucidated. Whether effective weight loss results from smaller reductions in energy expenditure during caloric restriction is not known. We analyzed whether obese individuals with a “thrifty” phenotype, that is, greater reductions in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and smaller increases with overfeeding, lose less weight during caloric restriction than those with a “spendthrift” phenotype. During a weight-maintaining period, 24-h energy expenditure responses to fasting and 200% overfeeding were measured in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Volunteers then underwent 6 weeks of 50% caloric restriction. We calculated the daily energy deficit (kilocalories per day) during caloric restriction, incorporating energy intake and waste, energy expenditure, and daily activity. We found that a smaller reduction in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and a larger response to overfeeding predicted more weight loss over 6 weeks, even after accounting for age, sex, race, and baseline weight, as well as a greater rate of energy deficit accumulation. The success of dietary weight loss efforts is influenced by the energy expenditure response to caloric restriction. Greater decreases in energy expenditure during caloric restriction predict less weight loss, indicating the presence of thrifty and spendthrift phenotypes in obese humans. PMID:25964395

  18. Caloric stimulation with near infrared radiation does not induce paradoxical nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Asenov, D R; Di Martino, E

    2011-04-01

    Near infrared radiation can be used for warm stimulation in caloric irrigation of the equilibrium organ. Aim of this study was to determine whether near infrared radiation offers effective stimulation of the vestibular organ, whether it is well tolerated by the patients and especially whether it is a viable alternative to warm air stimulation in patients with defects of the tympanic membrane and radical mastoid cavities. Patients with perforations of the tympanic membrane (n = 15) and with radical mastoid cavities (n = 13) were tested both with near infrared radiation and warm dry air. A caloric-induced nystagmus could be seen equally effectively and rapidly in all patients. Contrary to stimulation with warm dry air, no paradoxical nystagmus was observed following caloric irrigation with a warm stimulus (near infrared radiation). Results of a questionnaire showed excellent patient acceptance of near infrared stimulation with no arousal effects or unpleasant feeling. In conclusion, near infrared radiation proved to be an alternative method of caloric irrigation to warm dry air in patients with tympanic membrane defects and radical mastoid cavities. Near infrared radiation is pleasant, quick, contact free, sterile and quiet. With this method an effective caloric warm stimulus is available. If near infrared radiation is used for caloric stimulus no evaporative heat loss occurs.

  19. Postoral Glucose Sensing, Not Caloric Content, Determines Sugar Reward in C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that because of their energy value, sugars are more rewarding than non-caloric sweeteners. However, intragastric infusion data indicate that sugars differ in their postoral appetite-stimulating effects. We therefore compared the preference for isocaloric 8% sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions with that of a non-caloric sweetener solution (0.8% sucralose) in C57BL/6J mice. Brief 2-bottle tests indicated that sucralose was isopreferred to sucrose but more preferred than glucose or fructose. Yet, in long-term tests, the mice preferred sucrose and glucose, but not fructose to sucralose. Additional experiments were conducted with a non-caloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin mixture (S + S), which does not have the postoral inhibitory effects of 0.8% sucralose. The S + S was preferred to fructose in brief and long-term choice tests. S + S was also preferred to glucose and sucrose in brief tests, but the sugars were preferred in long-term tests. In progressive ratio tests, non-deprived and food-deprived mice licked more for glucose but not fructose than for S + S. These findings demonstrate that the nutrient-specific postoral actions, not calories per se, determine the avidity for sugar versus non-caloric sweeteners. Furthermore, sweet taste intensity and potential postoral inhibitory actions must be considered in comparing non-caloric and caloric sweeteners. PMID:25715333

  20. Caloric compensation for sugar-sweetened beverages in meals: A population-based study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gombi-Vaca, Maria Fernanda; Sichieri, Rosely; Verly-Jr, Eliseu

    2016-03-01

    Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption can cause positive energy balance, therefore leading to weight gain. A plausible biological mechanism to explain this association is through weak caloric compensation for liquid calories. However, there is an ongoing debate surrounding SSB calorie compensation. The body of evidence comes from a diversity of study designs and highly controlled settings assessing food and beverage intake. Our study aimed to test for caloric compensation of SSB in the free-living setting of daily meals. We analyzed two food records of participants (age 10 years or older) from the 2008-2009 National Dietary Survey (Brazil, N = 34,003). We used multilevel analyses to estimate the within-subject effects of SSB on food intake. Sugar-sweetened beverage calories were not compensated for when comparing daily energy intake over two days for each individual. When comparing meals, we found 42% of caloric compensation for breakfast, no caloric compensation for lunch and zero to 22% of caloric compensation for dinner, differing by household per capita income. In conclusion, SSB consumption contributed to higher energy intake due to weak caloric compensation. Discouraging the intake of SSB especially during lunch and dinner may help reduce excessive energy intake and lead to better weight management.

  1. A Human Thrifty Phenotype Associated With Less Weight Loss During Caloric Restriction.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Martin; Thearle, Marie S; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Hohenadel, Maximilian G; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B

    2015-08-01

    Successful weight loss is variable for reasons not fully elucidated. Whether effective weight loss results from smaller reductions in energy expenditure during caloric restriction is not known. We analyzed whether obese individuals with a "thrifty" phenotype, that is, greater reductions in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and smaller increases with overfeeding, lose less weight during caloric restriction than those with a "spendthrift" phenotype. During a weight-maintaining period, 24-h energy expenditure responses to fasting and 200% overfeeding were measured in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Volunteers then underwent 6 weeks of 50% caloric restriction. We calculated the daily energy deficit (kilocalories per day) during caloric restriction, incorporating energy intake and waste, energy expenditure, and daily activity. We found that a smaller reduction in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and a larger response to overfeeding predicted more weight loss over 6 weeks, even after accounting for age, sex, race, and baseline weight, as well as a greater rate of energy deficit accumulation. The success of dietary weight loss efforts is influenced by the energy expenditure response to caloric restriction. Greater decreases in energy expenditure during caloric restriction predict less weight loss, indicating the presence of thrifty and spendthrift phenotypes in obese humans.

  2. Behavioral and neural valuation of foods is driven by implicit knowledge of caloric content.

    PubMed

    Tang, Deborah W; Fellows, Lesley K; Dagher, Alain

    2014-12-01

    The factors that affect food choices are critical to understanding obesity. In the present study, healthy participants were shown pictures of foods to determine the impact of caloric content on food choice. Brain activity was then measured while participants bid for a chance to purchase and eat one item. True caloric density, but not individual estimates of calorie content, predicted how much participants were willing to pay for each item. Caloric density also correlated with the neural response to food pictures in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, a brain area that encodes the value of stimuli and predicts immediate consumption. That same region exhibited functional connectivity with an appetitive brain network, and this connectivity was modulated by willingness to pay. Despite the fact that participants were poor at explicitly judging caloric content, their willingness to pay and brain activity both correlated with actual caloric density. This suggests that the reward value of a familiar food is dependent on implicit knowledge of its caloric content. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Postoral glucose sensing, not caloric content, determines sugar reward in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that because of their energy value, sugars are more rewarding than non-caloric sweeteners. However, intragastric infusion data indicate that sugars differ in their postoral appetite-stimulating effects. We therefore compared the preference for isocaloric 8% sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions with that of a non-caloric sweetener solution (0.8% sucralose) in C57BL/6J mice. Brief 2-bottle tests indicated that sucralose was isopreferred to sucrose but more preferred than glucose or fructose. Yet, in long-term tests, the mice preferred sucrose and glucose, but not fructose to sucralose. Additional experiments were conducted with a non-caloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin mixture (S + S), which does not have the postoral inhibitory effects of 0.8% sucralose. The S + S was preferred to fructose in brief and long-term choice tests. S + S was also preferred to glucose and sucrose in brief tests, but the sugars were preferred in long-term tests. In progressive ratio tests, non-deprived and food-deprived mice licked more for glucose but not fructose than for S + S. These findings demonstrate that the nutrient-specific postoral actions, not calories per se, determine the avidity for sugar versus non-caloric sweeteners. Furthermore, sweet taste intensity and potential postoral inhibitory actions must be considered in comparing non-caloric and caloric sweeteners.

  4. The effect of caloric restriction and glycemic load on measures of oxidative stress and antioxidants in humans: results from the calerie trial of human caloric restriction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reducing oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant defense is suggested as one mechanism by which caloric restriction (CR) increases longevity in animals. A total of 46 moderately overweight volunteers (BMI: 25-30 kg/m2), ages 20-42 yr were randomized to either high glycemic (HG) or low glycemic ...

  5. Palatable Hyper-Caloric Foods Impact on Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Ferreira, Guillaume; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity is an intrinsic and essential characteristic of the nervous system that allows animals “self-tuning” to adapt to their environment over their lifetime. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system is a form of neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory formation, as well as long-lasting, environmentally-induced maladaptive behaviors, such as drug addiction and overeating of palatable hyper-caloric (PHc) food. In western societies, the abundance of PHc foods has caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of overweight/obesity and related disorders. To this regard, it has been suggested that increased adiposity may be caused at least in part by behavioral changes in the affected individuals that are induced by the chronic consumption of PHc foods; some authors have even drawn attention to the similarity that exists between over-indulgent eating and drug addiction. Long-term misuse of certain dietary components has also been linked to chronic neuroimmune maladaptation that may predispose individuals to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. In this review article, we discuss recent evidence that shows how consumption of PHc food can cause maladaptive neural plasticity that converts short-term ingestive drives into compulsive behaviors. We also discuss the neural mechanisms of how chronic consumption of PHc foods may alter brain function and lead to cognitive impairments, focusing on prenatal, childhood and adolescence as vulnerable neurodevelopmental stages to dietary environmental insults. Finally, we outline a societal agenda for harnessing permissive obesogenic environments. PMID:28261067

  6. Poor Prognosis After Second Locoregional Recurrences in the CALOR Trial.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, Irene L; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Geyer, Charles E; Paterson, Alexander H G; Láng, István; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Regan, Meredith M; Wolmark, Norman; Aebi, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRRs) of breast cancer confer a significant risk for the development of distant metastasis. Management practices and second ILRR events in the Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer (CALOR) trial were investigated. In this study, 162 patients with ILRR were randomly assigned to receive postoperative chemotherapy or no chemotherapy. Descriptive statistics characterize outcomes according to local therapy and the influence of hormone receptor status on subsequent recurrences. Competing risk regression models, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate associations between treatment, site of second recurrence, and outcome. The median follow-up period was 4.9 years. Of the 98 patients who received breast-conserving primary surgery 89 had an ipsilateral-breast tumor recurrence. Salvage mastectomy was performed for 73 patients and repeat lumpectomy for 16 patients. Another eight patients had nodal ILRR, and one patient had chest wall ILRR. Among 64 patients whose primary surgery was mastectomy, 52 had chest wall/skin ILRR, and 12 had nodal ILRR. For 15 patients, a second ILRR developed a median of 1.6 years (range 0.08-4.8 years) after ILRR. All second ILRRs occurred for patients with progesterone receptor-negative ILRR. Death occurred for 7 (47 %) of 15 patients with a second ILRR and 19 (51 %) of 37 patients with a distant recurrence. As shown in the multivariable analysis, the significant predictors of survival after either a second ILRR or distant recurrence were chemotherapy for the primary cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.55; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.15-10.9; p = 0.03) and the interval (continuous) from the primary surgery (HR, 0.87; 95 % CI, 0.75-1.00; p = 0.05). Second ILRRs represented about one third of all recurrence events after ILRR, and all were PR-negative. These second ILRRs and distant metastases portend an unfavorable outcome.

  7. Adaptations of intestinal nutrient transport to chronic caloric restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Casirola, D M; Rifkin, B; Tsai, W; Ferraris, R P

    1996-07-01

    Lifelong caloric restriction increases median and maximum life span and retards the aging process in many organ systems of rodents. Because the small intestine absorbs a reduced amount of nutrients each day, does lifelong caloric restriction induce adaptations in intestinal nutrient transport? We initially compared intestinal transport of sugars and amino acids between 24-mo-old mice allowed free access to food [ad libitum (AL)] and those provided a calorically restricted [40% less than ad libitum (CR)] diet since 3 mo of age. We found that CR mice had significantly greater transport rates for D-glucose, D-fructose, and several amino acids and had significantly lower villus heights. Total intestinal absorptive capacities for D-glucose, D-fructose, and L-proline were each 40-50% greater in CR mice; absorptive capacity normalized to metabolic mass (body weight 0.75) was approximately 80% greater in CR mice. Comparison of uptakes in aged AL and CR mice with previously published results in young AL mice suggests that caloric restriction delays age-related decreases in nutrient transport. In contrast to published studies in hibernation and starvation, chronic caloric restriction enhances not only uptake per milligram but also uptake per centimeter. We then switched 24-mo-old AL mice to a calorie-restricted diet for 1 mo and found that short-term caloric restriction has no effect on intestinal nutrient transport, intestinal mass, and total absorptive capacity. Thus chronic but not short-term caloric restriction increases intestinal nutrient transport rates in aged mice, and the main mechanism underlying these increases is enhanced transport rates per unit intestinal tissue weight.

  8. Correlation between bithermal caloric test results and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Isabel Vaamonde Sanchez; Santos-Perez, Sofia; Diz, Pilar Gayoso; Caballero, Torcuato Labella; Soto-Varela, Andrés

    2013-05-01

    Bithermal caloric testing and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are both diagnostic tools for the study of the vestibular system. The first tests the horizontal semicircular canal and the second evaluates the saccule and lower vestibular nerve. The results of these two tests can therefore be expected to be correlated. The aim of this study was to compare bithermal caloric test results with VEMP records in normal subjects to verify whether they are correlated. A prospective study was conducted in 60 healthy subjects (30 men and 30 women) who underwent otoscopy, pure tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing and VEMPs. From the caloric test, we assessed the presence of possible vestibular hypofunction, whether there was directional preponderance and reflectivity of each ear (all based on both slow phase velocity and nystagmus frequency). The analysed VEMPs variables were: p1 and n1 latency, corrected amplitude, interaural p1 latency difference and p1 interaural amplitude asymmetry. We compared the reflectivity, hypofunction and directional preponderance of the caloric tests with the corrected amplitudes and amplitude asymmetries of the VEMPs. No correlations were found in the different comparisons between bithermal caloric testing results and VEMPs except for a weak correlation (p = 0.039) when comparing preponderance based on the number of nystagmus in the caloric test and amplitude asymmetry with 99 dB tone burst in the VEMPs test. The results indicate that the two diagnostic tests are not comparable, so one of them cannot replace the other, but the use of both increases diagnostic success in some conditions.

  9. Replacing sweetened caloric beverages with drinking water is associated with lower energy intake.

    PubMed

    Stookey, Jodi D; Constant, Florence; Gardner, Christopher D; Popkin, Barry M

    2007-12-01

    Reduced intake of sweetened caloric beverages (SCBs) is recommended to lower total energy intake. Replacing SCBs with non-caloric diet beverages does not automatically lower energy intake, however. Compensatory increases in other food or beverages reportedly negate benefits of diet beverages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate drinking water as an alternative to SCBs. Secondary analysis of data from the Stanford A TO Z intervention evaluated change in beverage pattern and total energy intake in 118 overweight women (25 to 50 years) who regularly consumed SCBs (>12 ounces/d) at baseline. At baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months, mean daily beverage intake (SCBs, drinking water, non-caloric diet beverages, and nutritious caloric beverages), food composition (macronutrient, water, and fiber content), and total energy intake were estimated using three 24-hour diet recalls. Beverage intake was expressed in relative terms (percentage of beverages). In fixed effects models that controlled for total beverage intake, non-caloric and nutritious caloric beverage intake (percentage of beverages), food composition, and energy expenditure [metabolic equivalent (MET)], replacing SCBs with drinking water was associated with significant decreases in total energy intake that were sustained over time. The caloric deficit attributable to replacing SCBs with water was not negated by compensatory increases in other food or beverages. Replacing all SCBs with drinking water was associated with a predicted mean decrease in total energy of 200 kcal/d over 12 months. The results suggest that replacing SCBs with drinking water can help lower total energy intake in overweight consumers of SCBs motivated to diet.

  10. Caloric and nitrogen balances as predictors of nutritional outcome in patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Mancusi-Ungaro, H R; Van Way, C W; McCool, C

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of energy expenditure with indirect calorimetry allows determination of caloric balance. The present study was done to determine the predictive value of caloric and nitrogen balances for nutritional outcome. Energy expenditure was obtained weekly and interpolated between measurements for daily caloric balance. Nitrogen balance was obtained weekly. Because nitrogen output fluctuated, interpolation of daily values was not possible. Nutritional outcome was defined by whether body weight was lost or maintained and by levels of visceral proteins (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin). The study group included 12 patients with 7% to 82.5% total body surface area burns. Eleven patients survived their burn injuries, and one died of congestive heart failure at 38 days, after her burn wounds had healed. Nine patients had good nutritional outcomes (group 1) and three had poor nutritional outcomes (group 2) (including the one who died). Nitrogen balance was 1.3 +/- 1.0 gm/day in group 1 and 4.5 +/- 1.7 gm/day in group 2 (mean +/- SEM; p > 0.10). Caloric balance was 515 +/- 130 kcal/day in group 1 and -667 +/- 140 in group 2 (p < 0.001). Caloric balance was significantly different between the two groups, whereas nitrogen balance was not. Caloric intake correlated positively with nitrogen intake (r = 0.92). Nitrogen intake was 16% of total caloric intake. Nitrogen intake from blood products was appreciable and averaged 15% of total nitrogen intake (range, 0% to 47%); 11.3 +/- 1.6 gm/day in group 1 and 14.8 +/- 3 gm/day in group 2 (p > 0.10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Comparison of caloric intake and weight outcomes of an ad lib feeding regimen for preterm infants in two nurseries.

    PubMed

    Pridham, K F; Kosorok, M R; Greer, F; Kayata, S; Bhattacharya, A; Grunwald, P

    2001-09-01

    Effects on caloric intake and weight gain of an ad libitum (ad lib) feeding regimen for preterm infants may be specific to a special care nursery. To explore across two nurseries the similarity of effect on caloric intake and weight gain of an ad lib feeding regimen compared with a prescribed regimen and the similarity of effect of caloric intake on weight gain. All infants participating in the multi-site randomized clinical trial (RCT) of the ad lib feeding regimen were <35 weeks gestational age at birth and had birth weight appropriate for gestational age. Data on caloric intake and weight gain were collected at two nurseries (A, n=22; B, n=78) with the same feeding regimen protocols. Two strategies were used to explore similarity of regimen effect on caloric intake and weight gain. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine the effect on caloric intake and weight gain of time, feeding regimen, and time-by-regimen interaction for each nursery. In both nurseries, regimen effects were reasonably consistent for caloric intake and weight gain. Caloric intake was lower across nurseries for infants fed ad lib. After accounting for caloric intake, the ad lib regimen did not affect weight gain. The time-by-regimen interaction effect on caloric intake was significant in both nurseries. Caloric intake for infants fed ad lib increased significantly over 5 days. Despite differences between nurseries in infant characteristics and in protocol implementation, the feeding regimen effect was consistent for caloric intake and weight gain. Further support was found for the development of infant self-regulatory capacity.

  12. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    1-0361 TITLE: Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and...COVERED (From - To) 17 SEP 2001 - 16 SEP 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on 5a...14. ABSTRACT This proposal entitled “Effects of moderate aerobic exercise combined with caloric restriction on circulating estrogens and IGF- 1 in

  13. Impact of long-term caloric restriction on cardiac senescence: caloric restriction ameliorates cardiac diastolic dysfunction associated with aging.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Ken; Tamaki, Kayoko; Sano, Motoaki; Murata, Mitsushige; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of older patients with congestive heart failure have normal left ventricular (LV) systolic but abnormal LV diastolic function. In mammalian hearts, aging is associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Caloric restriction (CR) is expected to retard cellular senescence and to attenuate the physiological decline in organ function. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of long-term CR on cardiac senescence, in particular the effect of CR on LV diastolic dysfunction associated with aging. Male 8-month-old Fischer344 rats were divided into ad libitum fed and CR (40% energy reduction) groups. LV function was evaluated by echocardiography and cardiac senescence was compared between the two groups at the age of 30-month-old. (1) Echocardiography showed similar LV systolic function, but better LV diastolic function in the CR group. (2) Histological analysis revealed that CR attenuated the accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and lipofuscin and reduced myocyte apoptosis. (3) In measurements of [Ca(2+)](i) transients, the time to 50% relaxation was significantly smaller in the CR group, whereas F/F(0) was similar. (4) CR attenuated the decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 protein with aging. (5) CR suppressed the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and increased the ratio of conjugated to cytosolic light chain 3, suggesting that autophagy is enhanced in the CR hearts. In conclusion, CR improves diastolic function in the senescent myocardium by amelioration of the age-associated deterioration in intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Enhanced autophagy via the suppression of mTOR during CR may retard cardiac senescence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Lexicocalorimeter: Gauging public health through caloric input and output on social media

    PubMed Central

    Alajajian, Sharon E.; Williams, Jake Ryland; Reagan, Andrew J.; Alajajian, Stephen C.; Frank, Morgan R.; Mitchell, Lewis; Lahne, Jacob; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    We propose and develop a Lexicocalorimeter: an online, interactive instrument for measuring the “caloric content” of social media and other large-scale texts. We do so by constructing extensive yet improvable tables of food and activity related phrases, and respectively assigning them with sourced estimates of caloric intake and expenditure. We show that for Twitter, our naive measures of “caloric input”, “caloric output”, and the ratio of these measures are all strong correlates with health and well-being measures for the contiguous United States. Our caloric balance measure in many cases outperforms both its constituent quantities; is tunable to specific health and well-being measures such as diabetes rates; has the capability of providing a real-time signal reflecting a population’s health; and has the potential to be used alongside traditional survey data in the development of public policy and collective self-awareness. Because our Lexicocalorimeter is a linear superposition of principled phrase scores, we also show we can move beyond correlations to explore what people talk about in collective detail, and assist in the understanding and explanation of how population-scale conditions vary, a capacity unavailable to black-box type methods. PMID:28187216

  15. How have agricultural policies influenced caloric consumption in the United States?

    PubMed

    Rickard, Bradley J; Okrent, Abigail M; Alston, Julian M

    2013-03-01

    Many commentators have speculated that agricultural policies have contributed to increased obesity rates in the United States, yet such claims are often made without any analysis of the complex links between real-world farm commodity support programs, prices and consumption of foods, and caloric intake. This article carefully studies the effects of US agricultural policies on prices and quantities of 10 agricultural commodities and nine food categories in the United States over time. Using a detailed multimarket model, we simulate the counterfactual removal of measures of support applied to US agricultural commodities in 1992, 1997, and 2002 and quantify the effects on US food consumption and caloric intake. To parameterize the simulations, we calculate three alternative measures of consumer support (the implicit consumer subsidy from policies that support producers) for the 10 agricultural commodities using information about government expenditures on agricultural commodities from various sources. Our results indicate that-holding all other policies constant-removing US subsidies on grains and oilseeds in the three periods would have caused caloric consumption to decrease minimally whereas removal of all US agricultural policies (including barriers against imports of sugar and dairy products) would have caused total caloric intake to increase. Our results also indicate that the influence of agricultural policies on caloric intake has diminished over time.

  16. Role of video-head impulse test in lateralization of vestibulopathy: Comparative study with caloric test.

    PubMed

    Park, Pona; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Ji Soo; Koo, Ja-Won

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the lateralization value of video head-impulse test (vHIT) for the diagnosis of vestibulopathy and to analyze cases showing dissociated results with caloric test. In total, 19 healthy volunteers and 92 dizzy patients who underwent both a caloric test and a vHIT were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups depending on their fluctuating pattern of vertigo. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and gain asymmetry (GA) of a vHIT as well as unilateral weakness (UW) and the sum of the slow-phase velocities (SPVs) of warm and cold irrigation of the same side were compared. A cutoff value of VOR gain of a vHIT was also calculated using a receiver-operating characteristic curve. A VOR gain in an affected ear and GA of a vHIT showed a statistically significant correlation with UW in a caloric test. The cutoff value of a vHIT was determined to be 0.875, derived under the assumption that UW of a caloric test ≤25% is normal. However, the parameters of the two tests were dissociated in 18%. A VOR gain of vHIT is a valuable objective parameter with a lateralization value determining vestibular hypofunction. However, considering substantial dissociation between a vHIT and a caloric test, these tests can be complementary tools for the lateralization of vestibular impairment for the comprehensive evaluation of patients' VOR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Lexicocalorimeter: Gauging public health through caloric input and output on social media.

    PubMed

    Alajajian, Sharon E; Williams, Jake Ryland; Reagan, Andrew J; Alajajian, Stephen C; Frank, Morgan R; Mitchell, Lewis; Lahne, Jacob; Danforth, Christopher M; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    We propose and develop a Lexicocalorimeter: an online, interactive instrument for measuring the "caloric content" of social media and other large-scale texts. We do so by constructing extensive yet improvable tables of food and activity related phrases, and respectively assigning them with sourced estimates of caloric intake and expenditure. We show that for Twitter, our naive measures of "caloric input", "caloric output", and the ratio of these measures are all strong correlates with health and well-being measures for the contiguous United States. Our caloric balance measure in many cases outperforms both its constituent quantities; is tunable to specific health and well-being measures such as diabetes rates; has the capability of providing a real-time signal reflecting a population's health; and has the potential to be used alongside traditional survey data in the development of public policy and collective self-awareness. Because our Lexicocalorimeter is a linear superposition of principled phrase scores, we also show we can move beyond correlations to explore what people talk about in collective detail, and assist in the understanding and explanation of how population-scale conditions vary, a capacity unavailable to black-box type methods.

  18. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  19. A Biomechanical Model of the Inner Ear: Numerical Simulation of the Caloric Test

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Zhao, Wei; Su, Yingfeng; Yu, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Whether two vertical semicircular canals can receive thermal stimuli remains controversial. This study examined the caloric response in the three semicircular canals to the clinical hot caloric test using the finite element method. The results of the developed model showed the horizontal canal (HC) cupula maximally deflected to the utricle side by approximately 3 μm during the hot supine test. The anterior canal cupula began to receive the caloric stimuli about 20 s after the HC cupula, and it maximally deflected to the canal side by 0.55 μm. The posterior canal cupula did not receive caloric stimuli until approximately 40 s after the HC cupula, and it maximally deflected to the canal side by 0.34 μm. Although the endolymph flow and the cupular deformation change with respect to the head position during the test, the supine test ensures the maximal caloric response in the HC, but no substantial improvement for the responses of the two vertical canals was observed. In conclusion, while the usual supine test is the optimum test for evaluating the functions of the inner ear, more irrigation time is needed in order to effectively clinically examine the vertical canals. PMID:24223498

  20. Triple test as predictive screen for unilateral weakness on caloric testing in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Rohrmeier, Christian; Richter, Otto; Schneider, Michael; Wirsching, Kornelia; Fiedler, Isabella; Haubner, Frank; Strutz, Jürgen; Kühnel, Thomas S

    2013-02-01

    To investigate in vertigo patients in routine practice to what extent a rapid and straightforward triple bedside test (spontaneous nystagmus, head-shaking nystagmus, and the head impulse test) can predict a normal result on caloric testing. Prospective, single-blind, diagnostic study. Tertiary referral center. 151 patients (78 male and 73 female subjects; mean age, 52.5 +/- 16.4 yr) presenting with acute or recent symptoms of vertigo. Diagnostic evaluation. The negative predictive value (NPV) of the triple test in relation to a normal caloric test response. In unilateral weakness (UW) on caloric testing (UW, >=25%), the triple test had sensitivity of 63.6%, specificity of 85.4%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 71.4%, and an NPV of 80.4%. In other words, 80.4% of patients with a negative triple test also had a normal response on caloric testing. In pronounced canal paresis (UW, >=50%), the triple test had sensitivity of 81.8%, specificity of 81.4%, a PPV of 55.1%, and an NPV of 94.1%. Significant differences were found between 2 subgroups assessed by examiners with differing levels of experience (p < 0.05). The triple test represents a good screening tool that quickly and reliably excludes unilateral weakness and in particular pronounced canal paresis on caloric testing. (C) 2013 Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

  1. Caloric Requirements of Patients With Brain Impairment and Cerebral Palsy Who Are Dependent on Chronic Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gale, Rena; Namestnic, Julia; Singer, Pierre; Kagan, Ilya

    2016-08-15

    Israeli law mandates chronic ventilator support for children and adolescents who are severely brain impaired and show minimal responses. Feeding protocols in these cases have been based on the caloric requirements of healthy children, deducting calories for lack of activity as well as an individual adjustment according to the cerebral palsy growth curves. However, patients are still inclined to gain excessive weight. Our objective was to determine the caloric requirements of these patients. Sixteen patients hospitalized in a dedicated unit who were ventilated through tracheostomies and fed via gastrostomies were included. Patients were aged 3-24 years; duration of ventilation was 1-7.5 years; and diagnoses included congenital genetic or brain malformations (n = 9), hypoxic accidents (n = 4), and postbacterial or postviral encephalitis (n = 3). Resting energy expenditure (REE) was determined by indirect calorimetry. REE values were compared with the caloric requirements of age-comparable healthy children and the calories actually delivered. Data were analyzed with paired t tests, Pearson correlations, and linear regression. The REE of our patients was 46% lower than the estimated caloric requirements of healthy children. In practice, patients received 32% more calories than that measured by REE. These findings were not affected by age, weight, diagnosis, or length of hospitalization. The caloric expenditure of these patients is very low. A diet guided by indirect calorimetry is proposed to aid in providing optimal nutrition support for this unique population to avoid overfeeding and obesity. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Inflammatory Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mark A.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Gunsolley, John C.; Branch-Mays, Grishondra L.; Holt, Stanley C.; Mattison, Julie A.; Ingram, Donald K.; Novak, M. John

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dietary caloric restriction (CR) has been found to reduce systemic markers of inflammation and may attenuate the effects of chronic inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long-term CR on naturally occurring chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in a nonhuman primate model. Methods The effects of long-term CR on extent and severity of naturally occurring chronic periodontal disease, local inflammatory and immune responses, and periodontal microbiology, were evaluated in a cohort of 81 (35 female and 46 male; 13–40 years of age) rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta) with no previous exposure to routine oral hygiene. The CR monkeys had been subjected to 30% CR for 13–17 years relative to control-fed (CON) animals starting at 3–5 years of age. Clinical and laboratory parameters were submitted to analysis of covariance, including Tukey's test for post hoc comparisons, linear regression analysis, and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results Same sex CR and CON monkeys exhibited comparable mean scores for plaque index, calculus index, and bleeding on probing. Among CON animals, males showed significantly greater periodontal breakdown, as reflected by higher mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PD) scores, than females (p ≤ 0.05). CR males had significantly less periodontal pocketing compared to CON males (p ≤ 0.05). CR males demonstrated a significantly lower IgG antibody response and lower levels of IL-8 and β-glucuronidase in gingival crevicular fluid compared to control males. A similar but nonsignificant reduction was found for IL-1β in CR male monkeys. In contrast, CR females exhibited mean PD and CAL scores comparable to CON females. CR females had a lower IgG antibody response but comparable levels of inflammatory markers in GCF compared to CON females. The CR diet had no demonstrable effects on the periodontal microbiota in male or female monkeys. Conclusion Males exhibited

  3. Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Jean A.; Sharma, Andrea; Abramson, Jerome L.; Vaccarino, Viola; Gillespie, Cathleen; Vos, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    Context Dietary carbohydrates have been associated with dyslipidemia, a lipid profile known to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Added sugars (caloric sweeteners used as ingredients in processed or prepared foods) are an increasing and potentially modifiable component in the US diet. No known studies have examined the association between the consumption of added sugars and lipid measures. Objective To assess the association between consumption of added sugars and blood lipid levels in US adults. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study among US adults (n=6113) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2006. Respondents were grouped by intake of added sugars using limits specified in dietary recommendations (<5% [reference group], 5%–<10%, 10%–<17.5%, 17.5%–<25%, and ≥25% of total calories). Linear regression was used to estimate adjusted mean lipid levels. Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios of dyslipidemia. Interactions between added sugars and sex were evaluated. Main Outcome Measures Adjusted mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), geometric mean triglycerides, and mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and adjusted odds ratios of dyslipidemia, including low HDL-C levels (<40 mg/dL for men; <50 mg/dL for women), high triglyceride levels (≥150 mg/dL), high LDL-C levels (≥130 mg/dL), or high ratio of triglycerides to HDL-C (>3.8). Results were weighted to be representative of the US population. Results A mean of 15.8% of consumed calories was from added sugars. Among participants consuming less than 5%, 5% to less than 17.5%, 17.5% to less than 25%, and 25% or greater of total energy as added sugars, adjusted mean HDL-C levels were, respectively, 58.7, 57.5, 53.7, 51.0, and 47.7 mg/dL (P<.001 for linear trend), geometric mean triglyceride levels were 105, 102, 111, 113, and 114 mg/dL (P<.001 for linear trend), and LDL-C levels modified by sex were

  4. Caloric restriction in primates and relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Roth, G S; Ingram, D K; Lane, M A

    2001-04-01

    Dietary caloric restriction (CR) is the only intervention conclusively and reproducibly shown to slow aging and maintain health and vitality in mammals. Although this paradigm has been known for over 60 years, its precise biological mechanisms and applicability to humans remain unknown. We began addressing the latter question in 1987 with the first controlled study of CR in primates (rhesus and squirrel monkeys, which are evolutionarily much closer to humans than the rodents most frequently employed in CR studies). To date, our results strongly suggest that the same beneficial "antiaging" and/or "antidisease" effects observed in CR rodents also occur in primates. These include lower plasma insulin levels and greater sensitivity; lower body temperatures; reduced cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and arterial stiffness; elevated HDL; and slower age-related decline in circulating levels of DHEAS. Collectively, these biomarkers suggest that CR primates will be less likely to incur diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and other age-related diseases and may in fact be aging more slowly than fully fed counterparts. Despite these very encouraging results, it is unlikely that most humans would be willing to maintain a 30% reduced diet for the bulk of their adult life span, even if it meant more healthy years. For this reason, we have begun to explore CR mimetics, agents that might elicit the same beneficial effects as CR, without the necessity of dieting. Our initial studies have focused on 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), a sugar analogue with a limited metabolism that actually reduces glucose/energy flux without decreasing food intake in rats. In a six-month pilot study, 2DG lowered plasma insulin and body temperature in a manner analagous to that of CR. Thus, metabolic effects that mediate the CR mechanism can be attained pharmacologically. Doses were titrated to eliminate toxicity; a long-term longevity study is now under way. In addition, data from other laboratories

  5. Effect of gravity on the caloric stimulation of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Deserranno, Dimitri; Oas, John G

    2004-11-01

    Robert Barany won the 1914 Nobel Prize in medicine for his convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab 1 mission produced nystagmus results that contradicted the basic premise of Barany's convection theory. In this paper, we present a fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, natural convection is the dominant mechanism for endolymphatic flow. However, in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, an expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing endolymph motion and cupular displacement. Transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the different dynamic behaviors of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The associated fluid-structural interactions are also analyzed based on the time evolution of cupular displacements.

  6. Effect of gravity on the caloric stimulation of the inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Deserranno, Dimitri; Oas, John G.

    2004-01-01

    Robert Barany won the 1914 Nobel Prize in medicine for his convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab 1 mission produced nystagmus results that contradicted the basic premise of Barany's convection theory. In this paper, we present a fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, natural convection is the dominant mechanism for endolymphatic flow. However, in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, an expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing endolymph motion and cupular displacement. Transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the different dynamic behaviors of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The associated fluid-structural interactions are also analyzed based on the time evolution of cupular displacements.

  7. Caloric curve across the liquid-to-gas change for sodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Hippler, T; Donges, J; Kronmüller, W; von Issendorff, B; Haberland, H; Labastie, P

    2001-11-12

    The caloric curve for Na(139)(+) has been measured from 100 K up to the temperature where the clusters are boiling hot and spontaneously emit atoms. In this limit the clusters form an evaporative ensemble, the temperature and energy of which have been determined. As the caloric curve of an atomic gas with a finite number of atoms is known, one can construct the caloric curve for this finite system below and above the boiling point. A conjecture is made on how to link the evaporative ensemble temperature of the free cluster in vacuum to the boiling temperature of a finite system at a given pressure. This allows one to determine the enthalpy of vaporization at the phase transition of the finite system.

  8. The physics of compensating calorimetry and the new CALOR89 code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Brau, J.E.; Bishop, B.L.

    1989-03-01

    Much of the understanding of the physics of calorimetry has come from the use of excellent radiation transport codes. A new understanding of compensating calorimetry was introduced four years ago following detailed studies with a new CALOR system. Now, the CALOR system has again been revised to reflect a better comprehension of high energy nuclear collisions by incorporating a modified high energy fragmentation model from FLUKA87. This revision will allow for the accurate analysis of calorimeters at energies of 100's of GeV. Presented in this paper is a discussion of compensating calorimetry, the new CALOR system, the revisions to HETC, and recently generated calorimeter related data on modes of energy deposition and secondary neutron production (E < 50 MeV) in infinite iron and uranium blocks. 38 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Effects of smoking cessation on weight gain, metabolic rate, caloric consumption, and blood lipids.

    PubMed

    Stamford, B A; Matter, S; Fell, R D; Papanek, P

    1986-04-01

    Thirteen sedentary adult females successfully quit smoking cigarettes for 48 days. Mean daily caloric consumption increased 227 kcal and mean weight gain was 2.2 kg. There were no measurable acute effects of smoke inhalation and no chronic net effects of smoking cessation on resting metabolic rate, as determined by oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratio. After 1 yr, subjects who continued to abstain gained an average of 8.2 kg. HDL-cholesterol increased 7 mg/dl in 48 days; however, this effect was lost in those who returned to smoking. Increased caloric consumption accounted for 69% of weight gained immediately following smoking cessation. Factors other than changes in caloric consumption and metabolic rate may be responsible for a significant proportion (31%) of the weight gained in individuals who quit smoking.

  10. Effect of gravity on the caloric stimulation of the inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Deserranno, Dimitri; Oas, John G.

    2004-01-01

    Robert Barany won the 1914 Nobel Prize in medicine for his convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab 1 mission produced nystagmus results that contradicted the basic premise of Barany's convection theory. In this paper, we present a fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, natural convection is the dominant mechanism for endolymphatic flow. However, in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, an expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing endolymph motion and cupular displacement. Transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the different dynamic behaviors of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The associated fluid-structural interactions are also analyzed based on the time evolution of cupular displacements.

  11. [The phenomenon of the fixation suppression of caloric nystagmus in the diagnosis of vestibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Levashov, M M; Lilenko, S V; Samoĭlova, I G

    1998-01-01

    Fixation nystagmus suppression in caloric tests was used in examination of 56 patients suffering from chronic remittent labyrinthopathy, acute labyrinthopathy, vestibular neuronitis, otosclerosis, adhesive otitis media, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, motor disease, chronic remittent vestibulopathy and neurinoma of the VIII nerve. The bithermal test (BT) with electronystagmography was made to calculate the fixation suppression index (FSI). Complete suppression of the caloric nystagmus in at least one BT test appeared to be the most frequent variant of the response (24 cases). This was not dependent on the severity of the vestibular analyzer lesion. In 3 cases FSI of the caloric nystagmus was rather high (> 0.50). Introduction of the period of glance fixation in performance of all the 4 BT tests may serve an additional method in differential diagnosis of the vestibular disorders. The fixation test results should be compared to findings obtained in the other vestibulometric tests.

  12. [The diagnostic value of vertical nystagmus in the simultaneous bilateral calibrated caloric vestibular test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toupet, M; Pialoux, P

    1981-01-01

    Vertical nystagmus provoked by simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation has been known since 1907 (Bàràny). However, if a controlled and calibrated injection os water at 44 degrees C or 30 degrees C for 30 seconds at a flow rate of 250 ml/minute is given in normal subjects, this stimulus is insufficient to provoke a response, whilst in subjects with a central vestibular disorder there appear upward vertical movements with hot stimulation and downward movements with cold stimulation. The degree of this response is proportional to the degree of horizontal nystagmic responses to classical unilateral caloric tests. The authors feel that vertical nystagmic responses to simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation reflect a loss of control of the vestibular reflex activity of the superior semicircular canals.

  13. Caloric restriction and exercise “mimetics”: ready for prime time?

    PubMed Central

    Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Exercise and diet are powerful interventions to prevent and ameliorate various pathologies. The development of pharmacological agents that confer exercise- or caloric restriction-like phenotypic effects is thus an appealing therapeutic strategy in diseases or even when used as life-style and longevity drugs. Such so-called exercise or caloric restriction “mimetics” have so far mostly been described in pre-clinical, experimental settings with limited translation into humans. Interestingly, many of these compounds activate related signaling pathways, most often postulated to act on the common downstream effector peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle. In this review, resveratrol and other exercise- and caloric restriction “mimetics” are discussed with a special focus on feasibility, chances and limitations of using such compounds in patients as well as in healthy individuals. PMID:26658171

  14. SirT1 Regulates Energy Metabolism and Response to Caloric Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boily, Gino; Seifert, Erin L.; Bevilacqua, Lisa; He, Xiao Hong; Sabourin, Guillaume; Estey, Carmen; Moffat, Cynthia; Crawford, Sean; Saliba, Sarah; Jardine, Karen; Xuan, Jian; Evans, Meredith; Harper, Mary-Ellen; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast sir2 gene and its orthologues in Drosophila and C. elegans have well-established roles in lifespan determination and response to caloric restriction. We have studied mice carrying two null alleles for SirT1, the mammalian orthologue of sir2, and found that these animals inefficiently utilize ingested food. These mice are hypermetabolic, contain inefficient liver mitochondria, and have elevated rates of lipid oxidation. When challenged with a 40% reduction in caloric intake, normal mice maintained their metabolic rate and increased their physical activity while the metabolic rate of SirT1-null mice dropped and their activity did not increase. Moreover, CR did not extend lifespan of SirT1-null mice. Thus, SirT1 is an important regulator of energy metabolism and, like its orthologues from simpler eukaryotes, the SirT1 protein appears to be required for a normal response to caloric restriction. PMID:18335035

  15. Effect of Modest Caloric Restriction on Oxidative Stress in Women, a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Buchowski, Maciej S.; Hongu, Nobuko; Acra, Sari; Wang, Li; Warolin, Joshua; Roberts, L. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is not established to what extent caloric intake must be reduced to lower oxidative stress in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short-term, moderate caloric restriction on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in overweight and obese premenopausal women. Materials/Methods Randomized trial comparison of 25% caloric restriction (CR) or control diet in 40 overweight or obese women (body mass index 32±5.8 kg/m2) observed for 28 days and followed for the next 90 days. Weight, anthropometry, validated markers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostane) and inflammation (C-reactive protein), adipokines, hormones, lipids, interleukins, and blood pressure were assessed at baseline, during the intervention, and at follow-up. Results Baseline median F2-isoprostane concentration (57.0, IQR = 40.5–79.5) in the CR group was 1.75-fold above average range for normal weight women (32.5 pg/ml). After starting of the caloric restriction diet, F2-isoprostane levels fell rapidly in the CR group, reaching statistical difference from the control group by day 5 (median 33.5, IQR = 26.0–48.0, P<0.001) and remained suppressed while continuing on the caloric restriction diet. Three months after resuming a habitual diet, concentrations of F2-isoprostane returned to baseline elevated levels in ∼80% of the women. Conclusions Oxidative stress can be rapidly reduced and sustained through a modest reduction in caloric intake suggesting potential health benefits in overweight and obese women. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00808275 PMID:23071718

  16. Effects of experimental sleep restriction on caloric intake and activity energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Calvin, Andrew D; Carter, Rickey E; Adachi, Taro; Macedo, Paula G; Albuquerque, Felipe N; van der Walt, Christelle; Bukartyk, Jan; Davison, Diane E; Levine, James A; Somers, Virend K

    2013-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies link short sleep duration to obesity and weight gain. Insufficient sleep appears to alter circulating levels of the hormones leptin and ghrelin, which may promote appetite, although the effects of sleep restriction on caloric intake and energy expenditure are unclear. We sought to determine the effect of 8 days/8 nights of sleep restriction on caloric intake, activity energy expenditure, and circulating levels of leptin and ghrelin. We conducted a randomized study of usual sleep vs a sleep restriction of two-thirds of normal sleep time for 8 days/8 nights in a hospital-based clinical research unit. The main outcomes were caloric intake, activity energy expenditure, and circulating levels of leptin and ghrelin. Caloric intake in the sleep-restricted group increased by +559 kcal/d (SD, 706 kcal/d, P=.006) and decreased in the control group by -118 kcal/d (SD, 386 kcal/d, P=.51) for a net change of +677 kcal/d (95% CI, 148-1,206 kcal/d; P=.014). Sleep restriction was not associated with changes in activity energy expenditure (P=.62). No change was seen in levels of leptin (P=.27) or ghrelin (P=.21). Sleep restriction was associated with an increase in caloric consumption with no change in activity energy expenditure or leptin and ghrelin concentrations. Increased caloric intake without any accompanying increase in energy expenditure may contribute to obesity in people who are exposed to long-term sleep restriction. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01334788; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  17. Tasting profile affects adoption of caloric beverage reduction in a randomized weight loss intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Popkin, B.; Tate, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this study was to examine differences in rates of non‐caloric beverage adoption by participants classified as sweet likers (SLs) or sweet dislikers (measured using a behavioural tasting task). Methods Data are a sub‐study from a 6‐month, three‐group, randomized weight loss trial (CHOICE) (body mass index 36.3 ± 5.8 kg m−2, 84% female, aged 42.2 ± 10.9 years, 53% African‐American) comparing the replacement of caloric beverages with either non‐caloric sweetened beverages (diet) or water (water) compared with a control group. This sub‐study, which included participants within the water (n = 106) and diet (n = 103) groups only, examined whether SLs (n = 33 water; n = 37 diet) varied in their adherence to caloric beverage recommendations compared with sweet dislikers (n = 73 water; n = 76 diet) over the 6‐month study. Results Diet intake and sweet‐liking data collected on 190 (3 months) and 169 participants (6 months) were used for analysis. The interaction between SL status and beverage group (diet vs. water) approached significance (P = 0.06) at 3 months but not 6 months. Caloric beverage intake (% energy) at 3 months was significantly higher in SLs within the water group (9.7 ± 1.4%) compared with SLs in the diet group (5.4 ± 1.0%, P = 0.03). Conclusions Results suggest that SL status may affect the rate in reduction of caloric beverages when water is the recommended substitution. Future studies should explore tailoring beverage recommendations to tasting profile. PMID:28090344

  18. Absence of Rotation Perception during Warm Water Caloric Irrigation in Some Seniors with Postural Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Magnani, Christophe; Lamas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; de Waele, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Falls in seniors are a major public health problem. Falls lead to fear of falling, reduced mobility, and decreased quality of life. Vestibular dysfunction is one of the fall risk factors. The relationship between objective measures of vestibular responses and age has been studied. However, the effects of age on vestibular perception during caloric stimulation have not been studied. Twenty senior subjects were included in the study, and separated in two groups: 10 seniors reporting postural instability (PI) and exhibiting absence of vestibular perception when they tested with caloric stimulation and 10 sex- and age-matched seniors with no such problems (controls). We assessed vestibular perception on a binary rating scale during the warm irrigation of the caloric test. The function of the various vestibular receptors was assessed using video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric tests, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. The Equitest was used to evaluate balance. No horizontal canal dysfunction assessed using both caloric test and vHIT was detected in either group. No significant difference was detected between PI and control groups for the peak SPV of caloric-induced ocular nystagmus or for the HVOR gain. All the controls perceived rotation when the maximal SPV during warm irrigation was equal to or ≥15°/s. None of the subjects in the PI group perceived rotation even while the peak SPV exceeded 15°/s, providing objective evidence of normal peripheral horizontal canal function. All the PI group had abnormal Equitest results, particularly in the two last conditions. These investigations show for the first time that vestibular perception can be absent during a caloric test despite normal horizontal canal function. We call this as dissociation vestibular neglect. Patients with poor vestibular perception may not be aware of postural perturbations and so will not correct for them. Thus, falls in the elderly may result, among other factors, from

  19. Absence of Rotation Perception during Warm Water Caloric Irrigation in Some Seniors with Postural Instability.

    PubMed

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Magnani, Christophe; Lamas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S; de Waele, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Falls in seniors are a major public health problem. Falls lead to fear of falling, reduced mobility, and decreased quality of life. Vestibular dysfunction is one of the fall risk factors. The relationship between objective measures of vestibular responses and age has been studied. However, the effects of age on vestibular perception during caloric stimulation have not been studied. Twenty senior subjects were included in the study, and separated in two groups: 10 seniors reporting postural instability (PI) and exhibiting absence of vestibular perception when they tested with caloric stimulation and 10 sex- and age-matched seniors with no such problems (controls). We assessed vestibular perception on a binary rating scale during the warm irrigation of the caloric test. The function of the various vestibular receptors was assessed using video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric tests, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. The Equitest was used to evaluate balance. No horizontal canal dysfunction assessed using both caloric test and vHIT was detected in either group. No significant difference was detected between PI and control groups for the peak SPV of caloric-induced ocular nystagmus or for the HVOR gain. All the controls perceived rotation when the maximal SPV during warm irrigation was equal to or ≥15°/s. None of the subjects in the PI group perceived rotation even while the peak SPV exceeded 15°/s, providing objective evidence of normal peripheral horizontal canal function. All the PI group had abnormal Equitest results, particularly in the two last conditions. These investigations show for the first time that vestibular perception can be absent during a caloric test despite normal horizontal canal function. We call this as dissociation vestibular neglect. Patients with poor vestibular perception may not be aware of postural perturbations and so will not correct for them. Thus, falls in the elderly may result, among other factors, from

  20. Sex and race differences in caloric intake during sleep restriction in healthy adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Andrea M; Dinges, David F; Goel, Namni

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence indicates that men and African Americans may be more susceptible to weight gain resulting from sleep loss than women and whites, respectively. Increased daily caloric intake is a major behavioral mechanism that underlies the relation between sleep loss and weight gain. Objective: We sought to assess sex and race differences in caloric intake, macronutrient intake, and meal timing during sleep restriction. Design: Forty-four healthy adults aged 21–50 y (mean ± SD: 32.7 ± 8.7 y; n = 21 women, n = 16 whites) completed an in-laboratory protocol that included 2 consecutive baseline nights [10 or 12 h time in bed (TIB)/night; 2200–0800 or 2200–1000] followed by 5 consecutive sleep-restriction nights (4 h TIB/night; 0400–0800). Caloric intake and meal-timing data were collected during the 2 d after baseline sleep and the first 3 d after sleep restriction. Results: During sleep restriction, subjects increased daily caloric intake (P < 0.001) and fat intake (P = 0.024), including obtaining more calories from condiments, desserts, and salty snacks (Ps < 0.05) and consumed 532.6 ± 295.6 cal during late-night hours (2200–0359). Relative to women, men consumed more daily calories during baseline and sleep restriction, exhibited a greater increase in caloric intake during sleep restriction (d = 0.62), and consumed a higher percentage of daily calories during late-night hours (d = 0.78, Ps < 0.05). African Americans and whites did not significantly differ in daily caloric intake, increased caloric intake during sleep restriction, or meal timing. However, African Americans consumed more carbohydrates, less protein, and more caffeine-free soda and juice than whites did during the study (Ps < 0.05). Conclusions: Men may be more susceptible to weight gain during sleep loss than women due to a larger increase in daily caloric intake, particularly during late-night hours. These findings are relevant to the promotion of public health awareness by

  1. Caloric Intake From Fast Food Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Vikraman, Sundeep; Fryar, Cheryl D; Ogden, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    Consumption of fast food has been linked to weight gain in adults (1). Fast food has also been associated with higher caloric intake and poorer diet quality in children and adolescents (2). From 1994 through 2006, caloric intake from fast food increased from 10% to 13% among children aged 2-18 years (3). This report presents the most recent data on the percentage of calories consumed from fast food among U.S. children by sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin, poverty status, and weight status.

  2. Changes of endolymphatic pressure in the semicircular canal of pigeon by caloric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Watanabe, S.

    1994-08-01

    It gets into difficult to explain the mechanism of caloric nystagmus only by convection theory from results of microgravity experiments. One of the other theories is an occurrence of a relative volume change due to a temperature change. Since the volume change must lead to a pressure change after caloric stimulation, we tried to measure the ampulla pressure of the horizontal semicircular canal in pigeons (Columba livia) using an improved servo micropipette system. The main result was that the ampulla pressure increased by cooling and decreased by heating. The changes of the ampulla pressure depended on the temperature change but were not influenced by the pigeon's head position.

  3. Effects of Experimental Sleep Restriction on Weight Gain, Caloric Intake, and Meal Timing in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Andrea M.; Dinges, David F.; Goel, Namni

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine sleep restriction's effects on weight gain, daily caloric intake, and meal timing. Design: Repeated-measures experiments assessing body weight at admittance and discharge in all subjects (N = 225) and caloric intake and meal timing across days following 2 baseline nights, 5 sleep restriction nights and 2 recovery nights or across days following control condition nights in a subset of subjects (n = 37). Setting: Controlled laboratory environment. Participants: Two hundred twenty-five healthy adults aged 22-50 y (n = 198 sleep-restricted subjects; n = 31 with caloric intake data; n = 27 control subjects; n = 6 with caloric intake data). Interventions: Approximately 8-to-1 randomization to an experimental condition (including five consecutive nights of 4 h time in bed [TIB]/night, 04:00-08:00) or to a control condition (all nights 10 h TIB/night, 22:00-08:00). Measurements and Results: Sleep-restricted subjects gained more weight (0.97 ± 1.4 kg) than control subjects (0.11 ± 1.9 kg; d = 0.51, P = 0.007). Among sleep-restricted subjects, African Americans gained more weight than Caucasians (d = 0.37, P = 0.003) and males gained more weight than females (d = 0.38, P = 0.004). Sleep-restricted subjects consumed extra calories (130.0 ± 43.0% of daily caloric requirement) during days with a delayed bedtime (04:00) compared with control subjects who did not consume extra calories (100.6 ± 11.4%; d = 0.94, P = 0.003) during corresponding days. In sleep-restricted subjects, increased daily caloric intake was due to more meals and the consumption of 552.9 ± 265.8 additional calories between 22:00-03:59. The percentage of calories derived from fat was greater during late-night hours (22:00-03:59, 33.0 ± 0.08%) compared to daytime (08:00-14:59, 28.2 ± 0.05%) and evening hours (15:00-21:59, 29.4 ± 0.06%; Ps < 0.05). Conclusions: In the largest, most diverse healthy sample studied to date under controlled laboratory conditions, sleep restriction

  4. Effect of the stringency of conditions on caloric test results in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Krstulovic, Claudio; Tulsidas Mahtani, Bharti; Atrache Al Attrache, Nabil; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio

    The caloric test is widely used to assess vestibular function, but the conditions in which it is performed can vary. Caloric nystagmus obtained in 57 healthy subjects were compared: 24 subjects studied in ideal conditions and 33 subjects in non-ideal conditions. A statistically significant decrease in the slow phase velocity of the 4 irrigations performed on the subjects in non-ideal conditions was observed. This must be considered, especially in subjects with suspected bilateral involvement. Stringent conditions reduce the risk of misdiagnosis with bilateral deficit.

  5. Fuel NOx production during the combustion of low caloric value fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Colaluca, M.A.; Caraway, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this investigation is to identify and qualify physical mechanisms and parameters that affect the combustion of low caloric value gases (LCVG) and the formation of NOx pollutants produced form fuel bound nitrogen. Average physical properties of a low caloric value gas were determined from the products of several industrial coal gasifiers. A computer model was developed, utilizing the PHOENICS computational fluid dynamics software to model the combustion of LCVG. The model incorporates a 3-dimensional physical design and is based on typical industrial combustors. Feed stock to the gasifier can be wood, feed stock manure, cotton gin trash, coal, lignite and numerous forms of organic industrial wastes.

  6. Combined caloric effects in a multiferroic Ni-Mn-Ga alloy with broad refrigeration temperature region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Li, Zongbin; Yang, Bo; Qian, Suxin; Gan, Weimin; Gong, Yuanyuan; Li, Yang; Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Jian; Zhao, Xiang; Zuo, Liang; Wang, Dunhui; Du, Youwei

    2017-04-01

    Solid-state refrigeration based on the caloric effects is promising to replace the traditional vapor-compressing refrigeration technology due to environmental protection and high efficiency. However, the narrow working temperature region has hindered the application of these refrigeration technologies. In this paper, we propose a method of combined caloric, through which a broad refrigeration region can be realized in a multiferroic alloy, Ni-Mn-Ga, by combining its elastocaloric and magnetocaloric effects. Moreover, the materials' efficiency of elastocaloric effect has been greatly improved in our sample. These results illuminate a promising way to use multiferroic alloys for refrigeration with a broad refrigeration temperature region.

  7. High-Caloric Expenditure Exercise: A New Approach to Cardiac Rehabilitation for Overweight Coronary Patients Ades: High-Caloric Exercise Overweight Coronary Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ades, Philip A; Savage, Patrick D; Toth, Michael J; Harvey-Berino, Jean; Schneider, David J; Bunn, Janice Y; Audelin, Marie C; Ludlow, Maryann

    2009-01-01

    Background Over 80% of patients entering cardiac rehabilitation (CR) are overweight and >50% have metabolic syndrome. Current CR exercise protocols result in little weight loss and minimal changes in cardiac risk factors. We sought to design an exercise protocol that would lead to greater weight loss and risk factor change. Methods and Results We performed a randomized-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effect of high-caloric expenditure exercise (3000-3500 kcal/week exercise-related energy expenditure) compared with standard CR exercise (7-800 kcal/week) on weight loss and risk factors in 74 overweight patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Both groups were counseled for weight loss and taking evidence-based preventive medications. High-caloric exercise resulted in double the weight loss (8.2±4 vs 3.7±5 kg, P<0.001) and fat mass loss (5.9±4 vs 2.8±3 kg, P< 0.001) and a greater waist reduction (-7±5 vs. -5±5 cm, P=0.02) than standard CR exercise at 5-months. High-caloric exercise reduced insulin resistance, measured with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, along with the Cholesterol/HDL-Cholesterol ratio and components of the metabolic syndrome more than standard CR exercise (each P<0.01). Overall, fat mass loss best predicted improved metabolic risk and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome decreased from 59% to 31%. Changes in cardiac risk factors included decreased insulin resistance, increased HDL-Cholesterol and decreased measures of insulin, triglycerides, blood pressure, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and the Cholesterol/HDL-Cholesterol ratio (each P<0.05). Significant weight loss was maintained at 1-year. Conclusions High-caloric exercise promotes greater weight loss and more favorable cardio-metabolic risk profiles than standard CR for overweight coronary patients. PMID:19433757

  8. Prenatal Caloric Intake and the Development of Academic Achievement among U.S. Children from Ages 5 to 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Eric J.; Beaver, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between maternal caloric intake during pregnancy and growth in child academic achievement while controlling for important confounding influences. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the current study examined the effects of reduced prenatal caloric intake on growth in scores on the…

  9. Prenatal Caloric Intake and the Development of Academic Achievement among U.S. Children from Ages 5 to 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Eric J.; Beaver, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between maternal caloric intake during pregnancy and growth in child academic achievement while controlling for important confounding influences. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the current study examined the effects of reduced prenatal caloric intake on growth in scores on the…

  10. An In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of Caloric and Non-Caloric Sweeteners on Liver Lipid Metabolism in Rats.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Sharon; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wolters, Justina C; van Riel, Natal A; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2017-05-10

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or solutions containing 13% (w/v) glucose, 13% fructose, or 0.4% aspartame. After 7 weeks, in vivo hepatic dietary lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis were assessed with proton-observed, carbon-13-edited MRS combined with (13)C-labeled lipids and (13)C-labeled glucose, respectively. The molecular basis of alterations in hepatic liver metabolism was analyzed in detail ex vivo using immunoblotting and targeted quantitative proteomics. Both glucose and fructose feeding increased adiposity, but only fructose induced hepatic lipid accumulation. In vivo MRS showed that this was not caused by increased hepatic uptake of dietary lipids, but could be attributed to an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Stimulation of lipogenesis by fructose was confirmed by a strong upregulation of lipogenic enzymes, which was more potent than with glucose. The non-caloric sweetener aspartame did not significantly affect liver lipid content or metabolism. In conclusion, liquid fructose more severely affected liver lipid metabolism in rats than glucose, while aspartame had no effect.

  11. An In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of Caloric and Non-Caloric Sweeteners on Liver Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Sharon; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wolters, Justina C.; van Riel, Natal A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or solutions containing 13% (w/v) glucose, 13% fructose, or 0.4% aspartame. After 7 weeks, in vivo hepatic dietary lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis were assessed with proton-observed, carbon-13-edited MRS combined with 13C-labeled lipids and 13C-labeled glucose, respectively. The molecular basis of alterations in hepatic liver metabolism was analyzed in detail ex vivo using immunoblotting and targeted quantitative proteomics. Both glucose and fructose feeding increased adiposity, but only fructose induced hepatic lipid accumulation. In vivo MRS showed that this was not caused by increased hepatic uptake of dietary lipids, but could be attributed to an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Stimulation of lipogenesis by fructose was confirmed by a strong upregulation of lipogenic enzymes, which was more potent than with glucose. The non-caloric sweetener aspartame did not significantly affect liver lipid content or metabolism. In conclusion, liquid fructose more severely affected liver lipid metabolism in rats than glucose, while aspartame had no effect. PMID:28489050

  12. Effects of caloric deprivation and satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system

    PubMed Central

    Zverev, Yuriy P

    2004-01-01

    Background Sensitivity of the gustatory system could be modulated by a number of short-term and long-term factors such as body mass, gender, age, local and systemic diseases and pathological processes, excessive alcohol drinking, drug dependence, smoking, composition of oral fluid, state of oral hygiene, consumption of some foods among many others. A few studies have demonstrated the effects of hunger and caloric satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system in obese humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of short-term caloric deprivation and satiety on recognition taste thresholds of healthy, non-smoking, non-drinking, non-obese young male subjects. The two-alternative forced-choice technique was used to measure taste threshold. Results Recognition thresholds for sucrose and salt were significantly lower during fasting state than after a meal (t = 2.23, P < 0.05, and t = 2.86, P < 0.02, respectively) while the values of recognition thresholds for bitter substances in fasting state and after caloric loading did not differ significantly. Conclusions Short-term caloric deprivation in our study model was associated with increased taste sensitivity to sweet and salty substances compared to satiated state while taste sensitivity to bitter substances was not affected by the conditions of measurements. Selective modulation of sensitivity of the gustatory system might reflect the different biological importance of salty, sweet and bitter qualities of taste. PMID:15028115

  13. Effect of solids, caloric content on dual-phase gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Maegdenbergh, V.; Urbain, J.L.; Siegel, J.A.; Mortelmans, L.; De Roo, M. Temple Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The dual-phase gastric emptying technique is routinely employed to determine the differential emptying of solids and liquids in a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal diseases. Composition, acidity, volume, caloric density, physical form and viscosity of the test means have been shown to be important determinants for the quantitative evaluation of gastric emptying. In this study, the authors have evaluated the effect of increasing the caloric content of the solid portion of a physiologic test mean on both solid and liquid emptying kinetics in health male volunteers. They observed that increasing solid caloric content delayed emptying of both solids and liquids. For the solid phase, the delay was accounted for by a longer lag phase and decrease in emptying rate; for liquids a longer emptying rate was also obtained. They conclude that modification of the caloric content of the solid portion of a meal not only affects the emptying of the solid phase but also alters the emptying of the liquid component of the meal.

  14. Vestibular reactions to long-term caloric stimulation of the rabbit labyrinth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorgiladze, G. I.

    1978-01-01

    Long-term, periodically repeated caloric stimulation of the labyrinth receptors of the internal ear was studied on eight rabbits with immobilzed heads. Warm (20 C) water was used as a stimulus in a dose of 40 ml per min injected into the auditory meatus.

  15. The effects of a discretionary food allowance during a caloric restriction regimen with provided food

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of self-selected discretionary foods in a structured energy restricted diet on adherence to a caloric restriction (CR) regimen, dietary satisfaction, and weight loss were studied in 32 healthy, overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2) adults, aged 20-42y participating in the CALERIE trial. Subjects ...

  16. Cardiac Frequency and Caloric Cost of Aerobic Dancing in Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Deborah J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of cardiac frequency during aerobic dancing indicated that it can sustain an elevated cardiac frequency in most cases. The caloric cost of aerobic dancing is approximately 50 percent greater than an equal duration of barre and center-floor exercise by elite ballet dancers. (JD)

  17. Benefits of caloric restriction in the myenteric neuronal plasticity in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joice N B; Mari, Renata B; Stabille, Sandra R; de Faria, Haroldo G; Mota, Thais F M; Ferreira, Walter M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is a biologic process characterized by progressive damage of structures and functions of organic systems. In gastrointestinal tract, it can involve enteric nervous system, which plays an important role in digestion and absorption of nutrients, causing hastening of intestinal transit thus reducing its absorptive function. Caloric restriction has been used in several studies with the intention of delaying deleterious effects of aging. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of caloric restriction on myenteric neurons of ileum by aging in rats. 30 Wistar rats were grouped as follows: GI (animals aged 6 months fed with normal diet), GII (animals aged 18 months fed with normal diet) and GIII (animals aged 18 months subject to 31% of caloric restriction). The rats of the GI group were euthanized at 6 months of age and after experimental period of 12 months animals of the group GII and GIII were euthanized, the ileum of all groups were collected, measured and processed by NADPH-dp and Acetylcholinesterase. Quantitative analysis of neurons revealed that aging promotes the increasing of myenteric neurons NADPH-dp and reduces Acetylcholinesterase neuronal population. However, in the cellular profile area, were not observed significant differences between the groups. The caloric restriction has been efficient and can be used preventively because it minimizes quantitative changes associated with aging on ileum myenteric plexuses.

  18. Thermoregulatory, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Responses to Mild Caloric Restriction in the Brown Norway Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to prolong the life span of a variety of species. CR-induced reduction in core temperature (Tc) is considered a key mechanism responsible for prolonging life span in rodents; however, little is known on the regulation of CR-induced h...

  19. Brainstem injury associated with supratentorial lesions is revealed by electronystagmography of the cold caloric reflex test

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qizhi; Qi, Zhiguo; Yang, Ruirui; Cheng, Ke; Yang, Yongtao; Xie, Peng

    2017-01-01

    To explore the brainstem injury associated with supratentorial lesions, we conducted analysis of ICP levels and detected ENG parameters by using the cold caloric reflex test and histopathological examinations of the brainstem. Rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage was well-established in the study of supratentorial lesions of varying severities (n=210). Intracerebral pressure monitoring and electronystagmography of the cold caloric reflex test were simultaneously performed in animals. Apoptotic, immunohistochemical, and histopathological changes in different segments of the brainstem were investigated at various time intervals. Electronystagmography parameters were analyzed by cold caloric reflex test. The result showed that the increase of intracerebral pressure was correlated with lesion severity including elevating levels and rostral-caudal progression of neuronal apoptosis, demyelination, N-methyl-D-aspartate cell receptor down-regulation (r=0.815), and histopathological changes. Mutiple discrimination analysis of electronystagmography parameters presented a diagnostic accuracy rate of 79.5% in localizing brainstem injury. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that electronystagmography monitoring along with the cold caloric reflex test performed a favorable effect on the estimation of brainstem injury in ICH rat model, which provided a potential bedside diagnostic tool to assess and predict the progress of supratentorial lesion patient in future. PMID:28559965

  20. SIRT2 deacetylates FOXO3a in response to oxidative stress and caloric restriction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sirtuin family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent (NAD) deacetylases plays an important role in aging and metabolic regulation. In yeast, the Sir2 gene and its homolog Hst2 independently mediate the action of caloric restriction on lifespan extension. The mammalian Sir2 ortholog, SIR...

  1. The Effect of the Presence of Others on Caloric Intake in Homebound Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Julie L.; Robinson, Caroline O.; Roth, David L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Burgio, Kathryn L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Undernutrition in homebound older adults is a significant problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the presence of others, both within the household and during meals, on caloric intake in homebound older adults. Methods In-depth interviews and three 24-hour dietary recalls were obtained from 50 older adults who were receiving home health services. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize participants, and hierarchical linear modeling was performed to evaluate predictors of caloric intake per meal. Results Participants’ mean age was 77. Females composed 65% and African Americans composed 42% of the sample. Analyses are based on 553 meal observations. The majority (84%) of participants consumed all meals for each of the 3 days of data collection; however, they consumed an average of only 1305 calories per day. Hierarchical linear modeling analysis indicated that persons who had others present during meals consumed an average of 114.0 calories more per meal than those who ate alone (p = .009) and that women consumed 76.7 fewer calories per meal than did men (p = .045). The presence of others within the household had no effect on caloric intake. Conclusion This research suggests that a simple and inexpensive way to increase caloric intake in homebound older adults is to make arrangements for family members or caregivers to eat with them. PMID:16339337

  2. Sex-related differences in energy balance in response to caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Català-Niell, A; Colom, B; García-Palmer, F J; Oliver, J; Roca, P

    2005-07-01

    Sex-related differences in energy balance were studied in young Wistar rats fed standard chow pellets either ad libitum or in restricted amounts (60% of ad libitum intake) for 100 days. Caloric intake, indirect calorimetry, organ and adipose tissue weights, energy efficiency, liver mitochondrial respiration rate, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) content were measured. Ad libitum-fed females showed greater oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and carbon dioxide production (Vco(2)) and lower energy efficiency than males. Caloric restriction induced a chronic drop of Vo(2) and Vco(2) in females but not in males over the period studied. Restricted females showed a better conservation of metabolic active organ mass and a greater decrease in adipose depots than restricted males. Moreover, changes of BAT size and UCP1 content suggest that BAT may be the main cause responsible for sex differences in the response of energy balance to caloric restriction. In conclusion, our results indicate that females under caloric restriction conditions deactivate facultative thermogenesis to a greater degree than males. This ability may have obvious advantages for female survival and therefore the survival of the species when food is limiting.

  3. Long–term effects of caloric restriction on total and resting energy expenditure in healthy adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of long-term caloric restriction (CR) on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) in humans is uncertain. Objective To examine the effects of a 30% CR regimen on TEE and RMR. Methods One year randomized controlled trial of 30% CR in 29 healthy overweight adults (me...

  4. Caloric estimation of healthy and unhealthy foods in normal-weight, overweight and obese participants.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Derek; Martin, Colin R

    2016-12-01

    Individuals make dietary choices each time they consume food or drink, and assign labels to each item, such as un/healthy, high/low in calories, high/low in nutrients. These labels are thought to be snap judgments based on prior, and often limited nutritional knowledge. The aim of this study was to examine the perception of the caloric content of 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' foods. Participants (N=141) rated 53 food images on perceived healthiness/un-healthiness alongside the caloric content. Participants were subdivided into three groups: BMI (normal-weight, overweight, obese). Findings suggest that weight status impacts on participant's caloric estimation of foods perceived as healthy, but only marginally for unhealthy foods. However, not all foods were consistently labeled as healthy or unhealthy, on these occasions weight salience appears not to have influenced estimations of caloric content. Foods that confound the dichotomous labeling of healthy or unhealthy appear to gain a 'branding' that confers either greater or fewer calories than they actually contain, on these occasions weight salience does not appear to influence the labeling; implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiac Frequency and Caloric Cost of Aerobic Dancing in Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Deborah J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of cardiac frequency during aerobic dancing indicated that it can sustain an elevated cardiac frequency in most cases. The caloric cost of aerobic dancing is approximately 50 percent greater than an equal duration of barre and center-floor exercise by elite ballet dancers. (JD)

  6. Resource availability hypothesis: Perceived financial and caloric status affect individuals' height preferences for potential partners.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingzhou; Lou, Liandi; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhong, Jun; Tan, Xuyun; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Yongfang

    2016-10-01

    Height is an important concern in human mate choices. Prior research indicates that people who live in areas with abundant resources differ from those who live in areas with scarce resources regarding height preferences. Based on a health-maximizing principle, we propose a resource availability account for such differences. Compared with women's height preferences, men's height preferences are hypothesized to be more dependent on either financial or caloric resource availability. Specifically, taller females would be more preferred by males who are poor in resources than those who are rich in resources. Results from three studies supported these hypotheses. In Study 1, men from remote areas of China who had lower family income preferred taller women more than those from eastern China who had higher family income. In Study 2, men who were financially dissatisfied preferred taller women more than those who were financially satisfied. In Study 3, men with low caloric status preferred taller women more than men with high caloric status. In addition, women's height preferences in Studies 1, 2 and 3 were less determined by resource availability. These findings suggest that height preferences are changeable, depending on financial or caloric status.

  7. Thermoregulatory, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Responses to Mild Caloric Restriction in the Brown Norway Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to prolong the life span of a variety of species. CR-induced reduction in core temperature (Tc) is considered a key mechanism responsible for prolonging life span in rodents; however, little is known on the regulation of CR-induced h...

  8. Variations of body composition, physical activity and caloric intake in schoolchildren during national holidays.

    PubMed

    Cristi-Montero, Carlos; Munizaga, Cristian; Tejos, Constanza; Ayala, Raquel; Henríquez, Raúl; Solís-Urra, Patricio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Scientific literature has described that a significant body weight increase in schoolchildren occurs during some holiday periods (summer, winter, and thanksgiving holidays), harming their health. In this regard, it is thought that this phenomenon is mainly due to changes in eating habits and the variation in levels of physical activity; however, this approach has not yet been explored during national holidays (NAH) in Chile. To determine any changes in body composition, physical activity and caloric intake during NAH. A total of 46 schoolchildren (24 boys, age 10.5 ± 0.5; BMI 21.7 ± 4.7) participated. Measurements were performed 2 days before and after the NAH (9 days). Weight was measured and fat percentage was established using the Slaughter formula. Levels of physical activity were measured with accelerometers, validating 3 weekdays and 1 weekend; caloric intake was established through a 24-h recall. Weight, percentage of fat and caloric intake increased significantly (250 g, 2.2 % and 733.3 kcal, respectively; p < 0.05); however, none of the variables of physical activity showed significant changes. The change in caloric intake seems to be the main cause of weight and fat gain during the NAH.

  9. 3D analysis of human locomotion before and after caloric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Kumakura, H; Hirokawa, Y; Yamamoto, K; Imai, T; Hirasaki, E

    1997-03-01

    Human locomotion was analysed in the sagittal and coronal planes using a position detector system composed of 2 infrared video cameras and a data processor. Normal healthy volunteers with 8 marker points on the body were asked to walk in place (WIP) and on a treadmill (WOT). Vertical and medial/lateral (M/L) translational movements were measured. Head angular movements in the sagittal (pitch) and coronal (roll) planes were also analysed. Pitch movements counteracted the vertical head movements. Head movement was remarkably attenuated in the vertical axis compared with that of the trunk. However, head M/L movement showed no difference with that of the lower part of the body. Ice water caloric stimulation was introduced to cause acute unilateral vestibular deficit. The stride length and step cycle became small after caloric stimulation in WOT, but not in WIP. The characteristic change in locomotive pattern was a large lateral sway of the hip joint occurring to the side away from calorization (right) during one foot standing (right foot) (t-test, p = 0.057). Measurement of M/L sway amplitude showed an increase only at the hip joint. As the changes in head and neck movements were not significant after caloric stimulation, it appears that the vestibulo-spinal reflex contributes little to maintaining the dynamic balance of the upper body. The importance of the hip joint for locomotion (hip strategy) was confirmed from the present data.

  10. Change in the Rate of Biological Aging in Response to Caloric Restriction: CALERIE Biobank Analysis.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Huffman, Kim M; Pieper, Carl F; Shalev, Idan; Kraus, William E

    2017-05-22

    Biological aging measures have been proposed as proxies for extension of healthy lifespan in trials of geroprotective therapies that aim to slow aging. Several methods to measure biological aging show promise; but it is not known if these methods are sensitive to changes caused by geroprotective therapy. We conducted analysis of two proposed methods to quantify biological aging using data from a recently concluded trial of an established geroprotector, caloric restriction. We obtained data from the National Institute on Aging CALERIE randomized trial through its public-access biobank (https://calerie.duke.edu/). The CALERIE trial randomized N=220 non-obese adults to 25% caloric restriction (n=145; 11.7% caloric restriction was achieved, on average) or to maintain current diet (n=75) for two years. We analyzed biomarker data collected at baseline, 12-, and 24-month follow-up assessments. We applied published biomarker algorithms to these data to calculate two biological age measures, Klemera-Doubal Method Biological Age and homeostatic dysregulation. Intent-to-treat analysis using mixed-effects growth models of within-person change over time tested if caloric restriction slowed increase in measures of biological aging across follow-up. Analyses of both measures indicated caloric restriction slowed biological aging. Weight loss did not account for the observed effects. Results suggest future directions for testing of geroprotective therapies in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The publics' understanding of daily caloric recommendations and their perceptions of calorie posting in chain restaurants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Calorie posting in chain restaurants has received increasing attention as a policy lever to reduce energy intake. Little research has assessed consumer understanding of overall daily energy requirements or perceived effectiveness of calorie posting. Methods A phone survey was conducted from May 1 through 17, 2009 with 663 randomly selected, nationally-representative adults aged 18 and older, including an oversample of Blacks and Hispanics in the United States. To examine differences in responses by race and ethnicity (White, Black, and Hispanic) and gender, we compared responses by conducting chi-squared tests for differences in proportions. Results We found that most Americans were knowledgeable about energy requirements for moderately active men (78%) and women (69%), but underestimated energy requirements for inactive adults (60%). Whites had significantly higher caloric literacy and confidence about their caloric knowledge than Blacks and Hispanics (p < 0.05). As compared to their counterparts, Blacks, Hispanics and women reported a significantly higher likelihood of eating at a chain restaurant and of selecting lower calorie foods where caloric information was posted. Most Americans favored the government requiring chain restaurants to post calorie information on menus at the point of purchase (68%). Support for government mandated calorie posting in chain restaurants was significantly higher among Blacks, Hispanics and women as compared to their counterparts. The public was divided about the mode of caloric information that would best help them make a lower calorie decision; a third favored number of calories (35%) which is the current standard mode of presenting caloric information in chain restaurants, a third favored a physical activity equivalent (26%), and a third favored percentage of total energy intake (39%). Conclusion Mandating calorie posting in chain restaurants may be a useful policy tool for promoting energy balance, particularly

  12. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    SciTech Connect

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-07-11

    Here, caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s).

  13. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    DOE PAGES

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-07-11

    Here, caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by verymore » small perturbations of the driving field(s).« less

  14. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    SciTech Connect

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-07-11

    Here, caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s).

  15. Parental attachment insecurity predicts child and adult high-caloric food consumption.

    PubMed

    Faber, Aida; Dubé, Laurette

    2015-05-01

    Eating habits are established early and are difficult to change once formed. This study investigated the role of caregiver-child attachment quality and its associations with high-caloric food consumption in a sample of middle socio-economic status children and adults, respectively. Survey data were collected from an online questionnaire administered separately to 213 (143 girls) children and 216 parents (adult sample; 180 women). Two studies showed that an insecure parental attachment, whether actual (Study 1; children) or recalled (Study 2; adults), significantly and positively predicted high-caloric food consumption in both samples. The present findings highlight the importance of parental attachment and its association with unhealthy eating patterns in children and adults.

  16. Mechanism‐Based Modeling of Gastric Emptying Rate and Gallbladder Emptying in Response to Caloric Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, DP; Hansen, M; Bagger, JI; Lund, A; Rehfeld, JF; Alskär, O; Karlsson, MO; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, FK; Bergstrand, M

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids released postprandially modify the rate and extent of absorption of lipophilic compounds. The present study aimed to predict gastric emptying (GE) rate and gallbladder emptying (GBE) patterns in response to caloric intake. A mechanism‐based model for GE, cholecystokinin plasma concentrations, and GBE was developed on data from 33 patients with type 2 diabetes and 33 matched nondiabetic individuals who were administered various test drinks. A feedback action of the caloric content entering the proximal small intestine was identified for the rate of GE. The cholecystokinin concentrations were not predictive of GBE, and an alternative model linking the nutrients amount in the upper intestine to GBE was preferred. Relative to fats, the potency on GBE was 68% for proteins and 2.3% for carbohydrates. The model predictions were robust across a broad range of nutritional content and may potentially be used to predict postprandial changes in drug absorption. PMID:28028939

  17. Mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast chronological life span and its extension by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Shadel, Gerald S; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-07-03

    We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases and determining how this affects chronological life span (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity, and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS. Extension of CLS by caloric restriction also required respiration above a similar threshold during exponential growth and completely alleviated the need for respiration in the stationary phase. Finally, we show that supplementation of media with 1% trehalose, a storage carbohydrate, restores wild-type CLS to respiratory-null cells. We conclude that mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast CLS and its extension by caloric restriction by increasing stress resistance, an important component of which is the optimal accumulation and mobilization of nutrient stores.

  18. Non-caloric artificial sweeteners and the microbiome: findings and challenges.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are common food supplements consumed by millions worldwide as means of combating weight gain and diabetes, by retaining sweet taste without increasing caloric intake. While they are considered safe, there is increasing controversy regarding their potential ability to promote metabolic derangements in some humans. We recently demonstrated that NAS consumption could induce glucose intolerance in mice and distinct human subsets, by functionally altering the gut microbiome. In this commentary, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent works demonstrating the effects of NAS on host health and the microbiome, and the challenges and open questions that need to be addressed in understanding the effects of NAS consumption on human health.

  19. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s). This article is part of the themed issue ‘Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials’. PMID:27402923

  20. Mitochondrial Respiratory Thresholds Regulate Yeast Chronological Lifespan and its Extension by Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Schroeder, Elizabeth A.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases, and determining how this affects chronological lifespan (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS. Extension of CLS by caloric restriction also required respiration above a similar threshold during exponential growth, and completely alleviated the need for respiration in stationary phase. Finally, we show that media supplementation with 1% trehalose, a storage carbohydrate, restores wild-type CLS to respiratory null cells. We conclude that mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast CLS and its extension by caloric restriction by increasing stress resistance, an important component of which is the optimal accumulation and mobilization of nutrient stores. PMID:22768839

  1. Non-caloric artificial sweeteners and the microbiome: findings and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are common food supplements consumed by millions worldwide as means of combating weight gain and diabetes, by retaining sweet taste without increasing caloric intake. While they are considered safe, there is increasing controversy regarding their potential ability to promote metabolic derangements in some humans. We recently demonstrated that NAS consumption could induce glucose intolerance in mice and distinct human subsets, by functionally altering the gut microbiome. In this commentary, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent works demonstrating the effects of NAS on host health and the microbiome, and the challenges and open questions that need to be addressed in understanding the effects of NAS consumption on human health. PMID:25831243

  2. [Comparison of caloric responses between vestibular migraine and Ménière disease patients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuechang; Zhuang, Jianhua; Zhou, Lili; Tong, Bei; Zhou, Xiaowen; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    To compare the features of caloric tests in vestibular migraine (VM) and Menière's disease (MD) patients, and provide objective evidence for differentiating the 2 groups of patients. This case-control study included 11 MD patients with left ear involved and mild to moderate impaired hearing, and 18 matched cases with VM. All participants received caloric tests. Maximum slow phase velocities (SPVmax) were used to describe horizontal and vertical nystagmus respectively and were compared between the 2 groups. Horizontal and vertical canal parasis(CP) were calculated according to respective SPVmax. Unilateral (UW-VR) or bilateral (BW-VR) weakness of vestibular response, and positive unilateral (UVR) or bilateral (BVR) vertical response or negative bilateral vertical response (NBVR) were judged by the boundary point of SPVmax of 5°/s respectively. Total left (LV) or right (RV) Vertical reactions were calculated accoeding to vertical SPVmax,and inter ears difference of vertical responses (IED-VR) calculated from LV minus RV. There were no significant differences in age and gender between the 2 groups. Horizontal SPVmax of all of caloric tests of VM group,except the left cold (LC), were statistically larger than that of MD group (P < 0.05) and the maximum responses of right warm (RW) caloric test in VM group (34.50 ± 17.77) were significantly greater than that in MD group (12.82 ± 6.69) (P < 0.01). Only the vertical SPVmax of RW of all caloric tests has statistically difference between the 2 groups (P < 0.01), and the maximum responses of RW caloric test in VM group (6.00 ± 4.45) were significantly stronger than that of LC in MD group (1.27 ± 2.00) (P < 0.01). Horizontal CP ≥ 25% of the 2 groups(VM: 72.22%, MD: 54.55%) were not statistically different, while the proportions of UW-VR and BW-VR in VM group (5.56%, 0) were significantly lower than that in MD group (27.27%, 18.18%) (P < 0.05). Vertical CP ≥ 25% of the 2 groups (VM: 94.44%, MD: 27.27%) were

  3. The fine line between lifespan extension and shortening in response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Kirk; Mekhail, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is generally linked to lifespan extension in various organisms and may limit age-associated diseases. Processes through which caloric restriction promotes lifespan include obesity-countering weight loss, increased DNA repair, control of ribosomal and telomeric DNA repeats, mitochondrial regulation, activation of antioxidants, and protective autophagy. Several of these protective cellular processes are linked to the suppression of TOR (target of rapamycin) or the activation of sirtuins. In stark contrast, CR fails to extend or even shortens lifespan in certain settings. CR-dependent lifespan shortening is linked to weight loss in the non-obese, mitochondrial hyperactivity, genomic inflexibility, and several other processes. Deciphering the balance between positive and negative effects of CR is critical to understanding its ultimate impact on aging. This knowledge is especially needed in order to fulfil the promise of using CR or its mimetic drugs to counteract age-associated diseases and unhealthy aging. PMID:24637399

  4. Influence of meal weight and caloric content on gastric emptying of meals in man

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Christian, P.E.; Brown, J.A.; Brophy, C.; Datz, F.; Taylor, A.; Alazraki, N.

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the relative influence of meal weight and caloric content on gastric emptying of liquid and solid meals in man. A dual radioisotopic method which permits noninvasive and simultaneous measurement of liquid- and solid-phase emptying by external gamma camera techniques was employed. Nine healthy volunteer subjects ingested 50-, 300-, and 900-g lettuce and water meals adjusted to either 68, 208, or 633 kcal with added salad oil. The following observations were made: (1) absolute emptying rates (grams of solid food emptied from the stomach per minute) increased directly and significantly with meal weight; (2) increasing meal total caloric content significantly slowed solid food gastric emptying but did not overcome the enhancing effect of meal weight; and (3) liquid emptying rates were uninfluenced by meal total kcal amount.

  5. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D

    2016-08-13

    Caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s).This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. The minimal caloric test asymmetric response in vertigo-free migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2016-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms and subclinical vestibular dysfunctions may occur in migraine. The Minimal Caloric Test (MCT), an easy-to-perform, convenient and yet informative procedure was used to test the vestibular function in 30 vertigo-free migraine patients outside attacks and 30 paired controls. Although not statistically significant, a right-to-left nystagmus duration asymmetry greater than 25% was present in both groups. This difference was greater in the patients group, suggesting the presence of subclinical vestibular imbalance in migraine.

  7. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients. PMID:27746761

  8. The influence of caffeine on calorics and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs).

    PubMed

    McNerney, Kathleen; Coad, Mary Lou; Burkard, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Prior to undergoing vestibular function testing, it is not uncommon for clinicians to request that patients abstain from caffeine 24 hr prior to the administration of the tests. However, there is little evidence that caffeine affects vestibular function. To evaluate whether the results from two tests commonly used in a clinical setting to assess vestibular function (i.e., calorics and the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential [cVEMP]) are affected by caffeine. Subjects were tested with and without consuming a moderate amount of caffeine prior to undergoing calorics and cVEMPs. Thirty young healthy controls (mean = 23.28 yr; females = 21). Subjects were excluded if they reported any history of vestibular/balance impairment. The Variotherm Plus Caloric Irrigator was used to administer the water, while the I-Portal VNG software was used to collect and analyze subjects' eye movements. The TECA Evoked Potential System was used for the cVEMP stimulus presentation as well as for the data collection. During cVEMP collection, subjects were asked to monitor their sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction with a Delsys EMG monitor. IBM SPSS Statistics 20 was used to statistically analyze the results via paired t-tests. Analysis of the data revealed that ingestion of caffeine did not significantly influence the results of either test of vestibular function. The results revealed that a moderate amount of caffeine does not have a clinically significant effect on the results from caloric and cVEMP tests in young healthy adults. Future research is necessary to determine whether similar results would be obtained from individuals with a vestibular impairment, as well as older adults. American Academy of Audiology.

  9. Caloric content of Chukchi Sea benthic invertebrates: Modeling spatial and environmental variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, Lisa M.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Miller, Thomas J.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2014-04-01

    The Chukchi Sea shelf off the northern coast of Alaska is rich with infauna and epibenthic macroinvertebrates used by foraging Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and other benthic-feeding consumers. Recent seasonal sea-ice retreat on the Chukchi Sea shelf has resulted in walrus hauling out in late summer on beaches of the Chukchi Sea in Russia and Alaska rather than on sea ice. Additional energetic costs may be imposed upon walruses traveling from these haul-outs to more productive foraging areas. Here, we provide an energetic assessment of prey items that could be relevant to the foraging energetics of walruses in haul-out locations. Caloric values for 171 potential walrus prey items (comprising 11 classes of benthic fauna) were obtained over 15 southeastern Chukchi Sea stations in 2010. There were statistically significant relationships between caloric content and increasing latitude (R=0.661) and bottom temperature (R=-0.560). Linear modeling indicated that taxon and latitude were the most important explanatory variables for caloric content in the study area, whereas a second model with taxon dependencies removed returned significant coefficients for the explanatory variables of latitude, depth, bottom water temperature, and sediment total organic carbon and nitrogen. K-means cluster analysis identified 6 clusters based mainly upon environmental variables such as bottom temperature, bottom salinity, and other water-column and sediment parameters that explained 86% of the variation in the data. The finding that caloric content varies strongly with latitude, which is a proxy for both water-mass type and associated water-mass productivity in the study area, may have implications for Pacific walrus, whose historical foraging patterns well offshore on sea ice have been disrupted by sea-ice decline.

  10. Elemental composition, biochemical composition and caloric value of Antarctic krill.: Implications in Energetics and carbon balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färber-Lorda, Jaime; Gaudy, Raymond; Mayzaud, P.

    2009-11-01

    Samples of Antarctic krill were analyzed for elemental composition, biochemical composition, weight and caloric content. Sexes and maturity stages were separated. Mature females showed the highest caloric values (Joules) and juveniles the lowest in a per animal basis. On unit of wet weight per animal basis, spent females showed the lowest caloric values. For the caloric values by animal, a significant difference was found between males, mature females, spent females and juveniles, either on a per animal basis or in the basis of 1 g of wet weight, showing a real difference between the groups, regardless of their individual size. Significant differences were found for carbon, nitrogen and lipids, but not for proteins, analyzed in % of dry weight. Carbon was lowest for spent females and highest for mature females. On the contrary, nitrogen values were lowest for mature females and highest for males. Mature females had the highest lipid content and males the lowest. All variables were significantly correlated. For the linear regression analysis, the best correlation found was between Joules and carbon, followed by carbon vs. dry weight and Joules vs. dry weight. In an analysis with two independent variables, the best correlation was found for Joules vs. lipids and dry weight, followed by Joules vs. carbon and nitrogen, and Joules vs. lipids and proteins. The results obtained were used to make an analysis of the energy and carbon fluxes through the food chain in the sampled area, showing higher energetic and carbon "densities" in frontal areas, the POM calorific values showed an opposite pattern than that of krill.

  11. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  12. Caloric Value of Some Forest Fuels of the Southern United States

    Treesearch

    Walter A. Hough

    1969-01-01

    The caloric value of a variety of southern forest fuels was determined in an oxygen bomb calorimeter. High heat values ranged between about 3,600 and 5,200 cal./g. for fuels as sampled and between 4,500 and 5,600 cal./g. for fuels on an ash-free basis. Additional tests of forest fuels from the Southern, Eastern, and North Central United States showed a...

  13. Perovskite-like fluorides and oxyfluorides: Phase transitions and caloric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flerov, I. N.; Gorev, M. V.; Tressaud, A.; Laptash, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the effect that chemical and hydrostatic pressures have on the thermodynamic properties of perovskite-like fluorine-oxygen compounds A 2 A' MeO x F6 - x has revealed that materials under-going order-disorder transitions and having significant external-pressure compliance have the highest caloric efficiency. Some of the fluorides and oxyfluorides under study can be considered promising solid coolants.

  14. Subjective Visual Vertical during Caloric Stimulation in Healthy Subjects: Implications to Research and Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Funabashi, Martha; Flores, Aline I.; Vicentino, Amanda; Barros, Camila G. C.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Leite, João P.; Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) is a perception often impaired in patients with neurologic disorders and is considered a sensitive tool to detect otolithic dysfunctions. However, it remains unclear whether the semicircular canals (SCCs) are also involved in the visual vertical perception. Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of horizontal SCCs on SVV by caloric stimulation in healthy subjects. Methods. SVV was performed before and during the ice-cold caloric stimulation (4°C, right ear) in 30 healthy subjects. Results. The mean SVV tilts before and during the caloric stimulation were 0.31° ± 0.39 and −0.28° ± 0.40, respectively. There was no significant difference between the mean SVV tilts before and during stimulation (p = 0.113). Conclusion. These results suggest that horizontal SCCs do not influence SVV. Therefore, investigations and rehabilitation approaches for SVV misperceptions should be focused on otolithic and cognitive strategies. PMID:26161271

  15. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  16. Caloric restriction-induced life extension of rats and mice: a critique of proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Masoro, Edward J

    2009-10-01

    In 1935, Clive McCay and colleagues reported that decreasing the food intake of rats extends their life. This finding has been confirmed many times using rat and mouse models. The responsible dietary factor in rats is the reduced intake of energy; thus, this phenomenon is frequently referred to as caloric restriction. Although many hypotheses have been proposed during the past 74 years regarding the underlying mechanism, it is still not known. It is proposed that this lack of progress relates to the fact that most of these hypotheses have been based on a single underlying mechanism and that this is too narrow a focus. Rather, a broad framework is needed. Hormesis has been suggested as providing such a framework. Although it is likely that hormesis is involved in the actions of caloric restriction, it also is probably too narrowly focused. Based on currently available data, a provisional broad framework is presented depicting the complex of mechanisms that likely underlie the life-extending and other anti-aging actions of caloric restriction.

  17. Peripheral ghrelin enhances sweet taste food consumption and preference, regardless of its caloric content.

    PubMed

    Disse, Emmanuel; Bussier, Anne-Lise; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Deblon, Nicolas; Pfluger, Paul T; Tschöp, Matthias H; Laville, Martine; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Ghrelin is one of the most potent orexigens known to date. While the prevailing view is that ghrelin participates in the homeostatic control of feeding, the question arose as to whether consummatory responses evoked by this compound could be related to search for reward. We therefore attempted to delineate the involvement of ghrelin in the modulation of non-caloric but highly rewarding consumption. We tested the effect of intraperitoneally injected ghrelin on the acceptance and preference for a 0.3% saccharin solution using single bottle tests and free-choice preference test procedures in C57BL6/J mice, as well as in mice lacking the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a -/-) and their wild-type (WT) littermates. In the single bottle tests, peripheral ghrelin consistently increased the consumption of saccharin, independently of availability of caloric food. In the free-choice preference test procedures, ghrelin increased the preference for saccharin in WT mice, while it did had not effect in GHSR1a -/-animals, indicating that the ghrelin receptor pathway is necessary to mediate this parameter. Peripheral ghrelin enhances intake and preference for a sweet food, regardless of whether the food has caloric content. This effect, mediated through the ghrelin receptor pathway, may serve as additional enhancers of energy intake. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  19. Normal physical activity obliterates the deleterious effects of a high-caloric intake.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Maria; Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine Haugaard; Hansen, Louise Seier; Karstoft, Kristian; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Thomsen, Carsten; Holst, Jens Juul; Pedersen, Bente K

    2014-02-01

    A high-caloric intake combined with a sedentary lifestyle is an important player in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was undertaken to examine if the level of physical activity has impact on the metabolic effects of a high-caloric (+2,000 kcal/day) intake. Therefore, healthy individuals on a high-caloric intake were randomized to either 10,000 or 1,500 steps/day for 14 days. Step number, total energy expenditure, dietary records, neuropsychological tests, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max), whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with stable isotopes were performed before and after the intervention. Both study groups gained the same amount of body weight. However, the inactive group accumulated significantly more visceral fat compared with the active group. Following the 2-wk period, the inactive group also experienced a poorer glycemic control, increased endogenous glucose production, decreased hepatic insulin extraction, increased baseline plasma levels of total cholesterol and LDL, and a decreased cognitive function with regard to capacity of attention. In conclusion, we find evidence to support that habitual physical activity may prevent pathophysiological symptoms associated with diet-induced obesity.

  20. Weight cycling and cancer: weighing the evidence of intermittent caloric restriction and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adverse effects of weight cycling on energy metabolism remain largely unsubstantiated, there is also a lack of epidemiologic evidence that intentional weight loss followed by regain of weight affects chronic-disease risk. In the limited studies of weight cycling and cancer, no independent effect on postmenopausal breast cancer but a modest enhancement of risk for renal cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have been reported. An effect of either intermittent caloric restriction or fasting in protecting against cancer is not supported by the majority of rodent carcinogenesis experiments. Collectively, the data argue against weight cycling and indicate that the objective of energy balance-based approaches to reduce cancer risk should be to strive to prevent adult weight gain and maintain body weight within the normal range defined by body mass index.

  1. Molecular Links between Caloric Restriction and Sir2/SIRT1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is the most significant risk factor for a range of prevalent diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Accordingly, interventions are needed for delaying or preventing disorders associated with the ageing process, i.e., promotion of healthy ageing. Calorie restriction is the only nongenetic and the most robust approach to slow the process of ageing in evolutionarily divergent species, ranging from yeasts, worms, and flies to mammals. Although it has been known for more than 80 years that calorie restriction increases lifespan, a mechanistic understanding of this phenomenon remains elusive. Yeast silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), the founding member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases, and its mammalian homologue Sir2-like protein 1 (SIRT1), have been suggested to promote survival and longevity of organisms. SIRT1 exerts protective effects against a number of age-associated disorders. Caloric restriction increases both Sir2 and SIRT1 activity. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights between caloric restriction and Sir2/SIRT1 activation. A number of molecular links, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, biotin, and related metabolites, are suggested to be the most important conduits mediating caloric restriction-induced Sir2/SIRT1 activation and lifespan extension. PMID:25349818

  2. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. CALOR2012 XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Akchurin, Nural .

    2015-05-04

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, or the CALOR series, have always been where the calorimeter experts come together to review the state of calorimetry and bring forth new ideas every two years. The fteenth conference, CALOR2012, in Santa Fe was no exception. Although they were built roughly a decade ago, we are now witnessing the exceptional power of the LHC calorimeters and the crucial role they have been playing in the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs-like boson. As we ruminate on the coming generation of experiments at the next (linear) collider and on the upgrades at the LHC, we are heartened by the substantial advances we made in calorimetry in the last decade. These advances will certainly help uncover new physics in the years to come, not only at colliders but also in astroparticle experiments that take advantage of natural elements such as air, water, and ice. The proceedings were published by the IOP in Journal of Physics, Vol 404 2011. The conference web site is calor2012.ttu.edu.

  4. Acute caloric restriction improves glomerular filtration rate in patients with morbid obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Giordani, I; Malandrucco, I; Donno, S; Picconi, F; Di Giacinto, P; Di Flaviani, A; Chioma, L; Frontoni, S

    2014-04-01

    The role of caloric restriction in the improvement of renal function following bariatric surgery is still unclear; with some evidence showing that calorie restriction can reduce proteinuria. However, data on the impact of caloric restriction on renal function are still lacking. Renal function, as measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR), was evaluated in 14 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, morbid obesity and stage 2 chronic kidney disease before and after a 7-day very low-calory diet (VLCD). After the VLCD, both GFR and overall glucose disposal (M value) significantly increased from 72.6 ± 3.8 mL/min/1.73 m(-2) BSA to 86.9 ± 6.1 mL/min/1.73 m(-2) BSA (P=0.026) and from 979 ± 107 μmol/min(1)/m(2) BSA to 1205 ± 94 μmol/min(1)/m(2) BSA (P=0.008), respectively. A significant correlation was observed between the increase in GFR and the rise in M value (r=0.625, P=0.017). Our observation of improved renal function following acute caloric restriction before weight loss became relevant suggesting that calory restriction per se is able to affect renal function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Heavy metal content in sediments along the Calore river: relationships with physical-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, G; Papa, S; Sagnella, E; Fioretto, A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, trace metals contents (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) and physico-chemical parameters (nitrogen, organic and inorganic carbon, pH and particle size) in sediments samples along the Calore river were analyzed in two seasons. Sediment samples were collected in ten sites upstream and downstream of the city of Benevento and its industrial area, the confluence of Sabato and Tammaro tributaries, and the confluence of Calore and Volturno rivers. The highest contents of trace metals were found, generally, in the sites immediately downstream of industrial area and of Benevento city. The sites on the Tammaro and Sabato also showed relatively high contents of Ni and, only for Sabato sites, of Cr, and Fe. With the exception of Cd, the heavy metal contents were highest in the last site of Calore river, which therefore is a source of pollution to the Volturno river. Besides the sites downstream of Benevento city showed the higher pH values and also the highest contents of fine particles size and organic matter. Positive correlations among trace metals, organic substance, particle size sediments were found. The data obtained in this study were analyzed with reference to Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines and indicated moderate-to-high pollution by some trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu).

  6. Economic management of vertigo/dizziness disease in a county hospital: video-head-impulse test vs. caloric irrigation.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger A

    2015-10-01

    The video-head-impulse test (vHIT) is an important test for examining unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Alternatively, one can test for vestibular hypofunction with the caloric irrigation test. Various studies have shown that both tests may not always identify vestibular hypofunction; instead, the results of the tests might be contradictory. This retrospective study reproduces those finding in a much larger group of patients at a county hospital. 1063 patients were examined with the vHIT and bithermal caloric irrigation on the same day and analyzed with respect to side differences. Of those patients 13.3% had pathological vHIT and a caloric irrigation test, 4.6% a pathological vHIT only and 24.1% a pathologic caloric test only. As both tests might be necessary, we calculated the optimal sequence of the two examinations based on savings in time for the different disease groups. Especially in vestibular failure using the vHIT first and only applying the caloric irrigation in case of an unremarkable vHIT saves time and optimizes the diagnostic work up. In contrast, in Menière's disease and vestibular migraine testing caloric irrigation first might be more efficient.

  7. Saccharin and aspartame, compared with sucrose, induce greater weight gain in adult Wistar rats, at similar total caloric intake levels.

    PubMed

    Feijó, Fernanda de Matos; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Batista, Bruna Aparecida Melo; Neves, Alice Magagnin; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) can lead to weight gain, but evidence regarding their real effect in body weight and satiety is still inconclusive. Using a rat model, the present study compares the effect of saccharin and aspartame to sucrose in body weight gain and in caloric intake. Twenty-nine male Wistar rats received plain yogurt sweetened with 20% sucrose, 0.3% sodium saccharin or 0.4% aspartame, in addition to chow and water ad libitum, while physical activity was restrained. Measurements of cumulative body weight gain, total caloric intake, caloric intake of chow and caloric intake of sweetened yogurt were performed weekly for 12 weeks. Results showed that addition of either saccharin or aspartame to yogurt resulted in increased weight gain compared to addition of sucrose, however total caloric intake was similar among groups. In conclusion, greater weight gain was promoted by the use of saccharin or aspartame, compared with sucrose, and this weight gain was unrelated to caloric intake. We speculate that a decrease in energy expenditure or increase in fluid retention might be involved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Caloric beverages were major sources of energy among children and adults in Mexico, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Stern, Dalia; Piernas, Carmen; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-06-01

    Mexico, with 1 of the highest obesity prevalences in the world, instituted a 10% excise tax for any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) starting on 1 January 2014. Understanding the recent patterns and trends in beverage intake and sales in Mexico provides both background and baseline data for the importance of SSBs and other beverages in the Mexican diet. We analyzed a single 24-h dietary recall from 2 nationally representative surveys: the Mexican Nutrition Survey 1999 (n = 6049) and the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (n = 10,343). To describe trends and patterns in beverages, we calculated the volume and energy intake per capita and per consumer and the proportion of consumers of each beverage group in each survey. A commercial sales dataset was used to describe beverage sales trends from 1999 to 2012. From 1999 to 2012, total daily energy from beverages increased among children aged 5-11 y (+45.3 kcal), females aged 12-19 y (+57.3 kcal), and adult females aged 20-49 y (+96.4 kcal) (P < 0.05). Over the same period, intake of beverages with added sugars increased, specifically flavored milk, agua fresca (fruit water made in stalls or at home, usually with added sugars), and fruit drinks among children aged 5-11 y and females aged 12-19 y and caloric coffee/tea, soda, and agua fresca among adult females aged 20-49 y. In 2012, beverages represented 17.5% (325 kcal) and 19.0% (382 kcal) of the total daily energy intake per capita in children aged 1-19 y and adults aged ≥20 y, respectively. In 2012, flavored milk beverages, caloric soda, and high-fat milk were the top 3 major contributors to total daily energy intake per capita in all children aged 1-19 y. Caloric soda, caloric coffee/tea, and agua fresca were the top 3 major energy contributors in adults aged ≥20 y. From 1999 to 2012, sales of soda, fruit-flavored drinks, and flavored waters increased. In conclusion, consumption of several beverages with added sugars increased among children and adult

  9. Caloric compensation in preschool children: Relationships with body mass and differences by food category.

    PubMed

    Carnell, S; Benson, L; Gibson, E L; Mais, L A; Warkentin, S

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining a healthy weight may involve compensating for previously consumed calories at subsequent meals. To test whether heavier children demonstrated poorer caloric compensation across a range of conditions, and to explore whether compensation failure was the result of inadequate adjustment of overall intake or specific over-consumption of highly palatable, high energy-density 'junk' foods, we administered two compensation tests to a sample of 4-5 y olds. For Test A, preloads varied only in carbohydrate content and were organoleptically indistinguishable (200 ml orange-flavored beverage [0 kcal vs. 200 kcal]). For Test B, the preloads varied substantially in both macronutrient composition and learned gustatory cues to caloric content (200 ml water [0 kcal] vs. 200 ml strawberry milkshake [200 kcal]). Each preload was followed 30 min later by a multi-item ad-libitum meal containing junk foods (chocolate cookies, cheese-flavored crackers) and core foods (fruits and vegetables, bread rolls, protein foods). Testing took place at the children's own school under normal lunch-time conditions. Children were weighed and measured. Caloric compensation occurred in both tests, in terms of total, junk and core food intake (RMANOVA, all p < 0.01). Higher BMI z scores were associated with greater average caloric compensation (r = -0.26; p < 0.05), such that overweight/obese children showed least compensation (41%), children over the 50(th) centile the next least (59%), and children under the 50(th) centile (80%) the most. For Test A only, obese/overweight children compensated less well than normal-weight children in terms of junk food intake (RMANOVA preload-by-weight group interaction p < 0.05), with no significant effect for core foods. Our results suggest that caloric compensation is consistently poorer in heavier children, and that overweight/obese children's preferences for junk foods may overwhelm intake regulation mechanisms within meals containing

  10. Caloric Beverages Were Major Sources of Energy among Children and Adults in Mexico, 1999–2012123

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Dalia; Piernas, Carmen; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico, with 1 of the highest obesity prevalences in the world, instituted a 10% excise tax for any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) starting on 1 January 2014. Understanding the recent patterns and trends in beverage intake and sales in Mexico provides both background and baseline data for the importance of SSBs and other beverages in the Mexican diet. We analyzed a single 24-h dietary recall from 2 nationally representative surveys: the Mexican Nutrition Survey 1999 (n = 6049) and the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (n = 10,343). To describe trends and patterns in beverages, we calculated the volume and energy intake per capita and per consumer and the proportion of consumers of each beverage group in each survey. A commercial sales dataset was used to describe beverage sales trends from 1999 to 2012. From 1999 to 2012, total daily energy from beverages increased among children aged 5–11 y (+45.3 kcal), females aged 12–19 y (+57.3 kcal), and adult females aged 20–49 y (+96.4 kcal) (P < 0.05). Over the same period, intake of beverages with added sugars increased, specifically flavored milk, agua fresca (fruit water made in stalls or at home, usually with added sugars), and fruit drinks among children aged 5–11 y and females aged 12–19 y and caloric coffee/tea, soda, and agua fresca among adult females aged 20–49 y. In 2012, beverages represented 17.5% (325 kcal) and 19.0% (382 kcal) of the total daily energy intake per capita in children aged 1–19 y and adults aged ≥20 y, respectively. In 2012, flavored milk beverages, caloric soda, and high-fat milk were the top 3 major contributors to total daily energy intake per capita in all children aged 1–19 y. Caloric soda, caloric coffee/tea, and agua fresca were the top 3 major energy contributors in adults aged ≥20 y. From 1999 to 2012, sales of soda, fruit-flavored drinks, and flavored waters increased. In conclusion, consumption of several beverages with added sugars increased among

  11. Caloric restriction experience reprograms stress and orexegenic pathways and promotes binge-eating

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Teegarden, Sarah L.; Hedin, Andrew D.; Jensen, Catherine L.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term weight management by dieting has a high failure rate. Pharmacological targets have focused on appetite reduction, while less is understood as to the potential contributions of the stress state during dieting in long-term behavioral modification. In a mouse model of moderate caloric restriction in which a 10–15% weight loss similar to human dieting is produced, we examined physiological and behavioral stress measures. Following three weeks of restriction, mice showed significant increases in immobile time in a tail suspension test and stress-induced corticosterone levels. Increased stress was associated with brain region specific alterations of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression and promoter methylation, changes that were not normalized with re-feeding. Similar outcomes were produced by high fat diet withdrawal, an additional component of human dieting. In examination of long-term behavioral consequences, previously restricted mice showed a significant increase in binge-eating of a palatable high fat food during stress exposure. Orexegenic hormones, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, were significantly elevated in response to the high fat diet only in previously restricted mice. Further, administration of the MCH receptor-1 antagonist GSK-856464 significantly reduced total caloric intake in these mice during high fat access. These results reveal reprogramming of key central pathways involved in regulating stress responsivity and orexegenic drives by moderate caloric restriction experience. In humans, such changes would be expected to reduce treatment success by promoting behaviors resulting in weight re-gain, and suggest that management of stress during dieting may be beneficial in long-term maintenance. PMID:21123586

  12. Effects of anxiety on caloric intake and satiety-related brain activation in women and men

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Zoe L.; Melhorn, Susan J.; Askren, Mary K.; Tyagi, Vidhi; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Young, Liza L.; Mehta, Sonya; Webb, Mary; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Schur, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the relationship of anxiety to caloric intake and food cue perception in women and men. METHODS Fifty-five twins (26 complete, 3 incomplete pairs; 51% women) underwent 2 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans (before and after a standardized meal) and then ate at an ad libitum buffet to objectively assess food intake. State and trait anxiety were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. During the fMRI scans, participants viewed blocks of fattening and non-fattening food images, and non-food objects. RESULTS In women, higher trait anxiety was associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) (r=0.40, P=0.010). Trait anxiety was positively associated with kilocalories consumed at the buffet (r=0.53, P=0.005) and percent kilocalories consumed from fat (r=0.30, P=0.006), adjusted for BMI. In within-pair models, which control for shared familial and genetic factors, higher trait anxiety remained associated with kilocalories consumed at the buffet (ρ=0.66, P=0.014), but not with BMI. In men, higher state anxiety was related to macronutrient choices, but not to total caloric intake or BMI. FMRI results revealed that women with high trait anxiety did not suppress activation by fattening food cues across brain regions associated with satiety perception after eating a standardized meal (mean difference low anxiety: −15.4, P<0.001; high anxiety: −1.53, P=0.82, adjusted for BMI). CONCLUSIONS In women, trait anxiety may promote excess caloric consumption through altered perception of high-calorie environmental food cues, placing women with genetic predispositions toward weight gain at risk of obesity. PMID:26867073

  13. Correlation of Objective Audiometric and Caloric Function in Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Kyle P; Lin, Chen; Harris, Michael S; Adunka, Oliver F

    2017-02-01

    Objective Ménière's disease affects the vestibular and audiologic systems; however, little is known about the relationship between audiometric and caloric function with increasing duration of disease. We employed a novel methodology to understand the longitudinal correlation between audiometric and caloric function in Ménière's patients. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Neuro-otologic tertiary care practice. Subjects and Methods Charts of 19 patients with unilateral Ménière's disease, as classified by the 1995 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Foundation criteria, were examined. We included patients with ≥2 videonystagmograms and audiograms. We excluded those with bilateral Ménière's, prior audiovestibular destruction, or symptoms suggesting concomitant vestibular pathology. Spearman's rank correlation of audiometric status (pure tone average [PTA], low PTA, and word recognition score [WRS]) and vestibular function (bithermal calorics) was performed. The study was Institutional Review Board approved (protocol 2015H0266). Results A total of 112 audiograms and 42 videonystagmographies were performed. There was a decline in affected ear hearing PTA and WRS with duration of disease ( r = 0.602, P < .001, and r = -0.573, P < .001, respectively). Similarly, there was a decline in vestibular function with increasing duration of disease ( r = 0.709, P < .001). There were moderate correlations between vestibular weakness and PTA, low PTA, and WRS ( r = 0.464, P = .002; r = 0.498, P = .001; and r = -0.518, P = .001, respectively). Conclusions There is a correlation between decline in objective hearing and horizontal semicircular canal function with time. As expected, this correlation is not 1:1, indicating differential involvement of both systems. Understanding this relationship may assist in counseling patients with regard to prognosis, natural history, and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Three new strategies to improve the accuracy of monothermal caloric screening testing.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Durán, Emilio; Gandul-Merchán, Antonio; Tato-Gómez, José Ignacio; Lacalle-Remigio, Juan Ramón; Abrante-Jiménez, Antonio; Esteban-Ortega, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to find a way to estimate the value of inter-ear difference (IED) through monothermal caloric screening testing (MCST) that can be used at any laboratory, controlling and minimising the resulting error. We retrospectively included in this study 2304 patients from our department to whom a videonystagmography with caloric testing was performed between 2003 and 2011. The IED was calculated in 3 different ways: Using the values of the 4 caloric stimulations (bithermal form) and using only the 2 same-temperature values (warm monothermal and cool monothermal forms). We studied 3 strategies to improve the accuracy of MCST: Analysis of variables that could impair the prediction, delimitation of a grey area of insufficient prediction and location of a maximum utility cut-off point. Correcting Jongkees' formula with the value for spontaneous nystagmus makes it possible to include subjects with spontaneous nystagmus or nystagmus inversion. Establishing 2 cut-off points to classify the subjects avoids approximately 38% of bithermal stimulations performed with a sensitivity and specificity of 95%. Maximum utility was obtained diagnosing as healthy those subjects with IED values lesser than or equal to 16% in warm MCST when the pathological IED was set as greater than 20%. New statistical tools help clinicians to make decisions that affect their patients based on the results of MCST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  15. Lost in processing? Perceived healthfulness, taste and caloric content of whole and processed organic food.

    PubMed

    Prada, Marília; Garrido, Margarida V; Rodrigues, David

    2017-03-23

    The "organic" claim explicitly informs consumers about the food production method. Yet, based on this claim, people often infer unrelated food attributes. The current research examined whether the perceived advantage of organic over conventional food generalizes across different organic food types. Compared to whole organic foods, processed organic foods are less available, familiar and prototypical of the organic food category. In two studies (combined N = 258) we investigated how both organic foods types were perceived in healthfulness, taste and caloric content when compared to their conventional alternatives. Participants evaluated images of both whole (e.g., lettuce) and processed organic food exemplars (e.g., pizza), and reported general evaluations of these food types. The association of these evaluations with individual difference variables - self-reported knowledge and consumption of organic food, and environmental concerns - was also examined. Results showed that organically produced whole foods were perceived as more healthful, tastier and less caloric than those produced conventionally, thus replicating the well-established halo effect of the organic claim in food evaluation. The organic advantage was more pronounced among individuals who reported being more knowledgeable about organic food, consumed it more frequently, and were more environmentally concerned. The advantage of the organic claim for processed foods was less clear. Overall, processed organic (vs. conventional) foods were perceived as tastier, more healthful (Study 1) or equally healthful (Study 2), but also as more caloric. We argue that the features of processed food may modulate the impact of the organic claim, and outline possible research directions to test this assumption. Uncovering the specific conditions in which food claims bias consumer's perceptions and behavior may have important implications for marketing, health and public-policy related fields.

  16. Longitudinal Relationships between Caloric Expenditure and Gray Matter in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Raji, Cyrus A; Merrill, David A; Eyre, Harris; Mallam, Sravya; Torosyan, Nare; Erickson, Kirk I; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Gach, H Michael; Thompson, Paul M; Longstreth, W T; Kuller, Lewis H

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) can be neuroprotective and reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In assessing physical activity, caloric expenditure is a proxy marker reflecting the sum total of multiple physical activity types conducted by an individual. To assess caloric expenditure, as a proxy marker of PA, as a predictive measure of gray matter (GM) volumes in the normal and cognitively impaired elderly persons. All subjects in this study were recruited from the Institutional Review Board approved Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a multisite population-based longitudinal study in persons aged 65 and older. We analyzed a sub-sample of CHS participants 876 subjects (mean age 78.3, 57.5% F, 42.5% M) who had i) energy output assessed as kilocalories (kcal) per week using the standardized Minnesota Leisure-Time Activities questionnaire, ii) cognitive assessments for clinical classification of normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD, and iii) volumetric MR imaging of the brain. Voxel-based morphometry modeled the relationship between kcal/week and GM volumes while accounting for standard covariates including head size, age, sex, white matter hyperintensity lesions, MCI or AD status, and site. Multiple comparisons were controlled using a False Discovery Rate of 5 percent. Higher energy output, from a variety of physical activity types, was associated with larger GM volumes in frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes, as well as hippocampus, thalamus, and basal ganglia. High levels of caloric expenditure moderated neurodegeneration-associated volume loss in the precuneus, posterior cingulate, and cerebellar vermis. Increasing energy output from a variety of physical activities is related to larger gray matter volumes in the elderly, regardless of cognitive status.

  17. Longitudinal Relationships between Caloric Expenditure and Gray Matter in the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Raji, Cyrus A.; Merrill, David A.; Eyre, Harris; Mallam, Sravya; Torosyan, Nare; Erickson, Kirk I.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Gach, H. Michael; Thompson, Paul M.; Longstreth, W.T.; Kuller, Lewis H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) can be neuroprotective and reduce the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In assessing physical activity, caloric expenditure is a proxy marker reflecting the sum total of multiple physical activity types conducted by an individual. Objective:To assess caloric expenditure, as a proxy marker of PA, as a predictive measure of gray matter (GM) volumes in the normal and cognitively impaired elderly persons. Methods: All subjects in this study were recruited from the Institutional Review Board approved Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a multisite population-based longitudinal study in persons aged 65 and older. We analyzed a sub-sample of CHS participants 876 subjects (mean age 78.3, 57.5% F, 42.5% M) who had i) energy output assessed as kilocalories (kcal) per week using the standardized Minnesota Leisure-Time Activities questionnaire, ii) cognitive assessments for clinical classification of normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD, and iii) volumetric MR imaging of the brain. Voxel-based morphometry modeled the relationship between kcal/week and GM volumes while accounting for standard covariates including head size, age, sex, white matter hyperintensity lesions, MCI or AD status, and site. Multiple comparisons were controlled using a False Discovery Rate of 5 percent. Results: Higher energy output, from a variety of physical activity types, was associated with larger GM volumes in frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes, as well as hippocampus, thalamus, and basal ganglia. High levels of caloric expenditure moderated neurodegeneration-associated volume loss in the precuneus, posterior cingulate, and cerebellar vermis. Conclusion:Increasing energy output from a variety of physical activities is related to larger gray matter volumes in the elderly, regardless of cognitive status. PMID:26967227

  18. Age-Related Synapse Loss In Hippocampal CA3 Is Not Reversed By Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michelle M.; Donohue, Howard S.; Linville, M. Constance; Iversen, Elizabeth A.; Newton, Isabel G.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is a reduction of total caloric intake without a decrease in micronutrients or a disproportionate reduction of any one dietary component. While CR attenuates age-related cognitive deficits in tasks of hippocampal-dependent memory, the cellular mechanisms by which CR improves this cognitive decline are poorly understood. Previously, we have reported age-related decreases in key synaptic proteins in the CA3 region of the hippocampus that are stabilized by lifelong CR. In the present study, we examined possible age-related changes in the functional microcircuitry of the synapses in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SL-M) of the CA3 region of the hippocampus, and whether lifelong CR might prevent these age-related alterations. We used serial electron microscopy to reconstruct and classify SL-M synapses and their postsynaptic spines. We analyzed synapse number and size as well as spine surface area and volume in young (10 mos.) and old (29 mos) ad libitum fed rats and in old rats that were calorically restricted from 4 months of age. We limited our analysis to SL-M because previous work demonstrated age-related decreases in synaptophysin confined to this specific layer and region of the hippocampus. The results revealed an age-related decrease in macular axo-spinous synapses that was not reversed by CR that occurred in the absence of changes in the size of synapses or spines. Thus, the benefits of CR for CA3 function and synaptic plasticity may involve other biological effects including the stabilization of synaptic proteins levels in the face of age-related synapse loss. PMID:20854882

  19. Obesity, Abdominal Obesity, Physical Activity, and Caloric Intake in U.S. Adults: 1988-2010

    PubMed Central

    Ladabaum, Uri; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Myer, Parvathi A.; Singh, Gurkirpal

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity and abdominal obesity are independently associated with morbidity and mortality. Physical activity attenuates these risks. We examined trends in obesity, abdominal obesity, physical activity, and caloric intake in U.S. adults from 1988 to 2010. Methods Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Results Average body-mass index (BMI) increased by 0.37% (95% CI, 0.30-0.44%) per year in both women and men. Average waist circumference increased by 0.37% (95% CI, 0.30-0.43%) and 0.27% (95% CI, 0.22-0.32%) per year in women and men, respectively. The prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity increased substantially, as did the prevalence of abdominal obesity among overweight adults. Younger women experienced the greatest increases. The proportion of adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity increased from 19.1% (95% CI, 17.3-21.0%) to 51.7% (95% CI, 48.9-54.5%) in women, and from 11.4% (95% CI, 10.0-12.8%) to 43.5% (95% CI, 40.7-46.3%) in men. Average daily caloric intake did not change significantly. BMI and waist circumference trends were associated with physical activity level, but not caloric intake. The associated changes in adjusted BMIs were 8.3% (95% CI, 6.9-9.6%) higher among women and 1.7% (95% CI, 0.68-2.8%) higher among men with no leisure-time physical activity compared to those with an ideal level of leisure-time physical activity. Conclusions Our analyses highlight important dimensions of the public health problem of obesity, including trends in younger women and in abdominal obesity, and lend support to the emphasis placed on physical activity by the Institute of Medicine. PMID:24631411

  20. Obesity, abdominal obesity, physical activity, and caloric intake in US adults: 1988 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Ladabaum, Uri; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Myer, Parvathi A; Singh, Gurkirpal

    2014-08-01

    Obesity and abdominal obesity are associated independently with morbidity and mortality. Physical activity attenuates these risks. We examined trends in obesity, abdominal obesity, physical activity, and caloric intake in US adults from 1988 to 2010. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Average body mass index (BMI) increased by 0.37% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.44) per year in both women and men. Average waist circumference increased by 0.37% (95% CI, 0.30-0.43) and 0.27% (95% CI, 0.22-0.32) per year in women and men, respectively. The prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity increased substantially, as did the prevalence of abdominal obesity among overweight adults. Younger women experienced the greatest increases. The proportion of adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity increased from 19.1% (95% CI, 17.3-21.0) to 51.7% (95% CI, 48.9-54.5) in women, and from 11.4% (95% CI, 10.0-12.8) to 43.5% (95% CI, 40.7-46.3) in men. Average daily caloric intake did not change significantly. BMI and waist circumference trends were associated with physical activity level but not caloric intake. The associated changes in adjusted BMIs were 8.3% (95% CI, 6.9-9.6) higher among women and 1.7% (95% CI, 0.68-2.8) higher among men with no leisure-time physical activity compared with those with an ideal level of leisure-time physical activity. Our analyses highlight important dimensions of the public health problem of obesity, including trends in younger women and in abdominal obesity, and lend support to the emphasis placed on physical activity by the Institute of Medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of emodin on treating murine nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high caloric laboratory chaw

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Lu, Fu-Er; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Li-Jun; Wang, Kai-Fu; Zou, Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of emodin on the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats induced by high caloric laboratory chaw. METHODS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver model was successfully established by feeding with high caloric laboratory chaw for 12 wk. Then the model rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely model control group, emodin group and dietary treatment group. The rats in emodin group were given emodin at dose of 40 mg/(kg·d) while animals in other groups were given distilled water of the same volume. The rats in model control group were fed with high caloric laboratory chaw while animals in other groups were fed with normal diet. Four weeks later, liver index (liver/body weight ratio), serum activities of liver-associated enzymes, blood lipid, fasting blood glucose, fasting plasma insulin, HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), hepatic triglyceride content and histology features of all groups were assayed. The expression of hepatic peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma was determined by RT-PCR. RESULTS: The body weight, liver index, serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), blood lipid, hepatic triglyceride content of model control group were significantly elevated, with moderate to severe hepatocyte steatosis. The expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was obviously reduced in model control group. Compared with model control group, the body weight, liver index, serum activities of ALT, blood lipids and hepatic triglyceride of emodin group significantly decreased and hepatic histology display was also greatly improved. Meanwhile, the expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was elevated. However, high serum activities of ALT and hyperlipidemia were persisted in dietary treatment group although liver index was decreased and liver histology was somewhat improved. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that emodin might be effective in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats. Its therapeutic mechanism could be

  2. Increasing longevity through caloric restriction or rapamycin feeding in mammals: common mechanisms for common outcomes?

    PubMed

    Cox, Lynne S; Mattison, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    Significant extension of lifespan in important mammalian species is bound to attract the attention not only of the aging research community, but also the media and the wider public. Two recent papers published by Harrison et al. (2009) in Nature and by Colman et al. (2009) in Science report increased longevity of mice fed with rapamycin and of rhesus monkeys undergoing caloric restriction, respectively. These papers have generated considerable debate in the aging community. Here we assess what is new about these findings, how they fit with our knowledge of lifespan extension from other studies and what prospects this new work holds out for improvements in human longevity and human health span.

  3. Relationship Of Mediterranean Diet And Caloric Intake To Phenoconversion In Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Karen; Gu, Yian; Eberly, Shirley; Tanner, Caroline M.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Importance Adherence to Mediterranean-type diet (MeDi) may delay onset of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Whether adherence to MeDi affects time to phenoconversion in Huntington’s Disease (HD), a highly penetrant, single gene disorder, is unknown. Objective To determine if MeDi modifies the time to clinical onset of HD ('phenoconversion') in premanifest carriers participating in Prospective Huntington At Risk Observational Study (PHAROS), and to examine the effects of BMI and caloric intake on time to phenoconversion. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting 41 Huntington Study Group sites in the US and Canada. Participants 1001 participants were enrolled in PHAROS between July 1999 and January 2004, and were followed every 9 months until 2010. A total of 211 participants aged 26–57 with an expanded CAG repeat (≥37) were included in the current study. Exposure A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was administered 33 months after baseline. We calculated daily gram intake for dairy, meat, fruit, vegetables, legumes, cereals, fish, monounsaturated and saturated fatty-acids, and alcohol, and constructed MeDi scores (0–9); higher scores indicate higher adherence. Demographics, medical history, BMI, and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) were collected. Main Outcome Measure Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association of MeDi and phenoconversion. Results Age, caloric intake, gender, education, and UHDRS motor scores did not differ among MeDi tertiles (0–3, 4–5, 6–9). The highest BMI was associated with lowest adherence to MeDi. 31 participants phenoconverted. In a model adjusted for age, CAG, and caloric intake, MeDi was not associated with phenoconversion (p for trend=0.14 for tertile of MeDi, and p=0.22 for continuous MeDi). When individual diet components of MeDi were analyzed, higher dairy consumption (hazard ratio 2.36; 1.0–5.57; p=0.051) and higher caloric intake (p=0.035) were associated with

  4. On entropy change measurements around first order phase transitions in caloric materials.

    PubMed

    Caron, Luana; Ba Doan, Nguyen; Ranno, Laurent

    2017-02-22

    In this work we discuss the measurement protocols for indirect determination of the isothermal entropy change associated with first order phase transitions in caloric materials. The magneto-structural phase transitions giving rise to giant magnetocaloric effects in Cu-doped MnAs and FeRh are used as case studies to exemplify how badly designed protocols may affect isothermal measurements and lead to incorrect entropy change estimations. Isothermal measurement protocols which allow correct assessment of the entropy change around first order phase transitions in both direct and inverse cases are presented.

  5. Relationship of Mediterranean diet and caloric intake to phenoconversion in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Marder, Karen; Gu, Yian; Eberly, Shirley; Tanner, Caroline M; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira

    2013-11-01

    Adherence to Mediterranean-type diet (MeDi) may delay onset of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Whether adherence to MeDi affects time to phenoconversion in Huntington disease (HD), a highly penetrant, single-gene disorder, is unknown. To determine if MeDi modifies the time to clinical onset of HD (phenoconversion) in premanifest carriers participating in Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS), and to examine the effects of body mass index and caloric intake on time to phenoconversion. A prospective cohort study of 41 Huntington study group sites in the United States and Canada involving 1001 participants enrolled in PHAROS between July 1999 and January 2004 who were followed up every 9 months until 2010. A total of 211 participants aged 26 to 57 years had an expanded CAG repeat length (≥ 37). A semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered 33 months after baseline. We calculated daily gram intake for dairy, meat, fruit, vegetables, legumes, cereals, fish, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, and alcohol and constructed MeDi scores (0-9); higher scores indicate higher adherence. Demographics, medical history, body mass index, and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) score were collected. Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine the association of MeDi and phenoconversion. RESULTS Age, sex, caloric intake, education status, and UHDRS motor scores did not differ among MeDi tertiles (0-3, 4-5, and 6-9). The highest body mass index was associated with the lowest adherence to MeDi. Thirty-one participants phenoconverted. In a model adjusted for age, CAG repeat length, and caloric intake, MeDi was not associated with phenoconversion (P for trend = 0.14 for tertile of MeDi, and P = .22 for continuous MeDi). When individual components of MeDi were analyzed, higher dairy consumption (hazard ratio, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.0-5.57; P = .05) and higher caloric intake (P = .04) were associated with risk of

  6. Advanced techniques for all-electrical spectroscopy on spin caloric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, R.; Klemm, P.; Neusser, S.; Botters, B.; Wittmann, A.; Weiler, M.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Heyn, C.; Schneider, M.; Böni, P.; Grundler, D.

    2010-04-01

    Spin-dependent properties of nanomagnets and magnetic/nonmagnetic hybrid systems have gained a renewed interest after the discovery of spin caloric transport phenomena. To explore such properties in detail, advanced techniques need to be developed. In this paper we report novel approaches to study both the magneto-thermal and magneto-mechanical characteristics of hybrid systems. These techniques involve in particular broadband spectroscopy of spin dynamics and surface acoustic waves in the GHz frequency regime. By these means we investigate ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrid systems to explore spin pumping and the Seebeck effect as well as ferromagnet/piezoelectric hybrid systems to address magneto-mechanical coupling at high frequencies.

  7. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  8. Impact of energy density on liking for sweet beverages and caloric-adjustment conditioning in children.

    PubMed

    Remy, Eloïse; Divert, Camille; Rousselot, Juliette; Brondel, Laurent; Issanchou, Sylvie; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2014-10-01

    The contribution of sweet beverages to weight gain in children is controversial; the impact of these beverages on caloric adjustment needs clarification. We studied the influence of energy-density (ED) conditioning on the liking for sweet beverages and caloric adjustment after their consumption in children. We used a within-subject design. Forty-four 8-11-y-old children were exposed to the following 2 distinctly flavored, sweetened beverages: a high-energy (HE) version (150 kcal) and a no-energy (NE) version (0 kcal). During a 4-wk initial conditioning period, children were exposed either 2 or 7 times to each beverage. After a 3-wk stability period (without exposure), children were exposed 3 times to both beverages with a reversed association between the ED and flavor (4-wk reversed-conditioning period). Flavor liking and food intake during meals after the consumption of each beverage were assessed before and after each period. After the initial conditioning, the liking for both beverages increased (P < 0.001). After the stability period, the liking for the HE flavor was higher than for the NE flavor (P = 0.024). After the reversed conditioning, the liking for the flavor initially paired with the HE beverage tended to remain higher than for the NE flavor (P = 0.089). Initially, energy intakes during the meal did not differ after the consumption of NE or HE beverages. After the initial conditioning and up until the end of the reversed conditioning, energy intakes were lower after the HE beverage than after the NE beverage regardless of the beverage flavor (eg, after reversal; caloric compensation score: 29%). The number of exposures did not influence liking or energy intake. After the association between a flavor and ED and reversal of this association, liking may be first guided by ED and then the flavor firstly associated with ED, whereas the partial caloric compensation may consistently be guided by ED. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  9. On entropy change measurements around first order phase transitions in caloric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Luana; Doan, Nguyen Ba; Ranno, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss the measurement protocols for indirect determination of the isothermal entropy change associated with first order phase transitions in caloric materials. The magneto-structural phase transitions giving rise to giant magnetocaloric effects in Cu-doped MnAs and FeRh are used as case studies to exemplify how badly designed protocols may affect isothermal measurements and lead to incorrect entropy change estimations. Isothermal measurement protocols which allow correct assessment of the entropy change around first order phase transitions in both direct and inverse cases are presented.

  10. Effect of an ionic impurity on the caloric curves of water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douady, J.; Calvo, F.; Spiegelman, F.

    2009-04-01

    The equilibrium heat capacities of model pure and heterogeneous water clusters have been calculated using exchange Monte Carlo simulations. For the pure water cluster (H2O)20, microcanonical and canonical caloric curves obtained from various rigid intermolecular potentials indicate the onset of melting to lie in the range 140-180 K, in reasonable agreement with previous estimates. Clusters doped with a single hydronium or ammonium impurity show a significant shift of the melting point in the 20-molecule system, but a reduced effect when 50 molecules are reached.

  11. Effect of chronic caloric restriction on physiological variables related to energy metabolism in the male Fischer 344 rat.

    PubMed

    Duffy, P H; Feuers, R J; Leakey, J A; Nakamura, K; Turturro, A; Hart, R W

    1989-05-01

    In the present study, a number of physiological and behavioral measures that are related to metabolism were continuously monitored in 19-month-old male Fischer 344 rats that were fed ad libitum or fed a caloric restricted diet. Caloric restricted rats ate fewer meals but consumed more food during each meal and spent more time eating per meal than did rats fed ad libitum. Therefore, the timing and duration of meals as well as the total number of calories consumed may be associated with life extension. Average body temperature per day was significantly lower in restricted rats but body temperature range per day and motor activity were higher in restricted rats. Dramatic changes in respiratory quotient, indicating rapid changes in metabolic pathway and lower temperature, occurred in caloric restricted rats when carbohydrate reserves were depleted. Lower body temperature and metabolism during this time interval may result in less DNA damage, thereby increasing the survival potential of restricted rats. Nighttime feeding was found to synchronize physiological performance between ad libitum and caloric restricted rats better than daytime feeding, thereby allowing investigators to distinguish the effects of caloric restriction from those related solely to the time-of-day of feeding.

  12. Relation of video-head-impulse test and caloric irrigation: a study on the recovery in unilateral vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Zellhuber, Stephanie; Mahringer, Andrea; Rambold, Holger A

    2014-09-01

    The head-impulse test (HIT) is an important test for examining unilateral vestibular hypofunction. The new video-head-impulse test (vHIT) is more sensitive and specific than the clinical bedside-head-impulse test. Alternatively, one can test for vestibular hypofunction with the caloric irrigation test. Various studies have shown that both tests may not always identify vestibular hypofunction; instead, the results of the tests might be contradictory. To further explore the question, of whether vHIT and caloric irrigation test the same part of the angular horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), we examined patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis at different points in time. The tonic vestibular imbalance (e.g., subjective-visual-vertical, ocular torsion and spontaneous nystagmus) and dynamic dysfunction of VOR (vHIT and bithermal caloric irrigation) were measured and quantified. While parameters of the tonic vestibular imbalance were well described by single exponential decay functions, dynamic parameters were less well defined. Therefore, to better compare the time course of pairs of two different parameters, we used a linear regression analysis. No linear correlation was found in the group and individually for the gain asymmetry and the ipsilesional gain of the vHIT with the unilateral weakness of the bithermal caloric irrigation tests. Linear correlation was found for most parameters of tonic vestibular imbalance. These findings are further evidence that vHIT and caloric irrigation test different parts of the angular VOR.

  13. Reducing Caloric Intake Prevents Ischemic Injury and Myocardial Dysfunction and Affects Anesthetic Cardioprotection in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Christa; van den Akker, Rob F. P.; Loer, Stephan A.; Bouwman, R. Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of myocardial ischemia, followed by increased perioperative risk of cardiovascular morbidity. We investigated whether reducing caloric intake reduces ischemic injury and myocardial dysfunction and affects the protective effects of the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane in diet-induced T2DM rats. Methods. Rats received a western (WD) or control diet (CD). Caloric intake was reduced by reversing WD-fed rats to CD. Myocardial function was determined with echocardiography. After 8 weeks of diet feeding, myocardial infarction was induced and the effect of sevoflurane was studied on myocardial function and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Results. WD-feeding resulted in a mild T2DM phenotype and myocardial dysfunction. Sevoflurane further impaired systolic function in WD-fed rats. Unexpectedly, WD-feeding reduced infarct size compared to CD-feeding. Sevoflurane reduced infarct size in CD-fed rats; however it enlarged infarct size in WD-fed rats. Caloric reduction restored myocardial dysfunction and the protective effect of sevoflurane against ischemia compared to WD-fed rats, whereas the protective effects of WD-feeding persisted. Conclusion. Caloric reduction restored the T2DM phenotype and myocardial function, while the cardioprotective properties of WD-feeding or sevoflurane persisted. Our data suggest that reducing caloric intake in T2DM might be a possible intervention to reduce perioperative risk of cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:28349068

  14. Caloric stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature, it should cause fast, side-to-side eye movements called nystagmus. The test is done in the ... Rapid, side-to-side eye movements should occur when cold or warm water is placed into the ear. The eye movements should be similar on both ...

  15. Caloric catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, L; Damadian, R

    1973-02-01

    Six solutes known to be actively transported by bacteria were studied with the cell in a "minimum energy" state to determine if sufficient energy were available from cellular stores of ATP to supply the energy necessary to run postulated membrane-situated "pumps." Steady-state cellular concentrations of potassium, calcium, magnesium, leucine, glycine, and alpha-methyl glucoside were determined together with tracer fluxes, oxygen consumption, ATP turnover, and the P:O ratio. From these measurements, it was calculated that the energy supply, 4.20 cal/340 min-g dry wt, fell far short of the energy necessary (28.28 cal/340 min-g dry wt), by classical membrane theory, to operate "pumps."

  16. Diet-Beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and by Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Vine, Seanna; Wang, Y. Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. Methods. We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965). Results. Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. Conclusions. Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight. PMID:24432876

  17. Effect of high fat, fiber and caloric restriction on rat mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D.; Van Sant, J.; Butler, B.

    1986-03-05

    Female rats given 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were placed on diets of control fat (CF-4.5%) or high fat (HF-20%) with either control fiber (6%) or high fiber (FB-12%). A 60% reduction in the CF diet was used to study the effects of caloric restriction on tumorigenesis. Results showed that HF diets had a shorter latency period than CF rats. The respective average number of tumors per rat and tumor volume were 7.3 +/- 1.3 and 23694 mm/sup 2/ for rats on a HF diet and 5.1+/-1.1 and 9144 mm/sup 3/ for CF rats. Addition of high fiber to the diets reduced the tumor incidence from 95% to 70% in the CF group but did not reduce the incidence in HF group. Although tumor number was reduced to 3.7+/-1.5 in CF+FB rats, the tumor volumes were not reduced (8950 mm/sup 3/). Rats fed HF+FB did not have fewer tumors (7.0+/-1.1), but did show a 53% reduction in tumor load. The estrogen dependent enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by dietary levels of fat, which suggests that the promotional effects of fat may not be through estrogen stimulation. None of the caloric restricted rats had tumors 12 weeks post-DMBA. These restricted rats all had significantly elevated levels of serum corticosterone.

  18. Caloric vestibular stimulation as a treatment for conversion disorder: a case report and medical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Noll-Hussong, Michael; Holzapfel, Sabrina; Pokorny, Dan; Herberger, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation has been demonstrated to modulate a variety of cognitive functions associated with brain activations, especially in the temporal-parietal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex, there is evidence to assume an effect in specific mental disorders. Therefore, we go on to hypothesize that lateralized cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating conversion disorder and we present provisional evidence from one patient that supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct, this will be the first time in psychiatry and neurology that a clinically well-known mental disorder, long considered difficult to understand and to treat, is relieved by a simple or common, non-invasive medical procedure.

  19. Caloric and exercise requirements of space flight - Biostereometric results from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittle, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    The biostereometric study of the Skylab astronauts used stereophotogrammetry to make accurate three-dimensional measurements of body form, from which regional and total body volumes were derived. Volume changes in the thighs and calves, over the course of the flight, showed a high correlation with inflight exercise on the bicycle ergometer, and suggested that an exercise level of 80-100 W-min/d/kg lean body mass would be necessary to prevent inflight muscle atrophy. The bicycle ergometer is thus a relatively inefficient means of preventing leg muscle atrophy. Inflight caloric intake showed a high correlation with the change in volume of the buttocks, the abdomen, and the body as a whole, and suggested that a caloric intake of 47-51 kcal/d/kg lean body mass would be necessary to prevent a change in body fat. Only one of the astronauts exceeded this range and gained body fat; the group as a whole showed a mean fat loss of 1.2 kg.

  20. Growth hormone-releasing hormone disruption extends lifespan and regulates response to caloric restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liou Y; Spong, Adam; Swindell, William R; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal; Huber, Joshua A; Boehm, Jacob D; Westbrook, Reyhan; Salvatori, Roberto; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We examine the impact of targeted disruption of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in mice on longevity and the putative mechanisms of delayed aging. GHRH knockout mice are remarkably long-lived, exhibiting major shifts in the expression of genes related to xenobiotic detoxification, stress resistance, and insulin signaling. These mutant mice also have increased adiponectin levels and alterations in glucose homeostasis consistent with the removal of the counter-insulin effects of growth hormone. While these effects overlap with those of caloric restriction, we show that the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and the GHRH mutation are additive, with lifespan of GHRH-KO mutants further increased by CR. We conclude that GHRH-KO mice feature perturbations in a network of signaling pathways related to stress resistance, metabolic control and inflammation, and therefore provide a new model that can be used to explore links between GHRH repression, downregulation of the somatotropic axis, and extended longevity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01098.001 PMID:24175087

  1. Caloric restriction and resveratrol promote longevity through the Sirtuin-1-dependent induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, E; Maiuri, M C; Markaki, M; Megalou, E; Pasparaki, A; Palikaras, K; Criollo, A; Galluzzi, L; Malik, S A; Vitale, I; Michaud, M; Madeo, F; Tavernarakis, N; Kroemer, G

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction and autophagy-inducing pharmacological agents can prolong lifespan in model organisms including mice, flies, and nematodes. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of Sirtuin-1 induces autophagy in human cells in vitro and in Caenorhabditis elegans in vivo. The knockdown or knockout of Sirtuin-1 prevented the induction of autophagy by resveratrol and by nutrient deprivation in human cells as well as by dietary restriction in C. elegans. Conversely, Sirtuin-1 was not required for the induction of autophagy by rapamycin or p53 inhibition, neither in human cells nor in C. elegans. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Sirtuin-1 enhanced the vulnerability of human cells to metabolic stress, unless they were stimulated to undergo autophagy by treatment with rapamycin or p53 inhibition. Along similar lines, resveratrol and dietary restriction only prolonged the lifespan of autophagy-proficient nematodes, whereas these beneficial effects on longevity were abolished by the knockdown of the essential autophagic modulator Beclin-1. We conclude that autophagy is universally required for the lifespan-prolonging effects of caloric restriction and pharmacological Sirtuin-1 activators.

  2. Caloric restriction and resveratrol promote longevity through the Sirtuin-1-dependent induction of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, E; Maiuri, M C; Markaki, M; Megalou, E; Pasparaki, A; Palikaras, K; Criollo, A; Galluzzi, L; Malik, S A; Vitale, I; Michaud, M; Madeo, F; Tavernarakis, N; Kroemer, G

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction and autophagy-inducing pharmacological agents can prolong lifespan in model organisms including mice, flies, and nematodes. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of Sirtuin-1 induces autophagy in human cells in vitro and in Caenorhabditis elegans in vivo. The knockdown or knockout of Sirtuin-1 prevented the induction of autophagy by resveratrol and by nutrient deprivation in human cells as well as by dietary restriction in C. elegans. Conversely, Sirtuin-1 was not required for the induction of autophagy by rapamycin or p53 inhibition, neither in human cells nor in C. elegans. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Sirtuin-1 enhanced the vulnerability of human cells to metabolic stress, unless they were stimulated to undergo autophagy by treatment with rapamycin or p53 inhibition. Along similar lines, resveratrol and dietary restriction only prolonged the lifespan of autophagy-proficient nematodes, whereas these beneficial effects on longevity were abolished by the knockdown of the essential autophagic modulator Beclin-1. We conclude that autophagy is universally required for the lifespan-prolonging effects of caloric restriction and pharmacological Sirtuin-1 activators. PMID:21364612

  3. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation as a Treatment for Conversion Disorder: A Case Report and Medical Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Noll-Hussong, Michael; Holzapfel, Sabrina; Pokorny, Dan; Herberger, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation has been demonstrated to modulate a variety of cognitive functions associated with brain activations, especially in the temporal–parietal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex, there is evidence to assume an effect in specific mental disorders. Therefore, we go on to hypothesize that lateralized cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating conversion disorder and we present provisional evidence from one patient that supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct, this will be the first time in psychiatry and neurology that a clinically well-known mental disorder, long considered difficult to understand and to treat, is relieved by a simple or common, non-invasive medical procedure. PMID:24917828

  4. Of mice and men: the benefits of caloric restriction, exercise, and mimetics.

    PubMed

    Mercken, Evi M; Carboneau, Bethany A; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; de Cabo, Rafael

    2012-07-01

    During aging there is an increasing imbalance of energy intake and expenditure resulting in obesity, frailty, and metabolic disorders. For decades, research has shown that caloric restriction (CR) and exercise can postpone detrimental aspects of aging. These two interventions invoke a similar physiological signature involving pathways associated with stress responses and mitochondrial homeostasis. Nonetheless, CR is able to delay aging processes that result in an increase of both mean and maximum lifespan, whereas exercise primarily increases healthspan. Due to the strict dietary regime necessary to achieve the beneficial effects of CR, most studies to date have focused on rodents and non-human primates. As a consequence, there is vast interest in the development of compounds such as resveratrol, metformin and rapamycin that would activate the same metabolic- and stress-response pathways induced by these interventions without actually restricting caloric intake. Therefore the scope of this review is to (i) describe the benefits of CR and exercise in healthy individuals, (ii) discuss the role of these interventions in the diseased state, and (iii) examine some of the promising pharmacological alternatives such as CR- and exercise-mimetics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Caloric and exercise requirements of space flight - Biostereometric results from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittle, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    The biostereometric study of the Skylab astronauts used stereophotogrammetry to make accurate three-dimensional measurements of body form, from which regional and total body volumes were derived. Volume changes in the thighs and calves, over the course of the flight, showed a high correlation with inflight exercise on the bicycle ergometer, and suggested that an exercise level of 80-100 W-min/d/kg lean body mass would be necessary to prevent inflight muscle atrophy. The bicycle ergometer is thus a relatively inefficient means of preventing leg muscle atrophy. Inflight caloric intake showed a high correlation with the change in volume of the buttocks, the abdomen, and the body as a whole, and suggested that a caloric intake of 47-51 kcal/d/kg lean body mass would be necessary to prevent a change in body fat. Only one of the astronauts exceeded this range and gained body fat; the group as a whole showed a mean fat loss of 1.2 kg.

  6. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular reflexes: Sinusoidal rotation and caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR responses to caloric and to sinusoidal rotational stimuli in a putatively normal population. Caloric test parameters showed no consistent trend with age. Rotation test parameters showed declining response amplitude and slightly less compensatory response phase with increasing age. The magnitudes of these changes were not large relative to the variability within the population. The age-related trends in VOR were not consistent with the anatomic changes in the periphery reported by others which showed an increasing rate of peripheral hair cell and nerve fiber loss in subjects over 55 years. The poor correlation between physiological and anatomical data suggest that adaptive mechanisms in the central nervous system are important in maintaining the VOR.

  7. Caloric Restriction Effect on Proinflammatory Cytokines, Growth Hormone, and Steroid Hormone Concentrations during Exercise in Judokas

    PubMed Central

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Souissi, Nizar; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction on the immune and hormonal responses during exercise in judo athletes. In a randomised order, 11 male judokas (age: 20.45 ± 0.51; height: 1.71 ± 0.3 m; and body weight: 75.9 ± 3.1 kg) participate in this study during a period of weight maintenance (baseline) and after 7 days of caloric restriction (CR). All subjects performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the two conditions. Values for nutrient intakes were obtained from a 7 d food record kept during a period of weight maintenance and after a 7-day food restriction (−5~6 MJ/day). Our results showed that CR resulted in significant decreases in body weight (P < 0.05) and performance (P < 0.05). However, heart rate and SJFT index (P < 0.05) increase significantly during CR in comparison to baseline. Moreover, exercise leads to a significant increase in testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone (GH), leukocytes, neutrophils, TNF-α, and IL-6, in both CR and baseline conditions. Compared to baseline, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly higher during CR condition (P < 0.05). Additionally, CR leads to an increase in cortisol and GH (P < 0.05) and a decrease in testosterone concentrations (P < 0.05). PMID:26075039

  8. Caloric Restriction Mimetics Slow Aging of Neuromuscular Synapses and Muscle Fibers.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Jessica; Maxwell, Nicholas; Shapiro, Dillon; deCabo, Rafael; Valdez, Gregorio

    2017-03-07

    Resveratrol and metformin have been shown to mimic some aspects of caloric restriction and exercise. However, it remains unknown if these molecules also slow age-related synaptic degeneration, as previously shown for caloric restriction and exercise. In this study, we examined the structural integrity of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in 2-year-old mice treated with resveratrol and metformin starting at 1 year of age. We found that resveratrol significantly slows aging of NMJs in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of 2-year-old mice. Resveratrol also preserved the morphology of muscle fibers in old mice. Although metformin slowed the rate of muscle fiber aging, it did not significantly affect aging of NMJs. Based on these findings, we sought to determine if resveratrol directly affects NMJs. For this, we examined postsynaptic sites, the NMJ region located on the muscle peripheral membrane, on cultured myotubes derived from C2C12 cells. We discovered that resveratrol increases the number of postsynaptic sites on myotubes exhibiting a youthful architecture, suggesting that resveratrol directly affects the NMJ. Altogether, we provide compelling evidence indicating that resveratrol slows aging of NMJs and muscle fibers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Sara N; Wolfson, Julia A; Vine, Seanna; Wang, Y Claire

    2014-03-01

    We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965). Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight.

  10. Computing simulated endolymphatic flow thermodynamics during the caloric test using normal and hydropic duct models.

    PubMed

    Rey-Martinez, Jorge; McGarvie, Leigh; Pérez-Fernández, Nicolás

    2017-03-01

    The obtained simulations support the underlying hypothesis that the hydrostatic caloric drive is dissipated by local convective flow in a hydropic duct. To develop a computerized model to simulate and predict the internal fluid thermodynamic behavior within both normal and hydropic horizontal ducts. This study used a computational fluid dynamics software to simulate the effects of cooling and warming of two geometrical models representing normal and hydropic ducts of one semicircular horizontal canal during 120 s. Temperature maps, vorticity, and velocity fields were successfully obtained to characterize the endolymphatic flow during the caloric test in the developed models. In the normal semicircular canal, a well-defined endolymphatic linear flow was obtained, this flow has an opposite direction depending only on the cooling or warming condition of the simulation. For the hydropic model a non-effective endolymphatic flow was predicted; in this model the velocity and vorticity fields show a non-linear flow, with some vortices formed inside the hydropic duct.

  11. Caloric restriction promotes cell survival in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Kimura, Atsuko; Azuchi, Yuriko; Akiyama, Goichi; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. We previously reported that loss of glutamate transporters (EAAC1 or GLAST) in mice leads to RGC degeneration that is similar to normal tension glaucoma and these animal models are useful in examining potential therapeutic strategies. Caloric restriction has been reported to increase longevity and has potential benefits in injury and disease. Here we investigated the effects of every-other-day fasting (EODF), a form of caloric restriction, on glaucomatous pathology in EAAC1−/− mice. EODF suppressed RGC death and retinal degeneration without altering intraocular pressure. Moreover, visual impairment was ameliorated with EODF, indicating the functional significance of the neuroprotective effect of EODF. Several mechanisms associated with this neuroprotection were explored. We found that EODF upregulated blood β-hydroxybutyrate levels and increased histone acetylation in the retina. Furthermore, it elevated retinal mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors and catalase, whereas it decreased oxidative stress levels in the retina. Our findings suggest that EODF, a safe, non-invasive, and low-cost treatment, may be available for glaucoma therapy. PMID:27669894

  12. Proximate biochemical composition and caloric content calculated from elemental CHN analysis: a stoichiometric concept.

    PubMed

    Gnaiger, E; Bitterlich, G

    1984-06-01

    Carbohydrate, lipid, and protein compositions are stoichiometrically related to organic CHN (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen) contents. Elemental CHN analyses of total biomass and ash, therefore, provide a basis for the calculation of proximate biochemical composition and bomb caloric value. The classical nitrogen to protein conversion factor (6.25) should be replaced by 5.8±0.13. A linear relation exists between the mass fraction of non-protein carbon and the carbohydrate and lipid content. Residual water in dry organic matter can be estimated with the additional information derived from hydrogen measurements.The stoichiometric CHN method and direct biochemical analysis agreed within 10% of ash-free dry biomass (for muscle, liver and fat tissue of silver carp; gut contents composed of detritus and algae; commercial fish food). The detrital material, however, had to be corrected for non-protein nitrogen.A linear relationship between bomb caloric value and organic carbon fractions was derived on the basis of thermodynamic and stoichiometric principles, in agreement with experimental data published for bacteria, algae, protozoa and invertebrates. The highly automatic stoichiometric CHN method for the separation of nutrient contents in biomass extends existing ecophysiological concepts for the construction of balanced carbon and nitrogen, as well as biochemical and energy budgets.

  13. Hormesis--implications for risk assessment caloric intake (body weight) as an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Turturro, A; Hass, B; Hart, R W

    1998-08-01

    Hormesis can be considered as a parameter which has a non-monotonic relationship with some endpoint. Since caloric intake is such a parameter, and the impact of this parameter on risk assessment has been fairly well characterized, it can provide clues as to how to integrate the information from a hormetic parameter into risk assessments for toxicants. Based on the work with caloric intake, one could: (a) define a biomarker for hormetic effect; (b) integrate specific information on when in the animals lifespan the parameter is active to influence parameters such as survival; (c) evaluate component effects of the overall hormetic response; and (d) address the consequences of a non-monotonic relationship between the hormetic parameter and endpoints critical for risk assessment. These impacts on risk assessments have been characterized for chronic tests, but are also true for short-term tests. A priority is the characterization of the dose-response curves for hormetic parameters. This quantification will be critical in utilizing them in risk assessment. With this information, one could better quantitatively address the changes one expects to result from the hormetic parameter, and limit the uncertainty and variability which occurs in toxicity testing.

  14. Caloric restriction reduces the systemic progression of mouse AApoAII amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xin; Yang, Mu; Xu, Zhe; Miyahara, Hiroki; Mori, Masayuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    In mouse senile amyloidosis, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-II is deposited extracellularly in many organs in the form of amyloid fibrils (AApoAII). Reduction of caloric intake, known as caloric restriction (CR), slows the progress of senescence and age-related disorders in mice. In this study, we intravenously injected 1 μg of isolated AApoAII fibrils into R1.P1-Apoa2c mice to induce experimental amyloidosis and investigated the effects of CR for the next 16 weeks. In the CR group, AApoAII amyloid deposits in the liver, tongue, small intestine and skin were significantly reduced compared to those of the ad libitum feeding group. CR treatment led to obvious reduction in body weight, improvement in glucose metabolism and reduction in the plasma concentration of ApoA-II. Our molecular biological analyses of the liver suggested that CR treatment might improve the symptoms of inflammation, the unfolded protein response induced by amyloid deposits and oxidative stress. Furthermore, we suggest that CR treatment might improve mitochondrial functions via the sirtuin 1-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (SIRT1-PGC-1α) pathway. We suggest that CR is a promising approach for treating the onset and/or progression of amyloidosis, especially for systemic amyloidosis such as senile AApoAII amyloidosis. Our analysis of CR treatment for amyloidosis should provide useful information for determining the cause of amyloidosis and developing effective preventive treatments. PMID:28225824

  15. Spatio-temporal pattern of vestibular information processing after brief caloric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Vincenzo; Esposito, Fabrizio; Aragri, Adriana; Furia, Teresa; Riccardi, Pasquale; Tosetti, Michela; Biagi, Laura; Marciano, Elio; Di Salle, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Processing of vestibular information at the cortical and subcortical level is essential for head and body orientation in space and self-motion perception, but little is known about the neural dynamics of the brain regions of the vestibular system involved in this task. Neuroimaging studies using both galvanic and caloric stimulation have shown that several distinct cortical and subcortical structures can be activated during vestibular information processing. The insular cortex has been often targeted and presented as the central hub of the vestibular cortical system. Since very short pulses of cold water ear irrigation can generate a strong and prolonged vestibular response and a nystagmus, we explored the effects of this type of caloric stimulation for assessing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) dynamics of neural vestibular processing in a whole-brain event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment. We evaluated the spatial layout and the temporal dynamics of the activated cortical and subcortical regions in time-locking with the instant of injection and were able to extract a robust pattern of neural activity involving the contra-lateral insular cortex, the thalamus, the brainstem and the cerebellum. No significant correlation with the temporal envelope of the nystagmus was found. The temporal analysis of the activation profiles highlighted a significantly longer duration of the evoked BOLD activity in the brainstem compared to the insular cortex suggesting a functional de-coupling between cortical and subcortical activity during the vestibular response.

  16. Balanced caloric macronutrient composition downregulates immunological gene expression in human blood cells-adipose tissue diverges.

    PubMed

    Brattbakk, Hans-Richard; Arbo, Ingerid; Aagaard, Siv; Lindseth, Inge; de Soysa, Ann Kristin Hjelle; Langaas, Mette; Kulseng, Bård; Lindberg, Fedon; Johansen, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes are conditions characterized by low-grade systemic inflammation, strongly influenced by lifestyle, but the mechanisms that link these characteristics are poorly understood. Our first objective was to investigate if a normocaloric diet with a calorically balanced macronutrient composition influenced immunological gene expression. Findings regarding the suitability of blood as biological material in nutrigenomics and gene expression profiling have been inconclusive. Our second objective was to compare blood and adipose tissue sample quality in terms of adequacy for DNA-microarray analyses, and to determine tissue-specific gene expression patterns. Blood and adipose tissue samples were collected for gene expression profiling from three obese men before, during, and after a 28-day normocaloric diet intervention where each meal contained an approximately equal caloric load of macronutrients. Time series analyses of blood gene expression revealed a cluster of downregulated genes involved in immunological processes. Blood RNA quality and yield were satisfactory, and DNA-microarray analysis reproducibility was similar in blood and adipose tissue. Gene expression correlation between blood and adipose tissue varied according to gene function, and was especially low for genes involved in immunological and metabolic processes. This suggests that diet composition is of importance in inflammatory processes in blood cells. The findings also suggest that a systems biology approach, in which tissues are studied in parallel, should be employed to fully understand the impact of dietary challenges on the human body.

  17. [A comparison between the "bithermal caloric test" and the "hot monothermal with simultaneous cold test"].

    PubMed

    Vannucchi, P; Pagnini, P; Santoro, R

    1993-01-01

    Hot (44) and cold (30) caloric test are the most common tool to investigate canal activity. Many authors, otherwise, have pointed out that this method is very long needing about five minutes of interval among the irrigations and that it is often troublesome for the patient that is exposed four times to a vertigo. To investigate vestibular function some of these authors tried to use the hot monothermal test alone but results were poor. The aim of this study was to propose a shorter and a less troublesome method of investigation and to introduce a new diagnostic possibility not pointed out with traditional caloric test. We have tried to determine some new reliable diagnostic criteria modifying confidential value of the hot monothermal test and considering the eventual presence of the nystagmus and its direction during the cold simultaneous test; on the basis of this results we are able to distinguish a normal vestibular function from a labyrinthine preponderance or a directional preponderance or an aspecific disfunction. When the vestibular function is normal or when there is a labyrinthine preponderance our results are in total accord with those achieved with the traditional bithermal test. Therefore we suggest to use always the hot monothermal test associated with the cold simultaneous test, performing the two cold irrigations in additions, only in the case of a directional preponderance or an aspecific disfunction.

  18. Remission of anosognosia for right hemiplegia and neglect after caloric vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Roberta; Rode, Gilles; Cotton, François; Farnè, Alessandro; Rossetti, Yves; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Neglect and related phenomena, as anosognosia for hemiplegia and somatoparaphrenia, are often associated to right-hemisphere lesions. These deficits can be alleviated by caloric vestibular stimulation, but little is known about the efficacy of this physiological intervention on neglect following left-hemisphere lesions. Here we report the case of an ambidextrous left brain-damaged patient with severe right personal and extrapersonal neglect, anosognosia for right hemiplegia and somatoparaphrenia. These symptoms co-occurred with more typical manifestations of left-brain damage, such as aphasia and apraxia. Neurological examination revealed right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia and hemianopia. Visuo-spatial tests for personal and extrapersonal neglect, as well as an anosognosia questionnaire, were submitted before and after caloric vestibular stimulation. Results showed a dramatic improvement of anosognosia for hemiplegia and neglect; no change was observed for the remaining deficits. The results confirm the notion of the selectivity of vestibular stimulation for neglect and related disorders and extend this notion by showing that similar effects can be obtained after lesion of the left hemisphere, suggesting that similar mechanisms are responsible for left- and right-sided neglect. Such a peculiar association of language and visuo-spatial disorders jointly present after a left-sided lesion opens the question of the link between handedness and lateralization of cognitive functions.

  19. Overeat today, skip the scale tomorrow: An examination of caloric intake predicting nonadherence to daily self-weighing.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Molly L; Ross, Kathryn M; Wing, Rena R

    2016-11-01

    Daily self-weighing is an effective weight loss strategy. Little is known about "micro" factors influencing nonadherence to self-weighing (e.g., daily overeating). It was hypothesized that increased caloric intake on a given day would increase odds of not self-weighing the following day. Daily self-reports of weight and caloric intake were collected from 74 adults with overweight and obesity (mean BMI = 31.2 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) , age = 50.6 ± 10 years, 69% female, 87% Caucasian) throughout a 12-week Internet-based weight management intervention. Multilevel logistic regression investigated odds of nonadherence to self-weighing on a given day based on the previous day's caloric intake. Self-monitoring adherence was high (weights: 87%; calories: 85%); adherence was associated with greater 12-week weight loss (weighing: r = -0.24, P = 0.04; calories: r = -0.26, P = 0.04). Increased caloric intake on a given day, relative to the individual's average intake, was associated with increased odds of nonadherence to self-weighing the next day (F(1,5106)  = 12.66, P = 0.0004, β = 0.001). For example, following a day of eating 300 calories more than usual, odds of not self-weighing increased by 1.33. Odds of nonadherence to self-weighing increased following a day with higher-than-usual caloric intake. Weight management interventions collecting daily self-monitoring data could provide support to participants who report increased caloric intake to prevent self-weighing nonadherence. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  20. Effects of age and caloric restriction on the cardiac and coronary response to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Rubio, Carmen; Amor, Sara; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Carreño-Tarragona, Gonzalo; Carrascosa, José M; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2014-12-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in the cardiovascular system such as increased vasoconstriction and decreased vasodilatation. Some of these changes are partially reversed by caloric restriction. Endothelin-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor which levels increased with age. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of endothelin-1 in the cardiac and coronary changes induced by age and whether these changes may be attenuated by a three-month caloric restriction. Hearts from young (3 months old), aged (24 months old) and aged rats after 3 months of caloric restriction were perfused according to the Langendorff technique. Coronary vasoconstriction to endothelin-1 was reduced in old rats, and endothelin-1 increased myocardial contractility (dP/dt) and heart rate in old but not in young rats. These changes observed in old rats were partly reversed by caloric restriction. Also, in the myocardial tissue of old rats the gene expression of endothelin-1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) was increased, and the gene expression of endothelin ETB receptors and endothelial nitric oxide syntase (eNOS) was reduced, compared with young rats. Aging induced changes in the expression of ETB receptors and eNOS were reversed by caloric restriction. These results suggest that aging produces alterations in myocardial and coronary responses to endothelin-1, that may be related to changes in expression of nitric oxide synthases and/or endothelin receptor subtypes, with some of these changes being prevented by caloric restriction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. General and persistent effects of high-intensity sweeteners on body weight gain and caloric compensation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Baker, Chelsea R.; Davidson, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    In four experiments, we assessed the generality of previous findings (Swithers & Davidson, 2008) that increased caloric intake, body weight gain, and reduced caloric compensation are exhibited by rats that consume a diet containing a nonnutritive, high intensity sweetener. In this earlier work, rats consumed a diet in which saccharin was mixed in low-fat yogurt, and animals were provided with a fixed amount of the yogurt. The present experiments showed that the effects of saccharin on energy intake and body weight gain are also obtained when rats were given Acesulfame Potassium (AceK), a nonnutritive high intensity sweetener that is chemically distinct from saccharin. Increased energy intake and body weight gain and impaired caloric compensation were also obtained with a saccharin-sweetened base diet (refried beans) that was calorically similar, but nutritionally distinct from low-fat yogurt. The present studies also extended earlier findings by showing that body weight differences persist after saccharin-sweetened diets are discontinued and following a shift to a diet sweetened with glucose. In addition, rats first exposed to a diet sweetened with glucose still gain additional weight when subsequently exposed to a saccharin sweetened diet. The effect of saccharin on caloric compensation was more complex in that it appeared to depend on the type of diet (yogurt or beans) in which saccharin was consumed prior to testing. The results of these experiments add support to the hypothesis that exposure to weak or non-predictive relationships between sweet tastes and caloric consequences may lead to positive energy balance. PMID:19634935

  2. The importance of caloric restriction in the early improvements in insulin sensitivity after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Isbell, James M; Tamboli, Robyn A; Hansen, Erik N; Saliba, Jabbar; Dunn, Julia P; Phillips, Sharon E; Marks-Shulman, Pamela A; Abumrad, Naji N

    2010-07-01

    Many of the metabolic benefits of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) occur before weight loss. In this study we investigated the influence of caloric restriction on the improvements in the metabolic responses that occur within the 1st week after RYGB. RESEARCH METHODS AND DESIGN: A mixed meal was administered to nine subjects before and after RYGB (average 4 +/- 0.5 days) and to nine matched, obese subjects before and after 4 days of the post-RYGB diet. Weight loss in both groups was minimal; the RYGB subjects lost 1.4 +/- 5.3 kg (P = 0.46) vs. 2.2 +/- 1.0 kg (P = 0.004) in the calorically restricted group. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) improved with both RYGB (5.0 +/- 3.1 to 3.3 +/- 2.1; P = 0.03) and caloric restriction (4.8 +/- 4.1 to 3.6 +/- 4.1; P = 0.004). The insulin response to a mixed meal was blunted in both the RYGB and caloric restriction groups (113 +/- 67 to 65 +/- 33 and 85 +/- 59 to 65 +/- 56 nmol x l(-1) x min(-1), respectively; P < 0.05) without a change in the glucose response. Glucagon-like peptide 1 levels increased (9.2 +/- 8.6 to 12.2 +/- 5.5 pg x l(-1) x min(-1); P = 0.04) and peaked higher (45.2 +/- 37.3 to 84.8 +/- 33.0 pg/ml; P = 0.01) in response to a mixed meal after RYGB, but incretin responses were not altered after caloric restriction. These data suggest that an improvement in insulin resistance in the 1st week after RYGB is primarily due to caloric restriction, and the enhanced incretin response after RYGB does not improve postprandial glucose homeostasis during this time.

  3. Caloric stress alters fat characteristics and Hsp70 expression in milk somatic cells of lactating beef cows.

    PubMed

    Eitam, Harel; Brosh, Arieh; Orlov, Alla; Izhaki, Ido; Shabtay, Ariel

    2009-03-01

    Selection for higher production rate in cattle inhabiting challenging habitats may be considered disadvantageous because of possible deleterious effects on immunity and reproduction and, consequently, on calf crop percentage. In Israel, free-grazing high productive beef cows experience reduction in nutritional quality of forage during up to 8 months of the year. As milk production by dams dictates calf performance, dam's nutritional needs and rebreeding rates, the aim of the present study was to test how lactating beef cows deal with combined caloric and protein stress both at the productive and self protective levels. For this purpose, we studied the effect of long-term caloric stress on milk characteristics and gene expression of stress and milk components producing proteins. Lactating dams responded to caloric stress by decreased body weight, milk, and milk protein production. To compensate for total energy loses in milk, they produced milk of higher fat concentration and shifted the proportions of its fatty acids towards long and unsaturated ones. This was reflected by increased mRNA transcription of the fatty acid binding protein. Prolonged low-energy diet promoted cell-specific heat shock protein (Hsp) response; whereas significant increase of Hsp90 but unchanged levels of Hsp70 proteins were observed in white blood cells, the expression of Hsp70 in milk somatic cells was markedly attenuated, in parallel with a marked increase of alpha(s1)-casein expression. At the mammary gland level, these results may indicate a decrease in turnover of proteins and a shift to an exclusive expression of milk components producing factors. Similar responses to caloric stress were revealed also in ketotic dairy cows. Ketosis promoted a shift towards long and unsaturated fatty acids and an increased expression of alpha(s1)-casein in milk somatic cells. These findings may reflect an evolutionary-preserved mechanism in lactating cows for coping with caloric restriction. Overall

  4. The calorically restricted ketogenic diet, an effective alternative therapy for malignant brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Mukherjee, Purna; Kiebish, Michael A; Markis, William T; Mantis, John G; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2007-02-21

    Malignant brain cancer persists as a major disease of morbidity and mortality in adults and is the second leading cause of cancer death in children. Many current therapies for malignant brain tumors fail to provide long-term management because they ineffectively target tumor cells while negatively impacting the health and vitality of normal brain cells. In contrast to brain tumor cells, which lack metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose for growth and survival, normal brain cells can metabolize both glucose and ketone bodies for energy. This study evaluated the efficacy of KetoCal, a new nutritionally balanced high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy, on the growth and vascularity of a malignant mouse astrocytoma (CT-2A) and a human malignant glioma (U87-MG). Adult mice were implanted orthotopically with the malignant brain tumors and KetoCal was administered to the mice in either unrestricted amounts or in restricted amounts to reduce total caloric intake according to the manufacturers recommendation for children with refractory epilepsy. The effects KetoCal on tumor growth, vascularity, and mouse survival were compared with that of an unrestricted high carbohydrate standard diet. KetoCal administered in restricted amounts significantly decreased the intracerebral growth of the CT-2A and U87-MG tumors by about 65% and 35%, respectively, and significantly enhanced health and survival relative to that of the control groups receiving the standard low fat/high carbohydrate diet. The restricted KetoCal diet reduced plasma glucose levels while elevating plasma ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) levels. Tumor microvessel density was less in the calorically restricted KetoCal groups than in the calorically unrestricted control groups. Moreover, gene expression for the mitochondrial enzymes, beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA: 3-ketoacid CoA transferase, was lower in the tumors than in the contralateral normal

  5. The calorically restricted ketogenic diet, an effective alternative therapy for malignant brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Mukherjee, Purna; Kiebish, Michael A; Markis, William T; Mantis, John G; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2007-01-01

    Background Malignant brain cancer persists as a major disease of morbidity and mortality in adults and is the second leading cause of cancer death in children. Many current therapies for malignant brain tumors fail to provide long-term management because they ineffectively target tumor cells while negatively impacting the health and vitality of normal brain cells. In contrast to brain tumor cells, which lack metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose for growth and survival, normal brain cells can metabolize both glucose and ketone bodies for energy. This study evaluated the efficacy of KetoCal®, a new nutritionally balanced high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy, on the growth and vascularity of a malignant mouse astrocytoma (CT-2A) and a human malignant glioma (U87-MG). Methods Adult mice were implanted orthotopically with the malignant brain tumors and KetoCal® was administered to the mice in either unrestricted amounts or in restricted amounts to reduce total caloric intake according to the manufacturers recommendation for children with refractory epilepsy. The effects KetoCal® on tumor growth, vascularity, and mouse survival were compared with that of an unrestricted high carbohydrate standard diet. Results KetoCal® administered in restricted amounts significantly decreased the intracerebral growth of the CT-2A and U87-MG tumors by about 65% and 35%, respectively, and significantly enhanced health and survival relative to that of the control groups receiving the standard low fat/high carbohydrate diet. The restricted KetoCal® diet reduced plasma glucose levels while elevating plasma ketone body (β-hydroxybutyrate) levels. Tumor microvessel density was less in the calorically restricted KetoCal® groups than in the calorically unrestricted control groups. Moreover, gene expression for the mitochondrial enzymes, β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA: 3-ketoacid CoA transferase, was lower in the

  6. Predictive properties of the video head impulse test: measures of caloric symmetry and self-report dizziness handicap.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Devin L; Jacobson, Gary P; Bennett, Marc L; Gruenwald, Jill M; Green, Andrea P

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a predictable relationship existed between self-reported dizziness handicap and video Head Impulse Test (vHIT) results in a large sample of patients reporting to a dizziness clinic. Secondary objectives included describing the characteristics of the vHIT ipsilesional and contralesional vestibulo-ocular reflex slow-phase velocity in patients with varying levels of canal paresis. Finally, the authors calculated the sensitivity and specificity of the vHIT for detecting horizontal semicircular canal impairment using the caloric test as the "gold standard." Participants were 115 adults presenting to a tertiary medical care center with symptoms of dizziness. Participants were administered a measure of self-report dizziness handicap (i.e., Dizziness Handicap Inventory) and underwent caloric testing and vHIT at the same appointment. Results showed that (1) there were no significant group differences (i.e., vHIT normal versus vHIT abnormal) in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory total score, (2) both ipsilesional and contralateral velocity gain decreased with increases in caloric paresis, and (3) a caloric asymmetry of 39.5% was determined to be the cutoff that maximized discrimination of vHIT outcome. The level of self-reported dizziness handicap is not predicted by the outcome of the vHIT, which is consistent with the majority of published reports describing the poor relationship between quantitative tests of vestibular function and dizziness handicap. Further, the study findings have demonstrated that vHIT and caloric data are not redundant, and each test provides unique information regarding the functional integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal at different points on the frequency spectrum. The vHIT does offer some advantages over caloric testing, but at the expense of sensitivity. The vHIT can be completed in less time, is not noxious to the patient, and requires very little laboratory space. However, the

  7. Addressing the policy cacophony does not require more evidence: an argument for reframing obesity as caloric overconsumption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous policies have been proposed to address the public health problem of obesity, resulting in a policy cacophony. The noise of so many policy options renders it difficult for policymakers to determine which policies warrant implementation. This has resulted in calls for more and better evidence to support obesity policy. However, it is not clear that evidence is the solution. This paper argues that to address the policy cacophony it is necessary to rethink the problem of obesity, and more specifically, how the problem of obesity is framed. This paper argues that the frame “obesity” be replaced by the frame “caloric overconsumption”, concluding that the frame caloric overconsumption can overcome the obesity policy cacophony. Discussion Frames are important because they influence public policy. Understood as packages that define issues, frames influence how best to approach a problem. Consequently, debates over public policy are considered battles over framing, with small shifts in how an issue is framed resulting in significant changes to the policy environment. This paper presents a rationale for reframing the problem of obesity as caloric overconsumption. The frame “obesity” contributes to the policy cacophony by including policies aimed at both energy output and energy input. However, research increasingly demonstrates that energy input is the primary cause of obesity, and that increases in energy input are largely attributable to the food environment. By focusing on policies that aim to prevent increases in energy input, the frame caloric overconsumption will reduce the noise of the obesity policy cacophony. While the proposed frame will face some challenges, particularly industry opposition, policies aimed at preventing caloric overconsumption have a clearer focus, and can be more politically palatable if caloric overconsumption is seen as an involuntary risk resulting from the food environment. Summary The paper concludes that

  8. Caloric Intake from Fast Food among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2011-2012. NCHS Data Brief. Number 213

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vikraman, Sundeep; Fryar, Cheryl D.; Ogden, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of fast food has been linked to weight gain in adults. Fast food has also been associated with higher caloric intake and poorer diet quality in children and adolescents. From 1994 through 2006, caloric intake from fast food increased from 10% to 13% among children aged 2-18 years. This report presents the most recent data on the…

  9. [Caloric value and ash content of dominant plants in plantation communities in Heshan of Guangdong, China].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-ping; Cai, Xi-an; Zhao, Ping; Rao, Xing-quan

    2009-03-01

    Different parts of twenty dominant plant species in five plantation communities on the subtropical hilly lands in Heshan of Gunagdong as well as the litters from three of the five plantation communities were sampled, and their gross caloric value (GCV) and ash content were measured by using a PARR-1281 oxygen bomb calorimeter and a muffle furnace. Based on the measurements, the ash-free caloric value (AFCV) of the samples was calculated, and the characteristics of caloric value and ash content of the samples, according to plant part, individual, and plant growth form, were analyzed. The results showed that the GCV and AFCV of leaf, branch, stem wood, stem bark, and root were in the range of 10.7-22.17 kJ x g(-1) and 13.89-23.04 kJ x g(-1), respectively. The GCV and AFCV of leaf were significantly higher than those of other parts (P < 0.05), and the individual plant' s weighted mean values of GCV and AFCV were in the range of 14.24-19.43 and 16.63-20.99 kJ x g(-1), respectively. The mean AFCV of plantation communities was in the order of tree layer (19.55 kJ x g(-1)) > shrub layer (19.46 kJ x g(-1) > herb layer (18.77 kJ x g(-1)), with indigenous coniferous tree (19.86 kJ x g(-1)) > indigenous broad-leaved tree (19.55 kJ x g(-1)) > exotic eucalyptus (19.18 kJ x g(-1)), while the mean ash content was just the opposite. In Acacia mangium, coniferous, and Schima plantation communities, the GCV and AFCV of litters were higher than those of various plant parts (P < 0.01). The litter-falls in A. mangium and coniferous plantations had higher mean GCV and AFCV than the litters and fresh leaves of tree layer, while the fresh leaves of tree layer in Schima plantation showed higher mean GCV and AFCV.

  10. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory Rat: Effects on Body Composition, Metabolism, Growth, and Overall Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? How do lean and obese rats respond physiologically to caloric restriction? What is the main finding and its importance? Obese rats show marked benefits compared with lean animals. Reduced body fat is associated with improv...

  11. A two year randomized controlled trial of human caloric restriction: feasibility and effects on predictors of health span and longevity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Caloric restriction (CR), energy intake reduced below ad libitum (AL) intake, increases life span in many species. The implications for humans can be clarified by randomized controlled trials of CR. Methods: To determine CRs feasibility, safety, and effects on predictors of longevity, di...

  12. Caloric test and video-head-impulse: a study of vertigo/dizziness patients in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Mahringer, Andrea; Rambold, Holger A

    2014-03-01

    The head-impulse test (HIT) is an important test for examining unilateral vestibular hypofunction. The new video-head-impulse test (vHIT) is more sensitive and specific than the clinical bedside-head-impulse test (bHIT). Alternatively, one can test for vestibular hypofunction with the caloric irrigation test. Various studies showed that both tests may not always identify vestibular hypofunction; instead, the results of the tests might be contradictory. To evaluate the diagnostic value of these tests, we routinely measured patients exhibiting vertigo or dizziness at our community hospital with bithermal caloric irrigation, the bHIT and the vHIT. Only those patients (n = 172) with a pathological caloric irrigation test of more than 25 % unilateral weakness in the Jongkee's formula were included. Out of these patients, 41 % had a pathologic vHIT. Among the subgroup with acute symptoms (symptom onset within 5 days), 63 % had a pathological video-head-impulse, whereas only 33 % of the non-acute group (symptom onset more than 5 days) tested pathological. A pathological HIT depended on the disease stage, the amount of unilateral weakness in caloric examination and on the test itself.

  13. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory Rat: Effects on Body Composition, Metabolism, Growth, and Overall Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? How do lean and obese rats respond physiologically to caloric restriction? What is the main finding and its importance? Obese rats show marked benefits compared with lean animals. Reduced body fat is associated with improv...

  14. Effects of Caloric Intake on Learning and Memory Function in Juvenile C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Lei; Wang, Rong; Ma, Li-Na; Dong, Wen; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Dietary composition may influence neuronal function as well as processes underlying synaptic plasticity. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of high and low caloric diets on a mouse model of learning and memory and to explore mechanisms underlying this process. Mice were divided into three different dietary groups: normal control (n = 12), high-caloric (HC) diet (n = 12), and low-caloric (LC) diet (n = 12). After 6 months, mice were evaluated on the Morris water maze to assess spatial memory ability. We found that HC diet impaired learning and memory function relative to both control and LC diet. The levels of SIRT1 as well as its downstream effectors p53, p16, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) were decreased in brain tissues obtained from HC mice. LC upregulated SIRT1 but downregulated p53, p16, and PPARγ. The expressions of PI3K and Akt were not altered after HC or LC diet treatment, but both LC and HC elevated the levels of phosphorylated-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) and IGF-1 in hippocampal CA1 region. Therefore, HC diet-induced dysfunction in learning and memory may be prevented by caloric restriction via regulation of the SIRT1-p53 or IGF-1 signaling pathways and phosphorylation of CREB.

  15. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Cardiovascular Aging in Non-human Primates and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cruzen, Christina; Colman, Ricki J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Approximately one in three Americans has some form of cardiovascular disease (CVD), accounting for one of every 2.8 deaths in the United States in 2004. Two of the major risk factors for CVD are advancing age and obesity. An intervention able to positively impact both aging and obesity, such as caloric restriction (CR), may prove extremely useful in the fight against CVD. CR is the only environmental or lifestyle intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase maximum life span and to retard aging in laboratory rodents. In this article, we review evidence that CR in nonhuman primates and humans has a positive effect on risk factors for CVD. PMID:19944270

  16. Mechanism by Which Caloric Restriction Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew L.; Distelmaier, Klaus; Lanza, Ian R.; Irving, Brian A.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Konopka, Adam R.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) improves insulin sensitivity and reduces the incidence of diabetes in obese individuals. The underlying mechanisms whereby CR improves insulin sensitivity are not clear. We evaluated the effect of 16 weeks of CR on whole-body insulin sensitivity by pancreatic clamp before and after CR in 11 obese participants (BMI = 35 kg/m2) compared with 9 matched control subjects (BMI = 34 kg/m2). Compared with the control subjects, CR increased the glucose infusion rate needed to maintain euglycemia during hyperinsulinemia, indicating enhancement of peripheral insulin sensitivity. This improvement in insulin sensitivity was not accompanied by changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity or oxidant emissions, nor were there changes in skeletal muscle ceramide, diacylglycerol, or amino acid metabolite levels. However, CR lowered insulin-stimulated thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) levels and enhanced nonoxidative glucose disposal. These results support a role for TXNIP in mediating the improvement in peripheral insulin sensitivity after CR. PMID:26324180

  17. Facts and controversies in our understanding of how caloric restriction impacts the mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Hepple, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has pronounced benefits in promoting healthy aging. Amongst the most frequently implicated physiological mechanisms implicated in this benefit is altered mitochondrial function. Whereas a reduction in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a widely consistent effect of CR, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is accepted by many as fact, is contradicted on several levels, most critically by a lack of increase in mitochondrial protein synthesis rate in vivo. Furthermore, an increase in PGC-1α protein and markers of mitochondrial content with CR is a highly variable observation between studies. On the other hand, deacetylation of several mitochondrial proteins by the sirtuin, Sirt3, is an increasingly reported observation and at least so far, this observation is consistent between studies. Notwithstanding this point, the controversies evident in the published literature underscore the significant questions that remain in our understanding of how CR impacts the mitochondrion and suggest we have yet to fully understand the complexities herein.

  18. Chaos theory applied to the caloric response of the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Aasen, T

    1993-12-01

    Developments in the field of nonlinear dynamics has given us a new conceptual framework for understanding the mechanisms involved in the regulation of complex nonlinear systems. This concept, called "chaos" or "deterministic chaos," has been applied to EKG, EEG, and other physiological signals, but not yet to the ENG signal. The underlying geometrical structure in chaotic dynamics is fractal (noninteger dimension), and calculating the fractal dimension of the electronystagmographic recording from caloric testing gave a dimension ranging from 3.3 to 7.7. This result demonstrates that the multidimensional vestibular system, with its numerous neurological pathways, can somehow reduce the degrees of freedom and give rise to an irregular dynamic low-dimensional behavior, which is associated with deterministic chaos.

  19. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Alexis M; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake.

  20. Caloric Restriction as a Strategy to Improve Vascular Dysfunction in Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Concha F.; Fernández-Alfonso, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has proved to be the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention to increase healthy lifespan and aging. A reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in obese subjects can be already achieved by a moderate and sustainable weight loss. Since pharmacological approaches for body weight reduction have, at present, a poor long-term efficacy, CR is of great interest in the prevention and/or reduction of CVD associated with obesity. Other dietary strategies changing specific macronutrients, such as altering carbohydrates, protein content or diet glycemic index have been also shown to decrease the progression of CVD in obese patients. In this review, we will focus on the positive effects and possible mechanisms of action of these strategies on vascular dysfunction. PMID:27314388

  1. Left caloric vestibular stimulation as a tool to reveal implicit and explicit parameters of body representation.

    PubMed

    Sedda, A; Tonin, D; Salvato, G; Gandola, M; Bottini, G

    2016-04-01

    Homeostatic parameters, such as temperature, are related to body representation. In this study, we measured whether caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) alters body temperature and tactile processing, and if in the direction predicted by a holistic body matrix representation. Skin temperature and tactile two-point discrimination (TPD) acuity were measured for both arms before, immediately after and with a delay from CVS. Participants were also administered a personality questionnaire and an anxiety inventory to rule out confounding factors. Two control experiments were planned to exclude casual variations. Our results show that temperature drops significantly in both arms after CVS. CVS also induces a bilateral improvement in tactile acuity (even though not immediately after but in the delayed condition). Finally, these effects are not due to learning, as demonstrated by the control experiment. In summary, our results suggest that vestibular stimulation updates body representation, supporting the evidence in favor of a body matrix.

  2. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    PubMed Central

    Hambly, Catherine; Duncan, Jacqueline S.; Archer, Zoë A.; Moar, Kim M.; Mercer, Julian G.; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH) represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR). We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity. PMID:21954068

  3. The effect of non-caloric sweeteners on cognition, choice, and post-consumption satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sarah E; Prokosch, Marjorie L; Morin, Amanda; Rodeheffer, Christopher D

    2014-12-01

    Consumers often turn to non-caloric sweeteners (NCS) as a means of promoting a healthy body weight. However, several studies have now linked their long-term use to increased weight gain, raising the question of whether these products produce unintended psychological, physiological, or behavioral changes that have implications for weight management goals. In the following, we present the results of three experiments bearing on this issue, testing whether NCS-consumption influences how individuals think about and respond to food. Participants in each of our three experiments were randomly assigned to consume a sugar-sweetened beverage, an unsweetened beverage, or a beverage sweetened with NCS. We then measured their cognition (Experiment 1), product choice (Experiment 2), and subjective responses to a sugar-sweetened food (Experiment 3). Results revealed that consuming NCS-sweetened beverages influences psychological processes in ways that - over time - may increase calorie intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's.

    PubMed

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Microarray profiling of gene expression in aging and its alteration by caloric restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Weindruch, R; Kayo, T; Lee, C K; Prolla, T A

    2001-03-01

    An active research area in biological gerontology concerns the mechanisms by which caloric restriction (CR) retards the aging process in laboratory rodents. We used high density oligonucleotide arrays representing 6347 genes to determine the gene expression profile of the aging process in gastrocnemius muscle of male C57BL/6 mice. Aging resulted in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. Most alterations were completely or partially prevented by CR. Transcriptional patterns of muscle from calorie-restricted animals suggest that CR retards the aging process by causing a metabolic shift toward increased protein turnover and decreased macromolecular damage. The use of high density oligonucleotide microarrays provides a new tool to measure biological age on a tissue-specific basis and to evaluate at the molecular level the efficacy of nutritional interventions designed to retard the aging process.

  6. Caloric restriction reduces age-related and all-cause mortality in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Ricki J.; Beasley, T. Mark; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Weindruch, Richard; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases longevity and delays the onset of age-associated disorders in short-lived species, from unicellular organisms to laboratory mice and rats. The value of CR as a tool to understand human ageing relies on translatability of CR’s effects in primates. Here we show that CR significantly improves age-related and all-cause survival in monkeys on a long-term ~30% restricted diet since young adulthood. These data contrast with observations in the 2012 NIA intramural study report, where a difference in survival was not detected between control-fed and CR monkeys. A comparison of body weight of control animals from both studies with each other, and against data collected in a multi-centred relational database of primate ageing, suggests that the NIA control monkeys were effectively undergoing CR. Our data indicate that the benefits of CR on ageing are conserved in primates. PMID:24691430

  7. Achieving tailorable magneto-caloric effect in the Gd-Co binary amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Ding, D.; Xia, L.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    Tailorable magnetic properties and magneto-caloric effect were achieved in the Gd-Co binary amorphous alloys. It was found that the Curie temperature (Tc) of the GdxCo100-x (x=50, 53, 56, 58, 60) metallic glasses can be tuned by changing the concentration of Gd as Tc =708.8-8.83x, and the mechanism involved was investigated. On the other hand, a linear correlation between the peak value of magnetic entropy change (-Δ Smpeak) and Tc-2/3 is found in the amorphous alloys with a linear correlation coefficients of above 0.992. Therefore, the -ΔSmpeak of the Gd-Co binary amorphous alloys under different magnetic fields can be easily tailored by adjusting the composition of the alloy.

  8. Tuning the caloric response of BaTiO3 by tensile epitaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünebohm, Anna; Marathe, Madhura; Ederer, Claude

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of epitaxial strain on the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in BaTiO3 by means of ab-initio-based molecular-dynamics simulations. We show that tensile strain can be used to optimize the operation range for ferroic cooling. Strain in the range of ≤ 1% can be used to shift the operation temperature by several hundreds of kelvin both to higher and lower temperatures, depending on the direction of the external field. In addition, the transformation between multi-domain and mono-domain states, induced by an in-plane electric field, results in an additional peak of the adiabatic temperature change at lower temperatures, and a broad temperature interval where the caloric response scales linearly with the applied field strength, even up to very high fields.

  9. Adiabatic measurements of magneto-caloric effects in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 55 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, T.; Kohama, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Katsumoto, S.; Tokunaga, M.

    2013-07-01

    Magneto-caloric effects (MCEs) measurement system in adiabatic condition is proposed to investigate the thermodynamic properties in pulsed magnetic fields up to 55 T. With taking the advantage of the fast field-sweep rate in pulsed field, adiabatic measurements of MCEs were carried out at various temperatures. To obtain the prompt response of the thermometer in the pulsed field, a thin film thermometer is grown directly on the sample surfaces. The validity of the present setup was demonstrated in the wide temperature range through the measurements on Gd at about room temperature and on Gd3Ga5O12 at low temperatures. The both results show reasonable agreement with the data reported earlier. By comparing the MCE data with the specific heat data, we could estimate the entropy as functions of magnetic field and temperature. The results demonstrate the possibility that our approach can trace the change in transition temperature caused by the external field.

  10. Hypophosphatemia and neurological changes secondary to oral caloric intake: a variant of hyperalimentation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silvis, S E; DiBartolomeo, A G; Aaker, H M

    1980-03-01

    Previous reports have described a syndrome of paresthesias, weakness, seizures and hypophosphatemia in patients and animals receiving intravenous hyperalimentation. In this report we describe a group of five patients who developed this syndrome while on oral caloric intake and three patients who received only modest amounts of hyperalimentation therapy. As an experimental corollary, studies were performed in starved and normal dogs with calories infused via an intragastric catheter. The serum inorganic phosphorus (Pi) fell slightly in normal animals from 4.8-2.5 mg. %. In the starved dogs with diarrhea or vomiting the Pi fell gradually from 4.8-1.6. In starved dogs without gastrointestinal symptoms the Pi fell precipitously from 3.7-1.4 mg % on the first day of infusion and remained at that level. Approximately 50% of the starved animals developed the neurological syndrome; none of the normal animals had neurological symptoms.

  11. Characterization of global gene expression during assurance of lifespan extension by caloric restriction in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Young-Yon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the best-studied intervention known to delay aging and extend lifespan in evolutionarily distant organisms ranging from yeast to mammals in the laboratory. Although the effect of CR on lifespan extension has been investigated for nearly 80years, the molecular mechanisms of CR are still elusive. Consequently, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of when and how lifespan is affected by CR. In this study, we first identified the time-windows during which CR assured cellular longevity by switching cells from culture media containing 2% or 0.5% glucose to water, which allows us to observe CR and non-calorically-restricted cells under the same conditions. We also constructed time-dependent gene expression profiles and selected 646 genes that showed significant changes and correlations with the lifespan-extending effect of CR. The positively correlated genes participated in transcriptional regulation, ribosomal RNA processing and nuclear genome stability, while the negatively correlated genes were involved in the regulation of several metabolic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum function, stress response and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we discovered major upstream regulators of those significantly changed genes, including AZF1 (YOR113W), HSF1 (YGL073W) and XBP1 (YIL101C). Deletions of two genes, AZF1 and XBP1 (HSF1 is essential and was thus not tested), were confirmed to lessen the lifespan extension mediated by CR. The absence of these genes in the tor1Δ and ras2Δ backgrounds did show non-overlapping effects with regard to CLS, suggesting differences between the CR mechanism for Tor and Ras signaling. © 2013.

  12. Caloric beverages consumed freely at meal-time add calories to an ad libitum meal.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Shirin; El Khoury, Dalia; Luhovyy, Bohdan L; Goff, H Douglas; Anderson, G Harvey

    2013-06-01

    The objective was to compare the effects of ad libitum consumption of commonly consumed meal-time beverages on energy and fluid intakes and post-meal average subjective appetite and blood glucose in healthy adults. In a randomized controlled design, 29 males and females consumed to satiation an ad libitum pizza meal with one of five beverages in unlimited amount including water (0 kcal), 1% milk (44 kcal/100 ml), regular cola (44 kcal/100 ml), orange juice (44 kcal/100 ml) and diet cola (0 kcal). Food and fluid intakes were measured at the meal. Average subjective appetite and blood glucose were measured before and for 2h after the meal. Although energy intake from pizza was similar among all beverage treatments, the amount of fluid consumed (g) varied among the beverages with intake of orange juice higher than regular and diet cola, but not different from water or milk. Meal-time ingestion of caloric beverages, milk, orange juice and regular cola, led to higher total meal-time energy intakes compared to either water or diet cola. Post-meal blood glucose area under the curve (AUC) was lower after milk than after meals with water, orange juice and regular cola and post-meal average subjective appetite AUC was lower after milk than after meals with water. Meal intakes of nutrients including protein, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, vitamins B12, A and D were higher at the meal with milk compared to the other beverages. Thus, caloric beverages consumed ad libitum during a meal add to total meal-time energy intake, but 1% milk favors a lower post-meal blood glucose and average subjective appetite score and adds to nutrient intake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive Performances Are Selectively Enhanced during Chronic Caloric Restriction or Resveratrol Supplementation in a Primate

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, Julia; Picq, Jean-Luc; Aujard, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Effects of an 18-month treatment with a moderate, chronic caloric restriction (CR) or an oral supplementation with resveratrol (RSV), a potential CR mimetic, on cognitive and motor performances were studied in non-human primates, grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Thirty-three adult male mouse lemurs were assigned to three different groups: a control (CTL) group fed ad libitum, a CR group fed 70% of the CTL caloric intake, and an RSV group (RSV supplementation of 200 mg.kg−1.day−1) fed ad libitum. Three different cognitive tests, two motor tests, one emotional test and an analysis of cortisol level were performed in each group. Compared to CTL animals, CR or RSV animals did not show any change in motor performances evaluated by rotarod and jump tests, but an increase in spontaneous locomotor activity was observed in both groups. Working memory was improved by both treatments in the spontaneous alternation task. Despite a trend for CR group, only RSV supplementation increased spatial memory performances in the circular platform task. Finally, none of these treatments induced additional stress to the animals as reflected by similar results in the open field test and cortisol analyses compared to CTL animals. The present data provided the earliest evidence for a beneficial effect of CR or RSV supplementation on specific cognitive functions in a primate. Taken together, these results suggest that RSV could be a good candidate to mimic long-term CR effects and support the growing evidences that nutritional interventions can have beneficial effects on brain functions even in adults. PMID:21304942

  14. Effects of caloric restriction and overnight fasting on cycling endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lisa M; Rossi, Kelly A; Ward, Emily; Jadwin, Emily; Miller, Todd A; Miller, Wayne C

    2009-03-01

    In addition to aerobic endurance and anaerobic capacity, high power-to-weight ratio (PWR) is important for cycling performance. Cyclists often try to lose weight before race season to improve body composition and optimize PWR. Research has demonstrated body fat-reducing benefits of exercise after fasting overnight. We hypothesized that fasted-state exercise in calorie-restricted trained cyclists would not result in performance decrements and that their PWR would improve significantly. We also hypothesized that substrate use during fasted-state submaximal endurance cycling would shift to greater reliance on fat. Ten trained, competitive cyclists completed a protocol consisting of baseline testing, 3 weeks of caloric restriction (CR), and post-CR testing. The testing sessions measured pre- and post-CR values for resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition, VO2, PWR and power-to-lean weight ratio (PLWR), and power output, as well as 2-hour submaximal cycling performance, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and respiratory exchange ratio (RER). There were no significant differences between baseline and post-CR for submaximal trial RER, power output, VO2, RMR, VO2max, or workload at VO2max. However, RPE was significantly lower, and PWR was significantly higher post-CR, whereas RER did not change. The cyclists' PWR and body composition improved significantly, and their overall weight, fat weight, and body fat percentage decreased. Lean mass was maintained. The cyclists' RPE decreased significantly during 2 hours of submaximal cycling post-CR, and there was no decrement in submaximal or maximal cycling performance after 3 weeks of CR combined with overnight fasting. Caloric restriction (up to 40% for 3 weeks) and exercising after fasting overnight can improve a cyclist's PWR without compromising endurance cycling performance.

  15. Effects of caloric restriction on nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios in adult rat bone.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kimberly L; Rowland, Neil E; Krigbaum, John

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope analysis is a valuable technique for dietary estimation in ecological and archaeological research, yet many variables can potentially affect tissue stable isotope signatures. Controlled feeding studies across a range of species have consistently demonstrated impacts of caloric restriction on tissue stable isotope ratios, but most have focused on juvenile, fasting, and/or starving individuals, and most have utilized soft tissues despite the importance of bone for paleodietary analyses. The goal of this study was to determine whether temporally defined, moderate food restriction could affect stable carbon and/or nitrogen isotope ratios in adult mammalian bone - a tissue that arguably reflects long-term dietary signals. Adult rats fed a standard laboratory diet were restricted to 45% of ad libitum intakes for 3 or 6 months. Relevant anatomical and physiological parameters were measured to confirm that the restriction protocol resulted in significant nutritional stress and to provide independent data to facilitate interpretation of stable isotope ratios. Femoral bone δ(13)Ccollagen, δ(15)Ncollagen, and δ(13)Capatite values were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calorie-restricted animals exhibited a small, yet significant enrichment in (15)Ncollagen compared with control animals, reflecting protein-calorie stress. While the δ(13)Ccollagen values did not differ, the δ(13)Capatite values revealed less enrichment in (13)C than in controls, reflecting catabolism of body fat. Independent anatomical and physiological data from these same individuals support these interpretations. Results indicate that moderate caloric restriction does not appreciably undermine broad interpretations of dietary signals in adult mammalian bone. Significant variability among individuals or groups, however, is best explained by marked differences in energy intake over variable timescales. An inverse relationship between the δ(13)Capatite and δ(15)Ncollagen

  16. Higher Caloric Refeeding Is Safe in Hospitalised Adolescent Patients with Restrictive Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Elizabeth K.; Faruquie, Sahrish S.; Anderson, Gail; Gomes, Linette; Kennedy, Andrew; Wearne, Christine M.; Kohn, Michael R.; Clarke, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study examines weight gain and assesses complications associated with refeeding hospitalised adolescents with restrictive eating disorders (EDs) prescribed initial calories above current recommendations. Methods. Patients admitted to an adolescent ED structured “rapid refeeding” program for >48 hours and receiving ≥2400 kcal/day were included in a 3-year retrospective chart review. Results. The mean (SD) age of the 162 adolescents was 16.7 years (0.9), admission % median BMI was 80.1% (10.2), and discharge % median BMI was 93.1% (7.0). The mean (SD) starting caloric intake was 2611.7 kcal/day (261.5) equating to 58.4 kcal/kg (10.2). Most patients (92.6%) were treated with nasogastric tube feeding. The mean (SD) length of stay was 3.6 weeks (1.9), and average weekly weight gain was 2.1 kg (0.8). No patients developed cardiac signs of RFS or delirium; complications included 4% peripheral oedema, 1% hypophosphatemia (<0.75 mmol/L), 7% hypomagnesaemia (<0.70 mmol/L), and 2% hypokalaemia (<3.2 mmol/L). Caloric prescription on admission was associated with developing oedema (95% CI 1.001 to 1.047; p = 0.039). No statistical significance was found between electrolytes and calories provided during refeeding. Conclusion. A rapid refeeding protocol with the inclusion of phosphate supplementation can safely achieve rapid weight restoration without increased complications associated with refeeding syndrome. PMID:27293884

  17. Caloric Restriction and the Aging Process: A Critique 5/15pm/2014

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Rajindar S.; Forster, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this review is to provide an appraisal of the current status of the relationship between energy intake and the life span of animals. The concept, that a reduction in food intake, or caloric restriction (CR), retards the aging process, delays the age-associated decline in physiological fitness and extends the life span of organisms of diverse phylogenetic groups, is one of the leading paradigms in gerontology. However, emerging evidence disputes some of the primary tenets of this conception. One disparity is that the CR-related increase in longevity is not universal and may not even be shared among different strains of the same species. A further misgiving is that the control animals, fed ad-libitum (AL), become overweight, prone to early onset of diseases and death, and thus may not be the ideal control animals for studies concerned with comparisons of longevity. Re-examination of body weight and longevity data from a study involving over 60,000 mice and rats, conducted by a National Institute on Aging-sponsored project, suggests that CR-related increase in life span of specific genotypes is directly related to the gain in body weight under the AL feeding regimen. Additionally, CR in mammals and “dietary restriction” in organisms, such as Drosophila, are dissimilar phenomena, albeit they are often presented to be the very same. The latter involves a reduction in yeast rather than caloric intake, which is inconsistent with the notion of a common, conserved mechanism of CR action in different species. Although specific mechanisms by which CR affects longevity are not well understood, existing evidence supports the view that CR increases the life span of those particular genotypes that develop energy imbalance due to AL feeding. In such groups, CR lowers body temperature, rate of metabolism and oxidant production, and retards the age-related pro-oxidizing shift in the redox state. PMID:24941891

  18. Low-versus high-glycemic index diets in women: effects on caloric requirement, substrate utilization and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Clapp, James F; Lopez, Beth

    2007-09-01

    Lowering dietary glycemic index appears to have positive health effects in obese and/or insulin resistant individuals. However, detailed studies in lean young men show no effect. This study was designed to test the null hypothesis that a diet rich in low-glycemic carbohydrate has no effect on lipid profile, caloric requirements, fat oxidation, or insulin sensitivity in adult women when compared to one rich in high-glycemic carbohydrate. The metabolic feeding protocol used was conducted in both a free-living and in-patient setting using a randomized crossover design. Seven women were studied on each of 2 diets in which 60% of the calories were from either high- or low-glycemic carbohydrate sources. Each diet lasted 20 days with measurements of caloric requirement, resting metabolic rate, glucose and insulin responses to diet and activity, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profile over the last 7 days. Caloric requirement was determined by bomb calorimetry. Other techniques included indirect calorimetry, hydrodensitometry, stable isotope tracers, and the euglycemic clamp. On the low-glycemic index diet the women's caloric requirements were 11% +/- 1% higher, fat oxidation at fasted rest supplied an average of 45% +/- 4% versus 28% +/- 5% of oxidative requirements, average glucose and insulin levels were approximately 40% lower, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and leptin concentrations were lower, and various indices of insulin sensitivity were > 20% higher. In this group of adult women, a diet that lowered glycemic index well below that typically found in western diets increased both daily caloric requirement and fat oxidation, decreased insulin and glucose concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity.

  19. Daily exercise vs. caloric restriction for prevention of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the OLETF rat model.

    PubMed

    Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Morris, E Matthew; Borengasser, Sarah J; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W; Thyfault, John P; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2011-05-01

    The maintenance of normal body weight either through dietary modification or being habitually more physically active is associated with reduced incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the means by which weight gain is prevented and potential mechanisms activated remain largely unstudied. Here, we sought to determine the effects of obesity prevention by daily exercise vs. caloric restriction on NAFLD in the hyperphagic, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. At 4 wk of age, male OLETF rats (n = 7-8/group) were randomized to groups of ad libitum fed, sedentary (OLETF-SED), voluntary wheel running exercise (OLETF-EX), or caloric restriction (OLETF-CR; 70% of SED) until 40 wk of age. Nonhyperphagic, control strain Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were kept in sedentary cage conditions for the duration of the study (LETO-SED). Both daily exercise and caloric restriction prevented obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes observed in the OLETF-SED rats, with glucose tolerance during a glucose tolerance test improved to a greater extent in the OLETF-EX animals (30-50% lower glucose and insulin areas under the curve, P < 0.05). Both daily exercise and caloric restriction also prevented excess hepatic triglyceride and diacylglycerol accumulation (P < 0.001), hepatocyte ballooning and nuclear displacement, and the increased perivenular fibrosis and collagen deposition that occurred in the obese OLETF-SED animals. However, despite similar hepatic phenotypes, OLETF-EX rats also exhibited increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, enhanced oxidative enzyme function and protein content, and further suppression of hepatic de novo lipogenesis proteins compared with OLETF-CR. Prevention of obesity by either daily exercise or caloric restriction attenuates NAFLD development in OLETF rats. However, daily exercise may offer additional health benefits on glucose homeostasis and hepatic mitochondrial function compared with

  20. Short-term hyper-caloric diet induces blunted aortic vasoconstriction and enhanced vasorelaxation via increased NOS3 activity and expression in Dahl salt-sensitive rats

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Pollock, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that hyper-caloric diet on mechanisms of angiotensin (Ang)II-induced vasoconstriction in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats and genetic control SS-13BN rats. Methods Aortic function was assessed using wire myography in 16-week-old rats maintained on a normal diet or started on a 4-week hyper-caloric diet at 12-weeks-old. Results On normal diet, AngII vasoconstriction was greater in SS rats than SS-13BN rats. Intriguingly, the AngII response was reduced in aortic rings from SS rats on hyper-caloric diet versus normal diet, whereas this response was not altered by hyper-caloric diet in SS-13BN rats. We probed whether O2−, H2O2, or NO mediate the AngII response. PEG-SOD reduced the AngII response in all 4 groups. Catalase treatment of aortic rings did not alter aortic AngII response from SS rats on hyper-caloric but reduced the aortic AngII response of SS rats on normal diet; the exact opposite finding was observed with catalase in SS-13BN rats. L-NAME increased AngII response in SS rats on hyper-caloric but was without effect in the normal diet group. In stark contrast, L-NAME did not alter the AngII response in SS-13BN rats on hyper-caloric diet, yet L-NAME enhanced AngII responsiveness in the normal diet group. In SS rats, hyper-caloric diet increased aortic NOS3 activity and expression corresponding with increased endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation. Conclusion A short-term hyper-caloric diet elicits a vasodilatory phenotype in SS rats, but not in SS-13BN rats, by increasing NOS3 expression and function as well as reducing H2O2 function. PMID:23176108

  1. Caloric stress alters fat characteristics and Hsp70 expression in milk somatic cells of lactating beef cows

    PubMed Central

    Eitam, Harel; Brosh, Arieh; Orlov, Alla; Izhaki, Ido

    2008-01-01

    Selection for higher production rate in cattle inhabiting challenging habitats may be considered disadvantageous because of possible deleterious effects on immunity and reproduction and, consequently, on calf crop percentage. In Israel, free-grazing high productive beef cows experience reduction in nutritional quality of forage during up to 8 months of the year. As milk production by dams dictates calf performance, dam’s nutritional needs and rebreeding rates, the aim of the present study was to test how lactating beef cows deal with combined caloric and protein stress both at the productive and self protective levels. For this purpose, we studied the effect of long-term caloric stress on milk characteristics and gene expression of stress and milk components producing proteins. Lactating dams responded to caloric stress by decreased body weight, milk, and milk protein production. To compensate for total energy loses in milk, they produced milk of higher fat concentration and shifted the proportions of its fatty acids towards long and unsaturated ones. This was reflected by increased mRNA transcription of the fatty acid binding protein. Prolonged low-energy diet promoted cell-specific heat shock protein (Hsp) response; whereas significant increase of Hsp90 but unchanged levels of Hsp70 proteins were observed in white blood cells, the expression of Hsp70 in milk somatic cells was markedly attenuated, in parallel with a marked increase of αs1-casein expression. At the mammary gland level, these results may indicate a decrease in turnover of proteins and a shift to an exclusive expression of milk components producing factors. Similar responses to caloric stress were revealed also in ketotic dairy cows. Ketosis promoted a shift towards long and unsaturated fatty acids and an increased expression of αs1-casein in milk somatic cells. These findings may reflect an evolutionary-preserved mechanism in lactating cows for coping with caloric restriction. Overall, our

  2. Looking at the label and beyond: the effects of calorie labels, health consciousness, and demographics on caloric intake in restaurants.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Brenna; Lusk, Jayson L; Davis, David

    2013-02-08

    Recent legislation has required calorie labels on restaurant menus as a means of improving Americans' health. Despite the growing research in this area, no consensus has been reached on the effectiveness of menu labels. This suggests the possibility of heterogeneity in responses to caloric labels across people with different attitudes and demographics. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential relationships between caloric intake and diners' socio-economic characteristics and attitudes in a restaurant field experiment that systematically varied the caloric information printed on the menus. We conducted a field experiment in a full service restaurant where patrons were randomly assigned to one of three menu treatments which varied the amount of caloric information printed on the menus (none, numeric, or symbolic calorie label). At the conclusion of their meals, diners were asked to complete a brief survey regarding their socio-economic characteristics, attitudes, and meal selections. Using regression analysis, we estimated the number of entrée and extra calories ordered by diners as a function of demographic and attitudinal variables. Additionally, irrespective of the menu treatment to which a subject was assigned, our study identified which types of people are likely to be low-, medium-, and high-calorie diners. Results showed that calorie labels have the greatest impact on those who are least health conscious. Additionally, using a symbolic calorie label can further reduce the caloric intake of even the most health conscious patrons. Finally, calorie labels were more likely to influence the selection of the main entrée as opposed to supplemental items such as drinks and desserts. If numeric calorie labels are implemented (as currently proposed), they are most likely to influence consumers who are less health conscious - probably one of the key targets of this legislation. Unfortunately, numeric labels did little for those consumers who were already

  3. Looking at the label and beyond: the effects of calorie labels, health consciousness, and demographics on caloric intake in restaurants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent legislation has required calorie labels on restaurant menus as a means of improving Americans’ health. Despite the growing research in this area, no consensus has been reached on the effectiveness of menu labels. This suggests the possibility of heterogeneity in responses to caloric labels across people with different attitudes and demographics. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential relationships between caloric intake and diners’ socio-economic characteristics and attitudes in a restaurant field experiment that systematically varied the caloric information printed on the menus. Methods We conducted a field experiment in a full service restaurant where patrons were randomly assigned to one of three menu treatments which varied the amount of caloric information printed on the menus (none, numeric, or symbolic calorie label). At the conclusion of their meals, diners were asked to complete a brief survey regarding their socio-economic characteristics, attitudes, and meal selections. Using regression analysis, we estimated the number of entrée and extra calories ordered by diners as a function of demographic and attitudinal variables. Additionally, irrespective of the menu treatment to which a subject was assigned, our study identified which types of people are likely to be low-, medium-, and high-calorie diners. Results Results showed that calorie labels have the greatest impact on those who are least health conscious. Additionally, using a symbolic calorie label can further reduce the caloric intake of even the most health conscious patrons. Finally, calorie labels were more likely to influence the selection of the main entrée as opposed to supplemental items such as drinks and desserts. Conclusions If numeric calorie labels are implemented (as currently proposed), they are most likely to influence consumers who are less health conscious – probably one of the key targets of this legislation. Unfortunately, numeric labels did

  4. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  5. Can vestibular caloric stimulation be used to treat Dejerine-Roussy Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; McGeoch, Paul D; Williams, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Dejerine-Roussy Syndrome (thalamic pain syndrome) is characterised by the development of chronic, severe pain in the contralateral half of the body after a thalamic stroke. It is often largely refractory to treatment. In this paper we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel therapy for this condition. There is already substantial evidence from neurological disease that the brain's left hemisphere serves to "smooth over" discrepancies in sensory input in order to impose order and maintain the existing view of the world around us. Conversely the right hemisphere acts on discrepant sensory input to cause a re-evaluation of one's world view. Based on this, it was proposed by Harris that pain is an organism's response to discrepancy. It is already known that cold water vestibular caloric irrigation of the ear leads to activation of a number of areas in the contralateral hemisphere - including the insular cortex. Indeed it is known that - presumably because it also activates the right parietal lobe - this technique can be used to treat anosognosia, somatoparaphrenia and neglect. In addition to being activated by vestibular stimulation, it has been shown that the posterior insula has a somatotopic map of the body for painful stimuli. We speculate that phylogenetically, close anatomical proximity between the pain and vestibular areas of the brain makes sense; as it would allow modulation of otherwise disabling chronic pain, when the organism makes a sudden movement to avoid a predator. Given Harris's theory we propose that post stroke thalamic pain may represent a pathological amplification of the thalamic posterior insular response to pain due to discrepant sensory input. Based on all the above we go on to hypothesise that cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating Dejerine-Roussy Syndrome and we present provisional evidence from two patients which supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct this will be

  6. Assessment of potentially harmful elements pollution in the Calore River basin (Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Zuzolo, Daniela; Cicchella, Domenico; Catani, Vittorio; Giaccio, Lucia; Guagliardi, Ilaria; Esposito, Libera; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-06-01

    The geographical distribution of concentration values for harmful elements was determined in the Campania region, Italy. The study area consists of the drainage basin of the River Calore, a tributary of the river Volturno, the largest Southern Italian river. The results provide reliable analytical data allowing a quantitative assessment of the trace element pollution threat to the ecosystem and human health. Altogether 562 stream sediment samples were collected at a sampling density of 1 site per 5 km(2). All samples were air-dried, sieved to <100 mesh fraction and analyzed for 37 elements after an aqua regia extraction by a combination of ICP-AES and ICP-MS. In addition to elemental analysis, gamma-ray spectrometry data were collected (a total of 562 measurements) using a hand-held Scintrex GRS-500 spectrometer. Statistical analyses were performed to show the single-element distribution and the distribution of elemental association factor scores resulting from R-mode factor analyses. Maps showing element distributions were made using GeoDAS and ArcGIS software. Our study showed that, despite evidence from concentrations of many elements for enrichment over natural background values, the spatial distribution of major and trace elements in Calore River basin is determined mostly by geogenic factors. The southwestern area of the basin highlighted an enrichment of many elements potentially harmful for human health and other living organisms (Al, Fe, K, Na, As, Cd, La, Pb, Th, Tl, U); however, these anomalies are due to the presence of pyroclastic and alkaline volcanic lithologies. Even where sedimentary lithologies occur, many harmful elements (Co, Cr, Mn, Ni) showed high concentration levels due to natural origins. Conversely, a strong heavy metal contamination (Pb, Zn, Cu, Sb, Ag, Au, Hg), due to an anthropogenic contribution, is highlighted in many areas characterized by the presence of road junctions, urban settlements and industrial areas. The enrichment factor

  7. Effect of caloric restriction on myenteric neuroplasticity in the rat duodenum during aging.

    PubMed

    da Silva Porto, Gisele; Bertaglia Pereira, Joice Naiara; Tibúrcio, Vanessa Graciele; Stabille, Sandra Regina; Garcia de Faria, Haroldo; de Melo Germano, Ricardo; de Britto Mari, Renata

    2012-05-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on myenteric neurons in the duodenum of Wistar rats during aging. Thirty rats were divided into three groups: the C group (six-month-old animals that were fed a normal diet from weaning until six months of age), the SR group (18-month-old animals that were fed a normal diet from weaning until 18 months of age) and the CR group (18-month-old animals that were fed a 30% CR diet after six months of age). After 12 months, the animals were euthanized. Whole-mount preparations of the duodenums were either stained with Giemsa or underwent NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry to determine the general myenteric neuron population and the nitrergic neuron subpopulation (NADPH-d+), respectively. The NADPH-d-negative (NADPH-d-) neuron population was estimated based on the difference between the Giemsa-stained and NADPH-d+ neurons. The neurons were counted, and the cell body areas were measured. Aging was associated with neuronal loss in the SR group, which was minimized by caloric restriction in the CR group. The density (mm(2)) of the Giemsa-stained neurons was higher in the SR group (79.09 ± 6.25) than in the CR (92.37 ± 11.6) and C (111.68 ± 15.26) groups. The density of the NADPH-d+ neurons was higher in the SR group (44.90 ± 5.88) than in the C (35.75 ± 1.6) and RC (39.14 ± 7.02) groups. The density of NADPH-d- neurons was higher in the CR (49.73 ± 12.08) and C (75.64 ± 17.05) groups than in the SR group (33.82 ± 4.5). In the C group, 32% and 68% of the Giemsa-stained myenteric neurons were NADPH-d+ or NADPH-d-, respectively. With aging (SR group), the percentage of nitrergic neurons (56.77%) increased, whereas the percentage of NADPH-d- neurons (43.22%) decreased. In the CR group, the change in the percentage of nitrergic (42.37%) and NADPH-d- (57.62%) neurons was lower. As NADPH-d- neurons will be mostly cholinergic neurons, CR appears to reduce the loss of cholinergic neurons during

  8. Acute caloric restriction counteracts hepatic bile acid and cholesterol deficiency in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Straniero, S; Rosqvist, F; Edholm, D; Ahlström, H; Kullberg, J; Sundbom, M; Risérus, U; Rudling, M

    2017-05-01

    Bile acid (BA) synthesis is regulated by BA signalling in the liver and by fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), synthesized and released from the intestine. In morbid obesity, faecal excretion and hepatic synthesis of BAs and cholesterol are strongly induced and caloric restriction reduces their faecal excretion considerably. We hypothesized that the high intestinal food mass in morbidly obese subjects promotes faecal excretion of BAs and cholesterol, thereby creating a shortage of both BAs and cholesterol in the liver. Ten morbidly obese women (BMI 42 ± 2.6 kg m(-2) ) were monitored on days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after beginning a low-calorie diet (800-1100 kcal day(-1) ). Serum was collected and liver size and fat content determined. Synthesis of BAs and cholesterol was evaluated from serum markers, and the serum levels of lipoproteins, BAs, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), insulin, glucose and FGF19 were monitored. Fifty-four nonobese women (BMI <25 kg m(-2) ) served as controls. At baseline, synthesis of both BAs and cholesterol and serum levels of BAs and PCSK9 were elevated in the obese group compared to controls. Already after 3 days on a low-calorie diet, BA and cholesterol synthesis and serum BA and PCSK9 levels normalized, whereas LDL cholesterol increased. FGF19 and triglyceride levels were unchanged, and liver volume was reduced by 10%. The results suggest that hepatic BAs and cholesterol are deficient in morbid obesity. Caloric restriction rapidly counteracts these deficiencies, normalizing BA and cholesterol synthesis and circulating PCSK9 levels, indicating that overproduction of cholesterol in enlarged peripheral tissues cannot explain this phenotype. We propose that excessive food intake promotes faecal loss of BAs and cholesterol contributing to their hepatic deficiencies. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of

  9. The effect of caloric restriction interventions on growth hormone secretion in nonobese men and women.

    PubMed

    Redman, Leanne M; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Rood, Jennifer; Smith, Steven R; Williamson, Donald; Ravussin, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Lifespan in rodents is prolonged by caloric restriction (CR) and by mutations affecting the somatotropic axis. It is not known if CR can alter the age-associated decline in growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and GH secretion. To evaluate the effect of CR on GH secretory dynamics; forty-three young (36.8 +/- 1.0 years), overweight (BMI 27.8 +/- 0.7) men (n = 20) and women (n = 23) were randomized into four groups; control = 100% of energy requirements; CR = 25% caloric restriction; CR + EX = 12.5% CR + 12.5% increase in energy expenditure by structured exercise; LCD = low calorie diet until 15% weight reduction followed by weight maintenance. At baseline and after 6 months, body composition (DXA), abdominal visceral fat (CT) 11 h GH secretion (blood sampling every 10 min for 11 h; 21:00-08:00 hours) and deconvolution analysis were measured. After 6 months, weight (control: -1 +/- 1%, CR: -10 +/- 1%, CR + EX: -10 +/- 1%, LCD: -14 +/- 1%), fat mass (control: -2 +/- 3%, CR: -24 +/- 3%, CR + EX: -25 +/- 3%, LCD: -31 +/- 2%) and visceral fat (control: -2 +/- 4%, CR: -28 +/- 4%, CR + EX: -27 +/- 3%, LCD: -36 +/- 2%) were significantly (P < 0.001) reduced in the three intervention groups compared to control. Mean 11 h GH concentrations were not changed in CR or control but increased in CR + EX (P < 0.0001) and LCD (P < 0.0001) because of increased secretory burst mass (CR + EX: 34 +/- 13%, LCD: 27 +/- 22%, P < 0.05) and amplitude (CR + EX: 34 +/- 14%, LCD: 30 +/- 20%, P < 0.05) but not to changes in secretory burst frequency or GH half-life. Fasting ghrelin was significantly increased from baseline in all three intervention groups; however, total IGF-1 concentrations were increased only in CR + EX (10 +/- 7%, P < 0.05) and LCD (19 +/- 4%, P < 0.001). A 25% CR diet for 6 months does not change GH, GH secretion or IGF-1 in nonobese men and women.

  10. Caloric restriction blocks neuropathology and motor deficits in Machado–Joseph disease mouse models through SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Santos, Janete; Duarte-Neves, Joana; Carmona, Vitor; Guarente, Leonard; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an abnormal expansion of the CAG triplet in the ATXN3 gene, translating into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. The available treatments only ameliorate symptomatology and do not block disease progression. In this study we find that caloric restriction dramatically rescues the motor incoordination, imbalance and the associated neuropathology in transgenic MJD mice. We further show that caloric restriction rescues SIRT1 levels in transgenic MJD mice, whereas silencing SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the beneficial effects on MJD pathology. In addition, the re-establishment of SIRT1 levels in MJD mouse model, through the gene delivery approach, significantly ameliorates neuropathology, reducing neuroinflammation and activating autophagy. Furthermore, the pharmacological activation of SIRT1 with resveratrol significantly reduces motor incoordination of MJD mice. The pharmacological SIRT1 activation could provide important benefits to treat MJD patients. PMID:27165717

  11. Better Living through Chemistry: Caloric Restriction (CR) and CR Mimetics Alter Genome Function to Promote Increased Health and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Zoe E.; Pickering, Joshua; Eskiw, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), defined as decreased nutrient intake without causing malnutrition, has been documented to increase both health and lifespan across numerous organisms, including humans. Many drugs and other compounds naturally occurring in our diet (nutraceuticals) have been postulated to act as mimetics of caloric restriction, leading to a wave of research investigating the efficacy of these compounds in preventing age-related diseases and promoting healthier, longer lifespans. Although well studied at the biochemical level, there are still many unanswered questions about how CR and CR mimetics impact genome function and structure. Here we discuss how genome function and structure are influenced by CR and potential CR mimetics, including changes in gene expression profiles and epigenetic modifications and their potential to identify the genetic fountain of youth. PMID:27588026

  12. Study of electro-caloric effect in Ca and Sn co-doped BaTiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sanjay Kumar; Fatima, Iram; Raghavendra Reddy, V.

    2017-04-01

    The present work deals with the study of structural, ferroelectric, dielectric and electro-caloric effects in lead free ferroelectric polycrystalline Ba1-x Ca x Ti0.95Sn0.05O3 (x  =  2, 5 and 10%) i.e. Ca, Sn co-doped BaTiO3 (BTO). Phase purity of the samples is confirmed from x-ray data by using Rietveld refinement. 119Sn Mössbauer reveals homogenous phase as well as iso-valent substitution of Sn at Ti site. Enhancements in ferroelectric and dielectric properties have been observed. Indirect method which is based on Maxwell equation has been used to determine the electro-caloric (EC) effect in the studied ferroelectric ceramics and maximum EC coefficient is observed for Ba0.95Ca0.05Ti0.95Sn0.05O3.

  13. Improved magneto-caloric effect of the Gd50Co50 metallic glass by minor Si addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B. Z.; Yu, P.; Ding, D.; Wu, C.; Xia, L.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, we studied the effect of minor Si addition on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of the Gd50Co50 metallic glass. The Gd50Co50-xSix (x=2, 5) as-spun ribbons show typical amorphous characteristics in structure and magneto-caloric behaviors. The peak values for the magnetic entropy change (-ΔSmpeak) of the Gd50Co50-xSix (x=0, 2, 5) metallic glasses increase significantly with the addition of Si. The mechanism for the enhanced MCE by minor addition of Si was investigated by revealing the relationship between -ΔSmpeak and the Curie temperature in the Gd-Co-based amorphous ribbons.

  14. The effect of brand and caloric information on flavor perception and food consumption in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Kevin V; Kruja, Blina; Forestell, Catherine A

    2014-11-01

    The goal of the current study was to determine whether provision of brand and caloric information affects sensory perception and consumption of a food in restrained (n=84) and unrestrained eaters (n=104). Using a between-subjects 2 × 2 × 3 design, female restrained and unrestrained eaters were asked to taste and rate a cookie that was labeled with a brand associated with healthful eating (Kashi(®)) or one associated with unhealthful eating (Nabisco(®)). Additionally, some participants were presented with a nutrition label alongside the brand name indicating that one serving contained 130 calories (Low-Calorie Condition), or 260 calories (High-Calorie Condition). The remaining participants were not shown a nutrition label (No Label Condition). Results indicated that those in the No Label or the High-Calorie Condition perceived the healthful branded cookie to have a better flavor than those who received the unhealthful branded cookie regardless of their restraint status. However, restrained eaters in the No Label Condition consumed more of the healthful than the unhealthful branded cookie, whereas those in the Low-Calorie Condition consumed more of the unhealthful than the healthful branded cookie. In contrast, unrestrained eaters ate more of the healthful branded cookie regardless of the caloric information provided. Thus, although restrained and unrestrained eaters' perceptions are similarly affected by branding and caloric information, brands and caloric information interact to affect restrained eaters' consumption. This study reveals that labeling foods as low calorie may create a halo effect which may lead to over-consumption of these foods in restrained eaters.

  15. Effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Rubio, Carmen; Carrascosa, Jose Ma; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Martín-Carro, Beatriz; Granado, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular alterations are the most prevalent cause of impaired physiological function in aged individuals with kidney being one the most affected organs. Aging-induced alterations in renal circulation are associated with a decrease in endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide (NO) and with an increase in contracting factors such as endothelin-1(ET-1). As caloric restriction (CR) exerts beneficial effects preventing some of the aging-induced alterations in cardiovascular system, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to ET-1 in aged rats. Vascular function was studied in renal arteries from 3-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (3m) and in renal arteries from 8-and 24-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (8m and 24m), or subjected to 20% caloric restriction during their three last months of life (8m-CR and 24m-CR). The contractile response to ET-1 was increased in renal arteries from 8m and 24m compared to 3m rats. ET-1-induced contraction was mediated by ET-A receptors in all experimental groups and also by ET-B receptors in 24m rats. Caloric restriction attenuated the increased contraction to ET-1 in renal arteries from 8m but not from 24m rats possibly through NO release proceeding from ET-B endothelial receptors. In 24m rats, CR did not attenuate the aging-increased response of renal arteries to ET-1, but it prevented the aging-induced increase in iNOS mRNA levels and the aging-induced decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in arterial tissue. In conclusion, aging is associated with an increased response to ET-1 in renal arteries that is prevented by CR in 8m but not in 24m rats.

  16. Effect of replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in beverages on the reward value after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Griffioen-Roose, Sanne; Smeets, Paul A M; Weijzen, Pascalle L G; van Rijn, Inge; van den Bosch, Iris; de Graaf, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The reward value of food is partly dependent on learned associations. It is not yet known whether replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in food is affecting long-term acceptance. To determine the effect of replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in a nutrient-empty drink (soft drink) versus nutrient-rich drink (yoghurt drink) on reward value after repeated exposure. We used a randomized crossover design whereby forty subjects (15 men, 25 women) with a mean ± SD age of 21 ± 2 y and BMI of 21.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2) consumed a fixed portion of a non-caloric sweetened (NS) and sugar sweetened (SS) versions of either a soft drink or a yoghurt drink (counterbalanced) for breakfast which were distinguishable by means of colored labels. Each version of a drink was offered 10 times in semi-random order. Before and after conditioning the reward value of the drinks was assessed using behavioral tasks on wanting, liking, and expected satiety. In a subgroup (n=18) fMRI was performed to assess brain reward responses to the drinks. Outcomes of both the behavioral tasks and fMRI showed that conditioning did not affect the reward value of the NS and SS versions of the drinks significantly. Overall, subjects preferred the yoghurt drinks to the soft drinks and the ss drinks to the NS drinks. In addition, they expected the yoghurt drinks to be more satiating, they reduced hunger more, and delayed the first eating episode more. Conditioning did not influence these effects. Our study showed that repeated consumption of a non-caloric sweetened beverage, instead of a sugar sweetened version, appears not to result in changes in the reward value. It cannot be ruled out that learned associations between sensory attributes and food satiating capacity which developed preceding the conditioning period, during lifetime, affected the reward value of the drinks.

  17. Effect of Replacing Sugar with Non-Caloric Sweeteners in Beverages on the Reward Value after Repeated Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen-Roose, Sanne; Smeets, Paul A. M.; Weijzen, Pascalle L. G.; van Rijn, Inge; van den Bosch, Iris; de Graaf, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Background The reward value of food is partly dependent on learned associations. It is not yet known whether replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in food is affecting long-term acceptance. Objective To determine the effect of replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in a nutrient-empty drink (soft drink) versus nutrient-rich drink (yoghurt drink) on reward value after repeated exposure. Design We used a randomized crossover design whereby forty subjects (15 men, 25 women) with a mean±SD age of 21±2 y and BMI of 21.5±1.7 kg/m2 consumed a fixed portion of a non-caloric sweetened (NS) and sugar sweetened (SS) versions of either a soft drink or a yoghurt drink (counterbalanced) for breakfast which were distinguishable by means of colored labels. Each version of a drink was offered 10 times in semi-random order. Before and after conditioning the reward value of the drinks was assessed using behavioral tasks on wanting, liking, and expected satiety. In a subgroup (n=18) fMRI was performed to assess brain reward responses to the drinks. Results Outcomes of both the behavioral tasks and fMRI showed that conditioning did not affect the reward value of the NS and SS versions of the drinks significantly. Overall, subjects preferred the yoghurt drinks to the soft drinks and the ss drinks to the NS drinks. In addition, they expected the yoghurt drinks to be more satiating, they reduced hunger more, and delayed the first eating episode more. Conditioning did not influence these effects. Conclusion Our study showed that repeated consumption of a non-caloric sweetened beverage, instead of a sugar sweetened version, appears not to result in changes in the reward value. It cannot be ruled out that learned associations between sensory attributes and food satiating capacity which developed preceding the conditioning period, during lifetime, affected the reward value of the drinks. PMID:24312382

  18. Short-term effects of sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction on blood pressure in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Amaia; Becerril, Sara; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Ramírez, Beatriz; Lancha, Andoni; Martín, Marina; Burrell, María A; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy constitutes an effective surgical procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity. The aim of the present study was to establish the effects of sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction on weight loss and cardiovascular parameters in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Male Wistar DIO rats were subjected to surgical interventions (n = 30) (sham operation, sleeve gastrectomy, or pair-fed to the amount of food eaten by sleeve-gastrectomized animals and compared to lean control rats) or dietary interventions (n = 40) (fed ad libitum a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet or an ND with a caloric restriction of 25 %). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, and mean blood pressure values and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious, resting animals by noninvasive tail-cuff plethysmography before and 3 weeks after surgical or dietary interventions. Both sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction induced a reduction in body weight, whole-body adiposity, and serum leptin together with an increased excess weight loss in DIO rats. Sleeve gastrectomy was further associated with an improvement in insulin resistance and the lipid profile, as well as with a reduction in serum ghrelin levels. A decrease in HR and heart weight was observed in caloric-restricted groups. Sleeve-gastrectomized rats not only exhibited a reduction in HR (∆HR = -45 ± 19 bpm) but also in SBP values (∆SBP = -22 ± 10 mmHg) compared to the DIO rats (∆SBP = 14 ± 8 mmHg). Our findings provide evidence that the beneficial effects of sleeve gastrectomy on blood pressure values are beyond weight loss in rats with diet-induced obesity.

  19. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J.E.; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Sun, Liou Y.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species. PMID:26959761

  20. Transport of heat in caloric vestibular stimulation. Conduction, convection or radiation?

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H; Hüttenbrink, K B; Delank, K W

    1991-01-01

    Experiments in temporal bone specimens were carried out under strictly controlled conditions: temperature (37 degrees C) and humidity kept constant; standardized irrigation of the external ear canal by an automated system (in 15 s, 50 ml of water, 11 degrees C above temperature of specimen), thermistor probes of 0.2 mm diameter placed in different parts of the specimens. In the intact temporal bone such an irrigation causes a rise in temperature with a gradient from the external ear canal across the bony bridge to the lateral semicircular canal as expected with heat conduction. After removal of the bony bridge, which is the main route for heat conduction, the rise in temperature in the lateral semicircular canal is greater and faster than in the intact specimen. This effect again is drastically reduced by placing a reflecting shield between tympanic membrane and labyrinth. In the intact middle ear inserting a reflecting shield or filling the cavity with gel also reduces the heat transfer to the labyrinth, although the bony routes for heat conduction are left untouched. The experiments prove that radiation plays an important part in heat transfer in caloric stimulation.

  1. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-01-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  2. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting: two potential diets for successful brain aging.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P; Maudsley, Stuart

    2006-08-01

    The vulnerability of the nervous system to advancing age is all too often manifest in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review article we describe evidence suggesting that two dietary interventions, caloric restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF), can prolong the health-span of the nervous system by impinging upon fundamental metabolic and cellular signaling pathways that regulate life-span. CR and IF affect energy and oxygen radical metabolism, and cellular stress response systems, in ways that protect neurons against genetic and environmental factors to which they would otherwise succumb during aging. There are multiple interactive pathways and molecular mechanisms by which CR and IF benefit neurons including those involving insulin-like signaling, FoxO transcription factors, sirtuins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. These pathways stimulate the production of protein chaperones, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes, all of which help cells cope with stress and resist disease. A better understanding of the impact of CR and IF on the aging nervous system will likely lead to novel approaches for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Krebs cycle enzymes from livers of old mice are differentially regulated by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Krebs cycle enzyme activities and levels of five metabolites were determined from livers of old mice (30 months) maintained either on control or on long-term caloric restriction (CR) diets (28 months). In CR mice, the cycle was divided into two major blocks, the first containing citrate synthase, aconitase and NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase which showed decreased activities, while the second block, containing the remaining enzymes, displayed increased activity (except for fumarase, which was unchanged). CR also resulted in decreased levels of citrate, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate, increased levels of malate, and unchanged levels of aspartate. The alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate and malate/alpha-ketoglutarate ratios were higher in CR, in parallel with previously reported increases with CR in pyruvate carboxylase activity and glucagon levels, respectively. The results indicate that long-term CR induces a differential regulation of Krebs cycle in old mice and this regulation may be the result of changes in gene expression levels, as well as a complex interplay between enzymes, hormones and other effectors. Truncation of Krebs cycle by CR may be an important adaptation to utilize available substrates for the gluconeogenesis necessary to sustain glycolytic tissues, such as brain.

  4. CoA protects against the deleterious effects of caloric overload in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Palanker Musselman, Laura; Fink, Jill L; Baranski, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    We developed a Drosophila model of T2D in which high sugar (HS) feeding leads to insulin resistance. In this model, adipose TG storage is protective against fatty acid toxicity and diabetes. Initial biochemical and gene expression studies suggested that deficiency in CoA might underlie reduced TG synthesis in animals during chronic HS feeding. Focusing on the Drosophila fat body (FB), which is specialized for TG storage and lipolysis, we undertook a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that CoA could protect against the deleterious effects of caloric overload. Quantitative metabolomics revealed a reduction in substrate availability for CoA synthesis in the face of an HS diet. Further reducing CoA synthetic capacity by expressing FB-specific RNAi targeting pantothenate kinase (PK orfumble) or phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthase (PPCS) exacerbated HS-diet-induced accumulation of FFAs. Dietary supplementation with pantothenic acid (vitamin B5, a precursor of CoA) was able to ameliorate HS-diet-induced FFA accumulation and hyperglycemia while increasing TG synthesis. Taken together, our data support a model where free CoA is required to support fatty acid esterification and to protect against the toxicity of HS diets. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Caloric Restriction Protects against Lactacystin-Induced Degeneration of Dopamine Neurons Independent of the Ghrelin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Jessica; Bentea, Eduard; Bayliss, Jacqueline A; Demuyser, Thomas; Walrave, Laura; Albertini, Giulia; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Deneyer, Lauren; Aourz, Najat; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Andrews, Zane B; Massie, Ann; De Bundel, Dimitri; Smolders, Ilse

    2017-03-04

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to exert ghrelin-dependent neuroprotective effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrathydropyridine (MPTP)-based animal model for PD. We here investigated whether CR is neuroprotective in the lactacystin (LAC) mouse model for PD, in which proteasome disruption leads to the destruction of the DA neurons of the SNc, and whether this effect is mediated via the ghrelin receptor. Adult male ghrelin receptor wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were maintained on an ad libitum (AL) diet or on a 30% CR regimen. After 3 weeks, LAC was injected unilaterally into the SNc, and the degree of DA neuron degeneration was evaluated 1 week later. In AL mice, LAC injection significanty reduced the number of DA neurons and striatal DA concentrations. CR protected against DA neuron degeneration following LAC injection. However, no differences were observed between ghrelin receptor WT and KO mice. These results indicate that CR can protect the nigral DA neurons from toxicity related to proteasome disruption; however, the ghrelin receptor is not involved in this effect.

  6. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  7. Practical system for the direct measurement of magneto-caloric effect by micro-thermocouples.

    PubMed

    Kamarád, J; Kaštil, J; Arnold, Z

    2012-08-01

    A system for direct measurements of the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) exploits a rapid transport of a sample into or from magnetic field in permanent Halbach-type (1 T) or superconducting (4.7 T) magnets. Time dependence of induced changes of the sample temperature, ΔT(t), is detected directly by the differential Cu-Constantan-Cu micro-thermocouples with time steps of 300 ms. A sample placed inside an evacuated simple LN(2) cryostat is either totally isolated (adiabatic conditions) or partly connected with the copper sample holder (non-adiabatic conditions). The last arrangement (a model of the Brayton cycle) is used to simulate an application of MCE in refrigeration techniques. The relations describing ΔT(t) that allow an analysis of MCE of the studied materials are based on the general cooling law. The effect of the first-order magnetic transition on MCE of selected sample is also demonstrated by non-standard ΔT(t) curves measured in the last mentioned experimental arrangements.

  8. Pathways for ischemic cytoprotection: Role of sirtuins in caloric restriction, resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kahlilia C; Lin, Hung Wen; Thompson, John W; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) have been shown to promote protection against ischemic injury in the heart and brain, as well as in other tissues. The activity of sirtuins, which are enzymes that modulate diverse biologic processes, seems to be vital in the ability of these therapeutic modalities to prevent against cellular dysfunction and death. The protective mechanisms of the yeast Sir2 and the mammalian homolog sirtuin 1 have been extensively studied, but the involvement of other sirtuins in ischemic protection is not yet clear. We examine the roles of mammalian sirtuins in modulating protective pathways against oxidative stress, energy depletion, excitotoxicity, inflammation, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Although many of these sirtuins have not been directly implicated in ischemic protection, they may have unique roles in enhancing function and preventing against stress-mediated cellular damage and death. This review will include in-depth analyses of the roles of CR, resveratrol, and IPC in activating sirtuins and in mediating protection against ischemic damage in the heart and brain. PMID:21224864

  9. Sex-Dependent Cognitive Performance in Baboon Offspring Following Maternal Caloric Restriction in Pregnancy and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse S.; Bartlett, Thad Q.; Keenan, Kathryn E.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Nijland, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In humans a suboptimal diet during development has negative outcomes in offspring. We investigated the behavioral outcomes in baboons born to mothers undergoing moderate maternal nutrient restriction (MNR). Maternal nutrient restriction mothers (n = 7) were fed 70% of food eaten by controls (CTR, n = 12) fed ad libitum throughout gestation and lactation. At 3.3 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]) years of age offspring (controls: female [FC, n = 8], male [MC, n = 4]; nutrient restricted: female [FR, n = 3] and male [MR, n = 4]) were administered progressive ratio, simple discrimination, intra-/extra-dimension set shift and delayed matching to sample tasks to assess motivation, learning, attention, and working memory, respectively. A treatment effect was observed in MNR offspring who demonstrated less motivation and impaired working memory. Nutrient-restricted female offspring showed improved learning, while MR offspring showed impaired learning and attentional set shifting and increased impulsivity. In summary, 30% restriction in maternal caloric intake has long lasting neurobehavioral outcomes in adolescent male baboon offspring. PMID:22344725

  10. Metabolic shifts due to long-term caloric restriction revealed in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Rezzi, Serge; Martin, François-Pierre J.; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Colman, Ricki J.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Weindruch, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The long-term health benefits of caloric restriction (CR) are well known but the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood despite increasing knowledge of transcriptional and related metabolic changes. We report new metabolic insights into long-term CR in nonhuman primates revealed by the holistic inspection of plasma 1H-NMR spectroscopic metabolic and lipoprotein profiles. The results revealed attenuation of aging-dependant alterations of lipoprotein and energy metabolism by CR, noted by relative increase in HDL and reduction in VLDL levels. Metabonomic analysis also revealed animals exhibiting distinct metabolic trajectories from aging that correlated with higher insulin sensitivity. The plasma profiles of insulin-sensitive animals were marked by higher levels of gluconate and acetate suggesting a CR-modulated increase in metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. The metabonomic findings, particularly those that parallel improved insulin sensitivity, are consistent with diminished adiposity in CR monkeys despite aging. The metabolic profile and the associated pathways are compatible with our previous findings that CR-induced gene transcriptional changes in tissue suggest the critical regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors as a key mechanism. The metabolic phenotyping provided in this study can be used to define a reference molecular profile of CR-associated health benefits and longevity in symbiotic superorganisms and man. PMID:19264119

  11. Role of Fat Body Lipogenesis in Protection against the Effects of Caloric Overload in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Laura Palanker; Fink, Jill L.; Ramachandran, Prasanna Venkatesh; Patterson, Bruce W.; Okunade, Adewole L.; Maier, Ezekiel; Brent, Michael R.; Turk, John; Baranski, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila fat body is a liver- and adipose-like tissue that stores fat and serves as a detoxifying and immune responsive organ. We have previously shown that a high sugar diet leads to elevated hemolymph glucose and systemic insulin resistance in developing larvae and adults. Here, we used stable isotope tracer feeding to demonstrate that rearing larvae on high sugar diets impaired the synthesis of esterified fatty acids from dietary glucose. Fat body lipid profiling revealed changes in both carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation of fatty acid substituents, particularly in stored triglycerides. We tested the role of the fat body in larval tolerance of caloric excess. Our experiments demonstrated that lipogenesis was necessary for animals to tolerate high sugar feeding as tissue-specific loss of orthologs of carbohydrate response element-binding protein or stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 resulted in lethality on high sugar diets. By contrast, increasing the fat content of the fat body by knockdown of king-tubby was associated with reduced hyperglycemia and improved growth and tolerance of high sugar diets. Our work supports a critical role for the fat body and the Drosophila carbohydrate response element-binding protein ortholog in metabolic homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:23355467

  12. Caloric Restriction Study Design Limitations in Rodent and Nonhuman Primate Studies.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Kelli L; Kaiser, Tamzin; Peaden, Robert; Anson, R Michael; de Cabo, Rafael; Mattison, Julie A

    2017-06-13

    For a century, we have known that caloric restriction influences aging in many species. However, only recently it was firmly established that the effect is not entirely dependent on the calories provided. Instead, rodent and nonhuman primate models have shown that the rate of aging depends on other variables, including the macronutrient composition of the diet, the amount of time spent in the restricted state, age of onset, the gender and genetic background, and the particular feeding protocol for the control group. The field is further complicated when attempts are made to compare studies across different laboratories, which seemingly contradict each other. Here, we argue that some of the contradictory findings are most likely due to methodological differences. This review focuses on the four methodological differences identified in a recent comparative report from the National Institute on Aging and University of Wisconsin nonhuman primate studies, namely feeding regimen, diet composition, age of onset, and genetics. These factors, that may be influencing the effects of a calorie restriction intervention, are highlighted in the rodent model to draw parallels and elucidate findings reported in a higher species, nonhuman primates. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Caloric restriction preserves memory and reduces anxiety of aging mice with early enhancement of neurovascular functions

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Ishita; Guo, Janet; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Zhong, Yu; Rempe, Ralf G.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Armstrong, Rachel; Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Neurovascular integrity plays an important role in protecting cognitive and mental health in aging. Lifestyle interventions that sustain neurovascular integrity may thus be critical on preserving brain functions in aging and reducing the risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that caloric restriction (CR) had an early effect on neurovascular enhancements, and played a critical role in preserving vascular, cognitive and mental health in aging. In particular, we found that CR significantly enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-brain barrier function in young mice at 5-6 months of age. The neurovascular enhancements were associated with reduced mammalian target of rapamycin expression, elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, and increased ketone bodies utilization. With age, CR decelerated the rate of decline in CBF. The preserved CBF in hippocampus and frontal cortex were highly correlated with preserved memory and learning, and reduced anxiety, of the aging mice treated with CR (18-20 months of age). Our results suggest that dietary intervention started in the early stage (e.g., young adults) may benefit cognitive and mental reserve in aging. Understanding nutritional effects on neurovascular functions may have profound implications in human brain aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27829242

  14. Adipose-immune interactions during obesity and caloric restriction: reciprocal mechanisms regulating immunity and health span

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a tight coupling of metabolic and immune systems. This cross-talk mediated by neuroendocrine peptides as well as numerous cytokines and chemokines is believed to be responsible for integrating energy balance to immune function. These neuroendocrine-immune interactions are heightened during the state of chronic positive energy balance, as seen during obesity, and negative energy balance caused by caloric restriction (CR). Emerging evidence suggests that obesity may be associated with an immunodeficient state and chronic inflammation, which contribute to an increased risk of premature death. The direct interactions between expanded leukocyte populations within the adipose tissue during obesity and an increased number of adipocytes within an aging lymphoid microenvironment may constitute an important adaptive or pathological response as a result of change in energy balance. In stark contrast to obesity, CR causes negative energy balance and robustly prolongs a healthy lifespan in all of the species studied to date. Therefore, the endogenous neuroendocrine-metabolic sensors elevated or suppressed as a result of changes in energy balance may offer an important mechanism in understanding the antiaging and potential immune-enhancing nature of CR. Ghrelin, one such sensor of negative energy balance, is reduced during obesity and increased by CR. Ghrelin also regulates immune function by reducing proinflammatory cytokines and promotes thymopoiesis during aging and thus, may be a new CR mimetic target. The identification of immune effects and molecular pathways used by such orexigenic metabolic factors could offer potentially novel approaches to enhance immunity and increase healthy lifespan. PMID:18579754

  15. Caloric Restriction, CR Mimetics, and Healthy Aging in Okinawa: Controversies and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, Bradley J.; Willcox, Donald Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review To examine the role of two nutritional factors implicated in the healthy aging of the Okinawans: caloric restriction (CR); and traditional foods with potential CR-mimetic properties. Recent Findings CR is a research priority for the U.S. National Institute on Aging. However, little is known regarding health effects in humans. Some CR-related outcomes, such as cause-specific mortality and lifespan, are not practical for human clinical trials. Therefore, epidemiological data on older Okinawans, who experienced a CR-like diet for close to half their lives, are of special interest. The nutritional data support mild CR (10–15%) and high consumption of foods that may mimic the biological effects of CR, including sweet potatoes, marine-based carotenoid-rich foods, and turmeric. Phenotypic evidence is consistent with CR (including short stature, low body weight, lean BMI), less age-related chronic disease (including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and dementia) and longer lifespan (mean and maximum). Summary Both CR and traditional Okinawan functional foods with CR-mimetic properties likely had roles in the extended healthspan and lifespan of the Okinawans. More research is needed on health consequences of CR and foods with CR-mimetic properties to identify possible nutritional interventions for healthy aging. PMID:24316687

  16. Magneto Caloric Effect in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys: First Principles and Experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Nicholson, Don; Brown, Gregory; Rusanu, Aurelian; Rios, Orlando; Hodges, Jason; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Ludtka, Gerard; Eisenbach, Markus; Evans, Boyd

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the Magneto-Caloric Effect (MCE) in alloys with real technological potential is important to the development of viable MCE based products. We report results of computational and experimental investigation of a candidate MCE materials Ni-Mn-Ga alloys. The Wang-Landau statistical method is used in tandem with Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) method to explore magnetic states of the system. A classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian is parametrized based on these states and used in obtaining the density of magnetic states. The Currie temperature, isothermal entropy change, and adiabatic temperature change are then calculated from the density of states. Experiments to observe the structural and magnetic phase transformations were performed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on alloys of Ni-Mn-Ga and Fe-Ni-Mn-Ga-Cu. Data from the observations are discussed in comparison with the computational studies. This work was sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (ORNL), by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division; Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (US DOE), and by the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (US DOE).

  17. Impact of 6-month caloric restriction on autonomic nervous system activity in healthy, overweight, individuals.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Lilian; Moreira, Emilia A M; Martin, Corby K; Ravussin, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) increases maximum lifespan but the mechanisms are unclear. Dominance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) over the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) has been shown to be a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity and aging are associated with increased SNS activity, and weight loss and/or exercise seem to have positive effects on this balance. We therefore evaluated the effect of different approaches of CR on autonomic function in 28 overweight individuals participating in the Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (CALERIE) trial. Participants were randomized to either control, CR: 25% decrease in energy intake, CREX: 12.5% CR + 12.5% increase in energy expenditure, or LCD: low-calorie diet until 15% weight reduction followed by weight maintenance. Autonomic function was assessed by spectral analysis of heart-rate variability (HRV) while fasting and after a meal. Measurements were performed at baseline and 6 months. HR and SNS index decreased and PNS index increased in all intervention groups but reached significance only in CREX. HR and SNS index increased and PNS index decreased in response to the meal in all intervention groups. The results therefore suggest that weight loss improved SNS/PNS balance especially when CR is combined with exercise.

  18. Gene Expression in the Hippocampus: Regionally Specific Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Zane; Madorsky, Irina; Xu, Ying; Ogle, William O.; Notterpek, Lucia; Foster, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    We measured changes in gene expression, induced by aging and caloric restriction (CR), in three hippocampal subregions. When analysis included all regions, aging was associated with expression of genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and stress responses, and in some cases, expression was reversed by CR. An age-related increase in ubiquintination was observed, including increased expression of ubiquitin conjugating enzyme genes and cytosolic ubiquitin immunoreactivity. CR decreased cytosolic ubiquitin and upregulated deubiquitinating genes. Region specific analyses indicated that CA1 was more susceptible to aging stress, exhibiting a greater number of altered genes relative to CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), and an enrichment of genes related to the immune response and apoptosis. CA3 and the DG were more responsive to CR, exhibiting marked changes in the total number of genes across diet conditions, reversal of age-related changes in p53 signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, and enrichment of genes related to cell survival and neurotrophic signaling. Finally, CR differentially influenced genes for synaptic plasticity in CA1 and CA3. It is concluded that regional disparity in response to aging and CR relates to differences in vulnerability to stressors, the availability of neurotrophic, and cell survival mechanisms, and differences in cell function. PMID:21055414

  19. Effects of Low-Dose Non-Caloric Sweetener Consumption on Gut Microbiota in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Uebanso, Takashi; Ohnishi, Ai; Kitayama, Reiko; Yoshimoto, Ayumi; Nakahashi, Mutsumi; Shimohata, Takaaki; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NASs) provide sweet tastes to food without adding calories or glucose. NASs can be used as alternative sweeteners for controlling blood glucose levels and weight gain. Although the consumption of NASs has increased over the past decade in Japan and other countries, whether these sweeteners affect the composition of the gut microbiome is unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of sucralose or acesulfame-K ingestion (at most the maximum acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels, 15 mg/kg body weight) on the gut microbiome in mice. Consumption of sucralose, but not acesulfame-K, for 8 weeks reduced the relative amount of Clostridium cluster XIVa in feces. Meanwhile, sucralose and acesulfame-K did not increase food intake, body weight gain or liver weight, or fat in the epididymis or cecum. Only sucralose intake increased the concentration of hepatic cholesterol and cholic acid. Moreover, the relative concentration of butyrate and the ratio of secondary/primary bile acids in luminal metabolites increased with sucralose consumption in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that daily intake of maximum ADI levels of sucralose, but not acesulfame-K, affected the relative amount of the Clostridium cluster XIVa in fecal microbiome and cholesterol bile acid metabolism in mice. PMID:28587159

  20. Sex-dependent cognitive performance in baboon offspring following maternal caloric restriction in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jesse S; Bartlett, Thad Q; Keenan, Kathryn E; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    In humans a suboptimal diet during development has negative outcomes in offspring. We investigated the behavioral outcomes in baboons born to mothers undergoing moderate maternal nutrient restriction (MNR). Maternal nutrient restriction mothers (n = 7) were fed 70% of food eaten by controls (CTR, n = 12) fed ad libitum throughout gestation and lactation. At 3.3 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]) years of age offspring (controls: female [FC, n = 8], male [MC, n = 4]; nutrient restricted: female [FR, n = 3] and male [MR, n = 4]) were administered progressive ratio, simple discrimination, intra-/extra-dimension set shift and delayed matching to sample tasks to assess motivation, learning, attention, and working memory, respectively. A treatment effect was observed in MNR offspring who demonstrated less motivation and impaired working memory. Nutrient-restricted female offspring showed improved learning, while MR offspring showed impaired learning and attentional set shifting and increased impulsivity. In summary, 30% restriction in maternal caloric intake has long lasting neurobehavioral outcomes in adolescent male baboon offspring.

  1. SIRT1 and Caloric Restriction: An Insight Into Possible Trade-Offs Between Robustness and Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review aims to summarize the importance of the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 as a critical mediator that coordinates metabolic responses to caloric restriction (CR) and the recent progress in the development of SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics. It also discusses possible trade-offs between robustness and frailty in CR and the applicability of CR or SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics to humans. Recent findings Loss- and gain-of-function mouse studies have provided genetic evidence that SIRT1 is a key mediator that orchestrates the physiological response to CR. SIRT1-activating compounds function as potential CR mimetics, at least in part, through the activation of SIRT1 in vivo. Summary Increasing SIRT1 dosage/activity is effective to provide significant protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic complications, suggesting that SIRT1 activation likely promotes robustness in the regulation of metabolism. However, CR itself and CR mimicry through systemic SIRT1 activation might also generate frailty in response to unexpected environmental stimuli, such as bacterial and viral infections. It will be of great importance to understand the principles of systemic robustness and its spatial and temporal dynamics for the regulation of aging and longevity in mammals in order to achieve an optimal balance between robustness and frailty in our complex physiological system. PMID:19474721

  2. Caloric restriction improves efficiency and capacity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Choi, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Calorie restriction (CR) increases electron transport chain (ETC) at both RNA and protein level. {yields} CR enhances mitochondrial membrane potential, and, regardless of ages, reduces reactive oxygen species. {yields} CR increases both efficiency and capacity of the ETC. {yields} CR induces intensive modulation at mitochondrial ETC where might be a major site leading to extension of lifespan. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend lifespan in a variety of species; however, the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found that CR potentiated the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Indeed, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was increased by CR, and, regardless of ages, overall reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was decreased by CR. With these changes, overall growth rate of cells was maintained under various CR conditions, just like cells under a non-restricted condition. All of these data support increased efficiency and capacity of the ETC by CR, and this change might lead to extension of lifespan.

  3. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-08-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting: Two potential diets for successful brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of the nervous system to advancing age is all too often manifest in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review article we describe evidence suggesting that two dietary interventions, caloric restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF), can prolong the health-span of the nervous system by impinging upon fundamental metabolic and cellular signaling pathways that regulate life-span. CR and IF affect energy and oxygen radical metabolism, and cellular stress response systems, in ways that protect neurons against genetic and environmental factors to which they would otherwise succumb during aging. There are multiple interactive pathways and molecular mechanisms by which CR and IF benefit neurons including those involving insulin-like signaling, FoxO transcription factors, sirtuins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. These pathways stimulate the production of protein chaperones, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes, all of which help cells cope with stress and resist disease. A better understanding of the impact of CR and IF on the aging nervous system will likely lead to novel approaches for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16899414

  5. Attenuation of age-related changes in mouse neuromuscular synapses by caloric restriction and exercise.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Gregorio; Tapia, Juan C; Kang, Hyuno; Clemenson, Gregory D; Gage, F H; Lichtman, Jeff W; Sanes, Joshua R

    2010-08-17

    The cellular basis of age-related behavioral decline remains obscure but alterations in synapses are likely candidates. Accordingly, the beneficial effects on neural function of caloric restriction and exercise, which are among the most effective anti-aging treatments known, might also be mediated by synapses. As a starting point in testing these ideas, we studied the skeletal neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a large, accessible peripheral synapse. Comparison of NMJs in young adult and aged mice revealed a variety of age-related structural alterations, including axonal swellings, sprouting, synaptic detachment, partial or complete withdrawal of axons from some postsynaptic sites, and fragmentation of the postsynaptic specialization. Alterations were significant by 18 mo of age and severe by 24 mo. A life-long calorie-restricted diet significantly decreased the incidence of pre- and postsynaptic abnormalities in 24-mo-old mice and attenuated age-related loss of motor neurons and turnover of muscle fibers. One month of exercise (wheel running) in 22-mo-old mice also reduced age-related synaptic changes but had no effect on motor neuron number or muscle fiber turnover. Time-lapse imaging in vivo revealed that exercise partially reversed synaptic alterations that had already occurred. These results demonstrate a critical effect of aging on synaptic structure and provide evidence that interventions capable of extending health span and lifespan can partially reverse these age-related synaptic changes.

  6. Severe caloric restriction in young women during World War II and subsequent breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, N; Barchana, M; Linn, S; Keinan-Boker, L

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the impact of WWII-related caloric restriction (CR) on subsequent breast cancer (BC) risk based on individual exposure experiences and whether this effect was modified by age at exposure. We compared 65 breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2005-2010 to 200 controls without breast cancer who were all members of various organizations for Jewish WWII survivors in Israel. All participants were Jewish women born in Europe prior to 1945 who lived at least 6 months under Nazi rule during WWII and immigrated to Israel after the war. We estimated CR using a combined index for hunger and used logistic regression models to estimate the association between CR and BC, adjusting for potential confounders. Women who were severely exposed to hunger had an increased risk of BC (OR=5.0, 95% CI= 2.3-10.8) compared to women who were mildly exposed. The association between CR and BC risk was stronger for women who were exposed at a younger age (0-7 years) compared to the risk of BC in women exposed at ≥ 14 years (OR= 2.8, 95% CI=1.3-6.3). Severe exposure to CR is associated with a higher risk for BC decades later, and may be generalized to other cases of severe starvation during childhood that may have long-term effects on cancer in adulthood. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. [Developing indices for caloric restriction related to World War II--a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shi; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2011-04-01

    The vast numbers of studies regarding caloric restriction (CR) and breast cancer risk are based on war-related extreme situations. Studying the impact of CR in Jews during World War II (WW II) is challenging due to its variance and duration. To develop novel research tools in order to assess CR exposure in Jews that occurred more than 60 years ago during WW II. A pilot study based on Israeli women born in Europe in 1926-45, who lived there during WWII. Primary incident breast cancer patients and population-based controls were interviewed using a detailed questionnaire referring to demographic, obstetric factors and WW II experiences. Exposure to WWII-related CR was assessed by several proxy variables based on this information. The individual hunger score was higher in the exposed cases [mean score 141.06 vs. 130.07 in the controls). The same trend was observed for self perceived hunger score (mean score 2.75 in cases vs. 2.40 in controls) and hunger symptoms score (4.89 vs. 3.56, respectively). The novel research tools are appropriate for comparative assessment of CR exposure in case control studies.

  8. Non-Invasive Neuromodulation Using Time-Varying Caloric Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Lesco L.; Ade, Kristen K.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Adkins, Heather D.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) to elicit the vestibulo-ocular reflex has long been used in clinical settings to aid in the diagnosis of balance disorders and to confirm the absence of brainstem function. While a number of studies have hinted at the potential therapeutic applications of CVS, the limitations of existing devices have frustrated that potential. Current CVS irrigators use water or air during short-duration applications; however, this approach is not tenable for longer duration therapeutic protocols or home use. Here, we describe a solid-state CVS device we developed in order to address these limitations. This device delivers tightly controlled time-varying thermal waveforms, which can be programmed through an external control unit. It contains several safety features, which limit patients to the prescribed waveform and prevent the potential for temperature extremes. In this paper, we provide evidence that CVS treatment with time-varying, but not constant temperature waveforms, elicits changes in cerebral blood flow physiology consistent with the neuromodulation of brainstem centers, and we present results from a small pilot study, which demonstrate that the CVS can safely and feasibly be used longitudinally in the home setting to treat episodic migraine. Together, these results indicate that this solid-state CVS device may be a viable tool for non-invasive neuromodulation. PMID:27777829

  9. Caloric Restriction Extends Yeast Chronological Life Span by Optimizing the Snf1 (AMPK) Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wierman, Margaret B; Maqani, Nazif; Strickler, Erika; Li, Mingguang; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2017-07-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the homologous yeast SNF1 complex are key regulators of energy metabolism that counteract nutrient deficiency and ATP depletion by phosphorylating multiple enzymes and transcription factors that maintain energetic homeostasis. AMPK/SNF1 also promotes longevity in several model organisms, including yeast. Here we investigate the role of yeast SNF1 in mediating the extension of chronological life span (CLS) by caloric restriction (CR). We find that SNF1 activity is required throughout the transition of log phase to stationary phase (diauxic shift) for effective CLS extension. CR expands the period of maximal SNF1 activation beyond the diauxic shift, as indicated by Sak1-dependent T210 phosphorylation of the Snf1 catalytic α-subunit. A concomitant increase in ADP is consistent with SNF1 activation by ADP in vivo Downstream of SNF1, the Cat8 and Adr1 transcription factors are required for full CR-induced CLS extension, implicating an alternative carbon source utilization for acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) production and gluconeogenesis. Indeed, CR increased acetyl-CoA levels during the diauxic shift, along with expression of both acetyl-CoA synthetase genes ACS1 and ACS2 We conclude that CR maximizes Snf1 activity throughout and beyond the diauxic shift, thus optimizing the coordination of nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA production with massive reorganization of the transcriptome and respiratory metabolism. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jacob J E; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species.

  11. Changes in behavior and gene expression induced by caloric restriction in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawai, Tomoko; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Katsuura, Sakurako; Nishida, Kensei; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Sei, Hiroyoshi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-11-06

    Caloric restriction (CR) is an effective method for prevention of age-associated diseases as well as overweight and obesity; however, there is controversy regarding the effects of dieting regimens on behavior. In this study, we investigated two different dieting regimens: repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) and daily feeding of half the amount of food consumed by RFR mice (CR). CR and RFR mice had an approximate 20% reduction in food intake compared with control mice. Open field, light-dark transition, elevated plus maze, and forced swimming tests indicated that CR, but not RFR, reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, with a reduction peak on day 8. Using a mouse whole genome microarray, we analyzed gene expression in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hypothalamus. In addition to the CR-responsive genes commonly modified by RFR and CR, each regimen differentially changed the expression of distinct genes in each region. The most profound change was observed in the amygdalas of CR mice: 884 genes were specifically upregulated. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that these 884 genes significantly modified nine canonical pathways in the amygdala. alpha-Adrenergic and dopamine receptor signalings were the two top-scoring pathways. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the upregulation of six genes in these pathways. Western blotting confirmed that CR specifically increased dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (Darpp-32), a key regulator of dopamine receptor signaling, in the amygdala. Our results suggest that CR may change behavior through altered gene expression.

  12. Effects of aging and caloric restriction on dentate gyrus synapses and glutamate receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Isabel G.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Linville, M. Constance; Pang, Hui; Tucker, Elizabeth M.; Riddle, David R.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related degenerative processes throughout the body. It is less clear, however, whether CR has a similar effect in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus, an area important for learning and memory processes that often are compromised in aging. In order to evaluate the effect of CR on synapses across lifespan, we quantified synapses stereologically in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) of young, middle aged, and old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a CR diet from 4 months of age. The results indicate that synapses are maintained across lifespan in both AL and CR rats. In light of this stability, we addressed whether aging and CR influence neurotransmitter receptor levels by measuring subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and AMPA (GluR1, GluR2) receptors in the DG of a second cohort of AL and CR rats across lifespan. The results reveal that the NR1 and GluR1 subunits decline with age in AL, but not CR rats. The absence of an aging-related decline in these subunits in CR rats, however, does not arise from increased levels in old CR rats. Instead, it is due to subunit decreases in young CR rats to levels that are sustained in CR rats throughout lifespan, but that are reached in AL rats only in old age. PMID:17433502

  13. Early postnatal caloric restriction protects adult male intrauterine growth-restricted offspring from obesity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Meena; Thamotharan, Manikkavasagar; Dai, Yun; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Shin, Bo-Chul; Stout, David; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2012-06-01

    Postnatal ad libitum caloric intake superimposed on intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with adult-onset obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We hypothesized that this paradigm of prenatal nutrient deprivation-induced programming can be reversed with the introduction of early postnatal calorie restriction. Ten-month-old male rats exposed to either prenatal nutrient restriction with ad libitum postnatal intake (IUGR), pre- and postnatal nutrient restriction (IPGR), or postnatal nutrient restriction limited to the suckling phase (50% from postnatal [PN]1 to PN21) (PNGR) were compared with age-matched controls (CON). Visceral adiposity, metabolic profile, and insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were examined. The 10-month-old male IUGR group had a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in subcutaneous and visceral fat (P < 0.0002) while remaining euglycemic, insulin sensitive, inactive, and exhibiting metabolic inflexibility (Vo(2)) versus CON. The IPGR group remained lean, euglycemic, insulin sensitive, and active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. The PNGR group was insulin sensitive, similar to IPGR, but less active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. We conclude that IUGR resulted in obesity without insulin resistance and energy metabolic perturbations prior to development of glucose intolerance and T2DM. Postnatal nutrient restriction superimposed on IUGR was protective, restoring metabolic normalcy to a lean and active phenotype.

  14. Effects of chronic caloric restriction on mitochondrial respiration in the ischemic reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Tom L; Belke, Terry; Driedzic, William R

    2002-04-01

    Dietary restriction increases life span and delays the development of age-related diseases in rodents. We have recently demonstrated that chronic dietary restriction is beneficial on recovery of heart function following ischemia. We studied whether the metabolic basis of this benefit is associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were assigned to an ad libitum-fed (AL) group and a food restricted (FR) group, in which food intake was reduced to 55% of the amount consumed by the AL group. Following an 8-month period of restricted caloric intake, isolated working hearts perfused with glucose and high levels of fatty acids were subjected to global ischemia followed by reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, total heart mitochondria respiration was assessed in the presence of pyruvate, tricarboxylic acid intermediates, and palmitoylcarnitine. Recovery of heart function following ischemia was greater in FR hearts compared to AL hearts. Paralleling these changes in heart function was an increase in state 3 respiration with pyruvate. The respiratory control ratios in the presence of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid intermediates were higher in FR hearts compared to AL hearts, indicating well-coupled mitochondria. Overall energy production, expressed as the ADP:O ratio and the oxidative phosphorylation rate, was also improved in FR hearts. Our results indicate that the beneficial effect of FR on recovery of heart function following ischemia is associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration.

  15. Caloric restriction reveals a metabolomic and lipidomic signature in liver of male mice.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Ramírez-Núñez, Omar; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Selman, Colin; Withers, Dominic J; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-10-01

    Lipid composition, particularly membrane unsaturation, has been proposed as being a lifespan determinant, but it is currently unknown whether caloric restriction (CR), an accepted life-extending intervention, affects cellular lipid profiles. In this study, we employ a liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight-based methodology to demonstrate that CR in the liver of male C57BL/6 mice: (i) induces marked changes in the cellular lipidome, (ii) specifically reduces levels of a phospholipid peroxidation product, 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine, (iii) alters cellular phosphoethanolamine and triglyceride distributional profiles, (iv) affects mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, increasing complex II and decreasing complex III and (v) is associated with specific changes in liver metabolic pathways. These data demonstrate that CR induces a specific lipidome and metabolome reprogramming event in mouse liver which is associated with lower protein oxidative damage, as assessed by mass spectrometry-based measurements. Such changes may be critical to the increased lifespan and healthspan observed in C57BL/6 mice following CR.

  16. Influence of Caloric Vestibular Stimulation on Body Experience in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Schönherr, Andreas; May, Christian Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system has more connections with and influence on higher cortical centers than previously thought. These interactions with higher cortical centers and the phenomena that they elicit require a structural intact cerebral cortex. To date, little is known about the role and influence of the vestibular system on one’s body experience. In this study we show that caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) in healthy participants has an effect on the perceptive component of one’s body experience. After CVS all participants showed a statistically significant difference of thigh width estimation. In contrast to previous studies, which demonstrated an influence of CVS on higher cortical centers with an intact cerebral cortex both the cognitive and affective component of body experience were not effected by the CVS. Our results demonstrate the influence of the vestibular system on body perception and emphasize its role in modulating different perceptive-qualities which contributes to our body experience. We found that CVS has a limited influence on one’s conscious state, thought process and higher cortical functions. PMID:27013995

  17. Watching a food-related television show and caloric intake. A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Bodenlos, Jamie S; Wormuth, Bernadette M

    2013-02-01

    Television watching has been positively associated with overeating and obesity. How popular food-related television shows affects eating behavior has not been examined. An experimental study was conducted to examine how exposure to a food-related television program affects amount and type of food consumed in adults (N=80). Participants were randomized to watch a cooking or nature television program and were then presented with 800 total calories of chocolate covered candies, cheese curls, and carrots. Food was weighed before and after the ad libitum eating session to determine amount consumed. After controlling for dietary restraint, hunger and food preference, significantly more chocolate covered candies were consumed among individuals who watched the cooking program compared to the nature program. No significant differences between conditions were found for overall caloric intake or for cheese curl or carrot consumption. Findings suggest that watching food-related television programs may affect eating behavior and has implications for obesity prevention and intervention efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Caloric Restriction Protects against Lactacystin-Induced Degeneration of Dopamine Neurons Independent of the Ghrelin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Jessica; Bentea, Eduard; Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Demuyser, Thomas; Walrave, Laura; Albertini, Giulia; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Deneyer, Lauren; Aourz, Najat; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Andrews, Zane B.; Massie, Ann; De Bundel, Dimitri; Smolders, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to exert ghrelin-dependent neuroprotective effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrathydropyridine (MPTP)-based animal model for PD. We here investigated whether CR is neuroprotective in the lactacystin (LAC) mouse model for PD, in which proteasome disruption leads to the destruction of the DA neurons of the SNc, and whether this effect is mediated via the ghrelin receptor. Adult male ghrelin receptor wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were maintained on an ad libitum (AL) diet or on a 30% CR regimen. After 3 weeks, LAC was injected unilaterally into the SNc, and the degree of DA neuron degeneration was evaluated 1 week later. In AL mice, LAC injection significanty reduced the number of DA neurons and striatal DA concentrations. CR protected against DA neuron degeneration following LAC injection. However, no differences were observed between ghrelin receptor WT and KO mice. These results indicate that CR can protect the nigral DA neurons from toxicity related to proteasome disruption; however, the ghrelin receptor is not involved in this effect. PMID:28273852

  19. CoA protects against the deleterious effects of caloric overload in Drosophila1

    PubMed Central

    Palanker Musselman, Laura; Fink, Jill L.; Baranski, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a Drosophila model of T2D in which high sugar (HS) feeding leads to insulin resistance. In this model, adipose TG storage is protective against fatty acid toxicity and diabetes. Initial biochemical and gene expression studies suggested that deficiency in CoA might underlie reduced TG synthesis in animals during chronic HS feeding. Focusing on the Drosophila fat body (FB), which is specialized for TG storage and lipolysis, we undertook a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that CoA could protect against the deleterious effects of caloric overload. Quantitative metabolomics revealed a reduction in substrate availability for CoA synthesis in the face of an HS diet. Further reducing CoA synthetic capacity by expressing FB-specific RNAi targeting pantothenate kinase (PK orfumble) or phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthase (PPCS) exacerbated HS-diet-induced accumulation of FFAs. Dietary supplementation with pantothenic acid (vitamin B5, a precursor of CoA) was able to ameliorate HS-diet-induced FFA accumulation and hyperglycemia while increasing TG synthesis. Taken together, our data support a model where free CoA is required to support fatty acid esterification and to protect against the toxicity of HS diets. PMID:26805007

  20. Historical evolution of slope instability in the Calore River Basin, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodato, Nazzareno; Soriano, Marcella; Bellocchi, Gianni; Fiorillo, Francesco; Cevasco, Andrea; Revellino, Paola; Guadagno, Francesco Maria

    2017-04-01

    There is interest in knowing historical spatio-temporal patterns of landslide activity. However, this is challenging to reconstruct because it is difficult to obtain detailed records for past landslide activity. Here, we deal with hydro-geomorphological signatures, such as storms, downpours, floods, snowmelt and mass movement, to detect annual slope instability events (ASIEs) over historical times. In order to obtain ASIEs for each year, a monthly Instability Density Index (IDI) was used and then monthly values were summed up to obtain a yearly value. Classes of monthly IDI varying between 0 (no instability) and 4 (highest instability) were determined from historical documents. We present an application for the Calore River Basin, Southern Italy, using data from a 313-year long series (1701-2013 CE). After 1880 CE the information becomes more valuable with directly observed landslide frequency. By this cataloguing, 129 ASIEs were obtained. Their evolution shows slight instability during the 18th century. Uneven and greater slope instability occurred instead across the 19th century, when an important phase of deforestation coincided with intensification of agricultural activities. Slope instability events continued during the 20th century but their causes are mainly related to anthropisation and the effects of recent climate change. It was determined that stormy autumns until the 19th century and successive winter-times with enhanced snowmelt, may have driven the reactivation of widespread instability events. We also found that mountainous and hilly terrains have an acute sensitivity to climate change.

  1. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  2. Excessive caloric intake acutely causes oxidative stress, GLUT4 carbonylation, and insulin resistance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Homko, Carol; Barrero, Carlos A; Stein, T Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Cheung, Peter; Fecchio, Chiara; Koller, Sarah; Merali, Salim

    2015-09-09

    Obesity-linked insulin resistance greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, together known as the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome. How obesity promotes insulin resistance remains incompletely understood. Plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and proinflammatory cytokines, endoplasmic reticulum ( ER) stress, and oxidative stress are all elevated in obesity and have been shown to induce insulin resistance. However, they may be late events that only develop after chronic excessive nutrient intake. The nature of the initial event that produces insulin resistance at the beginning of excess caloric intake and weight gain remains unknown. We show that feeding healthy men with ~6000 kcal/day of the common U.S. diet [~50% carbohydrate (CHO), ~ 35% fat, and ~15% protein] for 1 week produced a rapid weight gain of 3.5 kg and the rapid onset (after 2 to 3 days) of systemic and adipose tissue insulin resistance and oxidative stress but no inflammatory or ER stress. In adipose tissue, the oxidative stress resulted in extensive oxidation and carbonylation of numerous proteins, including carbonylation of GLUT4 near the glucose transport channel, which likely resulted in loss of GLUT4 activity. These results suggest that the initial event caused by overnutrition may be oxidative stress, which produces insulin resistance, at least in part, via carbonylation and oxidation-induced inactivation of GLUT4.

  3. Ethanol preference in Drosophila melanogaster is driven by its caloric value

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Jascha B.; Baldwin, Brett A.; Dinh, Boingoc L.; Rahman, Pinkey; Smerek, Dustin; Prado, Francisco J.; Sherazee, Nyssa; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Perhaps the most difficult thing to ascertain concerning the behavior of another animal is its motivation. The motivation underlying the preference of Drosophila melanogaster for ethanol-rich food has long been ascribed to its value as a food. A recently introduced idea is that, as in humans, the pharmacological effects of ethanol also motivate the fly to choose ethanol-rich food over non-alcoholic food. Methods Flies are given a choice between pipets that contain liquid food and liquid food supplemented with ethanol. In some experiments, carbohydrates are added to the non-ethanol-containing food to balance the calories for ethanol. Results We confirm that Drosophila melanogaster indeed prefer food that is supplemented with ethanol. However, if the alternative food choice is isocaloric, Drosophila melanogaster usually do not show any preference for a 10% ethanol solution. Even after ethanol preference has been established, it can be completely reversed if the alternative food is calorically supplemented. This occurs even when the carbohydrate solution used to balance calories is not gustatorily attractive. Furthermore, if the alternative food contains more calories than the ethanol food, the flies will prefer the non-ethanol food. We go on to show that during the preference assay that ethanol in the fly does not exceed 4 mM, which in mammals is a non-intoxicating dose. Conclusions We conclude that preference for ethanol in this assay arises not from the pharmacological effects of ethanol but rather because of its nutritive value. PMID:22551215

  4. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  5. Caloric Restriction in Humans: Impact on Physiological, Psychological, and Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ravussin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The current societal environment is marked by overabundant accessibility of food coupled with a strong trend of reduced physical activity, both leading to the development of a constellation of disorders, including central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension (metabolic syndrome). Prolonged calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to extend both the median and maximal lifespan in a variety of lower species such as yeast, worms, fish, rats, and mice. Mechanisms of this CR-mediated lifespan extension are not fully elucidated, but possibly involve significant alterations in energy metabolism, oxidative damage, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and functional changes in both the neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems. Here we review some of the major physiological, psychological, and behavioral changes after 6 months of CR in overweight otherwise healthy volunteers. Special emphasis is given to the first completed clinical studies that have investigated the effects of controlled, high-quality energy-restricted diets on both biomarkers of longevity and on the development of chronic diseases related to age in humans. With the incremental expansion of research endeavors in the area of energy or caloric restriction, data on the effects of CR in animal models and human subjects are becoming more accessible. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 275–287. PMID:20518700

  6. Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy G. The thermodynamical potential G is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

  7. Fist Principles Approach to the Magneto Caloric Effect: Application to Ni2MnGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Nicholson, Don; Rusanu, Aurelian; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Gregory; Evans, Boyd, III

    2011-03-01

    The magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has potential application in heating and cooling technologies. In this work, we present calculated magnetic structure of a candidate MCE material, Ni 2 MnGa. The magnetic configurations of a 144 atom supercell is first explored using first-principle, the results are then used to fit exchange parameters of a Heisenberg Hamiltonian. The Wang-Landau method is used to calculate the magnetic density of states of the Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Based on this classical estimate, the magnetic density of states is calculated using the Wang Landau method with energies obtained from the first principles method. The Currie temperature and other thermodynamic properties are calculated using the density of states. The relationships between the density of magnetic states and the field induced adiabatic temperature change and isothermal entropy change are discussed. This work was sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (ORNL), by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division; Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (US DOE), and by the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (US DOE).

  8. Intestinal PPARγ signalling is required for sympathetic nervous system activation in response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Duszka, Kalina; Picard, Alexandre; Ellero-Simatos, Sandrine; Chen, Jiapeng; Defernez, Marianne; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Pigram, Anna; Vanoaica, Liviu; Canlet, Cécile; Parini, Paolo; Narbad, Arjan; Guillou, Hervé; Thorens, Bernard; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor PPARγ has been proven to affect metabolism in multiple tissues, and has received considerable attention for its involvement in colon cancer and inflammatory disease. However, its role in intestinal metabolism has been largely ignored. To investigate this potential aspect of PPARγ function, we submitted intestinal epithelium-specific PPARγ knockout mice (iePPARγKO) to a two-week period of 25% caloric restriction (CR), following which iePPARγKO mice retained more fat than their wild type littermates. In attempting to explain this discrepancy, we analysed the liver, skeletal muscle, intestinal lipid trafficking, and the microbiome, none of which appeared to contribute to the adiposity phenotype. Interestingly, under conditions of CR, iePPARγKO mice failed to activate their sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and increase CR-specific locomotor activity. These KO mice also manifested a defective control of their body temperature, which was overly reduced. Furthermore, the white adipose tissue of iePPARγKO CR mice showed lower levels of both hormone-sensitive lipase, and its phosphorylated form. This would result from impaired SNS signalling and possibly cause reduced lipolysis. We conclude that intestinal epithelium PPARγ plays an essential role in increasing SNS activity under CR conditions, thereby contributing to energy mobilization during metabolically stressful episodes. PMID:27853235

  9. DNA replication stress-induced loss of reproductive capacity in S. cerevisiae and its inhibition by caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Martin; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2013-01-01

    In many organisms, attenuation of growth signaling by caloric restriction or mutational inactivation of growth signaling pathways extends lifespan and protects against cancer and other age-related diseases. The focus of many efforts to understand these effects has been on the induction of oxidative stress defenses that inhibit cellular senescence and cell death. Here we show that in the model organism S. cerevisiae, growth signaling induces entry of cells in stationary phase into S phase in parallel with loss of reproductive capacity, which is enhanced by elevated concentrations of glucose. Overexpression of RNR1 encoding a ribonucleotide reductase subunit required for the synthesis of deoxynucleotide triphosphates and DNA replication suppresses the accelerated loss of reproductive capacity of cells cultured in high glucose. The reduced reproductive capacity of these cells is also suppressed by excess threonine, which buffers dNTP pools when ribonucleotide reductase activity is limiting. Caloric restriction or inactivation of the AKT homolog Sch9p inhibits senescence and death in stationary phase cells caused by the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea or by inactivation of the DNA replication and repair proteins Sgs1p or Rad27p. Inhibition of DNA replication stress represents a novel mechanism by which caloric restriction promotes longevity in S. cerevisiae. A similar mechanism may promote longevity and inhibit cancer and other age-related diseases in humans. PMID:23518504

  10. Caloric restriction and calcium's effect on bone metabolism and body composition in overweight and obese premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Radak, Tim L

    2004-12-01

    Obesity results in numerous preventable deaths and comorbidities. Unfortunately, a reduction of body weight has been correlated with a reduction in bone mass, the reasons for which have not been fully elucidated. The importance of maximizing peak bone mass during premenopausal years is well known. Most studies demonstrate a positive relationship between calcium intake and bone mass. However, during caloric restriction, which is commonly used for weight loss, calcium intake has shown mixed results. Calcium from dairy sources has received additional attention, beyond its importance to bone, for its role in regulating body weight and composition. Dairy foods are perceived as high fat, and therefore, are generally minimized or avoided during caloric restriction. The current calcium intake for premenopausal women is significantly below recommendations, and even if met during caloric restriction, may not be adequate. This review underscores the need for maintaining at least adequate intake levels of calcium, if not more, during weight loss regimens to minimize potential long-term detrimental effects on bone metabolism.

  11. Sweet taste of saccharin induces weight gain without increasing caloric intake, not related to insulin-resistance in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Melo Batista, Bruna Aparecida; Neves, Alice Magagnin; de Matos Feijó, Fernanda; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Marques Ribeiro, Maria Flávia; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that saccharin can induce weight gain when compared with sucrose in Wistar rats despite similar total caloric intake. We now question whether it could be due to the sweet taste of saccharin per se. We also aimed to address if this weight gain is associated with insulin-resistance and to increases in gut peptides such as leptin and PYY in the fasting state. In a 14 week experiment, 16 male Wistar rats received either saccharin-sweetened yogurt or non-sweetened yogurt daily in addition to chow and water ad lib. We measured daily food intake and weight gain weekly. At the end of the experiment, we evaluated fasting leptin, glucose, insulin, PYY and determined insulin resistance through HOMA-IR. Cumulative weight gain and food intake were evaluated through linear mixed models. Results showed that saccharin induced greater weight gain when compared with non-sweetened control (p = 0.027) despite a similar total caloric intake. There were no differences in HOMA-IR, fasting leptin or PYY levels between groups. We conclude that saccharin sweet taste can induce mild weight gain in Wistar rats without increasing total caloric intake. This weight gain was not related with insulin-resistance nor changes in fasting leptin or PYY in Wistar rats.

  12. General and persistent effects of high-intensity sweeteners on body weight gain and caloric compensation in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Baker, Chelsea R; Davidson, T L

    2009-08-01

    In an earlier work (S. E. Swithers & T. L. Davidson, 2008), rats provided with a fixed amount of a yogurt diet mixed with saccharin gained more weight and showed impaired caloric compensation relative to rats given the same amount of yogurt mixed with glucose. The present 4 experiments examined the generality of these findings and demonstrated that increased body weight gain was also demonstrated when animals consumed a yogurt diet sweetened with an alternative high-intensity sweetener (acesulfame potassium; AceK) as well as in animals given a saccharin-sweetened base diet (refried beans) that was calorically similar but nutritionally distinct from low-fat yogurt. These studies also extended earlier findings by showing that body weight differences persist after saccharin-sweetened diets are discontinued and following a shift to a diet sweetened with glucose. In addition, rats first exposed to a diet sweetened with glucose still gain additional weight when subsequently exposed to a saccharin-sweetened diet. The results of these experiments add support to the hypothesis that exposure to weak or nonpredictive relationships between sweet tastes and caloric consequences may lead to positive energy balance.

  13. Molecular simulation of caloric properties of fluids modelled by force fields with intramolecular contributions: Application to heat capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William R.; Jirsák, Jan; Nezbeda, Ivo; Qi, Weikai

    2017-07-01

    The calculation of caloric properties such as heat capacity, Joule-Thomson coefficients, and the speed of sound by classical force-field-based molecular simulation methodology has received scant attention in the literature, particularly for systems composed of complex molecules whose force fields (FFs) are characterized by a combination of intramolecular and intermolecular terms. The calculation of a thermodynamic property for a system whose molecules are described by such a FF involves the calculation of the residual property prior to its addition to the corresponding ideal-gas property, the latter of which is separately calculated, either using thermochemical compilations or nowadays accurate quantum mechanical calculations. Although the simulation of a volumetric residual property proceeds by simply replacing the intermolecular FF in the rigid molecule case by the total (intramolecular plus intermolecular) FF, this is not the case for a caloric property. We describe the correct methodology required to perform such calculations and illustrate it in this paper for the case of the internal energy and the enthalpy and their corresponding molar heat capacities. We provide numerical results for cP, one of the most important caloric properties. We also consider approximations to the correct calculation procedure previously used in the literature and illustrate their consequences for the examples of the relatively simple molecule 2-propanol, CH3CH(OH)CH3, and for the more complex molecule monoethanolamine, HO(CH2)2NH2, an important fluid used in carbon capture.

  14. Nonnutritive, Low Caloric Substitutes for Food Sugars: Clinical Implications for Addressing the Incidence of Dental Caries and Overweight/Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael W.; Wright, J. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Caries and obesity are two common conditions affecting children in the United States and other developed countries. Caries in the teeth of susceptible children have often been associated with frequent ingestion of fermentable sugars such as sucrose, fructose, glucose, and maltose. Increased calorie intake associated with sugars and carbohydrates, especially when associated with physical inactivity, has been implicated in childhood obesity. Fortunately, nonnutritive artificial alternatives and non-/low-caloric natural sugars have been developed as alternatives to fermentable sugars and have shown promise in partially addressing these health issues. Diet counseling is an important adjunct to oral health instruction. Although there are only five artificial sweeteners that have been approved as food additives by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are additional five non-/low caloric sweeteners that have FDA GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) designation. Given the health impact of sugars and other carbohydrates, dental professionals should be aware of the nonnutritive non-/low caloric sweeteners available on the market and both their benefits and potential risks. Dental health professionals should also be proactive in helping identify patients at risk for obesity and provide counseling and referral when appropriate. PMID:22505906

  15. Effects of caloric restriction and a moderate or intense physiotherapy program for treatment of lameness in overweight dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mlacnik, Evamaria; Bockstahler, Barbara A; Müller, Marion; Tetrick, Mark A; Nap, Richard C; Zentek, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of a weight reduction program combined with a basic or more complex physical therapy program including transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on lameness in overweight dogs with osteoarthritis. Nonblinded prospective randomized clinical trial. Animals-29 adult overweight or obese dogs with a body condition score of 4/5 or 5/5 and clinical and radiographic signs of osteoarthritis. A weight-loss program was initiated for all dogs. One group received caloric restriction and a home-based physical therapy program. The other group received the identical dietetic protocol and an intensive physical therapy program including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Lameness was assessed clinically and by kinetic gait analysis on a treadmill with 4 force plates to measure symmetry of ground reaction forces (GRFs) of the affected and contralateral limbs in bimonthly intervals for 6 months. Significant weight loss was achieved in both groups; however, greater weight reduction was attained by dogs treated with caloric restriction and intensive physiotherapy. Mobility and symmetry indices of GRFs were improved after 6 months; the best outcome was detected in the group receiving energy restriction combined with intensive physical therapy. Caloric restriction combined with intensive physical therapy improved mobility and facilitated weight loss in overweight dogs. The combination of dietetic and physical therapy may help to improve the health status more efficiently than dietetic treatment alone.

  16. Molecular simulation of caloric properties of fluids modelled by force fields with intramolecular contributions: Application to heat capacities.

    PubMed

    Smith, William R; Jirsák, Jan; Nezbeda, Ivo; Qi, Weikai

    2017-07-21

    The calculation of caloric properties such as heat capacity, Joule-Thomson coefficients, and the speed of sound by classical force-field-based molecular simulation methodology has received scant attention in the literature, particularly for systems composed of complex molecules whose force fields (FFs) are characterized by a combination of intramolecular and intermolecular terms. The calculation of a thermodynamic property for a system whose molecules are described by such a FF involves the calculation of the residual property prior to its addition to the corresponding ideal-gas property, the latter of which is separately calculated, either using thermochemical compilations or nowadays accurate quantum mechanical calculations. Although the simulation of a volumetric residual property proceeds by simply replacing the intermolecular FF in the rigid molecule case by the total (intramolecular plus intermolecular) FF, this is not the case for a caloric property. We describe the correct methodology required to perform such calculations and illustrate it in this paper for the case of the internal energy and the enthalpy and their corresponding molar heat capacities. We provide numerical results for cP, one of the most important caloric properties. We also consider approximations to the correct calculation procedure previously used in the literature and illustrate their consequences for the examples of the relatively simple molecule 2-propanol, CH3CH(OH)CH3, and for the more complex molecule monoethanolamine, HO(CH2)2NH2, an important fluid used in carbon capture.

  17. Water with food intake does not influence caloric intake after gastric bypass (GBP): a cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, A; Evertsson, I; Ekelund, M; Gislason, H G; Hedenbro, J L

    2015-02-01

    Bariatric patients seeking information meet very different recommendations on postoperative diet and eating behaviour. A reason for variability may be lack of hard evidence. A national survey on current dietary advice was conducted to serve as background for the present study on how drinking during a meal influenced caloric consumption. A standardised questionnaire was sent to all units in the Scandinavian Obesity surgery registry (SOReg) in order to obtain information regarding current diet advice after gastric bypass. Twenty-eight patients, 14 in each group, were studied either 2 months or 1 year after a standard gastric bypass (GBP). A standardised lunch was served on two separate days with or without water in randomised order. Meal and water weights were measured before and after. Hunger/satiety scores were obtained using visual analogue scales. Response rate for surgeons was low, for dieticians 75 %. No clear consensus for liquid intake during meals was found; few surgeons advised patients whether or not to drink with meals. All patients ate to full satiety. Two months post-GBP, 7/14 patients consumed more solid food when allowed drinking water; the increase in caloric consumption was not significant. One year post-GBP, 5/14 patients consumed more solid food when allowed drinking water, the difference not reaching statistical significance. Our study does not indicate that patients should refrain from drinking during meals the first year after a GBP, at least not from a caloric intake point of view.

  18. Nonnutritive, low caloric substitutes for food sugars: clinical implications for addressing the incidence of dental caries and overweight/obesity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael W; Wright, J Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Caries and obesity are two common conditions affecting children in the United States and other developed countries. Caries in the teeth of susceptible children have often been associated with frequent ingestion of fermentable sugars such as sucrose, fructose, glucose, and maltose. Increased calorie intake associated with sugars and carbohydrates, especially when associated with physical inactivity, has been implicated in childhood obesity. Fortunately, nonnutritive artificial alternatives and non-/low-caloric natural sugars have been developed as alternatives to fermentable sugars and have shown promise in partially addressing these health issues. Diet counseling is an important adjunct to oral health instruction. Although there are only five artificial sweeteners that have been approved as food additives by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are additional five non-/low caloric sweeteners that have FDA GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) designation. Given the health impact of sugars and other carbohydrates, dental professionals should be aware of the nonnutritive non-/low caloric sweeteners available on the market and both their benefits and potential risks. Dental health professionals should also be proactive in helping identify patients at risk for obesity and provide counseling and referral when appropriate.

  19. Extension of Drosophila Lifespan by Rhodiola rosea Depends on Dietary Carbohydrate and Caloric Content in a Simplified Diet.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Coskun, Volkan; Hogan, Sean P; Nguyen, Cindy T; Lopez, Terry E; Jafari, Mahtab

    2016-03-01

    The root and rhizome extract of Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used in traditional medicine to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. We also previously found that the extract can act independently of dietary restriction (DR), a treatment that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. Here, we report that the ability of R. rosea extract to extend lifespan in flies is dependent on the carbohydrate and caloric content when supplemented with a simplified diet composed of yeast and sucrose. R. rosea extract elevated the sugar content in flies and down-regulated hexokinase expression, suggesting that it perturbs carbohydrate metabolism in flies. In our previous studies, bananas, barley malt, and corn syrup provided dietary carbohydrates, and R. rosea extract could extend lifespan with a range of caloric levels. We conclude that the lifespan-extending effect of R. rosea extract in flies is dependent on dietary carbohydrate and caloric contents coupled with an interaction with complex dietary components present in bananas, barley, or corn.

  20. [Index of Nutritional Purchasing Power Parity: comparison of caloric costs of a healthy versus an unhealthy diet].

    PubMed

    Mendoza Velázquez, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Develop the Index of Nutritional Purchasing Power Parity (Nut3-CiO) as an instrument to compare the caloric costs of a healthy versus an unhealthy diet between regions or cities in a country over time. Indices of caloric prices were constructed and the "law of one price" was used to derive the Nut3-CiO index. Caloric inflation rates were obtained using basic descriptive statistics. The Nut3-CiO was applied in the major cities of Mexico during the period from January 1996 to December 2010. The statistical behavior of the Nut3-CiO revealed that, in Mexican cities, products for a typical diet are less expensive than products for a healthy diet. The findings showed a cyclical behavior to the index, a high correlation between inflation for the typical diet and inflation for the market basket, and a high persistence of prices. The Nut3-CiO index makes it possible to periodically compare the price differential of two types of diets-typical and healthy-between cities in a single country. This instrument could help health authorities identify the cities where it is easier or more difficult for consumers to access a typical or healthy diet in terms of cost. Furthermore, it makes it possible to estimate the percentage adjustment necessary in each city to attain levels of nutritional purchasing power parity.

  1. [Effects of enclosure on the caloric values of main plant species, litters, and communities in Leymus chinensis steppe in Xilin River Basin, Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Zhu, Tie-Xia; Wang, Qi-Bing; Han, Guo-Dong

    2012-04-01

    In August 2010, a sampling work was conducted in the plots of the Leymus chinensis steppe, which were fenced in 1979, 1999, and 2004, respectively, in Inner Mongolia Grassland Ecosystem Research Station (IMGERS), aimed to approach the effects of different time periods of enclosure on the caloric values of main plant species, litters, and commnities, and on the total energy storage per unit area. Enclosure had significant effects on the caloric values of the main plant species, litters, and communities, and on the total energy storage per unit area. The total energy storage per unit area in the plots fenced in 1979 and 1999 was significantly higher than that in the plot fenced in 2004, while the caloric values of the litters and communities were in adverse. No significant differences were observed between the plots fenced in 1979 and 1999, respectively. The caloric value of the same plant species varied significantly with the time period of enclosure, and that of different plant species presently definite differences. The caloric value of communities depended on the plant species in the communities, while the total energy storage per unit area depended on the biomass production of the steppe. Both the caloric value of communities and the total energy storage per unit area presented the same variation trend of fluctuation in a short term, but maintained at a stable level over a long period of enclosure, and ecologically reached enrgy balance finally.

  2. Meals of differing caloric content do not alter physical activity behavior during a subsequent simulated recess period in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly J; Pohle-Krauza, Rachael; Uhas, Samantha; Barkley, Jacob E

    2016-01-01

    Research on adults and animals has demonstrated that chronic and acute overfeeding can alter physical activity behavior. However, there are no assessments of the acute effects of high-calorie (HC) meals on physical activity behavior in children. This is of importance as a typical school lunch is HC. If this type of meal negatively impacts subsequent physical activity behavior, the ability of post-lunch recess periods as a means to increase energy expenditure may be lessened. To assess the effect of two meals of differing caloric content, HC and low calorie (LC), on children's subsequent physical activity behavior. Nineteen healthy children (aged 6-10) completed two laboratory sessions where they were fed lunch with HC or LC content, but equivalent macronutrient distribution. Children had 15 min to consume as much of the meal as possible per session. Children consumed 659.5 ± 101.3 kcal in the HC condition and 291.8 ± 12.1 kcal in the LC condition. After the meal, children went to a gymnasium for 40 min. In the gymnasium children had free-choice access to obstacle courses, various sports equipment, and a table with sedentary activities. Children could play with any of the activities in any amount they wished for the entire activity session. Children's physical activity was monitored with accelerometers and that data was converted into caloric expenditure. Each child ate all meals and participated in the free-choice activity sessions with no other children present. Caloric expenditure during the free-choice activity sessions was not significantly different (p = 0.4) between the HC (89.2 ± 27.3 kcals) and LC (83.4 ± 34.9 kcals) conditions. However, caloric balance (kcals eaten-kcals expended) was 2.74-fold greater (p < 0.001) in the HC condition (Δ 570.3 ± 92.2 kcals) than the LC condition (Δ 208.4 ± 32.0 kcals). Children did not alter their physical activity behavior during a free-choice activity session after consuming a HC meal

  3. Cardiovascular risk escalation with caloric excess: a prospective demonstration of the mechanics in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok K; Johnson, William D; Johannsen, Darcy; Ravussin, Eric

    2013-01-24

    The link between weight gain and cardiovascular risk characterized with circadian blood pressure variability [CBPV] and endothelial function [EF] is unexplored. To prospectively demonstrate weight gain in healthy adults, increases body fat [BF], enlarges waist circumference [WC], expands visceral adipose tissue [VAT], exacerbates systemic inflammation [sIF], worsens insulin resistance [IR] and enhances functional cardiovascular disease [CVD] risk. Healthy men [n=11] and women [n=3] provided initial and eight-week post-caloric excess anthropometric and fasting laboratory measures. Functional CVD risk assessments: CBPV and resting EF were also obtained with 7-day automatic ambulatory BP monitoring and increased test finger peripheral arterial tone [PAT] relative to control [reported as relative hyperemia index (RHI)], respectively. After determining individualized mean energy requirements for weight maintenance over 7-days, each participant received a personalized over feeding prescription (1.4 times; 41% carbohydrate, 44% fat, and 15% protein) for 8-weeks. mean (SEM). Participants increased body weight [BW; +7.4(0.1) kg]*, body mass index [BMI; +2.5(0.2) kg/m²]*, BF [+2.0(0.01)%]*, WC [+8.2(1.0) cm]*, and VAT [+0.2(0.03) L]* and intrahepatic lipid [IHL + 0.0004(0.002) L] :*all p < 0.01. Increased subcutaneous adipose cell size [+0.3(0.01) ρL; p = 0.02] accompanied significant sIF [hs-CRP + 0.4(0.09) mg/dL; p = 0.04; leptin 6.63 ng/ml; p = 0.0008] and IR [fasting plasma glucose; [FPG] +7.0(0.6) mg/dL;p = 0.01, fasting insulin; [FI] +5.7(1.4) uIU/ml; p = 0.001, HOMA-IR +1.6(0.5); p = 0.02]. Abn CBPV {systolic [+5.4(0.8); p = 0.002, diastolic [+1.7(0.1); p = 0.07 and pulse pressure [PP] [+3.5(0.4); p = 0.003 mm Hg} or elevated heart rate [HR] [+4.9(0.5) bpm; p = 0.003] ensued. Resting RHI declined by 0.47(0.004) from initial 2.24(0.09) to 1.77(0.1); p = 0.001, indicating endothelial dysfunction [ED]. Controlled

  4. PREFACE: 16th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Rainer W.

    2015-02-01

    The XVIth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics - CALOR 2014 - was held in Giessen, Germany from 6-11 April 2014 at the Science Campus of the University. It was hosted by the Justus-Liebig-University and the HIC for FAIR Helmholtz International Center. The series of conferences on calorimetry were started in 1990 at Fermilab and are focusing primarily on operating and future calorimeter systems within the Hadron and High-Energy Physics community without neglecting the impact on other fields such as Astrophysics or Medical Imaging. Confirmed by the impressive list of over 70 oral presentations, 5 posters and over 100 attendees, the field of calorimetry appears alive and attractive. The present volume contains the written contributions of almost all presentations which can be found at http://calor2014.de. Time slots of 15 or 30 minutes including discussion were allocated. The conference was accompanied by a small exhibition of several industrial companies related to the field. The day before the opening of the scientific program, Richard Wigmans gave an excellent and vivid tutorial on basic aspects on calorimetry meant as an introduction for students and conference attendees new in the field. The opening ceremony was used to give an impression of the present and future status and the scientific program of the new FAIR facility nearby at Darmstadt presented by Klaus Peters from GSI. The conference program of the first day was dedicated to the performance and required future upgrade of the LHC experiments, dominated by ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The program of the next day contained specific aspects on electronics and readout as well as calorimetry in outer space. Several contributions discussed in detail new concepts for hadron calorimeters within the CALICE collaboration completed by a session on sampling calorimeters. The next sections were dedicated to operating and future calorimeters at various laboratories and covering a wide range of

  5. Synergistic interaction between caloric restriction and amphetamine in food-unrelated approach behavior of rats

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Kristine L.; Vollrath-Smith, Fiori R.; Jafari, Mehrnoosh; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Approach behavior is regulated by the brain integrating information about environment and body state. Psychoactive drugs interact with this process. Objectives We examined the extent to which caloric (i.e., food) restriction, amphetamine and lithium interact in potentiating locomotor activity and responding reinforced by visual stimulus (VS), a reward unrelated to energy homeostasis. Methods Rats either had ad-libitum access to food or received daily rations that maintained 85-90% of their original body weights. Leverpressing turned on a cue light for 1 sec and turned off house light for 5 sec. Amphetamine and lithium were administered through intraperitoneal injections and diet, respectively. Results Food-restriction or amphetamine (1 mg/kg) alone had little effect on VS-reinforced responding; however, the combination of the two conditions markedly potentiated VS-reinforced responding (4-fold). Food restriction lasting 7 days or longer was needed to augment amphetamine’s effect on VS-reinforced responding. Amphetamine (0.3 – 3 mg/kg) potentiated locomotor activity similarly between food-restricted and ad-libitum groups. Repeated injections of amphetamine sensitized locomotor activity, but not VS-reinforced responding. In addition, while chronic lithium treatments (0.2% lithium carbonate chow) reduced VS-reinforced responding, chronic lithium further augmented amphetamine-potentiated VS-reinforced responding. Conclusions Food-restriction interacts with psychoactive drugs to potentiate goal-directed responding unrelated to food-seeking in a much more powerful manner than previously thought. The novel finding that lithium can augment a psychostimulant effect of amphetamine suggests caution when combining lithium and psychostimulant drugs in clinical settings. PMID:24101157

  6. Final diagnosis of patients with clinically suspected vestibular neuritis showing normal caloric response.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2017-07-01

    Vestibular neuritis is one of the most common peripheral causes of acute vestibular syndrome, of which the diagnosis is generally based on a comprehensive interpretation of clinical and laboratory findings following reasonable exclusion of other disorders. This study aimed to investigate the final diagnosis of patients admitted to hospital under the clinical impression of vestibular neuritis who showed no unilateral caloric paresis. Forty-five patients who visited the emergency department with isolated acute spontaneous vertigo were included. Among them, six patients (13%) developed definitive spontaneous vertigo lasting longer than 20min again after discharge from hospital, accompanied by hearing loss, which was audiometrically documented, leading to a final diagnosis of definite Ménière's disease. Nine patients (20%) revisited our clinic with recurrent episodic vertigo without any documented hearing loss or auditory symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus or ear fullness, which led to a final diagnosis of possible Ménière's disease. In four patients (9%), initial spontaneous vertigo and nystagmus changed to positional vertigo and nystagmus on the second hospital day. In 26 patients (58%), neither another episode of vertigo nor auditory symptoms developed during follow-up period (7-92months), a condition to which the authors gave an arbitrary diagnosis of "mild unilateral vestibular deficit". In conclusion, patients admitted to hospital under clinical impression of vestibular neuritis may have various final diagnoses, and "mild unilateral vestibular deficit" was the most common final diagnosis among patients who did not meet the diagnostic criteria of vestibular neuritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HPA axis dampening by limited sucrose intake: reward frequency vs. caloric consumption

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Ostrander, Michelle M.; Herman, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals often cope with stress by consuming calorically-dense, highly-palatable “comfort” foods. The present work explores the stress-relieving properties of palatable foods in a rat model of limited sucrose intake. In this model, adult male rats with free access to chow and water are given additional access to a small amount of sucrose drink (or water as a control). A history of such limited sucrose intake reduces the collective (HPA axis, sympathetic, and behavioral-anxiety) stress response. Moreover, the stress-dampening by sucrose appears to be mediated primarily by its rewarding properties, since beneficial effects are reproduced by the noncaloric sweetener saccharin but not oral intragastric gavage of sucrose. The present work uses an alternate strategy to address the hypothesis that the rewarding properties of sucrose mediate its stress-dampening. This work varies the duration, frequency, and/or volume of sucrose and assesses the ability to attenuate HPA axis stress responses. The data indicate that HPA-dampening is optimal with a greater duration and/or frequency of sucrose, whereas increasing the volume of sucrose consumed is without effect. This finding suggests that the primary factor mediating stress-dampening is the number/rate of reward (i.e., sucrose) exposures, rather than the total sucrose calories consumed. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that stress relief by limited palatable food intake is mediated primarily by its hedonic/rewarding properties. Moreover, the results support the contention that naturally rewarding behaviors are a physiological means to produce stress relief. PMID:21168428

  8. Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Claire; Ludwig, David S; Sonneville, Kendrin; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2009-04-01

    To estimate the net caloric impact from replacing sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with alternatives in children and adolescents in naturalistic settings. Secondary analysis based on nationally representative cross-sectional study. Fixed-effect regression analysis of 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Children and adolescents 2 to 19 years of age (N = 3098). Within-person beverage consumption between 2 surveyed days. The association between changes in the consumption of SSBs and other beverages and changes in total energy intake (TEI) of the same individual. Each additional serving (8 oz) of SSB corresponded to a net increase of 106 kcal/d (P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 91 to 121 kcal/d), holding other beverages constant. Increases were also seen (all P < .001) for each additional serving of whole milk (169 kcal/d; 95% CI, 143 to 195 kcal/d), reduced-fat milk (145 kcal/d; 95% CI, 118 to 171 kcal/d), and 100% juice (123 kcal/d; 95% CI, 90 to 157 kcal/d). No net increases in TEI were seen for water (8 kcal/d; P = .27; 95% CI, -6 to 22 kcal/d) or diet drinks (47 kcal/d; P = .20; 95% CI, -23 to 117 kcal/d). Substituting SSBs with water was associated with a significant decrease in TEI, controlling for intake of other beverages, total beverage and nonbeverages, and fast-food and weekend effects. Each 1% of beverage replacement was associated with 6.6-kcal lower TEI, a reduction not negated by compensatory increases in other food or beverages. We estimate that replacing all SSBs with water could result in an average reduction of 235 kcal/d. Replacing SSB intake with water is associated with reductions in total calories for all groups studied.

  9. Caloric restriction coupled with radiation decreases metastatic burden in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Simone, Brittany A; Dan, Tu; Palagani, Ajay; Jin, Lianjin; Han, Sunny Y; Wright, Christopher; Savage, Jason E; Gitman, Robert; Lim, Meng Kieng; Palazzo, Juan; Mehta, Minesh P; Simone, Nicole L

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is devastating and triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a higher propensity for metastasis. Improved local control upfront in this aggressive cancer could potentially decrease its propensity toward metastasis. We sought to determine if using caloric restriction (CR) as a systemic therapy, combined with radiation therapy (IR) to the primary tumor, may impact metastatic disease. An orthotopic mouse model using a highly metastatic, luciferase-tagged TNBC cell line (4T1), was used to generate palpable tumors. Mice were then treated with CR, IR, and a combination of the two. In vivo imaging was performed for metastatic evaluation. Molecular evaluation of the tumors was performed, generating a mechanistic hypothesis for CR, which was then tested with pertinent pathway inhibition in the model. CR significantly increased the time to developing metastases, decreased the overall number and volume of lung metastases, and increased survival. CR decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and globally downregulated the IGF-1R signaling pathway. Adding an IGF-1R/INSR inhibitor to local IR in vivo accomplished a decrease in metastases similar to CR plus IR, demonstrating the importance of the IGF-1R signaling pathway, and underscoring it as a possible mechanism for CR. CR decreased metastatic burden and therefore may complement cytotoxic therapies being used in the clinical setting for metastatic disease. Downregulation of the IGF-1R pathway, is in part responsible for this response and modulating IGF-1R directly resulted in similar improved progression-free survival. The novel use of CR has the potential to enhance clinical outcomes for patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  10. Effects of caloric restriction on body composition and total body nitrogen as measured by neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, A N; Vartsky, D; Ellis, K J; Yasumura, S; Cohn, S H

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two isocaloric diets (800 Kcals) on the changes in body composition during weight reduction. While the protein content of both diets was 70 g, the carbohydrate content of diet A was 10 g and that of diet B was 70 g. The various parameters of body composition were determined as follows: Total body potassium (TBK) by 40K counting, total body water (TBW) by the tritiated water technique, total body nitrogen (TBN) by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) and total body fat was estimated by measuring the skinfold thickness. Routine serum chemistries were performed every 2 wk and serum insulin and triiodothyronine by radioimmunoassay were done at 4-wk intervals. Seventeen obese women who were at least 30% above ideal body weight volunteered for the outpatient study, (group A--10 subjects, group B--7 subjects). At the end of the 12 wk study, the percent changes in the above parameters of body composition were not significantly different for the two groups. The biochemical changes were consistent with the degree of caloric restriction. We conclude that: (1) the technique of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis can be used effectively to determine long term changes in total body nitrogen during weight reduction, (2) loss of lean tissue (water, potassium and nitrogen) as well as fat tissue occurred during weight reduction. The loss of TBN in absolute quantities was less for diet A compared to diet B; however, there was no significant difference between the two diets when the data was expressed as a percent change from the baseline values, and (3) TBK determination probably provides the best estimate of total body fat.

  11. Mimetics of caloric restriction include agonists of lipid-activated nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Corton, J Christopher; Apte, Udayan; Anderson, Steven P; Limaye, Pallavi; Yoon, Lawrence; Latendresse, John; Dunn, Corrie; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Voss, Kenneth A; Swanson, Cynthia; Kimbrough, Carie; Wong, Jean S; Gill, Sarjeet S; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Stulnig, Thomas M; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Mehendale, Harihara M

    2004-10-29

    The obesity epidemic in industrialized countries is associated with increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and certain types of cancer. In animal models, caloric restriction (CR) suppresses these diseases as well as chemical-induced tissue damage. These beneficial effects of CR overlap with those altered by agonists of nuclear receptors (NR) under control of the fasting-responsive transcriptional co-activator, peroxisome proliferator-activated co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha). In a screen for compounds that mimic CR effects in the liver, we found statistically significant overlaps between the CR transcript profile in wild-type mice and the profiles altered by agonists of lipid-activated NR, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), liver X receptor, and their obligate heterodimer partner, retinoid X receptor. The overlapping genes included those involved in CVD (lipid metabolism and inflammation) and cancer (cell fate). Based on this overlap, we hypothesized that some effects of CR are mediated by PPARalpha. As determined by transcript profiling, 19% of all gene expression changes in wild-type mice were dependent on PPARalpha, including Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14, involved in fatty acid omega-oxidation, acute phase response genes, and epidermal growth factor receptor but not increases in PGC-1alpha. CR protected the livers of wild-type mice from damage induced by thioacetamide, a liver toxicant and hepatocarcinogen. CR protection was lost in PPARalpha-null mice due to inadequate tissue repair. These results demonstrate that PPARalpha mediates some of the effects of CR and indicate that a pharmacological approach to mimicking many of the beneficial effects of CR may be possible.

  12. Late-onset caloric restriction alters skeletal muscle metabolism by modulating pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Lin, Shang-Ying; Liao, Yi-Hung; Li, Zhen-Jie; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2015-06-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates age-related muscle loss. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for this attenuation is not fully understood. This study evaluated the role of energy metabolism in the CR-induced attenuation of muscle loss. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the effect of CR on energy metabolism and determine its relationship with muscle mass, and 2) to determine whether the effects of CR are age dependent. Young and middle-aged rats were randomized into either 40% CR or ad libitum (AL) diet groups for 14 wk. Major energy-producing pathways in muscles, i.e., glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), were examined. We found that the effects of CR were age dependent. CR improved muscle metabolism and normalized muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not young animals. CR decreased glycolysis and increased the cellular dependency for OXPHOS vs. glycolysis in muscles of middle-aged rats, which was associated with the improvement of normalized muscle mass. The metabolic reprogramming induced by CR was related to modulation of pyruvate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Compared with animals fed AL, middle-aged animals with CR had lower lactate dehydrogenase A content and greater mitochondrial pyruvate carrier content. Markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, including AMPK activation levels and SIRT1 and COX-IV content, also showed increased levels. In conclusion, 14 wk of CR improved muscle metabolism and preserved muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not in young developing animals. CR-attenuated age-related muscle loss is associated with reprogramming of the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to OXPHOS.

  13. Leaf Caloric Value from Tropical to Cold-Temperate Forests: Latitudinal Patterns and Linkage to Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guangyan; Hou, Jihua; Li, Ying; Zhang, Jiahui; He, Nianpeng

    2016-01-01

    Leaf caloric value (LCV) reflects the capacity of a leaf to fix and accumulate solar energy through photosynthesis. We systematically investigated the LCV of 745 plant species in 9 forests, representing a range of tropical to cold-temperate forests along the 4700-km North-South Transect of Eastern China. The goals were to explore the latitudinal patterns of LCV at the levels of species, plant functional group, and community and to establish the relationship between LCV and gross primary productivity (GPP). Our results showed that LCV for all species ranged from 12.85 to 22.15 KJ g–1 with an average of 18.46 KJ g–1. Plant functional groups had a significant influence on LCV, with trees > shrubs > herbs, conifers > broadleaved trees, and evergreens > deciduous trees. The different values of LCV represented the long-term evolution and adaptation of plant species to different environments. Unexpectedly, no apparent latitudinal trends of LCV at community level were observed, although LCV at the species level clearly decreased with increasing latitude. Use efficiency of LCV (CUE, gC KJ–1), defined as the ratio of GPP to total LCV at the community level, varied quadratic with latitude and was lower in the middle latitudes. Climate (temperature and precipitation) may explain 52.9% of the variation in spatial patterns of CUE, which was positively correlated with aridity. Our findings are the first large-scale report of the latitudinal patterns of LCV in forests at the species, plant functional group, and community levels and provide new insights into the relationship between LCV and ecosystem functions in forest communities. PMID:27341474

  14. Increased caloric intake after a high-fat preload: relation to circulating triglycerides and orexigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, V A; Karatayev, O; Chang, G-Q; Leibowitz, S F

    2007-05-16

    To investigate mechanisms that mediate the greater food intake induced by a fat-rich diet, the present study tested an acute "preload-to-test meal" paradigm in normal-weight rats. In this paradigm, the rats were given a small high-fat (HF) compared to low-fat (LF) preload and, after an intermeal interval, allowed to consume freely on a subsequent test meal. Modified versions of this paradigm were tested to determine the robustness of the greater caloric intake induced by the HF preload while standardizing the test protocol. A HF preload of 10-15 kcals, compared to an equicaloric LF preload, significantly increased food intake by 40-50% in the subsequent test meal. This effect, a 4-6 kcal increase, was observed with HF preloads equal in energy density and palatability to the LF preloads. It was evident with preloads or test meals that were liquid or solid, preloads that were injected, test meals that had variable fat content, and natural intermeal intervals of 60-120 min. This overeating after a HF preload was invariably associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in circulating levels of triglycerides (TG), with no change in leptin or insulin. It was also accompanied by increased expression of the orexigenic peptides, galanin in the paraventricular nucleus and orexin in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus. Moreover, if given repeatedly over several days, the HF compared to equicaloric LF preload significantly increased 24-h food intake. These results establish a protocol for studying the phenomenon of increased feeding on a HF diet under controlled conditions and suggest possible underlying mechanisms involving circulating lipids and orexigenic peptides.

  15. Mild caloric restriction up-regulates the expression of prohibitin: A proteome study

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Shoko; Masuda, Junko; Shimagami, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomomasa; Saito, Kenji; Kato, Hisanori

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomic analysis was performed to elucidate physiological alterations induced by mild CR. {yields} The results suggest good reproducibility and possibility to grasp the important response of CR. {yields} The increase in prohibitin abundance was observed in CR groups by proteomic analysis. {yields} We hypothesize that prohibitin might be involved in the longevity induced by CR. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is well known to expand lifespan in a variety of species and to retard many age-related diseases. The effects of relatively mild CR on the proteome profile in relation to lifespan have not yet been reported, despite the more extensive studies of the stricter CR conditions. Thus, the present study was conducted to elucidate the protein profiles in rat livers after mild CR for a relatively short time. Young growing rats were fed CR diets (10% and 30% CR) for 1 month. We performed the differential proteomic analysis of the rat livers using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The most remarkable protein among the differentially expressed proteins was found to be prohibitin, the abundance of which was increased by 30% CR. Prohibitin is a ubiquitously expressed protein shown to suppress cell proliferation and to be related to longevity. The increase in prohibitin was observed both in 10% and 30% CR by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, induction of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) protein, related to the actions of prohibitin in promoting longevity, was observed. The increased prohibitin level in response to subtle CR suggests that this increase may be one of the early events leading to the expansion of lifespan in response to CR.

  16. HPA axis dampening by limited sucrose intake: reward frequency vs. caloric consumption.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Herman, James P

    2011-04-18

    Individuals often cope with stress by consuming calorically-dense, highly-palatable 'comfort' foods. The present work explores the stress-relieving properties of palatable foods in a rat model of limited sucrose intake. In this model, adult male rats with free access to chow and water are given additional access to a small amount of sucrose drink (or water as a control). A history of such limited sucrose intake reduces the collective (HPA axis, sympathetic, and behavioral-anxiety) stress response. Moreover, the stress-dampening by sucrose appears to be mediated primarily by its rewarding properties, since beneficial effects are reproduced by the noncaloric sweetener saccharin but not oral intragastric gavage of sucrose. The present work uses an alternate strategy to address the hypothesis that the rewarding properties of sucrose mediate its stress-dampening. This work varies the duration, frequency, and/or volume of sucrose and assesses the ability to attenuate HPA axis stress responses. The data indicate that HPA-dampening is optimal with a greater duration and/or frequency of sucrose, whereas increasing the volume of sucrose consumed is without effect. This finding suggests that the primary factor mediating stress-dampening is the number/rate of reward (i.e., sucrose) exposures, rather than the total sucrose calories consumed. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that stress relief by limited palatable food intake is mediated primarily by its hedonic/rewarding properties. Moreover, the results support the contention that naturally rewarding behaviors are a physiological means to produce stress relief.

  17. Leaf Caloric Value from Tropical to Cold-Temperate Forests: Latitudinal Patterns and Linkage to Productivity.

    PubMed

    Song, Guangyan; Hou, Jihua; Li, Ying; Zhang, Jiahui; He, Nianpeng

    2016-01-01

    Leaf caloric value (LCV) reflects the capacity of a leaf to fix and accumulate solar energy through photosynthesis. We systematically investigated the LCV of 745 plant species in 9 forests, representing a range of tropical to cold-temperate forests along the 4700-km North-South Transect of Eastern China. The goals were to explore the latitudinal patterns of LCV at the levels of species, plant functional group, and community and to establish the relationship between LCV and gross primary productivity (GPP). Our results showed that LCV for all species ranged from 12.85 to 22.15 KJ g-1 with an average of 18.46 KJ g-1. Plant functional groups had a significant influence on LCV, with trees > shrubs > herbs, conifers > broadleaved trees, and evergreens > deciduous trees. The different values of LCV represented the long-term evolution and adaptation of plant species to different environments. Unexpectedly, no apparent latitudinal trends of LCV at community level were observed, although LCV at the species level clearly decreased with increasing latitude. Use efficiency of LCV (CUE, gC KJ-1), defined as the ratio of GPP to total LCV at the community level, varied quadratic with latitude and was lower in the middle latitudes. Climate (temperature and precipitation) may explain 52.9% of the variation in spatial patterns of CUE, which was positively correlated with aridity. Our findings are the first large-scale report of the latitudinal patterns of LCV in forests at the species, plant functional group, and community levels and provide new insights into the relationship between LCV and ecosystem functions in forest communities.

  18. An evaluation of commercial water irrigation systems used for caloric testing.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J E; Maguire, M H

    1992-10-01

    The post-1982 Grant Caloric Test Apparatus, and the Atmos Variotherm were evaluated and compared to BS5724 Part 1 (1989). Quality of construction is satisfactory, but design features may result in failure of tests for which this type of equipment should conform; namely splash, liquid leakage and spillage. For the Variotherm the proximity of the water piping to the electrical parts could result in wetting of the electrical units in the event of a leakage. The large vents in the Grant tanks allow easy access of water to electrical parts in the event of splashing. Both sets of equipment fail BS5724 Part 1 (1989) with respect to labelling. The Grant irrigation nozzle is well designed, but the Variotherm nozzles are not so, as they can accidentally pass down the external auditory meatus causing meatal wall or tympanic membrane damage. Both sets of equipment passed on electrical safety test for Class I Type B equipment. Cut-outs are fitted to prevent heating in the absence of water or over-heating of the water. The 44 degrees C Grant tank cut out after 20 s in the absence of water and at 49 degrees C as the water temperature rose above the operating temperature. The Variotherm heater did not operate in the absence of a water supply. The Variotherm thermal cut-out was not assessed. The force of the water at recommended flow rates using the Variotherm 'standard' metal nozzle was considered to pose a potential hazard of tympanic membrane perforation, and has subsequently been withdrawn by the supplier. The plastic nozzle minimized any such risk. The Variotherm is easier to use due to the well-designed trigger handle for controlling water delivery. Both sets of equipment performed at the correct temperature to within +/- 0.5 degrees C and achieved a flow rate of 250 ml in 30 s.

  19. Caloric restriction alone and with exercise improves CVD risk in healthy non-obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Michael; Redman, Leanne M; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Smith, Julie V; Martin, Corby K; Rood, Jennifer C; Greenway, Frank L; Williamson, Donald A; Smith, Steven R; Ravussin, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) delays the development of age-associated disease and increases lifespan in rodents, but the effects in humans remain uncertain. Determine the effect of 6 months of CR with or without exercise on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and estimated 10-year CVD risk in healthy non-obese men and women. Thirty-six individuals were randomized to one of three groups for 6 months: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% calorie restriction; CR+EX, 12.5% CR+12.5% increase in energy expenditure via aerobic exercise. CVD risk factors were assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, CR and CR+EX lost approximately 10% of body weight. CR significantly reduced triacylglycerol (-31+/-15mg/dL) and factor VIIc (-10.7+/-2.3%). Similarly CR+EX reduced triacylglycerol (-22+/-8mg/dL) and additionally reduced LDL-C (-16.0+/-5.1mg/dL) and DBP (-4.0+/-2.1mmHg). In contrast, both triacylglycerol (24+/-14mg/dL) and factor VIIc (7.9+/-2.3%) were increased in the Control group. HDL-cholesterol was increased in all groups while hsCRP was lower in the Controls versus CR+EX. Estimated 10-year CVD risk significantly declined from baseline by 29% in CR (P<0.001) and 38% in the CR+EX (P<0.001) while remaining unchanged in the Control group. Based on combined favorable changes in lipid and blood pressure, caloric restriction with or without exercise that induces weight loss favorably reduces risk for CVD even in already healthy non-obese individuals.

  20. The ketogenic diet: initiation at goal calories versus gradual caloric advancement.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Seema; Cramp, Laura; Blalock, Dan; Zelleke, Tesfaye; Carpenter, Jessica; Kao, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient initiation of the ketogenic diet has historically involved fasting followed by gradual advancement of calories and/or diet ratio. Complications during this initiation period are common. We sought to determine if the initiation of the diet at goal calories would reduce these complications while maintaining efficacy. Sixty patients were admitted to a tertiary care hospital for elective initiation of the ketogenic diet between October 2007 and January 2013. All patients were placed on a ketogenic diet initiation pathway. In 2010, the pathway was modified from gradual caloric advancement to initiation at goal calories. We selected 30 consecutive patients before and after the change for comparison. Each child's record was reviewed for the occurrence of hypoglycemia, number of days to reach full ketosis (defined as 4 + urine ketones), acidosis requiring commencement of sodium citrate, length of admission, and long-term efficacy. Both methods of initiation had similar rates of dehydration, vomiting, lethargy, and irritability. More patients initiated at goal received sodium citrate (P = 0.005); however, mean daily values of carbon dioxide were not significantly different. Onset of ketosis was slightly delayed (P = 0.009) in patients initiated at goal, but length of stay was not affected (P > 0.1). Hypoglycemia was uncommon and rates were similar between the groups. Efficacy at 3 months was better in patients initiated at full calories (P < 0.05). Initiation of the ketogenic diet full calories is a reasonable alternative to the current standard practice of gradual advancement of calories and/or diet ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Caloric restriction coupled with radiation decreases metastatic burden in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Brittany A.; Dan, Tu; Palagani, Ajay; Jin, Lianjin; Han, Sunny Y.; Wright, Christopher; Savage, Jason E.; Gitman, Robert; Lim, Meng Kieng; Palazzo, Juan; Mehta, Minesh P.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Metastatic breast cancer is devastating and triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a higher propensity for metastasis. Improved local control upfront in this aggressive cancer could potentially decrease its propensity toward metastasis. We sought to determine if using caloric restriction (CR) as a systemic therapy, combined with radiation therapy (IR) to the primary tumor, may impact metastatic disease. Methods: An orthotopic mouse model using a highly metastatic, luciferase-tagged TNBC cell line (4T1), was used to generate palpable tumors. Mice were then treated with CR, IR, and a combination of the two. In vivo imaging was performed for metastatic evaluation. Molecular evaluation of the tumors was performed, generating a mechanistic hypothesis for CR, which was then tested with pertinent pathway inhibition in the model. Results: CR significantly increased the time to developing metastases, decreased the overall number and volume of lung metastases, and increased survival. CR decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and globally downregulated the IGF-1R signaling pathway. Adding an IGF-1R/INSR inhibitor to local IR in vivo accomplished a decrease in metastases similar to CR plus IR, demonstrating the importance of the IGF-1R signaling pathway, and underscoring it as a possible mechanism for CR. Conclusions: CR decreased metastatic burden and therefore may complement cytotoxic therapies being used in the clinical setting for metastatic disease. Downregulation of the IGF-1R pathway, is in part responsible for this response and modulating IGF-1R directly resulted in similar improved progression-free survival. The novel use of CR has the potential to enhance clinical outcomes for patients with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27027731

  2. Caloric restriction and L-carnitine administration improves insulin sensitivity in patients with impaired glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Molfino, Alessio; Cascino, Antonia; Conte, Caterina; Ramaccini, Cesarina; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Laviano, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Reduced circulating and tissue carnitine levels, possibly leading to impaired mitochondrial function, have been postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, whether L-carnitine administration may improve insulin sensitivity in patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) is still controversial. The aim of the study was to explore the role of L-carnitine supplementation in influencing insulin sensitivity. A randomized controlled study involving adult outpatients was designed. Adult patients referred to the outpatient clinic and within 10 days of the diagnosis of IFG or DM-2 were consecutively enrolled. Exclusion criteria were concomitant antidiabetic therapy and modifications of lifestyle during the previous 4 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a hypocaloric diet for 10 days (group C; n = 8) or the same dietetic regimen in addition to oral L-carnitine (2 g twice daily) supplementation (group LC; n = 8). Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), fasting plasma insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were assessed at the beginning and end of the study. Data were statistically analyzed using the Student t test for paired and unpaired data. OGTT at 2 hours improved in both groups. Only in the L-carnitine-supplemented group did plasma insulin levels and HOMA-IR significantly decrease when compared to baseline values. Considering the role of caloric restriction in increasing the intestinal uptake of carnitine, the results suggest that oral L-carnitine administration, when associated with a hypocaloric feeding regimen, improves insulin resistance and may represent an adjunctive treatment for IFG and DM-2.

  3. Differential effects of voluntary treadmill exercise and caloric restriction on tau pathogenesis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology fed with Western diet.

    PubMed

    Gratuze, Maud; Julien, Jacinthe; Morin, Françoise; Marette, André; Planel, Emmanuel

    2017-10-03

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that becomes pathological when it undergoes hyperphosphorylation and aggregation as seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is mostly sporadic, with environmental, biological and/or genetic risks factors, interacting together to promote the disease. In the past decade, reports have suggested that obesity in midlife could be one of these risk factors. On the other hand, caloric restriction and physical exercise have been reported to reduce the incidence and outcome of obesity as well as AD. We evaluated the impact of voluntary physical exercise and caloric restriction on tau pathology during 2months in hTau mice under high caloric diet in order to evaluate if these strategies could prevent AD-like pathology in obese conditions. We found no effects of obesity induced by Western diet on both Tau phosphorylation and aggregation compared to controls. However, exercise reduced tau phosphorylation while caloric restriction exacerbated its aggregation in the brains of obese hTau mice. We then examined the mechanisms underlying changes in tau phosphorylation and aggregation by exploring major tau kinases and phosphatases and key proteins involved in autophagy. However, there were no significant effects of voluntary exercise and caloric restriction on these proteins in hTau mice that could explain our results. In this study, we report differential effects of voluntary treadmill exercise and caloric restriction on tau pathogenesis in our obese mice, namely beneficial effect of exercise on tau phosphorylation and deleterious effect of caloric restriction on tau aggregation. Our results suggest that lifestyle strategies used to reduce metabolic disorders and AD must be selected and studied carefully to avoid exacerbation of pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Caloric restriction improves diabetes-induced cognitive deficits by attenuating neurogranin-associated calcium signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwajin; Kang, Heeyoung; Heo, Rok Won; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Yi, Chin-Ok; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kwak, Woori; Kim, Won-Ho; Kang, Sang Soo; Roh, Gu Seob

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes-induced cognitive decline has been recognized in human patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus and mouse model of obesity, but the underlying mechanisms or therapeutic targets are not clearly identified. We investigated the effect of caloric restriction on diabetes-induced memory deficits and searched a molecular mechanism of caloric restriction-mediated neuroprotection. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 40 weeks and RNA-seq analysis was performed in the hippocampus of high-fat diet-fed mice. To investigate caloric restriction effect on differential expression of genes, mice were fed high-fat diet for 20 weeks and continued on high-fat diet or subjected to caloric restriction (2 g/day) for 12 weeks. High-fat diet-fed mice exhibited insulin resistance, glial activation, blood-brain barrier leakage, and memory deficits, in that we identified neurogranin, a down-regulated gene in high-fat diet-fed mice using RNA-seq analysis; neurogranin regulates Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent synaptic function. Caloric restriction increased insulin sensitivity, reduced high-fat diet-induced blood-brain barrier leakage and glial activation, and improved memory deficit. Furthermore, caloric restriction reversed high-fat diet-induced expression of neurogranin and the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and calpain as well as the downstream effectors. Our results suggest that neurogranin is an important factor of high-fat diet-induced memory deficits on which caloric restriction has a therapeutic effect by regulating neurogranin-associated calcium signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Serum concentrations and gene expression of sirtuin 1 in healthy and slightly overweight subjects after caloric restriction or resveratrol supplementation: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Antonio P; Roggerio, Alessandra; Goes, Marisa F S; Avakian, Solange D; Leal, Dalila P; Maranhão, Raul C; Strunz, Célia M C

    2017-01-15

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) plays an important role in vascular biology, and influences aspects of age-dependent atherosclerosis. In animals, the sirtuin system is strongly influenced by resveratrol and caloric restriction, but its expression in humans is controversial. This study investigated the effects of resveratrol and caloric restriction on Sirt1 serum concentrations and vascular biomarkers in a healthy human population. Forty-eight healthy participants (24 women) aged 55-65years were randomized to either 30days of resveratrol administration (500mg/day) or caloric restriction (1000cal/day). Blood was collected at baseline and day 30. Laboratory data analyzed were triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, VLDL, LDL, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein (a), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, insulin, oxidative stress, C-reactive protein, and Sirt1. Expression of the Sirt1 gene was analyzed using real-time PCR. Caloric restriction diminished the abdominal circumference and improved the lipid profile, but not resveratrol intervention. Resveratrol and caloric restriction increased serum concentrations of Sirt1, from 1.06±0.71 to 5.75±2.98ng/mL; p<0.0001, and from 1.65±1.81 to 5.80±2.23ng/mL; p<0.0001, respectively. Sirt1 increased in women and men in both interventions. On the other hand expression of Sirt1 mRNA was not different after caloric restriction and resveratrol treatment. Caloric restriction and resveratrol significantly increased plasma concentrations of Sirt1. The long-term impact of these interventions on atherosclerosis should be assessed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Moderate caloric restriction during gestation in rats alters adipose tissue sympathetic innervation and later adiposity in offspring.

    PubMed

    García, Ana Paula; Palou, Mariona; Sánchez, Juana; Priego, Teresa; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2011-02-18

    Maternal prenatal undernutrition predisposes offspring to higher adiposity in adulthood. Mechanisms involved in these programming effects, apart from those described in central nervous system development, have not been established. Here we aimed to evaluate whether moderate caloric restriction during early pregnancy in rats affects white adipose tissue (WAT) sympathetic innervation in the offspring, and its relationship with adiposity development. For this purpose, inguinal and retroperitoneal WAT (iWAT and rpWAT, respectively) were analyzed in male and female offspring of control and 20% caloric-restricted (from 1-12 d of pregnancy) (CR) dams. Body weight (BW), the weight, DNA-content, morphological features and the immunoreactive tyrosine hydroxylase and Neuropeptide Y area (TH+ and NPY+ respectively, performed by immunohistochemistry) of both fat depots, were studied at 25 d and 6 m of age, the latter after 2 m exposure to high fat diet. At 6 m of life, CR males but not females, exhibited greater BW, and greater weight and total DNA-content in iWAT, without changes in adipocytes size, suggesting the development of hyperplasia in this depot. However, in rpWAT, CR males but not females, showed larger adipocyte diameter, with no changes in DNA-content, suggesting the development of hypertrophy. These parameters were not different between control and CR animals at the age of 25 d. In iWAT, both at 25 d and 6 m, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+), suggesting lower sympathetic innervation in CR males compared to control males. In rpWAT, at 6 m but not at 25 d, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+). Thus, the effects of caloric restriction during gestation on later adiposity and on the differences in the adult phenotype between internal and subcutaneous fat depots in the male offspring may be associated in part with specific alterations in sympathetic innervation, which may impact on WAT architecture.

  7. Age-related alterations in the sarcolemmal environment are attenuated by lifelong caloric restriction and voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Hord, Jeffrey M; Botchlett, Rachel; Lawler, John M

    2016-10-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, referred to as sarcopenia, is mitigated by lifelong calorie restriction as well as exercise. In aged skeletal muscle fibers there is compromised integrity of the cell membrane that may contribute to sarcopenia. The purpose of this study was to determine if lifelong mild (8%) caloric restriction (CR) and lifelong CR+voluntary wheel running (WR) could ameliorate disruption of membrane scaffolding and signaling proteins during the aging process, thus maintaining a favorable, healthy membrane environment in plantaris muscle fibers. Fischer-344 rats were divided into four groups: 24-month old adults fed ad libitum (OAL); 24-month old on 8% caloric restriction (OCR); 24month old 8% caloric restriction+wheel running (OCRWR); and 6-month old sedentary adults fed ad libitum (YAL) were used to determine age-related changes. Aging resulted in discontinuous membrane expression of dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) proteins: dystrophin and α-syntrophin. Older muscle also displayed decreased content of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), a key DGC signaling protein. In contrast, OCR and OCRWR provided significant protection against age-related DGC disruption. In conjunction with the age-related decline in membrane DGC patency, key membrane repair proteins (MG53, dysferlin, annexin A6, and annexin A2) were significantly increased in the OAL plantaris. However, lifelong CR and CRWR interventions were effective at maintaining membrane repair proteins near YAL levels of. OAL fibers also displayed reduced protein content of NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (Nox2) subunits (p67phox and p47phox), consistent with a perturbed sarcolemmal environment. Loss of Nox2 subunits was prevented by lifelong CR and CRWR. Our results are therefore consistent with the hypothesis that lifelong CR and WR are effective countermeasures against age-related alterations in the myofiber membrane environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Soluble Fermentable Dietary Fibre (Pectin) Decreases Caloric Intake, Adiposity and Lipidaemia in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Clare L.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Williams, Patricia A.; Ross, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of a high fat diet promotes obesity and poor metabolic health, both of which may be improved by decreasing caloric intake. Satiety-inducing ingredients such as dietary fibre may be beneficial and this study investigates in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats the effects of high or low fat diet with or without soluble fermentable fibre (pectin). In two independently replicated experiments, young adult male DIO rats that had been reared on high fat diet (HF; 45% energy from fat) were given HF, low fat diet (LF; 10% energy from fat), HF with 10% w/w pectin (HF+P), or LF with 10% w/w pectin (LF+P) ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group/experiment). Food intake, body weight, body composition (by magnetic resonance imaging), plasma hormones, and plasma and liver lipid concentrations were measured. Caloric intake and body weight gain were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Body fat mass increased in HF, was maintained in LF, but decreased significantly in LF+P and HF+P groups. Final plasma leptin, insulin, total cholesterol and triglycerides were lower, and plasma satiety hormone PYY concentrations were higher, in LF+P and HF+P than in LF and HF groups, respectively. Total fat and triglyceride concentrations in liver were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Therefore, the inclusion of soluble fibre in a high fat (or low fat) diet promoted increased satiety and decreased caloric intake, weight gain, adiposity, lipidaemia, leptinaemia and insulinaemia. These data support the potential of fermentable dietary fibre for weight loss and improving metabolic health in obesity. PMID:26447990

  9. Nutrient and caloric dynamics in Avicennia marina leaves at different developmental and decay stages in Zhangjiang River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Chao; Wei, Shu-Dong; Zeng, Qi; Zhang, Li-Hua; Tam, Nora Fung-yee; Lin, Yi-Ming

    2010-03-01

    Avicennia marina is a typical mangrove species in the subtropical coastlines of China. The main objective of this study was to assess nutrient and caloric dynamics in A. marina leaves at different developmental and decay stages. Decomposition studies using litter bags suggested that the time required for the loss of half of the initial dry weight ( t50) was 19 days. The extracts of A. marina leaves contained non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics (hydrolysable tannin), but no condensed tannin. Non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics contents did not differ significantly from each other at various developmental stages, but decreased rapidly during leaf decomposition. Avicennia marina leaves had high N levels, and both N and P concentrations decreased significantly during senescence. During decomposition, N concentration of the leaf litter increased gradually but the phosphorus concentration showed a decrease in the first week, and both N and P remained the same towards the end of the experiment. The gross caloric value (GCV) of mature leaves was significantly higher than those of young and senescent leaves, while ash-free caloric value (AFCV) did not change significantly during leaf development and senescence. During leaf decomposition, both GCV and AFCV increased gradually and remained the same at late stages. In subtropical Zhangjiang River Estuary, high N levels and lack of condensed tannins in A. marina leaves were responsible for the fast rate of decay. Non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics had no great effect on rate of decay. Nitrogen resorption during leaf senescence, and high litter decomposition followed by nitrogen immobilization are the important nutrient conservation strategy for A. marina.

  10. Consuming More of Daily Caloric Intake at Dinner Predisposes to Obesity. A 6-Year Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Simona; Musso, Giovanni; Beccuti, Guglielmo; Fadda, Maurizio; Fedele, Debora; Gambino, Roberto; Gentile, Luigi; Durazzo, Marilena; Ghigo, Ezio; Cassader, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives It has been hypothesized that assuming most of the caloric intake later in the day leads to metabolic disadvantages, but few studies are available on this topic. Aim of our study was to prospectively examine whether eating more of the daily caloric intake at dinner leads to an increased risk of obesity, hyperglycemia, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Subjects/Methods 1245 non-obese, non-diabetic middle-aged adults from a population-based cohort underwent a 3-day food record questionnaire at enrollment. Anthropometric values, blood pressure, blood metabolic variables, and estimated liver fat were measured at baseline and at 6-year follow-up. Design Prospective cohort study. Results Subjects were divided according to tertiles of percent daily caloric intake at dinner. A significant increase in the incidence rate of obesity (from 4.7 to 11.4%), metabolic syndrome (from 11.1 to 16.1%), and estimated NAFLD (from 16.5 to 23.8%) was observed from the lower to higher tertile. In a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for multiple covariates, subjects in the highest tertile showed an increased risk of developing obesity (OR = 2.33; 95% CI 1.17–4.65; p = 0.02), metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.01–2.30; p = 0.04), and NAFLD (OR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.10–2.22; p = 0.01). Conclusions Consuming more of the daily energy intake at dinner is associated with an increased risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD. PMID:25250617

  11. Caloric Intake on the Sabbath: A Pilot Study of Contributing Factors to Obesity in the Orthodox Jewish Community.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Deborah A; Swencionis, Charles; Segal-Isaacson, C J

    2016-10-01

    The American Orthodox Jewish community has specific cultural factors that may contribute to overweight and obesity. This study aimed to look at caloric intake on the Sabbath and its contribution to overweight and obesity. Twelve married or previously married women who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews were recruited to do 24-h food recalls over the phone. The participants were divided into three weight groups (normal, overweight, and obese) based on their BMI. The overweight and obese participants' data were combined into one group for the purposes of statistical testing. Paired t tests looking at the data for all participants showed significantly great caloric intake during an average Sabbath day than an average weekday [t(4) = 7.58, p < 0.001]. A repeated-measures ANOVA showed significantly greater energy intake on the Sabbath for the overweight-obese women compared to the normal weight women [F(1) = 7.83, p = 0.02]. No statistical difference was seen between the weekday energy intake of the normal weight women as compared to the combined group of overweight-obese women [F(1) = 0.501, p = 0.499]. These results support the hypotheses that all groups eat significantly more on the Sabbath than on weekdays, and overweight and obese individuals eat significantly more on the Sabbath than normal weight individuals. This supports the theory that caloric intake on the Sabbath is a contributing factor to overweight and obesity within the American Orthodox Jewish community.

  12. Soluble Fermentable Dietary Fibre (Pectin) Decreases Caloric Intake, Adiposity and Lipidaemia in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, Clare L; Thomson, Lynn M; Williams, Patricia A; Ross, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of a high fat diet promotes obesity and poor metabolic health, both of which may be improved by decreasing caloric intake. Satiety-inducing ingredients such as dietary fibre may be beneficial and this study investigates in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats the effects of high or low fat diet with or without soluble fermentable fibre (pectin). In two independently replicated experiments, young adult male DIO rats that had been reared on high fat diet (HF; 45% energy from fat) were given HF, low fat diet (LF; 10% energy from fat), HF with 10% w/w pectin (HF+P), or LF with 10% w/w pectin (LF+P) ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group/experiment). Food intake, body weight, body composition (by magnetic resonance imaging), plasma hormones, and plasma and liver lipid concentrations were measured. Caloric intake and body weight gain were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Body fat mass increased in HF, was maintained in LF, but decreased significantly in LF+P and HF+P groups. Final plasma leptin, insulin, total cholesterol and triglycerides were lower, and plasma satiety hormone PYY concentrations were higher, in LF+P and HF+P than in LF and HF groups, respectively. Total fat and triglyceride concentrations in liver were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Therefore, the inclusion of soluble fibre in a high fat (or low fat) diet promoted increased satiety and decreased caloric intake, weight gain, adiposity, lipidaemia, leptinaemia and insulinaemia. These data support the potential of fermentable dietary fibre for weight loss and improving metabolic health in obesity.

  13. Effects of immobilisation and caloric restriction on antioxidant parameters and T-cell apoptosis in healthy young men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, S.; Arendt, B. M.; Boese, A.; Juschus, M.; Schaefer, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Goerlich, R.

    Background: Astronauts are exposed to oxidative stress due to radiation and microgravity, which might impair immune functions. Effects of hypocaloric nutrition as often observed in astronauts on oxidative stress and immune functions are not clear. We investigated, if microgravity, simulated by 6 Head-down tilt (HDT) and caloric restriction (-25%, fat reduced) with adequate supply of micronutrients affect DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes, antioxidant parameters in plasma, and T-cell apoptosis. Material & Methods: 10 healthy male non-smokers were subjected to 4 different interventions (normocaloric diet or caloric restriction (CR) in upright position (UP) or HDT) for 14 days each (cross-over). DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes (Comet Assay), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and uric acid in plasma were measured before, after 5, 10, and 13 days of intervention, and after 2 days recovery. T-cell apoptosis (Annexin V binding test) was assessed before and after intervention. Results: Preliminary results show that only endogenous, but not ex vivo H2O2-induced DNA strand breaks were reduced by CR compared to normocaloric diet. In upright position, endogenous DNA strand breaks decreased continuously during CR, reaching significance after recovery. During HDT, caloric restriction seems to counteract a temporary increase in DNA strand breaks observed in subjects receiving normocaloric diet. TEAC was reduced during HDT compared to UP in subjects under caloric restriction. An increase in plasma uric acid related to intervention occurred only after 5 days HDT in CR vs. normocaloric diet. T-cell apoptosis was not affected by any kind of intervention. Conclusion: Neither HDT nor CR with sufficient supply of micronutrients seem to induce oxidative stress or T-cell apoptosis in healthy young men. In contrast, CR might prevent endogenous DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes. As DNA-damage is a risk factor for carcinogenesis, protective effects of energy reduction are

  14. Continuous versus bolus tube feeds: Does the modality affect glycemic variability, tube feeding volume, caloric intake, or insulin utilization?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David C; Forbes, Rachel; Jones, Christian; Cotterman, Robert; Njoku, Chinedu; Thongrong, Cattleya; Tulman, David; Bergese, Sergio D; Thomas, Sheela; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Enteral nutrition (EN) is very important to optimizing outcomes in critical illness. Debate exists regarding the best strategy for enteral tube feeding (TF), with concerns that bolus TF (BTF) may increase glycemic variability (GV) but result in fewer nutritional interruptions than continuous TF (CTF). This study examines if there is a difference in GV, insulin usage, TF volume, and caloric delivery among intensive care patients receiving BTF versus CTF. We hypothesize that there are no significant differences between CTF and BTF when comparing the above parameters. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized pilot study of critically ill adult patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement for EN was performed between March 1, 2012 and May 15, 2014. Patients were randomized to BTF or CTF. Glucose values, insulin use, TF volume, and calories administered were recorded. Data were organized into 12-h epochs for statistical analyses and GV determination. In addition, time to ≥80% nutritional delivery goal, demographics, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, and TF interruptions were examined. When performing BTF versus CTF assessments, continuous parameters were compared using Mann–Whitney U-test or repeated measures t-test, as appropriate. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: No significant demographic or physiologic differences between the CTF (n = 24) and BTF (n = 26) groups were seen. The immediate post-PEG 12-h epoch showed significantly lower GV and median TF volume for patients in the CTF group. All subsequent epochs (up to 18 days post-PEG) showed no differences in GV, insulin use, TF volume, or caloric intake. Insulin use for both groups increased when comparing the first 24 h post-PEG values to measurements from day 8. There were no differences in TF interruptions, time to ≥80% nutritional delivery goal, or hypoglycemic episodes. Conclusions: This study

  15. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    kcals; P< 0.05 pre vs post in both groups). The combination of moderate exercise and diet produced significant weight loss in both groups (Low BMI...Kines 481W Scientific basis of 3 50 Exercise for Older Adults Kines 496C Independent Study 3 1 Spring 1998 Kines 456 Fitness Appraisal 4 96 Kines...N AD_ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0360 TITLE: Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I

  16. Chronic Caloric Restriction and Exercise Improve Metabolic Conditions of Dietary-Induced Obese Mice in Autophagy Correlated Manner without Involving AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mingxia; Yu, Han; Wang, Jinli; Gao, Junjie; Li, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role of AMPK activation and autophagy in mediating the beneficial effects of exercise and caloric restriction in obesity. Methods. Dietary-induced obesity mice were made and divided into 5 groups; one additional group of normal mice serves as control. Mice in each group received different combinations of interventions including low fat diet, caloric restriction, and exercise. Then their metabolic conditions were assessed by measuring serum glucose and insulin, serum lipids, and liver function. AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy activity were detected by western blotting. Results. Obese mice models were successfully induced by high fat diet. Caloric restriction consistently improved the metabolic conditions of the obese mice, and the effects are more prominent than the mice that received only exercise. Also, caloric restriction, exercise, and low fat diet showed a synergistic effect in the improvement of metabolic conditions. Western blotting results showed that this improvement was not related with the activation of AMPK in liver, skeletal muscle, or heart but correlates well with the autophagy activity. Conclusion. Caloric restriction has more prominent beneficial effects than exercise in dietary-induced obese mice. These effects are correlated with the autophagy activity and may be independent of AMPK activation. PMID:23762877

  17. Impact of caloric and dietary restriction regimens on markers of health and longevity in humans and animals: a summary of available findings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Considerable interest has been shown in the ability of caloric restriction (CR) to improve multiple parameters of health and to extend lifespan. CR is the reduction of caloric intake - typically by 20 - 40% of ad libitum consumption - while maintaining adequate nutrient intake. Several alternatives to CR exist. CR combined with exercise (CE) consists of both decreased caloric intake and increased caloric expenditure. Alternate-day fasting (ADF) consists of two interchanging days; one day, subjects may consume food ad libitum (sometimes equaling twice the normal intake); on the other day, food is reduced or withheld altogether. Dietary restriction (DR) - restriction of one or more components of intake (typically macronutrients) with minimal to no reduction in total caloric intake - is another alternative to CR. Many religions incorporate one or more forms of food restriction. The following religious fasting periods are featured in this review: 1) Islamic Ramadan; 2) the three principal fasting periods of Greek Orthodox Christianity (Nativity, Lent, and the Assumption); and 3) the Biblical-based Daniel Fast. This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge related to CR and DR. A specific section is provided that illustrates related work pertaining to religious forms of food restriction. Where available, studies involving both humans and animals are presented. The review includes suggestions for future research pertaining to the topics of discussion. PMID:21981968

  18. The effect of a pre-load experiment on subsequent food consumption. Caloric and macronutrient intake in the days following a pre-load manipulation.

    PubMed

    Timko, C Alix; Juarascio, Adrienne; Chowansky, Amy

    2012-04-01

    The current study was designed to test potential caloric and macronutrient counter-regulation or compensation amongst 76 participants who participated in a milkshake preload experiment. Participants completed food diaries for 2 days before and 2 days after participating in the pre-load experiment. It was hypothesized that dieters and restrained eaters might respond to the pre-load by compensating or counter-regulating food consumption during the rest of the day following the experiment, and on the 2 days post-experiment. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in caloric or macronutrient consumption between the experimental and control groups on the days after the experiment. There were also no interactions between restraint and dieting status and the experimental condition. However, there was a main effect of caloric intake across dieting status, with those dieting to lose weight showing lower caloric intake than those not dieting and those dieting to maintain weight. The results of this study suggests that disinhibitory food stimuli may be less powerful than once thought or relatively short acting, as long-term counter-regulation or compensation did not occur for most people. Overall, the current study provides additional insight into potential long term caloric counter-regulation or compensation in participants who participated in a preload experiment, but additional research is needed to better understand this phenomenon.

  19. Impact of caloric and dietary restriction regimens on markers of health and longevity in humans and animals: a summary of available findings.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Canale, Robert E; Marshall, Kate E; Kabir, Mohammad M; Bloomer, Richard J

    2011-10-07

    Considerable interest has been shown in the ability of caloric restriction (CR) to improve multiple parameters of health and to extend lifespan. CR is the reduction of caloric intake - typically by 20 - 40% of ad libitum consumption - while maintaining adequate nutrient intake. Several alternatives to CR exist. CR combined with exercise (CE) consists of both decreased caloric intake and increased caloric expenditure. Alternate-day fasting (ADF) consists of two interchanging days; one day, subjects may consume food ad libitum (sometimes equaling twice the normal intake); on the other day, food is reduced or withheld altogether. Dietary restriction (DR) - restriction of one or more components of intake (typically macronutrients) with minimal to no reduction in total caloric intake - is another alternative to CR. Many religions incorporate one or more forms of food restriction. The following religious fasting periods are featured in this review: 1) Islamic Ramadan; 2) the three principal fasting periods of Greek Orthodox Christianity (Nativity, Lent, and the Assumption); and 3) the Biblical-based Daniel Fast. This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge related to CR and DR. A specific section is provided that illustrates related work pertaining to religious forms of food restriction. Where available, studies involving both humans and animals are presented. The review includes suggestions for future research pertaining to the topics of discussion.

  20. Effect of Ames dwarfism and caloric restriction on spontaneous DNA mutation frequency in different mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Busuttil, Rita A; Calder, R Brent; Dollé, Martijn E T; Diaz, Vivian; McMahan, C Alex; Bartke, Andrzej; Nelson, James; Reddick, Robert; Vijg, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Genetic instability has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Caloric restriction (CR) and suppression of the somatotroph axis significantly increase life span in the mouse and reduce multiple symptoms of aging, including cancer. To test if in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is reduced by such mechanisms, we crossed long-lived Ames dwarf mice with a C57BL/6J line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from tissues and organs into Escherichia coli to measure mutant frequencies. Four cohorts were studied: (1) ad lib wild-type; (2) CR wild-type; (3) ad lib dwarf; and (4) CR dwarf. While both CR wild-type and ad lib dwarf mice lived significantly longer than the ad lib wild-type mice, under CR conditions dwarf mice did not live any longer than ad lib wild-type mice. While this may be due to an as yet unknown adverse effect of the C57BL/6J background, it did not prevent an effect on spontaneous mutation frequencies at the lacZ locus, which were assessed in liver, kidney and small intestine of 7- and 15-month-old mice of all four cohorts. A lower mutant frequency in the ad lib dwarf background was observed in liver and kidney at 7 and 15 months of age and in small intestine at 15 months of age as compared to the ad lib wild-type. CR also significantly reduced spontaneous mutant frequency in kidney and small intestine, but not in liver. In a separate cohort of lacZ-C57BL/6J mice CR was also found to significantly reduce spontaneous mutant frequency in liver and small intestine, across three age levels. These results indicate that two major pro-longevity interventions in the mouse are associated with a reduced mutation frequency. This could be responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced longevity associated with Ames dwarfism and CR.

  1. Effect of Ames dwarfism and caloric restriction on spontaneous mutation frequency in different mouse tissues

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Busuttil, Rita; Calder, Brent; Dollé, Martijn E. T.; Diaz, Vivian; McMahan, C. Alex; Bartke, Andrzej; Nelson, James; Reddick, Robert; Vijg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Genetic instability has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Caloric restriction (CR) and suppression of the somatotroph axis significantly increase life span in the mouse and reduces multiple symptoms of aging, including cancer. To test if in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is reduced by such mechanisms, we crossed long-lived Ames dwarf mice with a C57BL/6J line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from tissues and organs into E. coli to measure mutant frequencies. Four cohorts were studied: (1) ad lib wild-type; (2) CR wild-type; (3) ad lib dwarf; and (4) CR dwarf. While both CR wild-type and ad lib dwarf mice lived significantly longer than the ad lib wild-type mice, under CR conditions dwarf mice did not live any longer than ad lib wild-type mice. While this may be due to an as yet unknown adverse effect of the C57Bl/6 background, it did not prevent an effect on spontaneous mutation frequencies at the lacZ locus, which were assessed in liver, kidney and small intestine of 7- and 15-month old mice of all four cohorts. A lower mutant frequency in the ad lib dwarf background was observed in liver and kidney at 7 and 15 months of age and in small intestine at 15 months of age as compared to the ad lib wild-type. CR also significantly reduced spontaneous mutant frequency in kidney and small intestine, but not in liver. In a separate cohort of lacZ-C57BL/6J mice CR was also found to significantly reduce spontaneous mutant frequency in liver and small intestine, across three age levels. These results indicate that two major pro-longevity interventions in the mouse are associated with a reduced mutation frequency. This could be responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced longevity associated with Ames dwarfism and CR. PMID:18565572

  2. Caloric Restriction and Formalin-Induced Inflammation: An Experimental Study in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nozad, Aisan; Safari, Mir Bahram; Saboory, Ehsan; Derafshpoor, Leila; Mohseni Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute and chronic inflammations are difficult to control. Using chemical anti-inflammatory medications along with their complications considerably limit their use. According to Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM), there is an important relation between inflammation and Imtila (food and blood accumulation in the body); food reduction or its more modern equivalent Caloric Restriction (CR) may act against both Imtila and inflammation. Objectives: This experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of 30% reduction in daily calorie intake on inflammation in rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 male rats (Rattus rattus) weighing 220 to 270 g were obtained. Then, the inflammation was induced by injecting formalin in their paws. Next, the rats were randomized by generating random numbers into two equal groups (9 + 9) putting on either normal diet (controls) or a similar diet with 30% reduction of calorie (cases). Paw volume changes were recorded twice per day by one observer in both groups using a standard plethysmometer for 8 consecutive days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), complete blood count (erythrocyte, platelet, and white blood cell) and hemoglobin were compared between the groups. Results: Decline of both body weight and paw volume was significantly more prominent in the case than in the control rats within the study period (P < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Paw volume decrease was more prominent after day 3. On day 8, serum CRP-positive (1 or 2 +) rats were more frequent in ad libitum fed group comparing with those received CR (33.3% vs. 11.1%). This difference, however, was insignificant (P = 0.58). At the same time, mean ESR was significantly higher in the control rats comparing with that in the case group (29.00 ± 2.89 h vs. 14.00 ± 1.55 h; P = 0.001). Other serum parameters were not significantly different between the two groups at endpoint. Conclusions: Rats fed with a 30% calorie

  3. Chemotherapy for Isolated Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer: The CALOR Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J.; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W.R.; Paterson, Alexander H.G.; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Geyer, Charles E.; Price, Karen N.; Coates, Alan S.; Gelber, Richard D.; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We investigated adjuvant chemotherapy for such patients in a randomised clinical trial. METHODS The CALOR trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00074152) accrued patients 2003-2010. The 162 patients with resected ILRR were centrally randomised using permuted blocks and stratified by prior chemotherapy, ER/PgR status, and location of ILRR. Eighty-five were allocated to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) and 77 to no chemotherapy. Patients with oestrogen receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy; radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS). All analyses were by intention to treat. FINDINGS At a median follow up of 4·9 (IQR 3.6,6.0) years we observed 24 DFS events and nine deaths in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 DFS events and 21 deaths in the no chemotherapy group. Five-year DFS was 69% vs. 57%, (hazard ratio for chemotherapy versus no chemotherapy, 0·59; 95% confidence interval 0·35 to 0·99; P=0·046) and five-year overall survival was 88% vs. 76%, (hazard ratio, 0·41; 95% CI, 0·19 to 0·89; P=0·02). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen receptor-negative disease measured in the recurrence (interaction P=0·04), but analyses of DFS based on the oestrogen receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (interaction P=0·43). Among the 85 patients who received standard chemotherapy, 12 reported SAEs. INTERPRETATION Adjuvant chemotherapy should be recommended for patients with completely resected isolated locoregional recurrences of breast cancer, especially if the recurrence is oestrogen receptor negative. FUNDING Public Service

  4. Chemotherapy for isolated locoregional recurrence of breast cancer (CALOR): a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Paterson, Alexander H G; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Geyer, Charles E; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We aimed to establish whether adjuvant chemotherapy improves the outcome of such patients. The CALOR trial was a pragmatic, open-label, randomised trial that accrued patients with histologically proven and completely excised ILRR after unilateral breast cancer who had undergone a mastectomy or lumpectomy with clear surgical margins. Eligible patients were enrolled from hospitals worldwide and were centrally randomised (1:1) to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) or no chemotherapy, using permuted blocks, and stratified by previous chemotherapy, oestrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor status, and location of ILRR. Patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy, radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival. All analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00074152. From Aug 22, 2003, to Jan 31, 2010, 85 patients were randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy and 77 were assigned to no chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 3·6-6 ·0), 24 (28%) patients had disease-free survival events in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 (44%) in the no chemotherapy group. 5-year disease-free survival was 69% (95% CI 56-79) with chemotherapy versus 57% (44-67) without chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0·59 [95% CI 0·35-0·99]; p=0·046). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen-receptor-negative ILRR (pinteraction=0·046), but analyses of disease-free survival according to the oestrogen-receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (pinteraction=0·43). Of the 81 patients who

  5. Glycemic effects of intensive caloric restriction and isocaloric refeeding in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Henry, R R; Scheaffer, L; Olefsky, J M

    1985-11-01

    To assess the effects of very low caloric (VLC) diets on glucose homeostasis in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, 30 obese subjects with NIDDM were studied for 40 days while eating a 330 Cal/day diet, with a subgroup of 12 subjects further evaluated during 40 days of refeeding. All subjects successfully lost weight, with an average weight loss of 4.6 +/- 0.2 kg (+/- SEM) after 10 days, 7.1 +/- 0.3 kg after 20 days, and 10.5 +/- 0.4 kg after 40 days of VLC diet therapy. Thus, weight loss was steady and progressive throughout the diet period. In contrast, the majority (87%) of the reduction in mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels (297 +/- 13 to 158 +/- 10 mg/dl; P less than 0.001) occurred after 10 days of VLC diet therapy, with a further reduction in glucose levels to 138 +/- 9 mg/dl on day 40. The FPG response measured after 10 days of VLC diet was unrelated to the degree of obesity, rate or extent of weight loss, or prevailing insulin levels, but did correlate significantly with the initial FPG level (r = 0.37; P less than 0.05) and duration of diabetes (r = 0.42; P less than 0.05). After discontinuation of the VLC diet and refeeding of an isocaloric (weight maintenance) diet in 12 subjects, a variable increase in the FPG occurred, with an average increase of 80% after 40 days of refeeding. However, the mean FPG level after 40 days of refeeding was still markedly lower than that before VLC diet therapy (254 +/- 20 vs. 167 +/- 14 mg/dl; P less than 0.02) despite withdrawal of antidiabetic medication in all subjects. The basal hepatic glucose output (HGO) fell rapidly from 149 +/- 13 to 81 +/- 5 mg/M2 X min (P less than 0.001) after 10 days of VLC diet and rose from 67 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 7 mg/M2 X min (P less than 0.001) after 10 days of refeeding. Basal HGO demonstrated a highly significant positive correlation with FPG levels (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001) before and during both VLC diet therapy and refeeding. A significant correlation was also found between

  6. Alleviation of senescence and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in aging kidney by short-term caloric restriction and caloric restriction mimetics via modulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dan; Cai, Guang-yan; Ning, Yi-chun; Wang, Jing-chao; Lv, Yang; Hong, Quan; Cui, Shao-yuan; Fu, Bo; Guo, Ya-nan; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2017-01-01

    Renal fibrosis contributes to declining renal function in the elderly. What is unclear however, is whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to this age-related renal fibrosis. Here, we analyzed indicators of EMT during kidney aging and investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of short-term regimens of caloric restriction (CR) or caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs), including resveratrol and metformin. High glucose was used to induce premature senescence and EMT in human primary proximal tubular cells (PTCs) in vitro. To test the role of AMPK-mTOR signaling, siRNA was used to deplete AMPK. Cellular senescence and AMPK-mTOR signaling markers associated with EMT were detected. CR or CRMs treatment alleviated age-related EMT in aging kidneys, which was accompanied by activation of AMPK-mTOR signaling. High glucose induced premature senescence and EMT in PTCs in vitro, which was accompanied by down-regulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling. CRMs alleviated high glucose-induced senescence and EMT via stimulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling. Activation of AMPK/mTOR signaling protected PTCs from high glucose-induced EMT and cellular senescence. Short-term regimens of CR and CRMs alleviated age-related EMT via AMPK-mTOR signaling, suggesting a potential approach to reducing renal fibrosis during aging. PMID:28147330

  7. Alleviation of senescence and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in aging kidney by short-term caloric restriction and caloric restriction mimetics via modulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ning, Yi-Chun; Wang, Jing-Chao; Lv, Yang; Hong, Quan; Cui, Shao-Yuan; Fu, Bo; Guo, Ya-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2017-03-07

    Renal fibrosis contributes to declining renal function in the elderly. What is unclear however, is whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to this age-related renal fibrosis. Here, we analyzed indicators of EMT during kidney aging and investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of short-term regimens of caloric restriction (CR) or caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs), including resveratrol and metformin. High glucose was used to induce premature senescence and EMT in human primary proximal tubular cells (PTCs) in vitro. To test the role of AMPK-mTOR signaling, siRNA was used to deplete AMPK. Cellular senescence and AMPK-mTOR signaling markers associated with EMT were detected. CR or CRMs treatment alleviated age-related EMT in aging kidneys, which was accompanied by activation of AMPK-mTOR signaling. High glucose induced premature senescence and EMT in PTCs in vitro, which was accompanied by down-regulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling. CRMs alleviated high glucose-induced senescence and EMT via stimulation of AMPK/mTOR signaling. Activation of AMPK/mTOR signaling protected PTCs from high glucose-induced EMT and cellular senescence. Short-term regimens of CR and CRMs alleviated age-related EMT via AMPK-mTOR signaling, suggesting a potential approach to reducing renal fibrosis during aging.

  8. Binge-like consumption of caloric and non-caloric palatable substances in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice: pharmacological and molecular evidence of orexin involvement.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, José Manuel; Valor, Luis Miguel; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The orexin (OX) system has been implicated in food-reinforced behavior, food-seeking and food overconsumption. Recent evidence suggests that OX signaling might influence consumption of palatable foods with high reinforcing value depending upon the caloric status of the animal. The present study evaluates from a pharmacological and a molecular approach the contribution of OX to excessive binge-like consumption of highly preferred palatable substances (sucrose and saccharin) in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice. The main findings of this study are: (1) intraperitoneal (ip) injection of SB-334867 (10, 20 or 30mg/kg), a selective OXR1 antagonist, significantly decreased binge-like consumption of sucrose (10%, w/v) and saccharin (0.15%, w/v) during the test day in a Drinking in the Dark procedure in ad libitum-fed animals, without evidence of any significant alteration of locomotor activity. (2) Four repetitive, 2-h daily episodes of sucrose and saccharin (but not water) binge-like drinking significantly dampened OX mRNA expression in the LH. Present findings show for the first time a role for OXR1 signaling in binge-like consumption of palatable substances in animals under no caloric needs. Targeting OXR1 could represent a novel pharmacological approach to treat binge-eating episodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Formation of S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine in rat liver mitochondrial proteins: effects of caloric and methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Naudí, Alba; Jové, Mariona; Cacabelos, Daniel; Ayala, Victoria; Cabre, Rosanna; Caro, Pilar; Gomez, José; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2013-02-01

    Maillard reaction contributes to the chemical modification and cross-linking of proteins. This process plays a significant role in the aging process and determination of animal longevity. Oxidative conditions promote the Maillard reaction. Mitochondria are the primary site of oxidants due to the reactive molecular species production. Mitochondrial proteome cysteine residues are targets of oxidative attack due to their specific chemistry and localization. Their chemical, non-enzymatic modification leads to dysfunctional proteins, which entail cellular senescence and organismal aging. Previous studies have consistently shown that caloric and methionine restrictions, nutritional interventions that increase longevity, decrease the rate of mitochondrial oxidant production and the physiological steady-state levels of markers of oxidative damage to macromolecules. In this scenario, we have detected S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine (CMC) as a new irreversible chemical modification in mitochondrial proteins. CMC content in mitochondrial proteins significantly correlated with that of the lysine-derived analog N (ε)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine. The concentration of CMC is, however, one order of magnitude lower compared with CML likely due in part to the lower content of cysteine with respect to lysine of the mitochondrial proteome. CMC concentrations decreases in liver mitochondrial proteins of rats subjected to 8.5 and 25 % caloric restriction, as well as in 40 and 80 % methionine restriction. This is associated with a concomitant and significant increase in the protein content of sulfhydryl groups. Data presented here evidence that CMC, a marker of Cys-AGE formation, could be candidate as a biomarker of mitochondrial damage during aging.

  10. High-Caloric and Chocolate Stimuli Processing in Healthy Humans: An Integration of Functional Imaging and Electrophysiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Asmaro, Deyar; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding how the human brain processes appetitive food cues, and knowing how such cues elicit craving responses is particularly relevant when current eating behavior trends within Westernized societies are considered. One substance that holds a special place with regard to food preference is chocolate, and studies that used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have identified neural regions and electrical signatures that are elicited by chocolate cue presentations. This review will examine fMRI and ERP findings from studies that used high-caloric food and chocolate cues as stimuli, with a focus on responses observed in samples of healthy participants, as opposed to those with eating-related pathology. The utility of using high-caloric and chocolate stimuli as a means of understanding the human reward system will also be highlighted, as these findings may be particularly important for understanding processes related to pathological overeating and addiction to illicit substances. Finally, research from our own lab that focused on chocolate stimulus processing in chocolate cravers and non-cravers will be discussed, as the approach used may help bridge fMRI and ERP findings so that a more complete understanding of appetitive stimulus processing in the temporal and spatial domains may be established. PMID:24434747

  11. Metformin and caloric restriction induce an AMPK-dependent restoration of mitochondrial dysfunction in fibroblasts from Fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Bullón, Pedro; Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Cotán, David; Carrión, Angel M; Alvarez-Suarez, José Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio; Battino, Maurizio; Cordero, Mario D

    2015-07-01

    Impaired AMPK is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological conditions, ranging from obesity, altered responses to exercise or metabolic syndrome, to inflammation, disturbed mitochondrial biogenesis and defective response to energy stress. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a world-wide diffused musculoskeletal chronic pain condition that affects up to 5% of the general population and comprises all the above mentioned pathophysiological states. Here, we tested the involvement of AMPK activation in fibroblasts derived from FM patients. AMPK was not phosphorylated in fibroblasts from FM patients and was associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, reduced oxygen consumption, decreased antioxidant enzymes expression levels and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, mtDNA sequencing analysis did not show any important alterations which could justify the mitochondrial defects. AMPK activation in FM fibroblast was impaired in response to moderate oxidative stress. In contrast, AMPK activation by metformin or incubation with serum from caloric restricted mice improved the response to moderate oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism in FM fibroblasts. These results suggest that AMPK plays an essential role in FM pathophysiology and could represent the basis for a valuable new therapeutic target/strategy. Furthermore, both metformin and caloric restriction could be an interesting therapeutic approach in FM.

  12. High-caloric and chocolate stimuli processing in healthy humans: an integration of functional imaging and electrophysiological findings.

    PubMed

    Asmaro, Deyar; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-10

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding how the human brain processes appetitive food cues, and knowing how such cues elicit craving responses is particularly relevant when current eating behavior trends within Westernized societies are considered. One substance that holds a special place with regard to food preference is chocolate, and studies that used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have identified neural regions and electrical signatures that are elicited by chocolate cue presentations. This review will examine fMRI and ERP findings from studies that used high-caloric food and chocolate cues as stimuli, with a focus on responses observed in samples of healthy participants, as opposed to those with eating-related pathology. The utility of using high-caloric and chocolate stimuli as a means of understanding the human reward system will also be highlighted, as these findings may be particularly important for understanding processes related to pathological overeating and addiction to illicit substances. Finally, research from our own lab that focused on chocolate stimulus processing in chocolate cravers and non-cravers will be discussed, as the approach used may help bridge fMRI and ERP findings so that a more complete understanding of appetitive stimulus processing in the temporal and spatial domains may be established.

  13. Long-term caloric restriction reduces metabolic rate and heart rate under cool and thermoneutral conditions in FBNF1 rats.

    PubMed

    Knight, W David; Witte, M M; Parsons, A D; Gierach, M; Overton, J Michael

    2011-05-01

    The long-term metabolic and cardiovascular responses to caloric restriction (CR) are poorly understood. We examined the responses to one year of CR in FBNF1 rats housed in cool (COOL; T(a)=15 °C) or thermoneutral (TMN; T(a)=30 °C) conditions. Rats were acclimated to COOL or TMN for 2 months, instrumented for cardiovascular telemetry and studied in calorimeters. Baseline caloric intake, oxygen consumption (VO(2)), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were determined prior to assignment to ad lib (AL) or CR groups (30-40% CR) within each T(a) (n = 8). Groups of rats were studied after 10 weeks CR, one year CR, and after 4 days of re-feeding. Both 10 weeks and one year of CR reduced HR and VO(2) irrespective of T(a). Evaluation of the relationship between metabolic organ mass (liver, heart, brain, and kidney mass) and energy expenditure revealed a clear shift induced by CR to reduce expenditure per unit metabolic mass in both COOL and TMN groups. Re-feeding resulted in prompt elevations of HR and VO(2) to levels observed in control rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that long term CR produces sustained reductions in metabolic rate and heart rate in rats.

  14. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  15. Race, childhood insulin, childhood caloric intake, and class 3 obesity at age 24: 14-year prospective study of schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J; Daniels, Stephen R; Wang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of Class 3 obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) has more than doubled in the past 25 years. In a 14-year prospective study from age 10 to 24 of a biracial schoolgirl cohort (293 black, 256 white), we assessed childhood correlates of Class 3 BMI at age 24. Of 42 girls with Class 3 BMI at age 24, 36 (86%) were black. By logistic regression, significant explanatory variables of Class 3 BMI at age 24 included top decile waist circumference at age 11 (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-13.9, P = 0.0002), age 10 BMI ≥ the Center for Disease Control (CDC) 2000 top 15% (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.5-19.3, P = 0.0002), and a three-way interaction between race, childhood insulin, and average caloric intake from age 10 to age 19 (for each unit increase, OR 1.7 95% CI 1.3-2.2, P = 0.0003). Age 10 BMI, age 11 waist circumference, and interaction of race, childhood insulin, and childhood caloric intake predict Class 3 obesity in young adulthood, facilitating childhood identification of girls at high risk for developing Class 3 obesity.

  16. Auditory Function in Rhesus Monkeys: Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction in the Wisconsin Monkeys Five Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Cynthia G.; Chiasson, Kirstin Beach; Leslie, Tami Hanson; Thomas, Denise; Beasley, T. Mark; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Weindruch, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) slows aging in many species and protects some animals from age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but the effect on humans is not yet known. Because rhesus monkeys are long-lived primates that are phylogenically closer to humans than other research animals are, they provide a better model for studying the effects of CR in aging and ARHL. Subjects were from the pool of 55 rhesus monkeys aged 15–28 years who had been in the Wisconsin study on CR and aging for 8–13.5 years. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) with f2 frequencies from 2211–8837 Hz and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds from clicks and 8, 16, and 32 kHz tone bursts were obtained. DPOAE levels declined linearly at approximately 1 dB/year, but that rate doubled for the highest frequencies in the oldest monkeys. There were no interactions for diet condition or sex. ABR thresholds to clicks and tone bursts showed increases with aging. Borderline significance was shown for diet in the thresholds at 8 kHz stimuli, with monkeys on caloric restriction having lower thresholds. Because the rhesus monkeys have a maximum longevity of 40 years, the full benefits of CR may not yet be realized. PMID:20079820

  17. Effect of exercise and caloric restriction on DMBA induced mammary tumorigenesis and plasma lipids in rats fed high fat diets

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D. )

    1991-03-15

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single 10 mg dose of 7, 12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and grouped as follows: (1) low fat-sedentary (LF-SED), (2) low fat-exercised (LF-EX), (3) high fat-sedentary (HF-SED), (4) high fat-exercised (HF-EX), (5) high fat-caloric restricted (HF-RES). Diets were isocaloric and contained 3.9% (LF) and 19.4% (HF) of corn oil. Group 5 was fed a 25% caloric restricted diet but with 24.6% fat content to equalize fat intake to HF-SED. After 12 weeks of diet or treadmill exercise, tumor data and plasma lipid profiles were determined. Results show that rats on HF-EX had more total tumors, % of tumors and tumors per tumor bearing rat than rats on HF-SED. The effect of exercise was also evident in LF-EX rats, when compared to LF-SED. Average tumor size and tumor volumes were not affected. The HF-RES group showed reduced tumor profiles compared to HF-SED. HDL, LDL, triglycerides and total cholesterol were unaffected by HF or LF diets or exercise. These data suggest that tumorigenesis is increased by moderate and constant exercise.

  18. Caloric restriction promotes rapid expansion and long-lasting increase of Lactobacillus in the rat fecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Fraumene, Cristina; Manghina, Valeria; Cadoni, Erika; Marongiu, Fabio; Abbondio, Marcello; Serra, Monica; Palomba, Antonio; Tanca, Alessandro; Laconi, Ezio; Uzzau, Sergio

    2017-09-11

    Previous studies indicated that caloric restricted diet enables to lower significantly the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. In experimental animal models, life-long lasting caloric restriction (CR) was demonstrated to induce changes of the intestinal microbiota composition, regardless of fat content and/or exercise. To explore the potential impact of short and long-term CR treatment on the gut microbiota, we conducted an analysis of fecal microbiota composition in young and adult Fisher 344 rats treated with a low fat feed under ad libitum (AL) or CR conditions (70%). We report here significant changes of the rat fecal microbiota that arise rapidly in young growing animals after short-term administration of a CR diet. In particular, Lactobacillus increased significantly after 8 weeks of CR treatment and its relative abundance was significantly higher in CR vs AL fed animals after 36 weeks of dietary intervention. Taken together, our data suggest that Lactobacillus intestinal colonization is hampered in AL fed young rats compared to CR fed ones, while health-promoting CR diet intervention enables the expansion of this genus rapidly and persistently up to adulthood.

  19. Identification of Sphingolipid Metabolites That Induce Obesity via Misregulation of Appetite, Caloric Intake and Fat Storage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Stanley M.; Attle, Steve J.; Brulte, Gregory B.; Walls, Marlena L.; Finley, Kim D.; Chatfield, Dale A.; Herr, Deron R.; Harris, Greg L.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is defined by excessive lipid accumulation. However, the active mechanistic roles that lipids play in its progression are not understood. Accumulation of ceramide, the metabolic hub of sphingolipid metabolism, has been associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity in humans and model systems. Here, we use Drosophila genetic manipulations to cause accumulation or depletion of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) intermediates. Sphingolipidomic profiles were characterized across mutants for various sphingolipid metabolic genes using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy. Biochemical assays and microscopy were used to assess classic hallmarks of obesity including elevated fat stores, increased body weight, resistance to starvation induced death, increased adiposity, and fat cell hypertrophy. Multiple behavioral assays were used to assess appetite, caloric intake, meal size and meal frequency. Additionally, we utilized DNA microarrays to profile differential gene expression between these flies, which mapped to changes in lipid metabolic pathways. Our results show that accumulation of ceramides is sufficient to induce obesity phenotypes by two distinct mechanisms: 1) Dihydroceramide (C14:0) and ceramide diene (C14:2) accumulation lowered fat store mobilization by reducing adipokinetic hormone- producing cell functionality and 2) Modulating the S1P: ceramide (C14:1) ratio suppressed postprandial satiety via the hindgut-specific neuropeptide like receptor dNepYr, resulting in caloric intake-dependent obesity. PMID:24339790

  20. Caloric restriction maintains OX40 agonist-mediated tumor immunity and CD4 T cell priming during aging.

    PubMed

    Farazi, Michelle; Nguyen, Justine; Goldufsky, Josef; Linnane, Stephanie; Lukaesko, Lisa; Weinberg, Andrew D; Ruby, Carl E

    2014-06-01

    Immune responses wane during aging, posing challenges to the potential effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies. We previously demonstrated that in the context of a promising immunotherapeutic, OX40 agonist (αOX40), older animals exhibited impaired anti-tumor immune responses and diminished CD4 T cell effector differentiation. In this study, we hypothesized that tumor immune responses could be maintained during aging through caloric restriction (CR) or dietary supplementation with resveratrol (RES), a CR mimetic. Mice were placed on either a calorically restricted diet or a RES-formulated diet starting between 4 and 6 months of age and continued until mice reached 12 months of age. Tumor immune responses were assessed after challenging with either sarcoma or breast tumor cells followed by αOX40 treatment. Our results show that CR, but not RES, maintained OX40-mediated anti-tumor immunity. In addition, CR fully sustained antigen-specific CD4 T cell priming in aged hosts (12 months old), whereas tumor-specific CD8 T cell priming was not fully maintained compared to young reference animals (2 months old). Thus, CR appears to maintain immunological fitness of the CD4 T cell priming environment during aging, which is critical for optimal OX40-mediated responses.

  1. Caloric Restriction in Older Adults-Differential Effects of Weight Loss and Reduced Weight on Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Prehn, Kristin; Jumpertz von Schwartzenberg, Reiner; Mai, Knut; Zeitz, Ulrike; Witte, A Veronica; Hampel, Dierk; Szela, Anna-Maria; Fabian, Sonja; Grittner, Ulrike; Spranger, Joachim; Flöel, Agnes

    2017-03-01

    Dietary modifications such as caloric restriction (CR) have been suggested as a means to improve memory and prevent age-related decline. However, it is unclear whether those effects remain stable over time or are related specifically to negative energy balance during the weight loss phase of CR. Using a randomized interventional design, we investigated changes in recognition memory and neural correlates in postmenopausal obese women (n = 19): 1) after intense weight loss in the course of a 12-week low-caloric diet (reduced body weight and negative energy balance) and 2) after having sustained the reduced weight over 4 more weeks (reduced body weight, but energy balance equilibrium). Participants were contrasted to a control group (n = 18) instructed not to change dietary habits. In the CR group, we found improved recognition memory, paralleled by increased gray matter volume in inferior frontal gyrus and hippocampus, and augmented hippocampal resting-state functional connectivity to parietal areas. Moreover, effects were specific for transient negative energy balance and could not be detected after subsequent weight maintenance. Our data demonstrate for the first time in humans that beneficial effects of CR on brain structure and function are due to weight loss rather than an overall reduced weight. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Pireddu, Giorgio; Galati, Gaspare; Sulpizio, Valentina; Paolucci, Stefano; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited ev