Science.gov

Sample records for estimate unperturbed temperatures

  1. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodova, E.; Shchepakina, E.

    2006-12-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models.

  2. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  3. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  5. Unperturbed Schelling Segregation in Two or Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmpalias, George; Elwes, Richard; Lewis-Pye, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Schelling's models of segregation, first described in 1969 (Am Econ Rev 59:488-493, 1969) are among the best known models of self-organising behaviour. Their original purpose was to identify mechanisms of urban racial segregation. But his models form part of a family which arises in statistical mechanics, neural networks, social science, and beyond, where populations of agents interact on networks. Despite extensive study, unperturbed Schelling models have largely resisted rigorous analysis, prior results generally focusing on variants in which noise is introduced into the dynamics, the resulting system being amenable to standard techniques from statistical mechanics or stochastic evolutionary game theory (Young in Individual strategy and social structure: an evolutionary theory of institutions, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1998). A series of recent papers (Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012); Barmpalias et al. in: 55th annual IEEE symposium on foundations of computer science, Philadelphia, 2014, J Stat Phys 158:806-852, 2015), has seen the first rigorous analyses of 1-dimensional unperturbed Schelling models, in an asymptotic framework largely unknown in statistical mechanics. Here we provide the first such analysis of 2- and 3-dimensional unperturbed models, establishing most of the phase diagram, and answering a challenge from Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012).

  6. Unperturbed Schelling Segregation in Two or Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmpalias, George; Elwes, Richard; Lewis-Pye, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Schelling's models of segregation, first described in 1969 (Am Econ Rev 59:488-493, 1969) are among the best known models of self-organising behaviour. Their original purpose was to identify mechanisms of urban racial segregation. But his models form part of a family which arises in statistical mechanics, neural networks, social science, and beyond, where populations of agents interact on networks. Despite extensive study, unperturbed Schelling models have largely resisted rigorous analysis, prior results generally focusing on variants in which noise is introduced into the dynamics, the resulting system being amenable to standard techniques from statistical mechanics or stochastic evolutionary game theory (Young in Individual strategy and social structure: an evolutionary theory of institutions, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1998). A series of recent papers (Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012); Barmpalias et al. in: 55th annual IEEE symposium on foundations of computer science, Philadelphia, 2014, J Stat Phys 158:806-852, 2015), has seen the first rigorous analyses of 1-dimensional unperturbed Schelling models, in an asymptotic framework largely unknown in statistical mechanics. Here we provide the first such analysis of 2- and 3-dimensional unperturbed models, establishing most of the phase diagram, and answering a challenge from Brandt et al. in: Proceedings of the 44th annual ACM symposium on theory of computing (STOC 2012), 2012).

  7. Estimation Method of Body Temperature from Upper Arm Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Arata; Ryu, Kazuteru; Kanai, Nobuyuki

    This paper proposes a method for estimation of a body temperature by using a relation between the upper arm temperature and the atmospheric temperature. Conventional method has measured by armpit or oral, because the body temperature from the body surface is influenced by the atmospheric temperature. However, there is a correlation between the body surface temperature and the atmospheric temperature. By using this correlation, the body temperature can estimated from the body surface temperature. Proposed method enables to measure body temperature by the temperature sensor that is embedded in the blood pressure monitor cuff. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and body temperature can be realized. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through the actual body temperature experiment. The proposed method might contribute to reduce the medical staff's workloads in the home medical care, and more.

  8. Transformer winding temperature estimation based on tank surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenyu; Wijaya, Jaury; Martin, Daniel; Lelekakis, Nick

    2011-04-01

    Power transformers are among the most valuable assets of the electrical grid. Since the largest units cost in the order of millions of dollars, it is desirable to operate them in such a manner that extends their remaining lives. Operating these units at high temperature will cause excessive insulation ageing in the windings. Consequently, it is necessary to study the thermal performance of these expensive items. Measuring or estimating the winding temperature of power transformers is beneficial to a utility because this provides them with the data necessary to make informed decisions on how best to use their assets. Fiber optic sensors have recently become viable for the direct measurement of winding temperatures while a transformer is energized. However, it is only practical to install a fiber optic temperature sensor during the manufacture of a transformer. For transformers operating without fiber optic sensors, the winding temperature can be estimated with calculations using the temperature of the oil at the top of the transformer tank. When the oil temperature measurement is not easily available, the temperature of the tank surface may be used as an alternative. This paper shows how surface temperature may be utilized to estimate the winding temperature within a transformer designed for research purposes.

  9. Estimating Mixing Heights Using Microwave Temperature Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson-Gammon, John; Powell, Christina; Mahoney, Michael; Angevine, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    A paper describes the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) for making measurements of the planetary boundary layer thermal structure data necessary for air quality forecasting as the Mixing Layer (ML) height determines the volume in which daytime pollution is primarily concentrated. This is the first time that an airborne temperature profiler has been used to measure the mixing layer height. Normally, this is done using a radar wind profiler, which is both noisy and large. The MTP was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000). An objective technique was developed and tested for estimating the ML height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, estimates from a variety of measurements during the TexAQS-2000 were compared. Estimates of ML height were used from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in-situ aircraft measurements in addition to those from the MTP.

  10. External auditory canal temperature as an estimate of core temperature.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Castle, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of rectal (T sub re), auditory canal (T sub ac), positioned 8 to 10 mm from the tympanic membrane, and mean skin temperature (mean T sub sk) in five men during various exercise regimens at an ambient temperature (T sub a) of 25 C (phase one) and in two men during rest and exercise at 5, 15, 25, and 35 C T sub a (phase two). The purpose was to determine if T sub ac can be used as an accurate estimate of core temperature. Previous observations that T sub ac was highly correlated with T sub re but T sub ac was consistently lower than T sub re are confirmed; the mean difference varied from 0.4 C at rest to 1.1 C at the end of exercise. It is concluded that auditory canal temperature cannot be utilized as an estimate of core temperature, but T sub ac may be used to estimate mean body temperature where very accurate measurements are not required.

  11. An alternative estimation of the RF-enhanced plasma temperature during SPEAR artificial heating experiments: Early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, H.; Baddeley, L.

    2011-11-01

    RF heating of the F region plasma at high latitudes has long been known to produce electron temperature increases that can vary from tens to hundreds of percent above the background, unperturbed level. In contrast, artificial ionospheric modification experiments conducted using the Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR) heating facility on Svalbard have often failed to produce obvious enhancements in the electron temperatures when measured using the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard radar (ESR), colocated with the heater. Contamination of the ESR ion line spectra by the zero-frequency purely growing mode (PGM) feature is known to persist at varying amplitudes throughout SPEAR heating, and such spectral features can lead to significant temperature underestimations when the incoherent scatter spectra are analyzed using conventional methods. In this study, we present the first results of applying a recently developed technique to correct the PGM-contaminated spectra to SPEAR-enhanced ESR spectra and derive an alternative estimate of the SPEAR-heated electron temperature. We discuss how the effectiveness of the spectrum corrections can be affected by the data variance, estimated over the integration period. The subsequent electron temperatures, inferred from corrected spectra, range from a few tens to a few hundred Kelvin above the average background temperature. These temperatures are found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical “enhanced” temperature, calculated for the peak of the stationary temperature perturbation profile, when realistic absorption effects are accounted for.

  12. Improved Estimation Model of Lunar Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface temperature (LST) is of great scientific interest both uncovering the thermal properties and designing the lunar robotic or manned landing missions. In this paper, we proposed the improved LST estimation model based on the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE). The shadow and surface tilts effects were combined into the model. Using the Chang'E (CE-1) DEM data from the Laser Altimeter (LA), the topographic effect can be estimated with an improved effective solar irradiance (ESI) model. In Fig. 1, the highest LST of the global Moon has been estimated with the spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel, applying the solar albedo data derived from Clementine UV-750nm in solving the PDE function. The topographic effect is significant in the LST map. It can be identified clearly the maria, highland, and craters. The maximum daytime LST presents at the regions with low albedo, i.g. mare Procellarum, mare Serenitatis and mare Imbrium. The results are consistent with the Diviner's measurements of the LRO mission. Fig. 2 shows the temperature variations at the center of the disk in one year, assuming the Moon to be standard spherical. The seasonal variation of LST at the equator is about 10K. The highest LST occurs in early May. Fig.1. Estimated maximum surface temperatures of the global Moon in spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel

  13. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  14. Estimating pre-industrial global temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ed; Ortega, Pablo; Suckling, Emma; Schurer, Andrew; Hegerl, Gabi; Jones, Phil; Joshi, Manoj; Osborn, Tim; Mignot, Juliette; Thorne, Peter; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan

    2016-04-01

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process has recently agreed to try and limit global temperature rise to `well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels'. But what period is `pre-industrial'? Remarkably, perhaps, this is not defined within the UNFCCC or its many agreements and protocols. Neither was the term used in the IPCC's fifth assessment report (AR5) when discussing when particular temperature levels might be reached, due to the lack of a robust definition. Here, we discuss the important factors to consider when defining a period to call pre-industrial, based on estimates of historical radiative forcings and the availability of climate observations. There is no perfect period to choose, but we suggest that 1720-1800 is the optimal choice. We also attempt to estimate the change in global temperatures since this pre-industrial period using a range of approaches based on observations, radiative forcings, global climate model simulations and proxy evidence. We discuss how such an assessment might be improved in future and conclude that 2015 was likely the first year in which global temperatures were more than 1°C above pre-industrial levels.

  15. Multi-model ensemble analysis of Pacific and Atlantic SST variability in unperturbed climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchettin, D.; Bothe, O.; Rubino, A.; Jungclaus, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    We assess internally-generated climate variability expressed by a multi-model ensemble of unperturbed climate simulations. We focus on basin-scale annual-average sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from twenty multicentennial pre-industrial control simulations contributing to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Ensemble spatial patterns of regional modes of variability and ensemble (cross-)wavelet-based phase-frequency diagrams of corresponding paired indices summarize the ensemble characteristics of inter-basin and regional-to-global SST interactions on a broad range of timescales. Results reveal that tropical and North Pacific SSTs are a source of simulated interannual global SST variability. The North Atlantic-average SST fluctuates in rough co-phase with the global-average SST on multidecadal timescales, which makes it difficult to discern the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) signal from the global signal. The two leading modes of tropical and North Pacific SST variability converge towards co-phase in the multi-model ensemble, indicating that the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) results from a combination of tropical and extra-tropical processes. No robust inter- or multi-decadal inter-basin SST interaction arises from our ensemble analysis between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, though specific phase-locked fluctuations occur between Pacific and Atlantic modes of SST variability in individual simulations and/or periods within individual simulations. The multidecadal modulation of PDO by the AMV identified in observations appears to be a recurrent but not typical feature of ensemble-simulated internal variability. Understanding the mechanism(s) and circumstances favoring such inter-basin SST phasing and related uncertainties in their simulated representation could help constraining uncertainty in decadal climate predictions.

  16. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  17. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. I. Unperturbed structures.

    PubMed

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf

    2015-09-21

    Similar to uniform linear chains, the unperturbed structure of branched polymers forms the basis for the development of a theory on the effect of excluded volume interactions. A clear overview over the skeleton of such complex structures is obtained with a simplifying modification of the general branching theory. The use of probability generating functions permits a direct incorporation of essential details from the chemical synthesis in this branching theory. The unperturbed structure parameters, the degree of polymerization DP(w), radius of gyration R(g), hydrodynamic radius R(h), and the angular dependence of scattered light P(q) are derived for three examples: (i) randomly branched f-functional polymers, (ii) branched copolymers from A3 with B2 monomers, and (iii) AB2 hyper-branched particles. The effect of excluded volume interaction is treated in Paper II [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114907 (2015)].

  18. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one's thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  19. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-23

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one's thermal environment.

  20. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  1. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial system using temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from < 0.2??C in two wells to ???8??C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  2. Theoretical estimation of surface Debye temperature of nano structured material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Bijan Kumar; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of Debye temperature (TD) exploiting phonon is very important. In this work an attempt has been made to estimate TD for solids in a simple phenomenological approach. The ultimate goal is to estimate TD for nano structured material. The objective of this present work is to extend Debye model for nano-structured material and hence to extract the contribution to surface specific heat and surface Debye temperature. An empirical relation between TD and surface Debye temperature (TDS) is proposed. Lindemann melting criterion is also extended towards nano structure. The overall results obtained are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  3. Estimating temperature exposure of burnt bone - A methodological review.

    PubMed

    Ellingham, Sarah T D; Thompson, Tim J U; Islam, Meez; Taylor, Gillian

    2015-05-01

    Forensic anthropologists are frequently confronted with the need to interpret burnt bone. Regardless of the context, one of the key factors for the correct interpretation of the remains and a reconstruction of the incidents leading to incineration is the estimation of the maximum exposure temperature. The recent years have seen an influx in experimental research focusing on temperature estimation, spanning from colour assessment, mechanical strength measurements, histology and structural observations, biochemical changes and crystallinity studies, vastly advancing the understanding of heat induced changes in bone, thus facilitating a more accurate interpretation. This paper draws together and evaluates all currently available methodologies for temperature estimation. PMID:25934370

  4. Inverse estimation of near-field temperature and surface heat flux via single point temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Shu, Yong-Hua; Xie, Ji-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Zheng; Fan, Jing

    2016-05-01

    A concept was developed to inversely estimate the near-field temperature as well as the surface heat flux for the transient heat conduction problem with boundary condition of the unknown heat flux. The mathematical formula was derived for the inverse estimation of the near-field temperature and surface heat flux via a single point temperature measurement. The experiments were carried out in a vacuum chamber and the theoretically predicted temperatures were justified in specific positions. The inverse estimation principle was validated and the estimation deviation was evaluated for the present configuration.

  5. US Low-Temperature EGS Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Shapefile of shallow, low-temperature EGS resources for the United States, and accompanying paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis. These data are part of a very rough estimate created for use in the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Office's Vision Study. They are not a robust estimate of low-temperature EGS resources in the U.S, and should be used accordingly.

  6. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial system using temperatures.

    PubMed

    Su, Grace W; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.2 degrees C in two wells to approximately 8 degrees C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers. PMID:15584302

  7. Estimation of sensible heat flux from remotely sensed canopy temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, R. C.; Blad, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Temperatures of tallgrass priarie vegetation were measured with infrared thermometers (IRT) at different view zenith and azimuth angles. The optimum IRT view zenith angle for estimating sensible heat fluxes (H) was determined by comparing H estimated with eddy correlation and/or Bowen ratio techniques to H calculated by a method suggested by Hatfield et al. (1984). For wind speeds of 5 m/s or greater, H estimated with surface temperatures measured at a 0 deg or 20 deg view zenith angle gave the best agreement, but for wind speeds of less than 4 m/s the best estimate of H was made with surface temperatures measured at a 40 deg or 60 deg view zenith angle.

  8. Estimating the extreme low-temperature event using nonparametric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Silva, Anisha

    This thesis presents a new method of estimating the one-in-N low temperature threshold using a non-parametric statistical method called kernel density estimation applied to daily average wind-adjusted temperatures. We apply our One-in-N Algorithm to local gas distribution companies (LDCs), as they have to forecast the daily natural gas needs of their consumers. In winter, demand for natural gas is high. Extreme low temperature events are not directly related to an LDCs gas demand forecasting, but knowledge of extreme low temperatures is important to ensure that an LDC has enough capacity to meet customer demands when extreme low temperatures are experienced. We present a detailed explanation of our One-in-N Algorithm and compare it to the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution. We show that our One-in-N Algorithm estimates the one-in- N low temperature threshold more accurately than the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution according to root mean square error (RMSE) measure at a 5% level of significance. The One-in- N Algorithm is tested by counting the number of times the daily average wind-adjusted temperature is less than or equal to the one-in- N low temperature threshold.

  9. Real-time calibration of temperature estimates during radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Daniels, M J

    2004-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an interstitial focal ablative therapy that can be used in a percutaneous fashion and permits in situ destruction of hepatic tumors. Recurrence rates after rf therapy are as high as 34-55%, due to difficulties in accurately identifying the zone of necrosis (thermal lesion) because of the low intrinsic acoustic contrast between normal and ablated liver tissue. Our goal is to provide real-time ultrasonic tracking of temperature changes over the large range of temperatures traditionally used (40-100 degrees C) in rfablation procedures using an external ultrasound transducer. Temperature estimates are obtained using a cross-correlation algorithm applied to rf ultrasound echo signal data acquired at discrete intervals during heating. Apparent tissue displacement estimates obtained at these discrete time-intervals are accumulated to obtain a cumulative displacement map, whose gradient provides after appropriate scaling provides a temperature map at the specified elapsed ablation duration. Temperature maps are used to display the initial temperature rise and to continuously update a thermal map of the treated region. In this paper, we develop calibration curves that relate the echo shift due to the change in the speed of sound and thermal expansion to the corresponding temperature increase on in-vitro tissue specimens. These calibration curves can then be utilized for the real time calibration and analysis of temperature estimates obtained from the rf echo signals during ablation. Temperature maps obtained using the calibration curve compare favorably to temperature estimates observed using the invasive thermosensor readings on the ablation electrode and previous results that utilized a linear calibration factor.

  10. Estimating upper ocean phosphate concentrations using ARGO float temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamykowski, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The ARGO free-drifting profiling float array, with >3125 floats deployed between 60°N and 60°S latitudes at about 3° resolution as of May 2008 and each float profiling through 2000 m every 10 days, provides a comprehensive four-dimensional view of temperature and salinity in the world ocean. The resulting dataset complements satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) measurements and similarly will complement future satellite-based sea surface salinity measurements. Although plans exist to add biogeochemical sensors to future floats, cost and depth restrictions may limit comprehensive upgrades to a fraction of all floats deployed after 2008. Temperature-nutrient (TN) relationships provide a mechanism to estimate nutrient concentrations from temperature to supplement sparser nutrient concentration measurements potentially obtained using non-chemical approaches like ISUS-based nitrate. Both negative and positive aspects of applying a temperature-phosphate (TP) linear regression matrix with global coverage (70°N and 70°S) are examined. The TP linear regression matrix was derived by combining an existing 1° latitude and longitude table of phosphate depletion temperatures (PDT) or X-intercepts with representative TP linear regression slopes derived from the GEOSECS dataset. Temperatures from datasets with associated latitude and longitude coordinates and, in some cases, measured phosphate concentrations ([PO 4]) were matched with calculated TP linear regression slopes and Y-intercepts in the global matrix with 1° resolution using MSExcel Lookup worksheet functions to calculate TP-estimated [PO 4]. The mean deviation of TP-estimated [PO 4] <3.0 μM from measured [PO 4] is 0.18±0.18 μM at Hawaii (HOT) and 0.04±0.08 μM at Bermuda (BATS) time series stations and 0.28±0.27 μM over all considered World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) stations representing the different ocean basins. In general, TP-estimated [PO 4] represents measured [PO 4] more accurately

  11. Gaussian interferometric power and Black box estimation of Unruh temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-01

    We present a black box estimation paradigm of Unruh temperature in a relativistic bosonic continuous-variable setting. It is shown that the guaranteed precision for the estimation of Unruh temperature can be evaluated by the Gaussian interferometric power for a given probe state. We demonstrate that the amount of interferometric power is always beyond the entanglement type quantum correlations in a relativistic setting. It is found that due to the fact that Unruh radiation acts as a thermal bath on the probe system, it destroys available resources of the probe system and reduces the guaranteed precision of the estimation of Unruh temperature. We also find that the thermal noise induced by Unruh effect will generate interferometric power between accelerated Bob and his auxiliary partner anti-Bob, while it does not generate any correlation between inertial Alice and anti-Bob.

  12. Estimation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Using Marine Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Satish Kumar; Dewangan, Pawan; Sain, Kalachand

    2016-04-01

    Not much attention is given to direct wave arrivals in marine seismic data that are acquired for petroleum exploration and prospecting. These direct arrivals are usually muted out in routine seismic data processing. In the present study, we process these direct arrivals to accurately estimate soundspeed in near-surface seawater and invert for sea surface temperature. The established empirical equation describing the relationships among temperature, salinity, pressure and soundspeed is used for the inversion. We also discuss processing techniques, such as first-break picking and cross-correlation for the estimation of soundspeed, that are well known among petroleum-industry geophysicists. The accuracy of the methods is directly linked to the data quality and signal processing. The novelty in our approach is in the data conditioning, which consists essentially of spectral balancing based on a wavelet transform that compensates for spherical spreading and increases the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio. The 2D seismic data used in this paper are from the offshore Krishna-Godavari Basin east of India. We observe a significantly higher soundspeed of 1545 m/s for near-surface water than the commonly used value of ~1500 m/s. The estimated temperature (from velocity) is about 30 °C. Interestingly, the estimated temperature matches well with the temperature recorded in the CTD profile acquired in the study area during the month of May, the month corresponding to the acquisition of seismic data. Furthermore, the estimated temperatures during different times of data acquisition correlate well with the expected diurnal variation in temperature.

  13. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times.

  14. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-21

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times. PMID:27448871

  15. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iezzi, F.; Todisco, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  16. Estimation of soil moisture from diurnal surface temperature observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Camillo, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A coupled heat and moisture balance model was used to determine the thermal inertia of a grass covered top soil under different meteorological conditions. Relations between thermal inertia and soil moisture were established using the De Vries models for thermal conductivity and heat capacity to relate soil moisture and thermal inertia as a function of soil type. A sensitivity study of the surface roughness length and thermal inertia on diurnal surface temperature shows the necessity of focusing on the night time surface temperature rather than on the day time surface temperature, in order to estimate the soil moisture content of the top soil.

  17. Non-Invasive In Vivo Ultrasound Temperature Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Mahdi

    New emerging technologies in thermal therapy require precise monitoring and control of the delivered thermal dose in a variety of situations. The therapeutic temperature changes in target tissues range from few degrees for releasing chemotherapy drugs encapsulated in the thermosensitive liposomes to boiling temperatures in complete ablation of tumors via cell necrosis. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has emerged as a promising modality for noninvasive surgery due to its ability to create precise mechanical and thermal effects at the target without affecting surrounding tissues. An essential element in all these procedures, however, is accurate estimation of the target tissue temperature during the procedure to ensure its safety and efficacy. The advent of diagnostic imaging tools for guidance of thermal therapy was a key factor in the clinical acceptance of these minimally invasive or noninvasive methods. More recently, ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) thermography techniques have been proposed for guidance, monitoring, and control of noninvasive thermal therapies. MR thermography has shown acceptable sensitivity and accuracy in imaging temperature change and it is currently FDA-approved on clinical HIFU units. However, it suffers from limitations like cost of integration with ultrasound therapy system and slow rate of imaging for real time guidance. Ultrasound, on the other hand, has the advantage of real time imaging and ease of integration with the therapy system. An infinitesimal model for imaging temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound has been demonstrated, including in vivo small-animal imaging. However, this model suffers from limitations that prevent demonstration in more clinically-relevant settings. One limitation stems from the infinitesimal nature of the model, which results in spatial inconsistencies of the estimated temperature field. Another limitation is the sensitivity to tissue motion and deformation during in vivo, which

  18. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  19. Estimation of river and stream temperature trends under haphazard sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Brian R.; Lyubchich, Vyacheslav; Gel, Yulia R.; Rogala, James T.; Robertson, Dale M.; Wei, Xiaoqiao

    2015-01-01

    Long-term temporal trends in water temperature in rivers and streams are typically estimated under the assumption of evenly-spaced space-time measurements. However, sampling times and dates associated with historical water temperature datasets and some sampling designs may be haphazard. As a result, trends in temperature may be confounded with trends in time or space of sampling which, in turn, may yield biased trend estimators and thus unreliable conclusions. We address this concern using multilevel (hierarchical) linear models, where time effects are allowed to vary randomly by day and date effects by year. We evaluate the proposed approach by Monte Carlo simulations with imbalance, sparse data and confounding by trend in time and date of sampling. Simulation results indicate unbiased trend estimators while results from a case study of temperature data from the Illinois River, USA conform to river thermal assumptions. We also propose a new nonparametric bootstrap inference on multilevel models that allows for a relatively flexible and distribution-free quantification of uncertainties. The proposed multilevel modeling approach may be elaborated to accommodate nonlinearities within days and years when sampling times or dates typically span temperature extremes.

  20. Role of the unperturbed limb and arms in the reactive recovery response to an unexpected slip during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Marigold, Daniel S; Bethune, Allison J; Patla, Aftab E

    2003-04-01

    Understanding reactive recovery responses to slipping is fundamental in falls research and prevention. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the unperturbed limb and arms in the reactive recovery response to an unexpected slip. Ten healthy, young adults participated in this experiment in which an unexpected slip was induced by a set of steel free-wheeling rollers. Surface electromyography (EMG) data were collected from the unperturbed limb (i.e., the swing limb) rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and the medial head of gastrocnemius, and bilateral gluteus medius, erector spinae, and deltoids. Kinematic data were also collected by an optical imaging system to monitor limb trajectories. The first slip response was significantly different from the subsequent recovery responses to the unexpected slips, with an identifiable reactive recovery response and no proactive changes in EMG patterns. The muscles of the unperturbed limb, upper body, and arms were recruited at the same latency as those previously found for the perturbed limb. The arm elevation strategies assisted in shifting the center of mass forward after it was posteriorly displaced with the slip, while the unperturbed limb musculature demonstrated an extensor strategy supporting the observed lowering of the limb to briefly touch the ground to widen the base of support and to increase stability. Evidently a dynamic multilimb coordinated strategy is employed by the CNS to control and coordinate the upper and lower limbs in reactive recovery responses to unexpected slips during locomotion. PMID:12611998

  1. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  2. Estimation of human core temperature from sequential heart rate observations.

    PubMed

    Buller, Mark J; Tharion, William J; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J; Kenefick, Robert W; Castellani, John; Latzka, William A; Roberts, Warren S; Richter, Mark; Jenkins, Odest Chadwicke; Hoyt, Reed W

    2013-07-01

    Core temperature (CT) in combination with heart rate (HR) can be a good indicator of impending heat exhaustion for occupations involving exposure to heat, heavy workloads, and wearing protective clothing. However, continuously measuring CT in an ambulatory environment is difficult. To address this problem we developed a model to estimate the time course of CT using a series of HR measurements as a leading indicator using a Kalman filter. The model was trained using data from 17 volunteers engaged in a 24 h military field exercise (air temperatures 24-36 °C, and 42%-97% relative humidity and CTs ranging from 36.0-40.0 °C). Validation data from laboratory and field studies (N = 83) encompassing various combinations of temperature, hydration, clothing, and acclimation state were examined using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LoA) method. We found our model had an overall bias of -0.03 ± 0.32 °C and that 95% of all CT estimates fall within ±0.63 °C (>52 000 total observations). While the model for estimating CT is not a replacement for direct measurement of CT (literature comparisons of esophageal and rectal methods average LoAs of ±0.58 °C) our results suggest it is accurate enough to provide practical indication of thermal work strain for use in the work place.

  3. A nonintrusive temperature measuring system for estimating deep body temperature in bed.

    PubMed

    Sim, S Y; Lee, W K; Baek, H J; Park, K S

    2012-01-01

    Deep body temperature is an important indicator that reflects human being's overall physiological states. Existing deep body temperature monitoring systems are too invasive to apply to awake patients for a long time. Therefore, we proposed a nonintrusive deep body temperature measuring system. To estimate deep body temperature nonintrusively, a dual-heat-flux probe and double-sensor probes were embedded in a neck pillow. When a patient uses the neck pillow to rest, the deep body temperature can be assessed using one of the thermometer probes embedded in the neck pillow. We could estimate deep body temperature in 3 different sleep positions. Also, to reduce the initial response time of dual-heat-flux thermometer which measures body temperature in supine position, we employed the curve-fitting method to one subject. And thereby, we could obtain the deep body temperature in a minute. This result shows the possibility that the system can be used as practical temperature monitoring system with appropriate curve-fitting model. In the next study, we would try to establish a general fitting model that can be applied to all of the subjects. In addition, we are planning to extract meaningful health information such as sleep structure analysis from deep body temperature data which are acquired from this system.

  4. Estimating Hardness from the USDC Tool-Bit Temperature Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    A method of real-time quantification of the hardness of a rock or similar material involves measurement of the temperature, as a function of time, of the tool bit of an ultrasonic/sonic drill corer (USDC) that is being used to drill into the material. The method is based on the idea that, other things being about equal, the rate of rise of temperature and the maximum temperature reached during drilling increase with the hardness of the drilled material. In this method, the temperature is measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in the USDC tool bit near the drilling tip. The hardness of the drilled material can then be determined through correlation of the temperature-rise-versus-time data with time-dependent temperature rises determined in finite-element simulations of, and/or experiments on, drilling at various known rates of advance or known power levels through materials of known hardness. The figure presents an example of empirical temperature-versus-time data for a particular 3.6-mm USDC bit, driven at an average power somewhat below 40 W, drilling through materials of various hardness levels. The temperature readings from within a USDC tool bit can also be used for purposes other than estimating the hardness of the drilled material. For example, they can be especially useful as feedback to control the driving power to prevent thermal damage to the drilled material, the drill bit, or both. In the case of drilling through ice, the temperature readings could be used as a guide to maintaining sufficient drive power to prevent jamming of the drill by preventing refreezing of melted ice in contact with the drill.

  5. Air Temperature Estimation over the Third Pole Using MODIS LST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Ye, M.; Che, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Third Pole is centered on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), which is the highest large plateau around the world with extremely complex terrain and climate conditions, resulting in very scarce meteorological stations especially in the vast west region. For these unobserved areas, the remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) can greatly contribute to air temperature estimation. In our research we utilized the MODIS LST production from both TERRA and AQUA to estimate daily mean air temperature over the TP using multiple statistical models. Other variables used in the models include longitudes, latitudes, Julian day, solar zenith, NDVI and elevation. To select a relatively optimal model, we chose six popular and representative statistical models as candidate models including the multiple linear regression (MLR), the partial least squares regression (PLS), back propagate neural network (BPNN), support vector regression (SVR), random forests (RF) and Cubist regression (CR). The performances of the six models were compared for each possible combination of LSTs at four satellite pass times and two quality situations. Eventually a ranking table consisting of optimal models for each LST combination and quality situation was built up based on the validation results. By this means, the final production is generated providing daily mean air temperature with the least cloud blockage and acceptable accuracy. The average RMSEs of cross validation are mostly around 2℃. Stratified validations were also performed to test the expansibility to unobserved and high-altitude areas of the final models selected.

  6. Apply a hydrological model to estimate local temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Masao; Shinozawa, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    Continuous times series {f(x)} such as a depth of water is written f(x) = T(x)+P(x)+S(x)+C(x) in hydrological science where T(x),P(x),S(x) and C(x) are called the trend, periodic, stochastic and catastrophic components respectively. We simplify this model and apply it to the local temperature data such as given E. Halley (1693), the UK (1853-2010), Germany (1880-2010), Japan (1876-2010). We also apply the model to CO2 data. The model coefficients are evaluated by a symbolic computation by using a standard personal computer. The accuracy of obtained nonlinear curve is evaluated by the arithmetic mean of relative errors between the data and estimations. E. Halley estimated the temperature of Gresham College from 11/1692 to 11/1693. The simplified model shows that the temperature at the time rather cold compared with the recent of London. The UK and Germany data sets show that the maximum and minimum temperatures increased slowly from the 1890s to 1940s, increased rapidly from the 1940s to 1980s and have been decreasing since the 1980s with the exception of a few local stations. The trend of Japan is similar to these results.

  7. Using optimal estimation method for upper atmospheric Lidar temperature retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Rongshi; Pan, Weilin; Qiao, Shuai

    2016-07-01

    Conventional ground based Rayleigh lidar temperature retrieval use integrate technique, which has limitations that necessitate abandoning temperatures retrieved at the greatest heights due to the assumption of a seeding value required to initialize the integration at the highest altitude. Here we suggests the use of a method that can incorporate information from various sources to improve the quality of the retrieval result. This approach inverts lidar equation via optimal estimation method(OEM) based on Bayesian theory together with Gaussian statistical model. It presents many advantages over the conventional ones: 1) the possibility of incorporating information from multiple heterogeneous sources; 2) provides diagnostic information about retrieval qualities; 3) ability of determining vertical resolution and maximum height to which the retrieval is mostly independent of the a priori profile. This paper compares one-hour temperature profiles retrieved using conventional and optimal estimation methods at Golmud, Qinghai province, China. Results show that OEM results show a better agreement with SABER profile compared with conventional one, in some region it is much lower than SABER profile, which is a very different results compared with previous studies, further studies are needed to explain this phenomenon. The success of applying OEM on temperature retrieval is a validation for using as retrieval framework in large synthetic observation systems including various active remote sensing instruments by incorporating all available measurement information into the model and analyze groups of measurements simultaneously to improve the results.

  8. Battery internal temperature estimation by combined impedance and surface temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Ireland, Peter T.; Howey, David A.

    2014-11-01

    A new approach, suitable for real-time implementation, is introduced for estimation of non-uniform internal temperature distribution in cylindrical lithium-ion cells. A radial 1-D model is used to estimate the distribution using two inputs: the real or imaginary part of the electrochemical impedance of the cell at a single frequency, and the surface temperature. The approach does not require knowledge of cell thermal properties, heat generation or thermal boundary conditions. The model is validated experimentally, the first time for such an approach, using a cylindrical 26650 cell fitted with an internal thermocouple. The cell is heated by applying (1) current pulses of up to ±20 A and (2) a 3500 s HEV drive cycle current profile, whilst monitoring the surface and core temperatures and measuring impedance at 215 Hz. During the drive cycle test, the battery core temperature increases by 20 °C and the surface temperature increases by 14 °C. The mean absolute error in the predicted maximum temperature throughout the cycle is 0.6 °C (3% of the total core temperature increase), in contrast to a mean absolute error of 2.6 °C if the temperature is assumed to be uniform (13% of the total core temperature increase).

  9. Spatial Statistical Estimation for Massive Sea Surface Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Y.; Vazquez, J.; Nguyen, H.; Braverman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We combine several large remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) datasets to create a single high-resolution SST dataset that has no missing data and provides an uncertainty associated with each value. This high resolution dataset will optimize estimates of SST in critical parts of the world's oceans, such as coastal upwelling regions. We use Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF), a statistical methodology for predicting global spatial fields by exploiting spatial correlations in the data. The main advantages of SSDF over spatial smoothing methodologies include the provision of probabilistic uncertainties, the ability to incorporate multiple datasets with varying footprints, measurement errors and biases, and estimation at any desired resolution. In order to accommodate massive input and output datasets, we introduce two modifications of the existing SSDF algorithm. First, we compute statistical model parameters based on coarse resolution aggregated data. Second, we use an adaptive spatial grid that allows us to perform estimation in a specified region of interest, but incorporate spatial dependence between locations in that region and all locations globally. Finally, we demonstrate with a case study involving estimations on the full globe at coarse resolution grid (30 km) and a high resolution (1 km) inset for the Gulf Stream region.

  10. Rectal temperature-based death time estimation in infants.

    PubMed

    Igari, Yui; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Funayama, Masato

    2016-03-01

    In determining the time of death in infants based on rectal temperature, the same methods used in adults are generally used. However, whether the methods for adults are suitable for infants is unclear. In this study, we examined the following 3 methods in 20 infant death cases: computer simulation of rectal temperature based on the infinite cylinder model (Ohno's method), computer-based double exponential approximation based on Marshall and Hoare's double exponential model with Henssge's parameter determination (Henssge's method), and computer-based collinear approximation based on extrapolation of the rectal temperature curve (collinear approximation). The interval between the last time the infant was seen alive and the time that he/she was found dead was defined as the death time interval and compared with the estimated time of death. In Ohno's method, 7 cases were within the death time interval, and the average deviation in the other 12 cases was approximately 80 min. The results of both Henssge's method and collinear approximation were apparently inferior to the results of Ohno's method. The corrective factor was set within the range of 0.7-1.3 in Henssge's method, and a modified program was newly developed to make it possible to change the corrective factors. Modification A, in which the upper limit of the corrective factor range was set as the maximum value in each body weight, produced the best results: 8 cases were within the death time interval, and the average deviation in the other 12 cases was approximately 80min. There was a possibility that the influence of thermal isolation on the actual infants was stronger than that previously shown by Henssge. We conclude that Ohno's method and Modification A are useful for death time estimation in infants. However, it is important to accept the estimated time of death with certain latitude considering other circumstances.

  11. Skin Temperature Over the Carotid Artery, an Accurate Non-invasive Estimation of Near Core Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Karimi Rouzbahani, Hamid Reza; Goudarzi, Mehrdad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahim Soltani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: During anesthesia, continuous body temperature monitoring is essential, especially in children. Anesthesia can increase the risk of loss of body temperature by three to four times. Hypothermia in children results in increased morbidity and mortality. Since the measurement points of the core body temperature are not easily accessible, near core sites, like rectum, are used. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure skin temperature over the carotid artery and compare it with the rectum temperature, in order to propose a model for accurate estimation of near core body temperature. Patients and Methods: Totally, 124 patients within the age range of 2 - 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were selected. Temperature of rectum and skin over the carotid artery was measured. Then, the patients were randomly divided into two groups (each including 62 subjects), namely modeling (MG) and validation groups (VG). First, in the modeling group, the average temperature of the rectum and skin over the carotid artery were measured separately. The appropriate model was determined, according to the significance of the model’s coefficients. The obtained model was used to predict the rectum temperature in the second group (VG group). Correlation of the predicted values with the real values (the measured rectum temperature) in the second group was investigated. Also, the difference in the average values of these two groups was examined in terms of significance. Results: In the modeling group, the average rectum and carotid temperatures were 36.47 ± 0.54°C and 35.45 ± 0.62°C, respectively. The final model was obtained, as follows: Carotid temperature × 0.561 + 16.583 = Rectum temperature. The predicted value was calculated based on the regression model and then compared with the measured rectum value, which showed no significant difference (P = 0.361). Conclusions: The present study was the first research, in which rectum temperature was compared with that

  12. Estimation of Electron Temperature on Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Sadiq, M.; Shah, S. I. W.; GLAST Team

    2015-03-01

    Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST) is a small spherical tokamak indigenously developed in Pakistan with an insulating vacuum vessel. A commercially available 2.45 GHz magnetron is used as pre-ionization source for plasma current startup. Different diagnostic systems like Rogowski coils, magnetic probes, flux loops, Langmuir probe, fast imaging and emission spectroscopy are installed on the device. The plasma temperature inside of GLAST, at the time of maxima of plasma current, is estimated by taking into account the Spitzer resistivity calculations with some experimentally determined plasma parameters. The plasma resistance is calculated by using Ohm's law with plasma current and loop voltage as experimentally determined inputs. The plasma resistivity is then determined by using length and area of the plasma column. Finally, the average plasma electron temperature is predicted to be 12.65eV for taking neon (Ne) as a working gas.

  13. Effects of unilateral leg muscle fatigue on balance control in perturbed and unperturbed gait in healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Toebes, Marcel J P; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Dekker, Joost; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed effects of unilateral leg muscle fatigue (ULMF) on balance control in gait during the stance and swing phases of the fatigued leg in healthy elderly, to test the assumption that leg muscle strength limits balance control during the stance-phase. Ten subjects (aged 63.4, SD 5.5 years) walked on a treadmill in 4 conditions: unperturbed unfatigued, unperturbed fatigued, perturbed unfatigued, and perturbed fatigued. The perturbations were lateral trunk pulls just before contralateral heel contact. ULMF was evoked by unilateral squat exercise until task failure. Isometric knee extension strength was measured to verify the presence of muscle fatigue. Between-stride standard deviations and Lyapunov exponents of trunk kinematics were used as indicators of balance control. Required perturbation force and the deviation of trunk kinematics from unperturbed gait were used to assess perturbation responses. Knee extension strength decreased considerably (17.3% SD 8.6%) as a result ULMF. ULMF did not affect steady-state gait balance. Less force was required to perturb subjects when the fatigued leg was in the stance-phase compared to the swing-phase. Subjects showed a faster return to the unperturbed gait pattern in the fatigued than in the unfatigued condition, after perturbations in swing and stance of the fatigued leg. The results of this study are not in line with the hypothesized effects of leg muscle fatigue on balance in gait. The healthy elderly subjects were able to cope with substantial ULMF during steady-state gait and demonstrated faster balance recovery after laterally directed mechanical perturbations in the fatigued than in the unfatigued condition.

  14. Contribution of Each Leg to the Control of Unperturbed Bipedal Stance in Lower Limb Amputees: New Insights Using Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Hlavackova, Petra; Franco, Céline; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the relative contribution of each leg to unperturbed bipedal posture in lower limb amputees. To achieve this goal, eight unilateral traumatic trans-femoral amputees (TFA) were asked to stand as still as possible on a plantar pressure data acquisition system with their eyes closed. Four dependent variables were computed to describe the subject's postural behavior: (1) body weight distribution, (2) amplitude, (3) velocity and (4) regularity of centre of foot pressure (CoP) trajectories under the amputated (A) leg and the non-amputated (NA) leg. Results showed a larger body weight distribution applied to the NA leg than to the A leg and a more regular CoP profiles (lower sample entropy values) with greater amplitude and velocity under the NA leg than under the A leg. Taken together, these findings suggest that the NA leg and the A leg do not equally contribute to the control of unperturbed bipedal posture in TFA. The observation that TFA do actively control unperturbed bipedal posture with their NA leg could be viewed as an adaptive process to the loss of the lower leg afferents and efferents because of the unilateral lower-limb amputation. From a methodological point of view, these results demonstrate the suitability of computing bilateral CoP trajectories regularity for the assessment of lateralized postural control under pathological conditions. PMID:21603630

  15. Unperturbed state and solitary structures in an electron-positron plasma having dust impurity and density inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Malik, Rakhee; Malik

    2014-08-01

    An electron-positron pair plasma having dust impurity and density non-uniformity is studied for its unperturbed state and evolution of solitary structures under the effect of either positively charged or negatively charged dust grains. Zeroth-order equations are solved to examine the unperturbed state of the plasma via unperturbed potential φ0, drift velocities of the electrons and positrons (v e0 and v p0), and plasma (positron) density gradient n p0η. It is observed that the dust distribution affects the gradient n p0η significantly, which increases very sharply with a small increment in the dust density gradient n d0η. With relation to the solitary structures, a modified form of Korteweg-deVries equation (mKdV equation) is realized in the said plasma, which reveals that a tailing structure is associated with the soliton (sech2 structure). This tail is less prominent in the present pair plasma, contrary to the observation made in ordinary plasmas having only ions and electrons. The dust impurity is found to influence the solitary structure much significantly and its presence suppresses the rarefactive solitons, which are generally observed in multi-component species plasmas.

  16. Estimating Air Temperature over the Tibetan Plateau Using MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fangfang; Ma, Weiqiang; Ma, Yaoming; Li, Maoshan; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Time series of MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data, combined with digital elevation model (DEM) and meterological data for 2001-2012, were used to estimate and map the spatial distribution of monthly mean air temperature over the Tibatan Plateau (TP). Time series and regression analysis of monthly mean land surface temperature (Ts) and air temperature (Ta) were both conducted by ordinary liner regression (OLR) and geographical weighted regression (GWR) methods. Analysis showed that GWR method had much better result (Adjusted R2 > 0.79, root mean square error (RMSE) is between 0.51° C and 1.12° C) for estimating Ta than OLR method. The GWR model, with MODIS LST, NDVI and altitude as independent variables, was used to estimate Ta over the Tibetan Plateau. All GWR models in each month were tested by F-test with significant level of α=0.01 and the regression coefficients were all tested by T-test with significant level of α=0.01. This illustrated that Ts, NDVI and altitude play an important role on estimating Ta over the Tibetan Plateau. Finally, the major conclusions are as follows: (1) GWR method has higher accuracy for estimating Ta than OLR (Adjusted R2=0.40˜0.78, RMSE=1.60˜4.38° C), and the Ta control precision can be up to 1.12° C. (2) Over the Northern TP, the range of Ta variation in January is -29.28 ˜ -5.0° C, and that in July is -0.53 ˜ 14.0° C. Ta in summer half year (from May to October) is between -15.92 ˜ 14.0° C. From October on, 0° C isothermal level is gradually declining from the altitude of 4˜5 kilometers, and hits the bottom with altitude of 3200 meters in December, and Ta is all under 0° C in January. 10° C isothermal level gradually starts rising from the altitude of 3200 meters from May, and reaches the highest level with altitude of 4˜5 kilometers in July. In addition, Ta in south slope of the Tanggula Mountains is obviously higher than that in the north slope. Ta

  17. Model-based estimation of changes in air temperature seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Trigo, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Seasonality is a ubiquitous feature in climate time series. Climate change is expected to involve not only changes in the mean of climate parameters but also changes in the characteristics of the corresponding seasonal cycle. Therefore the identification and quantification of changes in seasonality is a highly relevant topic in climate analysis, particularly in a global warming context. However, the analysis of seasonality is far from a trivial task. A key challenge is the discrimination between long-term changes in the mean and long-term changes in the seasonal pattern itself, which requires the use of appropriate statistical approaches in order to be able to distinguish between overall trends in the mean and trends in the seasons. Model based approaches are particularly suitable for the analysis of seasonality, enabling to assess uncertainties in the amplitude and phase of seasonal patterns within a well defined statistical framework. This work addresses the changes in the seasonality of air temperature over the 20th century. The analysed data are global air temperature values close to surface (2m above ground) and mid-troposphere (500 hPa geopotential height) from the recently developed 20th century reanalysis. This new 3-D Reanalysis dataset is available since 1891, considerably extending all other Reanalyses currently in use (e.g. NCAR, ECWMF), and was obtained with the Ensemble Filter (Compo et al., 2006) by assimilation of pressure observations into a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model that includes the radiative effects of historical time-varying CO2 concentrations, volcanic aerosol emissions and solar output variations. A modeling approach based on autoregression (Barbosa et al, 2008; Barbosa, 2009) is applied within a Bayesian framework for the estimation of a time varying seasonal pattern and further quantification of changes in the amplitude and phase of air temperature over the 20th century. Barbosa, SM, Silva, ME, Fernandes, MJ

  18. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  19. Bloch-Nordsieck estimates of high-temperature QED

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, H. M.; Sheu, Y.-M.; Grandou, T.

    2008-05-15

    In anticipation of a subsequent application to QCD, we consider the case of QED at high temperature. We introduce a Fradkin representation into the exact, Schwingerian, functional expression of a fermion propagator, as well as a new and relevant version of the Bloch-Nordsieck model, which extracts the soft contributions of every perturbative graph, in contradistinction to the assumed separation of energy scales of previous semiperturbative treatments. Our results are applicable to the absorption of a fast particle which enters a heat bath, as well as to the propagation of a symmetric pulse within the thermal medium due to the appearance of an instantaneous, shockwave-like source acting in the medium. An exponentially decreasing time dependence of the incident particle's initial momentum combines with a stronger decrease in the particle's energy, estimated by a sum over all Matsubara frequencies, to model an initial 'fireball', which subsequently decays in a Gaussian fashion. When extended to QCD, qualitative applications could be made to RHIC scattering, in which a fireball appears, expands, and is damped away.

  20. Estimates of Ground Temperature and Atmospheric Moisture from CERES Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed to retrieve surface ground temperature (Tg) and atmospheric moisture using clear sky fluxes (CSF) from CERES-TRMM observations. In general, the clear sky outgoing long-wave radiation (CLR) is sensitive to upper level moisture (q(sub h)) over wet regions and Tg over dry regions The clear sky window flux from 800 to 1200 /cm (RadWn) is sensitive to low level moisture (q(sub j)) and Tg. Combining these two measurements (CLR and RadWn), Tg and q(sub h) can be estimated over land, while q(sub h) and q(sub t) can be estimated over the oceans. The approach capitalizes on the availability of satellite estimates of CLR and RadWn and other auxiliary satellite data. The basic methodology employs off-line forward radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic CSF data from two different global 4-dimensional data assimilation products. Simple linear regression is used to relate discrepancies in CSF to discrepancies in Tg, q(sub h) and q(sub t). The slopes of the regression lines define sensitivity parameters that can be exploited to help interpret mismatches between satellite observations and model-based estimates of CSF. For illustration, we analyze the discrepancies in the CSF between an early implementation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS) and a recent operational version of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Prediction data assimilation system. In particular, our analysis of synthetic total and window region SCF differences (computed from two different assimilated data sets) shows that simple linear regression employing (Delta)Tg and broad layer (Delta)q(sub l) from 500 hPa to surface and (Delta)q(sub h) from 200 to 500 hPa provides a good approximation to the full radiative transfer calculations, typically explaining more than 90% of the 6-hourly variance in the flux differences. These simple regression relations can be inverted to "retrieve" the errors in the geophysical parameters

  1. Estimates of Ground Temperature and Atmospheric Moisture from CERES Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed to retrieve surface ground temperature (T(sub g)) and atmospheric moisture using clear sky fluxes (CSF) from CERES-TRMM observations. In general, the clear sky outgoing longwave radiation (CLR) is sensitive to upper level moisture (q(sub l)) over wet regions and (T(sub g)) over dry regions The clear sky window flux from 800 to 1200/cm (RadWn) is sensitive to low level moisture (q(sub t)) and T(sub g). Combining these two measurements (CLR and RadWn), Tg and q(sub h) can be estimated over land, while q(sub h) and q(sub l) can be estimated over the oceans. The approach capitalizes on the availability of satellite estimates of CLR and RadWn and other auxiliary satellite data. The basic methodology employs off-line forward radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic CSF data from two different global 4-dimensional data assimilation products. Simple linear regression is used to relate discrepancies in CSF to discrepancies in T(sub g), q(sub h) and q(sub l). The slopes of the regression lines define sensitivity parameters that can be exploited to help interpret mismatches between satellite observations and model-based estimates of CSF. For illustration, we analyze the discrepancies in the CSF between an early implementation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS) and a recent operational version of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Prediction data assimilation system. In particular, our analysis of synthetic total and window region SCF differences (computed from two different assimilated data sets) shows that simple linear regression employing Delta(T(sub g)) and broad layer Delta(q(sub l) from .500 hPa to surface and Delta(q(sub h)) from 200 to .300 hPa provides a good approximation to the full radiative transfer calculations. typically explaining more than 90% of the 6-hourly variance in the flux differences. These simple regression relations can be inverted to "retrieve" the errors in the

  2. Quantification Model for Estimating Temperature Field Distributions of Apple Fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Yang, Le; Zhao, Huizhong; Zhang, Leijie; Zhong, Zhiyou; Liu, Yanling; Chen, Jianhua

    A quantification model of transient heat conduction was provided to simulate apple fruit temperature distribution in the cooling process. The model was based on the energy variation of apple fruit of different points. It took into account, heat exchange of representative elemental volume, metabolism heat and external heat. The following conclusions could be obtained: first, the quantification model can satisfactorily describe the tendency of apple fruit temperature distribution in the cooling process. Then there was obvious difference between apple fruit temperature and environment temperature. Compared to the change of environment temperature, a long hysteresis phenomenon happened to the temperature of apple fruit body. That is to say, there was a significant temperature change of apple fruit body in a period of time after environment temperature dropping. And then the change of temerature of apple fruit body in the cooling process became slower and slower. This can explain the time delay phenomenon of biology. After that, the temperature differences of every layer increased from centre to surface of apple fruit gradually. That is to say, the minimum temperature differences closed to centre of apple fruit body and the maximum temperature differences closed to the surface of apple fruit body. Finally, the temperature of every part of apple fruit body will tend to consistent and be near to the environment temperature in the cooling process. It was related to the metabolism heat of plant body at any time.

  3. Air Temperature estimation from Land Surface temperature and solar Radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, Michele; Eissa, Yehia; Marpu, Prashanth; Ghedira, Hosni

    2013-04-01

    Air Temperature (AirT) is a fundamental parameter in a wide range of applications such as climate change studies, weather forecast, energy balance modeling, efficiency of Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, etc. Air temperature data are generally obtained through regular measurements from meteorological stations. The distribution of these stations is normally sparse, so the spatial pattern of this parameter cannot be accurately estimated by interpolation methods. This work investigated the relationship between Air Temperature measured at meteorological stations and spatially contiguous measurements derived from Remote Sensing techniques, such as Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps, emissivity maps and shortwave radiation maps with the aim of creating a continuous map of AirT. For LST and emissivity, MSG-SEVIRI LST product from Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) has been used. For shortwave radiation maps, an Artificial Neural Networks ensemble model has been developed and previously tested to create continuous maps from Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) point measurements, utilizing six thermal channels of MSG-SEVIRI. The testing sites corresponded to three meteorological stations located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where in situ measurements of Air Temperature were available. From the starting parameters, energy fluxes and net radiation have been calculated, in order to have information on the incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation and the incoming short-wave radiation. The preliminary analysis (day and Night measurements, cloud free) showed a strong negative correlation (0.92) between Outgoing long-wave radiation - GHI and LST- AirT, with a RMSE of 1.84 K in the AirT estimation from the initial parameters. Regression coefficients have been determined and tested on all the ground stations. The analysis also demonstrated the predominant impact of the incoming short-wave radiation in the AirT hourly variation, while the incoming

  4. An empirical technique for estimating near-surface air temperature trends in central Greenland from SSM/I brightness temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, C.A.; Alley, R.B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Stearns, C.R.

    1995-02-01

    In central Greenland, near-surface air temperatures can be estimated from long-term satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures supported by limited air-temperature data from automatic weather stations. In this region, brightness temperature depends on snow emissivity, which varies slowly over time, and on snow temperature, which varies more rapidly and is controlled by air temperature. The air temperature and brightness temperature data define an emissivity trend which can be modeled as an annual sinusoid. An air temperature trend can then be derived from the brightness temperature and modeled emissivity information. The estimated air temperature values represent an integrated near-surface value that defines the overall temperature trend at the Greenland Summit. The modeled emissivity cycle allows daily-average air temperatures to be estimated across significant gaps in weather station records, as well as quality control of their temperature data. The technique also generates annual trends of emissivity which can be used to evaluate radiative transfer models of microwave emissivity from dry firn.

  5. New estimates for Io eruption temperatures: Implications for the interior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Jaeger, W.; Milazzo, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A.G.; Mitchell, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    The initial interpretation of Galileo data from Jupiter's moon, Io, suggested eruption temperatures ≥1600°C. Tidal heating models have difficulties explaining Io's prodigious heat flow if the mantle is >1300°C, although we suggest that temperatures up to ~1450°C may be possible. In general, Io eruption temperatures have been overestimated because the incorrect thermal model has been applied. Much of the thermal emission from high-temperature hot spots comes from lava fountains but lava flow models were utilized. We apply a new lava fountain model to the highest reported eruption temperature, the SSI observation of the 1997 eruption at Pillan. This resets the lower temperature limit for the eruption from ~1600 to ~1340°C . Additionally, viscous heating of the magma may have increased eruption temperature by ~50-100°C as a result of the strong compressive stresses in the ionian lithosphere. While further work is needed, it appears that the discrepancy between observations and interior models is largely resolved.

  6. Estimating of equilibrium formation temperature by curve fitting method and it's problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kenso Takai; Masami Hyodo; Shinji Takasugi

    1994-01-20

    Determination of true formation temperature from measured bottom hole temperature is important for geothermal reservoir evaluation after completion of well drilling. For estimation of equilibrium formation temperature, we studied non-linear least squares fitting method adapting the Middleton Model (Chiba et al., 1988). It was pointed out that this method was applicable as simple and relatively reliable method for estimation of the equilibrium formation temperature after drilling. As a next step, we are studying the estimation of equilibrium formation temperature from bottom hole temperature data measured by MWD (measurement while drilling system). In this study, we have evaluated availability of nonlinear least squares fitting method adapting curve fitting method and the numerical simulator (GEOTEMP2) for estimation of the equilibrium formation temperature while drilling.

  7. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  8. Satellite versus Surface Estimates of Air Temperature since 1979.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, James W.; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1996-09-01

    A comparison of near-global monthly mean surface temperature anomalies to those of global Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) 2R temperatures for 1979-95 reveals differences in global annual mean trends that are shown to be largely attributable to important physical differences in the quantities that are measured. Maps of standard deviations of the monthly mean anomalies, which can be viewed as mostly measuring the size of the climate signal, reveal pronounced differences regionally in each dataset. At the surface, the variability of temperatures is relatively small over the oceans but large over land, whereas in the MSU record the signal is much more zonally symmetric. The largest differences are found over the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans where the monthly standard deviations of the MSU temperatures are larger by more than a factor of 2. Locally over land, the variance of the surface record is larger than that of the MSU. In addition to differential responses to forcings from the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and volcanic eruptions, these characteristics are indicative of differences of the response to physical processes arising from the relative importance of advection versus surface interactions and the different heat capacities of land and ocean. The result is that the regions contributing to hemispheric or global mean anomalies differ substantially between the two temperature datasets. This helps to account for the observed differences in decadal trends where the surface record shows a warming trend since 1979 of 0.18°C per decade, relative to the MSU record. While a common perception from this result is that the MSU and surface measurements of global temperature change are inconsistent, the issue should not be about which record is better, but rather that both give a different perspective on the same events.

  9. Estimation of subsurface thermal structure using sea surface height and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yong Q. (Inventor); Jo, Young-Heon (Inventor); Yan, Xiao-Hai (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining a subsurface temperature in a body of water is disclosed. The method includes obtaining surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data of the body of water for a region of interest, and also obtaining subsurface temperature anomaly data for the region of interest at a plurality of depths. The method further includes regressing the obtained surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data for the region of interest with the obtained subsurface temperature anomaly data for the plurality of depths to generate regression coefficients, estimating a subsurface temperature at one or more other depths for the region of interest based on the generated regression coefficients and outputting the estimated subsurface temperature at the one or more other depths. Using the estimated subsurface temperature, signal propagation times and trajectories of marine life in the body of water are determined.

  10. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  11. Estimated temperatures of organic materials in the TMI-2 reactor building during hydrogen burn

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, H.W.; Nagata, P.K.

    1982-12-01

    Maximum surface temperatures attained by certain materials during the hydrogen burn associated with the March 1979 accident at TMI-2 are estimated, using photographs and material samples from the reactor building. Thermal degradation, melting, and charring noted in the photographs, and the chemical and thermal analyses of polymeric and organic materials indicated an increase in temperature with elevation in the reactor building. The maximum material surface temperatures estimated ranged from 360 to 500/sup 0/F (455 to 533/sup 0/K). Analyses were performed to estimate the damage to electrical cables and insulation. Based on temperatures reached and approximate duration, greater than 90% of cable insulation life remains.

  12. Estimation of uncertainty for fatigue growth rate at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, Arman; Weiss, Klaus P.; Urbach, Elisabeth; Marcinek, Dawid J.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) measurement data for high strength austenitic alloys at cryogenic environment suffer in general from a high degree of data scatter in particular at ΔK regime below 25 MPa√m. Using standard mathematical smoothing techniques forces ultimately a linear relationship at stage II regime (crack propagation rate versus ΔK) in a double log field called Paris law. However, the bandwidth of uncertainty relies somewhat arbitrary upon the researcher's interpretation. The present paper deals with the use of the uncertainty concept on FCGR data as given by GUM (Guidance of Uncertainty in Measurements), which since 1993 is a recommended procedure to avoid subjective estimation of error bands. Within this context, the lack of a true value addresses to evaluate the best estimate by a statistical method using the crack propagation law as a mathematical measurement model equation and identifying all input parameters. Each parameter necessary for the measurement technique was processed using the Gaussian distribution law by partial differentiation of the terms to estimate the sensitivity coefficients. The combined standard uncertainty determined for each term with its computed sensitivity coefficients finally resulted in measurement uncertainty of the FCGR test result. The described procedure of uncertainty has been applied within the framework of ITER on a recent FCGR measurement for high strength and high toughness Type 316LN material tested at 7 K using a standard ASTM proportional compact tension specimen. The determined values of Paris law constants such as C0 and the exponent m as best estimate along with the their uncertainty value may serve a realistic basis for the life expectancy of cyclic loaded members.

  13. Estimation Uncertainty in the Determinatin of the Master Curve Reference Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    TL Sham; DR Eno

    2006-11-15

    The Master Curve Reference Temperature, T{sub 0}, characterizes the fracture performance of structural steels in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. For a given material, this reference temperature is estimated via fracture toughness testing. A methodology is presented to compute the standard error of an estimated T{sub 0} value from a finite sample of toughness data, in a unified manner for both constant temperature and multiple temperature test methods. Using the asymptotic properties of maximum likelihood estimators, closed-form expressions for the standard error of the estimate of T{sub 0} are presented for both test methods. This methodology includes statistically rigorous treatment of censored data, which represents an advance over the current ASTM E1921 methodology. Through Monte Carlo simulations of realistic constant temperature and multiple temperature test plans, the recommended likelihood-based procedure is shown to provide better statistical performance than the methods in the ASTM E1920 standards.

  14. Validation of temperature methods for the estimation of pre-appearance interval in carrion insects.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The pre-appearance interval (PAI) is an interval preceding appearance of an insect taxon on a cadaver. It decreases with an increase in temperature in several forensically-relevant insects. Therefore, forensic entomologists developed temperature methods for the estimation of PAI. In the current study these methods were tested in the case of adult and larval Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae), adult and larval Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), adult Necrobia rufipes (Coleoptera: Cleridae), adult Saprinus semistriatus (Coleoptera: Histeridae) and adult Stearibia nigriceps (Diptera: Piophilidae). Moreover, factors affecting accuracy of estimation and techniques for the approximation and correction of predictor temperature were studied using results of a multi-year pig carcass study. It was demonstrated that temperature methods outperform conventional methods. The accuracy of estimation was strongly related to the quality of the temperature model for PAI and the quality of temperature data used for the estimation. Models for larval stage performed better than models for adult stage. Mean temperature for the average seasonal PAI was a good initial approximation of predictor temperature. Moreover, iterative estimation of PAI was found to effectively correct predictor temperature, although some pitfalls were identified in this respect. Implications for the estimation of PAI are discussed. PMID:26820285

  15. Rainfall and temperature estimation for a data sparse region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D.; Wilby, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Development agencies often face difficult decisions about where and how to prioritise climate risk reduction measures. These tasks are especially challenging in data sparse regions with few meteorological stations, complex topography and extreme weather events. At the same time, these regions are also often highly vulnerable to climate risks. In this study, we blend surface meteorological observations, remotely sensed (TRMM and NDVI) data, physiographic indices, and regression techniques to produce gridded maps of annual mean precipitation and temperature, as well as parameters for site-specific, daily weather generation in Yemen. Maps of annual means were cross-validated and tested against independent observations. These replicated known features such as peak rainfall totals in the Highlands and western escarpment, as well as maximum temperatures along the coastal plains and interior. The weather generator reproduced daily and annual diagnostics when run with parameters from observed meteorological series for a test site at Taiz. However, when run with interpolated parameters, the frequency of wet-days, mean wet-day amount, annual totals and variability were underestimated. Stratification of sites for model calibration improved representation of growing season rainfall totals. We conclude that local terrain and remotely sensed variables can be used to infer annual mean temperature and precipitation across the most populous, south-west area of Yemen. Important features of the daily and seasonal weather can also be simulated at the site scale, but more rigorous validation is ultimately constrained by lack of data. Future work should focus on a wider range of model inputs to better discriminate controls exerted by different landscape units.

  16. The impact of threat of shock on the framing effect and temporal discounting: executive functions unperturbed by acute stress?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Oliver J; Bond, Rebecca L; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and stress-related disorders constitute a large global health burden, but are still poorly understood. Prior work has demonstrated clear impacts of stress upon basic cognitive function: biasing attention toward unexpected and potentially threatening information and instantiating a negative affective bias. However, the impact that these changes have on higher-order, executive, decision-making processes is unclear. In this study, we examined the impact of a translational within-subjects stress induction (threat of unpredictable shock) on two well-established executive decision-making biases: the framing effect (N = 83), and temporal discounting (N = 36). In both studies, we demonstrate (a) clear subjective effects of stress, and (b) clear executive decision-making biases but (c) no impact of stress on these decision-making biases. Indeed, Bayes factor analyses confirmed substantial preference for decision-making models that did not include stress. We posit that while stress may induce subjective mood change and alter low-level perceptual and action processes (Robinson et al., 2013c), some higher-level executive processes remain unperturbed by these impacts. As such, although stress can induce a transient affective biases and altered mood, these need not result in poor financial decision-making.

  17. Rainfall and temperature estimation for a data sparse region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Yu, D.

    2013-06-01

    Agencies face difficult decisions about where and how to prioritise climate risk reduction measures. These tasks are especially challenging in regions with few meteorological stations, complex topography and extreme weather events. In this study, we blend surface meteorological observations, remotely sensed (TRMM and NDVI) data, physiographic indices, and regression techniques to produce gridded maps of annual mean precipitation and temperature, as well as parameters for site-specific, daily weather generation in Yemen. Maps of annual means were cross-validated and tested against independent observations. These replicated known features such as peak rainfall totals in the Highlands and western escarpment, as well as maximum temperatures along the coastal plains and interior. The weather generator reproduced daily and annual diagnostics when run with parameters from observed meteorological series for a test site at Taiz. However, when run with interpolated parameters, the frequency of wet-days, mean wet-day amount, annual totals and variability were underestimated. Stratification of sites for model calibration improved representation of growing season rainfall totals. Future work should focus on a wider range of model inputs to better discriminate controls exerted by different landscape units.

  18. Rainfall and temperature estimation for a data sparse region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Yu, D.

    2013-10-01

    Humanitarian and development agencies face difficult decisions about where and how to prioritise climate risk reduction measures. These tasks are especially challenging in regions with few meteorological stations, complex topography and extreme weather events. In this study, we blend surface meteorological observations, remotely sensed (TRMM and NDVI) data, physiographic indices, and regression techniques to produce gridded maps of annual mean precipitation and temperature, as well as parameters for site-specific, daily weather generation in Yemen. Maps of annual means were cross-validated and tested against independent observations. These replicated known features such as peak rainfall totals in the highlands and western escarpment, as well as maximum temperatures along the coastal plains and interior. The weather generator reproduced daily and annual diagnostics when run with parameters from observed meteorological series for a test site at Taiz. However, when run with interpolated parameters, the frequency of wet days, mean wet-day amount, annual totals and variability were underestimated. Stratification of sites for model calibration improved representation of the growing season's rainfall totals. Future work should focus on a wider range of model inputs to better discriminate controls exerted by different landscape units.

  19. Estimating Temperature Rise Due to Flashlamp Heating Using Irreversible Temperature Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the nondestructive thermography inspection techniques uses photographic flashlamps. The flashlamps provide a short duration (about 0.005 sec) heat pulse. The short burst of energy results in a momentary rise in the surface temperature of the part. The temperature rise may be detrimental to the top layer of the part being exposed. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure the nondestructive nature of the technique. Amount of the temperature rise determines whether the flashlamp heating would be detrimental to the part. A direct method for the temperature measurement is to use of an infrared pyrometer that has much shorter response time than the flash duration. In this paper, an alternative technique is given using the irreversible temperature 'indicators. This is an indirect technique and it measures the temperature rise on the irreversible temperature indicators and computes the incident heat flux. Once the heat flux is known, the temperature rise on the part can be computed. A wedge shaped irreversible temperature indicator for measuring the heat flux is proposed. A procedure is given to use the wedge indicator.

  20. A method for temperature estimation in high-temperature geothermal reservoirs by using synthetic fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, Giovanni; Orlando, Andrea; Chiarantini, Laura; Borrini, Daniele; Weisenberger, Tobias B.

    2016-04-01

    Super-hot geothermal systems in magmatic areas are a possible target for the future geothermal exploration either for the direct exploitation of fluids or as a potential reservoirs of Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Reservoir temperature measurements are crucial for the assessment of the geothermal resources, however temperature determination in the high-temperature (>380°C) zone of super-hot geothermal systems is difficult or impossible by using either mechanical temperature and pressure gauges (Kuster device) and electronic devices. In the framework of Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration (IMAGE) project, we developed a method to measure high reservoir temperature by the production of synthetic fluid inclusions within an apparatus that will be placed in the high-temperature zone of geothermal wells. First experiments were carried out by placing a gold capsule containing pre-fractured quartz and an aqueous solution (10 wt.% NaCl + 0.4 wt.% NaOH) in an externally heated pressure vessel. Experimental pressure-temperature conditions (i.e. 80-300 bars and 280-400°C) were set close to the liquid/vapour curve of pure H2O or along the H2O critical isochore. The experiments showed that synthetic fluid inclusions form within a relatively short time (even in 48 hours) and that temperatures calculated from homogenization temperatures and isochores of newly formed inclusions are close to experimental temperatures. A second set of laboratory experiments were carried out by using a stainless steel micro-rector in which a gold capsule (containing the pre-fractured quartz and the aqueous solution) was inserted together with an amount of distilled water corresponding to the critical density of water. These experiments were conducted by leaving the new micro-reactor within a furnace at 400°C and were aimed to reproduce the temperature existing in super-hot geothermal wells. Synthetic fluid inclusions formed during the experiments had trapping temperature

  1. A mathematical model for the estimation of flue temperature in a coke oven

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.I.; Kim, S.Y.; Suo, J.S.; Hur, N.S.; Kang, I.S.; Lee, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    The coke plants at the Kwangyang works has adopted an Automatic Battery Control (ABC) system which consists of four main parts, battery heating control, underfiring heat and waste gas oxygen control, pushing and charging schedule and Autotherm-S that measures heating wall temperature during pushing. The measured heating wall temperature is used for calculating Mean Battery Temperature (MBT) which is average temperature of flues for a battery, but the Autotherm-S system can not provide the flue temperatures of an oven. This work attempted to develop mathematical models for the estimation of the flue temperature using the measured heating wall temperature and to examine fitness of the mathematical model for the coke plant operation by analysis of raw gas temperature at the stand pipe. Through this work it is possible to reflect heating wall temperature in calculating MBT for battery heating control without the interruption caused by a maintenance break.

  2. Calculations of atmospheric transmittance in the 11 micrometer window for estimating skin temperature from VISSR infrared brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating the atmospheric transmittance in the 10 to 20 micro m spectral band from a known temperature and dewpoint profile, and then using this transmittance to estimate the surface (skin) temperature from a VISSR observation in the 11 micro m window is presented. Parameterizations are drawn from the literature for computing the molecular absorption due to the water vapor continuum, water vapor lines, and carbon dioxide lines. The FORTRAN code is documented for this application, and the sensitivity of the derived skin temperature to variations in the model's parameters is calculated. The VISSR calibration uncertainties are identified as the largest potential source of error.

  3. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  4. Similar negative impacts of temperature on global wheat yield estimated by three independent methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global wheat production has recently been assessed with different methods, scaling and aggregation approaches. Here we show that grid-based simulations, point-based simulations, and statistical regressions produce similar estimates of temperature ...

  5. The estimation of local brain temperature by in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cady, E B; D'Souza, P C; Penrice, J; Lorek, A

    1995-06-01

    Brain temperature may be important for investigating pathology and cerebroprotective effects of pharmaceuticals and hypothermia. Two methods for estimating temperature using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy are described: a partially water-suppressed binomial sequence and non-water-suppressed point-resolved spectroscopy. Relative to N-acetylaspartate (Naa), water chemical shift (delta H2O-Naa) in piglet brain depended linearly on temperature from 30 degrees to 40 degrees C: temperature was 286.9-94.0 delta H2O-Naa degrees C. Thalamic temperature in six normal infants was 38.1 degrees +/- 0.4 degree C indicating that local brain temperature could be estimated with adequate sensitivity for studying pathologic and therapeutic changes.

  6. Comparing Parameter Estimation Techniques for an Electrical Power Transformer Oil Temperature Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines various sources of error in MIT's improved top oil temperature rise over ambient temperature model and estimation process. The sources of error are the current parameter estimation technique, quantization noise, and post-processing of the transformer data. Results from this paper will show that an output error parameter estimation technique should be selected to replace the current least squares estimation technique. The output error technique obtained accurate predictions of transformer behavior, revealed the best error covariance, obtained consistent parameter estimates, and provided for valid and sensible parameters. This paper will also show that the output error technique should be used to minimize errors attributed to post-processing (decimation) of the transformer data. Models used in this paper are validated using data from a large transformer in service.

  7. Estimating transient climate response using consistent temperature reconstruction methods in models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observational temperature records such as HadCRUT4 typically have incomplete geographical coverage and blend air temperature over land with sea surface temperatures over ocean, in contrast to model output which is commonly reported as global air temperature. This complicates estimation of properties such as the transient climate response (TCR). Observation-based estimates of TCR have been made using energy-budget constraints applied to time series of historical radiative forcing and surface temperature changes, while model TCR is formally derived from simulations where CO2 increases at 1% per year. We perform a like-with-like comparison using three published energy-budget methods to derive modelled TCR from historical CMIP5 temperature series sampled in a manner consistent with HadCRUT4. Observation-based TCR estimates agree to within 0.12 K of the multi-model mean in each case and for 2 of the 3 energy-budget methods the observation-based TCR is higher than the multi-model mean. For one energy-budget method, using the HadCRUT4 blending method leads to a TCR underestimate of 0.3±0.1 K, relative to that estimated using global near-surface air temperatures.

  8. Preliminary verification of instantaneous air temperature estimation for clear sky conditions based on SEBAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shanyou; Zhou, Chuxuan; Zhang, Guixin; Zhang, Hailong; Hua, Junwei

    2016-03-01

    Spatially distributed near surface air temperature at the height of 2 m is an important input parameter for the land surface models. It is of great significance in both theoretical research and practical applications to retrieve instantaneous air temperature data from remote sensing observations. An approach based on Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to retrieve air temperature under clear sky conditions is presented. Taking the meteorological measurement data at one station as the reference and remotely sensed data as the model input, the research estimates the air temperature by using an iterative computation. The method was applied to the area of Jiangsu province for nine scenes by using MODIS data products, as well as part of Fujian province, China based on four scenes of Landsat 8 imagery. Comparing the air temperature estimated from the proposed method with that of the meteorological station measurement, results show that the root mean square error is 1.7 and 2.6 °C at 1000 and 30 m spatial resolution respectively. Sensitivity analysis of influencing factors reveals that land surface temperature is the most sensitive to the estimation precision. Research results indicate that the method has great potentiality to be used to estimate instantaneous air temperature distribution under clear sky conditions.

  9. Estimating stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using stochastic particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan-Xin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Wei; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Considering features of stellar spectral radiation and sky surveys, we established a computational model for stellar effective temperatures, detected angular parameters and gray rates. Using known stellar flux data in some bands, we estimated stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO). We first verified the reliability of SPSO, and then determined reasonable parameters that produced highly accurate estimates under certain gray deviation levels. Finally, we calculated 177 860 stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) catalog. These derived stellar effective temperatures were accurate when we compared them to known values from literatures. This research makes full use of catalog data and presents an original technique for studying stellar characteristics. It proposes a novel method for calculating stellar effective temperatures and detecting angular parameters, and provides theoretical and practical data for finding information about radiation in any band.

  10. Instantaneous frequency-based ultrasonic temperature estimation during focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Huang, Sheng-Min; Lu, I-Yeh; Lin, Deng-Yn; Lin, Shi-Ming; Ju, Kuen-Cheng

    2009-10-01

    Focused ultrasound thermal therapy relies on temperature monitoring for treatment guidance and assurance of targeting and dose control. One potential approach is to monitor temperature change through ultrasonic-backscattered signal processing. The current approach involves the detection of echo time-shifts based on cross-correlation processing from segmented radiofrequency (RF) data. In this study, we propose a novel ultrasonic temperature-measurement approach that detects changes in instantaneous frequency along the imaging beam direction. Focused ultrasound was used as the heating source, and the 1-D beamformed RF signals provided from an ultrasound imager were used to verify the proposed algorithm for temperature change estimation. For comparison, a conventional cross-correlation technique was also evaluated. Heating experiments testing tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo porcine muscles were conducted. The results showed that temperature can be well estimated by the proposed algorithm in the temperature range, where the relationship of sound speed versus temperature is linear. Compared with the cross-correlation-based algorithm, the proposed new algorithm yields a six-fold increase in computational efficiency, along with comparable contrast-detection ability and precision. This new algorithm may serve as an alternative method for implementing temperature estimation into a clinical ultrasound imager for thermal therapy guidance. PMID:19643529

  11. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  12. Mathematical model of cycad cones' thermogenic temperature responses: inverse calorimetry to estimate metabolic heating rates.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R B; Booth, D; Bhavsar, A A; Walter, G H; Terry, L I

    2012-12-21

    A mathematical model based on conservation of energy has been developed and used to simulate the temperature responses of cones of the Australian cycads Macrozamia lucida and Macrozamia. macleayi during their daily thermogenic cycle. These cones generate diel midday thermogenic temperature increases as large as 12 °C above ambient during their approximately two week pollination period. The cone temperature response model is shown to accurately predict the cones' temperatures over multiple days as based on simulations of experimental results from 28 thermogenic events from 3 different cones, each simulated for either 9 or 10 sequential days. The verified model is then used as the foundation of a new, parameter estimation based technique (termed inverse calorimetry) that estimates the cones' daily metabolic heating rates from temperature measurements alone. The inverse calorimetry technique's predictions of the major features of the cones' thermogenic metabolism compare favorably with the estimates from conventional respirometry (indirect calorimetry). Because the new technique uses only temperature measurements, and does not require measurements of oxygen consumption, it provides a simple, inexpensive and portable complement to conventional respirometry for estimating metabolic heating rates. It thus provides an additional tool to facilitate field and laboratory investigations of the bio-physics of thermogenic plants. PMID:22995822

  13. Accuracy comparison of spatial interpolation methods for estimation of air temperatures in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Shim, K.; Jung, M.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    Because of complex terrain, micro- as well as meso-climate variability is extreme by locations in Korea. In particular, air temperature of agricultural fields are influenced by topographic features of the surroundings making accurate interpolation of regional meteorological data from point-measured data. This study was conducted to compare accuracy of a spatial interpolation method to estimate air temperature in Korean Peninsula with the rugged terrains in South Korea. Four spatial interpolation methods including Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Spline, Kriging and Cokriging were tested to estimate monthly air temperature of unobserved stations. Monthly measured data sets (minimum and maximum air temperature) from 456 automatic weather station (AWS) locations in South Korea were used to generate the gridded air temperature surface. Result of cross validation showed that using Exponential theoretical model produced a lower root mean square error (RMSE) than using Gaussian theoretical model in case of Kriging and Cokriging and Spline produced the lowest RMSE of spatial interpolation methods in both maximum and minimum air temperature estimation. In conclusion, Spline showed the best accuracy among the methods, but further experiments which reflect topography effects such as temperature lapse rate are necessary to improve the prediction.

  14. An atomistic J-integral at finite temperature based on Hardy estimates of continuum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. E.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Oswald, J.; Belytschko, T.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we apply a material-frame, kernel-based estimator of continuum fields to atomic data in order to estimate the J-integral for the analysis of an atomically sharp crack at finite temperatures. Instead of the potential energy appropriate for zero temperature calculations, we employ the quasi-harmonic free energy as an estimator of the Helmholtz free energy required by the Eshelby stress in isothermal conditions. We employ the simplest of the quasi-harmonic models, the local harmonic model of LeSar and co-workers, and verify that it is adequate for correction of the zero temperature J-integral expression for various deformation states for our Lennard-Jones test material. We show that this method has the properties of: consistency among the energy, stress and deformation fields; path independence of the contour integrals of the Eshelby stress; and excellent correlation with linear elastic fracture mechanics theory.

  15. A Temperature-Based Model for Estimating Monthly Average Daily Global Solar Radiation in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huashan; Cao, Fei; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS) method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model) against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China. PMID:24605046

  16. Exospheric Temperature Estimation and Atmospheric Loss: a Comparative Study of Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, S.

    2005-03-01

    The heating of the thermospheres and the formation of the ionospheres of terrestrial planets like Venus, Earth and Mars are mainly controlled by the solar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (0.1 - 100 nm). The current estimates of the Martian exosphere temperature (in the order of about 300-350 K) are based on hydrogen Lyman-alpha measurements. There is much evidence however, that these exospheric temperature estimates are too high. The reason for that comes mainly from to the fact that hot neutral hydrogen particles may have contaminated the neutral hydrogen. This study compares the ionospheric data obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with previous ionospheric data obtained by observations of former spacecraft missions. As the various data sets were obtained during different solar activity periods, it was planned to study the behavior of the dependence between the neutral temperature in the thermosphere obtained from a Chapman ionospheric profile near the ionospheric peak, and the solar 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7). The estimations of this investigation clearly show that the exospheric temperature of Mars does not exceed a value of about 240 K, which is confirmed by inferred data of the Mars Global Surveyor aerobraking experiment. These results were compared to known observations (measurements of ionospheric profiles, F10.7 flux, and neutral gas temperatures at the Exobase level) on Venus. Furthermore the importance of these temperature estimations for the escape of hydrogen from the planets atmosphere are investigated and calculated. This study provides important results in the field of comparative planetology as it helps to obtain a good estimation of the Martian Exobase temperature, which so far (in contrast to Venus) has not been directly measured. This study is performed in the framework of the Mars Express participation of the Institute for Geophysics Astronomy and Meteorology (IGAM) of the Karl-Franzens University Graz/Austria and the Space

  17. A Probabilistic Model for Estimating the Depth and Threshold Temperature of C-fiber Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Dezhdar, Tara; Moshourab, Rabih A.; Fründ, Ingo; Lewin, Gary R.; Schmuker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The subjective experience of thermal pain follows the detection and encoding of noxious stimuli by primary afferent neurons called nociceptors. However, nociceptor morphology has been hard to access and the mechanisms of signal transduction remain unresolved. In order to understand how heat transducers in nociceptors are activated in vivo, it is important to estimate the temperatures that directly activate the skin-embedded nociceptor membrane. Hence, the nociceptor’s temperature threshold must be estimated, which in turn will depend on the depth at which transduction happens in the skin. Since the temperature at the receptor cannot be accessed experimentally, such an estimation can currently only be achieved through modeling. However, the current state-of-the-art model to estimate temperature at the receptor suffers from the fact that it cannot account for the natural stochastic variability of neuronal responses. We improve this model using a probabilistic approach which accounts for uncertainties and potential noise in system. Using a data set of 24 C-fibers recorded in vitro, we show that, even without detailed knowledge of the bio-thermal properties of the system, the probabilistic model that we propose here is capable of providing estimates of threshold and depth in cases where the classical method fails. PMID:26638830

  18. A Probabilistic Model for Estimating the Depth and Threshold Temperature of C-fiber Nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhdar, Tara; Moshourab, Rabih A.; Fründ, Ingo; Lewin, Gary R.; Schmuker, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The subjective experience of thermal pain follows the detection and encoding of noxious stimuli by primary afferent neurons called nociceptors. However, nociceptor morphology has been hard to access and the mechanisms of signal transduction remain unresolved. In order to understand how heat transducers in nociceptors are activated in vivo, it is important to estimate the temperatures that directly activate the skin-embedded nociceptor membrane. Hence, the nociceptor’s temperature threshold must be estimated, which in turn will depend on the depth at which transduction happens in the skin. Since the temperature at the receptor cannot be accessed experimentally, such an estimation can currently only be achieved through modeling. However, the current state-of-the-art model to estimate temperature at the receptor suffers from the fact that it cannot account for the natural stochastic variability of neuronal responses. We improve this model using a probabilistic approach which accounts for uncertainties and potential noise in system. Using a data set of 24 C-fibers recorded in vitro, we show that, even without detailed knowledge of the bio-thermal properties of the system, the probabilistic model that we propose here is capable of providing estimates of threshold and depth in cases where the classical method fails.

  19. Estimation of Temperature Dependent Parameters of a Batch Alcoholic Fermentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, Rafael Ramos; Rivera, Elmer Ccopa; Costa, Aline C.; Atala, Daniel I. P.; Filho, Francisco Maugeri; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    In this work, a procedure was established to develop a mathematical model considering the effect of temperature on reaction kinetics. Experiments were performed in batch mode in temperatures from 30 to 38°C. The microorganism used was Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the culture media, sugarcane molasses. The objective is to assess the difficulty in updating the kinetic parameters when there are changes in fermentation conditions. We conclude that, although the re-estimation is a time-consuming task, it is possible to accurately describe the process when there are changes in raw material composition if a re-estimation of parameters is performed.

  20. Estimation of the refractive-index temperature structure parameter over the ocean.

    PubMed

    Friehe, C A

    1977-02-01

    The semiempirical equation of Wyngaard, Izumi, and Collins is combined with the bulk aerodynamic formulas to provide equations for the estimation of C(T)(2) (the refractive-index temperature structure parameter) in the atmospheric boundary layer above the sea. The equations relate C(T)(2) to easily measured quantities of average wind speed and air-sea temperature and moisture differences. Comparison with limited C(T)(2) data obtained in the marine boundary layer suggests that the estimation equations are satisfactory.

  1. Estimation of water diffusion coefficient into polycarbonate at different temperatures using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Mass transport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture and temperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, it is shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model.

  2. Estimation of firing temperature of some archaeological pottery shreds excavated recently in Tamilnadu, India.

    PubMed

    Velraj, G; Janaki, K; Musthafa, A Mohamed; Palanivel, R

    2009-05-01

    An attempt has been made in the present work to estimate the firing temperature of the archaeological pottery shreds excavated from the three archaeological sites namely Maligaimedu, Thiruverkadu and Palur in the state of Tamilnadu in INDIA. The lower limit of firing temperature of the Archaeological pottery shreds were estimated by refiring the samples to different temperatures and recording the corresponding FT-IR spectrum. The firing methods and conditions of firing were inferred from the characteristic absorption positions and the bands observed due to the presence of magnetite and hematite in the samples. In addition, the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis were carried out to study the internal morphology, vitrification factor and the upper limit of the firing temperature of the potteries fired at the time of manufacture.

  3. Estimation of firing temperature of some archaeological pottery shreds excavated recently in Tamilnadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velraj, G.; Janaki, K.; Musthafa, A. Mohamed; Palanivel, R.

    2009-05-01

    An attempt has been made in the present work to estimate the firing temperature of the archaeological pottery shreds excavated from the three archaeological sites namely Maligaimedu, Thiruverkadu and Palur in the state of Tamilnadu in INDIA. The lower limit of firing temperature of the Archaeological pottery shreds were estimated by refiring the samples to different temperatures and recording the corresponding FT-IR spectrum. The firing methods and conditions of firing were inferred from the characteristic absorption positions and the bands observed due to the presence of magnetite and hematite in the samples. In addition, the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis were carried out to study the internal morphology, vitrification factor and the upper limit of the firing temperature of the potteries fired at the time of manufacture.

  4. Development of practical multiband algorithms for estimating land-surface temperature from EOS/MODIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J.; Wan, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A practical multiband, hierarchical algorithm for estimating land-surface temperature from NASA's future Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is developed through comprehensive, accurate, radiative transfer simulations at moderate spectral steps of 1-5/cm for wide ranges of atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm will accept empirical or estimated information about the surface emissivity and reflectivity and the atmospheric temperature and water-vapor profiles. Ground-based and aircraft measurements are necessary to validate and improve the algorithm and to establish its quality. Its accuracy depends on the calibration accuracy of thermal infrared data, uncertainties in surface heterogeneity, and temperature-dependent atmospheric absorption coefficients. Better knowledge of land-surface spectral emissivities and more accurate coefficients for atmospheric molecular band absorption and water vapor continuum absorption are needed to develop global land-surface temperature algorithms accurate to 1-2 K.

  5. Re-estimating temperature-dependent consumption parameters in bioenergetics models for juvenile Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumb, John M.; Moffitt, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have cautioned against the borrowing of consumption and growth parameters from other species and life stages in bioenergetics growth models. In particular, the function that dictates temperature dependence in maximum consumption (Cmax) within the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha produces estimates that are lower than those measured in published laboratory feeding trials. We used published and unpublished data from laboratory feeding trials with subyearling Chinook Salmon from three stocks (Snake, Nechako, and Big Qualicum rivers) to estimate and adjust the model parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax. The data included growth measures in fish ranging from 1.5 to 7.2 g that were held at temperatures from 14°C to 26°C. Parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax were estimated based on relative differences in food consumption, and bootstrapping techniques were then used to estimate the error about the parameters. We found that at temperatures between 17°C and 25°C, the current parameter values did not match the observed data, indicating that Cmax should be shifted by about 4°C relative to the current implementation under the bioenergetics model. We conclude that the adjusted parameters for Cmax should produce more accurate predictions from the bioenergetics model for subyearling Chinook Salmon.

  6. Temperature and Relative Humidity Estimation and Prediction in the Tobacco Drying Process Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Víctor; Baladrón, Carlos; Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Ruiz-Ruiz, Gonzalo; Navas-Gracia, Luis M.; Aguiar, Javier M.; Carro, Belén

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a system based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for estimating and predicting environmental variables related to tobacco drying processes. This system has been validated with temperature and relative humidity data obtained from a real tobacco dryer with a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). A fitting ANN was used to estimate temperature and relative humidity in different locations inside the tobacco dryer and to predict them with different time horizons. An error under 2% can be achieved when estimating temperature as a function of temperature and relative humidity in other locations. Moreover, an error around 1.5 times lower than that obtained with an interpolation method can be achieved when predicting the temperature inside the tobacco mass as a function of its present and past values with time horizons over 150 minutes. These results show that the tobacco drying process can be improved taking into account the predicted future value of the monitored variables and the estimated actual value of other variables using a fitting ANN as proposed. PMID:23202032

  7. Estimating Long-Term Survival Temperatures at the Assemblage Level in the Marine Environment: Towards Macrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Joëlle; Morley, Simon Anthony; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Peck, Lloyd Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Defining ecologically relevant upper temperature limits of species is important in the context of environmental change. The approach used in the present paper estimates the relationship between rates of temperature change and upper temperature limits for survival in order to evaluate the maximum long-term survival temperature (Ts). This new approach integrates both the exposure time and the exposure temperature in the evaluation of temperature limits. Using data previously published for different temperate and Antarctic marine environments, we calculated Ts in each environment, which allowed us to calculate a new index: the Warming Allowance (WA). This index is defined as the maximum environmental temperature increase which an ectotherm in a given environment can tolerate, possibly with a decrease in performance but without endangering survival over seasonal or lifetime time-scales. It is calculated as the difference between maximum long-term survival temperature (Ts) and mean maximum habitat temperature. It provides a measure of how close a species, assemblage or fauna are living to their temperature limits for long-term survival and hence their vulnerability to environmental warming. In contrast to data for terrestrial environments showing that warming tolerance increases with latitude, results here for marine environments show a less clear pattern as the smallest WA value was for the Peru upwelling system. The method applied here, relating upper temperature limits to rate of experimental warming, has potential for wide application in the identification of faunas with little capacity to survive environmental warming. PMID:22509340

  8. Estimation of body temperature rhythm based on heart activity parameters in daily life.

    PubMed

    Sooyoung Sim; Heenam Yoon; Hosuk Ryou; Kwangsuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature contains valuable health related information such as circadian rhythm and menstruation cycle. Also, it was discovered from previous studies that body temperature rhythm in daily life is related with sleep disorders and cognitive performances. However, monitoring body temperature with existing devices during daily life is not easy because they are invasive, intrusive, or expensive. Therefore, the technology which can accurately and nonintrusively monitor body temperature is required. In this study, we developed body temperature estimation model based on heart rate and heart rate variability parameters. Although this work was inspired by previous research, we originally identified that the model can be applied to body temperature monitoring in daily life. Also, we could find out that normalized Mean heart rate (nMHR) and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability showed better performance than other parameters. Although we should validate the model with more number of subjects and consider additional algorithms to decrease the accumulated estimation error, we could verify the usefulness of this approach. Through this study, we expect that we would be able to monitor core body temperature and circadian rhythm from simple heart rate monitor. Then, we can obtain various health related information derived from daily body temperature rhythm.

  9. Combining thermal and visible imagery for estimating canopy temperature and identifying plant stress.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, Ilkka; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2004-06-01

    Thermal imaging is a potential tool for estimating plant temperature, which can be used as an indicator of stomatal closure and water deficit stress. In this study, a new method for processing and analysing thermal images was developed. By using remote sensing software, the information from thermal and visible images was combined, the images were classified to identify leaf area and sunlit and shaded parts of the canopy, and the temperature statistics for specific canopy components were calculated. The method was applied to data from a greenhouse water-stress experiment of Vicia faba L. and to field data for Vitis vinifera L. Vaseline-covered and water-sprayed plants were used as dry and wet references, respectively, and two thermal indices, based on temperature differences between the canopy and reference surfaces, were calculated for single Vicia faba plants. The thermal indices were compared with measured stomatal conductance. The temperature distributions of sunlit and shaded leaf area of Vitis vinifera canopies from natural rainfall and irrigation treatments were compared. The present method provides two major improvements compared with earlier methods for calculating thermal indices. First, it allows more accurate estimation of the indices, which are consequently more closely related to stomatal conductance. Second, it gives more accurate estimates of the temperature distribution of the shaded and sunlit parts of canopy, and, unlike the earlier methods, makes it possible to quantify the relationship between temperature variation and stomatal conductance.

  10. Analytical solution and computer program (FAST) to estimate fluid fluxes from subsurface temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Irvine, Dylan J.

    2016-02-01

    This study details the derivation and application of a new analytical solution to the one-dimensional, transient conduction-advection equation that is applied to trace vertical subsurface fluid fluxes. The solution employs a flexible initial condition that allows for nonlinear temperature-depth profiles, providing a key improvement over most previous solutions. The boundary condition is composed of any number of superimposed step changes in surface temperature, and thus it accommodates intermittent warming and cooling periods due to long-term changes in climate or land cover. The solution is verified using an established numerical model of coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. A new computer program FAST (Flexible Analytical Solution using Temperature) is also presented to facilitate the inversion of this analytical solution to estimate vertical groundwater flow. The program requires surface temperature history (which can be estimated from historic climate data), subsurface thermal properties, a present-day temperature-depth profile, and reasonable initial conditions. FAST is written in the Python computing language and can be run using a free graphical user interface. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution and FAST using measured subsurface temperature and climate data from the Sendia Plain, Japan. Results from these illustrative examples highlight the influence of the chosen initial and boundary conditions on estimated vertical flow rates.

  11. Streambed Temperatures and Heat Budget Estimates in Groundwater-fed Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, M.; Allen, D. M.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    A streambed temperature monitoring network was installed in a groundwater-fed stream in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia. A network of fifteen temperature loggers was installed in a short reach (<40 m) of Fishtrap Creek to characterize the spatial and temporal variability in streambed temperatures and identify potential mechanisms for localized cooling based on heat exchanges during the summer low flow period. This reach has uniform channel form and water depth, and consistent bed material. Streambed temperature data were collected hourly for the period of July 2008 through October 2012, spanning five summer low flow periods. Nearby climate, stream discharge, and groundwater monitoring stations provided the data to estimate the heat budget components. Over the five summer low flow periods, the network of dataloggers recorded a mean streambed temperature of 13.8oC, with a range of 10.2oC to 20.0oC across the streambed. In order to assess controls on streambed temperature at individual datalogger locations, the incoming heat from sources acting across the entire reach had to be removed from the observed temperature signals. The incoming heat was calculated for the air-water interface to estimate the energy flux into the reach using a heat balance. Incoming solar radiation dominates the heat balance, and evaporative heat fluxes were noticeable as small amplitude variations at a daily scale. Precipitation occurrence, or absence, was not an important component of the heat balance during the summer low flow period. Since incoming solar radiation dominates both air and water temperatures, air temperature (Ta) can be used as a proxy for streambed temperature (Ts). The actual lag time between the air and streambed temperature for this site was 30 hours; however, for the calculation of stream temperature at a daily time step, a lag of 24 hours was used. The relationship between daily streambed temperature and daily air temperature, at a lag of one day, was

  12. Quantitative estimates of tropical temperature change in lowland Central America during the last 42 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauel, Anna-Lena; Hodell, David A.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2016-03-01

    Determining the magnitude of tropical temperature change during the last glacial period is a fundamental problem in paleoclimate research. Large discrepancies exist in estimates of tropical cooling inferred from marine and terrestrial archives. Here we present a reconstruction of temperature for the last 42 ka from a lake sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala, located at 17°N in lowland Central America. We compared three independent methods of glacial temperature reconstruction: pollen-based temperature estimates, tandem measurements of δ18O in biogenic carbonate and gypsum hydration water, and clumped isotope thermometry. Pollen provides a near-continuous record of temperature change for most of the glacial period but the occurrence of a no-analog pollen assemblage during cold, dry stadials renders temperature estimates unreliable for these intervals. In contrast, the gypsum hydration and clumped isotope methods are limited mainly to the stadial periods when gypsum and biogenic carbonate co-occur. The combination of palynological and geochemical methods leads to a continuous record of tropical temperature change in lowland Central America over the last 42 ka. Furthermore, the gypsum hydration water method and clumped isotope thermometry provide independent estimates of not only temperature, but also the δ18O of lake water that is dependent on the hydrologic balance between evaporation and precipitation over the lake surface and its catchment. The results show that average glacial temperature was cooler in lowland Central America by 5-10 °C relative to the Holocene. The coldest and driest times occurred during North Atlantic stadial events, particularly Heinrich stadials (HSs), when temperature decreased by up to 6 to 10 °C relative to today. This magnitude of cooling is much greater than estimates derived from Caribbean marine records and model simulations. The extreme dry and cold conditions during HSs in the lowland Central America were associated

  13. A new estimate of the China temperature anomaly series and uncertainty assessment in 1900-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Xu, Chengdong; Hu, Maogui; Li, Qinxiang; Yan, Zhongwei; Zhao, Ping; Jones, Phil

    2014-01-01

    global warming during the last century has been well recognized, the magnitude of the climate warming in regions such as China over the past 100 years still has some uncertainty due to limited observations during the early years. Several series of temperature anomalies for the 20th century in China have been independently developed by different groups. The uncertainty arises mainly from the sparse observations before 1950, where statistics are sensitive to the small and potentially biased sample. In this study, BSHADE-MSN (Biased Sentinel Hospitals Areal Disease Estimation and Means of Stratified Nonhomogeneous Surface), a combination of two novel distinct statistical methods that are applicable with different sample situations to a spatial heterogeneous surface, is applied to estimate annual mean temperature anomalies for China. This method takes into account prior knowledge of geographical spatial autocorrelation and nonhomogeneity of target domains, remedies the biased sample, and maximizes an objective function for the best linear unbiased estimation (BLUE) of the regional mean quantity. For the period 1900-1999, the overall trend estimated by BSHADE-MSN is 0.80°C with a 95% confidential interval between 0.41°C and 1.18°C. This is significantly lower than that calculated by Climate Anomaly Method (CAM) and Block Kriging. The new temperature anomaly series for China exhibits slightly warmer conditions for the period before 1950 than existing studies. All the methods applied so far agree well with each other for the period after 1950, when there are sufficient stations across the country for the estimation of temperature anomaly series. Cross validation shows that the new regional mean temperature anomaly series has smaller estimation error variance and higher accuracy than those based on the other methods assessed in this study.

  14. A technique for optimal temperature estimation for modeling sunrise/sunset thermal snap disturbance torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, D. F.; Dennehy, C. J.; Welch, R. V.; Born, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    A predictive temperature estimation technique which can be used to drive a model of the Sunrise/Sunset thermal 'snap' disturbance torque experienced by low Earth orbiting spacecraft is described. The twice per orbit impulsive disturbance torque is attributed to vehicle passage in and out of the Earth's shadow cone (umbra), during which large flexible appendages undergo rapidly changing thermal conditions. Flexible members, in particular solar arrays, experience rapid cooling during umbra entrance (Sunset) and rapid heating during exit (Sunrise). The thermal 'snap' phenomena has been observed during normal on-orbit operations of both the LANDSAT-4 satellite and the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS). Thermal 'snap' has also been predicted to be a dominant source of error for the TOPEX satellite. The fundamental equations used to model the Sunrise/Sunset thermal 'snap' disturbance torque for a typical solar array like structure will be described. For this derivation the array is assumed to be a thin, cantilevered beam. The time varying thermal gradient is shown to be the driving force behind predicting the thermal 'snap' disturbance torque and therefore motivates the need for accurate estimates of temperature. The development of a technique to optimally estimate appendage surface temperature is highlighted. The objective analysis method used is structured on the Gauss-Markov Theorem and provides an optimal temperature estimate at a prescribed location given data from a distributed thermal sensor network. The optimally estimated surface temperatures could then be used to compute the thermal gradient across the body. The estimation technique is demonstrated using a typical satellite solar array.

  15. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  16. Steam-leak cost estimation using thermographically acquired pipe temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madding, Robert P.; MacNamara, Neal A.

    1997-04-01

    Predictive maintenance practitioners readily diagnose steam leaks through drain using infrared thermography, often supplemented with ultrasonic probe verification. Typically, a pipe carries the leaking steam to a flash tank or directly to the condenser. Thus, the energy used to create the steam is what is lost, not the steam itself. However, the cost of steam production is not inexpensive. We have found steam leaks we estimate cost $30 K/year. As a part of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Boiler, Condenser and Steam Cycle Applications Project, the EPRI M&D (Monitoring & Diagnostic) Centers have begun acquiring steam leak data at several electric utilities. Estimates of steam leak costs are key to evaluating cost savings and recommendation of corrective action, but are hampered by lack of knowledge of the steam flow in the line. These lines are usually not instrumented because typically there is no flow. Consequently, we must derive an indirect method of estimating steam flow. This can be done for uninsulated pipes given knowledge of the pipe surface temperature gradient over a known distance. For single phase conditions, the mass flow of steam equals the heat lost from a length of pipe divided by the temperature drop along the length and the heat capacity of the steam. Pipe heat loss is calculated knowing the pipe diameter, pipe surface temperature, ambient air temperature and using American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) tabulated values. The temperatures are derived from thermographic data. Distances can also be derived from thermal imaging radiometer data, depending on the type of system employed. To facilitate calculation of steam leak cost estimates, we have developed a Microsoft ExcelTM spreadsheet macro. The user can interface directly with the spreadsheet, entering appropriate temperatures, distances, pipe diameter, heat rate, cost of power, etc. Or, the analyst can use thermal imaging radiometer

  17. Nonlinear regression method for estimating neutral wind and temperature from Fabry-Perot interferometer data.

    PubMed

    Harding, Brian J; Gehrels, Thomas W; Makela, Jonathan J

    2014-02-01

    The Earth's thermosphere plays a critical role in driving electrodynamic processes in the ionosphere and in transferring solar energy to the atmosphere, yet measurements of thermospheric state parameters, such as wind and temperature, are sparse. One of the most popular techniques for measuring these parameters is to use a Fabry-Perot interferometer to monitor the Doppler width and breadth of naturally occurring airglow emissions in the thermosphere. In this work, we present a technique for estimating upper-atmospheric winds and temperatures from images of Fabry-Perot fringes captured by a CCD detector. We estimate instrument parameters from fringe patterns of a frequency-stabilized laser, and we use these parameters to estimate winds and temperatures from airglow fringe patterns. A unique feature of this technique is the model used for the laser and airglow fringe patterns, which fits all fringes simultaneously and attempts to model the effects of optical defects. This technique yields accurate estimates for winds, temperatures, and the associated uncertainties in these parameters, as we show with a Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:24514183

  18. Estimation of the biphasic property in a female's menstrual cycle from cutaneous temperature measured during sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxi; Kitazawa, Masumi; Togawa, Tatsuo

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes a method to estimate a woman's menstrual cycle based on the hidden Markov model (HMM). A tiny device was developed that attaches around the abdominal region to measure cutaneous temperature at 10-min intervals during sleep. The measured temperature data were encoded as a two-dimensional image (QR code, i.e., quick response code) and displayed in the LCD window of the device. A mobile phone captured the QR code image, decoded the information and transmitted the data to a database server. The collected data were analyzed by three steps to estimate the biphasic temperature property in a menstrual cycle. The key step was an HMM-based step between preprocessing and postprocessing. A discrete Markov model, with two hidden phases, was assumed to represent higher- and lower-temperature phases during a menstrual cycle. The proposed method was verified by the data collected from 30 female participants, aged from 14 to 46, over six consecutive months. By comparing the estimated results with individual records from the participants, 71.6% of 190 menstrual cycles were correctly estimated. The sensitivity and positive predictability were 91.8 and 96.6%, respectively. This objective evaluation provides a promising approach for managing premenstrual syndrome and birth control. PMID:19551509

  19. Nonlinear regression method for estimating neutral wind and temperature from Fabry-Perot interferometer data.

    PubMed

    Harding, Brian J; Gehrels, Thomas W; Makela, Jonathan J

    2014-02-01

    The Earth's thermosphere plays a critical role in driving electrodynamic processes in the ionosphere and in transferring solar energy to the atmosphere, yet measurements of thermospheric state parameters, such as wind and temperature, are sparse. One of the most popular techniques for measuring these parameters is to use a Fabry-Perot interferometer to monitor the Doppler width and breadth of naturally occurring airglow emissions in the thermosphere. In this work, we present a technique for estimating upper-atmospheric winds and temperatures from images of Fabry-Perot fringes captured by a CCD detector. We estimate instrument parameters from fringe patterns of a frequency-stabilized laser, and we use these parameters to estimate winds and temperatures from airglow fringe patterns. A unique feature of this technique is the model used for the laser and airglow fringe patterns, which fits all fringes simultaneously and attempts to model the effects of optical defects. This technique yields accurate estimates for winds, temperatures, and the associated uncertainties in these parameters, as we show with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  20. Estimating cutting front temperature difference in disk and CO2 laser beam fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, L. D.; Tricarico, L.

    2012-07-01

    A three-dimensional, semi-stationary, simplified thermal numerical model was developed. The average cutting front temperature difference in disk and CO2 laser beam fusion cutting of 90MnCrV8 was estimated by computing the conductive power loss. Basing on heat affected zone extension experimentally measured and using an inverse methodology approach, the unknown thermal load on the cutting front during laser cutting was calculated. The accuracy of the numerical power loss estimation was evaluated comparing the results from simulation with the ones from analytical models. A good agreement was found for all the test cases considered in this study. The conduction losses estimation was used for justifying the lower quality of disk laser cuts due to the lower average cut front temperature. This results in the increase of viscosity of molten material and in the subsequent more difficult ejection of the melted material from the cut kerf.

  1. Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, V.T.

    1980-12-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

  2. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  3. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  4. Regional Stream Temperature Estimation Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Images From Terra - ASTER And Ground Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveh, N.; Cherkauer, K. A.; Burges, S. J.; Kay, J. E.; Handcock, R. N.; Gillespie, A.; Booth, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    Stream temperature is a significant water quality concern in the Pacific Northwest, where warm water can be lethal for indigenous fish species and cold water refugia are essential for the survival of threatened and endangered salmon. This necessitates regional-scale assessments of water temperature for compliance monitoring. These assessments have, however, been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time using submerged temperature-recording sensors. In the Puget Sound region, for example, the State of Washington relied on periodic data collected at 76 stations to assess water quality conditions for 12,721 km of streams and rivers (i.e., one station for 167 km of stream). We are evaluating the utility of remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) and visible images of streams and stream corridors for increasing the data coverage for stream temperature analysis and assessment. If stream temperatures can be estimated from images with known and acceptable levels of confidence, then regional temperature assessments will be less sensitive to the uncertainty associated with sampling temperature at a relatively small number of ground stations. Stream temperatures, energy and water fluxes are monitored to evaluate their significance to the stream energy balance using a ground-based network of temperature data loggers, stream gauging stations, and meteorological observations. Radiant ("skin") temperatures of streams and rivers are recorded with point measurements to evaluate the relationship between the kinetic and the "skin" temperature of the water in various conditions. TIR images from Terra - ASTER of parts of the Green River basin, Washington State, are processed and analyzed to obtain spatially extensive "skin" water temperature, and to identify the types of stream that are amenable to satellite thermal infrared remote temperature monitoring.

  5. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  6. Estimating streambed travel times and respiration rates based on temperature and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen consumption is a common proxy for aerobic respiration and novel in situ measurement techniques with high spatial resolution enable an accurate determination of the oxygen distribution in the streambed. The oxygen concentration at a certain location in the streambed depends on the input concentration, the respiration rate, temperature, and the travel time of the infiltrating flowpath. While oxygen concentrations and temperature can directly be measured, respiration rate and travel time must be estimated from the data. We investigated the interplay of these factors using a 6 month long, 5-min resolution dataset collected in a 3rdorder gravel-bed stream. Our objective was twofold, to determine transient rates of hyporheic respiration and to estimate travel times in the streambed based solely on oxygen and temperature measurements. Our results show that temperature and travel time explains ~70% of the variation in oxygen concentration in the streambed. Independent travel times were obtained using natural variations in the electrical conductivity (EC) of the stream water as tracer (µ=4.1 h; σ=2.3 h). By combining these travel times with the oxygen consumption, we calculated a first order respiration rate (µ=9.7 d-1; σ=6.1 d-1). Variations in the calculated respiration rate are largely explained by variations in streambed temperature. An empirical relationship between our respiration rate and temperature agrees with the theoretical Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation. With this relationship, a temperature-based respiration rate can be estimated and used to re-estimate subsurface travel times. The resulting travel times distinctively resemble the EC-derived travel times (R20.47; Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 0.32). Both calculations of travel time are correlated to stream water levels and increase during discharge events, enhancing the oxygen consumption for these periods. No other physical factors besides temperature were significantly correlated with the respiration

  7. Estimating resting metabolic rate by biologging core and subcutaneous temperature in a mammal.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G; Hetem, Robyn S; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan; Rouanet, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-01

    Tri-axial accelerometry has been used to continuously and remotely assess field metabolic rates in free-living endotherms. However, in cold environments, the use of accelerometry may underestimate resting metabolic rate because cold-induced stimulation of metabolic rate causes no measurable acceleration. To overcome this problem, we investigated if logging the difference between core and subcutaneous temperatures (ΔTc-s) could reveal the metabolic costs associated with cold exposure. Using implanted temperature data loggers, we recorded core and subcutaneous temperatures continuously in eight captive rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and concurrently measured their resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, at ambient temperatures ranging from -7 to +25°C. ΔTc-s showed no circadian fluctuations in warm (+23°C) or cold (+5°C) environments implying that the ΔTc-s was not affected by an endogenous circadian rhythm in our laboratory conditions. ΔTc-s correlated well with resting metabolic rate (R(2)=0.77) across all ambient temperatures except above the upper limit of the thermoneutral zone (+25°C). Determining ΔTc-s could therefore provide a complementary approach for better estimating resting metabolic rate of animals within and below their thermoneutral zone. Combining data from accelerometers with such measures of body temperature could improve estimates of the overall field metabolic rate of free-living endotherms.

  8. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    temperature estimation using meteorological parameters. References: [1] Skoplaki, E. et al., 2008: A simple correlation for the operating temperature of photovoltaic modules of arbitrary mounting, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92, 1393-1402 [2] Skoplaki, E. et al., 2008: Operating temperature of photovoltaic modules: A survey of pertinent correlations, Renewable Energy 34, 23-29 [3] Koehl, M. et al., 2011: Modeling of the nominal operating cell temperature based on outdoor weathering, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 95, 1638-1646 [4] Mattei, M. et al., 2005: Calculation of the polycrystalline PV module temperature using a simple method of energy balance, Renewable Energy 31, 553-567 [5] Kurtz, S. et al.: Evaluation of high-temperature exposure of rack-mounted photovoltaic modules

  9. Model-based estimation of adiabatic flame temperature during coal gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigul, Ihsan Mert

    Coal gasification temperature distribution in the gasifier is one of the important issues. High temperature may increase the risk of corrosion of the gasifier wall or it may cause an increase in the amount of volatile compounds. At the same time, gasification temperature is a dominant factor for high conversion of products and completing the reactions during coal gasification in a short time. In the light of this information it can be said that temperature is one of key parameters of coal gasification to enhance the production of high heating value syngas and maximize refractory longevity. This study aims to predict the adiabatic flame temperatures of Australian bituminous coal and Indonesian roto coal in an entrained flow gasifier using different operating conditions with the ChemCAD simulation and design program. To achieve these objectives, two types of gasification parameters were carried out using simulation of a vertical entrained flow reactor: oxygen-to-coal feed ratio by kg/kg and pressure and steam-to-coal feed ratio by kg/kg and pressure. In the first part of study the adiabatic flame temperatures, coal gasification products and other coal characteristics of two types of coals were determined using ChemCAD software. During all simulations, coal feed rate, coal particle size, initial temperature of coal, water and oxygen were kept constant. The relationships between flame temperature, coal gasification products and operating parameters were fundamentally investigated. The second part of this study addresses the modeling of the flame temperature relation to methane production and other input parameters used previous chapter. The scope of this work was to establish a reasonable model in order to estimate flame temperature without any theoretical calculation. Finally, sensitivity analysis was performed after getting some basic correlations between temperature and input variables. According to the results, oxygen-to-coal feed ratio has the most influential

  10. Exploiting the structure of MWR-derived temperature profile for stable boundary-layer height estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2015-10-01

    A method for the estimation of Stable Boundary Layer Height (SBLH) using curvature of the potential temperature profiles retrieved by a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is presented. The vertical resolution of the MWR-derived temperature profile decreases with the height. A spline interpolation is carried-out to obtain a uniformly discretized temperature profile. The curvature parameter is calculated from the first and second order derivatives of the interpolated potential temperature profile. The first minima of the curvature parameter signifies the point where the temperature profile starts changing from the stable to the residual conditions. The performance of the method is analyzed by comparing it against physically idealized models of the stable boundary-layer temperature profile available in the literature. There are five models which include stable-mixed, mixed-linear, linear, polynomial and exponential. For a given temperature profile these five models are fitted using the non-linear least-squares approach. The best fitting model is chosen as the one which fits with the minimum root-mean-square error. Comparison of the SBLH estimates from curvature-based method with the physically idealized models shows that the method works qualitatively and quantitatively well with lower variation. Potential application of this approach is the situation where given temperature profiles are significantly deviant from the idealized models. The method is applied to data from a Humidity-and-Temperature Profiler (HATPRO) MWR collected during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany. Radiosonde data, whenever available, is used as the ground-truth.

  11. Fundamental limitations of noninvasive temperature imaging by means of ultrasound echo strain estimation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Naomi R; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Meaney, Paul M

    2002-10-01

    Ultrasonic estimation of temperature-induced echo strain has been suggested as a means of predicting the location of thermal lesions formed by focused ultrasound (US) surgery before treatment. Preliminary investigations of this technique have produced optimistic results because they were carried out with rubber phantoms and used room temperature, rather than body temperature, as the baseline. The objective of the present study was to determine, through modelling, the likely feasibility of using ultrasonic temperature imaging to detect and localise the focal region of the heating beam for a medium with a realistic temperature-dependence of sound speed subjected to a realistic temperature rise. We determined the minimum ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to visualise the heated region for liver of varying fat content. Due to the small (0.5%) change in sound speed at the focus, the threshold SNR for normal liver (low fat content) was found to be at least 20 dB. This implies that temperature imaging in this tissue type will only be feasible if the effects of electronic noise can be minimised and if other sources of noise, such as cardiac-induced motion, do not substantially reduce the visibility of the focal region. For liver of intermediate fat content, the heated region could not be visualised even when the echo data were noise-free. Tissues with a very high fat content are likely to represent the most favourable conditions for ultrasonic temperature imaging. PMID:12467859

  12. Fundamental limitations of noninvasive temperature imaging by means of ultrasound echo strain estimation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Naomi R; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Meaney, Paul M

    2002-10-01

    Ultrasonic estimation of temperature-induced echo strain has been suggested as a means of predicting the location of thermal lesions formed by focused ultrasound (US) surgery before treatment. Preliminary investigations of this technique have produced optimistic results because they were carried out with rubber phantoms and used room temperature, rather than body temperature, as the baseline. The objective of the present study was to determine, through modelling, the likely feasibility of using ultrasonic temperature imaging to detect and localise the focal region of the heating beam for a medium with a realistic temperature-dependence of sound speed subjected to a realistic temperature rise. We determined the minimum ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to visualise the heated region for liver of varying fat content. Due to the small (0.5%) change in sound speed at the focus, the threshold SNR for normal liver (low fat content) was found to be at least 20 dB. This implies that temperature imaging in this tissue type will only be feasible if the effects of electronic noise can be minimised and if other sources of noise, such as cardiac-induced motion, do not substantially reduce the visibility of the focal region. For liver of intermediate fat content, the heated region could not be visualised even when the echo data were noise-free. Tissues with a very high fat content are likely to represent the most favourable conditions for ultrasonic temperature imaging.

  13. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation using soft computing methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Danesh, Amir Seyed; Abdullah, Mohd Shahidan; Zamani, Mazdak

    2016-07-01

    Precise knowledge of solar radiation is indeed essential in different technological and scientific applications of solar energy. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation would be appealing owing to broad availability of measured air temperatures. In this study, the potentials of soft computing techniques are evaluated to estimate daily horizontal global solar radiation (DHGSR) from measured maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures ( T max, T min, and T avg) in an Iranian city. For this purpose, a comparative evaluation between three methodologies of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), radial basis function support vector regression (SVR-rbf), and polynomial basis function support vector regression (SVR-poly) is performed. Five combinations of T max, T min, and T avg are served as inputs to develop ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models. The attained results show that all ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models provide favorable accuracy. Based upon all techniques, the higher accuracies are achieved by models (5) using T max- T min and T max as inputs. According to the statistical results, SVR-rbf outperforms SVR-poly and ANFIS. For SVR-rbf (5), the mean absolute bias error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient are 1.1931 MJ/m2, 2.0716 MJ/m2, and 0.9380, respectively. The survey results approve that SVR-rbf can be used efficiently to estimate DHGSR from air temperatures.

  14. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual.

  15. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual. PMID:26346020

  16. Temperature-based approaches for estimating monthly reference evapotranspiration based on MODIS data over North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X.; Zhu, Jiaojun

    2015-08-01

    Reference evapotranspiration (ETo) maps play an important role in distributed hydrological modeling and are particularly useful for regional agricultural and water resource management. In the Three-North Shelter Forest Program, water requirements (i.e., ETo) of different land use types are important preconditions for afforestation program management. The Food and Agriculture Organization Penman-Monteith (FAO-PM) method is the most common method for estimating ETo, but it requires many different types of meteorological data, and few stations with adequate meteorological resources exist in the Three-North regions. In addition, the spatial distribution of ordinary meteorological stations is limited. This study employed two temperature-based ETo methods, Hargreaves and Thornthwaite. The monthly mean, maximum, and minimum air temperatures were estimated using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The original coefficients of Hargreaves and mean temperatures of Thornthwaite were modified for regional calibration (with the FAO-PM method as the standard). In the comparison between the original/adjusted Hargreaves and the original/adjusted Thornthwaite methods, the adjusted Hargreaves method was appropriate for estimating ETo in the Three-North regions. The average mean bias error (MBE) was -0.21 mm, the relatively root mean square error (RRMSE) was 13.44 %, the correlation coefficient ( R 2) was 0.85, and the slope ( b) was 1.00 for the monthly ETo. While the MBE was 2.32 mm, the RRMSE was 7.07 %, the R 2 was 0.90, and the b was 1.00 for the annual ETo. Therefore, it is possible to estimate monthly and annual ETo values for other parts of the country or the world using adjusted Hargreaves with the estimated air temperature data instead of using the FAO-PM with observed data.

  17. Comparison of ET estimations by the three-temperature model, SEBAL model and eddy covariance observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinyao; Bi, Shaojie; Yang, Yonghui; Tian, Fei; Ren, Dandan

    2014-11-01

    The three-temperature (3T) model is a simple model which estimates plant transpiration from only temperature data. In-situ field experimental results have shown that 3T is a reliable evapotranspiration (ET) estimation model. Despite encouraging results from recent efforts extending the 3T model to remote sensing applications, literature shows limited comparisons of the 3T model with other remote sensing driven ET models. This research used ET obtained from eddy covariance to evaluate the 3T model and in turn compared the model-simulated ET with that of the more traditional SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land) model. A field experiment was conducted in the cotton fields of Taklamakan desert oasis in Xinjiang, Northwest China. Radiation and surface temperature were obtained from hyperspectral and thermal infrared images for clear days in 2013. The images covered the time period of 0900-1800 h at four different phenological stages of cotton. Meteorological data were automatically recorded in a station located at the center of the cotton field. Results showed that the 3T model accurately captured daily and seasonal variations in ET. As low dry soil surface temperatures induced significant errors in the 3T model, it was unsuitable for estimating ET in the early morning and late afternoon periods. The model-simulated ET was relatively more accurate for squaring, bolling and boll-opening stages than for seedling stage of cotton during when ET was generally low. Wind speed was apparently not a limiting factor of ET in the 3T model. This was attributed to the fact that surface temperature, a vital input of the model, indirectly accounted for the effect of wind speed on ET. Although the 3T model slightly overestimated ET compared with SEBAL and eddy covariance, it was generally reliable for estimating daytime ET during 0900-1600 h.

  18. HMM-based estimation of menstrual cycle from skin temperature during sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxi; Kitazawa, Masumi; Togawa, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    An HMM-based method is proposed to estimate biphasic property in female menstrual cycle. A tiny device is developed to measure skin temperature change during sleep. Data are collected from 30 female participants for 6 months. Raw data are preprocessed to remove obvious outliers and clamped between 34 and 42 degree Celsius. A two hidden states HMM-based algorithm was applied to estimate the biphasic property in menstrual cycle. The results showed that the number of correctly detected menstrual cycle is 159 among 173 in 30 participants during 6 months. Overall sensitivity reaches 92.0%. PMID:19162990

  19. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  20. Estimation of some thermoelastic properties of boron suboxide in wide ranges of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagareishvili, D. Sh.; Tushishvili, M. Ch.; Tsagareishvili, G. V.

    1991-07-01

    Approximate values of the thermal coefficient of volume expansion, the volume, the Young's and shear elastic moduli, the elastic bulk modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the Grüneisen, the Anderson-Grüneisen and the Murnaghan thermoelastic parameters, the average sound velocity, and the Debye temperature in 0-1500 K temperature range have been estimated based on the available in the literature limited experimental data on some thermal and elastic properties of boron suboxide and using known or the methods of calculation carried out by the authors.

  1. Diode Temperature Sensor Curve Estimation and Interchangeability for Non-Standard Excitation Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. S.; Yeager, C. J.; Krause, J. K.

    2006-04-01

    Diode temperature sensors' wide temperature range and interchangeability to a standard curve has led to their widespread use in the cryogenic industry. The standard curve for a given model is generated from the calibration of hundreds of diodes from that specific model lot. This is an expensive process and is usually carried out for only one excitation current, typically 10 μA, chosen as a trade off between self-heating at lower temperature and signal-to-noise ratio. There are many applications, however, where either the temperature range is limited or a higher signal-to-noise ratio is desired. It's useful in these cases to use a larger excitation current. Given the non-linear diode I-V characteristics, the results for the diode response and interchangeability at the standard curve cannot be arbitrarily generalized to other excitation currents. This research examined eleven diode Lake Shore Cryotronics model DT-670-SD temperature sensors. Calibration data for these devices were taken at twenty temperatures ranging from 2 K to 325 K and at seven excitation currents ranging from 1 μA to 1 mA. These data were analyzed to determine the effect of excitation current on the interchangeability as a function of temperature. A method for estimating the standard curve at nonstandard excitation currents is presented.

  2. A statistical model for estimating stream temperatures in the Salmon and Clearwater River basins, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, Mary M.

    2002-01-01

    A water-quality standard for temperature is critical for the protection of threatened and endangered salmonids, which need cold, clean water to sustain life. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality has established temperature standards to protect salmonids, yet little is known about the normal range of temperatures of most Idaho streams. A single temperature standard for all streams does not take into account the natural temperature variation of streams or the existence of naturally warm waters. To address these issues and to help the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality revise the existing State temperature standards for aquatic life, temperature data from more than 200 streams and rivers in the salmon and Clearwater River Basins were collected. From these data, a statistical model was developed for estimating stream temperatures on the basis of subbasin and site characteristics and climatic factors. Stream temperatures were monitored hourly for approximately 58 days during July, August, and September 2000 at relatively undisturbed sites in subbasins in the Salmon and Clearwater River Basins in central Idaho. The monitored subbasins vary widely in size, elevation, drainage area, vegetation cover, and other characteristics. The resulting data were analyzed for statistical correlations with subbasin and site characteristics to establish the most important factors affecting stream temperature. Maximum daily average stream temperatures were strongly correlated with elevation and total upstream drainage area; weaker correlations were noted with stream depth and width and aver-age subbasin slope. Stream temperatures also were correlated with certain types of vegetation cover, but these variables were not significant in the final model. The model takes into account seasonal temperature fluctuations, site elevation, total drainage area, average subbasin slope, and the deviation of daily average air temperature from a 30-year normal daily average air temperature

  3. A one-term extrapolation method for estimating equilibrium constants of aqueous reactions at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Gammons, C. H.; Bloom, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    A one-term method for extrapolating equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions is proposed which is based on the observation that the change in free energy of a well-balanced isocoulombic reaction is nearly independent of temperature. The current practice in extrapolating log K values for isocoulombic reactions is to omit the ΔCp term but include a ΔS term (i.e., the two-term extrapolation equation of LINDSAY, 1980). However, we observe that the ΔCp and ΔS terms for many isocoulombic reactions are not only small, but are often opposite in sign, and therefore tend to cancel one another. Thus, inclusion of an entropy term often yields estimates which are less accurate than omission of both terms. The one-term extrapolation technique is tested with literature data for a large number of isocoulombic reactions involving ion-ligand exchange, cation hydrolysis, acid-base neutralization, redox, and selected reactions involving solids. In most cases the extrapolated values are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements, especially at higher temperatures where they are often more accurate than those obtained using the two-term equation of LINDSAY (1980). The results are also comparable to estimates obtained using the modified HKF model of TANGER and HELGESON (1988) and the density model of ANDERSON et al. (1991). It is also found to produce reasonable estimates for isocoulombic reactions at elevated pressure (up to P = 2 kb) and ionic strength (up to I = 1.0). The principal advantage of the one-term method is that accurate estimates of high temperature equilibrium constants may be obtained using only free energy data for the reaction of interest at one reference temperature. The principal disadvantage is that the accuracies of the estimates are somewhat dependent on the model reaction selected to balance the isocoulombic reaction. Satisfactory results are obtained for reactions that have minimal energetic, electrostatic, structural, and volumetric

  4. Using Microwave Observations to Estimate Land Surface Temperature during Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and passive microwave observations (MW). TIR is the most commonly used approach and the method of choice to provide standard LST products for various satellite missions. MW-based LST retrievals on the other hand are not as widely adopted for land applications; currently their principle use is in soil moisture retrieval algorithms. MW and TIR technologies present two highly complementary and independent means of measuring LST. MW observations have a high tolerance to clouds but a low spatial resolution, and TIR has a high spatial resolution with temporal sampling restricted to clear skies. The nature of the temperature at the very surface layer of the land makes it difficult to combine temperature estimates between different methods. The skin temperature is characterized by a strong diurnal cycle that is dependant in timing and amplitude on the exact sensing depth and thermal properties of the vegetation. This paper builds on recent progress in characterizing the main structural components of the DTC that explain differences in TIR and MW estimates of LST. Spatial patterns in DTC timing (phase lag with solar noon) and DTC amplitude have been calculated for TIR, MW and compared to weather prediction estimates. Based on these comparisons MW LST can be matched to the TIR record. This paper will compare in situ measurements of LST with satellite estimates from (downscaled) TIR and (reconciled) MW products. By contrasting the validation results of clear sky days with those of cloudy days the expected tolerance to clouds of the MW observations will be tested. The goal of this study is to determine the weather conditions in which MW can supplement the TIR LST record.

  5. Estimation of daily minimum land surface air temperature using MODIS data in southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didari, Shohreh; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Zand-Parsa, Shahrokh; Khanbilvardi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Land surface air temperature (LSAT) is a key variable in agricultural, climatological, hydrological, and environmental studies. Many of their processes are affected by LSAT at about 5 cm from the ground surface (LSAT5cm). Most of the previous studies tried to find statistical models to estimate LSAT at 2 m height (LSAT2m) which is considered as a standardized height, and there is not enough study for LSAT5cm estimation models. Accurate measurements of LSAT5cm are generally acquired from meteorological stations, which are sparse in remote areas. Nonetheless, remote sensing data by providing rather extensive spatial coverage can complement the spatiotemporal shortcomings of meteorological stations. The main objective of this study was to find a statistical model from the previous day to accurately estimate spatial daily minimum LSAT5cm, which is very important in agricultural frost, in Fars province in southern Iran. Land surface temperature (LST) data were obtained using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua and Terra satellites at daytime and nighttime periods with normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. These data along with geometric temperature and elevation information were used in a stepwise linear model to estimate minimum LSAT5cm during 2003-2011. The results revealed that utilization of MODIS Aqua nighttime data of previous day provides the most applicable and accurate model. According to the validation results, the accuracy of the proposed model was suitable during 2012 (root mean square difference (RMSD) = 3.07 °C, {R}_{adj}^2 = 87 %). The model underestimated (overestimated) high (low) minimum LSAT5cm. The accuracy of estimation in the winter time was found to be lower than the other seasons (RMSD = 3.55 °C), and in summer and winter, the errors were larger than in the remaining seasons.

  6. Reevaluation of conflicting Eocene tropical temperature estimates: Molluskan oxygen isotope evidence for warm low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Takuro; Grossman, Ethan L.; Yancey, Thomas E.; Dockery, David T., III

    2001-11-01

    Oxygen isotope data from planktonic foraminifera for the warm Eocene epoch suggest that tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) may have been cooler than at present. Such data have stimulated various explanations involving, e.g., major changes in ocean heat transport. However, the planktonic data disagree with terrestrial climate proxies, which suggest significantly warmer low-latitude temperatures. We examined this discrepancy by analyzing seasonal oxygen isotope variations in shallow-marine mollusks from the Mississippi Embayment. Results indicate that mean annual SSTs decreased from 26 27 °C in the early Eocene to 22 23 °C in the Oligocene, agreeing well with temperatures inferred from terrestrial climate proxies. These cooling trends, with more significant winter cooling (5 °C) than summer cooling (3 °C), are consistent with the predicted consequences of decreasing atmospheric CO2 concentration through the Paleogene, suggesting that atmospheric CO2 change was a major controlling factor for Paleogene climate change. That winter SST estimates from the mollusks agree well with the foraminiferal SST estimates suggests that planktonic foraminiferal growth in low latitudes occurred mainly during the cooler winter months throughout the Eocene. We hypothesize that the unusual hydrography of Eocene oceans shifted foraminiferal productivity primarily to winter, biasing foraminiferal SST estimates of mean annual SSTs.

  7. A basin-scale approach to estimating stream temperatures of tributaries to the lower Klamath River, California.

    PubMed

    Flint, Lorraine E; Flint, Alan L

    2008-01-01

    Stream temperature is an important component of salmonid habitat and is often above levels suitable for fish survival in the Lower Klamath River in northern California. The objective of this study was to provide boundary conditions for models that are assessing stream temperature on the main stem for the purpose of developing strategies to manage stream conditions using Total Maximum Daily Loads. For model input, hourly stream temperatures for 36 tributaries were estimated for 1 Jan. 2001 through 31 Oct. 2004. A basin-scale approach incorporating spatially distributed energy balance data was used to estimate the stream temperatures with measured air temperature and relative humidity data and simulated solar radiation, including topographic shading and corrections for cloudiness. Regression models were developed on the basis of available stream temperature data to predict temperatures for unmeasured periods of time and for unmeasured streams. The most significant factor in matching measured minimum and maximum stream temperatures was the seasonality of the estimate. Adding minimum and maximum air temperature to the regression model improved the estimate, and air temperature data over the region are available and easily distributed spatially. The addition of simulated solar radiation and vapor saturation deficit to the regression model significantly improved predictions of maximum stream temperature but was not required to predict minimum stream temperature. The average SE in estimated maximum daily stream temperature for the individual basins was 0.9 +/- 0.6 degrees C at the 95% confidence interval.

  8. Artificial neural network based microwave precipitation estimation using scattering index and polarization corrected temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, C.; Prakash, Satya; Sathiyamoorthy, V.; Gairola, R. M.

    2011-11-01

    An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based technique is proposed for estimating precipitation over Indian land and oceanic regions [30° S - 40° N and 30° E - 120° E] using Scattering Index (SI) and Polarization Corrected Temperature (PCT) derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements. This rainfall retrieval algorithm is designed to estimate rainfall using a combination of SSM/I and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements. For training the ANN, SI and PCT (which signify rain signatures in a better way) calculated from SSM/I brightness temperature are considered as inputs and Precipitation Radar (PR) rain rate as output. SI is computed using 19.35 GHz, 22.235 GHz and 85.5 GHz Vertical channels and PCT is computed using 85.5 GHz Vertical and Horizontal channels. Once the training is completed, the independent data sets (which were not included in the training) were used to test the performance of the network. Instantaneous precipitation estimates with independent test data sets are validated with PR surface rain rate measurements. The results are compared with precipitation estimated using power law based (i) global algorithm and (ii) regional algorithm. Overall results show that ANN based present algorithm shows better agreement with PR rain rate. This study is aimed at developing a more accurate operational rainfall retrieval algorithm for Indo-French Megha-Tropiques Microwave Analysis and Detection of Rain and Atmospheric Structures (MADRAS) radiometer.

  9. Estimation of the radius of a star based on its effective temperature and surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Amethod for determining the radius of a star using its effective temperature and surface gravity is proposed. The method assumes that the relationship between the radius, effective temperature, and surface gravity can be approximated using models for the internal structure and evolution of the star. The method is illustrated using the Geneva-Toulouse evolutionary computations for two metal abundances—solar and one-tenth of solar. Analysis of the systematic errors shows that the accuracy of the method is better than 10% over most part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and is about 5% for main-sequence stars. The maximum relative systematic error due to the simplifications underlying the method is about 15%. A test using eclipsing binaries confirms the viability of the proposed method for estimating stellar radii. In the region of the main sequence, systematic deviations do not exceed 2%, and the relative standard deviation is ≤4.7%. It is expected that th maximum relative error over the rest of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram will likewise be close to the systematic error, about 15-20%. The method is applied to estimate the radii of model stellar atmospheres. Such estimates can be used to synthesize the color index and luminosity of a star. The method can be used whenever accuracies of about 10% in the estimated stellar radius and luminosity are acceptable.

  10. Estimation of temperature impact on gamma-induced degradation parameters of N-channel MOS transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2015-03-01

    The physical parameters of MOS transistors can be impressed by ionizing radiation and that leads to circuit degradation and failure. These effects require analyzing the basic mechanism that results in the buildup of induced defect in radiation environments. The reliable estimation also needs to consider external factors, particularly temperature fluctuations. I-V characteristic of the device was obtained using a temperature-dependent adapted form of charge-sheet model under heating cycle during irradiation with several ionizing dose levels at different gate biases. In this work, the analytical calculation for estimating the irradiation temperature impact on gamma-induced degradation parameters of N-channel MOS transistors at different gate biases was investigated. The experimental measurement was done in order to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results indicated that inserting irradiation temperature in the calculations caused a significant variation in radiation-induced MOS transistor parameters such as threshold voltage shift and off-state leakage current. According to the results, these variations were about 10.1% and 23.4% for voltage shifts and leakage currents respectively during investigated heating cycle for total dose of 20 krad at 9 V gate bias.

  11. Estimation of sampling error uncertainties in observed surface air temperature change in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Shen, Samuel S. P.; Weithmann, Alexander; Wang, Huijun

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the sampling error uncertainties in the monthly surface air temperature (SAT) change in China over recent decades, focusing on the uncertainties of gridded data, national averages, and linear trends. Results indicate that large sampling error variances appear at the station-sparse area of northern and western China with the maximum value exceeding 2.0 K2 while small sampling error variances are found at the station-dense area of southern and eastern China with most grid values being less than 0.05 K2. In general, the negative temperature existed in each month prior to the 1980s, and a warming in temperature began thereafter, which accelerated in the early and mid-1990s. The increasing trend in the SAT series was observed for each month of the year with the largest temperature increase and highest uncertainty of 0.51 ± 0.29 K (10 year)-1 occurring in February and the weakest trend and smallest uncertainty of 0.13 ± 0.07 K (10 year)-1 in August. The sampling error uncertainties in the national average annual mean SAT series are not sufficiently large to alter the conclusion of the persistent warming in China. In addition, the sampling error uncertainties in the SAT series show a clear variation compared with other uncertainty estimation methods, which is a plausible reason for the inconsistent variations between our estimate and other studies during this period.

  12. The use of streambed temperatures to estimate transmission losses on an experimental channel.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon C. Naranjo; Michael H. Young; Richard Niswonger; Julianne J. Miller; Richard H. French

    2001-10-18

    Quantifying channel transmission losses in arid environments is important for a variety of reasons, from engineering design of flood control structures to evaluating recharge. To quantify the losses in an alluvial channel, an experiment was performed on a 2-km reach of an alluvial fan located on the Nevada Test Site. The channel was subjected to three separate flow events. Transmission losses were estimated using standard discharge monitoring and subsurface temperature modeling approach. Four stations were equipped to continuously monitor stage, temperature, and water content. Streambed temperatures measured at 0, 30, 50 and 100 cm depths were used to calibrate VS2DH, a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow model. Average losses based on the difference in flow between each station indicate that 21 percent, 27 percent, and 53 percent of the flow was reduced downgradient of the source. Results from the temperature monitoring identified locations with large thermal gradients, suggesting a conduction-dominated heat transfer on streambed sediments where caliche-cemented surfaces were present. Transmission losses at the lowermost segment corresponded to the smallest thermal gradient, suggesting an advection-dominated heat transfer. Losses predicted by VS2DH are within an order of magnitude of the estimated losses based on discharge measurements. The differences in losses are a result of the spatial extent to which the modeling results are applied and lateral subsurface flow.

  13. Estimation of the lower flammability limit of organic compounds as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Rowley, J R; Rowley, R L; Wilding, W V

    2011-02-15

    A new method of estimating the lower flammability limit (LFL) of general organic compounds is presented. The LFL is predicted at 298 K for gases and the lower temperature limit for solids and liquids from structural contributions and the ideal gas heat of formation of the fuel. The average absolute deviation from more than 500 experimental data points is 10.7%. In a previous study, the widely used modified Burgess-Wheeler law was shown to underestimate the effect of temperature on the lower flammability limit when determined in a large-diameter vessel. An improved version of the modified Burgess-Wheeler law is presented that represents the temperature dependence of LFL data determined in large-diameter vessels more accurately. When the LFL is estimated at increased temperatures using a combination of this model and the proposed structural-contribution method, an average absolute deviation of 3.3% is returned when compared with 65 data points for 17 organic compounds determined in an ASHRAE-style apparatus. PMID:21144650

  14. Estimations of temperature deviations in chromatographic columns using isenthalpic plots. I. Theory for isocratic systems.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Iraneta, Pamela; Guiochon, Georges; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Poe, Donald P

    2014-10-31

    We propose to use constant enthalpy or isenthalpic diagrams as a tool to estimate the extent of the temperature variations caused by the mobile phase pressure drop along a chromatographic column, e.g. of its cooling in supercritical fluid and its heating in ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Temperature strongly affects chromatographic phenomena. Any of its variations inside the column, whether intended or not, can lead to significant changes in separation performance. Although instruments use column ovens in order to keep constant the column temperature, operating conditions leading to a high pressure drop may cause significant variations of the column temperature, both in the axial and the radial directions, from the set value. Different ways of measuring these temperature variations are available but they are too inconvenient to be employed in many practical situations. In contrast, the thermodynamic plot-based method that we describe here can easily be used with only a ruler and a pencil. They should be helpful in developing methods or in analyzing results in analytical laboratories. Although the most effective application area for this approach should be SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography), it can be applied to any chromatographic conditions in which temperature variations take place along the column due to the pressure drop, e.g. in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). The method proposed here is applicable to isocractic conditions only.

  15. Estimating temperature and current using a pair of transceivers in a harbor environment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Fen; Taniguchi, Naokazu; Chen, Yen-Hsiang; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Obtaining the horizontal variation of temperature and current fields of a water column usually requires travel-time measurements of acoustic signals traveling along different paths between several horizontally distributed transceivers. This study explores the possibility of using a pair of transceivers deployed in a highly-reverberant harbor environment to extract spatial information of the water. Multipath acoustic propagation of two main arrival groups, i.e., direct arrivals and arrivals reflecting off the harbor side, was observed in the pulse responses measured in the harbor environment during the flood tide. Compared with the direct point measurements of temperature and current, the path-averaged measurements show a similar temporal variation during the experiment, demonstrating the possibility of estimating the spatial variation of the currents and temperatures using the multipath acoustic propagation. PMID:27475203

  16. Modeling Lunar Borehole Temperature in order to Reconstruct Historical Total Solar Irradiance and Estimate Surface Temperature in Permanently Shadowed Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Miyahara, H.; Ohmura, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Moon is an ideal place to reconstruct historical total solar irradiance (TSI). With undisturbed lunar surface albedo and the very low thermal diffusivity of lunar regolith, changes in solar input lead to changes in lunar surface temperature that diffuse downward to be recorded in the temperature profile in the near-surface layer. Using regolith thermal properties from Apollo, we model the heat transfer in the regolith layer, and compare modeled surface temperature to Apollo observations to check model performance. Using as alternative input scenarios two reconstructed TSI time series from 1610 to 2000 (Lean, 2000; Wang, Lean, and Sheeley 2005), we conclude that the two scenarios can be distinguished by detectable differences in regolith temperature, with the peak difference of about 10 mK occuring at a depth of about 10 m (Miyahara et al., 2007). The possibility that water ice exists in permanently shadowed areas near the lunar poles (Nozette et al., 1997; Spudis et al, 1998), makes it of interest to estimate surface temperature in such dark regions. "Turning off" the Sun in our time dependent model, we found it would take several hundred years for the surface temperature to drop from ~~100K immediately after sunset down to a nearly constant equilibrium temperature of about 24~~38 K, with the range determined by the range of possible input from Earth, from 0 W/m2 without Earth visible, up to about 0.1 W/m2 at maximum Earth phase. A simple equilibrium model (e.g., Huang 2007) is inappropriate to relate the Apollo-observed nighttime temperature to Earth's radiation budget, given the long multi- centennial time scale needed for equilibration of the lunar surface layer after sunset. Although our results provide the key mechanisms for reconstructing historical TSI, further research is required to account for topography of lunar surfaces, and new measurements of regolith thermal properties will also be needed once a new base of operations is

  17. Estimates of the difference between thermodynamic temperature and the International Temperature Scale of 1990 in the range 118 K to 303 K.

    PubMed

    Underwood, R; de Podesta, M; Sutton, G; Stanger, L; Rusby, R; Harris, P; Morantz, P; Machin, G

    2016-03-28

    Using exceptionally accurate measurements of the speed of sound in argon, we have made estimates of the difference between thermodynamic temperature, T, and the temperature estimated using the International Temperature Scale of 1990, T90, in the range 118 K to 303 K. Thermodynamic temperature was estimated using the technique of relative primary acoustic thermometry in the NPL-Cranfield combined microwave and acoustic resonator. Our values of (T-T90) agree well with most recent estimates, but because we have taken data at closely spaced temperature intervals, the data reveal previously unseen detail. Most strikingly, we see undulations in (T-T90) below 273.16 K, and the discontinuity in the slope of (T-T90) at 273.16 K appears to have the opposite sign to that previously reported. PMID:26903104

  18. Shutterless solution for simultaneous focal plane array temperature estimation and nonuniformity correction in uncooled long-wave infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2013-09-01

    In uncooled long-wave infrared (LWIR) microbolometer imaging systems, temperature fluctuations of the focal plane array (FPA) result in thermal drift and spatial nonuniformity. In this paper, we present a novel approach based on single-image processing to simultaneously estimate temperature variances of FPAs and compensate the resulting temperature-dependent nonuniformity. Through well-controlled thermal calibrations, empirical behavioral models are derived to characterize the relationship between the responses of microbolometer and FPA temperature variations. Then, under the assumption that strong dependency exists between spatially adjacent pixels, we estimate the optimal FPA temperature so as to minimize the global intensity variance across the entire thermal infrared image. We make use of the estimated FPA temperature to infer an appropriate nonuniformity correction (NUC) profile. The performance and robustness of the proposed temperature-adaptive NUC method are evaluated on realistic IR images obtained by a 640 × 512 pixels uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging system operating in a significantly changed temperature environment.

  19. Estimating the Contribution of Impurities to the Uncertainty of Metal Fixed-Point Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. D.

    2014-04-01

    The estimation of the uncertainty component attributable to impurities remains a central and important topic of fixed-point research. Various methods are available for this estimation, depending on the extent of the available information. The sum of individual estimates method has considerable appeal where there is adequate knowledge of the sensitivity coefficients for each of the impurity elements and sufficiently low uncertainty regarding their concentrations. The overall maximum estimate (OME) forsakes the behavior of the individual elements by assuming that the cryoscopic constant adequately represents (or is an upper bound for) the sensitivity coefficients of the individual impurities. Validation of these methods using melting and/or freezing curves is recommended to provide confidence. Recent investigations of indium, tin, and zinc fixed points are reported. Glow discharge mass spectrometry was used to determine the impurity concentrations of the metals used to fill the cells. Melting curves were analyzed to derive an experimental overall impurity concentration (assuming that all impurities have a sensitivity coefficient equivalent to that of the cryoscopic constant). The two values (chemical and experimental) for the overall impurity concentrations were then compared. Based on the data obtained, the pragmatic approach of choosing the larger of the chemical and experimentally derived quantities as the best estimate of the influence of impurities on the temperature of the freezing point is suggested rather than relying solely on the chemical analysis and the OME method to derive the uncertainty component attributable to impurities.

  20. Theoretical estimation of the temperature and pressure within collapsing acoustical bubbles.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    Formation of highly reactive species such as OH, H, HO2 and H2O2 due to transient collapse of cavitation bubbles is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction. The crucial parameters influencing the formation of radicals are the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. Experimental determinations estimated a temperature of about 5000 K and pressure of several hundreds of MPa within the collapsing bubble. In this theoretical investigation, computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring in an O2-bubble oscillating in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for diverse combinations of various parameters such as ultrasound frequency (20-1000 kHz), acoustic amplitude (up to 0.3 MPa), static pressure (0.03-0.3 MPa) and liquid temperature (283-333 K). The aim of this series of computations is to correlate the production of OH radicals to the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse in acoustical field with the chemical kinetics of single bubble. The results of the numerical simulations revealed that the main oxidant created in an O2 bubble is OH radical. The computer simulations clearly showed the existence of an optimum bubble temperature of about 5200±200 K and pressure of about 250±20 MPa. The predicted value of the bubble temperature for the production of OH radicals is in excellent agreement with that furnished by the experiments. The existence of an optimum bubble temperature and pressure in collapsing bubbles results from the competitions between the reactions of production and those of consumption of OH radicals at high temperatures. PMID:23769748

  1. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions.

  2. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions. PMID:26030088

  3. Retrieval of Temperature and Water Vapour from Multiple Channel Lidar Systems Using an Optimal Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Robert; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    While the application of optimal estimation methods (OEMs) is well-known for the retrieval of atmospheric parameters from passive instruments, active instruments have typically not employed the OEM. For instance, the measurement of temperature in the middle atmosphere with Rayleigh-scatter lidars is an important technique for assessing atmospheric change. Current retrieval schemes for these temperatures have several shortcomings which can be overcome using an OEM. Forward models have been constructed that fully characterize the measurement and allow the simultaneous retrieval of temperature, dead time and background. The OEM allows a full uncertainty budget to be obtained on a per profile basis that includes, in addition to the statistical uncertainties, the smoothing error and uncertainties due to Rayleigh extinction, ozone absorption, the lidar constant, nonlinearity in the counting system, variation of the Rayleigh-scatter cross section with altitude, pressure, acceleration due to gravity and the variation of mean molecular mass with altitude. The vertical resolution of the temperature profile is found at each height, and a quantitative determination is made of the maximum height to which the retrieval is valid. A single temperature profile can be retrieved from measurements with multiple channels that cover different height ranges, vertical resolutions and even different detection methods. The OEM employed is shown to give robust estimates of temperature consistent with previous methods, while requiring minimal computational time. Retrieval of water vapour mixing ratio from vibrational Raman scattering lidar measurements is another example where an OEM offers a considerable advantage over the standard analysis technique, with the same advantages as discussed above for Rayleigh-scatter temperatures but with an additional benefit. The conversion of the lidar measurement into mixing ratio requires a calibration constant to be employed. Using OEM the calibration

  4. Estimating land surface heat flux using radiometric surface temperature without the need for an extra resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Yang, Y.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable in energy balance and is widely used for estimating regional heat flux. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero) poses a great challenge for regional heat flux estimation in one -source energy balance models. In this study, a one-source model for land (OSML) was proposed to estimate regional surface heat flux without a need for an empirical extra resistance. The proposed OSML employs both a conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analogue formula of sensible heat flux (H) to estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae) by using a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX), using a remotely-sensed data set at a regional scale. Validated against tower observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of H and latent heat flux (LE) from OSML was 47 W/m2 and 51 W/m2, which is comparable to other published studies. OSML and SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) compared under the same available energy indicated that LE estimated by OSML is comparable to that derived from the SEBS model. In conducting further inter-comparisons of rae, the aerodynamic resistance derived from SEBS (ra_SEBS), and aerodynamic resistance (ra) derived from Brutsaert et al. (2005) in corn and soybean fields, we found that rae and ra_SEBS are comparable. Most importantly, our study indicates that the OSML method is applicable without having to acquire wind speed or to specify aerodynamic surface characteristics and that it is applicable to heterogeneous areas.

  5. New estimates of tropical temperature and precipitation changes during the last 42ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauel, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Correa-Metrio, A.

    2013-12-01

    The amount of cooling in the tropics during the last Ice Age has been a longstanding problem with large discrepancies between terrestrial and marine estimates. Here we present a reconstruction of temperature and precipitation changes over the last 42ka from a lake sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala, located at 17°N in lowland Central America. Previous studies of sediment cores from Lake Petén Itzá showed that alternating layers of clay- and gypsum-rich sediment reflect times of wetter and dryer conditions, respectively. The most arid conditions coincide with stadials, especially those associated with Heinrich events (HEs) when pollen assemblages are dominated by xeric-tolerant taxa. In contrast, interstadials and the last glacial maximum (LGM) are characterized by clay deposition and pollen indicative of temperate pine-oak forest, indicating more humid conditions in the lowland Neotropics. We compared three independent methods to reconstruct glacial temperatures: tandem measurements of δ18O in biogenic carbonate and gypsum hydration water, clumped isotope thermometry, and pollen-based temperature estimates using the Modern Analog Technique (MAT). The temperatures derived by the three methods generally agree during interstadials and some stadials (e.g., HE2 and 3), but diverge during other stadial events (e.g., HE1 and 4). For example, gypsum hydration and clumped isotope methods indicate a severe cooling of 6 to 10°C during HE1 and 4, whereas the pollen MAT suggests more moderate cooling of 3 to 6 °C. The reason for this divergence is likely that no modern analogs exist for the pollen assemblage during these cold, arid stadials when the MAT is not applicable. Although the temperature decrease is similar (6-10°C) for HE1 and 4, deuterium excess is distinctly different (-19 and -14, respectively), perhaps indicating a change in source and/or seasonality of precipitation. The δ18O and δD of the lake water indicate HE1 was the most arid

  6. Exploring a Simple Method to Estimate Spot Temperatures in Weak-Lined T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, Chris

    2016-09-01

    The astronomy literature contains a wealth of photometric measurements of the brightness variations of weak-lined T Tauri stars. Comparing observations through two different filters, the brightness changes of the vast majority of these stars trace straight lines in magnitude-magnitude plots. It is plausible that the slope of the line is determined by a fixed mean starspot temperature, and that changing filling factors cause the linear magnitude-magnitude relations to be described. This is exploited to derive an estimator for the starspot temperature in terms of a linear regression slope, valid for modest starspot filling factors. Simulations are used to demonstrate that such regression slopes first need to be corrected for measurement errors, in order to avoid biased results. The theory is applied to a collection of 45 extensive sets of BVR (and in some cases UBVR) observations of weak-lined T Tauri stars taken from the literature. The results are examined critically, and it is pointed out that there are systematic differences between spot temperatures determined respectively from BV and VR data pairs. The reason for this is not known; possible causes are briefly speculated about. There is generally poor agreement with published spot temperatures, which also vary considerably. The simplest explanation is that the mean temperature of starspots is variable.

  7. Atmospheric corrections of passive microwave data for estimating land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Lin; Wu, Hua; Tang, Bo-Hui; Qiu, Shi; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of the atmospheric effects on observations made by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) has been performed. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and at the bottom of the atmosphere were analyzed using a database of simulated observations, which were configured to replicate AMSR-E data. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and land surface-emitted brightness temperatures were also computed. Quantitative results show that the atmosphere has different effects on brightness temperatures in different AMSR-E channels. Atmospheric effects can be neglected at 6.925 and 10.65 GHz, when the standard deviation is less than 1 K. However, at other frequencies and polarizations, atmospheric effects on observations should not be neglected. An atmospheric correction algorithm was developed at 18.7 GHz vertical polarization, based on the classic split-window algorithm used in thermal remote sensing. Land surface emission can be estimated with RMSE = 0.99 K using the proposed method. Using the known land surface emissivity, Land Surface Temperature (LST) can be retrieved. The RMSE of retrieved LST is 1.17 K using the simulated data.

  8. Estimation of effective temperatures in a quantum annealer: Towards deep learning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Realpe-Gómez, John; Benedetti, Marcello; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    Sampling is at the core of deep learning and more general machine learning applications; an increase in its efficiency would have a significant impact across several domains. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up these tasks, but several limitations still bar them from being used effectively. One of the main limitations, and the focus of this work, is that using the device's experimentally accessible temperature as a reference for sampling purposes leads to very poor correlation with the Boltzmann distribution it is programmed to sample from. Based on quantum dynamical arguments, one can expect that if the device indeed happens to be sampling from a Boltzmann-like distribution, it will correspond to one with an instance-dependent effective temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling processes. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the quantum-assisted training of Boltzmann machines, which can serve as a building block for deep learning architectures. This work was supported by NASA Ames Research Center.

  9. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  10. Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-02-14

    A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

  11. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Vanhellemont, Jan; Sueoka, Koji

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  12. Study on Air Temperature Estimation and Snowmelt Modeling over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation and melting of snow are important hydrological processes over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Accurate and reasonable simulation of snowmelt is useful for water resources management and planning. This study firstly developed a product of daily mean air temperatures over the TP by comprehensively integrating satellite data and field observations. Accumulation and melting of snow over TP was then simulated and analyzed using a distributed degree-day model based on the air temperature data. The proposed air temperature estimation method can reduce the cloud blockage dramatically by integrating all the available MODIS land surface data (LST) at four pass times dynamically and in the meantime keep relatively high estimating accuracies. Through zonal calibration and validation for snow cover modeling, the daily processes of snow accumulation and melting over TP can be successfully simulated. The results indicate that (1) during 2005-2010, annual precipitation over TP was ~442 mm/yr among which ~88 mm/yr was snow fall with approximately 56 mm/yr melted; (2) snow melt mostly happened in spring over TP, with spring snow melt dominating and accounting for about 53% of the full-year snow melts; and (3) the locations with higher snow melt were mainly in south and east TP and the spatial pattern of snow melts is basically in accordance with that of precipitation.

  13. Channel Temperature Estimates for Microwave AlGaN/GaN Power HEMTS on SiC and Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple technique to estimate the channel temperature of a generic AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC or Sapphire, while incorporating temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity is presented. The procedure is validated b y comparing it's predictions with the experimentally measured temperatures in devices presented in three recently published articles.

  14. Uncertainty in temperature response of current consumption-based emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstensen, J.; Peters, G. P.; Andrew, R. M.

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have connected emissions of greenhouse gases to economic and trade data to quantify the causal chain from consumption to emissions and climate change. These studies usually combine data and models originating from different sources, making it difficult to estimate uncertainties in the end results. We estimate uncertainties in economic data, multi-pollutant emission statistics and metric parameters, and use Monte Carlo analysis to quantify contributions to uncertainty and to determine how uncertainty propagates to estimates of global temperature change from regional and sectoral territorial- and consumption-based emissions for the year 2007. We find that the uncertainties are sensitive to the emission allocations, mix of pollutants included, the metric and its time horizon, and the level of aggregation of the results. Uncertainties in the final results are largely dominated by the climate sensitivity and the parameters associated with the warming effects of CO2. The economic data have a relatively small impact on uncertainty at the global and national level, while much higher uncertainties are found at the sectoral level. Our results suggest that consumption-based national emissions are not significantly more uncertain than the corresponding production based emissions, since the largest uncertainties are due to metric and emissions which affect both perspectives equally. The two perspectives exhibit different sectoral uncertainties, due to changes of pollutant compositions. We find global sectoral consumption uncertainties in the range of ±9-±27% using the global temperature potential with a 50 year time horizon, with metric uncertainties dominating. National level uncertainties are similar in both perspectives due to the dominance of CO2 over other pollutants. The consumption emissions of the top 10 emitting regions have a broad uncertainty range of ±9-±25%, with metric and emissions uncertainties contributing similarly. The Absolute global

  15. Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells by using an artificial neural network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassam, A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.; Hernández, J. A.; Espinoza-Ojeda, O. M.

    2010-09-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was used to develop a new predictive model for the calculation of static formation temperature (SFT) in geothermal wells. A three-layer ANN architecture was successfully trained using a geothermal borehole database, which contains "statistically normalised" SFT estimates. These estimates were inferred from seven analytical methods commonly used in geothermal industry. Bottom-hole temperature (BHT) measurements and shut-in times were used as main input variables for the ANN training. Transient temperature gradients were used as secondary variables. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) learning algorithm, the hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer function and the linear transfer function were used for the ANN optimisation. The best training data set was obtained with an ANN architecture composed by five neurons in the hidden layer, which made possible to predict the SFT with a satisfactory efficiency ( R2>0.95). A suitable accuracy of the ANN model was achieved with a percentage error less than ±5%. The SFTs predicted by the ANN model were statistically analyzed and compared with "true" SFTs measured in synthetic experiments and actual BHT logs collected in geothermal boreholes during long shut-in times. These data sets were processed both to validate the new ANN model and to avoid bias. The SFT estimates inferred from the ANN validation process were in good agreement ( R2>0.95) with the "true" SFT data reported for synthetic and field experiments. The results suggest that the new ANN model could be used as a practical tool for the reliable prediction of SFT in geothermal wells using BHT and shut-in time as input data only.

  16. Quantifying Surface Energy Flux Estimation Uncertainty Using Land Surface Temperature Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, A. N.; Hunsaker, D.; Thorp, K.; Bronson, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing with thermal infrared is widely recognized as good way to estimate surface heat fluxes, map crop water use, and detect water-stressed vegetation. When combined with net radiation and soil heat flux data, observations of sensible heat fluxes derived from surface temperatures (LST) are indicative of instantaneous evapotranspiration (ET). There are, however, substantial reasons LST data may not provide the best way to estimate of ET. For example, it is well known that observations and models of LST, air temperature, or estimates of transport resistances may be so inaccurate that physically based model nevertheless yield non-meaningful results. Furthermore, using visible and near infrared remote sensing observations collected at the same time as LST often yield physically plausible results because they are constrained by less dynamic surface conditions such as green fractional cover. Although sensitivity studies exist that help identify likely sources of error and uncertainty, ET studies typically do not provide a way to assess the relative importance of modeling ET with and without LST inputs. To better quantify model benefits and degradations due to LST observational inaccuracies, a Bayesian uncertainty study was undertaken using data collected in remote sensing experiments at Maricopa, Arizona. Visible, near infrared and thermal infrared data were obtained from an airborne platform. The prior probability distribution of ET estimates were modeled using fractional cover, local weather data and a Penman-Monteith mode, while the likelihood of LST data was modeled from a two-source energy balance model. Thus the posterior probabilities of ET represented the value added by using LST data. Results from an ET study over cotton grown in 2014 and 2015 showed significantly reduced ET confidence intervals when LST data were incorporated.

  17. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  18. Using Machine learning method to estimate Air Temperature from MODIS over Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, F.; Preusker, R.; Sodoudi, S.; Taheri, H.; Allahbakhshi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is defined as the temperature of the interface between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere and thus it is a critical variable to understand land-atmosphere interactions and a key parameter in meteorological and hydrological studies, which is involved in energy fluxes. Air temperature (Tair) is one of the most important input variables in different spatially distributed hydrological, ecological models. The estimation of near surface air temperature is useful for a wide range of applications. Some applications from traffic or energy management, require Tair data in high spatial and temporal resolution at two meters height above the ground (T2m), sometimes in near-real-time. Thus, a parameterization based on boundary layer physical principles was developed that determines the air temperature from remote sensing data (MODIS). Tair is commonly obtained from synoptic measurements in weather stations. However, the derivation of near surface air temperature from the LST derived from satellite is far from straight forward. T2m is not driven directly by the sun, but indirectly by LST, thus T2m can be parameterized from the LST and other variables such as Albedo, NDVI, Water vapor and etc. Most of the previous studies have focused on estimating T2m based on simple and advanced statistical approaches, Temperature-Vegetation index and energy-balance approaches but the main objective of this research is to explore the relationships between T2m and LST in Berlin by using Artificial intelligence method with the aim of studying key variables to allow us establishing suitable techniques to obtain Tair from satellite Products and ground data. Secondly, an attempt was explored to identify an individual mix of attributes that reveals a particular pattern to better understanding variation of T2m during day and nighttime over the different area of Berlin. For this reason, a three layer Feedforward neural networks is considered with LMA algorithm

  19. Estimating water temperatures in small streams in western Oregon using neural network models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Roehl, Edwin A.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Artificial neural network models were developed to estimate water temperatures in small streams using data collected at 148 sites throughout western Oregon from June to September 1999. The sites were located on 1st-, 2nd-, or 3rd-order streams having undisturbed or minimally disturbed conditions. Data collected at each site for model development included continuous hourly water temperature and description of riparian habitat. Additional data pertaining to the landscape characteristics of the basins upstream of the sites were assembled using geographic information system (GIS) techniques. Hourly meteorological time series data collected at 25 locations within the study region also were assembled. Clustering analysis was used to partition 142 sites into 3 groups. Separate models were developed for each group. The riparian habitat, basin characteristic, and meteorological time series data were independent variables and water temperature time series were dependent variables to the models, respectively. Approximately one-third of the data vectors were used for model training, and the remaining two-thirds were used for model testing. Critical input variables included riparian shade, site elevation, and percentage of forested area of the basin. Coefficient of determination and root mean square error for the models ranged from 0.88 to 0.99 and 0.05 to 0.59 oC, respectively. The models also were tested and validated using temperature time series, habitat, and basin landscape data from 6 sites that were separate from the 142 sites that were used to develop the models. The models are capable of estimating water temperatures at locations along 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-order streams in western Oregon. The model user must assemble riparian habitat and basin landscape characteristics data for a site of interest. These data, in addition to meteorological data, are model inputs. Output from the models include simulated hourly water temperatures for the June to September period

  20. Estimates of the potential temperature profile from lidar measurements of boundary layer evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, H. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2006-10-01

    The Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) was conducted in the Walnut Creek Watershed near Ames, Iowa, over the period from 15 June to 11 July 2002. A main focus of SMACEX is the investigation of the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer, surface moisture, and canopy. A vertically staring elastic lidar was used to provide a high time resolution, continuous record of the mixed layer height at the edge between a soybean and a corn field. The height and thickness of the entrainment zone are used to estimate the vertical potential temperature profile in the boundary layer using surface energy measurements in the Batchvarova-Gryning mixed layer model. Calculated values of potential temperature compared well to radiosonde measurements taken simultaneously with the lidar measurements. The root-mean-square difference between the lidar-derived values and the balloon-based values is 1.20°C.

  1. Using groundwater temperature data to constrain parameter estimation in a groundwater flow model of a wetland system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bravo, H.R.; Jiang, F.; Hunt, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Parameter estimation is a powerful way to calibrate models. While head data alone are often insufficient to estimate unique parameters due to model nonuniqueness, flow-and-heat-transport modeling can constrain estimation and allow simultaneous estimation of boundary fluxes and hydraulic conductivity. In this work, synthetic and field models that did not converge when head data were used did converge when head and temperature were used. Furthermore, frequency domain analyses of head and temperature data allowed selection of appropriate modeling timescales. Inflows in the Wilton, Wisconsin, wetlands could be estimated over periods such as a growing season and over periods of a few days when heads were nearly steady and groundwater temperature varied during the day. While this methodology is computationally more demanding than traditional head calibration, the results gained are unobtainable using the traditional approach. These results suggest that temperature can efficiently supplement head data in systems where accurate flux calibration targets are unavailable.

  2. Estimation and Attribution of the Temperature Variances in Height Range 60~140 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeyu

    The SABER/TIMED temperatures collected during 2002 2006 are used to estimate for height range 60 120 km the variances of temperature (Temp-VARs) that are contributed from nonstationary perturbations. The estimation results disclose that the height range 60 140 km can be separated into two regions that are characterized by significant differences of the attributions of the Temp-VARs. In the region below 100 km height, the Temp-VARs generally increase with height, the corresponding standard deviations of temperature (Temp-SDEVs) ranges from 4 K at 60 km and 18 K at 100 km. The regions exhibiting intense Temp-VARs appear at the equator and the extra-tropics of both hemispheres. Moreover, these non-stationary temperature disturbances can be accounted primarily by the tidal variances that are derived independently by using the same data-set, in particular by the migrating diurnal, semidiurnal, and terdiurnal tide. It is also found that the region above 100 km is characterized by surprisingly large Temp-VARs with the corresponding Temp-SDEVs greater than 30 K. In a height-latitude cross-section, a stagnant maximum of Temp-SDEVs embraced by the 30-K contour remains over the course of a year at the Equator in a narrow height range 110 125 km. At the same height in Southern hemisphere, the same kind maxima appears at latitudes from the extra-tropics to polar region except during the June solstice. In contrast, the maxima appearing in Northern hemisphere high latitudes exhibits intra-seasonal variations, there such maximum are seen during the course of a year. Further investigation results confirm that the large Temp-VARs have no relevance to the tidal variances, implying the control from other processes, e.g., non-stationary planetary waves. The details will be introduced in the presentation.

  3. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  4. Spontaneous magnitude estimation of thermal discomfort during changes in the ambient temperature*

    PubMed Central

    Wyon, D. P.; Andersen, I.; Lundqvist, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal comfort sensations are often studied in isolation, with the subjects' attention specifically directed towards their evaluation, both by instructions and by the recurrent act of questioning. A closer approach to the field situation, in which room temperature is at most a background stimulus, is made possible by the method of spontaneous magnitude estimation of thermal sensation. Thirty-six male and 36 female 17-year-old subjects in standard cotton uniforms (0·7 clo) were exposed in groups of 4 in a climate chamber to patterns of changing air temperature typical of conditions in occupied classrooms. Temperatures remained within the range 20-29° C. and did not increase more rapidly than 4° C./hr. Each individual recorded his thermal sensation on a dial voting apparatus, registering changes spontaneously as a secondary task while performing mental work during three successive 50 min. periods, with 10 min. breaks between. It was thus possible to obtain a measure of the time course of thermal discomfort sensations, including the extent to which they distracted attention. Significant differences were found between the responses of males and females, males in general feeling hotter and reacting more rapidly to changes in temperature. Response distributions are given in detail. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:4503865

  5. Planetary Temperatures : Early Estimates, Lowell, and the Albedo of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph

    2016-10-01

    While it was recognized by Huygens, as soon as the architecture of the solar system was understood, that outer planets would be much cooler than Earth, quantitative estimation of planetary temperatures only became possible with understanding of radiant heat, and specifically the Stefan law relating heat flux to the fourth power of absolute temperature. This relation appears to have been first applied to planetary temperatures by the Danish physicist Christiansen in 1885, and he derived results for Mars and Saturn of -40 and -180C, rather reasonable values. However, the separate values of the solar constant, absolute planetary albedos (including that of the Earth) and the short- and long-wave transparency of planetary atmospheres were not known, although mountaintop measurements by Langley made some first steps to quantifying these effects. Lowell recognized that the Martian atmosphere was thinner than ours, but had more carbon dioxide, and so considered these factors to cancel out. However, he suggested that the Earth had a reflectivity of some 75%, such that darker Mars would absorb a larger fraction of incident sunlight than the Earth, compensating for Mars' greater distance from the sun and thus allowing clement temperatures. It is difficult not to see this as pushing the numbers to obtain a desired result, and indeed a robust refutation of his calculations swiftly followed by Poynting and Alfred Russel Wallace. I present a brief review of these early days of planetary climate modeling.

  6. A noninvasive, remote and precise method for temperature and concentration estimation using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Wenzhong; Du, Zhongzhou; César de Morais, Paulo; Xiang, Qing; Xie, Qingguo

    2012-02-24

    This study describes an approach for remote measuring of on-site temperature and particle concentration using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via simulation and also experimentally. The sensor model indicates that under different applied magnetic fields, the magnetization equation of the MNPs can be discretized to give a higher-order nonlinear equation in two variables that consequently separates information regarding temperature and particle concentration. As a result, on-site tissue temperature or nanoparticle concentration can be determined using remote detection of the magnetization. In order to address key issues in the higher-order equation we propose a new solution method of the first-order model from the perspective of the generalized inverse matrix. Simulations for solving the equation, as well as to optimize the solution of higher equations, were carried out. In the final section we describe a prototype experiment used to investigate the measurement of the temperature in which we used a superconducting magnetometer and commercial MNPs. The overall error after nine repeated measurements was found to be less than 0.57 K within 310-350 K, with a corresponding root mean square of less than 0.55 K. A linear relationship was also found between the estimated concentration of MNPs and the sample's mass.

  7. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Law, C. S.; Hutchins, D. A.; Abraham, E. R.; Croot, P. L.; Ellwood, M.; Frew, R. D.; Hadfield, M.; Hall, J.; Handy, S.; Hare, C.; Higgins, J.; Hill, P.; Hunter, K. A.; Leblanc, K.; Maldonado, M. T.; McKay, R. M.; Mioni, C.; Oliver, M.; Pickmere, S.; Pinkerton, M.; Safi, K.; Sander, S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Smith, M.; Strzepek, R.; Tovar-Sanchez, A.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    An improved knowledge of iron biogeochemistry is needed to better understand key controls on the functioning of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic regions. Iron budgets for HNLC waters have been constructed using data from disparate sources ranging from laboratory algal cultures to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE of New Zealand, and measured concurrently all sources (with the exception of aerosol deposition) to, sinks of iron from, and rates of iron recycling within, the surface mixed layer. A pelagic iron budget (timescale of days) indicated that oceanic supply terms (lateral advection and vertical diffusion) were relatively small compared to the main sink (downward particulate export). Remote sensing and terrestrial monitoring reveal 13 dust or wildfire events in Australia, prior to and during FeCycle, one of which may have deposited iron at the study location. However, iron deposition rates cannot be derived from such observations, illustrating the difficulties in closing iron budgets without quantification of episodic atmospheric supply. Despite the threefold uncertainties reported for rates of aerosol deposition (Duce et al., 1991), published atmospheric iron supply for the New Zealand region is ˜50-fold (i.e., 7- to 150-fold) greater than the oceanic iron supply measured in our budget, and thus was comparable (i.e., a third to threefold) to our estimates of downward export of particulate iron. During FeCycle, the fluxes due to short term (hours) biological iron uptake and regeneration were indicative of rapid recycling and were tenfold greater than for new iron (i.e. estimated atmospheric and measured oceanic supply), giving an "fe" ratio (uptake of new iron/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.17 (i.e., a range of 0.06 to 0.51 due to uncertainties on aerosol iron supply), and an "Fe" ratio (biogenic Fe export/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.09 (i.e., 0.03 to 0.24).

  8. Comparison of different methods of estimating the mean radiant temperature in outdoor thermal comfort studies.

    PubMed

    Krüger, E L; Minella, F O; Matzarakis, A

    2014-10-01

    Correlations between outdoor thermal indices and the calculated or measured mean radiant temperature T(mrt) are in general of high importance because of the combined effect on human energy balance in outdoor spaces. The most accurate way to determine T(mrt) is by means of integral radiation measurements, i.e. measuring the short- and long-wave radiation from six directions using pyranometers and pyrgeometers, an expensive and not always an easily available procedure. Some studies use globe thermometers combined with air temperature and wind speed sensors. An alternative way to determine T(mrt) is based on output from the RayMan model from measured data of incoming global radiation and morphological features of the monitoring site in particular sky view factor (SVF) data. The purpose of this paper is to compare different methods to assess the mean radiant temperature T(mrt) in terms of differences to a reference condition (T(mrt) calculated from field measurements) and to resulting outdoor comfort levels expressed as PET and UTCI values. The T(mrt) obtained from field measurements is a combination of air temperature, wind speed and globe temperature data according to the forced ventilation formula of ISO 7726 for data collected in Glasgow, UK. Four different methods were used in the RayMan model for T(mrt) calculations: input data consisting exclusively of data measured at urban sites; urban data excluding solar radiation, estimated SVF data and solar radiation data measured at a rural site; urban data excluding solar radiation with SVF data for each site; urban data excluding solar radiation and including solar radiation at the rural site taking no account of SVF information. Results show that all methods overestimate T(mrt) when compared to ISO calculations. Correlations were found to be significant for the first method and lower for the other three. Results in terms of comfort (PET, UTCI) suggest that reasonable estimates could be made based on global radiation

  9. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, Claudia; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27?5 mW^-2 is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mW^-2, characteristic of the 'cool interior' of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mW^-2.

  10. Mantle potential temperature estimates of basalt from the surface of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The crater density and distribution of Venus indicates the average surface age is younger (≤1 Ga) than most terrestrial planets and satellites in the Solar System. The type and rate (i.e. equilibrium, catastrophic or differential) of volcanism associated with the stagnant lid tectonic system of Venus is a first order problem that has yet to be resolved but is directly related to the thermal conditions of the mantle. The calculated primary melt composition of basalt at the Venera 14 landing site is high-Mg basalt to picrite with a mantle potential temperature estimate similar to terrestrial ambient mantle (1370 ± 70 °C). The calculated accumulated fractional melting curves indicate the olivine compositions from the melt have Mg# of 89-91. The results show that the thermal regime required to generate the primary melt composition of the Venera 14 basalt was not anomalously high (i.e. mantle-plume system) but rather consistent with a lithospheric tensional rift system. The juxtaposition of high thermal regime structures (e.g. Beta Regio) and 'ambient' mantle potential temperature estimates of the Venera 14 basalt suggests that the relatively young surface of Venus is the result of volcanism from a combination of thermal systems that resurfaced the planet at variable rates.

  11. Shallow subsurface temperatures and some estimates of heat flow from the Colorado Plateau of northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Stone, C.; Bills, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature data to depths of a few hundred meters were obtained from 29 wells in northeastern Arizona; 12 in the region surrounding the San Francisco Volcanic Field, 8 in the Black Mesa area, and 9 in the south-central Colorado Plateau which includes the White Mountains. Although there was evidence for local hydrologic disturbances in many temperature profiles, most wells provided an estimate of the conductive thermal gradient at the site. A few thermal conductivities were measured and were combined with published regional averages for the north-central part of the Colorado Plateau to produce crude estimates of regional heat flux. None of the wells was accessible below the regional aquifers. To these depths, heat flow in the area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field appears to be controlled primarily by regional lateral water movement having a significant downward vertical component of velocity. The mean heat flow of 27 +- 5 mWm/sup -2/ is only a third to a quarter of what we would expect in this tectonic setting. The heat that is being carried laterally and downward probably is being discharged at low enthalpy and low elevation in springs and streams of the Colorado Plateau and Mogollon Rim. In the vicinity of Black Mesa, heat-flow averages about 60 mWm/sup -2/, characteristics of the coal interior of the Colorado Plateau. North of the White Mountain Volcanic Field, the average heat flow is about 95 mWm/sup -2/.

  12. Predicting cement distribution in geothermal sandstone reservoirs based on estimates of precipitation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Whitehouse, Martin; Kristensen, Lars; Hjuler, Morten L.; Mathiesen, Anders; Boyce, Adrian J.; Nielsen, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of geothermal sandstone reservoirs is challenged by pore-cementing minerals since they reduce the fluid flow through the sandstones. Geothermal exploration aims at finding sandstone bodies located at depths that are adequate for sufficiently warm water to be extracted, but without being too cemented for warm water production. The amount of cement is highly variable in the Danish geothermal reservoirs which mainly comprise the Bunter Sandstone, Skagerrak and Gassum formations. The present study involves bulk and in situ stable isotope analyses of calcite, dolomite, ankerite, siderite and quartz in order to estimate at what depth they were formed and enable prediction of where they can be found. The δ18O values measured in the carbonate minerals and quartz overgrowths are related to depth since they are a result of the temperatures of the pore fluid. Thus the values indicate the precipitation temperatures and they fit the relative diagenetic timing identified by petrographical observations. The sandstones deposited during arid climatic conditions contain calcite and dolomite cement that formed during early diagenesis. These carbonate minerals precipitated as a response to different processes, and precipitation of macro-quartz took over at deeper burial. Siderite was the first carbonate mineral that formed in the sandstones that were deposited in a humid climate. Calcite began precipitating at increased burial depth and ankerite formed during deep burial and replaced some of the other phases. Ankerite and quartz formed in the same temperature interval so constrains on the isotopic composition of the pore fluid can be achieved. Differences in δ13C values exist between the sandstones that were deposited in arid versus humid environments, which suggest that different kinds of processes were active. The estimated precipitation temperatures of the different cement types are used to predict which of them are present in geothermal sandstone reservoirs in

  13. Estimation and Attribution of the Temperature Variances in the Stratosphere using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeyu

    The SABER/TIMED temperatures collected during 2002 to 2006 are used to estimate the variances of temperature (Temp-VARs) that are contributed from non-stationary perturbations in the stratospheric portion (20 60 km height range), and the attributions of the Temp-VARs are analyzed. The current estimation results disclose that the temperature variances induced by tidal components, in particular the migrating diurnal and semi-diurnal tide, can account for significant amount of the Temp-VARs. The Temp-VARs are estimated for every 60-day period when the major hemispheres are the same for each sounding day, i.e., the soundings can reach 87 degree latitude for the same hemisphere all the days. In each of the one-year course among the years from 2002 to 2006, there are six such kind 60-day periods that are repeatedly centered on DOY 46, DOY 109, DOY 169, DOY 231, DOY 293 and DOY 352. Following the season of the northern hemisphere, they are referred to as late-winter, spring, mid-summer, late-summer, autumn, and mid-winter, respectively. During one year course, significant Temp-VARs are only seen in the extra-tropical latitudes for both hemispheres, which attain 8 K in term of the standard deviations of temperature (T-SDEVs). Across the two tropics and the equator, a quiescent slab is located at 20 km height where the T-SDEVs reach a minimum, less than 1.5 K. Above the slab, the T-SDEVs increases monotonically and slowly with height, but less than 4 K for most of the seasons. In the mid-summer, the slab extends to the mid-latitudes of the mid-summer hemisphere, then, large T-SDEVs greater than 4 K can only be seen in the extratropics of the opposite hemisphere. Tidal signals are extracted independently from each of the 60-day data by using the conventional procedures. The migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides are considered of most important, which can account for significant amount of the T-VARs. It is surprisingly found that during the spring time, the contribution

  14. A basin-scale approach to estimating stream temperatures of tributaries to the lower Klamath River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Stream temperature is an important component of salmonid habitat and is often above levels suitable for fish survival in the Lower Klamath River in northern California. The objective of this study was to provide boundary conditions for models that are assessing stream temperature on the main stem for the purpose of developing strategies to manage stream conditions using Total Maximum Daily Loads. For model input, hourly stream temperatures for 36 tributaries were estimated for 1 Jan. 2001 through 31 Oct. 2004. A basin-scale approach incorporating spatially distributed energy balance data was used to estimate the stream temperatures with measured air temperature and relative humidity data and simulated solar radiation, including topographic shading and corrections for cloudiness. Regression models were developed on the basis of available stream temperature data to predict temperatures for unmeasured periods of time and for unmeasured streams. The most significant factor in matching measured minimum and maximum stream temperatures was the seasonality of the estimate. Adding minimum and maximum air temperature to the regression model improved the estimate, and air temperature data over the region are available and easily distributed spatially. The addition of simulated solar radiation and vapor saturation deficit to the regression model significantly improved predictions of maximum stream temperature but was not required to predict minimum stream temperature. The average SE in estimated maximum daily stream temperature for the individual basins was 0.9 ?? 0.6??C at the 95% confidence interval. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of measurement resolution on the analysis of temperature time series for stream-aquifer flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-López, Carlos D.; Meixner, Thomas; Ferré, Ty P. A.

    2011-12-01

    From its inception in the mid-1960s, the use of temperature time series (thermographs) to estimate vertical fluxes has found increasing use in the hydrologic community. Beginning in 2000, researchers have examined the impacts of measurement and parameter uncertainty on the estimates of vertical fluxes. To date, the effects of temperature measurement discretization (resolution), a characteristic of all digital temperature loggers, on the determination of vertical fluxes has not been considered. In this technical note we expand the analysis of recently published work to include the effects of temperature measurement resolution on estimates of vertical fluxes using temperature amplitude and phase shift information. We show that errors in thermal front velocity estimation introduced by discretizing thermographs differ when amplitude or phase shift data are used to estimate vertical fluxes. We also show that under similar circumstances sensor resolution limits the range over which vertical velocities are accurately reproduced more than uncertainty in temperature measurements, uncertainty in sensor separation distance, and uncertainty in the thermal diffusivity combined. These effects represent the baseline error present and thus the best-case scenario when discrete temperature measurements are used to infer vertical fluxes. The errors associated with measurement resolution can be minimized by using the highest-resolution sensors available. But thoughtful experimental design could allow users to select the most cost-effective temperature sensors to fit their measurement needs.

  16. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times during Geminids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lukianova, Renata; Shalimov, Sergey; Lester, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Meteor radar observations at the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (67° 22'N, 26° 38'E, Finland) indicate that the mesospheric temperature derived from meteor decay times is systematically underestimated by 20-50 K during the Geminids meteor shower which has peak on 13 December. A very good coincidence of the minimum of routinely calculated temperature and maximum of meteor flux (the number of meteors detected per day) was observed regularly on that day in December 2008-2014. These observations are for a specific height-lifetime distribution of the Geminids meteor trails and indicate a larger percentage of overdense trails compared to that for sporadic meteors. A consequence of this is that the routine estimates of mesospheric temperature during the Geminids are in fact underestimates. The observations do, however, indicate unusual properties (e.g., mass, speed, or chemical composition) of the Geminids meteoroids. Similar properties were found also for Quadrantids in January 2009-2015, which like the Geminids has as a parent body an asteroid, but not for other meteor showers.

  17. Near infrared spectroscopy to estimate the temperature reached on burned soils: strategies to develop robust models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, César; Pedrosa, Elisabete T.; Pérez-Bejarano, Andrea; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2014-05-01

    The temperature reached on soils is an important parameter needed to describe the wildfire effects. However, the methods for measure the temperature reached on burned soils have been poorly developed. Recently, the use of the near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been pointed as a valuable tool for this purpose. The NIR spectrum of a soil sample contains information of the organic matter (quantity and quality), clay (quantity and quality), minerals (such as carbonates and iron oxides) and water contents. Some of these components are modified by the heat, and each temperature causes a group of changes, leaving a typical fingerprint on the NIR spectrum. This technique needs the use of a model (or calibration) where the changes in the NIR spectra are related with the temperature reached. For the development of the model, several aliquots are heated at known temperatures, and used as standards in the calibration set. This model offers the possibility to make estimations of the temperature reached on a burned sample from its NIR spectrum. However, the estimation of the temperature reached using NIR spectroscopy is due to changes in several components, and cannot be attributed to changes in a unique soil component. Thus, we can estimate the temperature reached by the interaction between temperature and the thermo-sensible soil components. In addition, we cannot expect the uniform distribution of these components, even at small scale. Consequently, the proportion of these soil components can vary spatially across the site. This variation will be present in the samples used to construct the model and also in the samples affected by the wildfire. Therefore, the strategies followed to develop robust models should be focused to manage this expected variation. In this work we compared the prediction accuracy of models constructed with different approaches. These approaches were designed to provide insights about how to distribute the efforts needed for the development of robust

  18. Soil moisture deficit estimation using satellite multi-angle brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei; Dai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Accurate soil moisture information is critically important for hydrological modelling. Although remote sensing soil moisture measurement has become an important data source, it cannot be used directly in hydrological modelling. A novel study based on nonlinear techniques (a local linear regression (LLR) and two feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs)) is carried out to estimate soil moisture deficit (SMD), using the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) multi-angle brightness temperatures (Tbs) with both horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarisations. The gamma test is used for the first time to determine the optimum number of Tbs required to construct a reliable smooth model for SMD estimation, and the relationship between model input and output is achieved through error variance estimation. The simulated SMD time series in the study area is from the Xinanjiang hydrological model. The results have shown that LLR model is better at capturing the interrelations between SMD and Tbs than ANNs, with outstanding statistical performances obtained during both training (NSE = 0.88, r = 0.94, RMSE = 0.008 m) and testing phases (NSE = 0.85, r = 0.93, RMSE = 0.009 m). Nevertheless, both ANN training algorithms (radial BFGS and conjugate gradient) have performed well in estimating the SMD data and showed excellent performances compared with those derived directly from the SMOS soil moisture products. This study has also demonstrated the informative capability of the gamma test in the input data selection for model development. These results provide interesting perspectives for data-assimilation in flood-forecasting.

  19. Effect of climate variability on estimation of greenhouse parameters: Usefulness of a pre-instrumental temperature record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.; White, Benjamin S.

    To estimate the strength of the greenhouse warming signal embedded in the noise of natural climate variability, a statistical methodology is applied to a functional model of the signal and stochastic models of the noise. The confidence of greenhouse parameter estimates, namely climate sensitivity, obtained from a record of global near-surface temperature is highly dependent on natural climate variability with a time scale of roughly a century. A pre-instrumental temperature record is needed to construct empirically a model for natural variability of century time-scale which, in turn, is needed to determine the confidence of parameter estimates. However, for assumed models for climate variability, data prior to 1950 does not significantly improve the confidence of estimates. In fact, addition of an accurate pre-instrumental record is not expected to have a large impact on climate sensitivity estimates made with only the instrumental temperature record.

  20. Heritability of body surface temperature in hens estimated by infrared thermography at normal or hot temperatures and genetic correlations with egg and feather quality.

    PubMed

    Loyau, T; Zerjal, T; Rodenburg, T B; Fablet, J; Tixier-Boichard, M; Pinard-van der Laan, M H; Mignon-Grasteau, S

    2016-10-01

    Exposure of laying hens to chronic heat stress results in loss of egg production. It should be possible to improve hen resilience to chronic heat stress by genetic selection but measuring their sensitivity through internal temperature is time consuming and is not very precise. In this study we used infrared thermography to measure the hen's capacity to dissipate heat, in a commercial line of laying hens subjected to cycles of neutral (N, 19.6°C) or high (H, 28.4°C) ambient temperatures. Mean body temperatures (BT) were estimated from 9355 infrared images of wing, comb and shank taken from 1200 hens. Genetic parameters were estimated separately for N and H temperatures. Correlations between BT and plumage condition were also investigated. Wing temperature had low heritability (0.00 to 0.09), consistent with the fact that wing temperature mainly reflects the environmental temperature and is not a zone of heat dissipation. The heritability of comb temperature was higher, from 0.15 to 0.19 in N and H conditions, respectively. Finally, the shank temperature provided the highest heritability estimates, with values of 0.20 to 0.22 in H and N conditions, respectively. Taken together, these results show that heat dissipation is partly under genetic control. Interestingly, the genetic correlation between plumage condition and shank and comb temperatures indicated that birds with poor condition plumage also had the possibility to dissipate heat through featherless areas. Genetic correlations of temperature measurements with egg quality showed that temperatures were correlated with egg width and weight, yolk brightness and yellowness and Haugh units only under H conditions. In contrast, shell colour was correlated with leg temperature only at thermo-neutrality.

  1. Heritability of body surface temperature in hens estimated by infrared thermography at normal or hot temperatures and genetic correlations with egg and feather quality.

    PubMed

    Loyau, T; Zerjal, T; Rodenburg, T B; Fablet, J; Tixier-Boichard, M; Pinard-van der Laan, M H; Mignon-Grasteau, S

    2016-10-01

    Exposure of laying hens to chronic heat stress results in loss of egg production. It should be possible to improve hen resilience to chronic heat stress by genetic selection but measuring their sensitivity through internal temperature is time consuming and is not very precise. In this study we used infrared thermography to measure the hen's capacity to dissipate heat, in a commercial line of laying hens subjected to cycles of neutral (N, 19.6°C) or high (H, 28.4°C) ambient temperatures. Mean body temperatures (BT) were estimated from 9355 infrared images of wing, comb and shank taken from 1200 hens. Genetic parameters were estimated separately for N and H temperatures. Correlations between BT and plumage condition were also investigated. Wing temperature had low heritability (0.00 to 0.09), consistent with the fact that wing temperature mainly reflects the environmental temperature and is not a zone of heat dissipation. The heritability of comb temperature was higher, from 0.15 to 0.19 in N and H conditions, respectively. Finally, the shank temperature provided the highest heritability estimates, with values of 0.20 to 0.22 in H and N conditions, respectively. Taken together, these results show that heat dissipation is partly under genetic control. Interestingly, the genetic correlation between plumage condition and shank and comb temperatures indicated that birds with poor condition plumage also had the possibility to dissipate heat through featherless areas. Genetic correlations of temperature measurements with egg quality showed that temperatures were correlated with egg width and weight, yolk brightness and yellowness and Haugh units only under H conditions. In contrast, shell colour was correlated with leg temperature only at thermo-neutrality. PMID:27095244

  2. Estimation of Daily Reference Evapotranspiration using Temperature Based Models and Remotely Sensed Data over Indian River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Shwetha H.; D, Nagesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Reference evapotranspiration (ETo) is the most significant component of the hydrological budget. Accurate quantification of ETo is vital for proper water management, efficient agricultural activities, irrigation planning and irrigation scheduling. FAO Penman Montieth (FAO-PM) is the widely accepted and used method for the ETo estimation under all climatic conditions, but needs numerous inputs which are difficult to acquire in developing countries. In such conditions, temperature based models such as Hargreaves-Samani (HS) equation and Penman Montieth temperature (PMT) can be used, where only maximum and minimum temperatures are required. Spatial interpolation of meteorological parameters to calculate spatial variation of ETo results in inaccurate estimations at lowly densed weather stations. Hence, there is a necessity of simple and easy method to estimate spatial distribution of ETo. In this regard, remotely sensed data provides viable alternative approach to obtain continuous spatio-temporal ETo. In this study, we used temperature based ETo models with remotely sensed LST data to estimate spatio-temporal variation of ETo. Day and night LST (MYD11A1) data of the year 2010 for the Cauvery basin on a daily basis were obtained from MODIS sensor of Aqua satellite. Firstly, day and night land surface temperatures (LST) with HS and PMT methods were applied to estimate ETo. Secondly, maximum and minimum air temperatures were estimated from day and night LST respectively using simple linear regression and these air temperature data were used to estimate ETo. Estimated results were validated with the ETo calculated using meteorological data obtained from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) by applying standard FAO-PM. The preliminary results revealed that, HS method with LST overestimated ETo in the study region. Statistical analysis showed PMT method with both LST and air temperatures performed better than the HS method. These two temperature based methods are often used for

  3. Estimation of Regional Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature. Part 2: Application of Equilibrium Evaporation Model to Estimate Evapotranspiration by Remote Sensing Technique. [Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotoda, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Kai, K.; Yoshino, M. M.; Takeda, K.; Seki, K.

    1985-01-01

    In a humid region like Japan, it seems that the radiation term in the energy balance equation plays a more important role for evapotranspiration then does the vapor pressure difference between the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer. A Priestley-Taylor type equation (equilibrium evaporation model) is used to estimate evapotranspiration. Net radiation, soil heat flux, and surface temperature data are obtained. Only temperature data obtained by remotely sensed techniques are used.

  4. A hybrid downscaling procedure for estimating the vertical distribution of ambient temperature in local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiannikopoulou, I.; Philippopoulos, K.; Deligiorgi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere is defined by a combination of dynamic and radiation transfer processes and plays an important role in describing the meteorological conditions at local scales. The scope of this work is to develop and quantify the predictive ability of a hybrid dynamic-statistical downscaling procedure to estimate the vertical profile of ambient temperature at finer spatial scales. The study focuses on the warm period of the year (June - August) and the method is applied to an urban coastal site (Hellinikon), located in eastern Mediterranean. The two-step methodology initially involves the dynamic downscaling of coarse resolution climate data via the RegCM4.0 regional climate model and subsequently the statistical downscaling of the modeled outputs by developing and training site-specific artificial neural networks (ANN). The 2.5ox2.5o gridded NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 dataset is used as initial and boundary conditions for the dynamic downscaling element of the methodology, which enhances the regional representivity of the dataset to 20km and provides modeled fields in 18 vertical levels. The regional climate modeling results are compared versus the upper-air Hellinikon radiosonde observations and the mean absolute error (MAE) is calculated between the four grid point values nearest to the station and the ambient temperature at the standard and significant pressure levels. The statistical downscaling element of the methodology consists of an ensemble of ANN models, one for each pressure level, which are trained separately and employ the regional scale RegCM4.0 output. The ANN models are theoretically capable of estimating any measurable input-output function to any desired degree of accuracy. In this study they are used as non-linear function approximators for identifying the relationship between a number of predictor variables and the ambient temperature at the various vertical levels. An insight of the statistically derived input

  5. Uncertainty in temperature response of current consumption-based emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstensen, J.; Peters, G. P.; Andrew, R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have connected emissions of greenhouse gases to economic and trade data to quantify the causal chain from consumption to emissions and climate change. These studies usually combine data and models originating from different sources, making it difficult to estimate uncertainties along the entire causal chain. We estimate uncertainties in economic data, multi-pollutant emission statistics, and metric parameters, and use Monte Carlo analysis to quantify contributions to uncertainty and to determine how uncertainty propagates to estimates of global temperature change from regional and sectoral territorial- and consumption-based emissions for the year 2007. We find that the uncertainties are sensitive to the emission allocations, mix of pollutants included, the metric and its time horizon, and the level of aggregation of the results. Uncertainties in the final results are largely dominated by the climate sensitivity and the parameters associated with the warming effects of CO2. Based on our assumptions, which exclude correlations in the economic data, the uncertainty in the economic data appears to have a relatively small impact on uncertainty at the national level in comparison to emissions and metric uncertainty. Much higher uncertainties are found at the sectoral level. Our results suggest that consumption-based national emissions are not significantly more uncertain than the corresponding production-based emissions since the largest uncertainties are due to metric and emissions which affect both perspectives equally. The two perspectives exhibit different sectoral uncertainties, due to changes of pollutant compositions. We find global sectoral consumption uncertainties in the range of ±10 to ±27 % using the Global Temperature Potential with a 50-year time horizon, with metric uncertainties dominating. National-level uncertainties are similar in both perspectives due to the dominance of CO2 over other pollutants. The consumption emissions of the top

  6. The reliability of emplacement temperature estimates using palaeomagnetic methods: a case study from Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardot, Leon; McClelland, Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    The mode of origin of volcaniclastic deposits can be difficult to determine from field constraints, and the palaeomagnetic technique of emplacement temperature (Te) determination provides a powerful discriminatory test for primary volcanic origin. This technique requires that the low-blocking-temperature (Tb) component of remanence in the direction of the Earth's field in inherited lithic clasts is of thermal origin and was acquired during transport and cooling in a hot pyroclastic flow; otherwise, the Te determination may be inaccurate. If the low-Tb component is not of thermal origin it may be a viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) or a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). The acquisition of a VRM depends on the duration of exposure to an applied magnetic field, and thus the laboratory unblocking temperature (Tub) of a VRM of a certain age imposes a minimum Te that can be determined for that deposit. Palaeointensity experiments were carried out to assess the magnetic origin (pTRM, CRM, or a combination of both) of the low-Tb component in a number of samples from pyroclastic deposits from Santorini, Greece. Seven of the 24 samples used in these experiments passed the stringent tests for reliable palaointensity determination. These values demonstrated, for six of the samples, that the low-Tb component was of thermal origin and therefore that the estimate of Te was valid. In the other 17 samples, valuable information was gained about the characteristics of the magnetic alteration that occurred during the palaeointensity experiments, allowing assessment of the reliability of Te estimates in these cases. These cases showed that if a CRM is present it has a direction parallel to the applied field, and not parallel to the direction of the parent grain. They also show that, even if a CRM is present, it does not necessarily affect the estimate of Te. Two samples used in these experiments displayed curvature between their two components of magnetization. Data from this

  7. Frictional Temperature of Chelungpu Seismic Faulting Estimated from the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Kuo, L.; Chou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Two holes, named Hole-A and Hole-B with the depths of 2,003 m and 1,350 m, respectively, were raised by the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) which recovered continuous fresh core samples across the rupture zone of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw7.6). To investigate the coseismic frictional temperature in seismogenic fault zones, we examine the characteristics of core materials including clay, carbonate and magnetic minerals and carbonaceous materials with optical, SEM, TEM and TXM for mineral identifications, and chemical analyses by ICP-MS for geochemical modeling in the Chelungpu-fault zones. The primary slip zone (PSZ), characterized by the isotropic layer in black gouge of those two holes can be recognized at the depth around 1,111 m and 1,136 m with ~20 mm and ~3 mm in thickness, respectively. For the Hole-A, the frictional temperature was calculated from the clay mineral assemblages of FZ1111, which show evidence of melting, and the temperature in a ~2 cm band within the black gouge zone is estimated to be from 900 °C to 1100 °C by comparing the SEM images of in situ natural samples with those of heated materials, and the finding of no recrystallization of kaolinite-amorphous aluminosilicates-spinel in the fault samples. For the Hole-B, the frictional temperature in the FZ1136 was calculated as 400 °C to 900 °C, based on the magnetic mineral variations, de-carbonation of calcite, clay mineral assemblages, and geochemical modeling on trace element variations.

  8. Using Annual Data to Estimate the Public Health Impact of Extreme Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Goggins, William B; Yang, Chunyuh; Hokama, Tomiko; Law, Lewis S K; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2015-07-01

    Short-term associations between both hot and cold ambient temperatures and higher mortality have been found worldwide. Few studies have examined these associations on longer time scales. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were calculated for 1976-2012 for Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China, defining "annual" time periods in 2 ways: from May through April of the following year and from November through October. Annual frequency and severity of extreme temperatures were summarized by using a degree-days approach with extreme heat expressed as annual degree-days >29.3°C and cold as annual degree-days <27.5°C. For example, a day with a mean temperature of 25.0°C contributes 2.5 cold degree-days to the annual total. Generalized additive models were used to estimate the association between annual hot and cold degree-days and the ASMR, with adjustment for long-term trends. Increases of 10 hot or 200 cold degree-days in an annual period, the approximate interquartile ranges for these variables, were significantly (all P's ≤ 0.011) associated with 1.9% or 3.1% increases, respectively, in the annual ASMR for the May-April analyses and with 2.2% or 2.8% increases, respectively, in the November-October analyses. Associations were stronger for noncancer and elderly mortality. Mortality increases associated with extreme temperature are not simply due to short-term forward displacement of deaths that would have occurred anyway within a few weeks. PMID:26009315

  9. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, J.; Jozsa, J.

    2009-05-01

    Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature () by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure) of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (,) pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature () and ET rate (ETw), obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. , in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska), was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000-2007) catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a) observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b) the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops).

  10. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, J.; Jozsa, J.

    2009-03-01

    Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature () by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure) of the complementary relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (, ) pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature () and ET rate (ETw), obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. , in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska), was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000-2007) catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a) observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b) the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e., rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops).

  11. Parameter Measurement and Estimation at Variable Scales: Example of Soil Temperature in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The issue of matching measurement scale to application scale is long standing and frequently revisited with advances in instrumentation and computing power. In the past we have emphasized the importance of understanding the dominant processes and amount and nature of parameter variability when addressing these issues. Landscape-scale distribution of carbon and carbon fluxes is a primary focus of the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (RC CZO). Soil temperature (Ts) is a critical parameter of generally unknown variability. Estimates of Ts are often based on air temperature (Ta), but it is understood that other factors control Ts, especially in complex terrain, where solar radiation may be a major driver. Data were collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), which is 240 km2 in extent and covers a 1000 m elevation range. We used spatially extensive Ts data to evaluate correlations with Ta (915 m elevation gradient) on aspect neutral sites with similar vegetative cover. Effects of complex terrain were evaluated using a combination of fixed point measurements, fiber optic distributed temperature sensing and periodic, spatially distributed point measurements. We found that Ts over the elevation gradient followed Ta closely. However, within small subwatersheds with uniform Ta, Ts may be extremely variable, with a standard deviation of 8° C. This was strongly related to topographically associated land surface units (LSU's) and highly seasonal. Within LSU variability was generally low while there were seasonally significant differences between LSU's. The mean annual soil temperature difference between LSU's was greater than that associated with the 915 m elevation gradient. The seasonality of Ts variability was not directly related to solar radiation effects but rather to variations in cover. Scaling Ts requires high resolution accounting of topography in this environment. Spatial patterns of soil carbon at the RCEW are consistent with this.

  12. S∧4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The S∧4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at ~1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S∧4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 ¢/K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S∧4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 ¢/K -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  13. Responding to bioterror concerns by increasing milk pasteurization temperature would increase estimated annual deaths from listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Martin, Nicole; Laue, Shelley; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In a 2005 analysis of a potential bioterror attack on the food supply involving a botulinum toxin release into the milk supply, the authors recommended adopting a toxin inactivation step during milk processing. In response, some dairy processors increased the times and temperatures of pasteurization well above the legal minimum for high temperature, short time pasteurization (72 °C for 15 s), with unknown implications for public health. The present study was conducted to determine whether an increase in high temperature, short time pasteurization temperature would affect the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen normally eliminated with proper pasteurization but of concern when milk is contaminated postpasteurization. L. monocytogenes growth during refrigerated storage was higher in milk pasteurized at 82 °C than in milk pasteurized at 72 °C. Specifically, the time lag before exponential growth was decreased and the maximum population density was increased. The public health impact of this change in pasteurization was evaluated using a quantitative microbial risk assessment of deaths from listeriosis attributable to consumption of pasteurized fluid milk that was contaminated postprocessing. Conservative estimates of the effect of pasteurizing all fluid milk at 82 °C rather than 72 °C are that annual listeriosis deaths from consumption of this milk would increase from 18 to 670, a 38-fold increase (8.7- to 96-fold increase, 5th and 95th percentiles). These results exemplify a situation in which response to a rare bioterror threat may have the unintended consequence of putting the public at increased risk of a known, yet severe harm and illustrate the need for a paradigm shift toward multioutcome risk benefit analyses when proposing changes to established food safety practices.

  14. Responding to bioterror concerns by increasing milk pasteurization temperature would increase estimated annual deaths from listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Martin, Nicole; Laue, Shelley; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In a 2005 analysis of a potential bioterror attack on the food supply involving a botulinum toxin release into the milk supply, the authors recommended adopting a toxin inactivation step during milk processing. In response, some dairy processors increased the times and temperatures of pasteurization well above the legal minimum for high temperature, short time pasteurization (72 °C for 15 s), with unknown implications for public health. The present study was conducted to determine whether an increase in high temperature, short time pasteurization temperature would affect the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen normally eliminated with proper pasteurization but of concern when milk is contaminated postpasteurization. L. monocytogenes growth during refrigerated storage was higher in milk pasteurized at 82 °C than in milk pasteurized at 72 °C. Specifically, the time lag before exponential growth was decreased and the maximum population density was increased. The public health impact of this change in pasteurization was evaluated using a quantitative microbial risk assessment of deaths from listeriosis attributable to consumption of pasteurized fluid milk that was contaminated postprocessing. Conservative estimates of the effect of pasteurizing all fluid milk at 82 °C rather than 72 °C are that annual listeriosis deaths from consumption of this milk would increase from 18 to 670, a 38-fold increase (8.7- to 96-fold increase, 5th and 95th percentiles). These results exemplify a situation in which response to a rare bioterror threat may have the unintended consequence of putting the public at increased risk of a known, yet severe harm and illustrate the need for a paradigm shift toward multioutcome risk benefit analyses when proposing changes to established food safety practices. PMID:24780323

  15. Using Annual Data to Estimate the Public Health Impact of Extreme Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Goggins, William B; Yang, Chunyuh; Hokama, Tomiko; Law, Lewis S K; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2015-07-01

    Short-term associations between both hot and cold ambient temperatures and higher mortality have been found worldwide. Few studies have examined these associations on longer time scales. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were calculated for 1976-2012 for Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China, defining "annual" time periods in 2 ways: from May through April of the following year and from November through October. Annual frequency and severity of extreme temperatures were summarized by using a degree-days approach with extreme heat expressed as annual degree-days >29.3°C and cold as annual degree-days <27.5°C. For example, a day with a mean temperature of 25.0°C contributes 2.5 cold degree-days to the annual total. Generalized additive models were used to estimate the association between annual hot and cold degree-days and the ASMR, with adjustment for long-term trends. Increases of 10 hot or 200 cold degree-days in an annual period, the approximate interquartile ranges for these variables, were significantly (all P's ≤ 0.011) associated with 1.9% or 3.1% increases, respectively, in the annual ASMR for the May-April analyses and with 2.2% or 2.8% increases, respectively, in the November-October analyses. Associations were stronger for noncancer and elderly mortality. Mortality increases associated with extreme temperature are not simply due to short-term forward displacement of deaths that would have occurred anyway within a few weeks.

  16. Estimating soil moisture and soil thermal and hydraulic properties by assimilating soil temperatures using a particle batch smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Giesen, Nick van de

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the potential of estimating the soil moisture profile and the soil thermal and hydraulic properties by assimilating soil temperature at shallow depths using a particle batch smoother (PBS) using synthetic tests. Soil hydraulic properties influence the redistribution of soil moisture within the soil profile. Soil moisture, in turn, influences the soil thermal properties and surface energy balance through evaporation, and hence the soil heat transfer. Synthetic experiments were used to test the hypothesis that assimilating soil temperature observations could lead to improved estimates of soil hydraulic properties. We also compared different data assimilation strategies to investigate the added value of jointly estimating soil thermal and hydraulic properties in soil moisture profile estimation. Results show that both soil thermal and hydraulic properties can be estimated using shallow soil temperatures. Jointly updating soil hydraulic properties and soil states yields robust and accurate soil moisture estimates. Further improvement is observed when soil thermal properties were also estimated together with the soil hydraulic properties and soil states. Finally, we show that the inclusion of a tuning factor to prevent rapid fluctuations of parameter estimation, yields improved soil moisture, temperature, and thermal and hydraulic properties.

  17. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  18. POWER ASYMMETRY IN WMAP AND PLANCK TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS AS MEASURED BY A LOCAL VARIANCE ESTIMATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Akrami, Y.; Fantaye, Y.; Eriksen, H. K.; Hansen, F. K.; Shafieloo, A.; Banday, A. J.; Górski, K. M. E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no

    2014-04-01

    We revisit the question of hemispherical power asymmetry in the WMAP and Planck temperature sky maps by measuring the local variance over the sky and on disks of various sizes. For the 2013 Planck sky map we find that none of the 1000 available isotropic Planck ''Full Focal Plane'' simulations have a larger variance asymmetry than that estimated from the data, suggesting the presence of an anisotropic signature formally significant at least at the 3.3σ level. For the WMAP 9 year data we find that 5 out of 1000 simulations have a larger asymmetry. The preferred direction for the asymmetry from the Planck data is (l, b) = (212°, –13°), in good agreement with previous reports of the same hemispherical power asymmetry.

  19. Developing first time-series of land surface temperature from AATSR with uncertainty estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2013-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Earth Observation satellites provide the opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST approximately every 3 days or less. One such source of satellite retrieved LST has been the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR); with LST retrieval being implemented in the AATSR Instrument Processing Facility in March 2004. Here we present first regional and global time-series of LST data from AATSR with estimates of uncertainty. Mean changes in temperature over the last decade will be discussed along with regional patterns. Although time-series across all three ATSR missions have previously been constructed (Kogler et al., 2012), the use of low resolution auxiliary data in the retrieval algorithm and non-optimal cloud masking resulted in time-series artefacts. As such, considerable ESA supported development has been carried out on the AATSR data to address these concerns. This includes the integration of high resolution auxiliary data into the retrieval algorithm and subsequent generation of coefficients and tuning parameters, plus the development of an improved cloud mask based on the simulation of clear sky conditions from radiance transfer modelling (Ghent et al., in prep.). Any inference on this LST record is though of limited value without the accompaniment of an uncertainty estimate; wherein the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology quote an uncertainty as "a parameter associated with the result of a measurement that characterizes the dispersion of the values that could reasonably be attributed to the measurand that is the value of the particular quantity to be measured". Furthermore, pixel level uncertainty fields are a mandatory requirement in the on-going preparation of the LST product for the upcoming Sea and Land Surface Temperature (SLSTR) instrument on-board Sentinel-3

  20. Comparison of ArcGIS and SAS Geostatistical Analyst to Estimate Population-Weighted Monthly Temperature for US Counties

    PubMed Central

    Xiaopeng, QI; Liang, WEI; BARKER, Laurie; LEKIACHVILI, Akaki; Xingyou, ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Temperature changes are known to have significant impacts on human health. Accurate estimates of population-weighted average monthly air temperature for US counties are needed to evaluate temperature’s association with health behaviours and disease, which are sampled or reported at the county level and measured on a monthly—or 30-day—basis. Most reported temperature estimates were calculated using ArcGIS, relatively few used SAS. We compared the performance of geostatistical models to estimate population-weighted average temperature in each month for counties in 48 states using ArcGIS v9.3 and SAS v 9.2 on a CITGO platform. Monthly average temperature for Jan-Dec 2007 and elevation from 5435 weather stations were used to estimate the temperature at county population centroids. County estimates were produced with elevation as a covariate. Performance of models was assessed by comparing adjusted R2, mean squared error, root mean squared error, and processing time. Prediction accuracy for split validation was above 90% for 11 months in ArcGIS and all 12 months in SAS. Cokriging in SAS achieved higher prediction accuracy and lower estimation bias as compared to cokriging in ArcGIS. County-level estimates produced by both packages were positively correlated (adjusted R2 range=0.95 to 0.99); accuracy and precision improved with elevation as a covariate. Both methods from ArcGIS and SAS are reliable for U.S. county-level temperature estimates; However, ArcGIS’s merits in spatial data pre-processing and processing time may be important considerations for software selection, especially for multi-year or multi-state projects. PMID:26167169

  1. A new lithium-ion battery internal temperature on-line estimate method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. G.; Sun, Z. C.; Wei, X. Z.; Dai, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    The power battery thermal management problem in EV (electric vehicle) and HEV (hybrid electric vehicle) has been widely discussed, and EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) is an effective experimental method to test and estimate the status of the battery. Firstly, an electrochemical-based impedance matrix analysis for lithium-ion battery is developed to describe the impedance response of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Then a method, based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement, has been proposed to estimate the internal temperature of power lithium-ion battery by analyzing the phase shift and magnitude of impedance at different ambient temperatures. Respectively, the SoC (state of charge) and temperature have different effects on the impedance characteristics of battery at various frequency ranges in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experimental study. Also the impedance spectrum affected by SoH (state of health) is discussed in the paper preliminary. Therefore, the excitation frequency selected to estimate the inner temperature is in the frequency range which is significantly influenced by temperature without the SoC and SoH. The intrinsic relationship between the phase shift and temperature is established under the chosen excitation frequency. And the magnitude of impedance related to temperature is studied in the paper. In practical applications, through obtaining the phase shift and magnitude of impedance, the inner temperature estimation could be achieved. Then the verification experiments are conduced to validate the estimate method. Finally, an estimate strategy and an on-line estimation system implementation scheme utilizing battery management system are presented to describe the engineering value.

  2. Global Assessment of Land Surface Temperature From Geostationary Satellites and Model Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Q.; Minnis, P.; daSilva, A. M., Jr.; Palikonda, R.; Yost, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface (or 'skin') temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research we compare two global and independent data sets: (i) LST retrievals from five geostationary satellites generated at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and (ii) LST estimates from the quasi-operational NASA GEOS-5 global modeling and assimilation system. The objective is to thoroughly understand both data sets and their systematic differences in preparation for the assimilation of the LaRC LST retrievals into GEOS-5. As expected, mean differences (MD) and root-mean-square differences (RMSD) between modeled and retrieved LST vary tremendously by region and time of day. Typical (absolute) MD values range from 1-3 K in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude regions to near 10 K in regions where modeled clouds are unrealistic, for example in north-eastern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil. Typically, model estimates of LST are higher than satellite retrievals during the night and lower during the day. RMSD values range from 1-3 K during the night to 2-5 K during the day, but are larger over the 50-120 W longitude band where the LST retrievals are derived from the FY2E platform

  3. Effect of TRMM boost on oceanic rain rate estimates based on microwave brightness temperature histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, L. S.; Shin, D.; Chokngamwong, R.

    2006-05-01

    A statistical emission-based passive microwave retrieval algorithm developed by Wilheit, Chang and Chiu (1991) has been used to estimate space/time oceanic rainfall. The algorithm has been applied to Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data taken on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites to provide monthly oceanic rainfall over 2.5ºx2.5º and 5ºx5º latitude-longitude boxes by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project-Polar Satellite Precipitation Data Center (GPCP-PSPDC, URL: http://gpcp- pspdc.gmu.edu) as part of NASA's contribution to the GPCP. The algorithm has been adapted to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data to produce a TRMM Level 3 standard product (3A11) over 5ºx5º latitude/longitude boxes. To extend the TRMM mission, the TRMM satellite was boosted to a higher altitude thus changing the rain rate-brightness temperature relation and other rain rate parameters in the estimation procedure. Comparison with the SSM/I product showed a statistically significant difference between the pre and post boost TMI monthly rain rates. Our results showed that the difference can be reconciled in terms of the changes in earth's incidence angle of TMI, the freezing level height, and the beam-filling correction factor. After the incorporation of these changes for the post boost data, there is no significant difference between the pre and post-boost 3A11 data.

  4. An alternative method to estimate zero flow temperature differences for Granier's thermal dissipation technique.

    PubMed

    Regalado, Carlos M; Ritter, Axel

    2007-08-01

    Calibration of the Granier thermal dissipation technique for measuring stem sap flow in trees requires determination of the temperature difference (DeltaT) between a heated and an unheated probe when sap flow is zero (DeltaT(max)). Classically, DeltaT(max) has been estimated from the maximum predawn DeltaT, assuming that sap flow is negligible at nighttime. However, because sap flow may continue during the night, the maximum predawn DeltaT value may underestimate the true DeltaT(max). No alternative method has yet been proposed to estimate DeltaT(max) when sap flow is non-zero at night. A sensitivity analysis is presented showing that errors in DeltaT(max) may amplify through sap flux density computations in Granier's approach, such that small amounts of undetected nighttime sap flow may lead to large diurnal sap flux density errors, hence the need for a correct estimate of DeltaT(max). By rearranging Granier's original formula, an optimization method to compute DeltaT(max) from simultaneous measurements of diurnal DeltaT and micrometeorological variables, without assuming that sap flow is negligible at night, is presented. Some illustrative examples are shown for sap flow measurements carried out on individuals of Erica arborea L., which has needle-like leaves, and Myrica faya Ait., a broadleaf species. We show that, although DeltaT(max) values obtained by the proposed method may be similar in some instances to the DeltaT(max) predicted at night, in general the values differ. The procedure presented has the potential of being applied not only to Granier's method, but to other heat-based sap flow systems that require a zero flow calibration, such as the Cermák et al. (1973) heat balance method and the T-max heat pulse system of Green et al. (2003).

  5. An alternative method to estimate zero flow temperature differences for Granier's thermal dissipation technique.

    PubMed

    Regalado, Carlos M; Ritter, Axel

    2007-08-01

    Calibration of the Granier thermal dissipation technique for measuring stem sap flow in trees requires determination of the temperature difference (DeltaT) between a heated and an unheated probe when sap flow is zero (DeltaT(max)). Classically, DeltaT(max) has been estimated from the maximum predawn DeltaT, assuming that sap flow is negligible at nighttime. However, because sap flow may continue during the night, the maximum predawn DeltaT value may underestimate the true DeltaT(max). No alternative method has yet been proposed to estimate DeltaT(max) when sap flow is non-zero at night. A sensitivity analysis is presented showing that errors in DeltaT(max) may amplify through sap flux density computations in Granier's approach, such that small amounts of undetected nighttime sap flow may lead to large diurnal sap flux density errors, hence the need for a correct estimate of DeltaT(max). By rearranging Granier's original formula, an optimization method to compute DeltaT(max) from simultaneous measurements of diurnal DeltaT and micrometeorological variables, without assuming that sap flow is negligible at night, is presented. Some illustrative examples are shown for sap flow measurements carried out on individuals of Erica arborea L., which has needle-like leaves, and Myrica faya Ait., a broadleaf species. We show that, although DeltaT(max) values obtained by the proposed method may be similar in some instances to the DeltaT(max) predicted at night, in general the values differ. The procedure presented has the potential of being applied not only to Granier's method, but to other heat-based sap flow systems that require a zero flow calibration, such as the Cermák et al. (1973) heat balance method and the T-max heat pulse system of Green et al. (2003). PMID:17472936

  6. Last interglacial sea-surface temperature estimates from the California margin; improvements to the modern analog technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Poore, Richard Z.

    1999-01-01

    Total faunal analyses of planktic foraminifer assemblages are used to derive sea surface temperature estimates for the last interglacial from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1018 and 1020 off northern and central California. Foraminifer assemblage data were transformed to sea-surface temperature (SST) estimates by using the modern analog technique (MAT). In order to improve our ability to estimate SST in this area, the coretop calibration data base used in the MAT was augmented by 13 new age-validated coretop assemblages from the U.S. Pacific Margin.

  7. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  8. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  9. Estimation of surface heat flux and temperature distributions in a multilayer tissue based on the hyperbolic model of heat conduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chen, Wen-Lih; Chang, Win-Jin; Yang, Yu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an inverse algorithm based on the conjugate gradient method and the discrepancy principle is applied to solve the inverse hyperbolic heat conduction problem in estimating the unknown time-dependent surface heat flux in a skin tissue, which is stratified into epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous layers, from the temperature measurements taken within the medium. Subsequently, the temperature distributions in the tissue can be calculated as well. The concept of finite heat propagation velocity is applied to the modeling of the bioheat transfer problem. The inverse solutions will be justified based on the numerical experiments in which two different heat flux distributions are to be determined. The temperature data obtained from the direct problem are used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of measurement errors on the precision of the estimated results is also investigated. Results show that an excellent estimation on the time-dependent surface heat flux can be obtained for the test cases considered in this study.

  10. Estimation of the temperature of a radiating body by measuring the stationary temperatures of a thermometer placed at different distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, V. M.; Villaluenga, J. P. G.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Pérez-Cordón, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the temperature of a radiating body. The experimental method requires only very common instrumentation. It is based on the measurement of the stationary temperature of an object placed at different distances from the body and on the application of the energy balance equation in a stationary state. The method allows one to obtain the temperature of an inaccessible radiating body when radiation measurements are not available. The method has been applied to the determination of the filament temperature of incandescent lamps of different powers.

  11. How deep, how hot: comparing pressure and temperature estimates from amphibole and rhyolite-MELTS thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A. S.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    unreliable for constraining temperature, if not also pressure. Thermobarometry with matrix glass compositions shows: - Rhyolite-MELTS thermobarometry: 190-260 MPa, 780-800 (×40 °C). Many glass compositions used for these simulations did not yield estimates, only low Na, high K analyses were successful. Thus, rhyolite-MELTS also served to pare down analyses affected by alteration or analytical problems. - Glass SiO2 contents (~76.9 wt.% SiO2): 200-250 MPa. - Projection on haplogranitic ternary: 250 (×50) MPa. We find poor agreement between the many calibrations of amphibole and amphibole-plagioclase thermobarometers. These thermobarometers may be useful for broadly identifying where magmas reside in the Earth's crust (lower, middle, upper), but they are likely not accurate enough to resolve pressure differences within the upper crust, where we expect many eruptible magmas to be stored. Results from glass barometry are more consistent and suggest that the Anderson & Smith (1995) calibration is the most accurate for amphibole. Temperatures from the rhyolite-MELTS thermometer are slight overestimates relative to Zr-in-sphene and Ti-in-zircon temperatures of 750 °C. Overall, rhyolite-MELTS thermobarometry shows great promise for determining crystallization conditions of glass-bearing rocks stored in the upper crust.

  12. Air temperature field distribution estimations over a Chinese mega-city using MODIS land surface temperature data: the case of Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weichun; Zhou, Liguo; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    The capability of obtaining spatially distributed air temperature data from remote sensing measurements is an improvement for many environmental applications focused on urban heat island, carbon emissions, climate change, etc. This paper is based on the MODIS/Terra and Aqua data utilized to study the effect of the urban atmospheric heat island in Shanghai, China. The correlation between retrieved MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and air temperature measured at local weather stations was initially studied at different temporal and spatial scales. Secondly, the air temperature data with spatial resolutions of 250 m and 1 km were estimated from MODIS LST data and in-situ measured air temperature. The results showed that there is a slightly higher correlation between air temperature and MODIS LST at a 250m resolution in spring and autumn on an annual scale than observed at a 1 km resolution. Although the distribution pattern of the air temperature thermal field varies in different seasons, the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai is characterized by a distribution pattern of multiple centers, with the central urban area as the primary center and the built-up regions in each district as the subcenters. This study demonstrates the potential not only for estimating the distribution of the air temperature thermal field from MODIS LST with 250 m resolution in spring and autumn in Shanghai, but also for providing scientific and effective methods for monitoring and studying UHI effect in a Chinese mega-city such as Shanghai.

  13. Estimating Bounds on Collisional Relaxation Rates of Spin-Polarized 87Rb Atoms at Ultracold Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Mies, Frederick H.; Williams, Carl J.; Julienne, Paul S.; Krauss, Morris

    1996-01-01

    We present quantum scattering calculations for the collisional relaxation rate coefficient of spin-polarized 87Rb(f = 2,m = 2) atoms, which determines the loss rate of cold Rb atoms from a magnetic trap. Unlike the lighter alkali atoms, spin-polarized 87Rb atoms can undergo dipolar relaxation due to both the normal spin-spin dipole interaction and a second-order spin-orbit interaction with distant electronic states of the dimer. We present ab initio calculations for the second-order spin-orbit terms for both Rb2 and Cs2. The corrections lead to a reduction in the relaxation rate for 87Rb. Our primary concern is to analyze the sensitivity of the 87Rb trap loss to the uncertainties in the ground state molecular potentials. Since the scattering length for the a3Σ+u state is already known, the major uncertainties are associated with the X1Σ+g potential. After testing the effect of systematically modifying the short-range form of the molecular potentials over a reasonable range, and introducing our best estimate of the second-order spin-orbit interaction, we estimate that in the low temperature limit the rate coefficient for loss of Rb atoms from the f = 2,m = 2 state is between 0.4 × 10−15 cm3/s and 2.4 × 10−15 cm3/s (where this number counts two atoms lost per collision). In a pure condensate the rate coefficient would be reduced by 1/2.

  14. Remotely estimating photosynthetic capacity, and its response to temperature, in vegetation canopies using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serbin, Shawn P.; Singh, Aditya; Desai, Ankur R.; Dubois, Sean G.; Jablonski, Andrew D.; Kingdon, Clayton C.; Kruger, Eric L.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2015-06-11

    To date, the utility of ecosystem and Earth system models (EESMs) has been limited by poor spatial and temporal representation of critical input parameters. For example, EESMs often rely on leaf-scale or literature-derived estimates for a key determinant of canopy photosynthesis, the maximum velocity of RuBP carboxylation (Vcmax, μmol m–2 s–1). Our recent work (Ainsworth et al., 2014; Serbin et al., 2012) showed that reflectance spectroscopy could be used to estimate Vcmax at the leaf level. Here, we present evidence that imaging spectroscopy data can be used to simultaneously predict Vcmax and its sensitivity to temperature (EV) at the canopy scale. In 2013 and 2014, high-altitude Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) imagery and contemporaneous ground-based assessments of canopy structure and leaf photosynthesis were acquired across an array of monospecific agroecosystems in central and southern California, USA. A partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling approach was employed to characterize the pixel-level variation in canopy Vcmax (at a standardized canopy temperature of 30 °C) and EV, based on visible and shortwave infrared AVIRIS spectra (414–2447 nm). Our approach yielded parsimonious models with strong predictive capability for Vcmax (at 30 °C) and EV (R2 of withheld data = 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), both of which varied substantially in the field (≥ 1.7 fold) across the sampled crop types. The models were applied to additional AVIRIS imagery to generate maps of Vcmax and EV, as well as their uncertainties, for agricultural landscapes in California. The spatial patterns exhibited in the maps were consistent with our in-situ observations. As a result, these findings highlight the considerable promise of airborne and, by implication, space-borne imaging spectroscopy, such as the proposed HyspIRI mission, to map spatial and

  15. Remotely estimating photosynthetic capacity, and its response to temperature, in vegetation canopies using imaging spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Serbin, Shawn P.; Singh, Aditya; Desai, Ankur R.; Dubois, Sean G.; Jablonski, Andrew D.; Kingdon, Clayton C.; Kruger, Eric L.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2015-06-11

    To date, the utility of ecosystem and Earth system models (EESMs) has been limited by poor spatial and temporal representation of critical input parameters. For example, EESMs often rely on leaf-scale or literature-derived estimates for a key determinant of canopy photosynthesis, the maximum velocity of RuBP carboxylation (Vcmax, μmol m–2 s–1). Our recent work (Ainsworth et al., 2014; Serbin et al., 2012) showed that reflectance spectroscopy could be used to estimate Vcmax at the leaf level. Here, we present evidence that imaging spectroscopy data can be used to simultaneously predict Vcmax and its sensitivity to temperature (EV) at the canopymore » scale. In 2013 and 2014, high-altitude Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) imagery and contemporaneous ground-based assessments of canopy structure and leaf photosynthesis were acquired across an array of monospecific agroecosystems in central and southern California, USA. A partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling approach was employed to characterize the pixel-level variation in canopy Vcmax (at a standardized canopy temperature of 30 °C) and EV, based on visible and shortwave infrared AVIRIS spectra (414–2447 nm). Our approach yielded parsimonious models with strong predictive capability for Vcmax (at 30 °C) and EV (R2 of withheld data = 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), both of which varied substantially in the field (≥ 1.7 fold) across the sampled crop types. The models were applied to additional AVIRIS imagery to generate maps of Vcmax and EV, as well as their uncertainties, for agricultural landscapes in California. The spatial patterns exhibited in the maps were consistent with our in-situ observations. As a result, these findings highlight the considerable promise of airborne and, by implication, space-borne imaging spectroscopy, such as the proposed HyspIRI mission, to map spatial and temporal variation in key drivers of photosynthetic metabolism in terrestrial vegetation.« less

  16. Soil Moisture Estimation by Assimilating L-Band Microwave Brightness Temperature with Geostatistics and Observation Localization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects. PMID:25635771

  17. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    PubMed

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  18. Temperature Observation Time and Type Influence Estimates of Heat-Related Mortality in Seven U.S. Cities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Robert E.; Hondula, David M.; Patel, Anjali P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extreme heat is a leading weather-related cause of mortality in the United States, but little guidance is available regarding how temperature variable selection impacts heat–mortality relationships. Objectives: We examined how the strength of the relationship between daily heat-related mortality and temperature varies as a function of temperature observation time, lag, and calculation method. Methods: Long time series of daily mortality counts and hourly temperature for seven U.S. cities with different climates were examined using a generalized additive model. The temperature effect was modeled separately for each hour of the day (with up to 3-day lags) along with different methods of calculating daily maximum, minimum, and mean temperature. We estimated the temperature effect on mortality for each variable by comparing the 99th versus 85th temperature percentiles, as determined from the annual time series. Results: In three northern cities (Boston, MA; Philadelphia, PA; and Seattle, WA) that appeared to have the greatest sensitivity to heat, hourly estimates were consistent with a diurnal pattern in the heat-mortality response, with strongest associations for afternoon or maximum temperature at lag 0 (day of death) or afternoon and evening of lag 1 (day before death). In warmer, southern cities, stronger associations were found with morning temperatures, but overall the relationships were weaker. The strongest temperature–mortality relationships were associated with maximum temperature, although mean temperature results were comparable. Conclusions: There were systematic and substantial differences in the association between temperature and mortality based on the time and type of temperature observation. Because the strongest hourly temperature–mortality relationships were not always found at times typically associated with daily maximum temperatures, temperature variables should be selected independently for each study location. In general, heat

  19. Estimation of stream temperature in support of fish production modeling under future climates in the Klamath River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream temperature estimates under future climatic conditions were needed in support of fish production modeling for evaluation of effects of dam removal in the Klamath River Basin. To allow for the persistence of the Klamath River salmon fishery, an upcoming Secretarial Determination in 2012 will review potential changes in water quality and stream temperature to assess alternative scenarios, including dam removal. Daily stream temperature models were developed by using a regression model approach with simulated net solar radiation, vapor density deficit calculated on the basis of air temperature, and mean daily air temperature. Models were calibrated for 6 streams in the Lower, and 18 streams in the Upper, Klamath Basin by using measured stream temperatures for 1999-2008. The standard error of the y-estimate for the estimation of stream temperature for the 24 streams ranged from 0.36 to 1.64°C, with an average error of 1.12°C for all streams. The regression models were then used with projected air temperatures to estimate future stream temperatures for 2010-99. Although the mean change from the baseline historical period of 1950-99 to the projected future period of 2070-99 is only 1.2°C, it ranges from 3.4°C for the Shasta River to no change for Fall Creek and Trout Creek. Variability is also evident in the future with a mean change in temperature for all streams from the baseline period to the projected period of 2070-99 of only 1°C, while the range in stream temperature change is from 0 to 2.1°C. The baseline period, 1950-99, to which the air temperature projections were corrected, established the starting point for the projected changes in air temperature. The average measured daily air temperature for the calibration period 1999-2008, however, was found to be as much as 2.3°C higher than baseline for some rivers, indicating that warming conditions have already occurred in many areas of the Klamath River Basin, and that the stream temperature

  20. Technical note: Development of Hemipyrellia ligurriens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at constant temperatures: Applications in estimating postmortem interval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-qiang; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Xue-bo; Li, Kui; Yao, Lan; Wan, Li-hua

    2015-08-01

    Blowflies (Calliphoridae) are recognized as a powerful tool for estimating the minimum postmortem interval (PMImin). The times for blowflies to develop from oviposition to eclosion is mainly controlled by temperature, which can differ between even closely related species. Hemipyrellia ligurriens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a blowfly distributed throughout Asia and Australia. However, a systematic determination of the developmental times of H. ligurriens under constant temperature, necessary for estimating the PMImin, is lacking. Such an examination would broaden the forensic importance of the species. Thus, this study explored the growth curves of larval H. ligurriens at 7 constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, and 34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were successfully constructed, depicting the time of larval length or developmental event, respectively, at different temperatures. A thermal summation model was also constructed via regression analysis, by estimating the developmental threshold temperature t and thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that t at 8.3°C and K at 5747.5 degree-hours (°Ch) are required for complete development from oviposition to eclosion, and suggested an optimum temperature range of 16-28°C for the development of H. ligurriens. These data establish for the first time the temperature-dependent developmental time of H. ligurriens for forensic entomology application. The 3 developmental models are provided.

  1. Technical note: Development of Hemipyrellia ligurriens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at constant temperatures: Applications in estimating postmortem interval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-qiang; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Xue-bo; Li, Kui; Yao, Lan; Wan, Li-hua

    2015-08-01

    Blowflies (Calliphoridae) are recognized as a powerful tool for estimating the minimum postmortem interval (PMImin). The times for blowflies to develop from oviposition to eclosion is mainly controlled by temperature, which can differ between even closely related species. Hemipyrellia ligurriens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a blowfly distributed throughout Asia and Australia. However, a systematic determination of the developmental times of H. ligurriens under constant temperature, necessary for estimating the PMImin, is lacking. Such an examination would broaden the forensic importance of the species. Thus, this study explored the growth curves of larval H. ligurriens at 7 constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, and 34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were successfully constructed, depicting the time of larval length or developmental event, respectively, at different temperatures. A thermal summation model was also constructed via regression analysis, by estimating the developmental threshold temperature t and thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that t at 8.3°C and K at 5747.5 degree-hours (°Ch) are required for complete development from oviposition to eclosion, and suggested an optimum temperature range of 16-28°C for the development of H. ligurriens. These data establish for the first time the temperature-dependent developmental time of H. ligurriens for forensic entomology application. The 3 developmental models are provided. PMID:26046676

  2. Estimation of blood perfusion using phase shift in temperature response to sinusoidal heating at the skin surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Xu, L X

    1999-09-01

    A closed form analytical solution of the Pennes' bio-heat equation was obtained for temperature distributions in the skin tissue subject to the sinusoidal heat flux. Phase shifts in the surface temperature response were revealed to be related to local blood perfusion rate and heating frequency. The influence of the thermal contact resistance on the perfusion estimation was investigated. It has been proved that this influence is relatively small because of the phase shift based estimation and can be effectively eliminated by application of highly conductive grease. This analysis provides the theoretical foundation for a new noninvasive modality of blood perfusion estimation based on the surface temperature measurement which can have significant applications in future clinical practices.

  3. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  4. Small ubiquitin-related modifier ligase activity of Mms21 is required for maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ragini; Varma, Satya P M V; Shinde, Nikhil; Ghosh, Shilpa; Kumaran, Srikala P; Skariah, Geena; Laloraya, Shikha

    2011-04-22

    The SUMO ligase activity of Mms21/Nse2, a conserved member of the Smc5/6 complex, is required for resisting extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. We report that the Mms21 SUMO ligase activity is also required during the unchallenged mitotic cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SUMO ligase-defective cells were slow growing and spontaneously incurred DNA damage. These cells required caffeine-sensitive Mec1 kinase-dependent checkpoint signaling for survival even in the absence of extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. SUMO ligase-defective cells were sensitive to replication stress and displayed synthetic growth defects with DNA damage checkpoint-defective mutants such as mec1, rad9, and rad24. MMS21 SUMO ligase and mediator of replication checkpoint 1 gene (MRC1) were epistatic with respect to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress or methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage sensitivity. Subjecting Mms21 SUMO ligase-deficient cells to transient replication stress resulted in enhancement of cell cycle progression defects such as mitotic delay and accumulation of hyperploid cells. Consistent with the spontaneous activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway observed in the Mms21-mediated sumoylation-deficient cells, enhanced frequency of chromosome breakage and loss was detected in these mutant cells. A mutation in the conserved cysteine 221 that is engaged in coordination of the zinc ion in Loop 2 of the Mms21 SPL-RING E3 ligase catalytic domain resulted in strong replication stress sensitivity and also conferred slow growth and Mec1 dependence to unchallenged mitotically dividing cells. Our findings establish Mms21-mediated sumoylation as a determinant of cell cycle progression and maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in budding yeast. PMID:21324902

  5. Mathematical Models Based on Transfer Functions to Estimate Tissue Temperature During RF Cardiac Ablation in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martínez, Jose; Trujillo, Macarena; Blasco-Gimenez, Ramon; Berjano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has been used to treat certain types of cardiac arrhythmias by producing a thermal lesion. Even though a tissue temperature higher than 50ºC is required to destroy the target, thermal mapping is not currently used during RFCA. Our aim was thus to develop mathematical models capable of estimating tissue temperature from tissue characteristics acquired or estimated at the beginning of the procedure (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and the applied voltage at any time. Biological tissue was considered as a system with an input (applied voltage) and output (tissue temperature), and so the mathematical models were based on transfer functions relating these variables. We used theoretical models based on finite element method to verify the mathematical models. Firstly, we solved finite element models to identify the transfer functions between the temperature at a depth of 4 mm and a constant applied voltage using a 7Fr and 4 mm electrode. The results showed that the relationships can be expressed as first-order transfer functions. Changes in electrical conductivity only affected the static gain of the system, while specific heat variations produced a change in the dynamic system response. In contrast, variations in thermal conductivity modified both the static gain and the dynamic system response. Finally, to assess the performance of the transfer functions obtained, we conducted a new set of computer simulations using a controlled temperature protocol and considering the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities, i.e. conditions closer to those found in clinical use. The results showed that the difference between the values estimated from transfer functions and the temperatures obtained from finite element models was less than 4ºC, which suggests that the proposed method could be used to estimate tissue temperature in real time. PMID:22715345

  6. Estimation of internal temperature in chicken meat by means of mid-infrared imaging and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Juan G.; Tao, Yang

    1999-01-01

    A non-invasive method to estimate internal temperature in boneless, skinless chicken meat after cooing is presented. In this work, the internal temperature of chicken breast samples, measured at approximately half the thickness, was correlated with the external temperature of the surface above and the cooling time. For the non-invasive and accurate external temperature measurement a focal planar array IR camera with spectral range of 3.4-5 micrometers was used. At this spectral band, the interference of water vapor originated from the sample is practically eliminated. Neural networks were used to establish a correlation between internal temperature with external temperature and cooling time. To model the internal and external temperature time series a one-hidden layer feed forward layer, with three hidden nodes was used. The network was trained with 60 time series of 20 time points each one, ranging form 0 to 570 seconds. Training was conducted for 400 epochs, with learning rate 0.3. The predictions obtained were compared with a test data set to judge the performance of the network. The method has great potential for the real-time estimation of internal temperature of cooked chicken meat in industrial lines.

  7. First pressure- and temperature estimates of the metamorphic sole of the Pinarbasi ophiolite, central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kalijn; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; van Roermund, Herman; Brouwer, Fraukje; Drury, Martyn

    2014-05-01

    Ophiolites are interpreted as remnants of oceanic lithosphere. Many have a so-called supra-subduction zone (SSZ) geochemical signature, suggestive of formation at a spreading ridge overlying a subduction zone. Supra-subduction zone ophiolites frequently have a several-hundred-meter thick sequence of metamorphic rocks below their mantle section: the metamorphic sole. These dominantly mafic and generally heavily sheared metamorphic rocks have been shown to preserve an inverted metamorphic gradient with the highest pressures and temperatures at the top of the sole, decreasing downwards. Pressure estimates from rocks found at the top of metamorphic soles may be as much as 10-15 kbar with temperature estimates up to 875°C. The metamorphic grade varies from greenschist near the base, up to granulite facies at the top, with the bulk comprising of amphibolite facies rocks. At some locations a blueschist overprint of the amphibolite facies mineral assemblages has been described. The relative high pressures preserved in the metamorphic sole cannot simply result from overburden pressure of the currently overlying ophiolite, which is a long-standing problem. This raises the question of what process(es) can explain pressures up to 10-15 kbar in the top of metamorphic soles, in relation to the approximately synchronous formation of the SSZ oceanic lithosphere above the sole. One of the places to study the formation of SSZ ophiolites and their metamorphic soles is the Neotethyan Suture zone. Remnants of Neotethyan lithosphere are preserved as ophiolites that are discontinuously exposed from the Mediterranean region through the Himalaya to SE Asia. Supra-subduction zone ophiolites are particularly widespread in Turkey. The Pinarbaşi ophiolite is located in the SE of Central Anatolia, and overlies the Tauride fold-and-thrust belt that formed since the Late Cretaceous. It comprises mantle tectonites consisting of serpentinized harzburgite and dunite with remnants of gabbro to the

  8. Estimation of the base temperature and growth phase duration in terms of thermal time for four grapevine cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, D.; Salazar, M.; Chaves, B.; Keller, M.; Hoogenboom, G.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal time models have been used to predict the development of many different species, including grapevine ( Vitis vinifera L.). These models normally assume that there is a linear relationship between temperature and plant development. The goal of this study was to estimate the base temperature and duration in terms of thermal time for predicting veraison for four grapevine cultivars. Historical phenological data for four cultivars that were collected in the Pacific Northwest were used to develop the thermal time model. Base temperatures ( T b) of 0 and 10 °C and the best estimated T b using three different methods were evaluated for predicting veraison in grapevine. Thermal time requirements for each individual cultivar were evaluated through analysis of variance, and means were compared using the Fisher's test. The methods that were applied to estimate T b for the development of wine grapes included the least standard deviation in heat units, the regression coefficient, and the development rate method. The estimated T b varied among methods and cultivars. The development rate method provided the lowest T b values for all cultivars. For the three methods, Chardonnay had the lowest T b ranging from 8.7 to 10.7 °C, while the highest T b values were obtained for Riesling and Cabernet Sauvignon with 11.8 and 12.8 °C, respectively. Thermal time also differed among cultivars, when either the fixed or estimated T b was used. Predictions of the beginning of ripening with the estimated temperature resulted in the lowest variation in real days when compared with predictions using T b = 0 or 10 °C, regardless of the method that was used to estimate the T b.

  9. Use of Sharpened Land Surface Temperature for Daily Evapotranspiration Estimation over Irrigated Crops in Arid Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Aguilar, J.; McCabe, M. F.; Houborg, R.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides data on land surface characteristics, useful for mapping land surface energy fluxes and evapotranspiration (ET). Land-surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal infrared (TIR) satellite data has been reliably used as a remote indicator of ET and surface moisture status. However, TIR imagery usually operates at a coarser resolution than that of shortwave sensors on the same satellite platform, making it sometimes unsuitable for monitoring of field-scale crop conditions. This study applies the data mining sharpener (DMS; Gao et al., 2012) technique to data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which sharpens the 1 km thermal data down to the resolution of the optical data (250-500 m) based on functional LST and reflectance relationships established using a flexible regression tree approach. The DMS approach adopted here has been enhanced/refined for application over irrigated farming areas located in harsh desert environments in Saudi Arabia. The sharpened LST data is input to an integrated modeling system that uses the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model and associated flux disaggregation scheme (DisALEXI) in conjunction with model reanalysis data and remotely sensed data from polar orbiting (MODIS) and geostationary (MSG; Meteosat Second Generation) satellite platforms to facilitate daily estimates of evapotranspiration. Results are evaluated against available flux tower observations over irrigated maize near Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. Successful monitoring of field-scale changes in surface fluxes are of importance towards an efficient water use in areas where fresh water resources are scarce and poorly monitored. Gao, F.; Kustas, W.P.; Anderson, M.C. A Data Mining Approach for Sharpening Thermal Satellite Imagery over Land. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 3287-3319.

  10. How to estimate exposure when studying the temperature-mortality relationship? A case study of the Paris area.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Laura; de Crouy-Chanel, Perrine; Wagner, Vérène; Desplat, Julien; Pascal, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Time series studies assessing the effect of temperature on mortality generally use temperatures measured by a single weather station. In the Paris region, there is a substantial measurement network, and a variety of exposure indicators created from multiple stations can be tested. The aim of this study is to test the influence of exposure indicators on the temperature-mortality relationship in the Paris region. The relationship between temperature and non-accidental mortality was assessed based on a time series analysis using Poisson regression and a generalised additive model. Twenty-five stations in Paris and its three neighbouring departments were used to create four exposure indicators. These indicators were (1) the temperature recorded by one reference station, (2) a simple average of the temperatures of all stations, (3) an average weighted on the departmental population and (4) a classification of the stations based on land use and an average weighted on the population in each class. The relative risks and the Akaike criteria were similar for all the exposure indicators. The estimated temperature-mortality relationship therefore did not appear to be significantly affected by the indicator used, regardless of study zone (departments or region) or age group. The increase in temperatures from the 90(th) to the 99(th) percentile of the temperature distribution led to a significant increase in mortality over 75 years (RR = 1.10 [95% CI, 1.07; 1.14]). Conversely, the decrease in temperature between the 10(th) and 1(st) percentile had a significant effect on the mortality under 75 years (RR = 1.04 [95% CI, 1.01; 1.06]). In the Paris area, there is no added value in taking multiple climatic stations into account when estimating exposure in time series studies. Methods to better represent the subtle temperature variations in densely populated areas in epidemiological studies are needed.

  11. How to estimate exposure when studying the temperature-mortality relationship? A case study of the Paris area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Laura; de Crouy-Chanel, Perrine; Wagner, Vérène; Desplat, Julien; Pascal, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Time series studies assessing the effect of temperature on mortality generally use temperatures measured by a single weather station. In the Paris region, there is a substantial measurement network, and a variety of exposure indicators created from multiple stations can be tested. The aim of this study is to test the influence of exposure indicators on the temperature-mortality relationship in the Paris region. The relationship between temperature and non-accidental mortality was assessed based on a time series analysis using Poisson regression and a generalised additive model. Twenty-five stations in Paris and its three neighbouring departments were used to create four exposure indicators. These indicators were (1) the temperature recorded by one reference station, (2) a simple average of the temperatures of all stations, (3) an average weighted on the departmental population and (4) a classification of the stations based on land use and an average weighted on the population in each class. The relative risks and the Akaike criteria were similar for all the exposure indicators. The estimated temperature-mortality relationship therefore did not appear to be significantly affected by the indicator used, regardless of study zone (departments or region) or age group. The increase in temperatures from the 90th to the 99th percentile of the temperature distribution led to a significant increase in mortality over 75 years (RR = 1.10 [95 % CI, 1.07; 1.14]). Conversely, the decrease in temperature between the 10th and 1st percentile had a significant effect on the mortality under 75 years (RR = 1.04 [95 % CI, 1.01; 1.06]). In the Paris area, there is no added value in taking multiple climatic stations into account when estimating exposure in time series studies. Methods to better represent the subtle temperature variations in densely populated areas in epidemiological studies are needed.

  12. Assessment of a Technique for Estimating Total Column Water Vapor Using Measurements of the Infrared Sky Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    A method for estimating the integrated precipitable water (IPW) content of the atmosphere using measurements of indicated infrared zenith sky temperature was validated over east-central Florida. The method uses inexpensive, commercial off the shelf, hand-held infrared thermometers (IRT). Two such IRTs were obtained from a commercial vendor, calibrated against several laboratory reference sources at KSC, and used to make IR zenith sky temperature measurements in the vicinity of KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The calibration and comparison data showed that these inexpensive IRTs provided reliable, stable IR temperature measurements that were well correlated with the NOAA IPW observations.

  13. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  14. A general model for estimation of daily global solar radiation using air temperatures and site geographic parameters in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mao-Fen; Fan, Li; Liu, Hong-Bin; Guo, Peng-Tao; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of daily global solar radiation (Rs) from routinely measured temperature data has been widely developed and used in many different areas of the world. However, many of them are site specific. It is assumed that a general model for estimating daily Rs using temperature variables and geographical parameters could be achieved within a climatic region. This paper made an attempt to develop a general model to estimate daily Rs using routinely measured temperature data (maximum (Tmax, °C) and minimum (Tmin, °C) temperatures) and site geographical parameters (latitude (La, °N), longitude (Ld, °E) and altitude (Alt, m)) for Guizhou and Sichuan basin of southwest China, which was classified into the hot summer and cold winter climate zone. Comparison analysis was carried out through statistics indicators such as root mean squared error of percentage (RMSE%), modeling efficiency (ME), coefficient of residual mass (CRM) and mean bias error (MBE). Site-dependent daily Rs estimating models were calibrated and validated using long-term observed weather data. A general formula was then obtained from site geographical parameters and the better fit site-dependent models with mean RMSE% of 38.68%, mean MBE of 0.381 MJ m-2 d-1, mean CRM of 0.04 and mean ME value of 0.713.

  15. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent paper by Morillas et al. [Morillas, L. et al. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective, Remote Sens. Environ. 136, 234-246, 2013] evaluates the two-source model (TSM) of Norman et al. (1995) with revi...

  16. Soil moisture and properties estimation by assimilating soil temperatures using particle batch smoother: A new perspective for DTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture, hydraulic and thermal properties are critical for understanding the soil surface energy balance and hydrological processes. Here, we will discuss the potential of using soil temperature observations from Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) to investigate the spatial variability of soil moisture and soil properties. With DTS soil temperature can be measured with high resolution (spatial <1m, and temporal < 1min) in cables up to kilometers in length. Soil temperature evolution is primarily controlled by the soil thermal properties, and the energy balance at the soil surface. Hence, soil moisture, which affects both soil thermal properties and the energy that participates the evaporation process, is strongly correlated to the soil temperatures. In addition, the dynamics of the soil moisture is determined by the soil hydraulic properties.Here we will demonstrate that soil moisture, hydraulic and thermal properties can be estimated by assimilating observed soil temperature at shallow depths using the Particle Batch Smoother (PBS). The PBS can be considered as an extension of the particle filter, which allows us to infer soil moisture and soil properties using the dynamics of soil temperature within a batch window. Both synthetic and real field data will be used to demonstrate the robustness of this approach. We will show that the proposed method is shown to be able to handle different sources of uncertainties, which may provide a new view of using DTS observations to estimate sub-meter resolution soil moisture and properties for remote sensing product validation.

  17. [Temperature determination of the skin surface for the estimation of blood supply disorders in myocutaneous island flaps of rats].

    PubMed

    Herrberger, U; Tilgner, A; Schumann, D

    1989-01-01

    In rectus abdominis myocutaneous island flaps (3.0 x 1.5 cm) of rats (Uje:WIST) skin surface temperature was measured by an infrared pyrometer for monitoring flap viability following experimentally induced blood flow insufficiency. The insufficiency was caused by ligation of the pedicle vessels (epigastric superior artery and vein) on the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th d after flap replantation, and by occlusion of these vessels with microclips for 2 h. Only the temperature differences between the intact and the operated skin surface were used to estimate blood flow efficiency not, the absolute values. These differences were statistically insignificant between the intact right and left abdominal skin areas and between the intact skin and the vital flap surfaces. In these cases the maximal temperature differences were 0.52 degree C. Only during the early postoperative period (3-days ligation group) a correlation between blood flow insufficiency and flap viability is expressed by temperature differences (2.14 degrees C). Later on (7-days ligation group) a temperature difference of 1.87 degrees C was no evidence of disturbed wound healing. Thus in advanced stages in myocutaneous flaps differences of blood flow and neovascularization respectively cannot be estimated reliably by measurements of skin surface temperature. However, temperature differences greater than 2 degrees C signal impaired flap viability. PMID:2711783

  18. Estimating daily air temperature across the Southeastern United States using high-resolution satellite data: A statistical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Kloog, Itai; Lee, Mihye; Kosheleva, Anna; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of spatio-temporal resolved near-surface air temperature (Ta) are crucial for environmental epidemiological studies. However, values of Ta are conventionally obtained from weather stations, which have limited spatial coverage. Satellite surface temperature (Ts) measurements offer the possibility of local exposure estimates across large domains. The Southeastern United States has different climatic conditions, more small water bodies and wetlands, and greater humidity in contrast to other regions, which add to the challenge of modeling air temperature. In this study, we incorporated satellite Ts to estimate high resolution (1km×1km) daily Ta across the southeastern USA for 2000-2014. We calibrated Ts-Ta measurements using mixed linear models, land use, and separate slopes for each day. A high out-of-sample cross-validated R(2) of 0.952 indicated excellent model performance. When satellite Ts were unavailable, linear regression on nearby monitors and spatio-temporal smoothing was used to estimate Ta. The daily Ta estimations were compared to the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) model. A good agreement with an R(2) of 0.969 and a mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of 1.376°C was achieved. Our results demonstrate that Ta can be reliably predicted using this Ts-based prediction model, even in a large geographical area with topography and weather patterns varying considerably.

  19. Estimating daily air temperature across the Southeastern United States using high-resolution satellite data: A statistical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Kloog, Itai; Lee, Mihye; Kosheleva, Anna; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of spatio-temporal resolved near-surface air temperature (Ta) are crucial for environmental epidemiological studies. However, values of Ta are conventionally obtained from weather stations, which have limited spatial coverage. Satellite surface temperature (Ts) measurements offer the possibility of local exposure estimates across large domains. The Southeastern United States has different climatic conditions, more small water bodies and wetlands, and greater humidity in contrast to other regions, which add to the challenge of modeling air temperature. In this study, we incorporated satellite Ts to estimate high resolution (1km×1km) daily Ta across the southeastern USA for 2000-2014. We calibrated Ts-Ta measurements using mixed linear models, land use, and separate slopes for each day. A high out-of-sample cross-validated R(2) of 0.952 indicated excellent model performance. When satellite Ts were unavailable, linear regression on nearby monitors and spatio-temporal smoothing was used to estimate Ta. The daily Ta estimations were compared to the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) model. A good agreement with an R(2) of 0.969 and a mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of 1.376°C was achieved. Our results demonstrate that Ta can be reliably predicted using this Ts-based prediction model, even in a large geographical area with topography and weather patterns varying considerably. PMID:26717080

  20. Estimation of surface temperature variations due to changes in sky and solar flux with elevation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummer-Miller, S.

    1981-01-01

    Sky and solar radiance are of major importance in determining the ground temperature. Knowledge of their behavior is a fundamental part of surface temperature models. These 2 fluxes vary with elevation and this variation produces temperature changes. Therefore, when using thermal-property differences to discriminate geologic materials, these flux variations with elevation need to be considered. -from Author

  1. Real-Time Estimation of Ball-Screw Thermal Elongation Based upon Temperature Distribution of Ball-Screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodera, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Kazuhiro; Miyaguchi, Kazuo; Nagai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Takamasa; Masuda, Masami; Yazawa, Takanori

    The optical telemeter system has been developed, which converts the temperature of rotating spindle to the digital data and carries the digital data from LED on the rotating side toward PD on the stationary side by the optical data transmission. Based upon the temperature distribution of hollow ball-screw obtained by the telemeter system, the thermal elongation of the ball-screw is estimated as the one-dimensional thermal elongation. Estimation accuracy, which is the difference between the estimated thermal elongation and the measured thermal elongation, is -3.1∼+3.2µ m for the thermal elongation of 50-60µ m over the length of 935.5mm of the ball-screw.

  2. Estimation of the activation energy in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction by temperature effect on excitable waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinzhong; Zhou, Luqun; Ouyang, Qi

    2007-02-15

    We report the temperature effect on the propagation of excitable traveling waves in a quasi-two-dimensional Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction-diffusion system. The onset of excitable waves as a function of the sulfuric acid concentration and temperature is identified, on which the sulfuric acid concentration exhibits an Arrhenius dependence on temperature. On the basis of this experimental data, the activation energy of the self-catalyzed reaction in the Oregonator model is estimated to be 83-113 kJ/mol, which is further supported by our numerical simulations. The estimation proceeds without analyzing detailed reaction steps but rather through observing the global dynamic behaviors in the BZ reaction. For a supplement, the wave propagation velocities are calculated based on our results and compared with the experimental observations. PMID:17249646

  3. Toward a "molecular thermometer" to estimate the charring temperature of wildland charcoals derived from different biomass sources.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maximilian P W; Pyle, Lacey A; Clark, Kenneth L; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Schmidt, Michael W I

    2013-10-15

    The maximum temperature experienced by biomass during combustion has a strong effect on chemical properties of the resulting charcoal, such as sorption capacity (water and nonpolar materials) and microbial degradability. However, information about the formation temperature of natural charcoal can be difficult to obtain in ecosystems that are not instrumented prior to fires. Benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) are molecular markers specific for pyrogenic carbon (PyC) which can provide information on the degree of aromatic condensation in charcoals. Here we apply the BPCA molecular marker method to a set of 10 charcoals produced during an experimental fire in a Pitch pine-scrub oak forest from litter and bark of pitch pine and inkberry plants in the Pinelands National Reserve in New Jersey, USA. We deployed temperature-sensitive crayons throughout the burn site, which recorded the maximum air temperature and made comparisons to the degree of thermal alteration recorded by BPCA molecular markers. Our results show an increase of the degree of aromatic condensation with monitored temperatures for bark biomass, while for needles no clear trend could be observed. For leaf-derived charcoals at increasing monitored fire temperatures, decreasing degree of aromatic condensation was obtained. This suggests that molecular markers can be used to roughly estimate the maximum fire temperatures experienced by bark and wood materials, but not based on leaf- and needle-derived materials. Possible applications include verifying declared pyrolysis temperatures of biochars and evaluating ecosystem fire temperature postburn.

  4. Toward a "molecular thermometer" to estimate the charring temperature of wildland charcoals derived from different biomass sources.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maximilian P W; Pyle, Lacey A; Clark, Kenneth L; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Schmidt, Michael W I

    2013-10-15

    The maximum temperature experienced by biomass during combustion has a strong effect on chemical properties of the resulting charcoal, such as sorption capacity (water and nonpolar materials) and microbial degradability. However, information about the formation temperature of natural charcoal can be difficult to obtain in ecosystems that are not instrumented prior to fires. Benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) are molecular markers specific for pyrogenic carbon (PyC) which can provide information on the degree of aromatic condensation in charcoals. Here we apply the BPCA molecular marker method to a set of 10 charcoals produced during an experimental fire in a Pitch pine-scrub oak forest from litter and bark of pitch pine and inkberry plants in the Pinelands National Reserve in New Jersey, USA. We deployed temperature-sensitive crayons throughout the burn site, which recorded the maximum air temperature and made comparisons to the degree of thermal alteration recorded by BPCA molecular markers. Our results show an increase of the degree of aromatic condensation with monitored temperatures for bark biomass, while for needles no clear trend could be observed. For leaf-derived charcoals at increasing monitored fire temperatures, decreasing degree of aromatic condensation was obtained. This suggests that molecular markers can be used to roughly estimate the maximum fire temperatures experienced by bark and wood materials, but not based on leaf- and needle-derived materials. Possible applications include verifying declared pyrolysis temperatures of biochars and evaluating ecosystem fire temperature postburn. PMID:24040784

  5. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  6. The use of streambed temperature profiles to estimate the depth, duration, and rate of percolation beneath arroyos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Thomas, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Temporal variations in a streambed temperature profile between 30 and 300 cm beneath Tijeras Arroyo, New Mexico, were analyzed at 30-min intervals for 1990 to estimate the depth, duration, and rate of percolation during streamflows. The depth of percolation was clearly documented by the rapid response of the streambed temperature profile to streamflows. Results indicate that the streambed possessed small thermal gradients with significant diurnal variations from late November to late May, indicating that ephemeral streamflows created continuous, advection-dominated beat transport to depths below 300 cm during this period. Timing and duration of percolation suggested by temporal variations in the temperature profile were verified by comparison with measured streamflow records for the study reach over 1990. Percolation rates were estimated using a technique based on the travel time of the daily maximum temperature into the streambed. Percolation rates were compared with streambed seepage rates determined from measurements of streamflow loss, stream surface area, and stream evaporative loss for the entire study reach. Travel time estimates of streambed percolation rates ranged from 9 to 40 cm/hr, while streamflow estimates of streambed seepage rates ranged from 6 to 26 cm/hr during the study period. Discrepancies between streambed percolation and seepage rates may be caused by differences in the areal extent of measurements for percolation versus seepages rates. In summary, the depth, timing, and duration of streamflow- induced percolation were well documented by temporal variations in a single streambed temperature profile, while rates of percolation based on the temperature profile were about double the seepage rates based on streamflow records for the entire study reach.

  7. Dependence of spectral-induced polarization response of sandstone on temperature and its relevance to permeability estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisser, N.; Kemna, A.; Nover, G.

    2010-09-01

    The possibility to estimate permeability from the electrical spectral induced polarization (SIP) response might be the most important benefit offered by SIP measurements. It can thus be deduced that, in the future, SIP measurements will be carried out more frequently at the field scale or in a well-logging context to estimate permeability. In the shallow subsurface, however, the temperature generally exhibits seasonal variability, and in the deeper subsurface, it usually increases with depth. Hence, knowledge about the dependence of the SIP response on temperature is necessary in order to avoid possible misinterpretation of datasets impacted by thermal effects. In our study, we present a semiempirical framework to describe the temperature dependence of the SIP response. We briefly introduce the SIP response and its relation to permeability in terms of an electrochemical polarization mechanism and combine this formulation with relationships for the dependence of ionic mobility on temperature. We compare the predictions of our formulation with the experimental data from SIP measurements performed on sandstone at temperatures from 0°C to 80°C. The measured SIP response was transformed into a relaxation time distribution, using the empirical Cole-Cole model and a regularized Debye decomposition procedure. The SIP response was found to be in good agreement with the theoretical model. The temperature dependence of both direct current conductivity and relaxation time is controlled mainly by the dependence of ionic mobility on temperature, and the shape of the relaxation time distribution of the investigated sandstone is almost independent of temperature. The temperature effect on the SIP response can therefore be easily corrected.

  8. Estimating the approximate firing temperature of burnt archaeological sediments through an unmixing algorithm applied to hysteresis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linford, N.; Platzman, E.

    2004-11-01

    Estimating the temperature to which burnt archaeological sediments and soils have been exposed in antiquity is of interest as it may well elucidate the interpretation of specific features. Certain semi-industrial activities, such as metal working or the production of pottery, are often associated with the controlled use of intense high-temperature processes (>500 °C). Exposure to such high-temperatures will, inevitably, lead to the thermal alteration of commonly found iron minerals within the soil. Magnetic measurements made on a series of soil samples subjected to controlled laboratory heating, confirms both the sensitivity of iron minerals to thermal alteration and also suggests a correlation between the maximum exposure temperature and the hysteresis properties. From this data a method for estimating the maximum exposure temperature of burnt archaeological samples, recovered from similar soil types is proposed, based on the application of a linear unmixing model. This model compares hysteresis data from the archaeological samples to an end-member data set created from the laboratory heated soil. The maximum exposure temperature for the archaeological samples is estimated from the relative proportion of known temperature end-members present within the final model describing the experimental hysteresis data. The validity of the model is demonstrated through application to samples recovered from a series of actualistic fire experiments and a range of burnt archaeological features recovered during excavation of a multi-period site at Yarnton, near the city of Oxford, UK. A further application of the method, to determine the fidelity of samples collected for archaeomagnetic dating, is presented from the excavation of a large hearth type features at Whitby, North Yorkshire, UK.

  9. Estimation of subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China: implications for hydrocarbon generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Hao, Chunyan

    2016-07-01

    Subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China, is vital for assessment of hydrocarbon generation and preservation, and of geothermal energy potential. However, it has not previously been well understood, due to poor data coverage and a lack of highly accurate temperature data. Here, we combined recently acquired steady-state temperature logging data with drill stem test temperature data and measured rock thermal properties, to investigate the geothermal regime and estimate the subsurface formation temperature at depth in the range of 1000-5000 m, together with temperatures at the lower boundary of each of four major Lower Paleozoic marine source rocks buried in this basin. Results show that heat flow of the Tarim Basin ranges between 26.2 and 66.1 mW/m2, with a mean of 42.5 ± 7.6 mW/m2; the geothermal gradient at depth of 3000 m varies from 14.9 to 30.2 °C/km, with a mean of 20.7 ± 2.9 °C/km. Formation temperature estimated at the depth of 1000 m is between 29 and 41 °C, with a mean of 35 °C, while 63-100 °C is for the temperature at the depth of 3000 m with a mean of 82 °C. Temperature at 5000 m ranges from 97 to 160 °C, with a mean of 129 °C. Generally spatial patterns of the subsurface formation temperature at depth are basically similar, characterized by higher temperatures in the uplift areas and lower temperatures in the sags, which indicates the influence of basement structure and lateral variations in thermal properties on the geotemperature field. Using temperature to identify the oil window in the source rocks, most of the uplifted areas in the basin are under favorable condition for oil generation and/or preservation, whereas the sags with thick sediments are favorable for gas generation and/or preservation. We conclude that relatively low present-day geothermal regime and large burial depth of the source rocks in the Tarim Basin are favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. In addition, it is found that the

  10. Wet-bulb globe temperature index estimation using meteorological data from São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Paulo Alves; Ruas, Álvaro Cézar; Bitencourt, Daniel Pires

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that excessive heat exposure causes heat disorders and can lead to death in some situations. Evaluation of heat stress on workers performing indoor and outdoor activities is, nowadays, conducted worldwide by wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, which calculation parameters are dry-bulb, natural wet-bulb, and globe temperatures, which must be measured at the same time and in location where the worker is conducting his/her activities. However, for some activities performed in large outdoor areas such as those of agricultural ones, it is not feasible to measure directly those temperatures in all work periods and locations where there are workers. Taking this into account, this work aims to introduce a WBGT index estimation using atmospheric variables observed by automatic meteorological stations. In order to support our estimation method, we used, as a test-bed, data recorded in the State of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. By adding the cloudiness factor in the calculation through measurement of solar radiation, the algorithm proved to be as efficient as those mentioned in this work. It was found that this method is viable, with WBGT-estimated values obtained from meteorological data measured by stations with a distance of less than 80 km. This estimate can be used for monitoring heat stress in real time as well as to investigate heat-related disorders and agricultural work.

  11. Wet-bulb globe temperature index estimation using meteorological data from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maia, Paulo Alves; Ruas, Álvaro Cézar; Bitencourt, Daniel Pires

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that excessive heat exposure causes heat disorders and can lead to death in some situations. Evaluation of heat stress on workers performing indoor and outdoor activities is, nowadays, conducted worldwide by wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, which calculation parameters are dry-bulb, natural wet-bulb, and globe temperatures, which must be measured at the same time and in location where the worker is conducting his/her activities. However, for some activities performed in large outdoor areas such as those of agricultural ones, it is not feasible to measure directly those temperatures in all work periods and locations where there are workers. Taking this into account, this work aims to introduce a WBGT index estimation using atmospheric variables observed by automatic meteorological stations. In order to support our estimation method, we used, as a test-bed, data recorded in the State of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. By adding the cloudiness factor in the calculation through measurement of solar radiation, the algorithm proved to be as efficient as those mentioned in this work. It was found that this method is viable, with WBGT-estimated values obtained from meteorological data measured by stations with a distance of less than 80 km. This estimate can be used for monitoring heat stress in real time as well as to investigate heat-related disorders and agricultural work. PMID:25634645

  12. Wet-bulb globe temperature index estimation using meteorological data from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maia, Paulo Alves; Ruas, Álvaro Cézar; Bitencourt, Daniel Pires

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that excessive heat exposure causes heat disorders and can lead to death in some situations. Evaluation of heat stress on workers performing indoor and outdoor activities is, nowadays, conducted worldwide by wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, which calculation parameters are dry-bulb, natural wet-bulb, and globe temperatures, which must be measured at the same time and in location where the worker is conducting his/her activities. However, for some activities performed in large outdoor areas such as those of agricultural ones, it is not feasible to measure directly those temperatures in all work periods and locations where there are workers. Taking this into account, this work aims to introduce a WBGT index estimation using atmospheric variables observed by automatic meteorological stations. In order to support our estimation method, we used, as a test-bed, data recorded in the State of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. By adding the cloudiness factor in the calculation through measurement of solar radiation, the algorithm proved to be as efficient as those mentioned in this work. It was found that this method is viable, with WBGT-estimated values obtained from meteorological data measured by stations with a distance of less than 80 km. This estimate can be used for monitoring heat stress in real time as well as to investigate heat-related disorders and agricultural work.

  13. Estimating changes in temperature extremes from millennial-scale climate simulations using generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Whitney K.; Stein, Michael L.; McInerney, David J.; Sun, Shanshan; Moyer, Elisabeth J.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in extreme weather may produce some of the largest societal impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, it is intrinsically difficult to estimate changes in extreme events from the short observational record. In this work we use millennial runs from the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in equilibrated pre-industrial and possible future (700 and 1400 ppm CO2) conditions to examine both how extremes change in this model and how well these changes can be estimated as a function of run length. We estimate changes to distributions of future temperature extremes (annual minima and annual maxima) in the contiguous United States by fitting generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions. Using 1000-year pre-industrial and future time series, we show that warm extremes largely change in accordance with mean shifts in the distribution of summertime temperatures. Cold extremes warm more than mean shifts in the distribution of wintertime temperatures, but changes in GEV location parameters are generally well explained by the combination of mean shifts and reduced wintertime temperature variability. For cold extremes at inland locations, return levels at long recurrence intervals show additional effects related to changes in the spread and shape of GEV distributions. We then examine uncertainties that result from using shorter model runs. In theory, the GEV distribution can allow prediction of infrequent events using time series shorter than the recurrence interval of those events. To investigate how well this approach works in practice, we estimate 20-, 50-, and 100-year extreme events using segments of varying lengths. We find that even using GEV distributions, time series of comparable or shorter length than the return period of interest can lead to very poor estimates. These results suggest caution when attempting to use short observational time series or model runs to infer infrequent extremes.

  14. Estimating more reliable measures of forest canopy temperatures using thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Still, C. J.; Aubrecht, D. M.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf temperature is critical to plant function, and it can be used to examine forest responses to droughts, heat waves, and storm events. The recent development of thermal infrared (TIR) imaging techniques has offered indirect measurement of forest canopy skin temperature, and it allows for extensive temporal and spatial sampling compared to direct thermocouple-based measurements. However, the accuracy of TIR indirect canopy temperature is not well understood, as few studies have evaluated how TIR-derived temperatures compare to other approaches. The objectives of this study are: (1) to monitor canopy temperatures of a coniferous forest canopy using a TIR camera and in situ sensors; (2) to evaluate the reliability of TIR canopy temperatures by comparing against leaf temperatures measured by thermocouples; (3) to develop and examine methods for improving TIR measures based on corrections of camera's default parameters ("Recalculation") and records of sensitivity by parameter changes ("Data-training"). This study showed the canopy temperatures varied from -5 and 30°C, and the patterns of changes between the TIR and thermocouple measures corresponded well. Overall, TIR canopy temperatures were underestimated against the direct thermocouple measurements with mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.83-1.38°C and root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.11-1.53°C for the study period. The modified TIR temperatures from the "Recalculation" method exhibited MAE of 0.56-0.95°C and RMSE of 0.83-1.15°C, and those by the "Data-training" method resulted in MAE of 0.32-0.50°C and RMSE of 0.53-0.83°C. Our results demonstrate that the TIR technique includes small errors for canopy temperature measurements; however, the range of errors is smaller when correction methods are applied.

  15. Estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures using upper-air and satellite data. Part 2: Estimation of the urban bias

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, D.L.; Davis, J.M.; Bloomfield, P.; Karl, T.R.; Mcnab, A.L.; Gallo, K.P. |

    1995-02-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures due to the effect of the urban heat island. Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986-89 using upper-air data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to represent the background climate, site-specific data to represent the local landscape, and satellite-derived data -- the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) nighttime brightness data -- to represent the urban and rural landscape. Local NDVI and DMSP values were calculated for each station using the mean NDVI and DMSP values from a 3 km x 3 km area centered over the given station. Regional NDVI and DMSP values were calculated to represent a typical rural value for each station using the mean NDVI and DMSP values from a 1 deg x 1 deg latitude-longitude area in which the given station was located. Models for the United States were then developed for monthly maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures using data from over 1000 stations in the U.S. Cooperative (COOP) Network and for monthly mean temperatures with data from over 1150 stations in the Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). Local biases, or the differences between the model predictions using the observed NDVI and DMSP values, and the predictions using the background regional values were calculated and compared with the results of other research.

  16. Uncertainty in Estimates of the Apparent Temperature Sensitivity of Peatland Dissolved Organic Carbon Fluxes under Changing Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. M.; Ballard, C. E.; Ireson, A. M.; Buytaert, W.; Wheater, H. S.; Rose, R.

    2010-12-01

    Peatlands cover ca. 3% of the land surface yet account for ca. 30% of the global soil carbon sink. As climate conditions are known to control carbon accumulation in peatlands, future projections of increased temperatures and decreased summer precipitation could alter peatland carbon fluxes by influencing the water table dynamics in these saturated soils. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a small but significant peatland carbon flux that can alter the balance between net carbon sink or source. In spite of this importance, DOC fluxes are often overlooked in both measured and modelled estimates of peatland carbon budgets. Integration of DOC fluxes into peatland carbon models is hindered because limited data are available to quantify production rates and their sensitivity to changes in temperature and water table, particularly in comparison to carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes. The few data that exist are largely based on laboratory incubation experiments; and it is unclear whether these laboratory derived values are comparable with the apparent temperature sensitivities observed in the field. Here, we present new analysis of long-term monitoring data from a British peatland site (Moor House), where we estimate the apparent temperature sensitivity of net DOC production using observed DOC concentrations and soil temperatures and estimates of soil water content from a hydrological model. Our estimates take into account uncertainties from both the observational data and the hydrological model. Our aim is to determine whether our laboratory derived Q10 values of net DOC production of 1.84 under saturated and 3.53 under unsaturated conditions for this site are comparable with values derived from the field monitoring data. If correct, these Q10 values suggest that DOC fluxes could increase under warmer and drier conditions.

  17. Estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures using upper-air and satellite data. Part 2: Estimation of the urban bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperson, David L.; Davis, Jerry M.; Bloomfield, Peter; Karl, Thomas R.; Mcnab, Alan L.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures due to the effect of the urban heat island. Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986-89 using upper-air data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to represent the background climate, site-specific data to represent the local landscape, and satellite-derived data -- the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) nighttime brightness data -- to represent the urban and rural landscape. Local NDVI and DMSP values were calculated for each station using the mean NDVI and DMSP values from a 3 km x 3 km area centered over the given station. Regional NDVI and DMSP values were calculated to represent a typical rural value for each station using the mean NDVI and DMSP values from a 1 deg x 1 deg latitude-longitude area in which the given station was located. Models for the United States were then developed for monthly maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures using data from over 1000 stations in the U.S. Cooperative (COOP) Network and for monthly mean temperatures with data from over 1150 stations in the Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). Local biases, or the differences between the model predictions using the observed NDVI and DMSP values, and the predictions using the background regional values were calculated and compared with the results of other research. The local or urban bias of U.S. temperatures, as derived from all U.S. stations (urban and rural) used in the models, averaged near 0.40 C for monthly minimum temperatures, near 0.25 C for monthly mean temperatures, and near 0.10 C for monthly maximum temperatures. The biases of monthly minimum temperatures for individual stations ranged from near -1.1 C for rural stations to 2.4 C for stations from the largest urban areas. The results of this study indicate minimal

  18. Venus: estimates of the surface temperature and pressure from radio and radar measurements.

    PubMed

    Wood, A T; Wattson, R B; Pollack, J B

    1968-10-01

    The radio brightness temperature and radar cross section spectra of Venus are in much better accord with surface boundary conditions deduced from a combination of the Mariner V results and the radar radius than those obtained by the Venera 4 space probe. The average surface temperature and pressure are approximately 750 degrees K and 90 atmospheres.

  19. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  20. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes inGeologic Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2004-12-06

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, forexample, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for thestorage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to stronglyaltered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments.The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure inthe field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method thatuses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. Theenergy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearlyisothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred toas a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles,such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heatpipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquidand gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transientconditions.

  1. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-01-21

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, for example, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for the storage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to strongly altered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments. The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure in the field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method that uses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. The energy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearly isothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred to as a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles, such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heat pipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquid and gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transient conditions.

  2. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-01

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available.

  3. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-01

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available. PMID:27176640

  4. Modelling of surface-water temperature for the estimation of the Czech fishery productivity under the climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svobodová, Eva; Trnka, Miroslav; Kopp, Radovan; Mareš, Jan; Dubrovský, Martin; Spurný, Petr; Žalud, Zděněk

    2015-04-01

    Freshwater fish production is significantly correlated with water temperature which is expected to increase under the climate change. This study is dealing with the estimation of the change of water temperature in productive ponds and its impact on the fishery in the Czech Republic. Calculation of surface-water temperature which was based on three-day mean of the air temperature was developed and tested in several ponds in three main fish production areas. Output of surface-water temperature model was compared with measured data and showed that the lower range of model accuracy is surface-water temperature 3°C, under this temperature threshold the model loses its predictive competence. In the expecting of surface-water temperature above the temperature 3°C the model has proved the well consistence between observed and modelled surface-water temperature (R 0.79 - 0.96). Verified model was applied in the conditions of climate change determined by the pattern scaling method, in which standardised scenarios were derived from five global circulation models MPEH5, CSMK3, IPCM4, GFCM21 and HADGEM. Results were evaluated with regard to thresholds which characterise the fish species requirements on water temperature. Used thresholds involved the upper temperature threshold for fish survival and the tolerable number of days in continual period with mentioned threshold surface-water temperature. Target fish species were Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), Maraene whitefish (Coregonus maraena), Northern whitefish (Coregonus peled) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykis). Results indicated the limitation of the Czech fish-farming in terms of i) the increase of the length of continual periods with surface-water temperature above the threshold appropriate to given fish species toleration, ii) the increase of the number of continual periods with surface-water temperature above the threshold, both appropriate to given fish species toleration, and iii) the increase of overall number of

  5. Estimation of effective temperatures in quantum annealers for sampling applications: A case study with possible applications in deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the efficiency of sampling from Boltzmann distributions would have a significant impact on deep learning and other machine-learning applications. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up this task, but several limitations still bar these state-of-the-art technologies from being used effectively. One of the main limitations is that, while the device may indeed sample from a Boltzmann-like distribution, quantum dynamical arguments suggest it will do so with an instance-dependent effective temperature, different from its physical temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the learning of a special class of a restricted Boltzmann machine embedded on quantum hardware, which can serve as a building block for deep-learning architectures. We also provide a comparison to k -step contrastive divergence (CD-k ) with k up to 100. Although assuming a suitable fixed effective temperature also allows us to outperform one-step contrastive divergence (CD-1), only when using an instance-dependent effective temperature do we find a performance close to that of CD-100 for the case studied here.

  6. Soil moisture status estimation over Three Gorges area with Landsat TM data based on temperature vegetation dryness index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lina; Niu, Ruiqing; Li, Jiong; Dong, Yanfang

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture is the important indicator of climate, hydrology, ecology, agriculture and other parameters of the land surface and atmospheric interface. Soil moisture plays an important role on the water and energy exchange at the land surface/atmosphere interface. Remote sensing can provide information on large area quickly and easily, so it is significant to do research on how to monitor soil moisture by remote sensing. This paper presents a method to assess soil moisture status using Landsat TM data over Three Gorges area in China based on TVDI. The potential of Temperature- Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI) from Landsat TM data in assessing soil moisture was investigated in this region. After retrieving land surface temperature and vegetation index a TVDI model based on the features of Ts-NDVI space is established. And finally, soil moisture status is estimated according to TVDI. It shows that TVDI has the advantages of stability and high accuracy to estimating the soil moisture status.

  7. Estimates of Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures During the Pliocene From Carbonate 'Clumped Isotope' Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, N.; Tripati, A.; Eiler, J.

    2007-12-01

    The early Pliocene (5 to 3 Ma) was an interval in Earth history that was globally warmer than the present; thus, study of the details of Pliocene climate can provide insights into the dynamics of warm climates. There are two competing models of the temperature structure of the tropical Pacific upper-ocean during the early Pliocene: the dynamical 'ocean thermostat' model [1,2] and the 'El Padre' (or permanent 'El Nino') model [3], each of which predict zonal temperature gradients and mean conditions in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), and which differ markedly from one another in these predictions. The dynamical 'ocean thermostat' model predicts an increased temperature contrast between the Western Equatorial Pacific (WEP) and EEP, enhanced thermocline tilt and intensified upwelling under warmer conditions. In contrast, the 'El Padre' model postulates a collapse of the zonal temperature gradient, reduced thermocline tilt and a reduction in upwelling and/or warmer temperatures of upwelled waters. Existing reconstructions of tropical temperatures produce WEP sea surface temperatures which agree with each other, but yield very different results in the EEP [4,5]. We have reconstructed EEP sea surface temperatures at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 847 using a few samples spanning key intervals of the last 6 million years using carbonate clumped isotope thermometer [6,7,8]. This technique is based on the temperature dependence of the abundances of 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals. Initial measurements of planktonic foraminifera and coccoliths from ODP Site 847 indicate cool EEP sea surface temperatures, supporting models of Pliocene climate that have enhanced zonal temperature gradients, relative to modern. Analyses of Globigerinoides sacculifer (with sac) from sediments indicate calcification temperatures of 20.3°C ± 0.1°C and seawater δ18O values of -0.8‰ ± 0.1‰ from ~6.1 to 5.1 million years ago. Measurements of a mixed coccolith assemblage from the

  8. An algorithm for the estimation of bounds on the emissivity and temperatures from thermal multispectral airborne remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.; Quattrochi, D.; Baskin, R.

    1992-01-01

    The effective flux incident upon the detectors of a thermal sensor, after it has been corrected for atmospheric effects, is a function of a non-linear combination of the emissivity of the target for that channel and the temperature of the target. The sensor system cannot separate the contribution from the emissivity and the temperature that constitute the flux value. A method that estimates the bounds on these temperatures and emissivities from thermal data is described. This method is then tested with remotely sensed data obtained from NASA's Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) - a 6 channel thermal sensor. Since this is an under-determined set of equations i.e. there are 7 unknowns (6 emissivities and 1 temperature) and 6 equations (corresponding to the 6 channel fluxes), there exist theoretically an infinite combination of values of emissivities and temperature that can satisfy these equations. Using some realistic bounds on the emissivities, bounds on the temperature are calculated. These bounds on the temperature are refined to estimate a tighter bound on the emissivity of the source. An error analysis is also carried out to quantitatively determine the extent of uncertainty introduced in the estimate of these parameters. This method is useful only when a realistic set of bounds can be obtained for the emissivities of the data. In the case of water the lower and upper bounds were set at 0.97 and 1.00 respectively. Five flights were flown in succession at altitudes of 2 km (low), 6 km (mid), 12 km (high), and then back again at 6 km and 2 km. The area selected with the Ross Barnett reservoir near Jackson, Mississippi. The mission was flown during the predawn hours of 1 Feb. 1992. Radiosonde data was collected for that duration to profile the characteristics of the atmosphere. Ground truth temperatures using thermometers and radiometers were also obtained over an area of the reservoir. The results of two independent runs of the radiometer data averaged

  9. Combined Radiometer-Radar Microphysical Profile Estimations with Emphasis on High Frequency Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Wang, James R.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hood, Robbie; Manning, Will; Meneghini, Robert; Weinman, James A.; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Information about the vertical microphysical cloud structure is useful in many modeling and predictive practices. Radiometers and radars are used to observe hydrometeor properties. This paper describes an iterative retrieval algorithm that combines the use of airborne active and wideband (10 to 340 GHz) passive observations to estimate the vertical content and particle size distributions of liquid and frozen hydrometeors. The physically-based retrieval algorithm relies on the high frequencies (greater than 89 GHz) to provide details on the frozen hydrometeors. Neglecting the high frequencies yielded acceptable estimates of the liquid profiles, but the ice profiles were poorly retrieved. Airborne radar and radiometer observations from the third Convection and Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3) were used in the retrieval algorithm as constraints. Nadir profiles were estimated for a minute each of flight time (approximately 12.5 km along track) from an anvil, convection, and quasi- stratiform rain. The complex structure of the frozen hydrometeors required the most iterations for convergence for the anvil cloud type. The wideband observations were found to more than double the estimated frozen hydrometeor content as compared to retrievals using only 90-GHz and below. The convective and quasi-stratiform quickly reached convergence (minimized difference between observations and calculations using the estimated profiles). A qualitative validation using coincident in situ CAMEX-3 observations shows that the retrieved particle size distributions are well corroborated with independent measurements.

  10. Using Integrated Assessment Models to Estimate the Economic Damages from Temperature Related Human Health Effects in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, E.; Calvin, K. V.; Puett, R.; Sapkota, A.; Schwarber, A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is projected to increase risks to human health. One pathway that may be particularly difficult to manage is adverse human health impacts (e.g. premature mortality and morbidity) from increases in mean temperatures and changing patterns of temperature extremes. Modeling how these health risks evolve over decadal time-scales is challenging as the severity of the impacts depends on changes in climate as well as socioeconomic conditions. Here, we show estimates of health damages as well as both direct and indirect economic damages that span climate and socioeconomic dimensions for each US state to 2050. We achieve this objective by extending the integrated assessment model (IAM), Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA). First, we quantify the change in premature mortality. We identify a range of exposure-response relationships for temperature related mortality through a critical review of the literature. We then implement these relationships in the GCAM by coupling them with projections of future temperature patterns and population estimates. Second, we monetize the effect of these adverse health effects, including both direct and indirect economic costs through labor force participation and productivity along a range of possible economic pathways. Finally, we evaluate how uncertainty in the parameters and assumptions affects the range of possible estimates. We conclude that the model is sensitive to assumptions regarding exposure-response relationship and population growth. The economic damages, however, are driven by the estimates of income and GDP growth as well as the potential for adaptation measures, namely the use and effectiveness of air conditioning.

  11. Passive estimation of internal temperatures making use of broadband ultrasound radiated by the body.

    PubMed

    Anosov, Andrey A; Kazansky, Alexandr S; Subochev, Pavel V; Mansfel'd, Anatoly D; Klinshov, Vladimir V

    2015-04-01

    The internal temperatures of plasticine models and the human forearm in vivo were determined, based on remote measurements of their intrinsic ultrasonic radiation. For passive detection of the thermal ultrasonic radiation an acoustic radiometer was developed, based on a broadband 0.8-3.3 MHz disk-shaped ultrasonic detector with an 8 mm aperture. To reconstruct temperature profiles using the experimentally measured spectra of thermal acoustic radiation a priori information was used regarding the temperature distribution within the objects being investigated. The temperature distribution for heated plasticine was considered to be a monotonic function. The distribution for the human forearm was considered to fit a heat equation incorporating blood flow parameters. Using sampling durations of 45 s the accuracy of temperature measurement inside a plasticine model was 0.5 K. The measured internal temperature of the forearm in vivo, at 36.3 °C, corresponded to existing physiological data. The results obtained verify the applicability of this passive method of wideband ultrasonic thermometry to medical applications that involve local internal heating of biological tissue. PMID:25920819

  12. Characterization of electrocaloric properties by indirect estimation and direct measurement of temperature-electric field hysteresis loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwa, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The electrocaloric properties of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3(PZT)-based and Ba(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramics and Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) crystals were investigated by the indirect estimation and direct measurement of temperature-electric field (T-E) hysteresis loops. The measured T-E loops showed a similar shape to strain-electric field (s-E) loops. The adiabatic temperature change ΔT due to electrocaloric effects was estimated from the polarization change of these samples. ΔTs of 0.48 and 0.66 K were estimated for the (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O3 (PLZT)(9.1/65/35) ceramics and PMN-PT crystals under a field of 30 kV/cm, respectively. The measured temperature changes ΔTs in these samples upon the release of the electric field from 30 kV/cm to zero were 0.39 and 0.36 K, respectively.

  13. Estimation of the Total Atmospheric Water Vapor Content and Land Surface Temperature Based on AATSR Thermal Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tangtang; Wen, Jun; van der Velde, Rogier; Meng, Xianhong; Li, Zhenchao; Liu, Yuanyong; Liu, Rong

    2008-01-01

    The total atmospheric water vapor content (TAWV) and land surface temperature (LST) play important roles in meteorology, hydrology, ecology and some other disciplines. In this paper, the ENVISAT/AATSR (The Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) thermal data are used to estimate the TAWV and LST over the Loess Plateau in China by using a practical split window algorithm. The distribution of the TAWV is accord with that of the MODIS TAWV products, which indicates that the estimation of the total atmospheric water vapor content is reliable. Validations of the LST by comparing with the ground measurements indicate that the maximum absolute derivation, the maximum relative error and the average relative error is 4.0K, 11.8% and 5.0% respectively, which shows that the retrievals are believable; this algorithm can provide a new way to estimate the LST from AATSR data.

  14. Estimates of crystalline LiF thermal conductivity at high temperature and pressure by a Green-Kubo method

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, R. E.; Ward, D. K.

    2016-07-18

    Here, given the unique optical properties of LiF, it is often used as an observation window in high-temperature and -pressure experiments; hence, estimates of its transmission properties are necessary to interpret observations. Since direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of LiF at the appropriate conditions are difficult, we resort to molecular simulation methods. Using an empirical potential validated against ab initio phonon density of states, we estimate the thermal conductivity of LiF at high temperatures (1000–4000 K) and pressures (100–400 GPa) with the Green-Kubo method. We also compare these estimates to those derived directly from ab initio data. To ascertainmore » the correct phase of LiF at these extreme conditions, we calculate the (relative) phase stability of the B1 and B2 structures using a quasiharmonic ab initio model of the free energy. We also estimate the thermal conductivity of LiF in an uniaxial loading state that emulates initial stages of compression in high-stress ramp loading experiments and show the degree of anisotropy induced in the conductivity due to deformation.« less

  15. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  16. Estimates of crystalline LiF thermal conductivity at high temperature and pressure by a Green-Kubo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. E.; Ward, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Given the unique optical properties of LiF, it is often used as an observation window in high-temperature and -pressure experiments; hence, estimates of its transmission properties are necessary to interpret observations. Since direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of LiF at the appropriate conditions are difficult, we resort to molecular simulation methods. Using an empirical potential validated against ab initio phonon density of states, we estimate the thermal conductivity of LiF at high temperatures (1000-4000 K) and pressures (100-400 GPa) with the Green-Kubo method. We also compare these estimates to those derived directly from ab initio data. To ascertain the correct phase of LiF at these extreme conditions, we calculate the (relative) phase stability of the B1 and B2 structures using a quasiharmonic ab initio model of the free energy. We also estimate the thermal conductivity of LiF in an uniaxial loading state that emulates initial stages of compression in high-stress ramp loading experiments and show the degree of anisotropy induced in the conductivity due to deformation.

  17. Estimation of a star's radius from its effective temperature and surface gravity taking into account stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the radius of a star based on its effective temperature and surface gravity together with computations of the star's structure and evolution is proposed. Rotating and nonrotating stellar models are considered, making it possible to take into account uncertainties associated with the lack of data on the rotational velocities of the stars considered. Each point of an evolutionary track is assigned a weight in accordance with the rate of the stellar evolution and the initial mass function. This enables a more correct estimation of the stellar radius. The method is used to calculate the radius corresponding to the effective temperature and surface gravity obtained from theoretical spectra derived from model stellar atmospheres. This makes it possible to calculate not only the color indices, but also the brightness of the star, enabling estimation of the distance to the star based on photometric observations. The method has been tested and its accuracy estimated using more than a hundred binaries and two dozen well-studied bright stars. The derived radius estimates for stars near the main sequence display systematic deviations that do not exceed 0.03%, and standard deviations for the relative errors below 3.87%. Data on well studied bright stars have enabled verification of the applicability of the method for the red giant branch, and hence proved the possibility of applying it in this densely populated area of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  18. New estimates of temperature response of leaf photosynthesis in Amazon forest trees, its acclimation to mean temperature change and consequences for modelling climate response to rain forests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijt, B.; Jans, W.; Vasconcelos, S.; Tribuzy, E. S.; Felsemburgh, C.; Eliane, M.; Rowland, L.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Meir, P.

    2014-12-01

    In many dynamic vegetation models, degradation of the tropical forests is induced because they assume that productivity falls rapidly when temperatures rise in the region of 30-40°C. Apart plant respiration, this is due to the assumptions on the temperature optima of photosynthetic capacity, which are low and can differ widely between models, where in fact hardly any empirical information is available for tropical forests. Even less is known about the possibility that photosynthesis will acclimate to changing temperatures. The objective of this study to is to provide better estimates for optima, as well as to determine whether any acclimation to temperature change is to be expected. We present both new and hitherto unpublished data on the temperature response of photosynthesis of Amazon rainforest trees, encompassing three sites, several species and five field campaigns. Leaf photosynthesis and its parameters were determined at a range of temperatures. To study the long-term (seasonal) acclimation of this response, this was combined with an artificial, in situ, multi-season leaf heating experiment. The data show that, on average for all non-heated cases, the photosynthetic parameter Vcmax weakly peaks between 35 and 40 ˚C, while heating does not have a clearly significant effect. Results for Jmax are slightly different, with sharper peaks. Scatter was relatively high, which could indicate weak overall temperature dependence. The combined results were used to fit new parameters to the various temperature response curve functions in a range of DGVMs. The figure shows a typical example: while the default Jules model assumes a temperature optimum for Vcmax at around 33 ˚C, the data suggest that Vcmax keeps rising up to at least 40 ˚C. Of course, calculated photosynthesis, obtained by applying this Vcmax in the Farquhar model, peaks at lower temperature. Finally, the implication of these new model parameters for modelled climate change impact on modelled Amazon

  19. Comparison of methods for estimating Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature index from standard meteorological measurements.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejash; Mullen, Stephen P; Santee, William R

    2013-08-01

    Environmental heat illness and injuries are a serious concern for the Army and Marines. Currently, the Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index is used to evaluate heat injury risk. The index is a weighted average of dry-bulb temperature (Tdb), black globe temperature (Tbg), and natural wet-bulb temperature (Tnwb). The WBGT index would be more widely used if it could be determined using standard weather instruments. This study compares models developed by Liljegren at Argonne National Laboratory and by Matthew at the U.S. Army Institute of Environmental Medicine that calculate WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. Both models use air temperature (Ta), relative humidity, wind speed, and global solar radiation (RG) to calculate Tnwb and Tbg. The WBGT and meteorological data used for model validation were collected at Griffin, Georgia and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. Liljegren (YPG: R(2) = 0.709, p < 0.01; Griffin: R(2) = 0.854, p < 0.01) showed closer agreement between calculated and actual WBGT than Matthew (YPG: R(2) = 0.630, p < 0.01; Griffin: R(2) = 0.677, p < 0.01). Compared to actual WBGT heat categorization, the Matthew model tended to underpredict compared to Liljegren's classification. Results indicate Liljegren is an acceptable alternative to direct WBGT measurement, but verification under other environmental conditions is needed.

  20. Estimation of low-temperature cracking threshold for asphalt binders using an acoustic emmission approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apeagyei, Alex K.; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2009-03-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) approach to evaluate low temperature cracking susceptibility of asphalt binders is presented. Thin films of asphalt binders were bonded to granite substrates and exposed to temperatures ranging from 15°C to - 50°C. Differential thermal contraction between granite substrates and asphalt binders induces progressively higher thermal stress in the binders resulting in thermal crack formation, which is accompanied by a release of elastic energy in the form of transient waves. Using piezoelectric sensors (Digital Wave, Model B-1025), a four-channel acoustic emission system was used to record the acoustic emission activity during the binder/granite cooling process. Assuming the cracking temperature (Tcr) to be the temperature at which the AE signal energy exceeds a pre-selected threshold energy level, this AE testing approach was found to be sensitive and repeatable for predicting cracking temperatures (Tcr) in four SUPERPAVE core asphalt binders. These AE-based Tcr predictions showed strong correlation (R2 = 0.9) with predictions based on either AASHTO TP1 or MP1A protocols. Unlike TP1 and MP1A protocols, the presented AE approach does not require the use of sophisticated software for predicting thermal stresses, and no assumption is required regarding the testing cooling rate and the binder coefficient of thermal contraction.

  1. Integrating temperature-dependent life table data into a matrix projection model for Drosophila suzukii population estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiman, Nik G; Walton, Vaughn M; Dalton, Daniel T; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J; Chiu, Joanna C; Daane, Kent M; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations. PMID:25192013

  2. Integrating temperature-dependent life table data into a matrix projection model for Drosophila suzukii population estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiman, Nik G; Walton, Vaughn M; Dalton, Daniel T; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J; Chiu, Joanna C; Daane, Kent M; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations.

  3. Position-dependent velocity of an effective temperature point for the estimation of the thermal diffusivity of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Settu; Shivaprakash, N. C.; Kameswara Rao, L.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to estimate the thermal diffusivity of optically transparent solids at ambient temperature based on the velocity of an effective temperature point (ETP), and by using a two-beam interferometer the proposed concept is corroborated. 1D unsteady heat flow via step-temperature excitation is interpreted as a ‘micro-scale rectilinear translatory motion’ of an ETP. The velocity dependent function is extracted by revisiting the Fourier heat diffusion equation. The relationship between the velocity of the ETP with thermal diffusivity is modeled using a standard solution. Under optimized thermal excitation, the product of the ‘velocity of the ETP’ and the distance is a new constitutive equation for the thermal diffusivity of the solid. The experimental approach involves the establishment of a 1D unsteady heat flow inside the sample through step-temperature excitation. In the moving isothermal surfaces, the ETP is identified using a two-beam interferometer. The arrival-time of the ETP to reach a fixed distance away from heat source is measured, and its velocity is calculated. The velocity of the ETP and a given distance is sufficient to estimate the thermal diffusivity of a solid. The proposed method is experimentally verified for BK7 glass samples and the measured results are found to match closely with the reported value.

  4. Global climatology and variability of potential new production estimated from remote sensing of sea-surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugdale, Richard C.; Wilkerson, Frances P.

    1995-01-01

    During this project we have collected numerous shipboard data-bases of oceanic nitrate and silicate versus temperature for both equatorial and coastal upwelling regions. These cruises all have accompanying N-15 measurements of new production. The inverse relationships between nutrients and temperatures have been determined and are being used to obtain surface nutrient fields from sea surface temperatures measured remotely by satellite borne sensors- i.e. AVHRR data from NOAA satellites contained in the MCSST data set for the world ocean provided by the University of Miami. The images and data derived from space in this way show the strong seasonal fluctuations and interannual el Nino fluctuations of the nitrate field. the nitrate data has been used to make estimates of new production for the equatorial pacific which are compared with shipboard measurements when available. The importance of silicate as a nutrient driving new production and the ratio of nitrate to silicate has been discovered to be crucial to better understand the causes of new production variability, so we have added these parameters to our study and have begun to make estimates of these for the equatorial Pacific, derived from the weekly averaged sea surface temperatures (SSTs).

  5. Integrating Temperature-Dependent Life Table Data into a Matrix Projection Model for Drosophila suzukii Population Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wiman, Nik G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Dalton, Daniel T.; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J.; Chiu, Joanna C.; Daane, Kent M.; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations. PMID:25192013

  6. Estimating energy balance fluxes above a boreal forest from radiometric temperature observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The great areal extent of boreal forests confers these ecosystems potential to impact on the global surface-atmosphere energy exchange. A modeling approach, based on a simplified two-source energy balance model, was proposed to estimate energy balance fluxes above boreal forests using thermal infrar...

  7. Estimating time-to-gravid for a freshwater mussel, Utterbackia imbecillis (Unionidae), after temperature conditioning in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Vreede, K.B. van; MacIntosh, D.L.; Black, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    The juvenile of Utterbackia imbecillis has recently become an important toxicity test organism. However, in temperate climates, gravid U. imbecillis are not readily available during many months of the year, especially if shoreline collection methods are used. This shortage of gravid mussels presents a logistical problem for use of juvenile U. imbecillis as toxicity test organisms. Therefore, this study was designed to test the feasibility of delaying and manipulating glochidial maturation in the laboratory through temperature control, because temperature changes seem to cue the maturation of glochidia in gravid mussels in the natural environment. The objectives of this study were to determine whether glochidial maturation can be stalled by holding adult mussels at cold temperatures, to determine if glochidial maturation could be cued by increasing water temperature at the time juveniles are needed for toxicity testing, and to predict the time required for cold-stored mussels to become gravid. Results of this study suggest that glochidial maturation can be stalled by holding mussels at winter temperature. Furthermore, glochidial maturation can later be cued by increasing the water temperature. Additionally, a survival analysis method is suitable for estimating the time-to-gravid for cold-stored mussels. These results should be useful for researchers requiring year-round availability of U. imbecillis for toxicity testing.

  8. Cherry blossom phenological data since the seventeenth century for Edo (Tokyo), Japan, and their application to estimation of March temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Yasuyuki

    2015-04-01

    The changes in March mean temperatures in Edo (Tokyo), Japan, since the seventeenth century, were reconstructed using phenological data for the cherry blossoms of Prunus jamasakura deduced from old diaries and chronicles. The observations of the time of full blossoming and of cherry blossom viewing parties were acquired and used to construct a full-blossoming phenological data series for P. jamasakura. Phenological data from 207 of the years from 1601 to 1905 were used for this study. The reconstructed temperatures suggested the existence of two cold periods (the second half of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth century), during which times the estimated March mean temperatures were about 4 °C and 5 °C, respectively. These two cold periods at Edo coincided with those reconstructed at Kyoto in previous studies. These cold periods coincided with two less extreme periods, the Maunder and Dalton minima, in the long-term solar variation cycle.

  9. Sex ratio estimations of loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings by histological examination and nest temperatures at Fethiye beach, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaska, Yakup; Ilgaz, Çetin; Özdemir, Adem; Başkale, Eyüp; Türkozan, Oğuz; Baran, Ibrahim; Stachowitsch, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Hatchling sex ratios in the loggerhead turtle ( Caretta caretta) were estimated by placing electronic temperature recorders in 21 nests at Fethiye beach during 2000 2002. Over the seasons, the mean temperature in the middle third of the incubation period ranged from 26.7 to 32.1°C, and incubation periods ranged from 49 to 67 days. Based on the mean temperatures during the middle third of the incubation period, and on histologically sexed dead hatchlings, the sex ratios of hatchlings at Fethiye beach were roughly equal, i.e. 60 65% of the hatchlings were females. This contrasts with the highly female-skewed sex ratios in loggerhead turtles elsewhere; Fethiye has a relatively high proportion of male hatchlings. For endangered sea turtles, the knowledge of hatchling sex ratios at different beaches, coupled with appropriate conservation measures, can make an important contribution to their survival.

  10. Sex ratio estimations of loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings by histological examination and nest temperatures at Fethiye beach, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kaska, Yakup; Ilgaz, Cetin; Ozdemir, Adem; Başkale, Eyüp; Türkozan, Oğuz; Baran, Ibrahim; Stachowitsch, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Hatchling sex ratios in the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) were estimated by placing electronic temperature recorders in 21 nests at Fethiye beach during 2000-2002. Over the seasons, the mean temperature in the middle third of the incubation period ranged from 26.7 to 32.1 degrees C, and incubation periods ranged from 49 to 67 days. Based on the mean temperatures during the middle third of the incubation period, and on histologically sexed dead hatchlings, the sex ratios of hatchlings at Fethiye beach were roughly equal, i.e. 60-65% of the hatchlings were females. This contrasts with the highly female-skewed sex ratios in loggerhead turtles elsewhere; Fethiye has a relatively high proportion of male hatchlings. For endangered sea turtles, the knowledge of hatchling sex ratios at different beaches, coupled with appropriate conservation measures, can make an important contribution to their survival.

  11. Estimation of ground heat flux from soil temperature over a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kedong; Wang, Wenke; Wang, Zhoufeng; Zhao, Yaqian; Yang, Zeyuan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Zaiyong; Duan, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Ground soil heat flux, G 0, is a difficult-to-measure but important component of the surface energy budget. Over the past years, many methods were proposed to estimate G 0; however, the application of these methods was seldom validated and assessed under different weather conditions. In this study, three popular models (force-restore, conduction-convection, and harmonic) and one widely used method (plate calorimetric), which had well performance in publications, were investigated using field data to estimate daily G 0 on clear, cloudy, and rainy days, while the gradient calorimetric method was regarded as the reference for assessing the accuracy. The results showed that harmonic model was well reproducing the G 0 curve for clear days, but it yielded large errors on cloudy and rainy days. The force-restore model worked well only under rainfall condition, but it was poor to estimate G 0 under rain-free conditions. On the contrary, the conduction-convection model was acceptable to determine G 0 under rain-free conditions, but it generated large errors on rainfall days. More importantly, the plate calorimetric method was the best to estimate G 0 under different weather conditions compared with the three models, but the performance of this method is affected by the placement depth of the heat flux plate. As a result, the heat flux plate was recommended to be buried as close as possible to the surface under clear condition. But under cloudy and rainy conditions, the plate placed at depth of around 0.075 m yielded G 0 well. Overall, the findings of this paper provide guidelines to acquire more accurate estimation of G 0 under different weather conditions, which could improve the surface energy balance in field.

  12. The Lifetime Estimate for ACSR Single-Stage Splice Connector Operating at Higher Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Graziano, Joe; Chan, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the continuation of Part I effort to develop a protocol of integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector (SSC) assembly during service at high operating temperature.1The Part II efforts are mainly focused on the thermal mechanical testing, thermal-cycling simulation and its impact on the effective lifetime of the SSC system. The investigation indicates that thermal cycling temperature and frequency, conductor cable tension loading, and the compressive residual stress field within a SSC system have significant impact on the SSC integrity and the associated effective lifetime.

  13. Quantitative estimates of full glacial temperatures in equatorial Africa from palynological data

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefille, R.; Chalie, F.; Vincens, A.; Guiot, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new reconstruction of the mean annual temperature obtained from a high altitude pollen sequence in equatorial Africa (3{degrees}28`S, 29{degrees}34`E, 2240 m). It has been achieved with an extended modern African reference data set by adding spectra from 228 new sites and using another selection for pollen taxa. The purpose of this paper is to test how the obtained temperature value depends upon the availability of modern analogues. The results are in good agreement with those previously published, reinforcing the validity of the method. The mean standard error is reduced by 0.3{degrees}C. The mean temperature for the Holocene appears +1.4{degrees}C warmer than the present and the last glacial maximum (25-18 kyrs BP) cooling is better specified at -3{+-}1.9{degrees}C, a conservative value, more consistent with reconstructed sea surface temperature in the equatorial ocean. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Estimating maize water stress by standard deviation of canopy temperature in thermal imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new crop water stress index using standard deviation of canopy temperature as an input was developed to monitor crop water status. In this study, thermal imagery was taken from maize under various levels of deficit irrigation treatments in different crop growing stages. The Expectation-Maximizatio...

  15. Using microwave observations to estimate land surface temperature during cloudy conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and...

  16. High variability of Greenland surface temperature over the past 4000 years estimated from trapped air in an ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Takuro; Kawamura, Kenji; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Barnola, Jean-Marc; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Vinther, Bo M.; Johnsen, Sigfús J.; Box, Jason E.

    2011-11-01

    Greenland recently incurred record high temperatures and ice loss by melting, adding to concerns that anthropogenic warming is impacting the Greenland ice sheet and in turn accelerating global sea-level rise. Yet, it remains imprecisely known for Greenland how much warming is caused by increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases versus natural variability. To address this need, we reconstruct Greenland surface snow temperature variability over the past 4000 years at the GISP2 site (near the Summit of the Greenland ice sheet; hereafter referred to as Greenland temperature) with a new method that utilises argon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from occluded air bubbles. The estimated average Greenland snow temperature over the past 4000 years was -30.7°C with a standard deviation of 1.0°C and exhibited a long-term decrease of roughly 1.5°C, which is consistent with earlier studies. The current decadal average surface temperature (2001-2010) at the GISP2 site is -29.9°C. The record indicates that warmer temperatures were the norm in the earlier part of the past 4000 years, including century-long intervals nearly 1°C warmer than the present decade (2001-2010). Therefore, we conclude that the current decadal mean temperature in Greenland has not exceeded the envelope of natural variability over the past 4000 years, a period that seems to include part of the Holocene Thermal Maximum. Notwithstanding this conclusion, climate models project that if anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions continue, the Greenland temperature would exceed the natural variability of the past 4000 years sometime before the year 2100.

  17. Are tree-ring based estimates for Northern Hemisphere medieval temperatures fit for purpose?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rob; Anchukaitis, Kevin; Briffa, Keith; Büntgen, Ulf; Cook, Ed; D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Esper, Jan; Frank, David; Gunnarson, Björn; Hegerl, Gabi; Krusic, Paul; Linderholm, Hans; Rydval, Milos; Tett, Simon; Wiles, Greg; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    At present, there are numerous millennial-length northern hemisphere reconstructions. However, only a small sub-set utilise just tree-ring data. Despite the theoretical ideal of the multi-proxy approach for producing large scale reconstructions, there still exist many problems with implementing such studies; (1) they generally do not take into account the varying seasonality of the climate signal that each constituent proxy record contains, resulting in a composite reconstruction that is a seasonal melange which is often calibrated to annual temperatures and (2) all non-tree-ring proxy archives contain small to substantial dating uncertainties that at best affords capture of temperature variations at decadal or longer time scales. These two problems conspire against the multi-proxy experiment for the robust attribution of climate forcing and characterizing the full spectrum of natural variability. We suggest that focusing on tree-ring based reconstructions will substantially improve our understanding of past climate variability as they are precisely dated and have the potential to reconstruct warm season temperatures on inter-annual to multi-centennial time scales. We present the development of an updated and expanded collection of published temperature sensitive tree-ring series (both ring-width and ring-density) for the Northern Hemisphere, which can be used not only to improve our understanding of past large-scale temperature changes but also to identify regions where currently too few data exist. Our main goals are; (1) enumerate the unique qualities of ring-width and maximum latewood density chronologies, especially for assessing volcanic forcing and seasonal response; and (2) compare the spatial robustness of gridded reconstructions, especially during the supposed warm medieval period and the more recent, but better represented, Little Ice Age. Currently, large scale single series NH temperature reconstructions do not agree well with climate model output

  18. Estimating index of refraction for material identification in comparison to existing temperature emissivity separation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2016-05-01

    As off-nadir viewing platforms become increasingly prevalent in remote sensing, material identification techniques must be robust to changing viewing geometries. Current identification strategies generally rely on estimating reflectivity or emissivity, both of which vary with viewing angle. Presented here is a technique, leveraging polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI), to estimate index of refraction which is invariant to viewing geometry. Results from a quartz window show that index of refraction can be retrieved to within 0.08 rms error from 875-1250 cm-1 for an amorphous material. Results from a silicon carbide (SiC) wafer, which has much sharper features than quartz glass, show the index of refraction can be retrieved to within 0.07 rms error. The results from each of these datasets show an improvement when compared with a maximum smoothness TES algorithm.

  19. Estimation of subsurface formation temperature in the Yangtze area, South China: implications for shale gas generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Hao, C.; Li, X.; Xu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is one key parameter for hydrocarbon generation and preservation, also playing important role in geothermal energy assessment;however, accurate regional temperature pattern is still challenging, owing to a lack of data coverage and data quality as well. The Yangtze area, located in the South China, is considered as the most favorable target for shale gas resource exploration in China, and attracts more and more attention recently. Here we used the newly acquired steady-state temperature loggings, reliable Drilling Stem Test temperature data available and thermal properties, estimated the subsurface temperature-at-depth for the Yangtze area. Results show that the geothermal gradient ranges between 17 K/m and 74K/m, mainly falling into 20~30K/m, with a mean of 24 K/m; heat flow varies from 25 mW/m2 to 92 mW/m2, with a mean of 65 mW/m2. For the estimated temperature-at-depth, it is about 20~50 ℃ at the depth of 1000m, 50~80℃ for that at 2000m; while the highest temperature can be up to 110℃ at 3000m depth. Generally, the present-day geothermal regime of the Yangtze area is characterized by high in the northeast, low in the middle and localized high again in the southwest, and this pattern is well consistent with the tectono-thermal processes occurred in the area. Due to Cenozoic crustal extension in the northeastern Yangtze area, magmatism is prevailed, accounting for the high heat flow observed. Precambrian basement exists in the middle Yangtze area, such as the Xuefeng and Wuling Mountains, heat flow and subsurface temperature accordingly show relatively low as well. While for the southwestern Yangtze area, especially Yunnan and western Sichuan provinces, localized Cenozoic magmatism and tectonic activities are available, which is attributed to the high geothermal regime there. Considering the Paleozoic intensive tectonic deformation in the Yangtze area, tectonically stable area is prerequisite for shale gas preservation. Geothermal regime analysis

  20. Estimating 750 years of temperature variations and uncertainties in the Pyrenees by tree-ring reconstructions and climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado Liñán, I.; Büntgen, U.; González-Rouco, F.; Zorita, E.; Montávez, J. P.; Gómez-Navarro, J. J.; Brunet, M.; Heinrich, I.; Helle, G.; Gutiérrez, E.

    2012-05-01

    Past temperature variations are usually inferred from proxy data or estimated using general circulation models. Comparisons between climate estimations derived from proxy records and from model simulations help to better understand mechanisms driving climate variations, and also offer the possibility to identify deficiencies in both approaches. This paper presents regional temperature reconstructions based on tree-ring maximum density series in the Pyrenees, and compares them with the output of global simulations for this region and with regional climate model simulations conducted for the target region. An ensemble of 24 reconstructions of May-to-September regional mean temperature was derived from 22 maximum density tree-ring site chronologies distributed over the larger Pyrenees area. Four different tree-ring series standardization procedures were applied, combining two detrending methods: 300-yr spline and the regional curve standardization (RCS). Additionally, different methodological variants for the regional chronology were generated by using three different aggregation methods. Calibration verification trials were performed in split periods and using two methods: regression and a simple variance matching. The resulting set of temperature reconstructions was compared with climate simulations performed with global (ECHO-G) and regional (MM5) climate models. The 24 variants of May-to-September temperature reconstructions reveal a generally coherent pattern of inter-annual to multi-centennial temperature variations in the Pyrenees region for the last 750 yr. However, some reconstructions display a marked positive trend for the entire length of the reconstruction, pointing out that the application of the RCS method to a suboptimal set of samples may lead to unreliable results. Climate model simulations agree with the tree-ring based reconstructions at multi-decadal time scales, suggesting solar variability and volcanism as the main factors controlling

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site atmospheric state best estimates for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and water vapor retrieval validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, David C.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Lesht, Barry M.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Hannon, Scott E.; Feltz, Wayne F.; Moy, Leslie A.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Cress, Ted S.

    2006-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is the first of a new generation of advanced satellite-based atmospheric sounders with the capability of obtaining high-vertical resolution profiles of temperature and water vapor. The high-accuracy retrieval goals of AIRS (e.g., 1 K RMS in 1 km layers below 100 mbar for air temperature, 10% RMS in 2 km layers below 100 mbar for water vapor concentration), combined with the large temporal and spatial variability of the atmosphere and difficulties in making accurate measurements of the atmospheric state, necessitate careful and detailed validation using well-characterized ground-based sites. As part of ongoing AIRS Science Team efforts and a collaborative effort between the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) project and the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, data from various ARM and other observations are used to create best estimates of the atmospheric state at the Aqua overpass times. The resulting validation data set is an ensemble of temperature and water vapor profiles created from radiosondes launched at the approximate Aqua overpass times, interpolated to the exact overpass time using time continuous ground-based profiles, adjusted to account for spatial gradients within the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) footprints, and supplemented with limited cloud observations. Estimates of the spectral surface infrared emissivity and local skin temperatures are also constructed. Relying on the developed ARM infrastructure and previous and ongoing characterization studies of the ARM measurements, the data set provides a good combination of statistics and accuracy which is essential for assessment of the advanced sounder products. Combined with the collocated AIRS observations, the products are being used to study observed minus calculated AIRS spectra, aimed at evaluation of the AIRS forward radiative transfer model, AIRS observed radiances, and temperature and water vapor profile

  2. Fully-automated estimation of actual to potential evapotranspiration in the Everglades using Landsat and air temperature data as inputs to the Vegetation Index-Temperature Trapezoid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagci, A. L.; Jones, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    While the greater Everglades contains a vast wetland, evapotranspiration (ET) is a major source of water "loss" from the system. Like other ecosystems, the Everglades is vulnerable to drought. Everglades restoration science and resource management requires information on the spatial and temporal distribution of ET. We developed a fully-automated ET model using the Vegetation Index-Temperature Trapezoid concept. The model was tested and evaluated against in-situ ET observations collected at the Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest eddy-covariance tower in Everglades National Park (Sitename / FLUXNET ID: Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest / US-Skr). It uses Landsat Surface Reflectance Climate Data from Landsat 5, and Landsat 5 thermal and air temperature data from the Daily Gridded Surface Dataset to output the ratio of actual evapotranspiration (AET) and potential evapotranspiration (PET). When multiplied with a PET estimate, this output can be used to estimate ET at high spatial resolution. Furthermore, it can be used to downscale coarse resolution ET and PET products. Two example outputs covering the agricultural lands north of the major Everglades wetlands extracted from two different dates are shown below along with a National Land Cover Database image from 2011. The irrigated and non-irrigated farms are easily distinguishable from the background (i.e., natural land covers). Open water retained the highest AET/PET ratio. Wetlands had a higher AET/PET ratio than farmlands. The main challenge in this study area is prolonged cloudiness during the growing season.

  3. Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun

    2011-02-15

    This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

  4. Sensitivity of CO2 migration estimation on reservoir temperature and pressure uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston; Doughty, Christine

    2008-11-01

    The density and viscosity of supercritical CO{sub 2} are sensitive to pressure and temperature (PT) while the viscosity of brine is sensitive primarily to temperature. Oil field PT data in the vicinity of WESTCARB's Phase III injection pilot test site in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, show a range of PT values, indicating either PT uncertainty or variability. Numerical simulation results across the range of likely PT indicate brine viscosity variation causes virtually no difference in plume evolution and final size, but CO{sub 2} density variation causes a large difference. Relative ultimate plume size is almost directly proportional to the relative difference in brine and CO{sub 2} density (buoyancy flow). The majority of the difference in plume size occurs during and shortly after the cessation of injection.

  5. Relationship Among High Rainfall Rates, Atmospheric Moisture, and Temperature Based on High-Resolution Radar-Based Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, S. E.; Nelson, B. R.; Kunkel, K.; Prat, O. P.; Karl, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global warming is expected to increase maximum rainfall rates in many areas. A primary factor for this expectation is the large increase in atmospheric water vapor content expected with global warming, a simple application of the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relationship. However, the spatial variations of changes will also be modulated by changes in frequency, intensity and location of the storms that produce heavy rainfall. In this study, we explore one dimension of this complex issue, specifically the observational evidence for robust relationships among atmospheric temperature, total precipitable water, and the most extreme magnitudes of surface rainfall rates. We investigate the extent to which a C-C relationship is followed and whether this is dependent on rainstorm duration. This information is crucial to understanding how to incorporate climate change considerations into extreme rainfall design values. Using high-frequency rainfall measurements from both in-situ networks such as the US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) and radar estimates such as the newly-developed National Mosaic and Multisensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (NMQ/Q2), rainfall rates and accumulations are compared to precipitable water estimates obtained from both radiosonde data and hourly gridded model analysis. A variety of durations are explored to determine if rising temperature, and thus rising precipitable water availability, corresponds to an increase in the most extreme values of short-term rainfall intensity, longer-term rainfall accumulation, both, or neither.

  6. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, C. R.; Borasi, G.; Payne, A.

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one.

  7. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data.

    PubMed

    Dillon, C R; Borasi, G; Payne, A

    2016-01-21

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one. PMID:26741344

  8. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junguo; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Guomo; Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Pingheng; Liang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information) effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK) and Co-Kriging (Co-OK) methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193) were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539) when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points. PMID:26807579

  9. Improving Estimations of Spatial Distribution of Soil Respiration Using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy Algorithm and Soil Temperature as Auxiliary Data.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junguo; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Guomo; Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Pingheng; Liang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration inherently shows strong spatial variability. It is difficult to obtain an accurate characterization of soil respiration with an insufficient number of monitoring points. However, it is expensive and cumbersome to deploy many sensors. To solve this problem, we proposed employing the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) algorithm, using soil temperature as auxiliary information, to study the spatial distribution of soil respiration. The BME algorithm used the soft data (auxiliary information) effectively to improve the estimation accuracy of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil respiration. Based on the functional relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration, the BME algorithm satisfactorily integrated soil temperature data into said spatial distribution. As a means of comparison, we also applied the Ordinary Kriging (OK) and Co-Kriging (Co-OK) methods. The results indicated that the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) and absolute values of bias for both Day 1 and Day 2 were the lowest for the BME method, thus demonstrating its higher estimation accuracy. Further, we compared the performance of the BME algorithm coupled with auxiliary information, namely soil temperature data, and the OK method without auxiliary information in the same study area for 9, 21, and 37 sampled points. The results showed that the RMSEs for the BME algorithm (0.972 and 1.193) were less than those for the OK method (1.146 and 1.539) when the number of sampled points was 9 and 37, respectively. This indicates that the former method using auxiliary information could reduce the required number of sampling points for studying spatial distribution of soil respiration. Thus, the BME algorithm, coupled with soil temperature data, can not only improve the accuracy of soil respiration spatial interpolation but can also reduce the number of sampling points. PMID:26807579

  10. Heat-related deaths in hot cities: estimates of human tolerance to high temperature thresholds.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Sharon L; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J; Ruddell, Benjamin L; Ruddell, Darren M

    2014-03-20

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥ 65 during the months May-October for years 2000-2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90-97 °F; 32.2-36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide.

  11. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B.; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Ruddell, Darren M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide. PMID:24658410

  12. Estimation of the Ocean Skin Temperature using the NASA GEOS Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Akella, Santha; Todling, Ricardo; Suarez, Max

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the status of the development of a sea surface temperature (SST) analysis for the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Version-5 atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). Its implementation is part of the steps being taken toward the development of an integrated earth system analysis. Currently, GEOS-ADAS SST is a bulk ocean temperature (from ocean boundary conditions), and is almost identical to the skin sea surface temperature. Here we describe changes to the atmosphere-ocean interface layer of the GEOS-atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) to include near surface diurnal warming and cool-skin effects. We also added SST relevant Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations to the GEOS-ADAS observing system. We provide a detailed description of our analysis of these observations, along with the modifications to the interface between the GEOS atmospheric general circulation model, gridpoint statistical interpolation-based atmospheric analysis and the community radiative transfer model. Our experiments (with and without these changes) show improved assimilation of satellite radiance observations. We obtained a closer fit to withheld, in-situ buoys measuring near-surface SST. Evaluation of forecast skill scores corroborate improvements seen in the observation fits. Along with a discussion of our results, we also include directions for future work.

  13. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  14. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  15. Estimation of deepwater temperature and hydrogeochemistry of springs in the Takab geothermal field, West Azerbaijan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Reza; Moore, Farid; Mohammadi, Zargham; Keshavarzi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water samples from 19 hot and cold springs are used to characterize Takab geothermal field, west of Iran. The springs are divided into two main groups based on temperature, host rock, total dissolved solids (TDS), and major and minor elements. TDS, electrical conductivity (EC), Cl(-), and SO4 (2-) concentrations of hot springs are all higher than in cold springs. Higher TDS in hot springs probably reflect longer circulation and residence time. The high Si, B, and Sr contents in thermal waters are probably the result of extended water-rock interaction and reflect flow paths and residence time. Binary, ternary, and Giggenbach diagrams were used to understand the deeper mixing conditions and locations of springs in the model system. It is believed that the springs are heated either by mixing of deep geothermal fluid with cold groundwater or low conductive heat flow. Mixing ratios are evaluated using Cl, Na, and B concentrations and a mass balance approach. Calculated quartz and chalcedony geothermometer give lower reservoir temperatures than cation geothermometers. The silica-enthalpy mixing model predicts a subsurface reservoir temperature between 62 and 90 °C. The δ(18)O and δD (δ(2)H) are used to trace and determine the origin and movement of water. Both hot and cold waters plot close to the local meteoric line, indicating local meteoric origin. PMID:26733417

  16. Estimating payload internal temperatures and radiator size for multimegawatt space platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-08-01

    A conceptual space platform consists of a payload, a power conditioning unit (PCU), and two radiators: the main radiator and a secondary radiator. A computer program was written to determine the required size of the two radiators and the temperatures of the PCU and payload for a given platform power level. An iterative approach is necessary because the required size of the main radiator depends on the size of the secondary radiator and vice versa. Also, the temperatures of the payload and PCU depend on the size of the radiators. The program user can subdivide the two radiators into any number of nodes to increase the accuracy of the radiant heat transfer solution. The use of more nodes also allows better prediction of the nonlinear temperature drop that occurs across the radiators as the working fluid deposits the platform's waste heat in the radiator. View factor expressions are automatically calculated for different choices of the number of nodes. The user can also select different separation distances between the various platform structures. A model is included to couple the radiant and conduction heat transfer that occurs between the payload and its meteoroid shell and between the PCU and its shell. Also, the program allows the use of a refrigerator to cool the payload. If a refrigerator is used, the program determines the amount of additional thermal power needed to run the refrigerator. The results of parametric calculations are included to demonstrate the use of the program.

  17. Quantitative Estimation of Temperature Variations in Plantar Angiosomes: A Study Case for Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Morales-Hernandez, L. A.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J. J.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Ramirez-Cortes, J. M.; Morales-Caporal, R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermography is a useful tool since it provides information that may help in the diagnostic of several diseases in a noninvasive and fast way. Particularly, thermography has been applied in the study of the diabetic foot. However, most of these studies report only qualitative information making it difficult to measure significant parameters such as temperature variations. These variations are important in the analysis of the diabetic foot since they could bring knowledge, for instance, regarding ulceration risks. The early detection of ulceration risks is considered an important research topic in the medicine field, as its objective is to avoid major complications that might lead to a limb amputation. The absence of symptoms in the early phase of the ulceration is conceived as the main disadvantage to provide an opportune diagnostic in subjects with neuropathy. Since the relation between temperature and ulceration risks is well established in the literature, a methodology that obtains quantitative temperature differences in the plantar area of the diabetic foot to detect ulceration risks is proposed in this work. Such methodology is based on the angiosome concept and image processing. PMID:24688595

  18. Estimation of deepwater temperature and hydrogeochemistry of springs in the Takab geothermal field, West Azerbaijan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Reza; Moore, Farid; Mohammadi, Zargham; Keshavarzi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water samples from 19 hot and cold springs are used to characterize Takab geothermal field, west of Iran. The springs are divided into two main groups based on temperature, host rock, total dissolved solids (TDS), and major and minor elements. TDS, electrical conductivity (EC), Cl(-), and SO4 (2-) concentrations of hot springs are all higher than in cold springs. Higher TDS in hot springs probably reflect longer circulation and residence time. The high Si, B, and Sr contents in thermal waters are probably the result of extended water-rock interaction and reflect flow paths and residence time. Binary, ternary, and Giggenbach diagrams were used to understand the deeper mixing conditions and locations of springs in the model system. It is believed that the springs are heated either by mixing of deep geothermal fluid with cold groundwater or low conductive heat flow. Mixing ratios are evaluated using Cl, Na, and B concentrations and a mass balance approach. Calculated quartz and chalcedony geothermometer give lower reservoir temperatures than cation geothermometers. The silica-enthalpy mixing model predicts a subsurface reservoir temperature between 62 and 90 °C. The δ(18)O and δD (δ(2)H) are used to trace and determine the origin and movement of water. Both hot and cold waters plot close to the local meteoric line, indicating local meteoric origin.

  19. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent.

  20. A Fourier approach for estimating and correcting the topographic perturbation of low-temperature thermochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, C.; Braun, J.; van der Beek, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermochronology is a unique tool to reconstruct the long-term exhumation history of outcropping rocks. Pronounced (palaeo-) topography can markedly perturb near-surface isotherms, which can result in erroneous exhumation histories derived from age-elevation relationships but also offers the possibility to reconstruct palaeo-topography. Here we use a synthetic dataset to illustrate the complex non-linear relationships between the degree of topographic perturbation of thermochronological ages on one hand, and exhumation rate, geothermal gradient, and topographic wavelength and relief on the other. The dataset reveals that, in theory, relief changes can be retrieved for wavelengths as low as 5 km, and wavelength changes are possible to detect for relief as low as 0.5 km. In addition, the data attest that even in regions characterised by very slow exhumation rates (e.g. 0.03 km/Ma), changes in palaeo-topography can be successfully retrieved. Coupling of this dataset with a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm to decompose complex 2D topography into sinusoidal functions allows a rapid and accurate estimation of the topographic perturbation and resulting thermochronological ages assuming steady-state exhumation. This coupled method was successfully implemented to (i) predict most promising sample sites for the estimation of palaeo-topography and (ii) correct exhumation rates derived from non-vertical age-elevation profiles.

  1. Fragility of estimated spatial temperature patterns in climate field reconstructions of the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Emile-Geay, J.; Vaccaro, A.; Guillot, D.; Rajaratnam, B.

    2013-12-01

    Climate field reconstructions (CFRs) of the Common Era can provide insight into dynamical causes of low-frequency climate variability. For instance, the Mann et al. [2009] study found that the reconstructed sea-surface temperature difference between the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age (hereinafter MCA - LIA) is marked by a La-Niña like pattern over the tropical Pacific, and proposed dynamical explanations for this observation. In this talk, we assess the robustness of such spatial patterns. First we examine the impact of the CFR methodology. Starting with the network of Mann et al. [2008] (hereinafter M08), we perform temperature reconstruction using four different CFR techniques: RegEM-TTLS [Schneider, 2001], the Mann et al. [2009] implementation of RegEM-TTLS (hereinafter M09), Canonical Correlation Analysis [Smerdon et al., 2010, CCA] and GraphEM [Guillot et al., in revision]. We find that results are greatly method-dependent even with identical inputs. While the M09 reconstruction displays a La Niña-like pattern over the tropical Pacific for MCA - LIA, CCA gives a neutral pattern, RegEM-TTLS and GraphEM both display El Niño-like pattern but show different amplitudes. Next we assess a given CFR technique's sensitivity to the selection of inputs. Proxies are selected based on the statistical significance of their correlations with HadCRUT3v annual temperature. A multiple hypothesis test [Ventura et al., 2004] is conducted to preclude spurious correlations. This choice has a large impact on resulting CFRs. In particular, whether the correlation is calculated between local or regional temperature-proxy pairs determines the number of significant records included in the proxy network. This in turn greatly affects the reconstructed spatial patterns and the Northern Hemispheric mean temperature time series with all CFR methods investigated. In order to further analyze CFRs' sensitivities to the abovementioned procedural choices, we assemble an

  2. Pre-test estimates of temperature decline for the LANL Fenton Hill Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

    1992-06-01

    Pre-test predications for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill were made using two models. Both models are dependent on estimates of the ``effective`` reservoir volume accessed by the fluid and the mean fracture spacing (MFS) of major joints for fluid flow. The effective reservoir volume was estimated using a variety of techniques, and the range of values for the MFS was set through experience in modeling the thermal cooldown of other experimental HDR reservoirs. The two pre-test predictions for cooldown to 210{degrees}C (a value taken to compare the models) from initial temperature of 240{degrees}C are 6.1 and 10.7 years. Assuming that a minimum of 10{degrees}C is required to provide an unequivocal indication of thermal cooldown, both models predict that the reservoir will not exhibit observable cooldown for at least two years.

  3. A proposed methodology for estimating transient engine-out temperature and emissions from steady-state maps

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Conklin, Jim; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2010-01-01

    Many vehicle systems simulations utilize engine maps constructed from steady-state dynamometer measurements to estimate exhaust temperature and emissions as functions of engine speed and load. Unfortunately, steady-state engine behavior is often significantly different from actual behavior under realistic driving conditions. This is particularly true for vehicles (e.g., electric hybrids) that undergo repeated engine shutdown and restart. We propose a methodology for estimating transient engine exhaust properties based on corrections to steady-state maps. We have implemented our methodology in the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) and use this implementation to demonstrate good agreement with experimental measurements for both a light-duty diesel and a flex-fuel gasoline/ethanol engine. We also recommend specific procedures for setting key parameters required by our methodology and suggest possible directions for further improvements.

  4. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  5. Estimation of elastic moduli of graphene monolayer in lattice statics approach at nonzero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    For the aim of the crystal temperature control the computational-statistical approach to studying thermo-mechanical properties for finite sized crystals is presented. The approach is based on the combination of the high-performance computational techniques and statistical analysis of the crystal response on external thermo-mechanical actions for specimens with the statistically small amount of atoms (for instance, nanoparticles). The heat motion of atoms is imitated in the statics approach by including the independent degrees of freedom for atoms connected with their oscillations. We obtained that under heating, graphene material response is nonsymmetric.

  6. Estimate of the fetal temperature increase due to UHF RFID exposure.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, S; Markakis, I A; Liorni, I; Parazzini, M; Samaras, T; Ravazzani, P

    2013-01-01

    Exposure from electromagnetic (EM) devices has increased during the last decades due to the rapid development of new technologies. Among them, radiofrequency identification (RFID) applications are used in almost every aspect of everyday life, which could expose people unselectively. This scenario could pose potential risks for certain groups of general population, such as pregnant women, who are more sensitive to thermal effects produced by EM exposure. In this paper, the temperature rise at the steady state in two pregnant women models exposed to UHF RFID has been assessed. Results show that heating of tissues is far from the threshold of biological effects indicated by radiation protection guidelines.

  7. Shallow thermal structure constrained by seafloor temperature and heat flow estimated from BSRs in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohde, A.; Otsuka, H.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a plate convergent boundary where earthquakes with a magnitude of 8 take place repeatedly. Thermal structure in subduction zones affects pore pressure and diagenesis such as consolidation, dewatering and cementation, and constrains physical properties of a fault-slip plane. In the Nankai subduction zone, existence of methane hydrate is confirmed from acoustic reflectors called the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) which parallel the seafloor on seismic reflection images with high-amplitude and reverse-polarity waveforms. As a depth of BSR is theoretically constrained by subseafloor profiles of temperature and pressure, the BSR depths effectively produce subseafloor geothermal information over a wide area without heat flow probe penetration or in-situ borehole temperature measurement that is fragmentary. In this study, we aim at calculating precise two-dimensional shallow thermal structure. First, we investigate detailed distribution of the BSRs in the Nankai area ranging from offshore Tokai to Hyuga using two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection data. The BSR depths are then forwarded to estimate heat flow values. Second, we use a simple two-dimensional thermal modeling of Blackwell et al. [1980] that takes into account topographical effects of the seafloor roughness. We also employ additional boundary conditions constrained by seafloor temperature and the heat flow estimated from BSR depths. In order to confirm reliability of the modeled thermal structure, we additionally estimate the base of gas hydrate stability zone which is proved to almost equal to observational BSR depths. We find in the modeled thermal structure that the convex portions that are subject to cooling by cold bottom water, while depressions are less subject to the cooling from observational BSRs and theoretical calculation. The thermal structure gained here provides essential data for seismic simulations in subduction zones and for laboratory experiments as

  8. Manual performance deterioration in the cold estimated using the wind chill equivalent temperature.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M

    2009-07-01

    Manual performance during work in cold and windy climates is severely hampered by decreased dexterity, but valid dexterity decrease predictors based on climatic factors are scarce. Therefore, this study investigated the decrease in finger- and hand dexterity and grip force for nine combinations of ambient temperature (-20, -10 and 0 degrees C) and wind speeds (0.2, 4 and 8 m x s(2)), controlled in a climatic chamber. Finger dexterity was determined by the Purdue pegboard test, hand dexterity by the Minnesota manual dexterity test and grip force by a hand dynamometer. Twelve subjects with average to low fat percentage were exposed to cold air for one hour with and without extra insulation by a parka. The subjects were clothed in standard work clothing of the Royal Netherlands Air Force for cold conditions. Extra insulation did affect cold sensation but not manual performance. The deterioration in manual performance appeared to be strongly dependent upon Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature (WCET) and the square root of exposure time (r=0.93 for group average). These simple models may be valuable to assess problems with work in the cold, but more work should be done to determine critical values in dexterity for a wide variety of operational tasks. PMID:19531912

  9. Improved pressure-volume-temperature method for estimation of cryogenic liquid volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mansu; Jeong, Sangkwon; Jung, Young-suk; Kim, Jakyung; Park, Hana

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues in a liquid propellant rocket is to measure the amount of remaining liquid propellant under low gravity environment during space mission. This paper presents the results of experiment and analysis of a pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) method which is a gauging method for low gravity environment. The experiment is conducted using 7.4 l tank for liquid nitrogen with various liquid-fill levels. To maximize the accuracy of a PVT method with minimum hardware, the technique of a helium injection with low mass flow rate is applied to maintain stable temperature profile in the ullage volume. The PVT analysis considering both pressurant and cryogen as a binary mixture is suggested. At high liquid-fill levels of 72-80%, the accuracy from the conventional PVT analysis is within 4.6%. At low fill levels of 27-30%, the gauging error is within 3.4% by mixture analysis of a PVT method with specific low mass flow rate of a helium injection. It is concluded that the proper mass flow rate of a helium injection and PVT analyses are crucial to enhance the accuracy of the PVT method with regard to various liquid-fill levels.

  10. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, W.F.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above ca. 140??C and that little re-equilibration occurs during ascent to the surface. The geothermometer is, however, affected by changes in ??18O of water due to subsurface boiling and dilution and by addition of sulfate of nearsurface origin. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures of 360, 240, and 142??C, respectively. ?? 1976.

  11. Estimating sampling biases and measurement uncertainties of AIRS/AMSU-A temperature and water vapor observations using MERRA reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Savtchenko, Andrey; Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric; Yung, Yuk L.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Fishbein, Evan; Won, Young-In

    2014-03-01

    We use MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research Applications) temperature and water vapor data to estimate the sampling biases of climatologies derived from the AIRS/AMSU-A (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) suite of instruments. We separate the total sampling bias into temporal and instrumental components. The temporal component is caused by the AIRS/AMSU-A orbit and swath that are not able to sample all of time and space. The instrumental component is caused by scenes that prevent successful retrievals. The temporal sampling biases are generally smaller than the instrumental sampling biases except in regions with large diurnal variations, such as the boundary layer, where the temporal sampling biases of temperature can be ± 2 K and water vapor can be 10% wet. The instrumental sampling biases are the main contributor to the total sampling biases and are mainly caused by clouds. They are up to 2 K cold and > 30% dry over midlatitude storm tracks and tropical deep convective cloudy regions and up to 20% wet over stratus regions. However, other factors such as surface emissivity and temperature can also influence the instrumental sampling bias over deserts where the biases can be up to 1 K cold and 10% wet. Some instrumental sampling biases can vary seasonally and/or diurnally. We also estimate the combined measurement uncertainties of temperature and water vapor from AIRS/AMSU-A and MERRA by comparing similarly sampled climatologies from both data sets. The measurement differences are often larger than the sampling biases and have longitudinal variations.

  12. Estimating Sampling Biases and Measurement Uncertainties of AIRS-AMSU-A Temperature and Water Vapor Observations Using MERRA Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric; Yung, Yuk L.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Fishbein, Evan; Won, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    We use MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research Applications) temperature and water vapor data to estimate the sampling biases of climatologies derived from the AIRS/AMSU-A (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) suite of instruments. We separate the total sampling bias into temporal and instrumental components. The temporal component is caused by the AIRS/AMSU-A orbit and swath that are not able to sample all of time and space. The instrumental component is caused by scenes that prevent successful retrievals. The temporal sampling biases are generally smaller than the instrumental sampling biases except in regions with large diurnal variations, such as the boundary layer, where the temporal sampling biases of temperature can be +/- 2 K and water vapor can be 10% wet. The instrumental sampling biases are the main contributor to the total sampling biases and are mainly caused by clouds. They are up to 2 K cold and greater than 30% dry over mid-latitude storm tracks and tropical deep convective cloudy regions and up to 20% wet over stratus regions. However, other factors such as surface emissivity and temperature can also influence the instrumental sampling bias over deserts where the biases can be up to 1 K cold and 10% wet. Some instrumental sampling biases can vary seasonally and/or diurnally. We also estimate the combined measurement uncertainties of temperature and water vapor from AIRS/AMSU-A and MERRA by comparing similarly sampled climatologies from both data sets. The measurement differences are often larger than the sampling biases and have longitudinal variations.

  13. Estimation of Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagrams of Mold Powder Slags from Thermo-analysis of Non-isothermal Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Yadira G.; Barraza de la P., Claudia; Rodríguez A., Sergio; Castillejos E., A. Humberto; Thomas, Brian G.

    2015-02-01

    The temperature range across the mold powder slag in the interfacial gap between the continuous casting mold and strand leads through different transformation behavior into crystalline phases. The transformation rates play a key role in determining the proportion of glassy and crystalline phases present, and thus greatly influence mold heat transfer and lubrication. Although thermal analysis has held great promise to quantify the crystallization of mold slags, so far the information it has provided is scarce. This work shows how differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, data allow evaluation of Time-Temperature-Transformation, TTT, diagrams of mold powder slags, when analyzed with the induction period and the Kissinger methods. The data required for estimating this important tool for the analysis and design of mold powders are onset temperature, T i, peak maximum temperature, T m, shape index, S, and conversion at peak maximum, x m, of the crystallization peaks appearing on thermograms obtained at various heating and cooling rates, ϕ or - ϕ, respectively. Industrial mold powders for casting low- and medium-carbon steels were analyzed to obtain TTT diagrams which correctly portray their different crystallization behavior. The diagrams reveal the start and end curves of the crystalline phases forming at each DSC crystallization peak. The estimated TTT curves present a correct picture of the degree of transformation observed in glass disks (~3 mm thick) treated isothermally for specified time intervals, quenched and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Additionally, the procedure developed for DSC-based TTT diagram calculation is supported by the good agreement between expected transformations and qualitative or quantitative X-ray diffraction results obtained from mold glass-powdered samples treated isothermally in a muffle furnace.

  14. Estimation of Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagrams of Mold Powder Slags from Thermo-analysis of Non-isothermal Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Yadira G.; Barraza de la P., Claudia; Rodríguez A., Sergio; Castillejos E., A. Humberto; Thomas, Brian G.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature range across the mold powder slag in the interfacial gap between the continuous casting mold and strand leads through different transformation behavior into crystalline phases. The transformation rates play a key role in determining the proportion of glassy and crystalline phases present, and thus greatly influence mold heat transfer and lubrication. Although thermal analysis has held great promise to quantify the crystallization of mold slags, so far the information it has provided is scarce. This work shows how differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, data allow evaluation of Time-Temperature-Transformation, TTT, diagrams of mold powder slags, when analyzed with the induction period and the Kissinger methods. The data required for estimating this important tool for the analysis and design of mold powders are onset temperature, T i, peak maximum temperature, T m, shape index, S, and conversion at peak maximum, x m, of the crystallization peaks appearing on thermograms obtained at various heating and cooling rates, ϕ or -ϕ, respectively. Industrial mold powders for casting low- and medium-carbon steels were analyzed to obtain TTT diagrams which correctly portray their different crystallization behavior. The diagrams reveal the start and end curves of the crystalline phases forming at each DSC crystallization peak. The estimated TTT curves present a correct picture of the degree of transformation observed in glass disks (~3 mm thick) treated isothermally for specified time intervals, quenched and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Additionally, the procedure developed for DSC-based TTT diagram calculation is supported by the good agreement between expected transformations and qualitative or quantitative X-ray diffraction results obtained from mold glass-powdered samples treated isothermally in a muffle furnace.

  15. Estimated Moho Temperature from Observed Heat Flow and Comparison with P-Wave Velocity in the East Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W. Y.; Wood, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated temperatures at the Moho surface by employing a published empirical relationship of Perry et al's work (JGR, doi:10.1029/2005JB003921) to the observed heat flow measurements in the East Sea (Sea of Japan), Korea. We assumed in our computation that the parameter values are all the same although the Perry et al's relationship between crustal thickness and heat flows to compute Moho temperature was derived for the Canadian Shield. For the heat flow data, we used the published global heat flow data (http://www.heatflow.und.edu) augmented with some recent heat flow measurements from Korea, and the LLN3_G3Dv3 for P-wave tomography model (JGR, doi:10.1029/2012JB009525). Preliminary results do not show a significant correlation between the computed Moho temperature and the P-wave velocity model perhaps due to uncertainty in the parameter values used in the computation as well as the empirical relation. An empirical relationship between the observed heat flow and the Moho temperature for the Canadian shield might be different for a backarec basin area like the East Sea, Korea. However, we noted that there exists a moderate negative correlation between the total crustal thickness and heat flow - less heat flows with increasing crustal thickness with a relation of Heat_Flow (mW/m2) = 205 - 18.3 * Crustal_Thickness (km). The modeled Moho temperature displays a trend of higher values (900o K -1400o K) from Japan toward the beneath of Yamato Basin and Rise in the NW direction, and beneath the Ulleung Basin area. Another higher Moho temperature (>1000o K) contour band is observed in the area north of Japan Basin, approximately centered along the 139.5o E.

  16. Temperature mapping in bread dough using SE and GE two-point MRI methods: experimental and theoretical estimation of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tiphaine; Musse, Maja; Bornert, Mélanie; Davenel, Armel; Quellec, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D)-SE, 2D-GE and tri-dimensional (3D)-GE two-point T(1)-weighted MRI methods were evaluated in this study in order to maximize the accuracy of temperature mapping of bread dough during thermal processing. Uncertainties were propagated throughout each protocol of measurement, and comparisons demonstrated that all the methods with comparable acquisition times minimized the temperature uncertainty to similar extent. The experimental uncertainties obtained with low-field MRI were also compared to the theoretical estimations. Some discrepancies were reported between experimental and theoretical values of uncertainties of temperature; however, experimental and theoretical trends with varying parameters agreed to a large extent for both SE and GE methods. The 2D-SE method was chosen for further applications on prefermented dough because of its lower sensitivity to susceptibility differences in porous media. It was applied for temperature mapping in prefermented dough during chilling prior to freezing and compared locally to optical fiber measurements.

  17. Temperature mapping in bread dough using SE and GE two-point MRI methods: experimental and theoretical estimation of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tiphaine; Musse, Maja; Bornert, Mélanie; Davenel, Armel; Quellec, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D)-SE, 2D-GE and tri-dimensional (3D)-GE two-point T(1)-weighted MRI methods were evaluated in this study in order to maximize the accuracy of temperature mapping of bread dough during thermal processing. Uncertainties were propagated throughout each protocol of measurement, and comparisons demonstrated that all the methods with comparable acquisition times minimized the temperature uncertainty to similar extent. The experimental uncertainties obtained with low-field MRI were also compared to the theoretical estimations. Some discrepancies were reported between experimental and theoretical values of uncertainties of temperature; however, experimental and theoretical trends with varying parameters agreed to a large extent for both SE and GE methods. The 2D-SE method was chosen for further applications on prefermented dough because of its lower sensitivity to susceptibility differences in porous media. It was applied for temperature mapping in prefermented dough during chilling prior to freezing and compared locally to optical fiber measurements. PMID:22227351

  18. WHTSubmersible: a simulator for estimating transient circulation temperature in offshore wells with the semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xun-cheng; Liu, Yong-wang; Guan, Zhi-chuan

    2015-10-01

    Offshore wellbore temperature field is significant to drilling fluids program, equipment selection, evaluations on potential risks caused by casing thermal stress, etc. This paper mainly describes the theoretical basis, module structure and field verification of the simulator WHTSubmersible. This computer program is a useful tool for estimating transient temperature distribution of circulating drilling fluid on semi-submersible platform. WHTSubmersible is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider radial and axial two-dimensional heat exchange of the inner drill pipe, the annulus, the drill pipe wall, the sea water and the formation in the process of drilling fluid circulation. The solution of the discrete equations is based on finite volume method with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Besides, the simulator also considers the heating generated by drilling fluid circulation friction, drill bit penetrating rocks, friction between the drill column and the borehole wall, and the temperature effect on thermal physical properties and rheology of the drilling fluid. These measures ensure more accurate results. The simulator has been programmed as a dynamic link library using Visual C++, the routine interface is simple, which can be connected with other computer programs conveniently. The simulator is validated with an actual well temperature filed developed on a semi-submersible platform in South China, and the error is less than 5 %.

  19. Simplified method for estimating heat transfer coefficients: constant wall temperature case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. A.; Baptista, A.; Coelho, P. M.

    2015-02-01

    This work completes a previous study (Cruz et al., in J Heat Transf 134:091703, 2012) by evaluating the performance of the simplified method proposed therein for calculating the Nusselt number for laminar flow of non-Newtonian fluids in pipes with constant wall temperature. The methodology was tested using the Herschel-Bulkley, Bingham, Casson and Carreau-Yasuda generalized Newtonian models, and also the simplified form of the Phan-Thien-Tanner viscoelastic model. The error of the approximate methodology is below 3 %, except for yield stress fluids, for which the maximum error increases to 7.4 % for the cases analyzed, which cover a wide range of shear viscosity curves. An explicit expression of Nusselt number for Casson fluids is also presented.

  20. Sea-surface temperature from Suomi-NPP VIIRS: algorithm development and uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, Peter J.; Evans, Robert H.; Podestá, Guillermo P.; Kilpatrick, Katherine A.

    2014-05-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi-NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite is the first of a new series of imaging radiometers on polar-orbiting earth-observation satellites. In addition to providing real-time data for weather and ocean forecasting, VIIRS is intended to continue the measurements of MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), including contributing to the Climate Data Record of Sea-Surface Temperature (SST). To achieve this objective requires a thorough assessment of the errors and uncertainties in the VIIRS SST retrievals. The results of comparisons with a range of independent measurements of SST indicate that the VIIRS SSTs have equal or better accuracies than those of the MODIS's on Terra and Aqua, and that the VIIRS SSTs are suitable to extend the satellite-derived Climate Data Records of SST into the future.

  1. Correcting infrared satellite estimates of sea surface temperature for atmospheric water vapor attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Yu, Yunyue; Wick, Gary A.; Schluessel, Peter; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A new satellite sea surface temperature (SST) algorithm is developed that uses nearly coincident measurements from the microwave special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) to correct for atmospheric moisture attenuation of the infrared signal from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). This new SST algorithm is applied to AVHRR imagery from the South Pacific and Norwegian seas, which are then compared with simultaneous in situ (ship based) measurements of both skin and bulk SST. In addition, an SST algorithm using a quadratic product of the difference between the two AVHRR thermal infrared channels is compared with the in situ measurements. While the quadratic formulation provides a considerable improvement over the older cross product (CPSST) and multichannel (MCSST) algorithms, the SSM/I corrected SST (called the water vapor or WVSST) shows overall smaller errors when compared to both the skin and bulk in situ SST observations. Applied to individual AVHRR images, the WVSST reveals an SST difference pattern (CPSST-WVSST) similar in shape to the water vapor structure while the CPSST-quadratic SST difference appears unrelated in pattern to the nearly coincident water vapor pattern. An application of the WVSST to week-long composites of global area coverage (GAC) AVHRR data demonstrates again the manner in which the WVSST corrects the AVHRR for atmospheric moisture attenuation. By comparison the quadratic SST method underestimates the SST corrections in the lower latitudes and overestimates the SST in th e higher latitudes. Correlations between the AVHRR thermal channel differences and the SSM/I water vapor demonstrate the inability of the channel difference to represent water vapor in the midlatitude and high latitudes during summer. Compared against drifting buoy data the WVSST and the quadratic SST both exhibit the same general behavior with the relatively small differences with the buoy temperatures.

  2. Climate sensitivity estimated from temperature reconstructions of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Urban, N.; Shakun, J. D.; Mahowald, N. M.; Clark, P. U.; Bartlein, P. J.; Mix, A. C.; Rosell-Melé, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 1959 IJ Good published the discussion "Kinds of Probability" in Science. Good identified (at least) five kinds. The need for (at least) a sixth kind of probability when quantifying uncertainty in the context of climate science is discussed. This discussion brings out the differences in weather-like forecasting tasks and climate-links tasks, with a focus on the effective use both of science and of modelling in support of decision making. Good also introduced the idea of a "Dynamic probability" a probability one expects to change without any additional empirical evidence; the probabilities assigned by a chess playing program when it is only half thorough its analysis being an example. This case is contrasted with the case of "Mature probabilities" where a forecast algorithm (or model) has converged on its asymptotic probabilities and the question hinges in whether or not those probabilities are expected to change significantly before the event in question occurs, even in the absence of new empirical evidence. If so, then how might one report and deploy such immature probabilities in scientific-support of decision-making rationally? Mature Probability is suggested as a useful sixth kind, although Good would doubtlessly argue that we can get by with just one, effective communication with decision makers may be enhanced by speaking as if the others existed. This again highlights the distinction between weather-like contexts and climate-like contexts. In the former context one has access to a relevant climatology (a relevant, arguably informative distribution prior to any model simulations), in the latter context that information is not available although one can fall back on the scientific basis upon which the model itself rests, and estimate the probability that the model output is in fact misinformative. This subjective "probability of a big surprise" is one way to communicate the probability of model-based information holding in practice, the probability that the

  3. BAYESIAN COMPONENT SEPARATION AND COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ESTIMATION FOR THE FIVE-YEAR WMAP TEMPERATURE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Jewell, J. B.; Gorski, K. M.; Huey, G.; Lawrence, C. R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2009-11-10

    A well-tested and validated Gibbs sampling code, that performs component separation and cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum estimation, was applied to the WMAP five-year data. Using a simple model consisting of CMB, noise, monopoles, and dipoles, a 'per pixel' low-frequency power-law (fitting for both amplitude and spectral index), and a thermal dust template with a fixed spectral index, we found that the low-l (l < 50) CMB power spectrum is in good agreement with the published WMAP5 results. Residual monopoles and dipoles were found to be small (approx<3 muK) or negligible in the five-year data. We comprehensively tested the assumptions that were made about the foregrounds (e.g., dust spectral index, power-law spectral index prior, templates), and found that the CMB power spectrum was insensitive to these choices. We confirm the asymmetry of power between the north and south ecliptic hemispheres, which appears to be robust against foreground modeling. The map of low-frequency spectral indices indicates a steeper spectrum on average (beta = -2.97 +- 0.21) relative to those found at low (approxGHz) frequencies.

  4. Simulation on simultaneous estimation of non-uniform temperature and soot volume fraction distributions in axisymmetric sooting flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yu-hua; Zhou, Huai-chun

    2005-02-01

    For visualizing non-uniform absorbing, emitting, non-scattering, axisymmetric sooting flames, because conventional two-color emission methods are no longer suitable, a three-color emission method for the simultaneous estimation of temperature and soot volume fraction distributions in these flames is studied in this paper. The spectral radiation intensities at wavelengths of red, green, and blue, which may be derived from color flame images, are simulated for the inverse analysis. Then the simultaneous estimation is carried out from the spectral radiation intensities by using a Newton-type iteration algorithm and the least-squares method. In this method, a factor is used to balance the wide variation of spectral radiation intensities due to both the wide ranges of temperature and wavelength of the flame radiation. The results indicate that the three-color method is suited for the reconstruction of flame structures with single or double peaks with small difference between the peak and valley. For a double-peaked flame structure with larger peak and valley difference, reasonable result can be obtained just when the mean square deviations of measurement data are small, for example, not more than 0.01.

  5. Estimating surface temperature in forced convection nucleate boiling: A simplified method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Papell, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    During a test program to investigate low-cycle thermal fatigue, 21 of 22 cylindrical test sections of a cylindrical rocket thrust chamber were thermally cycled to failure. Cylinder liners were fabricated from OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NARloy-Z. The cylinders were fabricated by milling cooling channels into the liner and closing out the backside with electrodeposited copper. The tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/sq m (600 psia) and an oxidant-fuel ratio of 6.0 using hydrogen-oxygen as propellants. The average throat heat flux was 54 MW/sq m (33 Btu/sq in./sec). All of the failures were characterized by a thinning of the cooling channel wall and eventual failure by tensile rupture. The 1/2-hard Amzirc material showed little improvement in cyclic life when compared with OFHC copper; while the NARloy-Z and aged Amzirc materials had the best cyclic life characteristics. One OFHC copper cylinder was thermall cycled 2044 times at a steady-state hot-gas-side wall temperature of 514 K (925 R) without failing.

  6. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  7. North American Magnetic Bottom/Curie Depth estimates and their significance for lithospheric temperatures and magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravat, D.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral magnetic methods have been used to derive the regional layered magnetic structure of the conterminous U.S. and parts of Canada from the North American full spectrum magnetic anomaly dataset. Large window sizes of 500 km were used to have adequate depth sensitivity and the depths were evaluated at 250 km spacing. The primary method used for the determination was the centroid slope method of Bhattarcharyya and Leu (1975). The spectral peak method (Ross et al., 2006; Ravat et al., 2007) and the one layer fractal method (Maus et al., 1997; Bouligand et al., 2009) were used to corroborate the results according to the nature of the spectra in appropriate locations. The depth resolution is poor where magnetic bottoms are deep because spectral slopes are steep, and consequently the depth errors are likely greater than 10 km. The derived magnetic bottom variation is related to a combination of factors including geology, tectonic province, mantle heat flow, and the crustal thickness. Only in a few cases was the derived magnetic bottom significantly deeper than the Moho. In most regions, including the cold Archean and Proterozoic provinces, magnetization appears to primarily lie in the crust and mantle may be non-magnetic. The large window size and spacing necessary for the methods of this study are not conducive to detection of serpentinized mantle in active subduction zones (e.g., Blakely et al., 2005). The deepest crustal magnetic layers must have strong magnetization (2-5 A/m), aided by viscous magnetization acquired since the last geomagnetic reversal and by the Hopkinson effect in order to reconcile rock-magnetic properties and satellite derived magnetization estimates.

  8. The estimation of the time since death using temperatures recorded from the external auditory canal : Part II: Using single temperatures from this site to estimate the time since death with consideration of environmental or body "factors" that could affect the estimation.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N

    2005-06-01

    In this second of two articles, single external auditory canal (EAC) temperatures from cases of suspicious deaths were used to verify the hypothesis that a single EAC temperature can be used to estimate a time since death (TSD). Two different types of thermometers were used (infrared and alcohol-in-glass) to record ambient and body temperatures, which were in turn applied to previously published algorithms without the use of corrective factors to estimate the TSD. In addition, 18 anatomical, environmental, and daily activity "factors" were investigated as to whether they may influence the temperature within the EAC and thus require the introduction of a corrective factor into an algorithm, other than one used to take into account the difference between the rectal and EAC temperature during life and after death. Of the ones examined, only head position, wind speed, daily circadian rhythm, drinking of hot drinks, and possibly mental thought were shown to influence temperature, but the difference was so small that the introduction of a corrective factor into an algorithm was considered unnecessary. Finally, this article provides a summary of both articles, with general recommendations to those who have to use a temperature recorded from the EAC in estimating a TSD.

  9. A data centred method to estimate and map changes in the full distribution of daily surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Sandra; Stainforth, David; Watkins, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing how our climate is changing includes local information which can inform adaptation planning decisions. This requires quantifying the geographical patterns in changes at specific quantiles or thresholds in distributions of variables such as daily surface temperature. Here we focus on these local changes and on a model independent method to transform daily observations into patterns of local climate change. Our method [1] is a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural statistical variability and/or the consequences of secular climate change. This deconstruction facilitates an assessment of how fast different quantiles of the distributions are changing. This involves both determining which quantiles and geographical locations show the greatest change but also, those at which any change is highly uncertain. For temperature, changes in the distribution itself can yield robust results [2]. We demonstrate how the fundamental timescales of anthropogenic climate change limit the identification of societally relevant aspects of changes. We show that it is nevertheless possible to extract, solely from observations, some confident quantified assessments of change at certain thresholds and locations [3]. We demonstrate this approach using E-OBS gridded data [4] timeseries of local daily surface temperature from specific locations across Europe over the last 60 years. [1] Chapman, S. C., D. A. Stainforth, N. W. Watkins, On estimating long term local climate trends, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc., A,371 20120287 (2013) [2] Stainforth, D. A. S. C. Chapman, N. W. Watkins, Mapping climate change in European temperature distributions, ERL 8, 034031 (2013) [3] Chapman, S. C., Stainforth, D. A., Watkins, N. W. Limits to the quantification of local climate change, ERL 10, 094018 (2015) [4] Haylock M. R. et al ., A European daily high-resolution gridded dataset of

  10. Measuring the Thermal Conductivity of Sediments for the Estimation of Groundwater Discharge to Surface Waters with Temperature Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, C.; Müller, S.; Sebok, E.; Engesgaard, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Using temperature probes is a common exploratory method for studying groundwater-surface water interaction due to the ease for collecting measurements and the simplicity of the different analytical solutions. This approach requires to define the surface water temperature, the groundwater temperature and a set of parameters (density and specific capacity of water, and thermal conductivity of sediments) that can be easily extracted from tabulated values under the assumption that they are homogeneous in the study area. In the case of the thermal conductivity, it is common to apply a standard value of 1.84 Wm-1 C-1 corresponding to sand. Nevertheless the environments where this method is applied, like streambeds or lake/lagoons shores, are sedimentary depositional systems with high energy and biological activity that often lead to sediments dominated by organic matter or sharp changes in grain size modifying greatly the thermal conductivity values. In this study, the thermal conductivity was measured in situ along transects where vertical temperature profiles were collected in a coastal lagoon bed receiving groundwater discharge (Ringkøbing Fjord, Denmark). A set of 4 transects with 10-20 temperature profiles during 3 different seasons was analyzed together with more than 150 thermal conductivity measurements along the working transects and in experimental parcels of 1 m2 where the cm scale spatial variability of the thermal conductivity was assessed. The application of a literature-based bulk thermal conductivity of 1.84 Wm-1 C-1 instead of field data that ranged from 0.62 to 2.19 Wm-1 C-1, produced a mean flux overestimation of 2.33 cm d-1 that, considering the low fluxes of the study area, represents an increase of 89 % and up to a factor of 3 in the most extreme cases. The changes in thermal conductivity can alter the estimated fluxes hindering the detection of patterns in groundwater discharge and modifying the interpretation of the results.

  11. Unveiling acoustic physics of the CMB using nonparametric estimation of the temperature angular power spectrum for Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Shafieloo, Arman; Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: shafieloo@kasi.re.kr E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-02-01

    Estimation of the angular power spectrum is one of the important steps in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data analysis. Here, we present a nonparametric estimate of the temperature angular power spectrum for the Planck 2013 CMB data. The method implemented in this work is model-independent, and allows the data, rather than the model, to dictate the fit. Since one of the main targets of our analysis is to test the consistency of the ΛCDM model with Planck 2013 data, we use the nuisance parameters associated with the best-fit ΛCDM angular power spectrum to remove foreground contributions from the data at multipoles ℓ ≥50. We thus obtain a combined angular power spectrum data set together with the full covariance matrix, appropriately weighted over frequency channels. Our subsequent nonparametric analysis resolves six peaks (and five dips) up to ℓ ∼1850 in the temperature angular power spectrum. We present uncertainties in the peak/dip locations and heights at the 95% confidence level. We further show how these reflect the harmonicity of acoustic peaks, and can be used for acoustic scale estimation. Based on this nonparametric formalism, we found the best-fit ΛCDM model to be at 36% confidence distance from the center of the nonparametric confidence set—this is considerably larger than the confidence distance (9%) derived earlier from a similar analysis of the WMAP 7-year data. Another interesting result of our analysis is that at low multipoles, the Planck data do not suggest any upturn, contrary to the expectation based on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe contribution in the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology.

  12. Estimating Inter-Sensor Sea Surface Temperature Biases using DINEOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomazic, Igor; Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Troupin, Charles; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie; Orain, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Climate studies need long-term data sets of homogeneous quality, in order to discern trends from other physical signals present in the data and to minimise the contamination of these trends by errors in the source data. Sea surface temperature (SST), defined as one of essential climatology variables, has been increasingly used in both oceanographical and meteorological operational context where there is a constant need for more accurate measurements. Satellite-derived SST provides an indispensable dataset, with both spatially and temporally high resolutions. However, these data have errors of ~0.5 K on a global scale and present inter-sensor and inter-regional differences due to their technical characteristics, algorithm limitations and the changing physical properties of the measured environments. These inter-sensor differences should be taken into account in any research involving more than one sensor (SST analysis, long term climate research …). The error correction for each SST sensor is usually calculated as a difference between the SST data derived from referent sensor (e.g. ENVISAT/AATSR) and from the other sensors (SEVIRI, AVHRR, MODIS). However, these empirical difference (bias) fields show gaps due to the satellite characteristics (e.g. narrow swath in case of AATSR) and to the presence of clouds or other atmospheric contaminations. We present a methodology based on DINEOF (Data INterpolation Empirical Orthogonal Functions) to reconstruct and analyse SST biases with the aim of studying temporal and spatial variability of the SST bias fields both at a large scale (European seas) and at a regional scale (Mediterranean Sea) and to perform the necessary corrections to the original SST fields. Two different approaches were taken: by analysing SST biases based on reconstructed SST differences and based on differences of reconstructed SST fields. Corrected SST fields based on both approaches were validated against independent in situ buoy SST data or with

  13. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  14. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D.; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene-Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene-Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM.

  15. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D.; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene–Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene–Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM.

  16. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature.

  17. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-10-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature. PMID:26352462

  18. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite.

    PubMed

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-12

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene-Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene-Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM. PMID:27354522

  19. Radio Bridge Structure and Its Application to Estimate the Mach Number and Ambient Gas Temperature of Powerful Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Greg F.; Daly, Ruth A.; Wan, Lin

    1997-05-01

    little reacceleration of relativistic electrons within the radio bridge and that the backflow velocity of relativistic plasma within the bridge is small compared with the lobe advance velocity. These results are consistent with implications based on the bridge shape and structure discussed by Alexander & Leahy since we consider only very powerful FR II sources here. The Mach number with which the radio lobe propagates into the ambient medium can be estimated using the structure of the radio bridge; this Mach number is the ratio of the lobe propagation velocity to the sound speed of the ambient gas. The lateral expansion of the bridge is driven initially by a blast wave. When the velocity of the blast wave falls to a value of the order of the sound speed of the ambient medium, the character of the expansion changes, and the functional form of the bridge width as a function of position exhibits a break, which may be used to estimate the ratio of the lobe advance velocity to the sound speed of the ambient gas. We observe this break in several sources studied here. The Mach number of lobe advance depends only upon the ratio of the width to the length of the bridge as a function of position, which is purely geometric. Typical Mach numbers obtained range from about 2 to 10 and seem to be roughly independent of redshift and the total size (core-lobe separation) of the radio source. The Mach number can be used to estimate the temperature of the ambient gas if an independent estimate of the lobe propagation velocity is available. Lobe propagation velocities estimated using the effects of synchrotron and inverse Compton aging of the relativistic electrons that produce the radio emission are combined with the Mach numbers in order to estimate ambient gas temperatures. The temperature obtained for Cygnus A matches that indicated by X-ray data for this source. Typical temperatures obtained range from about 1 to 20 keV. This temperature is characteristic of gas in clusters of galaxies

  20. A Method for Assessing the Quality of Model-Based Estimates of Ground Temperature and Atmospheric Moisture Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Lin, Ching I.; Stajner, Ivanka; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed for validating model-based estimates of atmospheric moisture and ground temperature using satellite data. The approach relates errors in estimates of clear-sky longwave fluxes at the top of the Earth-atmosphere system to errors in geophysical parameters. The fluxes include clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation (CLR) and radiative flux in the window region between 8 and 12 microns (RadWn). The approach capitalizes on the availability of satellite estimates of CLR and RadWn and other auxiliary satellite data, and multiple global four-dimensional data assimilation (4-DDA) products. The basic methodology employs off-line forward radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic clear-sky longwave fluxes from two different 4-DDA data sets. Simple linear regression is used to relate the clear-sky longwave flux discrepancies to discrepancies in ground temperature ((delta)T(sub g)) and broad-layer integrated atmospheric precipitable water ((delta)pw). The slopes of the regression lines define sensitivity parameters which can be exploited to help interpret mismatches between satellite observations and model-based estimates of clear-sky longwave fluxes. For illustration we analyze the discrepancies in the clear-sky longwave fluxes between an early implementation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS2) and a recent operational version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data assimilation system. The analysis of the synthetic clear-sky flux data shows that simple linear regression employing (delta)T(sub g)) and broad layer (delta)pw provides a good approximation to the full radiative transfer calculations, typically explaining more thin 90% of the 6 hourly variance in the flux differences. These simple regression relations can be inverted to "retrieve" the errors in the geophysical parameters, Uncertainties (normalized by standard deviation) in the monthly mean retrieved parameters range from 7% for

  1. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature from GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Data over the Chinese Landmass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ji; Dai, Fengnan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    As one of the most important parameter at the interface between the earth's surface and atmosphere, land surface temperature (LST) plays a crucial role in many fields, such as climate change monitoring and hydrological modeling. Satellite remote sensing provides the unique possibility to observe LST of large regions at diverse spatial and temporal scales. Compared with thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing, passive microwave (PW) remote sensing has a better ability in overcoming the influences of clouds; thus, it can be used to improve the temporal resolution of current satellite TIR LST. However, most of current methods for estimation LST from PW remote sensing are empirical and have unsatisfied generalization. In this study, a semi-empirical method is proposed to estimate LST from the observation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) on board the Global Change Observation Mission 1st-WATER "SHIZUKU" satellite (GCOM-W1). The method is based on the PW radiation transfer equation, which is simplified based on (1) the linear relationship between the emissivities of horizontal and vertical polarization channels at the same frequency and (2) the significant relationship between atmospheric parameters and the atmospheric water vapor content. An iteration approach is used to best fit the pixel-based coefficients in the simplified radiation transfer equation of the horizontal and vertical polarization channels at each frequency. Then an integration approach is proposed to generate the ensemble estimation from estimations of multiple frequencies for different land cover types. This method is trained with the AMSR2 brightness temperature and MODIS LST in 2013 over the entire Chinese landmass and then it is tested with the data in 2014. Validation based on in situ LSTs measured in northwestern China demonstrates that the proposed method has a better accuracy than the polarization radiation method, with a root-mean squared error of 3 K. Although the proposal

  2. Review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240-MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This report documents Bechtel's review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240 MWt High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) Lead Plant. The overall objective of the review is to verify that the 1982 update of the cost estimate and schedule for the Lead Plant are reasonable and consistent with current power plant experience.

  3. Estimate bond angle dependence of superconducting transition temperature in NaFeAs with the first principle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tieyu; Huang, Haitao; Peng, Biaolin; Zheng, Renkui; Lam, Chi-Hang; Tang, Tao; Wang, Yu

    2016-11-01

    The change of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) with bond angle in iron-pnictides was investigated by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory. A Green's function method was adopted to estimate the maximum eigenvalue of Eliashberg equation (an indicator of Tc) for NaFeAs with different bond angles. Through calculations the band structure of NaFeAs was obtained. It was found that hole pockets could form at the center of the first Brillion zone in the band structure, which confirmed the existence of superconductivity in NaFeAs. The upper limit of the Fe-As-Fe bond angle for superconductivity was found to be 121° and the highest Tc would occur at the angle of 108°.

  4. Effects of vegetation types on soil moisture estimation from the normalized land surface temperature versus vegetation index space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianjun; Zhou, Guoqing

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is a key variable that has been widely used in many environmental studies. Land surface temperature versus vegetation index (LST-VI) space becomes a common way to estimate SM in optical remote sensing applications. Normalized LST-VI space is established by the normalized LST and VI to obtain the comparable SM in Zhang et al. (Validation of a practical normalized soil moisture model with in situ measurements in humid and semiarid regions [J]. International Journal of Remote Sensing, DOI: 10.1080/01431161.2015.1055610). The boundary conditions in the study were set to limit the point A (the driest bare soil) and B (the wettest bare soil) for surface energy closure. However, no limitation was installed for point D (the full vegetation cover). In this paper, many vegetation types are simulated by the land surface model - Noah LSM 3.2 to analyze the effects on soil moisture estimation, such as crop, grass and mixed forest. The locations of point D are changed with vegetation types. The normalized LST of point D for forest is much lower than crop and grass. The location of point D is basically unchanged for crop and grass.

  5. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6-2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5-2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1-1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150-170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330-880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  6. A statistical analysis of systematic errors in temperature and ram velocity estimates from satellite-borne retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Klenzing, J. H.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    2009-05-15

    The use of biased grids as energy filters for charged particles is common in satellite-borne instruments such as a planar retarding potential analyzer (RPA). Planar RPAs are currently flown on missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program to obtain estimates of geophysical parameters including ion velocity and temperature. It has been shown previously that the use of biased grids in such instruments creates a nonuniform potential in the grid plane, which leads to inherent errors in the inferred parameters. A simulation of ion interactions with various configurations of biased grids has been developed using a commercial finite-element analysis software package. Using a statistical approach, the simulation calculates collected flux from Maxwellian ion distributions with three-dimensional drift relative to the instrument. Perturbations in the performance of flight instrumentation relative to expectations from the idealized RPA flux equation are discussed. Both single grid and dual-grid systems are modeled to investigate design considerations. Relative errors in the inferred parameters for each geometry are characterized as functions of ion temperature and drift velocity.

  7. Impact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Marie S.; Hajat, Shakoor; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Schwartz, Joel

    2005-11-01

    We assessed the influence of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on associations between apparent temperature (AT) and daily mortality in Mexico City and Monterrey. Poisson regressions were fit to mortality among all ages, children (ages 0 14 years) and the elderly (ages ≥65 years). Predictors included mean daily AT, season, day of week and public holidays for the base model. Respiratory epidemics and air pollution (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter and O3) were added singly and then jointly for a fully adjusted model. Percent changes in mortality were calculated for days of relatively extreme temperatures [cold (10 11°C) for both cities and heat (35 36°C) for Monterrey], compared to days at the overall mean temperature in each city (15°C in Mexico City, 25°C in Monterrey). In Mexico City, total mortality increased 12.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.5%, 14.5%] on cold days (fully adjusted). Among children, the adjusted association was similar [10.9% (95% CI: 5.4%, 16.7%)], but without control for pollution and epidemics, was nearly twice as large [19.7% (95% CI: 13.9%, 25.9)]. In Monterrey, the fully adjusted heat effect for all deaths was 18.7% (95% CI: 11.7%, 26.1%), a third lower than the unadjusted estimate; the heat effect was lower among children [5.5% (95% CI: -10.1%, 23.8%)]. Cold had a similar effect on all-age mortality as in Mexico City [11.7% (95% CI: 3.7%, 20.3%)]. Responses of the elderly differed little from all-ages responses in both cities. Associations between weather and health persisted even with control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics in two Mexican cities, but risk assessments and climate change adaptation programs are best informed by analyses that account for these potential confounders.

  8. A new model for the estimation of time of death from vitreous potassium levels corrected for age and temperature.

    PubMed

    Zilg, B; Bernard, S; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of potassium concentration in the vitreous fluid of the eye is frequently used by forensic pathologists to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI), particularly when other methods commonly used in the early phase of an investigation can no longer be applied. The postmortem rise in vitreous potassium has been recognized for several decades and is readily explained by a diffusion of potassium from surrounding cells into the vitreous fluid. However, there is no consensus regarding the mathematical equation that best describes this increase. The existing models assume a linear increase, but different slopes and starting points have been proposed. In this study, vitreous potassium levels, and a number of factors that may influence these levels, were examined in 462 cases with known postmortem intervals that ranged from 2h to 17 days. We found that the postmortem rise in potassium followed a non-linear curve and that decedent age and ambient temperature influenced the variability by 16% and 5%, respectively. A long duration of agony and a high alcohol level at the time of death contributed less than 1% variability, and evaluation of additional possible factors revealed no detectable impact on the rise of vitreous potassium. Two equations were subsequently generated, one that represents the best fit of the potassium concentrations alone, and a second that represents potassium concentrations with correction for decedent age and/or ambient temperature. The former was associated with narrow confidence intervals in the early postmortem phase, but the intervals gradually increased with longer PMIs. For the latter equation, the confidence intervals were reduced at all PMIs. Therefore, the model that best describes the observed postmortem rise in vitreous potassium levels includes potassium concentration, decedent age, and ambient temperature. Furthermore, the precision of these equations, particularly for long PMIs, is expected to gradually improve by adjusting the

  9. Estimation of upper flammability limits of C-H compounds in air at standard atmospheric pressure and evaluation of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Mendiburu, Andrés Z; de Carvalho, João A; Coronado, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on estimating the upper flammability limits of C-H compounds. A method was developed to determine the upper flammability limits in air at standard atmospheric pressure for the following cases: (a) estimation of the UFLs of pure C-H compounds at standard ambient temperature (25°C); (b) estimation of the UFLs of binary mixtures of C-H compounds at standard ambient temperature (25°C); (c) estimation of the UFLs of C-H compounds at different initial temperatures. The method was accurate in all cases. In case (a), for a total set of 115 compounds, the absolute average relative error was 7.27% and a squared correlation coefficient of 0.9248 was obtained. In case (b), the average absolute relative error was 5.55%; in case (c) it was 2.19%. PMID:26619050

  10. Estimation of upper flammability limits of C-H compounds in air at standard atmospheric pressure and evaluation of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Mendiburu, Andrés Z; de Carvalho, João A; Coronado, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on estimating the upper flammability limits of C-H compounds. A method was developed to determine the upper flammability limits in air at standard atmospheric pressure for the following cases: (a) estimation of the UFLs of pure C-H compounds at standard ambient temperature (25°C); (b) estimation of the UFLs of binary mixtures of C-H compounds at standard ambient temperature (25°C); (c) estimation of the UFLs of C-H compounds at different initial temperatures. The method was accurate in all cases. In case (a), for a total set of 115 compounds, the absolute average relative error was 7.27% and a squared correlation coefficient of 0.9248 was obtained. In case (b), the average absolute relative error was 5.55%; in case (c) it was 2.19%.

  11. A method for state-of-charge estimation of LiFePO4 batteries at dynamic currents and temperatures using particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Chenbin; Chen, Zonghai

    2015-04-01

    The state-of-charge (SOC) estimation for LiFePO4 batteries is one of the most important issues in battery management system (BMS) on electric vehicles (EVs). Significant temperature changes and drift current noises are inevitable in EVs and cause strong interference in SOC estimation, therefore a SOC-Particle filter (PF) estimator is proposed for SOC estimation. This paper tries to make three contributions: (1) a temperature composed battery model is established based on commercial LiFePO4 cells which can be used for SOC estimation at dynamic temperatures. (2) A capacity retention ratio (CRR) aging model is established based on the real history statistical analysis of the running mileage of the battery on an urban bus. (3) The proposed models are combined with an electrochemical model and the PF method is employed for SOC estimation to eliminate the drift noise effects. Experiments under dynamic current and temperature conditions are designed and performed to verify the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. The numeral results of the validation experiments have verified that accurate and robust SOC estimation results can be obtained by the proposed method.

  12. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture using the particle batch smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from land surface temperature (LST) time series and soil moisture observations. Surface turbulent heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology and other climate-related fields, but in-situ measurements are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that the time series of LST contains information of energy partitioning and that surface turbulent heat fluxes can be determined from assimilation of LST. These studies are mainly based on two assumptions: (1) a monthly value of bulk heat transfer coefficient under neutral conditions (CHN) which scales the sum of the fluxes, and (2) an evaporation fraction (EF) which stays constant during the near-peak hours of the day. Previous studies have applied variational and ensemble approaches to this problem. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) algorithm is adopted to test its capability in this application. The PBS can be seen as an extension of the standard particle filter (PF) in which the states and parameters within a fix window are updated in a batch using all observations in the window. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, the PBS is used to assimilate only LST time series into the force-restore model to estimate fluxes. Second, a simple soil water transfer scheme is introduced to evaluate the benefit of assimilating soil moisture observations simultaneously. The experiments are implemented using the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) (FIFE) data. It is shown that the restored LST time series using PBS agrees very well with observations, and that assimilating LST significantly improved the flux estimation at both daily and half-hourly time scales. When soil moisture is introduced to further constrain EF, the accuracy of estimated EF is greatly improved. Furthermore, the RMSEs of retrieved fluxes are effectively reduced at both

  13. Future change of extreme temperature climate indices over East Asia with uncertainties estimation in the CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ye-Won; Kim, Hojin; Yun, Kyung-Sook; Lee, June-Yi; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Moon, Ja-Yeon

    2014-11-01

    How well the climate models simulate extreme temperature over East Asia and how the extreme indices would change under anthropogenic global warming are investigated. The indices studied include hot days (HD), tropical nights (TN), growing degree days (GDD), and cooling degree days (CDD) in summer and heating degree days (HDD) and frost days (FD) in winter. The representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP 4.5) experiments for the period of 2075-2099 are compared with historical simulations for the period of 1979-2005 from 15 coupled models that are participated in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). To optimally estimate future change and its uncertainty, groups of best models are selected based on Taylor diagrams, relative entropy, and probability density function (PDF) methods previously suggested. Overall, the best models' multi-model ensemble based on Taylor diagrams has the lowest errors in reproducing temperature extremes in the present climate among three methods. Selected best models in three methods tend to project considerably different changes in the extreme indices from each other, indicating that the selection of reliable models are of critical importance to reduce uncertainties. Three groups of best models show significant increase of summerbased indices but decrease of the winter-based indices. Over East Asia, the most significant increase is seen in the HD (336 ± 23.4% of current climate) and the most significant decrease is appeared in the HDD (82 ± 4.2%). It is suggested that the larger future change in the HD is found over in the Southeastern China region, probably due to a higher local maximum temperature in the present climate. All of the indices show the largest uncertainty over Southeastern China, particularly in the TN (~3.9 times as large as uncertainty over East Asia) and in the HD (~2.4). It is further noted that the TN reveals the largest uncertainty over three East Asian countries (~1.7 and 1.4 over Korea and

  14. Using a laboratory-based growth model to estimate mass- and temperature-dependent growth parameters across populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Russell W.; Plumb, John M.; Huntington, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the parameters that govern mass- and temperature-dependent growth, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing growth data from juvenile Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were fed an ad libitum ration of a pelleted diet. Although the growth of juvenile Chinook Salmon has been well studied, research has focused on a single population, a narrow range of fish sizes, or a narrow range of temperatures. Therefore, we incorporated the Ratkowsky model for temperature-dependent growth into an allometric growth model; this model was then fitted to growth data from 11 data sources representing nine populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon. The model fit the growth data well, explaining 98% of the variation in final mass. The estimated allometric mass exponent (b) was 0.338 (SE = 0.025), similar to estimates reported for other salmonids. This estimate of b will be particularly useful for estimating mass-standardized growth rates of juvenile Chinook Salmon. In addition, the lower thermal limit, optimal temperature, and upper thermal limit for growth were estimated to be 1.8°C (SE = 0.63°C), 19.0°C (SE = 0.27°C), and 24.9°C (SE = 0.02°C), respectively. By taking a meta-analytical approach, we were able to provide a growth model that is applicable across populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon receiving an ad libitum ration of a pelleted diet.

  15. Effects of post-fire wood management strategies on vegetation recovery and land surface temperature (LST) estimated from Landsat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassova, Lidia; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    The study contributes remote sensing data to the discussion about effects of post-fire wood management strategies on forest regeneration. Land surface temperature (LST) and Normalized Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI), estimated from Landsat-8 images are used as indicators of Pinus halepensis ecosystem recovery after 2008 fire in areas of three post-fire treatments: (1) salvage logging with wood extraction from the site on skidders in suspended position (SL); (2) snag shredding in situ leaving wood debris in place (SS) performed two years after the event; and (3) non-intervention control areas (CL) where all snags were left standing. Six years after the fire NDVI values ∼0.5 estimated from satellite images and field radiometry indicate considerable vegetation recovery due to efficient regeneration traits developed by the dominant plant species. However, two years after management activities in part of the burnt area, the effect of SL and SS on ecosystem recovery is observed in terms of both LST and NDVI. Statistically significant differences are detected between the intervened areas (SL and SS) and control areas of non-intervention (CL); no difference is registered between zones of different intervention types (SL and SS). CL areas are on average 1 °C cooler and 10% greener than those corresponding to either SL or SS, because of the beneficial effects of burnt wood residuals, which favor forest recovery through (i) enhanced nutrient cycling in soils, (ii) avoidance of soil surface disturbance and mechanical damage of seedlings typical to the managed areas, and (iii) ameliorated microclimate. The results of the study show that in fire-resilient ecosystems, such as P. halepensis forests, NDVI is higher and LST is lower in areas with no management intervention, being an indication of more favorable conditions for vegetation regeneration.

  16. An original interpretation of the surface temperature-albedo space to estimate crop evapotranspiration (SEB-1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, O.

    2013-05-01

    The space defined by the pair surface temperature (T) and surface albedo (α), and the space defined by the pair T and fractional green vegetation cover (fvg) have been extensively used to estimate evaporative fraction (EF) from optical remote sensing data. In both space-based approaches, evapotranspiration (ET) is estimated as remotely sensed EF times the available energy. For a given data point in the T - α space or in the T - fvg space, EF is derived as the ratio of the distance separating the point from the line identified as the dry edge to the distance separating the dry edge and the line identified as the wet edge. The dry and wet edges are classically defined as the upper and lower limit of the spaces, respectively. When side-by-side investigating the T - α and the T - fvg spaces, one observes that the range covered by T values on the (classically determined) wet edge is different for both spaces. In addition, when extending the wet and dry lines of the T - α space, both lines cross at α ≈ 0.4 although the wet and dry edges of the T - fvg space never cross for 0 ≤ fvg < 1. In this paper, a new ET (EF) model (SEB-1S) is derived by revisiting the classical physical interpretation of the T - α space to make its wet edge consistent with that of the T - fvg space. SEB-1S is tested over a 16 km by 10 km irrigated area in northwestern Mexico during the 2007-2008 agricultural season. The classical T - α space-based model is implemented as benchmark to evaluate the performance of SEB-1S. Input data are composed of ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer) thermal infrared, Formosat-2 shortwave, and station-based meteorological data. The fluxes simulated by SEB-1S and the classical T - α space-based model are compared on seven ASTER overpass dates with the in situ measurements collected at six locations within the study domain. The ET simulated by SEB-1S is significantly more accurate and robust than that predicted by the

  17. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6–2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5–2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1–1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150–170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330–880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  18. Observing Volcanic Thermal Anomalies from Space: How Accurate is the Estimation of the Hotspot's Size and Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaksek, K.; Pick, L.; Lombardo, V.; Hort, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the heat emission from active volcanic features on the basis of infrared satellite images contributes to the volcano's hazard assessment. Because these thermal anomalies only occupy a small fraction (< 1 %) of a typically resolved target pixel (e.g. from Landsat 7, MODIS) the accurate determination of the hotspot's size and temperature is however problematic. Conventionally this is overcome by comparing observations in at least two separate infrared spectral wavebands (Dual-Band method). We investigate the resolution limits of this thermal un-mixing technique by means of a uniquely designed indoor analog experiment. Therein the volcanic feature is simulated by an electrical heating alloy of 0.5 mm diameter installed on a plywood panel of high emissivity. Two thermographic cameras (VarioCam high resolution and ImageIR 8300 by Infratec) record images of the artificial heat source in wavebands comparable to those available from satellite data. These range from the short-wave infrared (1.4-3 µm) over the mid-wave infrared (3-8 µm) to the thermal infrared (8-15 µm). In the conducted experiment the pixel fraction of the hotspot was successively reduced by increasing the camera-to-target distance from 3 m to 35 m. On the basis of an individual target pixel the expected decrease of the hotspot pixel area with distance at a relatively constant wire temperature of around 600 °C was confirmed. The deviation of the hotspot's pixel fraction yielded by the Dual-Band method from the theoretically calculated one was found to be within 20 % up until a target distance of 25 m. This means that a reliable estimation of the hotspot size is only possible if the hotspot is larger than about 3 % of the pixel area, a resolution boundary most remotely sensed volcanic hotspots fall below. Future efforts will focus on the investigation of a resolution limit for the hotspot's temperature by varying the alloy's amperage. Moreover, the un-mixing results for more realistic multi

  19. Feasibility of improving a priori regional climate model estimates of Greenland ice sheet surface mass loss through assimilation of measured ice surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navari, M.; Margulis, S. A.; Bateni, S. M.; Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P.; Fettweis, X.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has been the focus of climate studies due to its considerable impact on sea level rise. Accurate estimates of surface mass fluxes would contribute to understanding the cause of its recent changes and would help to better estimate the past, current and future contribution of the GrIS to sea level rise. Though the estimates of the GrIS surface mass fluxes have improved significantly over the last decade, there is still considerable disparity between the results from different methodologies (e.g., Rae et al., 2012; Vernon et al., 2013). The data assimilation approach can merge information from different methodologies in a consistent way to improve the GrIS surface mass fluxes. In this study, an ensemble batch smoother data assimilation approach was developed to assess the feasibility of generating a reanalysis estimate of the GrIS surface mass fluxes via integrating remotely sensed ice surface temperature measurements with a regional climate model (a priori) estimate. The performance of the proposed methodology for generating an improved posterior estimate was investigated within an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework using synthetically generated ice surface temperature measurements. The results showed that assimilation of ice surface temperature time series were able to overcome uncertainties in near-surface meteorological forcing variables that drive the GrIS surface processes. Our findings show that the proposed methodology is able to generate posterior reanalysis estimates of the surface mass fluxes that are in good agreement with the synthetic true estimates. The results also showed that the proposed data assimilation framework improves the root-mean-square error of the posterior estimates of runoff, sublimation/evaporation, surface condensation, and surface mass loss fluxes by 61, 64, 76, and 62 %, respectively, over the nominal a priori climate model estimates.

  20. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Development of a non-insulated cryogenic strain-gauge balance. Estimate of the accuracy of balance nr. 771 at temperatures between 90K and 300K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The influence of the combination of loads acting on it, the temperature, and the temperature gradients on a three component cryogenic balance was investigated. The effect of combined loads is determined at room temperature and is taken into account by means of a normal second order calibration. The temperature effects give rise to the application of four corrections on the test data. The estimated accuracy of the cryogenic balance presented is the summation of the accuracy at room temperature, and the accuracy with which the corrections were determined. The measurement of aerodynamic drag appears to be considerably less accurate than the measurement of the lift and pitching moment, mainly due to the influence of temperature gradients.

  2. How Consistent are Sea Surface Temperature Estimates from Different Proxies? An Assessment of the Alkenone, Mg/Ca, and Faunal Paleothermometers Using Records from the Plio-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, K. T.; Peterson, L.; deMenocal, P. B.; Bochner, L.; Gorbey, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    A variety of different paleothermometers have been used to estimate past sea surface temperature (SST). However, a limited number of studies have explored the consistency of the temperature estimates produced by these proxies or assessed the cross proxy reproducibility of the major results gleaned from these records. Here, incorporating novel and previously published records from a variety of different sites (ODP Site 662 in the Eastern Equatorial Atlantic, DSDP Site 607 and Site 609 in the North Atlantic, and ODP Site 1125 in the Southwest Pacific), we assess the consistency of the long-term trends and orbital signatures of Uk'37 SST records, relative to faunal and Mg/Ca estimates from the same sites. Exploring the similarity of companion SST datasets generated for different time windows within the Plio-Pleistocene at several different sites, we find that while there are structural differences between records, they produce very similar long-term trends and produce absolute temperature estimates that are generally within error of each other. Furthermore, companion records successfully capture the same dominant milankovtich period and produce phase estimates relative to benthic oxygen isotope estimates that are within error of each other. While there are some differences in the strength, temporal persistence, and presence/absence of the non-dominant milankovitch periodicies and some intervals in which one proxy record is coherent with δ18O while another is not, our results suggest that the primary results gleaned from SST proxy records remain intact regardless of which SST proxy is used.

  3. Improving Soil Moisture and Temperature Profile and Surface Turbulent Fluxes Estimations in Irrigated Field by Assimilating Multi-source Data into Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijing; Huang, Chunlin; Shen, Huanfeng; Wang, Weizhen

    2016-04-01

    The optimal estimation of hydrothermal conditions in irrigation field is restricted by the deficiency of accurate irrigation information (when and how much to irrigate). However, the accurate estimation of soil moisture and temperature profile and surface turbulent fluxes are crucial to agriculture and water management in irrigated field. In the framework of land surface model, soil temperature is a function of soil moisture - subsurface moisture influences the heat conductivity at the interface of layers and the heat storage in different layers. In addition, soil temperature determines the phase of soil water content with the transformation between frozen and unfrozen. Furthermore, surface temperature affects the partitioning of incoming radiant energy into ground (sensible and latent heat flux), as a consequence changes the delivery of soil moisture and temperature. Given the internal positive interaction lying in these variables, we attempt to retrieve the accurate estimation of soil moisture and temperature profile via assimilating the observations from the surface under unknown irrigation. To resolve the input uncertainty of imprecise irrigation quantity, original EnKS is implemented with inflation and localization (referred to as ESIL) aiming at solving the underestimation of the background error matrix and the extension of observation information from the top soil to the bottom. EnKS applied in this study includes the states in different time points which tightly connect with adjacent ones. However, this kind of relationship gradually vanishes along with the increase of time interval. Thus, the localization is also employed to readjust temporal scale impact between states and filter out redundant or invalid correlation. Considering the parameter uncertainty which easily causes the systematic deviation of model states, two parallel filters are designed to recursively estimate both states and parameters. The study area consists of irrigated farmland and is

  4. Temperature and volume estimation of under-seafloor fluid from the logging-while-drilling data beneath an active hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Sanada, Y.; Masaki, Y.; Moe, K.; Kido, Y. N.; Kumagai, H.; Takai, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    In July of 2014, offshore drillings on Iheya-North Knoll, Okinawa Trough, was executed as part of Next-generation technology for ocean resources survey, which is a research program in Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP). In this expedition, logging-while- drilling (LWD) and measuring-while-drilling (MWD) were inserted into 6 holes (C9011 - C9016) to investigate spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposit and geothermal fluid reservoir. Both of these tools included annular pressure-while-drilling (APWD). Annular pressure and temperature were monitored by the APWD to detect possible exceedingly-high-temperature geofluid. In addition, drilling fluid was continuously circulated at sufficient flow rate to protect LWD tools against high temperature (non-stop driller system). At C9012 and C9016, the LWD tool clearly detected pressure and temperature anomaly at 234 meter below the seafloor (mbsf) and 80 mbsf, respectively. Annular pressure and temperature quickly increases at that depth and it would reflect the injection of high-temperature fluid. During the drilling, however, drilling water was continuously circulated at high flow-rate (2600L/min) and the measured temperature is not exactly in-situ temperature. To investigate the detail of the heat source, such as in-situ temperature and quantity of heat, we performed numerical analyses of thermal fluid and energy-balance assuming injection of high-temperature fluid. We combined pressure loss theory of double cylinders and temperature equation to replicate the fluid flow and its temperature between borehole wall and drilling pipe during the thermofluid injection. As the result, we estimated the temperature and the volume of injected fluid to be 115oC~ and 17.3 m3, respectively (at C9012) from the calculation. This temperature is lower than that of a hydrothermall vent which had been found near the hole (300oC).

  5. Aquifer residence times for recycled water estimated using chemical tracers and the propagation of temperature signals at a managed aquifer recharge site in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Elise; Patterson, Bradley; Toze, Simon; Furness, Andrew; Higginson, Simon; Shackleton, Mark

    2014-09-01

    A prerequisite for minimizing contamination risk whilst conducting managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with recycled water is estimating the residence time in the zone where pathogen inactivation and biodegradation processes occur. MAR in Western Australia's coastal aquifers is a potential major water source. As MAR with recycled water becomes increasingly considered in this region, better knowledge of applied and incidental tracer-based options from case studies is needed. Tracer data were collected at a MAR site in Floreat, Western Australia, under a controlled pumping regime over a distance of 50 m. Travel times for bromide-spiked groundwater were compared with two incidental tracers in recycled water: chloride and water temperature. The average travel time using bromide was 87 ± 6 days, whereas the estimates were longer based on water temperature (102 ± 17 days) and chloride (98 ± 60 days). The estimate of average flow velocity based on water temperature data was identical to the estimate based on bromide within a 25-m section of the aquifer (0.57 ± 0.04 m day-1). This case study offers insights into the advantages, challenges and limitations of using incidental tracers in recycled water as a supplement to a controlled tracer test for estimating aquifer residence times.

  6. A dual-temperature-difference approach to estimate daytime sensible and latent heat fluxes under advective conditions during BEAREX08

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dual-Temperature-Difference (DTD) approach uses continuous radiometric surface temperature measurements in a two-source (soil + vegetation) energy balance model to solve for the daytime evolution of the sensible and latent heat fluxes. By using the surface-air temperature difference at two time...

  7. Future PMPs Estimation in Korea under AR5 RCP 8.5 Climate Change Scenario: Focus on Dew Point Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okjeong, Lee; Sangdan, Kim

    2016-04-01

    According to future climate change scenarios, future temperature is expected to increase gradually. Therefore, it is necessary to reflect the effects of these climate changes to predict Probable Maximum Precipitations (PMPs). In this presentation, PMPs will be estimated with future dew point temperature change. After selecting 174 major storm events from 1981 to 2005, new PMPs will be proposed with respect to storm areas (25, 100, 225, 400, 900, 2,025, 4,900, 10,000 and 19,600 km2) and storm durations (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 hours) using the Korea hydro-meteorological method. Also, orographic transposition factor will be applied in place of the conventional terrain impact factor which has been used in previous Korean PMPs estimation reports. After estimating dew point temperature using future temperature and representative humidity information under the Korea Meteorological Administration AR5 RCP 8.5, changes in the PMPs under dew point temperature change will be investigated by comparison with present and future PMPs. This research was supported by a grant(14AWMP-B082564-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  8. Estimates of in situ gas hydrate concentration from resistivity monitoring of gas hydrate bearing sediments during temperature equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, M.; Long, P.E.; Collett, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 at southern Hydrate Ridge off Oregon we have monitored changes in sediment electrical resistivity during controlled gas hydrate dissociation experiments. Two cores were used, each filled with gas hydrate bearing sediments (predominantly mud/silty mud). One core was from Site 1249 (1249F-9H3), 42.1 m below seafloor (mbsf) and the other from Site 1248 (1248C-4X1), 28.8 mbsf. At Site 1247, a third experiment was conducted on a core without gas hydrate (1247B-2H1, 3.6 mbsf). First, the cores were imaged using an infra-red (IR) camera upon recovery to map the gas hydrate occurrence through dissociation cooling. Over a period of several hours, successive runs on the multi-sensor track (includes sensors for P-wave velocity, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and gamma-ray density) were carried out complemented by X-ray imaging on core 1249F-9H3. After complete equilibration to room temperature (17-18??C) and complete gas hydrate dissociation, the final measurement of electrical resistivity was used to calculate pore-water resistivity and salinities. The calculated pore-water freshening after dissociation is equivalent to a gas hydrate concentration in situ of 35-70% along core 1249F-9H3 and 20-35% for core 1248C-4X1 assuming seawater salinity of in situ pore fluid. Detailed analysis of the IR scan, X-ray images and split-core photographs showed the hydrate mainly occurred disseminated throughout the core. Additionally, in core 1249F-9H3, a single hydrate filled vein, approximately 10 cm long and dipping at about 65??, was identified. Analyses of the logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity data revealed a structural dip of 40-80?? in the interval between 40 and 44 mbsf. We further analyzed all resistivity data measured on the recovered core during Leg 204. Generally poor data quality due to gas cracks allowed analyses to be carried out only at selected intervals at Sites 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, and 1252. With a few

  9. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 ??m) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  11. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-11-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  12. Utility of birefringence changes due to collagen thermal denaturation rate process analysis: vessel wall temperature estimation for new short term heating balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Gotoh, Maya; Nakatani, Eriko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    Our photo thermal reaction heating architecture balloon realizes less than 10 s short term heating that can soften vessel wall collagen without damaging surrounding tissue thermally. New thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA) has experimentally shown sufficient opening with 2 atm low pressure dilation and prevention of chronic phase restenosis and acute phase thrombus in vivo. Even though PTDBA has high therapeutic potential, the most efficient heating condition is still under study, because relationship of treatment and thermal dose to vessel wall is not clarified yet. To study and set the most efficient heating condition, we have been working on establishment of temperature history estimation method from our previous experimental results. Heating target of PTDBA, collagen, thermally denatures following rate process. Denaturation is able to be quantified with measured collagen birefringence value. To express the denaturation with equation of rate process, the following ex vivo experiments were performed. Porcine extracted carotid artery was soaked in two different temperature saline baths to enforce constant temperature heating. Higher temperature bath was set to 40 to 80 degree Celsius and soaking duration was 5 to 40 s. Samples were observed by a polarizing microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The birefringence was measured by polarizing microscopic system using Brace-Koehler compensator 1/30 wavelength. The measured birefringence showed temperature dependency and quite fit with the rate process equation. We think vessel wall temperature is able to be estimated using the birefringence changes due to thermal denaturation.

  13. Estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures using upper-air and satellite data. Part 1: Development of models predicting surface shelter temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, D.L.; Davis, J.M.; Bloomfield, P.; Karl, T.R.; Mcnab, A.L.; Gallo, K.P. |

    1995-02-01

    Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986-89 using upper-air data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to represent the background climate and site-specific data to represent the local landscape. Global monthly mean temperature models were developed using data from over 5000 stations available in the Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). Monthly maximum, mean, and minimum temperature models for the United States were also developed using data from over 1000 stations available in the U.S. Cooperative (COOP) Network and comparative monthly mean temperature models were developed using over 1150 U.S. stations in the GHCN. Three-, six-, and full-variable models were developed for comparative purposes. Inferences about the variables selected for the various models were easier for the GHCN models, which displayed month-to-month consistency in which variables were selected, than for the COOP models, which were assigned a different list of variables for nearly every month. These and other results suggest that global calibration is preferred because data from the global spectrum of physical processes that control surface temperatures are incorporated in a global model.

  14. A new look at the statistical assessment of approximate and rigorous methods for the estimation of stabilized formation temperatures in geothermal and petroleum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Ojeda, O. M.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2011-06-01

    Approximate and rigorous solutions of seven heat transfer models were statistically examined, for the first time, to estimate stabilized formation temperatures (SFT) of geothermal and petroleum boreholes. Constant linear and cylindrical heat source models were used to describe the heat flow (either conductive or conductive/convective) involved during a borehole drilling. A comprehensive statistical assessment of the major error sources associated with the use of these models was carried out. The mathematical methods (based on approximate and rigorous solutions of heat transfer models) were thoroughly examined by using four statistical analyses: (i) the use of linear and quadratic regression models to infer the SFT; (ii) the application of statistical tests of linearity to evaluate the actual relationship between bottom-hole temperatures and time function data for each selected method; (iii) the comparative analysis of SFT estimates between the approximate and rigorous predictions of each analytical method using a β ratio parameter to evaluate the similarity of both solutions, and (iv) the evaluation of accuracy in each method using statistical tests of significance, and deviation percentages between 'true' formation temperatures and SFT estimates (predicted from approximate and rigorous solutions). The present study also enabled us to determine the sensitivity parameters that should be considered for a reliable calculation of SFT, as well as to define the main physical and mathematical constraints where the approximate and rigorous methods could provide consistent SFT estimates.

  15. Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

    2008-10-10

    We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

  16. Estimation of daily global solar radiation using wavelet regression, ANN, GEP and empirical models: A comparative study of selected temperature-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Sayed Saber; Rezaverdinejad, Vahid; Nourani, Vahid

    2016-11-01

    Although the sunshine-based models generally have a better performance than temperature-based models for estimating solar radiation, the limited availability of sunshine duration records makes the development of temperature-based methods inevitable. This paper presents a comparative study between Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Gene Expression Programming (GEP), Wavelet Regression (WR) and 5 selected temperature-based empirical models for estimating the daily global solar radiation. A new combination of inputs including four readily accessible parameters have been employed: daily mean clearness index (KT), temperature range (ΔT), theoretical sunshine duration (N) and extraterrestrial radiation (Ra). Ten statistical indicators in a form of GPI (Global Performance Indicator) is used to ascertain the suitability of the models. The performance of selected models across the range of solar radiation values, was depicted by the quantile-quantile (Q-Q) plots. Comparing these plots makes it evident that ANNs can cover a broader range of solar radiation values. The results shown indicate that the performance of ANN model was clearly superior to the other models. The findings also demonstrated that WR model performed well and presented high accuracy in estimations of daily global solar radiation.

  17. Estimation of Listeria monocytogenes survival during thermoultrasonic treatments in non-isothermal conditions: Effect of ultrasound on temperature and survival profiles.

    PubMed

    Franco-Vega, Avelina; Ramírez-Corona, Nelly; López-Malo, Aurelio; Palou, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of Listeria monocytogenes survival during thermoultrasonic treatments in non-isothermal conditions was determined considering an increment from 45 to 70 °C, assessing the adequacy of predictions through experimental data obtained in laboratory media model systems. In order to characterize the sonication effect on the survival pattern, observed behavior was compared to that obtained when only thermal treatment was applied. A noticeable impact on L. monocytogenes survival in non-isothermal conditions was observed when heat is combined with ultrasound, since the sonication effect modifies not only the temperature profile, but also the dynamic survival pattern. It was observed that both treatments were able to achieve a reduction of 5.5 log cycles of the initial population, although the inactivation temperature and the required time to reach such temperature were lower for thermoultrasonic treatments than for thermal treatments. Furthermore, as the temperature dependent parameters required to estimate the dynamic responses in non-isothermal treatments were initially determined from isothermal conditions, the sonication effect on these parameters and its implications for dynamic estimations, which are closely related to the nonlinearity of the systems, were also addressed; for thermal treatments, obtained isothermal curves were properly described by the Weibull model and first order kinetics, while for thermoultrasonication treatments a clear non-linear behavior was observed and only the Weibullian model was able to adequately describe the inactivation pattern.

  18. How should forensic anthropologists correct national weather service temperature data for use in estimating the postmortem interval?

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2015-05-01

    This study examines the correlation between site-specific and retrospectively collected temperature data from the National Weather Service (NWS) over an extended time period. Using iButtonLink thermochrons (model DS1921G), hourly temperature readings were collected at 15 sites (1 validation; 14 experimental) from December 2010 to January 2012. Comparison between the site-specific temperature data and data retrieved from an official reporter of NWS temperature data shows statistically significant differences between the two in 71.4% (10/14) of cases. The difference ranged between 0.04 and 2.81°C. Examination of both regression and simple adjustment of the mean difference over extended periods (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 9 months) suggests that on the timescale typical in forensic anthropology cases neither method of correction is consistent or reliable and that forensic anthropologists would be better suited using uncorrected NWS temperature data when the postmortem interval is extended.

  19. Estimation of Vertical Groundwater Fluxes into a Streambed through Continuous Temperature Profile Monitoring and the Relationship of Groundwater Fluxes to Coaster Brook Trout Spawning Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, M. J.; Mayer, A. S.; Huckins, C.

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that the spatial distribution of groundwater inflows through river bottom sediments is a critical factor associated with the selection of coaster brook trout (a life history variant of Salvelinus fontinalis) spawning sites. An 80-m stretch of the Salmon Trout River, in the upper peninsula of Michigan, was selected to test the hypothesis. The river stretch is relatively similar along its length with regard to superficial spawning habitat selection factors. Coaster brook trout have been observed to return consistently to spawn in specific areas within the study river stretch. A monitoring well system was installed to measure subsurface temperatures underneath the riverbed over a 13-month period. The monitoring well locations were separated into areas where spawning and non-spawning behavior occurred. Over 200,000 temperature measurements were made at five vertical locations in the 22 monitoring wells. Temperature data in the subsurface below the spawning area was generally cooler and less variable than river temperatures. Temperatures in the non-spawning area were generally warmer, more variable, and closely tracked temporal variations in river temperatures. Temperature data were inverted to obtain subsurface groundwater velocities using a numerical approximation of the heat transfer equation. Approximately 45,000 estimates of groundwater velocities were obtained. Estimated velocities in the spawning and non-spawning areas confirmed that groundwater velocities in the spawning area are primarily in the upward direction, with magnitudes on the order of greater than 5×10-3 cm/s. In the non-spawning area, groundwater velocities were mostly either in the downward direction or, if they were in the upward direction, the magnitude of the velocity was low, on the order of less than 1×10-3 cm/s. Both the temperature and velocity results confirm the hypothesis that spawning sites correspond to areas of significant groundwater influx to the river bed.

  20. Estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures using upper-air and satellite data. Part 1: Development of models predicting surface shelter temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperson, David L.; Davis, Jerry M.; Bloomfield, Peter; Karl, Thomas R.; Mcnab, Alan L.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1995-01-01

    Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986-89 using upper-air data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to represent the background climate and site-specific data to represent the local landscape. Global monthly mean temperature models were developed using data from over 5000 stations available in the Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). Monthly maximum, mean, and minimum temperature models for the United States were also developed using data from over 1000 stations available in the U.S. Cooperative (COOP) Network and comparative monthly mean temperature models were developed using over 1150 U.S. stations in the GHCN. Three-, six-, and full-variable models were developed for comparative purposes. Inferences about the variables selected for the various models were easier for the GHCN models, which displayed month-to-month consistency in which variables were selected, than for the COOP models, which were assigned a different list of variables for nearly every month. These and other results suggest that global calibration is preferred because data from the global spectrum of physical processes that control surface temperatures are incorporated in a global model. All of the models that were developed in this study validated relatively well, especially the global models. Recalibration of the models with validation data resulted in only slightly poorer regression statistics, indicating that the calibration list of variables was valid. Predictions using data from the validation dataset in the calibrated equation were better for the GHCN models, and the globally calibrated GHCN models generally provided better U.S. predictions than the U.S.-calibrated COOP models. Overall, the GHCN and COOP models explained approximately 64%-95% of the total variance of surface shelter temperatures, depending on the month and the number of model variables. In addition, root

  1. Estimation of photosynthetic rate from measurements of natural fluorescence: analysis of the effects of light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Sean; Marra, John

    1992-10-01

    We examine the effects of light and temperature on the relationship between photosynthesis and natural fluorescence in oceanic and coastal waters. While a moderately-sized database suggests a strong correlation, there is evidence that light and temperature alter the ratio of the quantum yields of photosynthesis and natural fluorescence. Specifically, we find a reduction of this ratio as light intensity increases and temperature decreases. In this paper, we review the effects of these factors and present empirical equations to account for their behavior. Although these equations significantly improve our ability to predict photosynthetic rate from natural fluorescence, the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms undelying these effects are not understood sufficiently.

  2. Use of Empirical Mode Decomposition based Denoised NDVI in Extended Three-Temperature Model to estimate Evapotranspiration in Northeast Indian Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component involved in the energy balance and water budgeting methods, and its precise assessment are crucial for estimation of various hydrological parameters. Traditional point estimation methods for ET computation offer quantitative analysis, but lag in spatial distribution. The use of Remote Sensing (RS) data with good spatial, spectral and temporal resolution having broad spatial coverage, could lead the estimations with some advantages. However, approaches which requires data rich environment, demands time and resources. The estimation of spatially distributed soil evaporation (Es) and transpiration from canopy (Ec) by RS data, followed by their combination to provide the total ET, could be a simpler approach for accurate estimates of ET flux at macro-scale level. The 'Extended Three Temperature Model' (Extended 3T Model) is an established model based on same approach and is capable to compute ET and its partition of Es and Ec within the same algorithm. A case study was conducted using Extended 3T Model and MODIS products for the Brahmaputra river basin within the Northeast India for years 2000-2010. The extended 3T model was used by including its pre-requisite the land surface temperature (Ts), which was separated into the surface temperature of dry soil (Tsm) and the surface temperature of vegetation (Tcm), decided by a derivative of vegetation index (NDVI) called fractional vegetation cover (f). However, NDVI time series which is nonlinear and nonstationary can be decomposed by the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) into components called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), based on inherent temporal scales. The highest frequency component which was found to represent noise was subtracted from the original NDVI series to get the denoised product from which f was derived. The separated land surface temperatures (Tsm and Tcm) were used to calculate the Es and Ec followed by estimation of total ET. The spatiotemporal

  3. Estimating Expressed Temperature and Fractional Area of Hot Lava at the Kilauea Vent with AVIRIS Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy offers a framework based in physics and chemistry for scientific investigation of a wide range of phenomena of interest in the Earth environment. In the scientific discipline of volcanology knowledge of lava temperature and distribution at the surface provides insight into the volcano status and subsurface processes. A remote sensing strategy to measure surface lava temperatures and distribution would support volcanology research. Hot targets such as molten lava emit spectral radiance as a function of temperature. A figure shows a series of Planck functions calculated radiance spectra for hot targets at different temperatures. A maximum Lambertian solar reflected radiance spectrum is shown as well. While similar in form, each hot target spectrum has a unique spectral shape and is distinct from the solar reflected radiance spectrum. Based on this temperature-dependent signature, imaging spectroscopy provides an innovative approach for the remote-sensing-based measurement of lava temperature. A natural site for investigation of the measurement of lava temperature is the Big Island of Hawaii where molten lava from the Kilauea vent is present at the surface. In the past, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data sets have been used for the analysis of hot volcanic targets and hot burning fires. The research presented here builds upon and extends this earlier work. The year 2000 Hawaii AVIRIS data set has been analyzed to derive lava temperatures taking into account factors of fractional fill, solar reflected radiance, and atmospheric attenuation of the surface emitted radiance. The measurements, analyses, and current results for this research are presented here.

  4. EQUILGAS: Program to estimate temperatures and in situ two-phase conditions in geothermal reservoirs using three combined FT-HSH gas equilibria models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Rosa María; Núñez, José; Arellano, Víctor Manuel; Nieva, David

    2016-03-01

    Exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources require the estimation of important physical characteristics of reservoirs including temperatures, pressures and in situ two-phase conditions, in order to evaluate possible uses and/or investigate changes due to exploitation. As at relatively high temperatures (>150 °C) reservoir fluids usually attain chemical equilibrium in contact with hot rocks, different models based on the chemistry of fluids have been developed that allow deep conditions to be estimated. Currently either in water-dominated or steam-dominated reservoirs the chemistry of steam has been useful for working out reservoir conditions. In this context, three methods based on the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and combined H2S-H2 (HSH) mineral-gas reactions have been developed for estimating temperatures and the quality of the in situ two-phase mixture prevailing in the reservoir. For these methods the mineral buffers considered to be controlling H2S-H2 composition of fluids are as follows. The pyrite-magnetite buffer (FT-HSH1); the pyrite-hematite buffer (FT-HSH2) and the pyrite-pyrrhotite buffer (FT-HSH3). Currently from such models the estimations of both, temperature and steam fraction in the two-phase fluid are obtained graphically by using a blank diagram with a background theoretical solution as reference. Thus large errors are involved since the isotherms are highly nonlinear functions while reservoir steam fractions are taken from a logarithmic scale. In order to facilitate the use of the three FT-HSH methods and minimize visual interpolation errors, the EQUILGAS program that numerically solves the equations of the FT-HSH methods was developed. In this work the FT-HSH methods and the EQUILGAS program are described. Illustrative examples for Mexican fields are also given in order to help the users in deciding which method could be more suitable for every specific data set.

  5. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 1: Estimate of the electron velocity distribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients characteristic of EUV models of the solar transition region, the electron and proton velocity distribution functions are non-Maxwellian and are characterized by high energy tails. The magnitude of these tails are estimated for a model of the transition region and the heat flux is calculated at a maximum of 30 percent greater than predicted by collision-dominated theory.

  6. Evaluation of Model Complexity and Parameter Estimation: Indirect Inversion of a Numerical Model of Heat Conduction and Convection Using Subsurface Temperatures in Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, W.; Kamai, T.; Fogg, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of metal piezometers (thermal conductivity 16.0 W m-1 K-1) in peat (thermal conductivity 0.5 W m-1 K-1) can significantly influence temperatures recorded in the subsurface. Radially symmetrical 2D numerical models of heat conduction and convection that use a transient specified temperature boundary condition (Dirichlet) and explicitly account for the difference in thermal properties differ from the commonly used 1D analytical solution by as much as 2°C at 0.15m below ground surface. Field data from temperature loggers located inside and outside piezometers show similar differences, supporting the use of the more complex numerical model. In order to better simulate field data, an energy balance approach is used to calculate the temperature along the upper boundary using hourly radiation and air temperature data, along with daily average wind velocity and cloud cover data. Normally distributed random noise is added to recorded field data to address potential natural variation between conditions at the instrument site and the field site (piezometer). Five influential parameters are considered: albedo, crop coefficient, hydraulic conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and surface water depth. Ten sets of these five parameters are generated from a uniform random distribution and constrained by values reported in the literature or measured in the field. The ten parameter sets and noise are used to generate synthetic subsurface data in the numerical model. The synthetic temperature data is offset by a constant value determined from a uniform random distribution to represent potential offset in instrument accuracy (+/- 0.1 °C). The original parameter values are satisfactorily recovered by indirect inversion of the noise-free model using UCODE. Comparison of the parameter estimates from the homogeneous numerical model (equivalent to the analytical model) and the numerical model that explicitly models the metal piezometer are compared. The same inversion scheme is

  7. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of air temperature maps and their application to estimate rice growing season heat accumulation using multi-temporal MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-wen; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Li, Xin-xing; Sun, Wen-bo; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of thermal time usually represents the local heat resources to drive crop growth. Maps of temperature-based agro-meteorological indices are commonly generated by the spatial interpolation of data collected from meteorological stations with coarse geographic continuity. To solve the critical problems of estimating air temperature (T(a)) and filling in missing pixels due to cloudy and low-quality images in growing degree days (GDDs) calculation from remotely sensed data, a novel spatio-temporal algorithm for T(a) estimation from Terra and Aqua moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was proposed. This is a preliminary study to calculate heat accumulation, expressed in accumulative growing degree days (AGDDs) above 10 °C, from reconstructed T(a) based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The verification results of maximum T(a), minimum T(a), GDD, and AGDD from MODIS-derived data to meteorological calculation were all satisfied with high correlations over 0.01 significant levels. Overall, MODIS-derived AGDD was slightly underestimated with almost 10% relative error. However, the feasibility of employing AGDD anomaly maps to characterize the 2001-2010 spatio-temporal variability of heat accumulation and estimating the 2011 heat accumulation distribution using only MODIS data was finally demonstrated in the current paper. Our study may supply a novel way to calculate AGDD in heat-related study concerning crop growth monitoring, agricultural climatic regionalization, and agro-meteorological disaster detection at the regional scale.

  8. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of air temperature maps and their application to estimate rice growing season heat accumulation using multi-temporal MODIS data*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-wen; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Li, Xin-xing; Sun, Wen-bo; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of thermal time usually represents the local heat resources to drive crop growth. Maps of temperature-based agro-meteorological indices are commonly generated by the spatial interpolation of data collected from meteorological stations with coarse geographic continuity. To solve the critical problems of estimating air temperature (T a) and filling in missing pixels due to cloudy and low-quality images in growing degree days (GDDs) calculation from remotely sensed data, a novel spatio-temporal algorithm for T a estimation from Terra and Aqua moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was proposed. This is a preliminary study to calculate heat accumulation, expressed in accumulative growing degree days (AGDDs) above 10 °C, from reconstructed T a based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The verification results of maximum T a, minimum T a, GDD, and AGDD from MODIS-derived data to meteorological calculation were all satisfied with high correlations over 0.01 significant levels. Overall, MODIS-derived AGDD was slightly underestimated with almost 10% relative error. However, the feasibility of employing AGDD anomaly maps to characterize the 2001–2010 spatio-temporal variability of heat accumulation and estimating the 2011 heat accumulation distribution using only MODIS data was finally demonstrated in the current paper. Our study may supply a novel way to calculate AGDD in heat-related study concerning crop growth monitoring, agricultural climatic regionalization, and agro-meteorological disaster detection at the regional scale. PMID:23365013

  9. Analysis of a resistance-energy balance method for estimating daily evaporation from wheat plots using one-time-of-day infrared temperature observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate estimates of evaporation over field-scale or larger areas are needed in hydrologic studies, irrigation scheduling, and meteorology. Remotely sensed surface temperature might be used in a model to calculate evaporation. A resistance-energy balance model, which combines an energy balance equation, the Penman-Monteith (1981) evaporation equation, and van den Honert's (1948) equation for water extraction by plant roots, is analyzed for estimating daily evaporation from wheat using postnoon canopy temperature measurements. Additional data requirements are half-hourly averages of solar radiation, air and dew point temperatures, and wind speed, along with reasonable estimates of canopy emissivity, albedo, height, and leaf area index. Evaporation fluxes were measured in the field by precision weighing lysimeters for well-watered and water-stressed wheat. Errors in computed daily evaporation were generally less than 10 percent, while errors in cumulative evaporation for 10 clear sky days were less than 5 percent for both well-watered and water-stressed wheat. Some results from sensitivity analysis of the model are also given.

  10. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of air temperature maps and their application to estimate rice growing season heat accumulation using multi-temporal MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-wen; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Li, Xin-xing; Sun, Wen-bo; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of thermal time usually represents the local heat resources to drive crop growth. Maps of temperature-based agro-meteorological indices are commonly generated by the spatial interpolation of data collected from meteorological stations with coarse geographic continuity. To solve the critical problems of estimating air temperature (T(a)) and filling in missing pixels due to cloudy and low-quality images in growing degree days (GDDs) calculation from remotely sensed data, a novel spatio-temporal algorithm for T(a) estimation from Terra and Aqua moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was proposed. This is a preliminary study to calculate heat accumulation, expressed in accumulative growing degree days (AGDDs) above 10 °C, from reconstructed T(a) based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The verification results of maximum T(a), minimum T(a), GDD, and AGDD from MODIS-derived data to meteorological calculation were all satisfied with high correlations over 0.01 significant levels. Overall, MODIS-derived AGDD was slightly underestimated with almost 10% relative error. However, the feasibility of employing AGDD anomaly maps to characterize the 2001-2010 spatio-temporal variability of heat accumulation and estimating the 2011 heat accumulation distribution using only MODIS data was finally demonstrated in the current paper. Our study may supply a novel way to calculate AGDD in heat-related study concerning crop growth monitoring, agricultural climatic regionalization, and agro-meteorological disaster detection at the regional scale. PMID:23365013

  11. Studies on time of death estimation in the early post mortem period -- application of a method based on eyeball temperature measurement to human bodies.

    PubMed

    Kaliszan, Michał

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a verification of the thermodynamic model allowing an estimation of the time of death (TOD) by calculating the post mortem interval (PMI) based on a single eyeball temperature measurement at the death scene. The study was performed on 30 cases with known PMI, ranging from 1h 35min to 5h 15min, using pin probes connected to a high precision electronic thermometer (Dostmann-electronic). The measured eye temperatures ranged from 20.2 to 33.1°C. Rectal temperature was measured at the same time and ranged from 32.8 to 37.4°C. Ambient temperatures which ranged from -1 to 24°C, environmental conditions (still air to light wind) and the amount of hair on the head were also recorded every time. PMI was calculated using a formula based on Newton's law of cooling, previously derived and successfully tested in comprehensive studies on pigs and a few human cases. Thanks to both the significantly faster post mortem decrease of eye temperature and a residual or nonexistent plateau effect in the eye, as well as practically no influence of body mass, TOD in the human death cases could be estimated with good accuracy. The highest TOD estimation error during the post mortem intervals up to around 5h was 1h 16min, 1h 14min and 1h 03min, respectively in three cases among 30, while for the remaining 27 cases it was not more than 47min. The mean error for all 30 cases was ±31min. All that indicates that the proposed method is of quite good precision in the early post mortem period, with an accuracy of ±1h for a 95% confidence interval. On the basis of the presented method, TOD can be also calculated at the death scene with the use of a proposed portable electronic device (TOD-meter).

  12. Quantitative Estimation of the Impact of European Teleconnections on Interannual Variation of East Asian Winter Temperature and Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The impact of European teleconnections including the East AtlanticWest Russia (EA-WR), the Scandinavia (SCA), and the East Atlantic (EA) on East Asian winter temperature variability was quantified and compared with the combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Western Pacific (WP), and the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which are originated in the Northern Hemispheric high-latitudes or the Pacific. Three European teleconnections explained 22-25 percent of the total monthly upper-tropospheric height variance over Eurasia. Regression analysis revealed warming by EA-WR and EA and cooling by SCA over mid-latitude East Asia during their positive phase and vice versa. Temperature anomalies were largely explained by the advective temperature change process at the lower troposphere. The average spatial correlation over East Asia (90-180E, 10-80N) for the last 34 winters between observed and reconstructed temperature comprised of AO, WP and ENSO effect (AWE) was approximately 0.55, and adding the European teleconnection components (ESE) to the reconstructed temperature improved the correlation up to approximately 0.64. Lower level atmospheric structure demonstrated that approximately five of the last 34 winters were significantly better explained by ESE than AWE to determine East Asian seasonal winter temperatures. We also compared the impact between EA-WR and AO on the 1) East Asian winter monsoon, 2) cold surge, and 3) the Siberian high. These three were strongly coupled, and their spatial features and interannual variation were somewhat better explained by EA-WR than AO. Results suggest that the EA-WR impact must be treated more importantly than previously thought for a better understanding of East Asian winter temperature and monsoon variability.

  13. Spectrum parameter estimation in Brillouin scattering distributed temperature sensor based on cuckoo search algorithm combined with the improved differential evolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Yu, Chunjuan; Fu, Xinghu; Liu, Wenzhe; Bi, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    In the distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Brillouin scattering, strain and temperature are the main measuring parameters which can be obtained by analyzing the Brillouin center frequency shift. The novel algorithm which combines the cuckoo search algorithm (CS) with the improved differential evolution (IDE) algorithm is proposed for the Brillouin scattering parameter estimation. The CS-IDE algorithm is compared with CS algorithm and analyzed in different situation. The results show that both the CS and CS-IDE algorithm have very good convergence. The analysis reveals that the CS-IDE algorithm can extract the scattering spectrum features with different linear weight ratio, linewidth combination and SNR. Moreover, the BOTDR temperature measuring system based on electron optical frequency shift is set up to verify the effectiveness of the CS-IDE algorithm. Experimental results show that there is a good linear relationship between the Brillouin center frequency shift and temperature changes.

  14. Summary of Temperature Data Collected to Improve Emergence Timing Estimates for Chum and Fall Chinook Salmon in the Lower Columbia River, 1998-2004 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, E.; Geist, D.; Hanrahan, T.

    2005-10-01

    From 1999 through 2004, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected temperature data from within chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning gravels and the overlying river at 21 locations in the Ives Island area approximately 5 km downstream from Bonneville Dam. Sample locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. The study objectives were to (1) collect riverbed and river temperature data each year from the onset of spawning (October) to the end of emergence (June) and (2) provide those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with fall Chinook and chum salmon emergence timing estimates. Three systems were used over the life of the study. The first consisted of temperature sensors deployed inside piezometers that were screened to the riverbed or the river within chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. These sensors required direct access by staff to download data and were difficult to recover during high river discharge. The second system consisted of a similar arrangement but with a wire connecting the thermistor to a data logger attached to a buoy at the water surface. This system allowed for data retrieval at high river discharge but proved relatively unreliable. The third system consisted of temperature sensors installed in piezometers such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely via radio telemetry. After being downloaded, data were posted hourly on the Internet. Several times during the emergence season of each year, temperature data were downloaded manually and provided to management agencies. During 2003 and 2004, the real-time data were made available on the Internet to assist with emergence timing estimates. Examination of temperature data reveals several important patterns. Piezometer sites differ in the direction of vertical flow between surface and subsurface water. Bed temperatures in upwelling areas are more stable during salmon

  15. High temperature air-blown woody biomass gasification model for the estimation of an entrained down-flow gasifier.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nobusuke; Tanaka, Miku; Piao, Guilin; Kobayashi, Jun; Hatano, Shigenobu; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu

    2009-01-01

    A high temperature air-blown gasification model for woody biomass is developed based on an air-blown gasification experiment. A high temperature air-blown gasification experiment on woody biomass in an entrained down-flow gasifier is carried out, and then the simple gasification model is developed based on the experimental results. In the experiment, air-blown gasification is conducted to demonstrate the behavior of this process. Pulverized wood is used as the gasification fuel, which is injected directly into the entrained down-flow gasifier by the pulverized wood banner. The pulverized wood is sieved through 60 mesh and supplied at rates of 19 and 27kg/h. The oxygen-carbon molar ratio (O/C) is employed as the operational condition instead of the air ratio. The maximum temperature achievable is over 1400K when the O/C is from 1.26 to 1.84. The results show that the gas composition is followed by the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. Therefore, the air-blown gasification model is developed based on the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. The simple gasification model agrees well with the experimental results. From calculations in large-scale units, the cold gas is able to achieve 80% efficiency in the air-blown gasification, when the woody biomass feedrate is over 1000kg/h and input air temperature is 700K.

  16. Estimation of glacier mass balance: An approach based on satellite-derived transient snowlines and a temperature index driven by meteorological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawde, S. A.; Kulkarni, A. V.; Bala, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Himalaya, large area is comprised of glaciers and seasonal snow, mainly due to its high elevated mountain ranges. Long term and continuous assessment of glaciers in this region is important for climatological and hydrological applications. However, rugged terrains and severe weather conditions in the Himalaya lead to paucity in field observations. Therefore, in recent decades, glacier dynamics are extensively monitored using remote sensing in inaccessible terrain like Himalaya. Estimation of glacier mass balance using empirical relationship between mass balance and area accumulation ratio (AAR) requires an accurate estimate of equilibrium-line altitude (ELA). ELA is defined as the snowline at the end of the hydrological year. However, identification of ELA, using remote sensing is difficult because of temporal gaps, cloud cover and intermediate snowfall on glaciers. This leads to large uncertainty in glacier mass-balance estimates by the conventional AAR method that uses satellite-derived highest snowline in ablation season as an ELA. The present study suggests a new approach to improve estimates of ELA location. First, positions of modelled snowlines are optimized using satellite-derived snowlines in the early melt season. Secondly, ELA at the end of the glaciological year is estimated by the melt and accumulation models driven using in situ temperature and precipitation records. From the modelled ELA, mass balance is estimated using the empirical relationship between AAR and mass balance. The modelled mass balance is validated using field measurements on Chhota Shigri and Hamtah glaciers, Himachal Pradesh, India. The new approach shows a substantial improvement in glacier mass-balance estimation, reducing bias by 46% and 108% for Chhota Shigiri and Hamtah glaciers respectively. The cumulative mass loss reconstructed from our approach is 0.85 Gt for nine glaciers in the Chandra basin from 2001 to 2009. The result of the present study is in agreement with

  17. Temperature-moisture biases in ECMWF analyses based on clear sky longwave simulations constrained by SSMI and MSU measurements and comparisons to ERBE estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju

    1994-01-01

    Clear sky longwave radiation fluxes for the summer of 1988 and winter of 1989 have been simulated with a radiative transfer model that includes detailed treatment of atmospheric gas absorption. The input data to the model are humidity and temperature profiles from European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses and surface temperature measurements from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. To reduce the inherent uncertainties in humidity profiles, the ECMWF moisture fields have been adjusted, based on the climatological relationship between the moisture profile and total precipitable water (PW), so that the ECMWF PW is equal to that derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) data. SSMI and ECMWF PW patterns are generally similar, but significant differences in magnitude are found in the low latitudes, particularly over the subtropical oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. At the same time the tropospheric brightness temperature (T(sub B)) at 53.74 GHz has been computed using a microwave transfer model with ECMWF temperature and humidity fields as inputs. The comparison of computed T(sub B) with the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) channel 2 T(sub B) revealed differences larger than 1.5 K over most of the oceans, suggesting that the ECMWF model atmosphere has a cold bias. Maximum biases greater than 3 K are found in low latitudes. After removing the bias from the ECMWF temperature field, a new set of temperature profiles yielding brightness temperature equal to MSU channel 2 T(sub B) has been obtained. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that inclusion of satellite estimates of PW and T(sub B) enhances the accuracy of the clear sky LW flux simulation, substantially reducing the differences from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) estimates. Global averages indicate that the model-derived top-of-atmosphere (TOA) clear sky fluxes from the adjusted moisture and temperature profiles are in very good agreement with

  18. Daily rainfall and temperature estimation by kriging with external drift in an Alpine Catchment. Sensitivity analysis to the temporal scale adopted to define the variogram models. (southeast Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan Collados-Lara, Antonio; Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio; Pulido-Velazquez, David; Jimenez-Sanchez, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of the climatic historical variables in a River Basin is essential for an appropriate management of the water resources in the system. Temperature and precipitation are the most important variables from the point of view of the assessment of water availability and its spatially and temporal distribution. The aim of this work is to estimate temperature and precipitation using kriging with external drift (KED). A grid with a spatial resolution of 1 km and a daily temporal resolution has been adopted to estimate values for the period 1980 to 2014 in the "Alto Genil" basin (southeast Spain). The altitude in the catchment changes from 530 to 3100 m a.s.l. The climatic variables depend of the altitude and this variable has been used as external drift. Data from 119 precipitation station and 72 temperature station of the AEMET have been employed. The relationship between the altitude and the variables has been analyzed using the regression function of daily mean precipitation and temperature for annual and monthly scale. Normally the temperature and precipitation increase linearly with the altitude. The relationship between temperature and altitude is clearly linear. In the case of the precipitation there is a value of altitude (approximately 1500 m) from which the precipitation decreases with the altitude (inverse rainfall gradient) for every months with the exception of July that has a linear relationship. This inverse rainfall gradient has been observed in other cases as Andes Mountains, some African high mountains, tropical or subtropical high mountains. Therefore, in the case of the precipitation we have a quadratic external drift and for the temperature we have a linear external drift. The monthly and annual climatic variograms were calibrated in order to study if the climatic variables have a seasonal conduct. The KED allows to obtain an estimation with both models (annual and monthly) for the two variables and we can quantify the sensibility of the

  19. Using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain method to estimate contact parameter temperature dependence: implications for Martian cloud modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, Anni; Douspis, Marian

    2015-04-01

    In the last years several datasets on deposition mode ice nucleation in Martian conditions have showed that the effectiveness of mineral dust as a condensation nucleus decreases with temperature (Iraci et al., 2010; Phebus et al., 2011; Trainer et al., 2009). Previously, nucleation modelling in Martian conditions used only constant values of this so-called contact parameter, provided by the few studies previously published on the topic. The new studies paved the way for possibly more realistic way of predicting ice crystal formation in the Martian environment. However, the caveat of these studies (Iraci et al., 2010; Phebus et al., 2011) was the limited temperature range that inhibits using the provided (linear) equations for the contact parameter temperature dependence in all conditions of cloud formation on Mars. One wide temperature range deposition mode nucleation dataset exists (Trainer et al., 2009), but the used substrate was silicon, which cannot imitate realistically the most abundant ice nucleus on Mars, mineral dust. Nevertheless, this dataset revealed, thanks to measurements spanning from 150 to 240 K, that the behaviour of the contact parameter as a function of temperature was exponential rather than linear as suggested by previous work. We have tried to combine the previous findings to provide realistic and practical formulae for application in nucleation and atmospheric models. We have analysed the three cited datasets using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. The used method allows us to test and evaluate different functional forms for the temperature dependence of the contact parameter. We perform a data inversion by finding the best fit to the measured data simultaneously at all points for different functional forms of the temperature dependence of the contact angle m(T). The method uses a full nucleation model (Määttänen et al., 2005; Vehkamäki et al., 2007) to calculate the observables at each data point. We suggest one new and test

  20. A procedure for estimation of sea-surface temperature from remote measurements in the 10 - 13 micrometers spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anding, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility is demonstrated of a procedure for the remote measurement of sea-surface temperature which inherently corrects for the effect of the intervening atmosphere without recourse to climatological data. The procedure relies upon the near-linear differential absorption properties of the infrared window region between 10 and 13 micrometers and requires radiometric measurements in a minimum of two spectral intervals within the infrared window which have a significant difference in absorption coefficient. The procedure was applied to Nimbus 4 infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) data and to Skylab EREP S191 spectrometer data, and it is demonstrated that atmospheric effects on the observed brightness temperature can be reduced to less than 1.0 Kelvin.

  1. Impact of shallow water bodies on the permafrost temperature and estimation of risk of thermokarst development at the Barrow Environmental Observatory area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, A. L.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Chamberlain, A. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.

    2015-12-01

    Extension of the thermokarst features such as lakes and ponds had been noticed in many regions of the Arctic affected by the modern climate warming. Thermokarst is a process of permafrost thawing under the water bodies with depths larger than maximal thickness of seasonal ice in the area, i.e. with permanent positive temperature at the bottom. This process is most probable in the areas where massive ice bodies (wedges, lenses, layers etc) or ice rich deposits exist close to ground surface and even insignificant increasing of thaw depth can lead to its melting and surface subsidence. Local depressions such as low-centered polygonal ponds or interpolygonal troughs can potentially become triggers of thermokarst development. Current research was aimed on determination of warming impact of small water bodies on the permafrost temperature and seasonal thawing and estimation of risk of thermokarst development at Barrow Environmental Observatory area. Comparison of temperature measurements under shallow (10 - 40 cm deep) with relatively dry spots and active layer thickness survey show that warming impact of small water bodies (mean annual temperature at the permafrost table here is up to 2oC higher then under "dry" geomorphological features) is not realized in increasing of the thawing depth. Active layer thickness does not exceed values of 45 cm under polygonal ponds and 35 cm under troughs that is less then thickness of protective layer above ice wedges in the area. For estimation of risk of thermokarst development we used analytical equations developed by V.Kudryavtsev (1974). Results of calculations show that in this area crucial depth of water bodies required for mean annual temperature at the bottom of the pond became higher then freezing point consists of 0.95 cm. Current research was supported by US DOE as a part of research project Next Generation of Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE).

  2. Inverse method to estimate kinetic degradation parameters of grape anthocyanins in wheat flour under simultaneously changing temperature and moisture.

    PubMed

    Lai, K P K; Dolan, K D; Ng, P K W

    2009-06-01

    Thermal and moisture effects on grape anthocyanin degradation were investigated using solid media to simulate processing at temperatures above 100 degrees C. Grape pomace (anthocyanin source) mixed with wheat pastry flour (1: 3, w/w dry basis) was used in both isothermal and nonisothermal experiments by heating the same mixture at 43% (db) initial moisture in steel cells in an oil bath at 80, 105, and 145 degrees C. To determine the effect of moisture on anthocyanin degradation, the grape pomace-wheat flour mixture was heated isothermally at 80 degrees C at constant moisture contents of 10%, 20%, and 43% (db). Anthocyanin degradation followed a pseudo first-order reaction with moisture. Anthocyanins degraded more rapidly with increasing temperature and moisture. The effects of temperature and moisture on the rate constant were modeled according to the Arrhenius and an exponential relationship, respectively. The nonisothermal reaction rate constant and activation energy (mean +/- standard error) were k(80 degrees C, 43% (db) moisture) = 2.81 x 10(-4)+/- 1.1 x 10(-6) s(-1) and DeltaE = 75273 +/- 197 J/g mol, respectively. The moisture parameter for the exponential model was 4.28 (dry basis moisture content)(-1). One possible application of this study is as a tool to predict the loss of anthocyanins in nutraceutical products containing grape pomace. For example, if the process temperature history and moisture history in an extruded snack fortified with grape pomace is known, the percentage anthocyanin loss can be predicted. PMID:19646039

  3. Response of Insect Relative Growth Rate to Temperature and Host-Plant Phenology: Estimation and Validation from Field Data

    PubMed Central

    Ciss, Mamadou; Parisey, Nicolas; Fournier, Gwenaëlle; Taupin, Pierre; Dedryver, Charles-Antoine; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Between 1975 to 2011, aphid Relative Growth Rates (RGR) were modelled as a function of mean outdoor temperature and host plant phenology. The model was applied to the grain aphid Sitobion avenae using data on aphid counts in winter wheat at two different climate regions in France (oceanic climate, Rennes (western France); continental climate, Paris). Mean observed aphid RGR was higher in Paris compared to the Rennes region. RGR increased with mean temperature, which is explained by aphid reproduction, growth and development being dependent on ambient temperature. From the stem extension to the heading stage in wheat, there was either a plateau in RGR values (Rennes) or an increase with a maximum at heading (Paris) due to high intri