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Sample records for estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms

  1. Mechanisms of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-mediated spinal nociception

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Benamar, Khalid; Dun, Nae J.; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies suggest estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pro-nociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) activation. Membrane depolarization, increases in cytosolic calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are markers of neuronal activation, underlying pain sensitization in the spinal cord. Using behavioral, electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging studies, we evaluated GPER involvement in spinal nociceptive processing. Intrathecal challenging of mice with the GPER agonist G-1 results in pain-related behaviors. GPER antagonism with G15 reduces the G-1 induced response. Electrophysiological recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons indicate neuronal membrane depolarization upon G-1 application, which is G15 sensitive. In cultured spinal sensory neurons G-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration and induces mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS accumulation. In the presence of G15, G-1 does not elicit the calcium and ROS responses, confirming specific GPER involvement in this process. Following G-1 intracellular microinjections, cytosolic calcium concentration elevates faster and with higher amplitude compared to extracellular exposure, suggesting subcellular GPER functionality. Thus, GPER activation results in spinal nociception, and the downstream mechanisms involve cytosolic calcium increase, ROS accumulation and neuronal membrane depolarization. Perspective Our results suggest that GPER modulates pain processing in spinal sensory neurons via cytosolic calcium increase and ROS accumulation. These findings extend the current knowledge on GPER involvement in physiology and disease, providing the first evidence of its pro-nociceptive effects at central levels and characterizing some of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:22858342

  2. Superinduction of estrogen receptor mediated gene expression in luciferase based reporter gene assays is mediated by a post-transcriptional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Bovee, T F H; Brand, W; Velikova, N; Boeren, S; Murk, A J; Vervoort, J; Rietjens, I M C M

    2010-10-01

    Several estrogenic compounds including the isoflavonoid genistein have been reported to induce a higher maximal response than the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol in in vitro luciferase based reporter gene bioassays for testing estrogenicity. The phenomenon has been referred to as superinduction. The mechanism underlying this effect and thus also its biological relevance remain to be elucidated. In the present study several hypotheses for the possible mechanisms underlying this superinduction were investigated using genistein as the model compound. These hypotheses included (i) a non-estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated mechanism, (ii) a role for an ER activating genistein metabolite with higher ER inducing activity than genistein itself, and (iii) a post-transcriptional mechanism that is not biologically relevant but specific for the luciferase based reporter gene assays. The data presented in this study indicate that induction and also superinduction of the reporter gene is ER-mediated, and that superinduction by genistein could be ascribed to stabilization of the firefly luciferase reporter enzyme increasing the bioluminescent signal during the cell-based assay. This indicates that the phenomenon of superinduction may not be biologically relevant but may rather represent a post-transcriptional effect on enzyme stability.

  3. Genomic variation in the MMP-1 promoter influences estrogen receptor mediated activity in a mechanically activated environment: potential implications for microgravity risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, John; Myers, Ken; Lu, Ting; Hart, David

    Background: Mechanotransduction, the conversion of mechanical forces (tensile, compression, shear etc.) into cellular signals is a significant response mechanism in bone that contributes to the balance between formation and resorption and helps maintain bone density. In microgravity the lack of mechanical signals can lead to a loss of bone density, however the signaling pathways responsible are not well understood. For women, sex-specific hormones are also important in maintaining bone density since estrogen deficiency is a major factor in the etiology of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Estrogen Receptors (ERs) are present in human connective tissue cells such as osteoblasts and may play a role in mechanotransduction responses. The two ER isoforms, alpha (ER-α) and beta (ER-β) differentially regulate expression of matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix components found in connective tissues. Mechanical stimulation is known to affect the expression of MMP-1, a collagenase involved in the bone resorption process. The MMP-1 promoter region contains a single nucleotide polymorphism of an additional guanine (G) at position -1607 bp which creates a binding site for a member of the Ets family of mammalian transcription factors. The 2G allele is known to be present in 45-70% of healthy populations and has been associated with higher MMP-1 expression. The 2G allele has been linked to higher risk of several types of cancer but a link to osteoporosis or microgravity induced bone loss has not been explored. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a case-study to determine whether small genetic variations can influence cellular and tissue responses to mechanical loading. Specifically we examined the potential of the 1G/2G -1607 MMP-1 promoter SNP to alter the interplay between mechanical shear stress and estrogen receptors in controlling MMP-1 expression. Methods: Rabbit synovial cells (HIG-82) were used as an in vitro model system to

  4. Sex-specificity and estrogen-dependence of kappa opioid receptor-mediated antinociception and antihyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Kera P; Nag, Subodh; Thompson, Analisa D; Mokha, Sukhbir S

    2010-12-01

    This investigation determined whether the activation of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) in the spinal cord produces estrogen-dependent, sex-specific modulation of acute and inflammation-induced persistent nociception. We demonstrate for the first time that KOR antinociception and gene expression are enhanced by exogenous or endogenous estrogen in the female. The lack of KOR antinociception and KOR gene expression are not altered by the hormonal status (testosterone or estrogen) in males. Cannulae were implanted intrathecally in male, gonadectomized male (GDX), intact and ovariectomized female (OVX) Sprague-Dawley rats. Estradiol was injected subcutaneously, 48h before testing (GDX+E and OVX+E). Intrathecal injection of U50,488H, a selective KOR agonist, dose dependently increased heat-evoked tail flick latencies (TFLs) in proestrous and OVX+E groups, but not in male, GDX, GDX+E, OVX, and diestrous groups. Further, estrogen dose-dependently enhanced the effect of U50,488H in OVX rats. KOR selective antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (Nor-BNI), blocked the antinociceptive effect of U50,488H. U50,488H reversed the carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia in OVX+E rats, but not in male or OVX rats. However, U50,488H treatment did not alter mechanical thresholds in any group, with or without inflammation. KOR gene expression was enhanced in proestrous and OVX+E groups as compared to any other group. We conclude that selective activation of KOR in the spinal cord produces sex-specific, stimulus- and estrogen-dependent attenuation of acute and inflammatory pain in the rat via estrogen-induced upregulation of the KOR gene expression in the spinal cord. These findings may further implicate estrogen dependence of KOR effects in learning, epilepsy, stress response, addiction etc. PMID:20926192

  5. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain.

  6. Estrogen receptor mediates simvastatin-stimulated osteogenic effects in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Fu, Yin-Chin; Tai, I-Chun; Li, Ching-Ju; Chang, Li-Fu; Ho, Mei-Ling; Chang, Je-Ken

    2015-12-01

    Simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is known to promote osteogenic differentiation. However, the mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced osteogenesis is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesize that the estrogen receptor (ER) mediates simvastatin-induced osteogenic differentiation. ER antagonists and siRNA were used to determine the involvement of the ER in simvastatin-induced osteogenesis in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (D1 cells). Osteogenesis was evaluated by mRNA expression, protein level/activity of osteogenic markers, and mineralization. The estrogen response element (ERE) promoter activity and the ER-simvastatin binding affinity were examined. Our results showed that the simvastatin-induced osteogenic effects were decreased by treatment with ERα antagonists and ERα siRNA but not by an antagonist specific for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER-1). The simvastatin-induced osteogenic effects were further increased by E2 treatment and were reversed by ERα antagonists or siRNA treatment. Luciferase reporter gene assays demonstrated that simvastatin increase ERα-dependent transcriptional activity that was suppressed by ERα antagonists. Furthermore, the ERα-simvastatin binding assay showed that IC50 value of simvastatin is 7.85 μM and that of E2 is 32.8 nM, indicating that simvastatin is a weak ligand for ERα. These results suggest that simvastatin-stimulated osteogenesis is mediated by ERα but not GPER-1. Moreover, this is the first report to demonstrate that simvastatin acts as an ERα ligand and a co-activator to enhance ERα-dependent transcriptional activity and thus promotes osteogenesis. These results indicate that simvastatin-induced osteogenesis is mediated via an ERα-dependent pathway.

  7. G-1-activated membrane estrogen receptors mediate increased contractility of the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Maiti, K; Paul, J W; Read, M; Chan, E C; Riley, S C; Nahar, P; Smith, R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogens are key mediators of increased uterine contractility at labor. We sought to determine whether membrane-associated estrogen receptors, such as the recently described seven-transmembrane receptor G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), mediated some of this effect. Using human myometrium obtained at term cesarean section before or after the onset of labor, we demonstrated the presence of GPR30 mRNA and protein using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. GPR30 receptor was localized to the cell membrane and often colocalized with calveolin-1. Using the specific estrogen membrane receptor agonist G-1 and myometrial explants, we showed that membrane receptor activation led to phosphorylation of MAPK and the actin-modifying small heat shock protein 27. Using myometrial strips incubated with G-1 or vehicle we demonstrated that estrogen membrane receptor activation increased the myometrial contractile response to oxytocin. These data suggest that activation of the plasma membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 likely participates in the physiology of the human myometrium during pregnancy and identifies it as a potential target to modify uterine activity. PMID:21427217

  8. The wedelolactone derivative inhibits estrogen receptor-mediated breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Max A; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers.

  9. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  10. Internalisation of the bleomycin molecules responsible for bleomycin toxicity: a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Mahrour, N; Orlowski, S; Tounekti, O; Poddevin, B; Belehradek, J; Mir, L M

    1999-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) does not diffuse through the plasma membrane but nevertheless displays cytotoxic activity due to DNA break generation. The aim of the study was to describe the mechanism of BLM internalisation. We previously provided evidence for the existence of BLM-binding sites at the surface of DC-3F Chinese hamster fibroblasts, as well as of their involvement in BLM cytotoxicity on DC-3F cells and related BLM-resistant sublines. Here we report that A253 human cells and their BLM-resistant subline C-10E also possessed a membrane protein of ca. 250 kDa specifically binding BLM. Part of this C-10E cell resistance could be explained by a decrease in the number of BLM-binding sites exposed at the cell surface with respect to A253 cells. The comparison between A253 and DC-3F cells exposing a similar number of BLM-binding sites revealed that the faster the fluid phase endocytosis, the greater the cell sensitivity to BLM. Moreover, the experimental modification of endocytotic vesicle size showed that BLM cytotoxicity was directly correlated with the flux of plasma membrane area engulfed during endocytosis rather than with the fluid phase volume incorporated. Thus, BLM would be internalised by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism which would first require BLM binding to its membrane receptor and then the transfer of the complex into intracellular endocytotic vesicles, followed by BLM entry into the cytosol, probably from a nonacidic compartment.

  11. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  12. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  13. EGCG functions through estrogen receptor-mediated activation of ADAM10 in the promotion of non-amyloidogenic processing of APP

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jamie Winderbaum; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Obregon, Demian; Tan, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen depletion following menopause has been correlated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously explored the beneficial effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on AD mice and found increased non-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) through the α-secretase a-disintegrin-and-metallopeptidase-domain 10 (ADAM10). Our results in this study suggest that EGCG-mediated enhancement of non-amyloidogenic processing of APP is mediated by the maturation of ADAM10 via an estrogen receptor-α (ERα)/PI3K/Akt dependent mechanism, independent of furin-mediated ADAM10 activation. These data support prior assertions that central selective estrogen receptor modulation could be a therapeutic target for AD and support the use of EGCG as a well-tolerated alternative to estrogen therapy in the prophylaxis and treatment of this disease. PMID:20849853

  14. Src Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer Exhibiting Low Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Sunil; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R.; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapies in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, approximately 40% of patients relapse. Previously, we identified the Focal-adhesion kinase canonical pathway as a major contributor of resistance to estrogen deprivation and cellular-sarcoma kinase (c-src) as a dominant gene in this pathway. Dasatinib, a pan-src inhibitor, has recently been used in clinical trials to treat ER+ patients but has shown mixed success. In the following study, using isogenic cell line models, we provide a potential explanation for these findings and suggest a sub-group that may benefit. A panel of isogenic cell lines modelling resistance to aromatase inhibitors (LTED) and tamoxifen (TAMR) were assessed for response to dasatinib ± endocrine therapy. Dasatinib caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation in MCF7-TAMR cells and resensitized them to tamoxifen and fulvestrant but not in HCC1428-TAMR. In contrast, in estrogen-deprived conditions, dasatinib increased the proliferation rate of parental-MCF7 cells and had no effect on MCF7-LTED or HCC1428-LTED. Treatment with dasatinib caused a decrease in src-phosphorylation and inhibition of downstream pathways, including AKT and ERK1/2 in all cell lines tested, but only the MCF7-TAMR showed a concomitant decrease in markers of cell cycle progression. Inhibition of src also caused a significant decrease in cell migration in both MCF7-LTED and MCF7-TAMR cells. Finally, we showed that, in MCF7-TAMR cells, in contrast to tamoxifen sensitive cell lines, ER is expressed throughout the cell rather than being restricted to the nucleus and that treatment with dasatinib resulted in nuclear shuttling of ER, which was associated with an increase in ER-mediated transcription. These data suggest that src has differential effects in endocrine-resistant cell lines, particularly in tamoxifen resistant models, with low ER genomic activity, providing further evidence of the importance of patient selection

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF PUTATIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-MEDIATED ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS USING QSAR- AND STRUCTURE-BASED VIRTUAL SCREENING APPROACHES

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Identification of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause Estrogen Receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R2=0.71, STL R2=0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R2=0.53, p<0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. PMID:23707773

  16. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R(2)=0.71, STL R(2)=0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R(2)=0.53, p<0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation.

  17. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R(2)=0.71, STL R(2)=0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R(2)=0.53, p<0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. PMID:23707773

  18. Octyl Gallate Markedly Promotes Anti-Amyloidogenic Processing of APP through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated ADAM10 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, She-Qing; Sawmiller, Darrell; Li, Song; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Hou, Huayan; Zhou, Shufeng; Shytle, Douglas; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Frank; Mori, Takashi; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the green tea-derived polyphenolic compound (−)-epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG) reduces amyloid-β (Aβ) production in both neuronal and mouse Alzheimer’s disease (AD) models in concert with activation of estrogen receptor-α/phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (ERα/PI3K/Akt) signaling and anti-amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein (APP) α-secretase (a disintegrin and metallopeptidase domain-10, ADAM10) processing. Since the gallate moiety in EGCG may correspond to the 7α position of estrogen, thereby facilitating ER binding, we extensively screened the effect of other gallate containing phenolic compounds on APP anti-amyloidogenic processing. Octyl gallate (OG; 10 µM), drastically decreased Aβ generation, in concert with increased APP α-proteolysis, in murine neuron-like cells transfected with human wild-type APP or “Swedish” mutant APP. OG markedly increased production of the neuroprotective amino-terminal APP cleavage product, soluble APP-α (sAPPα). In accord with our previous study, these cleavage events were associated with increased ADAM10 maturation and reduced by blockade of ERα/PI3k/Akt signaling. To validate these findings in vivo, we treated Aβ-overproducing Tg2576 mice with OG daily for one week by intracerebroventricular injection and found decreased Aβ levels associated with increased sAPPα. These data indicate that OG increases anti-amyloidogenic APP α-secretase processing by activation of ERα/PI3k/Akt signaling and ADAM10, suggesting that this compound may be an effective treatment for AD. PMID:23977176

  19. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function.

  20. Estrogen-, androgen- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in passive and composite samples from municipal waste and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Jálová, V; Jarošová, B; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Ocelka, T; Grabic, R; Jurčíková, J; Vrana, B; Hilscherová, K

    2013-09-01

    Passive and composite sampling in combination with in vitro bioassays and identification and quantification of individual chemicals were applied to characterize pollution by compounds with several specific modes of action in urban area in the basin of two rivers, with 400,000 inhabitants and a variety of industrial activities. Two types of passive samplers, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) for hydrophobic contaminants and polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) for polar compounds such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, were used to sample wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent and effluent as well as rivers upstream and downstream of the urban complex and the WWTP. Compounds with endocrine disruptive potency were detected in river water and WWTP influent and effluent. Year-round, monthly assessment of waste waters by bioassays documented estrogenic, androgenic and dioxin-like potency as well as cytotoxicity in influent waters of the WWTP and allowed characterization of seasonal variability of these biological potentials in waste waters. The WWTP effectively removed cytotoxic compounds, xenoestrogens and xenoandrogens. There was significant variability in treatment efficiency of dioxin-like potency. The study indicates that the WWTP, despite its up-to-date technology, can contribute endocrine disrupting compounds to the river. Riverine samples exhibited dioxin-like, antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic potencies. The study design enabled characterization of effects of the urban complex and the WWTP on the river. Concentrations of PAHs and contaminants and specific biological potencies sampled by POCIS decreased as a function of distance from the city.

  1. Diosgenin promotes oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation through estrogen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation to accelerate remyelination.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Guo, Dazhi; Hu, Chun; Shen, Weiran; Shan, Lei; Li, Cui; Liu, Xiuyun; Yang, Wenjing; Zhang, Weidong; He, Cheng

    2012-07-01

    Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into mature oligodendrocytes is a prerequisite for remyelination after demyelination, and impairment of this process is suggested to be a major reason for remyelination failure. Diosgenin, a plant-derived steroid, has been implicated for therapeutic use in many diseases, but little is known about its effect on the central nervous system. In this study, using a purified rat OPC culture model, we show that diosgenin significantly and specifically promotes OPC differentiation without affecting the viability, proliferation, or migration of OPC. Interestingly, the effect of diosgenin can be blocked by estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182780 but not by glucocorticoid and progesterone receptor antagonist RU38486, nor by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spirolactone. Moreover, it is revealed that both ER-alpha and ER-beta are expressed in OPC, and diosgenin can activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in OPC via ER. The pro-differentiation effect of diosgenin can also be obstructed by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Furthermore, in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model, it is demonstrated that diosgenin administration significantly accelerates/enhances remyelination as detected by Luxol fast blue stain, MBP immunohistochemistry and real time RT-PCR. Diosgenin also increases the number of mature oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum while it does not affect the number of OPCs. Taking together, our results suggest that diosgenin promotes the differentiation of OPC into mature oligodendrocyte through an ER-mediated ERK1/2 activation pathway to accelerate remyelination, which implicates a novel therapeutic usage of this steroidal natural product in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).

  2. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in estrogen receptor-negative hepatoma and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, E F; Koch, D C; Bisson, W H; Jang, H S; Kolluri, S K

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer is an important clinical goal, especially for triple-negative breast cancer, which is refractory to existing targeted treatments. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor known primarily as the mediator of dioxin toxicity. However, the AhR can also inhibit cellular proliferation in a ligand-dependent manner and act as a tumor suppressor in mice, and thus may be a potential anticancer target. To investigate the AhR as an anticancer target, we conducted a small molecule screen to discover novel AhR ligands with anticancer properties. We identified raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator currently used in the clinic for prevention of ER-positive breast cancer and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, as an AhR activator. Raloxifene directly bound the AhR and induced apoptosis in ER-negative mouse and human hepatoma cells in an AhR-dependent manner, indicating that the AhR is a molecular target of raloxifene and mediates raloxifene-induced apoptosis in the absence of ER. Raloxifene selectively induced apoptosis of triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with non-transformed mammary epithelial cells via the AhR. Combined with recent data showing that raloxifene inhibits triple-negative breast cancer xenografts in vivo (Int J Oncol. 43(3):785-92, 2013), our results support the possibility of repurposing of raloxifene as an AhR-targeted therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer patients. To this end, we also evaluated the role of AhR expression on survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. We found that higher expression of the AhR is significantly associated with increased overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in both hormone-dependent (ER-positive) and hormone-independent (ER and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative) breast cancers. Together, our data strongly support the possibility of using the Ah

  3. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  4. Bisphenol A promotes dendritic morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons through estrogen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Guangxia; Chen, Lei; Tian, Dong; Shen, Xiuying; Yang, Yanling; Dong, Fanni

    2014-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental endocrine disruptor, has attracted increasing attention to its adverse effects on brain developmental process. The previous study indicated that BPA rapidly increased motility and density of dendritic filopodia and enhanced the phosphorylation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2B in cultured hippocampal neurons within 30min. The purpose of the present study was further to investigate the effects of BPA for 24h on dendritic morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. After cultured for 5d in vitro, the hippocampal neurons from 24h-old rat were infected by AdV-EGFP to indicate time-lapse imaging of living neurons. The results demonstrated that the exposure of the cultured hippocampal neurons to BPA (10, 100nM) or 17β-estradiol (17β-E2, 10nM) for 24h significantly promoted dendritic development, as evidenced by the increased total length of dendrite and the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia. However, these changes were suppressed by an ERs antagonist, ICI182,780, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, and a mitogen-activated ERK1/2-activating kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126. Meanwhile, the increased F-actin (filamentous actin) induced by BPA (100nM) was also completely eliminated by these blockers. Furthermore, the result of western blot analyses showed that, the exposure of the cultures to BPA or 17β-E2 for 24h promoted the expression of Rac1/Cdc42 but inhibited that of RhoA, suggesting Rac1 (Ras related C3 botulinum toxinsubstrate 1)/Cdc42 (cell divisioncycle 42) and RhoA (Ras homologous A), the Rho family of small GTPases, were involved in BPA- or 17β-E2-induced changes in the dendritic morphogenesis of neurons. These BPA- or 17β-E2-induced effects were completely blocked by ICI182,780, and were partially suppressed by U0126. These results reveal that, similar to 17β-E2, BPA exerts its effects on dendritic morphogenesis by eliciting both nuclear actions and extranuclear

  5. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  6. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. PMID:22072186

  7. Interrogating the Role of Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms: Biological Fate of Peptide-Functionalized Radiolabeled Gold Nanoparticles in Tumor Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco; Zambre, Ajit; Campello, Maria Paula Cabral; Gano, Lurdes; Santos, Isabel; Ferraria, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Maria João; Singh, Amolak; Upendran, Anandhi; Paulo, António; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-04-20

    To get a better insight on the transport mechanism of peptide-conjugated nanoparticles to tumors, we performed in vivo biological studies of bombesin (BBN) peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in human prostate tumor bearing mice. Initially, we sought to compare AuNPs with thiol derivatives of acyclic and macrocyclic chelators of DTPA and DOTA types. The DTPA derivatives were unable to provide a stable coordination of (67)Ga, and therefore, the functionalization with the BBN analogues was pursued for the DOTA-containing AuNPs. The DOTA-coated AuNPs were functionalized with BBN[7-14] using a unidentate cysteine group or a bidentate thioctic group to attach the peptide. AuNPs functionalized with thioctic-BBN displayed the highest in vitro cellular internalization (≈ 25%, 15 min) in gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptor expressing cancer cells. However, these results fail to translate to in vivo tumor uptake. Biodistribution studies following intravenous (IV) and intraperitoneal (IP) administration of nanoconjugates in tumor bearing mice indicated that the presence of BBN influences to some degree the biological profile of the nanoconstructs. For IV administration, the receptor-mediated pathway appears to be outweighed by the EPR effect. By contrast, in IP administration, it is reasoned that the GRPr-mediated mechanism plays a role in pancreas uptake. PMID:27003101

  8. Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis is regulated by mechanical properties of the target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beningo, Karen A.; Wang, Yu-li

    2002-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an actin-based process used by macrophages to clear particles greater than 0.5 microm in diameter. In addition to its role in immunological responses, phagocytosis is also necessary for tissue remodeling and repair. To prevent catastrophic autoimmune reactions, phagocytosis must be tightly regulated. It is commonly assumed that the recognition/selection of phagocytic targets is based solely upon receptor-ligand binding. Here we report an important new criterion, that mechanical parameters of the target can dramatically affect the efficiency of phagocytosis. When presented with particles of identical chemical properties but different rigidity, macrophages showed a strong preference to engulf rigid objects. Furthermore, phagocytosis of soft particles can be stimulated with the microinjection of constitutively active Rac1 but not RhoA, and with lysophosphatidic acid, an agent known to activate the small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family. These data suggest a Rac1-dependent mechanosensory mechanism for phagocytosis, which probably plays an important role in a number of physiological and pathological processes from embryonic development to autoimmune diseases.

  9. Molecular mechanisms involving sigma receptor-mediated induction of MCP-1: implication for increased monocyte transmigration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Honghong; Yang, Yanjing; Kim, Kee Jun; Bethel-Brown, Crystal; Gong, Nan; Funa, Keiko; Gendelman, Howard E; Su, Tsung-Ping; Wang, John Q; Buch, Shilpa

    2010-06-10

    Cocaine abuse hastens the neurodegeneration often associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. The mechanisms, in part, revolve around the neuroinflammatory processes mediated by the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2). Understanding factors that modulate MCP-1 and, in turn, facilitate monocyte extravasation in the brain is thus of paramount importance. We now demonstrate that cocaine induces MCP-1 in rodent microglia through translocation of the sigma receptor to the lipid raft microdomains of the plasma membrane. Sequential activation of Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and phosphatidylinositol-3' kinase (PI3K)/Akt and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathways resulted in increased MCP-1 expression. Furthermore, conditioned media from cocaine-exposed microglia increased monocyte transmigration, and thus was blocked by antagonists for CCR2 or sigma receptor. These findings were corroborated by demonstrating increased monocyte transmigration in mice exposed to cocaine, which was attenuated by pretreatment of mice with the sigma receptor antagonist. Interestingly, cocaine-mediated transmigratory effects were not observed in CCR2 knockout mice. We conclude that cocaine-mediated induction of MCP-1 accelerates monocyte extravasation across the endothelium. Understanding the regulation of MCP-1 expression and functional changes by cocaine/sigma receptor system may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:20354174

  10. Ligand-Specific Transcriptional Mechanisms Underlie Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Developmental Toxicity of Oxygenated PAHs

    PubMed Central

    Goodale, B. C.; La Du, J.; Tilton, S. C.; Sullivan, C. M.; Bisson, W. H.; Waters, K. M.; Tanguay, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are priority environmental contaminants that exhibit mutagenic, carcinogenic, proinflammatory, and teratogenic properties. Oxygen-substituted PAHs (OPAHs) are formed during combustion processes and via phototoxidation and biological degradation of parent (unsubstituted) PAHs. Despite their prevalence both in contaminated industrial sites and in urban air, OPAH mechanisms of action in biological systems are relatively understudied. Like parent PAHs, OPAHs exert structure-dependent mutagenic activities and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and cytochrome p450 metabolic pathway. Four-ring OPAHs 1,9-benz-10-anthrone (BEZO) and benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione (7,12-B[a]AQ) cause morphological aberrations and induce markers of oxidative stress in developing zebrafish with similar potency, but only 7,12-B[a]AQ induces robust Cyp1a protein expression. We investigated the role of the AHR in mediating the toxicity of BEZO and 7,12-B[a]AQ, and found that knockdown of AHR2 rescued developmental effects caused by both compounds. Using RNA-seq and molecular docking, we identified transcriptional responses that precede developmental toxicity induced via differential interaction with AHR2. Redox-homeostasis genes were affected similarly by these OPAHs, while 7,12-B[a]AQ preferentially activated phase 1 metabolism and BEZO uniquely decreased visual system genes. Analysis of biological functions and upstream regulators suggests that BEZO is a weak AHR agonist, but interacts with other transcriptional regulators to cause developmental toxicity in an AHR-dependent manner. Identifying ligand-dependent AHR interactions and signaling pathways is essential for understanding toxicity of this class of environmentally relevant compounds. PMID:26141390

  11. Ligand-specific transcriptional mechanisms underlie aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated developmental toxicity of oxygenated PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, B. C.; La Du, J.; Tilton, S. C.; Sullivan, C. M.; Bisson, W. H.; Waters, K. M.; Tanguay, R. L.

    2015-07-03

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are priority environmental contaminants that exhibit mutagenic, carcinogenic, proinflammatory, and teratogenic properties. Oxygen-substituted PAHs (OPAHs) are formed during combustion processes and via phototoxidation and biological degradation of parent (unsubstituted) PAHs. Despite their prevalence both in contaminated industrial sites and in urban air, OPAH mechanisms of action in biological systems are relatively understudied. Like parent PAHs, OPAHs exert structure-dependent mutagenic activities and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and cytochrome p450 metabolic pathway. Four-ring OPAHs 1,9-benz-10-anthrone (BEZO) and benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione (7,12-B[a]AQ) cause morphological aberrations and induce markers of oxidative stress in developing zebrafish with similar potency, but only 7,12-B[a]AQ induces robust Cyp1a protein expression. We investigated the role of the AHR in mediating the toxicity of BEZO and 7,12-B[a]AQ, and found that knockdown of AHR2 rescued developmental effects caused by both compounds. Using RNA-seq and molecular docking, we identified transcriptional responses that precede developmental toxicity induced via differential interaction with AHR2. Redox-homeostasis genes were affected similarly by these OPAHs, while 7,12-B[a]AQ preferentially activated phase 1 metabolism and BEZO uniquely decreased visual system genes. Analysis of biological functions and upstream regulators suggests that BEZO is a weak AHR agonist, but interacts with other transcriptional regulators to cause developmental toxicity in an AHR-dependent manner. Furthermore, identifying ligand-dependent AHR interactions and signaling pathways is essential for understanding toxicity of this class of environmentally relevant compounds.

  12. Ligand-specific transcriptional mechanisms underlie aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated developmental toxicity of oxygenated PAHs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Goodale, B. C.; Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH; La Du, J.; Tilton, S. C.; Pacific Northwest National Lab.; Sullivan, C. M.; Bisson, W. H.; Waters, K. M.; Tanguay, R. L.

    2015-07-03

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are priority environmental contaminants that exhibit mutagenic, carcinogenic, proinflammatory, and teratogenic properties. Oxygen-substituted PAHs (OPAHs) are formed during combustion processes and via phototoxidation and biological degradation of parent (unsubstituted) PAHs. Despite their prevalence both in contaminated industrial sites and in urban air, OPAH mechanisms of action in biological systems are relatively understudied. Like parent PAHs, OPAHs exert structure-dependent mutagenic activities and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and cytochrome p450 metabolic pathway. Four-ring OPAHs 1,9-benz-10-anthrone (BEZO) and benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione (7,12-B[a]AQ) cause morphological aberrations and induce markers of oxidative stress in developing zebrafish with similar potency, butmore » only 7,12-B[a]AQ induces robust Cyp1a protein expression. We investigated the role of the AHR in mediating the toxicity of BEZO and 7,12-B[a]AQ, and found that knockdown of AHR2 rescued developmental effects caused by both compounds. Using RNA-seq and molecular docking, we identified transcriptional responses that precede developmental toxicity induced via differential interaction with AHR2. Redox-homeostasis genes were affected similarly by these OPAHs, while 7,12-B[a]AQ preferentially activated phase 1 metabolism and BEZO uniquely decreased visual system genes. Analysis of biological functions and upstream regulators suggests that BEZO is a weak AHR agonist, but interacts with other transcriptional regulators to cause developmental toxicity in an AHR-dependent manner. Furthermore, identifying ligand-dependent AHR interactions and signaling pathways is essential for understanding toxicity of this class of environmentally relevant compounds.« less

  13. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  14. Estrogen receptor mediated activity in bankside groundwater, with flood suspended particulate matter and floodplain soil - an approach combining tracer substance, bioassay and target analysis.

    PubMed

    Wölz, J; Grosshans, K; Streck, G; Schulze, T; Rastall, A; Erdinger, L; Brack, W; Fleig, M; Kühlers, D; Braunbeck, T; Hollert, H

    2011-10-01

    Bankside groundwater is widely used as drinking water resource and, therefore, contamination has to be avoided. In the European Union groundwater protection is explicit subject to Water Framework Directive. While groundwater pollution may originate from different sources, this study investigated on impacts via flood events. Groundwater was sampled with increasing distance to the river Rhine near Karlsruhe, Germany. Samples were HPLC-MS-MS analyzed for the river contaminant carbamazepine to indicate river water infiltration, giving permanent presence in 250 m distance to the river (14-47 μg L⁻¹). Following a flood event, concentrations of about 16-20 μg L⁻¹ could also be detected in a distance of 750 m to the river. Furthermore, estrogenic activity as determined with the Yeast Estrogen Screen assay was determined to increase up to a 17β-ethinylestradiol equivalent concentration (E-EQ)=2.9 ng L⁻¹ near the river, while activity was initially measured following the flood with up to E-EQ=2.6 ng L⁻¹ in 750 m distance. Detections were delayed with increasing distance to the river indicating river water expansion into the aquifer. Flood suspended matter and floodplain soil were fractionated and analyzed for estrogenic activity in parallel giving up to 1.4 ng g⁻¹ and up to 0.7 ng g⁻¹, respectively. Target analysis focusing on known estrogenic active substances only explained < 1% of measured activities. Nevertheless, river water infiltration was shown deep into bankside groundwater, thus, impacting groundwater quality. Therefore, flood events have to be in the focus when aiming for groundwater and drinking water protection as well as for implementation of Water Framework Directive.

  15. The CRH-R₁ receptor mediates luteinizing hormone, prolactin, corticosterone and progesterone secretion induced by restraint stress in estrogen-primed rats.

    PubMed

    Traslaviña, Guillermo A Ariza; Franci, Celso Rodrigues

    2011-11-01

    Acute stress has been shown to modify hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis activity. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the principal regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, has been implicated as a mediator of stress-induced effects on the reproductive axis. The role of the specific CRH receptor subtypes in this response is not completely understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of the CRH-R(1) receptor on luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL), progesterone (P) and corticosterone (CT) secretion in stress-induced responses under the influence of estrogen (E(2)). Estrogen-primed ovariectomized rats (estradiol cypionate, 10 μg sc) received an i.v. administration of antalarmin (0.1 or 1mg/kg), a selective CRH-R(1) antagonist, or vehicle before restraint stress for 40 min. Seven blood samples were collected from two experimental groups (one from 10:00 h to 14:00 h and the other from 10:00 h to 18:00 h). An increase of plasma LH induced by restraint acute-stress was followed by alteration of the secretion pattern in the estrogen-induced afternoon surge. In a similar manner, we observed a suppression of the afternoon surge in plasma FSH, a delay of E(2)-induced PRL secretion, and an increase in plasma P and CT. Antalarmin attenuated stress-induce LH increase, decreased CT and P secretion and blocked the stress effects on PRL secretion. These findings suggest that CRH-R(1) mediates, at least in part, the restraint stress effects on the HPA, PRL, and reproductive axes.

  16. Estimation of in vivo dose of dermally applied chemicals leading to estrogen/androgen receptor-mediated toxicity from in vitro data--Illustration with four reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Dancik, Yuri; Troutman, John A; Jaworska, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    We present a quantitative in vitro-in vivo extrapolation framework enabling the estimation of the external dermal exposure dose from in vitro experimental data relevant to a toxicity pathway of interest. The framework adapts elements of the biological pathway altering dose (BPAD) method [Judson et al. Chem Res Toxicol 2011;24:451] to the case of dermal exposure. Dermal doses of four toxicants equivalent to concentrations characterizing their effect on estrogen receptor α or androgen receptor activity in chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) assays are estimated. The analysis shows that dermal BPADs, calculated from one in vitro concentration, can differ by up to a factor of 55, due to the impact applied dose and dermal exposure scenarios can have on skin permeation kinetics. These features should therefore be taken into account in risk assessment of dermally applied chemicals.

  17. Bisphenol-A rapidly promotes dynamic changes in hippocampal dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Ye Yinping; Li Tao; Chen Lei; Tian Dong; Luo Qingqing; Lu Mei

    2010-12-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is known to be a potent endocrine disrupter. Evidence is emerging that estrogen exerts a rapid influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the dendritic spine density, which requires activation of NMDA receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BPA (ranging from 1 to 1000 nM), focusing on the rapid dynamic changes in dendritic filopodia and the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) {beta} and NMDA receptor, as well as the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the cultured hippocampal neurons. A specific ER antagonist ICI 182,780 was used to examine the potential involvement of ERs. The results demonstrated that exposure to BPA (ranging from 10 to 1000 nM) for 30 min rapidly enhanced the motility and the density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons, as well as the phosphorylation of NR2B (pNR2B), though the expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2B, and ER{beta} were not changed. The antagonist of ERs completely inhibited the BPA-induced increases in the filopodial motility and the number of filopodia extending from dendrites. The increased pNR2B induced by BPA (100 nM) was also completely eliminated. Furthermore, BPA attenuated the effects of 17{beta}-estradiol (17{beta}-E{sub 2}) on the dendritic filopodia outgrowth and the expression of pNR2B when BPA was co-treated with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. The present results suggest that BPA, like 17{beta}-E{sub 2}, rapidly results in the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons with the concomitant activation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B via an ER-mediated signaling pathway. Meanwhile, BPA suppressed the enhancement effects of 17{beta}-E{sub 2} when it coexists with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. These results provided important evidence suggesting the neurotoxicity of the low levels of BPA during the early postnatal development of the brain.

  18. Estrogen receptor-mediated effect of δ-tocotrienol prevents neurotoxicity and motor deficit in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Takahashi, Toru; Hanaki, Takehiko; Nakasone, Masato; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Koike, Taisuke; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Neuroprotection following signal transduction has been investigated recently as a strategy for Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. While oxidative stress is important in the pathogenesis of PD, neuroprotection using antioxidants such as α-tocopherol have not been successful. δ-tocotrienol (δT3), a member of the vitamin E family, has received attention because of activities other than its antioxidative effects. In the present study, we examined the estrogen receptor-β (ERβ)-mediated neuroprotective effects of δT3 in a mouse model of PD. ERβ is expressed in neuronal cells, including dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Daily forced oral administration of δT3 inhibited the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In addition, the ER inhibitor tamoxifen canceled the neuroprotective effects of δT3. Moreover, δT3 administration improved the performance of the PD mice in the wheel running activity, while tamoxifen inhibited this improved performance. These results suggest that the oral administration of δT3 may be useful in the treatment of PD patients, and ERβ may be a candidate target for the neuroprotection activity of δT3. PMID:26523792

  19. Corticosterone suppresses vasotocin-enhanced clasping behavior in male rough-skinned newts by novel mechanisms interfering with V1a receptor availability and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Audrey; Abraham, Emily; McEvoy, Erin; Sonnenfeld, Sarah; Lewis, Christine; Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D; Coddington, Emma

    2015-03-01

    In rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, exposure to an acute stressor results in the rapid release of corticosterone (CORT), which suppresses the ability of vasotocin (VT) to enhance clasping behavior. CORT also suppresses VT-induced spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness of clasp-controlling neurons in the rostromedial reticular formation (Rf). The cellular mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unclear. We hypothesized that CORT blocks VT-enhanced clasping by interfering with V1a receptor availability and/or VT-induced endocytosis. We administered a physiologically active fluorescent VT conjugated to Oregon Green (VT-OG) to the fourth ventricle 9 min after an intraperitoneal injection of CORT (0, 10, 40 μg/0.1mL amphibian Ringers). The brains were collected 30 min post-VT-OG, fixed, and imaged with confocal microscopy. CORT diminished the number of endocytosed vesicles, percent area containing VT-OG, sum intensity of VT-OG, and the amount of VT-V1a within each vesicle; indicating that CORT was interfering with V1a receptor availability and VT-V1a receptor-mediated endocytosis. CORT actions were brain location-specific and season-dependent in a manner that is consistent with the natural and context-dependent expression of clasping behavior. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Rf to CORT was much higher in animals during the breeding season, arguing for ethologically appropriate seasonal variation in CORT's ability to prevent VT-induced endocytosis. Our data are consistent with the time course and interaction effects of CORT and VT on clasping behavior and neurophysiology. CORT interference with VT-induced endocytosis may be a common mechanism employed by hormones across taxa for mediating rapid context- and season-specific behavioral responses.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest is achieved through distinct cell-specific transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, I; Trowbridge, J M; Garabedian, M J

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit proliferation of many cell types, but the events leading from the activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to growth arrest are not understood. Ectopic expression and activation of GR in human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and SAOS2, which lack endogenous receptors, result in a G1 cell cycle arrest. GR activation in U2OS cells represses expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) CDK4 and CDK6 as well as their regulatory partner, cyclin D3, leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb). We also demonstrate a ligand-dependent reduction in the expression of E2F-1 and c-Myc, transcription factors involved in the G1-to-S-phase transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase, CDK2, cyclin E, and the CDK inhibitors (CDIs) p27 and p21 are unaffected by receptor activation in U2OS cells. The receptor's N-terminal transcriptional activation domain is not required for growth arrest in U2OS cells. In Rb-deficient SAOS2 cells, however, the expression of p27 and p21 is induced upon receptor activation. Remarkably, in SAOS2 cells that express a GR deletion derivative lacking the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, induction of CDI expression is abolished and the cells fail to undergo ligand-dependent cell cycle arrest. Similarly, murine S49 lymphoma cells, which, like SAOS2 cells, lack Rb, require the N-terminal activation domain for growth arrest and induce CDI expression upon GR activation. These cell-type-specific differences in receptor domains and cellular targets linking GR activation to cell cycle machinery suggest two distinct regulatory mechanisms of GR-mediated cell cycle arrest: one involving transcriptional repression of G1 cyclins and CDKs and the other involving enhanced transcription of CDIs by the activated receptor. PMID:9154817

  1. D2 dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms in the medial preoptic-anterior hypothalamus regulate effective defense behavior in the cat.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, S; Edinger, H; Siegel, A

    1991-05-17

    The role of the dopaminergic innervation of the medial preoptic-anterior hypothalamus (mPO-AH) in regulating the expression of affective defense behavior in the cat has been investigated in the present study. Feline affective defense behavior, characterized mainly by autonomic arousal, ear retraction, growling, hissing and paw striking, was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Following the establishment of a stable threshold current for eliciting the hissing response of the behavior, the effect of injecting various DAergic agonists and antagonists into the mPO-AH on the hissing threshold was determined. The microinjection of the non-selective DA agonist apomorphine (0.03, 0.16, 0.33, 0.66, 1.56 and 3.3 nmol) into the mPO-AH facilitated hissing in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the D2-selective agonist LY 171555 (0.2 and 1.0 nmol) but not by the D1-selective agonist SKF 38393 (1.7 and 17 nmol), and was blocked by the non-selective and the D2-selective antagonists haloperidol (1.3 nmol) and sulpiride (14.5 nmol), respectively. The injection of the D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (0.3 nmol), however, did not inhibit apomorphine-induced facilitation of hissing. In addition, the injection of haloperidol (1.3 nmol) and sulpiride (14.5 nmol), but not SCH 23390 (0.3 nmol), alone inhibited the behavior. It was therefore concluded that dopaminergic stimulation of the mPO-AH may facilitate the expression of affective defense behavior in the cat via a D2 receptor-mediated mechanism. The physiological significance of this effect and the interaction between dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic innervation of the mPO-AH in modulating the expression of affective defense behavior in response to threatening stimuli are discussed. PMID:1680019

  2. Mechanism of the estrogen receptor interaction with 4-hydroxytamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Sasson, S; Notides, A C

    1988-04-01

    The binding mechanism of the estrogen receptor with 4-[3H]hydroxytamoxifen was investigated. The equilibrium binding analysis with 4-[3H]hydroxytamoxifen indicated a positive cooperative interaction: the Scatchard plot was convex and the Hill coefficient was 1.4-1.5. This binding appears similar to the positively cooperative interaction of the estrogen receptor with [3H]estradiol. However, a competitive binding assay with a saturating concentration of [3H] estradiol and variable concentrations of 4-hydroxytamoxifen produced nonparallel displacement curves indicating that the binding mechanism of the receptor with these two ligands is different. The competitive binding assay with [3H]estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen at constant molar ratios demonstrated that the receptor's affinity for estradiol was reduced and the receptor preferentially bound 4-hydroxytamoxifen. These data suggest that 4-hydroxytamoxifen interacts with the receptor differently than estradiol; it antagonizes the binding of estradiol when these two ligands are simultaneously present.

  3. Mechanism of the estrogen receptor interaction with 4-hydroxytamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, S.; Notides, A.C.

    1988-04-01

    The binding mechanism of the estrogen receptor with 4-(/sup 3/H)hydroxytamoxifen was investigated. The equilibrium binding analysis with 4-(/sup 3/H)hydroxytamoxifen indicated a positive cooperative interaction: the Scatchard plot was convex and the Hill coefficient was 1.4-1.5. This binding appears similar to the positively cooperative interaction of the estrogen receptor with (/sup 3/H)estradiol. However, a competitive binding assay with a saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H) estradiol and variable concentrations of 4-hydroxytamoxifen produced nonparallel displacement curves indicating that the binding mechanism of the receptor with these two ligands is different. The competitive binding assay with (/sup 3/H)estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen at constant molar ratios demonstrated that the receptor's affinity for estradiol was reduced and the receptor preferentially bound 4-hydroxytamoxifen. These data suggest that 4-hydroxytamoxifen interacts with the receptor differently than estradiol; it antagonizes the binding of estradiol when these two ligands are simultaneously present.

  4. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  5. ESTROGEN RELATED MECHANISMS OF HYPERTENSION IN MENOPAUSAL WOMEN.

    PubMed

    Buleishvili, M; Lobjanidze, N; Ormotsadze, G; Enukidze, M; Machavariani, M; Sanikidze, T

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our investigation was to establish the role of estrogens in the pathogenesis of hypertension during menopause. Menopausal women (40-55 years) with hypertension who had been admitted to "The N. Kipshidze Central University Clinic" (Tbilisi, Georgia) during 2011-2015 and without hypertension were investigated. Essential hypertension was defined as elevated blood pressure while in a sitting position, exceeding 160±10/90±10 mm Hg 60/95 mm Hg, for three consecutive measurements over a period of at least 4 weeks. Determination and verification of menopause was provided based on the criteria of at least 12 months of amenorrhea. All the patients had given their informed consent before any procedure. Study protocol was approved by Local Ethical Committee of Davit Agmashenebeli University. In each group blood content of estradiol, free nitric oxide (NO) and nitrosilated hemoglobin (HbNO), endothelin-1 and angiotensin II (ANG) were investigated. Decrease free nitric oxide (NO) (by 10%) and increase in endothelin-1 (by 14%) and Angiotensin II (ANG) (by 12%) content in the blood of menopausal women with hypertension were identified. In some patients with hypertension it was detected low intensity of NOHb EPR signal in blood (~1,5±0,07 mm/mg). In blood of hypertensive postmenopausal women there was revealed statistically significant correlation between estrogen level and NO content (r=-0,7935, p=0,0061), estrogen level and ANG II content (r=-0,7080, p=0,0328), statistically nonsignificant dependence between NOHb EPR signal intensity and estradiol content (r=-0,29, p=0,12). In normotensive postmenopausal women correlation between blood estrogen and NO level, blood estrogen and ANGII level was not statistically significant (r=-0,4342, p=0,2429; r=-0,2676, p=0,4547). These data indicate that in postmenopausal women in the regulation of arterial pressure in addition to the estrogens involve other factors, like as was shown in our previous investigation, oxidative

  6. Lasting inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst--a novel mechanism for secretory blockade in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui Yuan; Song, Zhi Min; Cui, Zong Jie

    2013-08-01

    Although overwhelming evidence indicates that neutrophil infiltration is an early event in acute pancreatitis, the effect of neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini has not been investigated. In the present work, effect of fMLP-induced neutrophil respiratory burst on pancreatic acini was examined. It was found that neutrophil respiratory burst blocked calcium oscillations induced by cholecystokinin or by acetylcholine. Such lasting inhibition was dependent on the density of bursting neutrophils and could be overcome by increased agonist concentration. Inhibition of cholecystokinin stimulation was also observed in AR4-2J cells. In sharp contrast, neutrophil respiratory burst had no effect on calcium oscillations induced by phenylephrine (PE), vasopressin, or by ATP in rat hepatocytes. These data together suggest that inhibition of receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in pancreatic acini by neutrophil respiratory burst would lead to secretory blockade, which is a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. The present work has important implications for clinical treatment and management of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Estrogen or estrogen receptor agonist inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced microglial activation and death.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua A; Das, Arabinda; Butler, Jonathan T; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2011-09-01

    Inflammation is an important pathogenic mechanism in many neurodegenerative disorders. Activated microglia play a pivotal role in releasing pro-inflammatory factors including interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for inducing inflammation. While microglia mediated inflammation is essential in maintaining CNS homeostasis, chronic inflammation results in activation of proteases for cell death. Here, we examined the effect of PPT (estrogen receptor α agonist), DPN (estrogen receptor β agonist), and estrogen on rat primary microglia following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of microglia to LPS (200 ng/ml) for 24 h induced cell death. After LPS toxicity for 15 min, microglia were treated with 25 nM PPT, 25 nM DPN, or 100 nM estrogen that prevented cell death by attenuating the release of IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2. Treatment of cells with 100 nM fulvestrant (estrogen receptor antagonist) prior to addition of PPT, DPN, or estrogen significantly decreased their ability to prevent cell death, indicating involvement of estrogen receptor (ER) in providing PPT, DPN, or estrogen mediated cytoprotection. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed alterations in mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2, calpain, and calpastatin during apoptosis. We also examined mRNA expression of ERβ and ERα following exposure of microglia to LPS and subsequent treatment with PPT, DPN, or estrogen. We found that estrogen or estrogen receptor agonists upregulated expression of ERs. Overall, results indicate that estrogen receptor agonist or estrogen uses a receptor mediated pathway to protect microglia from LPS toxicity.

  8. Inhibition of isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in rat inguinal adipocytes in vitro by physiological melatonin via a receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, F; Krause, J A; Blask, D E

    2001-09-01

    Because the pineal hormone melatonin has been implicated in affecting adiposity in rats and fatty acid transport in certain rat tumor models, we tested whether melatonin regulates lipolysis in a normal cell system in vitro. Adipocytes were isolated from the inguinal fat pads (i.e. sc fat) of Sprague Dawley male rats during mid-light phase. Lipolysis was stimulated with isoproterenol (3 microM), and cells were incubated for 4 h in the presence or absence of a physiological circulating concentration of melatonin (1 nM). Lipolysis was measured by determining the amount of glycerol present in the incubation buffer, expressed as nmol glycerol/mg cellular fatty acid. We observed a 20- to 30-fold stimulation of basal lipolysis by isoproterenol, and this stimulation was inhibited 50--70% by melatonin. Melatonin exhibited this effect over a wide range of concentrations tested (100 pM-1 microM) with an IC(50) of approximately 500 pM. The effect by melatonin (1 nM) was completely blocked by pertussis toxin (50 ng/ml), by 8-bromo-cAMP (10 nM), and by the melatonin receptor antagonist S-20928 (1 nM). These results suggest that the antilipolytic effect occurs through one of the G(i) protein-coupled melatonin receptors because we have shown that both the mt(1) (Mel 1a) and MT(2) (Mel 1b) melatonin receptors are expressed in inguinal adipocytes. Melatonin inhibition of lipolysis was not observed in adipocytes isolated from rat epididymal fat pads (i.e. visceral fat), even though these cells also express both the mt(1) and MT(2) receptors. The results indicate that physiological circulating concentrations of melatonin inhibit isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes via a G protein-coupled melatonin receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway in a site-specific manner.

  9. Estrogen receptor independent neurotoxic mechanism of bisphenol A, an environmental estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoot Mo; Seong, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Yong Kyung; Kim, Tae Myoung; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Joong; Yun, Young Won; Kim, Tae Seong; Han, Soon Young

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to cause developmental toxicity and carcinogenic effects. BPA may have physiological activity through estrogen receptor (ER) -α and -β, which are expressed in the central nervous system. We previously found that exposure of BPA to immature mice resulted in behavioral alternation, suggesting that overexposure of BPA could be neurotoxic. In this study, we further investigated the molecular neurotoxic mechanisms of BPA. BPA increased vulnerability (decrease of cell viability and differentiation, and increase of apoptotic cell death) of undifferentiated PC12 cells and cortical neuronal cells isolated from gestation 18 day rat embryos in a concentration-dependent manner (more than 50 µM). The ER antagonists, ICI 182,780, and tamoxifen, did not block these effects. The cell vulnerability against BPA was not significantly different in the PC12 cells overexpressing ER-α and ER-β compared with PC12 cells expressing vector alone. In addition, there was no difference observed between BPA and 17-β estradiol, a well-known agonist of ER receptor in the induction of neurotoxic responses. Further study of the mechanism showed that BPA significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but inhibited anti-apoptotic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. In addition, ERK-specific inhibitor, PD 98,059, reversed BPA-induced cell death and restored NF-κB activity. This study demonstrated that exposure to BPA can cause neuronal cell death which may eventually be related with behavioral alternation in vivo. However, this neurotoxic effect may not be directly mediated through an ER receptor, as an ERK/NF-κB pathway may be more closely involved in BPA-induced neuronal toxicity. PMID:17322771

  10. Potential mechanisms underlying estrogen-induced expression of the molluscan estrogen receptor (ER) gene.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh; MacFarlane, Geoff R; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; O'Connor, Wayne A; Yu, Richard Man Kit

    2016-10-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens and estrogen mimicking chemicals modulate gene expression mainly through a genomic pathway mediated by the estrogen receptors (ERs). Although the existence of an ER orthologue in the mollusc genome has been known for some time, its role in estrogen signalling has yet to be deciphered. This is largely due to its constitutive (ligand-independent) activation and a limited mechanistic understanding of its regulation. To fill this knowledge gap, we cloned and characterised an ER cDNA (sgER) and the 5'-flanking region of the gene from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata. The sgER cDNA is predicted to encode a 477-amino acid protein that contains a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD) typically conserved among both vertebrate and invertebrate ERs. A comparison of the sgER LBD sequence with those of other ligand-dependent ERs revealed that the sgER LBD is variable at several conserved residues known to be critical for ligand binding and receptor activation. Ligand binding assays using fluorescent-labelled E2 and purified sgER protein confirmed that sgER is devoid of estrogen binding. In silico analysis of the sgER 5'-flanking sequence indicated the presence of three putative estrogen responsive element (ERE) half-sites and several putative sites for ER-interacting transcription factors, suggesting that the sgER promoter may be autoregulated by its own gene product. sgER mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in adult oyster tissues, with the highest expression found in the ovary. Ovarian expression of sgER mRNA was significantly upregulated following in vitro and in vivo exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2). Notably, the activation of sgER expression by E2 in vitro was abolished by the specific ER antagonist ICI 182, 780. To determine whether sgER expression is epigenetically regulated, the in vivo DNA methylation status of the putative proximal promoter in ovarian tissues was assessed using bisulfite genomic sequencing. The

  11. Rapid estrogen actions on ion channels: A survey in search for mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kow, Lee-Ming; Pfaff, Donald W

    2016-07-01

    A survey of nearly two hundred reports shows that rapid estrogenic actions can be detected across a range of kinds of estrogens, a range of doses, on a wide range of tissue, cell and ion channel types. Striking is the fact that preparations of estrogenic agents that do not permeate the cell membrane almost always mimic the actions of the estrogenic agents that do permeate the membrane. All kinds of estrogens, ranging from natural ones, through receptor modulators, endocrine disruptors, phytoestrogens, agonists, and antagonists to novel G-1 and STX, have been reported to be effective. For actions on specific types of ion channels, the possibility of opposing actions, in different cases, is the rule, not the exception. With this variety there is no single, specific action mechanism for estrogens per se, although in some cases estrogens can act directly or via some signaling pathways to affect ion channels. We infer that estrogens can bind a large number of substrates/receptors at the membrane surface. As against the variety of subsequent routes of action, this initial step of the estrogen's binding action is the key. PMID:26939826

  12. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Landeros, Rosalina Villalon; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions. PMID:24685383

  13. Invited review: Estrogens effects on the brain: multiple sites and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B S

    2001-12-01

    Besides their well-established actions on reproductive functions, estrogens exert a variety of actions on many regions of the nervous system that influence higher cognitive function, pain mechanisms, fine motor skills, mood, and susceptibility to seizures; they also appear to have neuroprotective actions in relation to stroke damage and Alzheimer's disease. Estrogen actions are now recognized to occur via two different intracellular estrogen receptors, ER-alpha and ER-beta, that reside in the cell nuclei of some nerve cells, as well as by some less well-characterized mechanisms. In the hippocampus, such nerve cells are sparse in number and yet appear to exert a powerful influence on synapse formation by neurons that do not have high levels of nuclear estrogen receptors. However, we also find nonnuclear estrogen receptors outside of the cell nuclei in dendrites, presynaptic terminals, and glial cells, where estrogen receptors may couple to second messenger systems to regulate a variety of cellular events and signal to the nuclear via transcriptional regulators such as CREB. Sex differences exist in many of the actions of estrogens in the brain, and the process of sexual differentiation appears to affect many brain regions outside of the traditional brain areas involved in reproductive functions. Finally, the aging brain is responsive to actions of estrogens, which have neuroprotective effects both in vivo and in vitro. However, in an animal model, the actions of estrogens on the hippocampus appear to be somewhat attenuated with age. In the future, estrogen actions over puberty and in pregnancy and lactation should be further explored and should be studied in both the hypothalamus and the extrahypothalamic regions.

  14. Targeting receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways with nanoparticles: rationale and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of drugs and their carrier systems by using receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways was in its nascent stages 25 years ago. In the intervening years, an explosion of knowledge focused on design and synthesis of nanoparticulate delivery systems as well as elucidation of the cellular complexity of what was previously-termed receptor-mediated endocytosis has now created a situation when it has become possible to design and test the feasibility of delivery of highly specific nanoparticle drug carriers to specific cells and tissue. This review outlines the mechanisms governing the major modes of receptor-mediated endocytosis used in drug delivery and highlights recent approaches using these as targets for in vivo drug delivery of nanoparticles. The review also discusses some of the inherent complexity associated with the simple shift from a ligand-drug conjugate versus a ligand-nanoparticle conjugate, in terms of ligand valency and its relationship to the mode of receptor-mediated internalization. PMID:23026636

  15. Estrogen and neuroprotection: from clinical observations to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dubal, Dena B.; Wise, Phyllis M.

    2002-01-01

    We now appreciate that estrogen is a pleiotropic gonadal steroid that exerts profound effects on the plasticity and cell survival of the adult brain. Over the past century, the life span of women has increased, but the age of the menopause remains constant. This means that women may now live over one third of their lives in a hypoestrogenic, postmenopausal state. The impact of prolonged hypoestrogenicity on the brain is now a critical health concern as we realize that these women may suffer an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration due to a variety of diseases. Accumulating evidence from both clinical and basic science studies indicates that estrogen exerts critical protective actions against neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Here, we review the discoveries that comprise our current understanding of estrogen action against neurodegeneration. These findings carry far-reaching possibilities for improving the quality of life in our aging population. PMID:22034440

  16. Importance of CRF receptor-mediated mechanisms of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the processing of anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lee; Schulkin, Jay; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2014-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated mechanisms in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) have a pivotal role in stress-induced anxiety and hyperalgesia. Although CRF is known to activate two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2, attempts to delineate the specific role of each subtype in modulating anxiety and nociception have been inconsistent. Here we test the hypothesis that CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the anteriolateral BNST (BNSTAL) facilitates divergent mechanisms modulating comorbid anxiety and hyperalgesia. Microinfusions of the specific antagonists CP376395 and Astressin2B into the BNSTAL were used to investigate CRF1 and CRF2 receptor functions, respectively. We found that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the BNSTAL had opposing effects on exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze, somatic mechanical threshold, and the autonomic and endocrine response to stress. However, CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonism in the BNSTAL revealed complementary roles in facilitating the acoustic startle and visceromotor reflexes. Our results suggest that the net effect of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the BNSTAL is pathway-dependent and provides important insight into the CRF receptor-associated circuitry that likely underpins stress-induced pathologies.

  17. Importance of CRF Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis in the Processing of Anxiety and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Schulkin, Jay; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated mechanisms in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) have a pivotal role in stress-induced anxiety and hyperalgesia. Although CRF is known to activate two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2, attempts to delineate the specific role of each subtype in modulating anxiety and nociception have been inconsistent. Here we test the hypothesis that CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the anteriolateral BNST (BNSTAL) facilitates divergent mechanisms modulating comorbid anxiety and hyperalgesia. Microinfusions of the specific antagonists CP376395 and Astressin2B into the BNSTAL were used to investigate CRF1 and CRF2 receptor functions, respectively. We found that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the BNSTAL had opposing effects on exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze, somatic mechanical threshold, and the autonomic and endocrine response to stress. However, CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonism in the BNSTAL revealed complementary roles in facilitating the acoustic startle and visceromotor reflexes. Our results suggest that the net effect of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the BNSTAL is pathway-dependent and provides important insight into the CRF receptor-associated circuitry that likely underpins stress-induced pathologies. PMID:24853772

  18. Molecular mechanisms of calcium-sensing receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the modulation of epithelial ion transport and bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Dong, Xiao; Wong, Chase; Vallon, Volker; Tang, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yang, Shiming; Dong, Hui

    2014-12-12

    Epithelial ion transport is mainly under the control of intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+) signaling. Although the molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced epithelial ion secretion are well defined, those induced by Ca(2+) signaling remain poorly understood. Because calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) activation results in an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) but a decrease in cAMP levels, it is a suitable receptor for elucidating the mechanisms of [Ca(2+)]cyt-mediated epithelial ion transport and duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS). CaSR proteins have been detected in mouse duodenal mucosae and human intestinal epithelial cells. Spermine and Gd(3+), two CaSR activators, markedly stimulated DBS without altering duodenal short circuit currents in wild-type mice but did not affect DBS and duodenal short circuit currents in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice. Clotrimazole, a selective blocker of intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels but not chromanol 293B, a selective blocker of cAMP-activated K(+) channels (KCNQ1), significantly inhibited CaSR activator-induced DBS, which was similar in wild-type and KCNQ1 knockout mice. HCO3 (-) fluxes across epithelial cells were activated by a CFTR activator, but blocked by a CFTR inhibitor. CaSR activators induced HCO3 (-) fluxes, which were inhibited by a receptor-operated channel (ROC) blocker. Moreover, CaSR activators dose-dependently raised cellular [Ca(2+)]cyt, which was abolished in Ca(2+)-free solutions and inhibited markedly by selective CaSR antagonist calhex 231, and ROC blocker in both animal and human intestinal epithelial cells. Taken together, CaSR activation triggers Ca(2+)-dependent DBS, likely through the ROC, intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and CFTR channels. This study not only reveals that [Ca(2+)]cyt signaling is critical to modulate DBS but also provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of CaSR-mediated Ca(2+)-induced

  19. Signal Transduction Mechanism for Serotonin 5-HT2B Receptor-Mediated DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Adult Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kota; Tanaka, Chizuru; Mitsuhashi, Manami; Moteki, Hajime; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Natsume, Hideshi; Ogihara, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the induction of DNA synthesis and proliferation was investigated in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes to elucidate the intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. Hepatocyte parenchymal cells maintained in a serum-free, defined medium, synthesized DNA and proliferated in the presence of 5-HT or a selective 5-HT2B receptor agonist, BW723C86, but not in the presence of 5-HT2A, or 5-HT2C receptor agonists (TCB-2 and CP809101, respectively), in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A selective 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, LY272015 (10(-7) M), and a specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U-73122 (10(-6) M), as well as specific inhibitors of growth-related signal transducers-including AG1478, LY294002, PD98059, and rapamycin-completely inhibited 5-HT (10(-6) M)- or BW723C86 (10(-6) M)-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Both 5-HT and BW723C86 were shown to significantly stimulate the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor (EGF)/transforming growth factor (TGF)-α receptor tyrosine kinase (p175 kDa) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 on Western blot analysis. These results suggest that the proliferative mechanism of activating 5-HT is mediated mainly through 5-HT2B receptor-stimulated Gq/PLC and EGF/TGF-α-receptor/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/ERK2/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in primary cultured hepatocytes.

  20. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  1. Methamphetamine blunts Ca2+ currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A.; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC) dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) and increased IH amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of i) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav2.2), T-type Cav3.1 Cacna1g, Cav3.2 Cacna1h, Cav3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1), ii) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2 and iii) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie prefrontal cortex functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals. PMID:25871318

  2. Methamphetamine blunts Ca(2+) currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica

    2016-05-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1 mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa ) and increased hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH ) amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e. bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of (1) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav 2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav 2.2), T-type Cav 3.1 Cacna1g, Cav 3.2 Cacna1h, Cav 3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1); (2) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2; and (3) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether, these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie PFC functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals.

  3. Estrogen and female reproductive tract innervation: cellular and molecular mechanisms of autonomic neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, M. Mónica; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The female reproductive tract undergoes remarkable functional and structural changes associated with cycling, conception and pregnancy, and it is likely advantageous to both individual and species to alter relationships between reproductive tissues and innervation. For several decades, it has been appreciated that the mammalian uterus undergoes massive sympathetic axon depletion in late pregnancy, possibly representing an adaptation to promote smooth muscle quiescence and sustained blood flow. Innervation to other structures such as cervix and vagina also undergo pregnancy-related changes in innervation that may facilitate parturition. These tissues provide highly tractable models for examining cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nervous system plasticity. Studies show that estrogen elicits rapid degeneration of sympathetic terminal axons in myometrium, which regenerate under low-estrogen conditions. Degeneration is mediated by the target tissue: under estrogen's influence, the myometrium produces proteins repulsive to sympathetic axons including BDNF, neurotrimin, semaphorins, and pro-NGF, and extracellular matrix components are remodeled. Interestingly, nerve depletion does not involve diminished levels of classical sympathetic neurotrophins that promote axon growth. Estrogen also affects sympathetic neuron neurotrophin receptor expression in ways that appear to favor pro-degenerative effects of the target tissue. In contrast to the uterus, estrogen depletes vaginal autonomic and nociceptive axons, with the latter driven in part by estrogen-induced suppression BMP4 synthesis. These findings illustrate that hormonally mediated physiological plasticity is a highly complex phenomenon involving multiple, predominantly repulsive target-derived factors acting in concert to achieve rapid and selective reductions in innervation. PMID:25530517

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  5. Receptor-mediated mitophagy in yeast and mammalian systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Sakakibara, Kaori; Chen, Quan; Okamoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy, or mitochondria autophagy, plays a critical role in selective removal of damaged or unwanted mitochondria. Several protein receptors, including Atg32 in yeast, NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 in mammalian systems, directly act in mitophagy. Atg32 interacts with Atg8 and Atg11 on the surface of mitochondria, promoting core Atg protein assembly for mitophagy. NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 also have a classic motif to directly bind LC3 (Atg8 homolog in mammals) for activation of mitophagy. Recent studies have shown that receptor-mediated mitophagy is regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates Atg32 and activates mitophagy in yeast. In contrast, in mammalian cells Src kinase and CK2 phosphorylate FUNDC1 to prevent mitophagy. Notably, in response to hypoxia and FCCP treatment, the mitochondrial phosphatase PGAM5 dephosphorylates FUNDC1 to activate mitophagy. Here, we mainly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of receptor-mediated mitophagy and the implications of this catabolic process in health and disease. PMID:24903109

  6. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  7. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Yu, Yijun; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Yu, Hongxia

    2015-12-01

    As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane×receptor (P×R)) pathways at 120hpf. Exposure to 0.5μM TBOEP significantly (p<0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were affected by TBOEP at the concentrations studied. Receptor-mediated responses (in vivo) and mammalian cell lines receptor binding assay (in vitro) combined with published information suggest that TBOEP can modulate receptor-mediated, endocrine process (in vivo/in vitro), particularly ER and MR. PMID:26562049

  8. Elucidation of Underlying Mechanisms by Which Millettia macrophylla Benth Induces Its Estrogenic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zingue, Stéphane; Magne Nde, Chantal Beatrice; Clyne, Colin; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2014-01-01

    Millettia macrophylla is used traditionally to treat menopause related symptoms. This plant was shown to exhibit estrogenic effects in vitro on human embryonic kidney cells and in vivo on ovariectomized rats. The present study aimed at elucidating underlying mechanisms by which M. macrophylla induced its estrogenic effects. To accomplish our goal, kidney Hek293T cells transiently transfected with estrogen alpha or beta receptor expression plasmids were cotreated with a pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 and the dichloromethane or methanol soluble fractions of M. macrophylla. To follow up, we cotreated ovariectomized rats with both extracts and ICI 182,780 for 3 days in the classical uterotrophic assay. Animals were then sacrificed and the uterine wet weight, total protein levels in uteri, uterine, and vaginal epithelial heights, and mammary gland were assessed. In vitro, the results suggested that the induction of the estrogenic activity by M. macrophylla is due to the binding of its secondary metabolites to ERα and ERβ. In vivo, the cotreatment of extracts and ICI 182,780 significantly abrogated the biological responses induced by the extracts alone. Taken together, these results indicate that the active principles of M. macrophylla induce their beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms by activating the ERs. PMID:27433539

  9. Elucidation of Underlying Mechanisms by Which Millettia macrophylla Benth Induces Its Estrogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zingue, Stéphane; Magne Nde, Chantal Beatrice; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2014-01-01

    Millettia macrophylla is used traditionally to treat menopause related symptoms. This plant was shown to exhibit estrogenic effects in vitro on human embryonic kidney cells and in vivo on ovariectomized rats. The present study aimed at elucidating underlying mechanisms by which M. macrophylla induced its estrogenic effects. To accomplish our goal, kidney Hek293T cells transiently transfected with estrogen alpha or beta receptor expression plasmids were cotreated with a pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 and the dichloromethane or methanol soluble fractions of M. macrophylla. To follow up, we cotreated ovariectomized rats with both extracts and ICI 182,780 for 3 days in the classical uterotrophic assay. Animals were then sacrificed and the uterine wet weight, total protein levels in uteri, uterine, and vaginal epithelial heights, and mammary gland were assessed. In vitro, the results suggested that the induction of the estrogenic activity by M. macrophylla is due to the binding of its secondary metabolites to ERα and ERβ. In vivo, the cotreatment of extracts and ICI 182,780 significantly abrogated the biological responses induced by the extracts alone. Taken together, these results indicate that the active principles of M. macrophylla induce their beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms by activating the ERs. PMID:27433539

  10. Estrogen binding, receptor mRNA, and biologic response in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, B.S.; Terpening, C.M.; Benz, D.J.; Graeme, K.A.; Gallegos, A.; Korc, M.; Greene, G.L.; O'Malley, B.W.; Haussler, M.R.

    1988-07-01

    High specific activity estradiol labeled with iodine-125 was used to detect approximately 200 saturable, high-affinity (dissociation constant approximately equal to 1.0 nM) nuclear binding sites in rat (ROS 17/2.8) and human (HOS TE85) clonal osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. Of the steroids tested, only testosterone exhibited significant cross-reactivity with estrogen binding. RNA blot analysis with a complementary DNA probe to the human estrogen receptor revealed putative receptor transcripts of 6 to 6.2 kilobases in both rat and human osteosarcoma cells. Type I procollagen and transforming growth factor-beta messenger RNA levels were enhanced in cultured human osteoblast-like cells treated with 1 nM estradiol. Thus, estrogen can act directly on osteoblasts by a receptor-mediated mechanism and thereby modulate the extracellular matrix and other proteins involved in the maintenance of skeletal mineralization and remodeling.

  11. Estrogens suppress RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via a stromal cell independent mechanism involving c-Jun repression

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Nirupama K.; Bendixen, Amy C.; Dienger, Krista M.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2000-01-01

    Loss of ovarian function following menopause results in a substantial increase in bone turnover and a critical imbalance between bone formation and resorption. This imbalance leads to a progressive loss of trabecular bone mass and eventually osteoporosis, in part the result of increased osteoclastogenesis. Enhanced formation of functional osteoclasts appears to be the result of increased elaboration by support cells of osteoclastogenic cytokines such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6, all of which are negatively regulated by estrogens. We show here that estrogen can suppress receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism that does not require mediation by stromal cells. This suppression is dose-dependent, isomer-specific, and reversed by ICI 182780. Furthermore, the bone-sparing analogues tamoxifen and raloxifene mimic estrogen's effects. Estrogen blocks RANKL/M-CSF-induced activator protein-1-dependent transcription, likely through direct regulation of c-Jun activity. This effect is the result of a classical nuclear activity by estrogen receptor to regulate both c-Jun expression and its phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our results suggest that estrogen modulates osteoclast formation both by down-regulating the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines from supportive cells and by directly suppressing RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10869427

  12. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  13. Acquisition of Estrogen Independence Induces TOB1-Related Mechanisms Supporting Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nasto, Rochelle E.; Varghese, Rency; Jablonski, Sandra A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Surana, Rishi; Calvert, Valerie S.; Bebu, Ionut; Murray, Joseph; Jin, Lu; Johnson, Michael; Riggins, Rebecca; Ressom, Habtom; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Clarke, Robert; Golemis, Erica A.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of siRNAs targeting an estrogen receptor- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells, and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mTOR inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  14. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  15. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-02-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody ..cap alpha..IR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I but not /sup 125/I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. ..cap alpha..IR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of ..cap alpha..IR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of < 1 ..mu..g/ml, the effect of insulin to stimulate (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 ..mu..g/ml) of insulin on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation are inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. ..cap alpha..IR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself.

  16. Hemoglobin uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  17. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  18. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  19. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  20. Effects of neuron-specific estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ deletion on the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Rachel Y; Porteous, Robert; Chambon, Pierre; Abrahám, István; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-04-01

    The negative feedback mechanism through which 17β-estradiol (E2) acts to suppress the activity of the GnRH neurons remains unclear. Using inducible and cell-specific genetic mouse models, we examined the estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms expressed by neurons that mediate acute estrogen negative feedback. Adult female mutant mice in which ERα was deleted from all neurons in the neonatal period failed to exhibit estrous cycles or negative feedback. Adult mutant female mice with neonatal neuronal ERβ deletion exhibited normal estrous cycles, but a failure of E2 to suppress LH secretion was seen in ovariectomized mice. Mutant mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of ERβ exhibited normal cycles and negative feedback, suggesting no critical role for ERβ in GnRH neurons in acute negative feedback. To examine the adult roles of neurons expressing ERα, an inducible tamoxifen-based Cre-LoxP approach was used to ablate ERα from neurons that express calmodulin kinase IIα in adults. This resulted in mice with no estrous cycles, a normal increase in LH after ovariectomy, but an inability of E2 to suppress LH secretion. Finally, acute administration of ERα- and ERβ-selective agonists to adult ovariectomized wild-type mice revealed that activation of ERα suppressed LH secretion, whereas ERβ agonists had no effect. This study highlights the differences in adult reproductive phenotypes that result from neonatal vs adult ablation of ERα in the brain. Together, these experiments expand previous global knockout studies by demonstrating that neurons expressing ERα are essential and probably sufficient for the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice. PMID:24476134

  1. DEHP exposure impairs mouse oocyte cyst breakdown and primordial follicle assembly through estrogen receptor-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xinyi; Liao, Xinggui; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Meirong; Shen, Cha; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Yingxiong; Liu, Xueqing; He, Junlin

    2015-11-15

    Estrogen plays an essential role in the development of mammalian oocytes, and recent studies suggest that it also regulates primordial follicle assembly in the neonatal ovaries. During the last decade, potential exposure of humans and animals to estrogen-like endocrine disrupting chemicals has become a growing concern. In the present study, we focused on the effect of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a widespread plasticizer with estrogen-like activity, on germ-cell cyst breakdown and primordial follicle assembly in the early ovarian development of mouse. Neonatal mice injected with DEHP displayed impaired cyst breakdown. Using ovary organ cultures, we revealed that impairment was mediated through estrogen receptors (ERs), as ICI 182,780, an efficient antagonist of ER, reversed this DEHP-mediated effect. DEHP exposure reduced the expression of ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), and Notch2 signaling components. Finally, DEHP reduced proliferation of pregranulosa precursor cells during the process of primordial folliculogenesis. Together, our results indicate that DEHP influences oocyte cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation through several mechanisms. Therefore, exposure to estrogen-like chemicals during fetal or neonatal development may adversely influence early ovarian development. PMID:26073378

  2. Anaerobic transformation kinetics and mechanism of steroid estrogenic hormones in dairy lagoon water.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Yates, Scott R; Bradford, Scott A

    2012-05-15

    Wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) frequently contains high concentrations of steroid estrogenic hormones. Release of these hormones into the environment may occur when CAFO wastewater is applied to agricultural lands as a nutrient and water source for crop production. To assess the potential risk of hormone contaminants derived from animal wastewater, we investigated the transformation kinetics and mechanisms of three natural estrogenic hormones (17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone) in aqueous solutions blended with dairy lagoon water under anaerobic conditions. Initial transformations of the three hormones in the dairy lagoon water were dominated by biodegradation and the degradation rates were temperature-dependent. The total amounts of hormones (initial concentration at 5 mg L(-1)) remaining in the solution after 52 days at 35 °C accounted for approximately 85%, 78%, and 77% of the initial amounts of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone, respectively. This observation suggests that these hormones are relatively stable over time and may accumulate in anaerobic or anoxic environments and anaerobic CAFO lagoons. A racemization reaction between 17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol via estrone was observed in aqueous solutions in the presence of CAFO wastewater under anaerobic conditions. The initial hormone concentrations did not affect this degradation mechanism. A reversible reaction kinetic model was applied to fit the observed transformation dynamics. The degradation and regeneration of the parent hormone and its metabolites were successfully simulated by this model. The information in this study is useful for assessing the environmental risk of steroid hormones released from CAFO wastewater and to better understand why these hormone contaminants persist in many aquatic environments.

  3. Anaerobic transformation kinetics and mechanism of steroid estrogenic hormones in dairy lagoon water.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Yates, Scott R; Bradford, Scott A

    2012-05-15

    Wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) frequently contains high concentrations of steroid estrogenic hormones. Release of these hormones into the environment may occur when CAFO wastewater is applied to agricultural lands as a nutrient and water source for crop production. To assess the potential risk of hormone contaminants derived from animal wastewater, we investigated the transformation kinetics and mechanisms of three natural estrogenic hormones (17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone) in aqueous solutions blended with dairy lagoon water under anaerobic conditions. Initial transformations of the three hormones in the dairy lagoon water were dominated by biodegradation and the degradation rates were temperature-dependent. The total amounts of hormones (initial concentration at 5 mg L(-1)) remaining in the solution after 52 days at 35 °C accounted for approximately 85%, 78%, and 77% of the initial amounts of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone, respectively. This observation suggests that these hormones are relatively stable over time and may accumulate in anaerobic or anoxic environments and anaerobic CAFO lagoons. A racemization reaction between 17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol via estrone was observed in aqueous solutions in the presence of CAFO wastewater under anaerobic conditions. The initial hormone concentrations did not affect this degradation mechanism. A reversible reaction kinetic model was applied to fit the observed transformation dynamics. The degradation and regeneration of the parent hormone and its metabolites were successfully simulated by this model. The information in this study is useful for assessing the environmental risk of steroid hormones released from CAFO wastewater and to better understand why these hormone contaminants persist in many aquatic environments. PMID:22519517

  4. Estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover but bone balance in ovariectomized rats is modulated by prevailing mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlind, K. C.; Wronski, T. J.; Ritman, E. L.; Luo, Z. P.; An, K. N.; Bell, N. H.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency induced bone loss is associated with increased bone turnover in rats and humans. The respective roles of increased bone turnover and altered balance between bone formation and bone resorption in mediating estrogen deficiency-induced cancellous bone loss was investigated in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy resulted in increased bone turnover in the distal femur. However, cancellous bone was preferentially lost in the metaphysis, a site that normally experiences low strain energy. No bone loss was observed in the epiphysis, a site experiencing higher strain energy. The role of mechanical strain in maintaining bone balance was investigated by altering the strain history. Mechanical strain was increased and decreased in long bones of ovariectomized rats by treadmill exercise and functional unloading, respectively. Functional unloading was achieved during orbital spaceflight and following unilateral sciatic neurotomy. Increasing mechanical loading reduced bone loss in the metaphysis. In contrast, decreasing loading accentuated bone loss in the metaphysis and resulted in bone loss in the epiphysis. Finally, administration of estrogen to ovariectomized rats reduced bone loss in the unloaded and prevented loss in the loaded limb following unilateral sciatic neurotomy in part by reducing indices of bone turnover. These results suggest that estrogen regulates the rate of bone turnover, but the overall balance between bone formation and bone resorption is influenced by prevailing levels of mechanical strain.

  5. Effects of estrogen and phytoestrogens on endometrial leakage in ovariectomized rats and the related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fang; Duan, Ying; Wang, Long-De; Tian, Zhi-Feng; Qiu, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ying-Fu; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Li-Na

    2013-02-25

    Phytoestrogens, a group of plant-derived non-steroidal compounds that can behave as estrogens by binding to estrogen receptors, have drawn great attention for their potentially beneficial effects on human health. However, there are few studies investigating the potential side effects of phytoestrogens on the reproductive system. The present study was to elucidate the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and phytoestrogens genistein (Gen), resveratrol (Res), and phloretin (Phl) on eosinophilic infiltration of the ovariectomized rat uterus and endometrial vascular permeability, and to analyze the underlying mechanisms. The ovariectomized rats received daily subcutaneous injections of E2, E2+P4, P4, Gen, Res, Phl, or an equivalent volume of vehicle for 21 days, and sham-operated animals (Sham rats) were used as the controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed a marked increase in uterine eosinophilic infiltrations in ovariectomized rats treated with E2, E2+P4 or P4, which was associated with increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) proteins as determined by immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis. However, all three phytoestrogens had no markedly effect on the uterine eosinophilic infiltration and the expressions of VEGF, NF-κB, and TNF-α in the uterus of ovariectomized rats. Our data demonstrate that E2 alone or in combination with P4 increases uterine eosinophilic infiltration which is related with vascular hyperpermeability caused by VEGF, NF-κB and TNF-α, whereas phytoestrogens Gen, Res, and Phl, have no such an effect.

  6. Heterogeneous estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells suggests diverse mechanisms of fulvestrant resistance.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Larios, Jose M; Muñiz, Maria C; Aung, Kimberly; Cannell, Emily M; Darga, Elizabeth P; Kidwell, Kelley M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Tokudome, Nahomi; Brown, Martha E; Connelly, Mark C; Chianese, David A; Schott, Anne F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Fulvestrant is a dose dependent selective estrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator (SERD) used in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Nearly all patients develop resistance. We performed molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) to gain insight into fulvestrant resistance. Preclinical studies were performed with cultured breast cancer cells spiked into human blood and analyzed on the CellSearch(®) system. Clinical data are limited to a subset of patients with ER-positive MBC from a previously reported pilot trial whose disease was progressing on fulvestrant (N = 7) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (N = 10). CTCs were enumerated and phenotyped for ER and B-cell lymphoma (BCL2) using the CellSearch(®) CXC kit. In preclinical modeling, tamoxifen and AIs resulted in stabilized ER expression, whereas fulvestrant eliminated it. Five of seven patients progressing on fulvestrant had ≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB. Two of these five, treated with 500 mg/month fulvestrant, had no detectable CTC-expression of ER and BCL2 (an ER regulated gene). Three patients had heterogeneous CTC-ER and BCL2 expression indicating incomplete degradation of the ER target by fulvestrant. Two of these patients received 250 mg/month whereas the third patient received 500 mg/month fulvestrant. Her cancer harbored a mutation (Y537S) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1). All seven ER positive patients progressing on AIs had heterogeneous CTC-ER expression. These results suggest heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance to fulvestrant, including insufficient dosage, ESR1 mutation, or conversion to dependence on non-ER pathways. CTC enumeration, phenotyping, and genotyping might identify patients who would benefit from fulvestrant dose escalation versus switching to alternative therapies. PMID:27178224

  7. Estrogenic Environmental Chemicals and Drugs: Mechanisms for Effects on the Developing Male Urogenital System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; Richter, Catherine A.; Ruhlen, Rachel L.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2011-01-01

    Development and differentiation of the prostate from the fetal urogenital sinus (UGS) is dependent on androgen action via androgen receptors (AR) in the UGS mesenchyme. Estrogens are not required for prostate differentiation but do act to modulate androgen action. In mice exposure to exogenous estrogen during development results in permanent effects on adult prostate size and function, which is mediated through mesenchymal estrogen receptor (ER) alpha. For many years estrogens were thought to inhibit prostate growth because estrogenic drugs studied were administered at very high concentrations that interfered with normal prostate development. There is now extensive evidence that exposure to estrogen at very low concentrations during the early stages of prostate differentiation can stimulate fetal/neonatal prostate growth and lead to prostate disease in adulthood. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical that binds to both ER receptor subtypes as well as to AR. Interest in BPA has increased because of its prevalence in the environment and its detection in over 90% of people in the USA. In tissue culture of fetal mouse UGS mesenchymal cells, BPA and estradiol stimulated changes in the expression of several genes. We discuss here the potential involvement of estrogen in regulating signaling pathways affecting cellular functions relevant to steroid hormone signaling and metabolism and to inter- and intra-cellular communications that promote cell growth. The findings presented here provide additional evidence that BPA and the estrogenic drug ethinylestradiol disrupt prostate development in male mice at administered doses relevant to human exposures. PMID:21827855

  8. Disentangling the molecular mechanisms of action of endogenous and environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Angel; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ripoll, Cristina; Fuentes, Esther

    2005-01-01

    The gonadal hormone 17beta-estradiol is involved in numerous cellular processes. In many cases, 17beta-estradiol actions are imitated by synthetic and natural chemicals in the environment. Their actions differ depending on the target tissue, the receptors involved and the molecular pathways activated. The plethora of estrogenic actions is triggered by different receptors and other specific structures that activate different signalling pathways. This amount of information may lead to a maze of effects triggered by endogenous and environmental estrogens that we intend to clarify in this review. Understanding the variety of estrogen receptors, their different locations and the signalling pathways activated by estrogenic ligands is fundamental for understanding the diversity of actions that estrogens have in different tissues and cells.

  9. Estrogens of multiple classes and their role in mental health disease mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S; Alyea, Rebecca A; Cunningham, Kathryn A; Jeng, Yow-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Gender and sex hormones can influence a variety of mental health states, including mood, cognitive development and function, and vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases and brain damage. Functions of neuronal cells may be altered by estrogens depending upon the availability of different physiological estrogenic ligands; these ligands and their effects vary with life stages, the genetic or postgenetic regulation of receptor levels in specific tissues, or the intercession of competing nonphysiological ligands (either intentional or unintentional, beneficial to health or not). Here we review evidence for how different estrogens (physiological and environmental/dietary), acting via different estrogen receptor subtypes residing in alternative subcellular locations, influence brain functions and behavior. We also discuss the families of receptors and transporters for monoamine neurotransmitters and how they may interact with the estrogenic signaling pathways. PMID:21072308

  10. Micropollutant sorption to membrane polymers: a review of mechanisms for estrogens.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Andrea I; Akanyeti, Ime; Semião, Andrea J C

    2011-05-11

    Organic micropollutants such as estrogens occur in water in increasing quantities from predominantly anthropogenic sources. In water such micropollutants partition not only to surfaces such as membrane polymers but also to any other natural or treatment related surfaces. Such interactions are often observed as sorption in treatment processes and this phenomenon is exploited in activated carbon filtration, for example. Sorption is important for polymeric materials and this is used for the concentration of such micropollutants for analytical purposes in solid phase extraction. In membrane filtration the mechanism of micropollutant sorption is a relatively new discovery that was facilitated through new analytical techniques. This sorption plays an important role in micropollutant retention by membranes although mechanisms of interaction are to date not understood. This review is focused on sorption of estrogens on polymeric surfaces, specifically membrane polymers. Such sorption has been observed to a large extent with values of up to 1.2 ng/cm(2) measured. Sorption is dependent on the type of polymer, micropollutant characteristics, solution chemistry, membrane operating conditions as well as membrane morphology. Likely contributors to sorption are the surface roughness as well as the microporosity of such polymers. While retention-and/or reflection coefficient as well as solute to effective pore size ratio-controls the access of such micropollutants to the inner surface, pore size, porosity and thickness as well as morphology or shape of inner voids determines the available area for sorption. The interaction mechanisms are governed, most likely, by hydrophobic as well as solvation effects and interplay of molecular and supramolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding, π-cation/anion interactions, π-π stacking, ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions, the extent of which is naturally dependent on micropollutant and polymer characteristics. Systematic

  11. High-throughput screening and mechanism-based evaluation of estrogenic botanical extracts

    PubMed Central

    Overk, Cassia R.; Yao, Ping; Chen, Shaonong; Deng, Shixing; Imai, Ayano; Main, Matthew; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Pauli, Guido F.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2009-01-01

    Symptoms associated with menopause can greatly affect the quality of life for women. Botanical dietary supplements have been viewed by the public as safe and effective despite a lack of evidence indicating a urgent necessity to standardize these supplements chemically and biologically. Seventeen plants were evaluated for estrogenic biological activity using standard assays: competitive estrogen receptor (ER) binding assay for both alpha and beta subtypes, transient transfection of the estrogen response element luciferase plasmid into MCF-7 cells expressing either ER alpha or ER beta, and the Ishikawa alkaline phosphatase induction assay for both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities. Based on the combination of data pooled from these assays, the following was determined: a) a high rate of false positive activity for the competitive binding assays, b) some extracts had estrogenic activity despite a lack of ability to bind the ER, c) one extract exhibited selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) activity, and d) several extracts show additive/synergistic activity. Taken together, these data indicate a need to reprioritize the order in which the bioassays are performed for maximal efficiency of programs involving bioassay-guided fractionation. In addition, possible explanations for the conflicts in the literature over the estrogenicity of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) are suggested. PMID:18473738

  12. Anabolic effect of the traditional Chinese medicine compound tanshinone IIA on myotube hypertrophy is mediated by estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Piwen; Soukup, Sebastian Tobias; Hegevoss, Jonas; Ngueu, Sandrine; Kulling, Sabine Emma; Diel, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle loss during menopause is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes type II and the general development of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, strategies combining nutritional and training interventions to prevent muscle loss are necessary. Danshen Si Wu is a traditional Chinese medicine used for menopausal complains. One of the main compounds of Danshen Si Wu is tanshinone IIA. Physiological effects of tanshinone IIA have been described as being mediated via the estrogen receptor. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine its tissue specific ERα- and ERβ-mediated estrogenic activity, to investigate its antiestrogenic properties, and, particularly, to study estrogen receptor-mediated biological responses to tanshinone IIA on skeletal muscle cells. The purity of tanshinone IIA was analyzed by LC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. ERα/ERβ-mediated activity was dose-dependently analyzed in HEK 239 cells transfected with ERα or ERβ expression vectors and respective reporter genes. Androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antiestrogenic properties of tanshinone IIA were analyzed in a yeast reporter gene assay. The effects of tanshinone IIA on proliferation and cell cycle distribution were investigated in ERα positive T47D breast cancer cells. The ability of tanshinone IIA to stimulate estrogen receptor-mediated myotube hypertrophy was studied in C2C12 myoblastoma cells. Our data show that tanshinone IIA is quite potent at stimulating ERα and ERβ reporter genes with comparable efficacy. Tanshinone IIA displayed antiestrogenic and also antiandrogenic properties in a yeast reporter gene assay. It inhibited the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by suppressing proliferation and arresting the cells in G0/G1. Tanshinone IIA also stimulated the hypertrophy of C2C12 myotubes via an estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism. Summarizing our results, tanshinone IIA can be characterized as an estrogen receptor partial agonist with antiandrogenic properties. It

  13. Bone marrow ablation demonstrates that estrogen plays an important role in osteogenesis and bone turnover via an antioxidative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunmin; Wu, Jun; Yan, Quanquan; Wang, Rong; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-10-01

    To assess the effect of estrogen deficiency on osteogenesis and bone turnover in vivo, 8-week-old mice were sham-operated or bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX), and after 8 weeks, mechanical bone marrow ablation (BMX) was performed and newly formed bone tissue was analyzed from 6 days to 2 weeks after BMX. Our results demonstrated that OVX mice following BMX displayed 2 reversed phase changes, one phase observed at 6 and 8 days after BMX delayed osteogenesis accompanied by a delay in osteoclastogenesis, and the other phase observed at 12 and 14 days after BMX increased osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, we asked whether impaired osteogenesis caused by estrogen deficiency was associated with increased oxidative stress, and oxidative stress parameters were examined in bone tissue from sham-operated and OVX mice and OVX mice were administrated with antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or vehicle after BMX. Results demonstrated that estrogen deficiency induced oxidative stress in mouse bone tissue with reduced antioxidase levels and activity, whereas NAC administration almost rescued the abnormalities in osteogenesis and bone turnover caused by OVX. Results from this study indicate that estrogen deficiency resulted in primarily impaired osteogenesis and subsequently accelerated bone turnover by increasing oxidative stress and oxidative stress promises to be an effective target in the process of treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26036172

  14. Estrogen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  15. Mechanisms of uterine estrogen signaling during early pregnancy in mice: an update.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, I; Bian, F; Das, S K

    2016-04-01

    Adherence of an embryo to the uterus represents the most critical step of the reproductive process. Implantation is a synchronized event between the blastocyst and the uterine luminal epithelium, leading to structural and functional changes for further embryonic growth and development. The milieu comprising the complex process of implantation is mediated by estrogen through diverse but interdependent signaling pathways. Mouse models have demonstrated the relevance of the expression of estrogen-modulated paracrine factors to uterine receptivity and implantation window. More importantly, some factors seem to serve as molecular links between different estrogen pathways, promoting cell growth, acting as molecular chaperones, or amplifying estrogenic effects. Abnormal expression of these factors can lead to implantation failure and infertility. This review provides an overview of several well-characterized signaling pathways that elucidates the molecular cross talk involved in the uterus during early pregnancy. PMID:26887389

  16. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the mouse claudin-5 promoter by estrogen receptor alpha and beta.

    PubMed

    Burek, Malgorzata; Steinberg, Katrin; Förster, Carola Y

    2014-07-01

    Claudin-5 is an integral membrane protein and a critical component of endothelial tight junctions that control paracellular permeability. Claudin-5 is expressed at high levels in the brain vascular endothelium. Estrogens have multiple effects on vascular physiology and function. The biological actions of estrogens are mediated by two different estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ER alpha and ER beta. Estrogens have beneficial effects in several vascular disorders. Recently we have cloned and characterized a murine claudin-5 promoter and demonstrated 17beta-estradiol (E2)-mediated regulation of claudin-5 in brain and heart microvascular endothelium on promoter, mRNA and protein level. Sequence analysis revealed a putative estrogen response element (ERE) and a putative Sp1 transcription factor binding site in the claudin-5 promoter. The aim of the present study was to further characterize the estrogen-responsive elements of claudin-5 promoter. First, we introduced point mutations in ERE or Sp1 site in -500/+111 or in Sp1 site of -268/+111 claudin-5 promoter construct, respectively. Basal and E2-mediated transcriptional activation of mutated constructs was abrogated in the luciferase reporter gene assay. Next, we examined whether estrogen receptor subtypes bind to the claudin-5 promoter region. For this purpose we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-estrogen receptor antibodies and cellular lysates of E2-treated endothelial cells followed by quantitative PCR analysis. We show enrichment of claudin-5 promoter fragments containing the ERE- and Sp1-binding site in immunoprecipitates after E2 treatment. Finally, in a gel mobility shift assay, we demonstrated DNA-protein interaction of both ER subtypes at ERE. In summary, this study provides evidence that both a non-consensus ERE and a Sp1 site in the claudin-5 promoter are functional and necessary for the basal and E2-mediated activation of the promoter.

  17. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  19. Uterine Epithelial Estrogen Receptor-α Controls Decidualization via a Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, S.; Laws, M. J.; Bagchi, I. C.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone-regulated differentiation of uterine stromal cells, known as decidualization, is essential for embryo implantation. The role of the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) during this differentiation process is unclear. Development of conditional Esr1-null mice showed that deletion of this gene in both epithelial and stromal compartments of the uterus leads to a complete blockade of decidualization, indicating a critical role of ESR1 during this process. To further elucidate the cell type-specific function of ESR1 in the uterus, we created WEd/d mice in which Esr1 is ablated in uterine luminal and glandular epithelia but is retained in the stroma. Uteri of WEd/d mice failed to undergo decidualization, indicating that epithelial ESR1 contributes to stromal differentiation via a paracrine mechanism. We noted markedly reduced production of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in WEd/d uteri. Supplementation with LIF restored decidualization in WEd/d mice. Our study indicated that LIF acts synergistically with progesterone to induce the expression of Indian hedgehog (IHH) in uterine epithelium and its receptor patched homolog 1 in the stroma. IHH then induces the expression of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, a transcription factor that promotes stromal differentiation. To address the mechanism by which LIF induces IHH expression, we used mice lacking uterine epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a well-known mediator of LIF signaling. Our study revealed that LIF-mediated induction of IHH occurs without the activation of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 but uses an alternate pathway involving the activation of the ERK1/2 kinase. Collectively our results provide unique insights into the paracrine mechanisms by which ESR1 directs epithelial-stromal dialogue during pregnancy establishment. PMID:26241389

  20. Uterine Epithelial Estrogen Receptor-α Controls Decidualization via a Paracrine Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pawar, S; Laws, M J; Bagchi, I C; Bagchi, M K

    2015-09-01

    Steroid hormone-regulated differentiation of uterine stromal cells, known as decidualization, is essential for embryo implantation. The role of the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) during this differentiation process is unclear. Development of conditional Esr1-null mice showed that deletion of this gene in both epithelial and stromal compartments of the uterus leads to a complete blockade of decidualization, indicating a critical role of ESR1 during this process. To further elucidate the cell type-specific function of ESR1 in the uterus, we created WE(d/d) mice in which Esr1 is ablated in uterine luminal and glandular epithelia but is retained in the stroma. Uteri of WE(d/d) mice failed to undergo decidualization, indicating that epithelial ESR1 contributes to stromal differentiation via a paracrine mechanism. We noted markedly reduced production of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in WE(d/d) uteri. Supplementation with LIF restored decidualization in WE(d/d) mice. Our study indicated that LIF acts synergistically with progesterone to induce the expression of Indian hedgehog (IHH) in uterine epithelium and its receptor patched homolog 1 in the stroma. IHH then induces the expression of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, a transcription factor that promotes stromal differentiation. To address the mechanism by which LIF induces IHH expression, we used mice lacking uterine epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a well-known mediator of LIF signaling. Our study revealed that LIF-mediated induction of IHH occurs without the activation of epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 but uses an alternate pathway involving the activation of the ERK1/2 kinase. Collectively our results provide unique insights into the paracrine mechanisms by which ESR1 directs epithelial-stromal dialogue during pregnancy establishment. PMID:26241389

  1. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award lecture: Molecular mechanisms underlying estrogen functions in trophoblastic cells--focus on leptin expression.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Y P; Maymó, J L; Pérez Pérez, A; Calvo, J C; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Varone, C L

    2012-02-01

    The steroid hormone 17β-estradiol is an estrogen that influences multiple aspects of placental function and fetal development in humans. During early pregnancy it plays a role in the regulation of blastocyst implantation, trophoblast differentiation and invasiveness, remodeling of uterine arteries, immunology and trophoblast production of hormones such as leptin. Estradiol exerts some effects through the action of classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which act as ligand-activated transcription factors and regulate gene expression. In addition, estradiol can elicit rapid responses from membrane-associated receptors, like activation of protein-kinase pathways. Thus, the cellular effects of estradiol will depend on the specific receptors expressed and the integration of their signaling events. Leptin, the 16,000MW protein product of the obese gene, was originally considered an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy. The leptin gene is expressed in placenta, where leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblastic cells. Expression of leptin in placenta is highly regulated by key pregnancy molecules as hCG and estradiol. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular mechanisms underlying estrogen functions in trophoblastic cells; focusing on mechanisms involved in estradiol regulation of placental leptin expression.

  2. Ritonavir binds to and downregulates estrogen receptors: Molecular mechanism of promoting early atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Jin; Wang, Ying; Su, Ke; Liu, Min; Hu, Peng-Chao; Ma, Tian; Li, Jia-Xi; Wei, Lei; Zheng, Zhongliang; Yang, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Estrogenic actions are closely related to cardiovascular disease. Ritonavir (RTV), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor, induces atherosclerosis in an estrogen-related manner. However, how RTV induce pathological phenotypes through estrogen pathway remains unclear. In this study, we found that RTV increases thickness of coronary artery walls of Sprague Dawley rats and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) levels. In addition, RTV could induce foam cell formation, downregulate both estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ expression, upregulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression, and all of them could be partially blocked by 17β-estradiol (E2), suggesting RTV acts as an antagonist for E2. Computational modeling shows a similar interaction with ERα between RTV and 2-aryl indoles, which are highly subtype-selective ligands for ERα. We also found that RTV directly bound to ERα and selectively inhibited the nuclear localization of ERα, and residue Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain (LBD) was essential for the interaction with RTV. In addition, RTV did not change the secondary structure of ERα-LBD like E2, which explained how ERα lost the capacity of nuclear translocation under the treatment of RTV. All of the evidences suggest that ritonavir acts as an antagonist for 17β-estradiol in regulating α subtype estrogen receptor function and early events of atherosclerosis. - Graphical abstract: RTV directly binds to ERα and Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain is essential for the interaction. - Highlights: • RTV increases the thickness of rat coronary artery wall and foam cell formation. • RTV downregulates the expression of ERα and ERβ. • RTV inhibits ERα promoter activity. • RTV directly binds to ERα and the key amino acid is Leu536. • RTV inhibits the nuclear translocation of ERα and GPER.

  3. Estrogen promotes the brain metastatic colonization of triple negative breast cancer cells via an astrocyte-mediated paracrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, C A; Hanna, C T; Gril, B; Cruz, H; Serkova, N J; Huber, K M; Kabos, P; Schedin, T B; Borges, V F; Steeg, P S; Cittelly, D M

    2016-06-01

    studies provide a novel mechanism by which estrogens, acting through ER+ astrocytes in the brain microenvironment, can promote BM of TN breast cancers, and suggests existing endocrine agents may provide some clinical benefit towards reducing and managing BM.

  4. Receptor mediated uptake of paclitaxel from a synthetic high density lipoprotein nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Mooberry, Linda K; Nair, Maya; Paranjape, Sulabha; McConathy, Walter J; Lacko, Andras G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism(s) whereby paclitaxel (PTX), is taken up by cancer cells, once encapsulated into synthetic/reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL). The uptake of PTX was found to be facilitated by the scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) when drug-loaded rHDL particles were incubated with cells that express the SRB1 receptor. Studies with double-labeled, PTX containing rHDL nanoparticles showed that prostate cancer (PC-3) cells incorporated PTX primarily via a selective (SR-B1 type) uptake mechanism. In the presence of a 10-fold excess of plasma HDL, PTX uptake decreased to 30% of the control. These findings suggest that the incorporation of lipophilic drugs by cancer cells from rHDL nanoparticles is facilitated by a receptor mediated (SR-B1) mechanism.

  5. Anaerobic transformation kinetics and mechanism of steroid estrogenic hormones in dairy lagoon water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) frequently contains high concentrations of steroid estrogenic hormones. Release of these hormones into the environment may occur when CAFO wastewater is applied to agricultural lands as a nutrient and/or water source for crop production....

  6. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery. PMID:27185939

  7. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  8. QSAR prediction of estrogen activity for a large set of diverse chemicals under the guidance of OECD principles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-11-01

    A large number of environmental chemicals, known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, are suspected of disrupting endocrine functions by mimicking or antagonizing natural hormones, and such chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. They are thought to act through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen-receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is practically impossible to perform thorough toxicological tests on all potential xenoestrogens, and thus, the quantitative structure--activity relationship (QSAR) provides a promising method for the estimation of a compound's estrogenic activity. Here, QSAR models of the estrogen receptor binding affinity of a large data set of heterogeneous chemicals have been built using theoretical molecular descriptors, giving full consideration to the new OECD principles in regulation for QSAR acceptability, during model construction and assessment. An unambiguous multiple linear regression (MLR) algorithm was used to build the models, and model predictive ability was validated by both internal and external validation. The applicability domain was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability. The results obtained using several validation paths indicate that the proposed QSAR model is robust and satisfactory, and can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogen activity of organic compounds.

  9. Free energy landscape of receptor-mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianyi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion plays a critical role in cell migration, proliferation, signaling, and survival. A number of diseases, including cancer, show a strong correlation between integrin activation and metastasis. A better understanding of cell adhesion is highly desirable for not only therapeutic but also a number of tissue engineering applications. While a number of computational models and experimental studies have addressed the issue of cell adhesion to surfaces, no model or theory has adequately addressed cell adhesion at the molecular level. In this paper, the authors present a thermodynamic model that addresses receptor-mediated cell adhesion at the molecular level. By incorporating the entropic, conformational, solvation, and long- and short-range interactive components of receptors and the extracellular matrix molecules, they are able to predict adhesive free energy as a function of a number of key variables such as surface coverage, interaction distance, molecule size, and solvent conditions. Their method allows them to compute the free energy of adhesion in a multicomponent system where they can simultaneously study adhesion receptors and ligands of different sizes, chemical identities, and conformational properties. The authors' results not only provide a fundamental understanding of adhesion at the molecular level but also suggest possible strategies for designing novel biomaterials.

  10. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  11. The applications of machine learning algorithms in the modeling of estrogen-like chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

    2009-06-01

    Increasing concern is being shown by the scientific community, government regulators, and the public about endocrine-disrupting chemicals that, in the environment, are adversely affecting human and wildlife health through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. Because of the large number of such chemicals in the environment, there is a great need for an effective means of rapidly assessing endocrine-disrupting activity in the toxicology assessment process. When faced with the challenging task of screening large libraries of molecules for biological activity, the benefits of computational predictive models based on quantitative structure-activity relationships to identify possible estrogens become immediately obvious. Recently, in order to improve the accuracy of prediction, some machine learning techniques were introduced to build more effective predictive models. In this review we will focus our attention on some recent advances in the use of these methods in modeling estrogen-like chemicals. The advantages and disadvantages of the machine learning algorithms used in solving this problem, the importance of the validation and performance assessment of the built models as well as their applicability domains will be discussed.

  12. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  13. Tibolone protects astrocytic cells from glucose deprivation through a mechanism involving estrogen receptor beta and the upregulation of neuroglobin expression.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Hidalgo-Lanussa, Oscar; Baez, Eliana; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2016-09-15

    Tibolone, a synthetic steroid used for the prevention of osteoporosis and the treatment of climacteric symptoms in post-menopausal women, may exert tissue selective estrogenic actions acting on estrogen receptors (ERs). We previously showed that tibolone protects human T98G astroglial cells against glucose deprivation (GD). In this study we have explored whether the protective effect of tibolone on these cells is mediated by ERs. Experimental studies showed that both ERα and ERβ were involved in the protection by tibolone on GD cells, being ERβ preferentially involved on these actions over ERα. Tibolone increased viability of GD cells by a mechanism fully blocked by an ERβ antagonist and partially blocked by an ERα antagonist. Furthermore, ERβ inhibition prevented the effect of tibolone on nuclear fragmentation, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in GD cells. The protective effect of tibolone was mediated by neuroglobin. Tibolone upregulated neuroglobin in T98G cells and primary mouse astrocytes by a mechanism involving ERβ and neuroglobin silencing prevented the protective action of tibolone on GD cells. In summary, tibolone protects T98G cells by a mechanism involving ERβ and the upregulation of neuroglobin. PMID:27250720

  14. Infiltrating Macrophages Induce ERα Expression through an IL17A-mediated Epigenetic Mechanism to Sensitize Endometrial Cancer Cells to Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengcheng; Xie, Bingying; Zhang, Lin; Li, Chunsheng; Shan, Weiwei; Yang, Bingyi; Luo, Xuezhen; Gu, Chao; He, Qizhi; Jin, Hongyan; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhenbo; Feng, Youji

    2016-03-15

    Persistent unopposed estrogen stimulation is a central oncogenic mechanism driving the formation of type I endometrial cancer. Recent epidemiologic and clinical studies of endometrial cancer have also revealed a role for insulin resistance, clinically manifested by chronic inflammation. However, the role of inflammation in estrogen-driven endometrial cancer is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the association between infiltrating macrophages and estrogen sensitivity in endometrial cancer. Evaluating tissue samples and serum from patients with precancerous lesions or endometrial cancer, we found that tissue macrophage infiltration, but not serum estradiol levels, correlated positively with endometrial cancer development. Furthermore, IL4/IL13-induced CD68(+)CD163(+) macrophages enhanced the proliferative effects of estradiol in endometrial cancer cells by upregulating estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but not ERβ. Mechanistic investigations revealed that CD68(+)CD163(+) macrophages secreted cytokines, such as IL17A, that upregulated ERα expression through TET1-mediated epigenetic modulation of the ERα gene. Overall, our findings show how cytokines produced by infiltrating macrophages in the endometrial microenvironment can induce epigenetic upregulation of ERα expression, which in turn sensitizes endometrial cells to estrogen stimulation. The concept that inflammation-induced estrogen sensitivity in the endometrium acts as a driver of type I endometrial cancer has implications for infiltrating macrophages as a prognostic biomarker of progression in this disease setting. PMID:26744532

  15. Receptor-mediated delivery of engineered nucleases for genome modification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Jaafar, Lahcen; Agyekum, Davies G; Xiao, Haiyan; Wade, Marlene F; Kumaran, R Ileng; Spector, David L; Bao, Gang; Porteus, Matthew H; Dynan, William S; Meiler, Steffen E

    2013-10-01

    Engineered nucleases, which incise the genome at predetermined sites, have a number of laboratory and clinical applications. There is, however, a need for better methods for controlled intracellular delivery of nucleases. Here, we demonstrate a method for ligand-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) proteins using transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Uptake is rapid and efficient in established mammalian cell lines and in primary cells, including mouse and human hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell populations. In contrast to cDNA expression, ZFN protein levels decline rapidly following internalization, affording better temporal control of nuclease activity. We show that transferrin-mediated ZFN uptake leads to site-specific in situ cleavage of the target locus. Additionally, despite the much shorter duration of ZFN activity, the efficiency of gene correction approaches that seen with cDNA-mediated expression. The approach is flexible and general, with the potential for extension to other targeting ligands and nuclease architectures.

  16. Glutamate receptor-mediated oligodendrocyte toxicity in periventricular leukomalacia: a protective role for topiramate.

    PubMed

    Follett, Pamela L; Deng, Wenbin; Dai, Weimin; Talos, Delia M; Massillon, Leon J; Rosenberg, Paul A; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2004-05-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is a form of hypoxic-ischemic cerebral white matter injury seen most commonly in premature infants and is the major antecedent of cerebral palsy. Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is a predominant mechanism of hypoxic-ischemic injury to developing cerebral white matter. We have demonstrated previously the protective effect of AMPA-kainate-type glutamate receptor blockade in a rodent model of periventricular leukomalacia. The present study explores the therapeutic potential of glutamate receptor blockade for hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury. We demonstrate that AMPA receptors are expressed on developing human oligodendrocytes that populate fetal white matter at 23-32 weeks gestation, the period of highest risk for periventricular leukomalacia. We show that the clinically available anticonvulsant topiramate, when administered post-insult in vivo, is protective against selective hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury and decreases the subsequent neuromotor deficits. We further demonstrate that topiramate attenuates AMPA-kainate receptor-mediated cell death and calcium influx, as well as kainate-evoked currents in developing oligodendrocytes, similar to the AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(f)quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX). Notably, protective doses of NBQX and topiramate do not affect normal maturation and proliferation of oligodendrocytes either in vivo or in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor blockade may have potential for translation as a therapeutic strategy for periventricular leukomalacia and that the mechanism of protective efficacy of topiramate is caused at least in part by attenuation of excitotoxic injury to premyelinating oligodendrocytes in developing white matter.

  17. ESTROGENIC STATUS MODULATES DMBA-MEDIATED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION: MICROARRAY-BASED ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic status in women influences the metabolism and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The objective of this study was to examine the influence of estradiol (E2) on 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mediated changes on gene expressio...

  18. Reciprocal roles between caffeine and estrogen on bone via differently regulating cAMP/PKA pathway: the possible mechanism for caffeine-induced osteoporosis in women and estrogen's antagonistic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Zhuo-Li; Guan, Xiao-Xu; Hou, Wei-Wei; Yu, Hai-Yang

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine is consumed by most people in Europe and North America. As a risk factor for osteoporosis, caffeine has been reported to decrease bone mineral density, negatively influence calcium absorption and increase the risk of bone fracture in women. Except for the epidemiological observations and several studies which proved caffeine's unfavorable effects on osteoblast proliferation and impaired ability to form bone, little mechanism is known for the caffeine-induced osteoporosis. Since our unpublished studies showed that the precursor cells of osteoblasts, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), were more sensitive than osteoblasts when exposed to the same dose of caffeine. We herein hypothesize that MSCs may be the primary target cells for caffeine-induced osteoporosis. It is well established that increasing cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can regulate the expression of key genes involved in bone metabolism, including Cbfa1, PPARgamma, RANKL and OPG. We thereby propose the hypothesis that caffeine, a known inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase, may affect bone metabolism by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. In addition, considering the fact observed in epidemiology that caffeine's negative effects on bone only occurred in postmenopausal women and the inverse roles of caffeine and estrogen on bone metabolism, we postulate that caffeine may exert its undesirable influences on bone only in absence or low level of estrogen in vivo and estrogen may antagonize the adverse effect of caffeine on bone. Since several studies have demonstrated that estrogen may have ability to temper the biological effects of cAMP stimulators' roles on bone through cAMP to regulate some important genes' expression in bone metabolism. We assume that estrogen may block cAMP-dependent PKA pathway which is shared by caffeine, to exhibit its antagonistic roles. PMID:19278793

  19. Estrogen effects on the brain: actions beyond the hypothalamus via novel mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Akama, Keith T.; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Milner, Teresa A.; Waters, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    From its origins in how the brain controls the endocrine system via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, neuroendocrinology has evolved into a science that now includes hormone action on many aspects of brain function. These actions involve the whole central nervous system and not just the hypothalamus. Advances in our understanding of cellular and molecular actions of steroid hormones have gone beyond the important cell nuclear actions of steroid hormone receptors to include signaling pathways that intersect with other mediators such as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. This has, in turn, broadened the search for and identification of steroid receptors to include non-nuclear sites in synapses, dendrites, mitochondria and glial cells, as well as cell nuclei. The study of estrogen receptors and estrogen actions on processes related to cognition, mood, autonomic regulation, pain and neuroprotection, among other functions, has led the way in this new view of hormone actions on the brain. In this review we summarize past and current work in our laboratory on this topic. This exciting and growing field involving many laboratories continues to reshape our ideas and approaches to neuroendocrinology both at the bench and the bedside. PMID:22289042

  20. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  1. AMPA receptor-mediated miniature synaptic calcium transients in GluR2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sabrina; Jia, Zhengping; Roder, John; Murphy, Timothy H

    2002-07-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are normally Ca(2+) impermeable due to the expression of the GluR2 receptor subunit. By using GluR2 null mice we were able to detect miniature synaptic Ca(2+) transients (MSCTs) associated with AMPA-type receptor-mediated miniature synaptic currents at single synapses in primary cortical cultures. MSCTs and associated Ca(2+) transients were monitored under conditions that isolated responses mediated by AMPA or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. As expected, addition of the antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxalene-2,3-dione (CNQX, 3 microM) blocked the AMPA receptor-mediated MSCTs. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels did not contribute to AMPA MSCTs because CdCl(2) (0.1-0.2 mM) did not significantly alter the frequency or the amplitude of the MSCTs. The amplitude of AMPA MSCTs appeared to be regulated independently from event frequency since the two measures were not correlated (R = 0.023). Synapses were identified that only expressed MSCTs attributed to either NMDA or AMPA receptors. At synapses with only NMDA responses, MSCT amplitude was significantly lower (by 40%) than synapses expressing both NMDA and AMPA responses. At synapses that showed MSCTs mediated by both AMPA and NMDA receptors, the amplitude of the transients in each condition was positively correlated (R = 0.94). Our results suggest that when AMPA and NMDA receptors are co-expressed at synapses, mechanisms exist to ensure proportional scaling of each receptor type that are distinct from the presynaptic factors controlling the frequency of miniature release. PMID:12091530

  2. A(2B) receptors mediate antimitogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dubey, R K; Gillespie, D G; Shue, H; Jackson, E K

    2000-01-01

    Adenosine inhibits growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. The goals of this study were to determine which adenosine receptor subtype mediates the antimitogenic effects of adenosine and to investigate the signal transduction mechanisms involved. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) (25 ng/mL) stimulated DNA synthesis ([(3)H]thymidine incorporation), cellular proliferation (cell number), collagen synthesis ([(3)H]proline incorporation), total protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. The adenosine receptor agonists 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, but not N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine or CGS21680, inhibited the growth effects of PDGF-BB, an agonist profile consistent with an A(2B) receptor-mediated effect. The adenosine receptor antagonists KF17837 and 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine, but not 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, blocked the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, an antagonist profile consistent with an A(2) receptor-mediated effect. Antisense, but not sense or scrambled, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor stimulated basal and PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and MAP kinase activity. Moreover, the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine, 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine plus iodotubericidin (inhibitors of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, respectively) were abolished by antisense, but not scrambled or sense, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that adenosine causes inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating A(2B) receptors coupled to inhibition of MAP kinase activity. Pharmacological or molecular biological activation of A(2B) receptors may prevent vascular remodeling associated with hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis

  3. Visualization of Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Jon; Konopka, James; Singer-Kruger, Birgit; Zerial, Marino; Botstein, David

    1999-01-01

    We studied the ligand-induced endocytosis of the yeast α-factor receptor Ste2p by immuno-electron microscopy. We observed and quantitated time-dependent loss of Ste2p from the plasma membrane of cells exposed to α-factor. This ligand-induced internalization of Ste2p was blocked in the well-characterized endocytosis-deficient mutant sac6Δ. We provide evidence that implicates furrow-like invaginations of the plasma membrane as the site of receptor internalization. These invaginations are distinct from the finger-like plasma membrane invaginations within actin cortical patches. Consistent with this, we show that Ste2p is not located within the cortical actin patch before and during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In wild-type cells exposed to α-factor we also observed and quantitated a time-dependent accumulation of Ste2p in intracellular, membrane-bound compartments. These compartments have a characteristic electron density but variable shape and size and are often located adjacent to the vacuole. In immuno-electron microscopy experiments these compartments labeled with antibodies directed against the rab5 homologue Ypt51p (Vps21p), the resident vacuolar protease carboxypeptidase Y, and the vacuolar H+-ATPase Vph1p. Using a new double-labeling technique we have colocalized antibodies against Ste2p and carboxypeptidase Y to this compartment, thereby identifying these compartments as prevacuolar late endosomes. PMID:10069819

  4. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  5. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  6. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice. PMID:25524412

  7. H-Ras regulation of TRAIL death receptor mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Bozza, William P.; Di, Xu; Zhang, Yaqin; Hallett, William; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through the death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the cell surface. Multiple clinical trials are underway to evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to DR4 or DR5. However, their therapeutic potential is limited by the high frequency of cancer resistance. Here we provide evidence demonstrating the role of H-Ras in TRAIL receptor mediated apoptosis. By analyzing the genome wide mRNA expression data of the NCI60 cancer cell lines, we found that H-Ras expression was consistently upregulated in TRAIL-resistant cell lines. By contrast, no correlation was found between TRAIL sensitivity and K-Ras expression levels or their mutational profiles. Notably, H-Ras upregulation associated with a surface deficiency of TRAIL death receptors. Selective inhibition of H-Ras activity in TRAIL-resistant cells restored the surface expression of both DR4 and DR5 without changing their total protein levels. The resulting cells became highly susceptible to both TRAIL and agonistic DR5 antibody, whereas K-Ras inhibition had little or no effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, indicating H-Ras plays a distinct role in the regulation of TRAIL death receptors. Further studies are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of H-Ras-specific inhibitors in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. PMID:25026275

  8. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  9. Estrogen and prostate cancer: an eclipsed truth in an androgen-dominated scenario.

    PubMed

    Carruba, Giuseppe

    2007-11-01

    estrogens, combined with androgens, appear to be required for the malignant transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Although the mechanisms underlying the hormonal induction of prostate cancer in experimental animals remain uncertain, there is however evidence to support the assumption that long term administration of androgens and estrogens results in an estrogenic milieu in rat prostates and in the ensuing development of dysplasia and cancer. Both androgen and estrogen have been reported to stimulate proliferation of cultured prostate cancer cells, primarily through receptor-mediated effects. As for estrogens, the two major receptor types, ERalpha and ERbeta, are expressed in both normal and diseased human prostate, though with a different cellular localization. Since these two receptors are different in terms of ligand binding, heterodimerization, transactivation, and estrogen response element activity, it is likely that an imbalance of their expression may be critical to determine the ultimate estrogen effects on prostate cancer cells. In prostate cancer, ERbeta activation appears to limit cell proliferation directly or through ERalpha inhibition, and loss of ERbeta has been consistently associated with tumor progression. Several splicing variants of both ERalpha and ERbeta exist. Little is known about their expression and function in the human prostate, although reciprocal regulation and interaction with gene promoter both warrant further investigation. In summary, although multiple consistent evidence suggests that estrogens are critical players in human prostate cancer, their role has been only recently reconsidered, being eclipsed for years by an androgen-dominated interest.

  10. Defining Estrogenic Mechanisms of Bisphenol A Analogs through High Throughput Microscopy-based Contextual Assays

    PubMed Central

    Stossi, Fabio; Bolt, Michael J.; Ashcroft, Felicity J.; Lamerdin, Jane E.; Melnick, Jonathan S.; Powell, Reid T.; Dandekar, Radhika D.; Mancini, Maureen G.; Walker, Cheryl L.; Westwick, John K.; Mancini, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Environmental exposures to chemically heterogeneous endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic or interfere with hormone actions, and negatively impact human health. Despite public interest and the prevalence of EDCs in the environment, methods to mechanistically classify these diverse chemicals in a high throughput (HT) manner have not been actively explored. Here, we describe the use of multi-parametric, HT microscopy-based platforms to examine how a prototypical EDC, Bisphenol A (BPA), and eighteen poorly studied analogs (BPXs), affect estrogen receptor (ER). We show that short exposure to BPA and most BPXs induce ERα and/or ERβ and change levels of target gene transcription. Many BPXs exhibit higher affinity for ERβ and act as ERβ antagonists, while they act largely as agonists or mixed agonists/antagonists on ERα. Finally, despite binding to ERs, some BPXs exhibit lower levels of activity. Our comprehensive view of BPXs activities allows their classification and evaluation of potential harmful effects. The strategy described here used on a large scale basis likely offers a faster, more cost-effective way to identify safer BPA alternatives. PMID:24856822

  11. The stimulation of respiration by progesterone in ovariectomized cat is mediated by an estrogen-dependent hypothalamic mechanism requiring gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Cidlowski, J A; Millhorn, D E

    1990-01-01

    The central site of action and the cellular mechanism by which progesterone stimulates respiration were studied in ovariectomized cats that were anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated and in which respiratory sensory feedback mechanisms were either eliminated or controlled. Phrenic nerve activity served as an index of central respiratory output. Progesterone did not stimulate respiration in ovariectomized cats not pretreated with estrogen. In contrast, repeated doses of progesterone (0.1-1.0 microgram/kg, iv, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) dose-dependent facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in animals primed 3 days before study with 17 beta-estradiol (20 micrograms/kg, sc). Estrogen exposure is, therefore, a prerequisite for the respiratory response to progesterone in ovariectomized cats. This estrogen-dependent respiratory response to progesterone was attenuated in animals pretreated with either the estrogen receptor antagonist CI628 or the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486, indicating that the respiratory response is mediated by both estrogen and progesterone receptors. Inhibitors of protein (anisomycin) and RNA (actinomycin-D) synthesis caused a diminution of the respiratory response to progesterone, implicating a requirement for gene expression in the response. Midcollicular decerebration (which removed the diencephalon) attenuated, whereas decortication (which spared the diencephalon) did not affect the respiratory response to progesterone. Thus, the diencephalon appears to be a critical neuroanatomical substrate for the response. These results indicate that the respiratory response to progesterone is mediated, at a hypothalamic site, via a genomic mechanism with characteristics consistent with the prototypic mechanism for progesterone actions. PMID:2294002

  12. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD).

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Maeno, E; Shimizu, T; Dezaki, K; Wang, J; Morishima, S

    2001-04-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl- channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl- conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNF receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be abolished by

  13. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  14. 17β-Estradiol and Agonism of G-protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Enhance Hippocampal Memory via Different Cell-Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyoon; Szinte, Julia S.; Boulware, Marissa I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal object recognition and spatial memory depends on rapid activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the dorsal hippocampus (DH). Although this activation can be mediated by the intracellular estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, little is known about the role that the membrane estrogen receptor GPER plays in regulating ERK or E2-mediated memory formation. In this study, post-training DH infusion of the GPER agonist G-1 enhanced object recognition and spatial memory in ovariectomized female mice, whereas the GPER antagonist G-15 impaired memory, suggesting that GPER activation, like E2, promotes hippocampal memory formation. However, unlike E2, G-1 did not increase ERK phosphorylation, but instead significantly increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the DH. Moreover, DH infusion of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 prevented G-1 from enhancing object recognition and spatial memory, but the ERK inhibitor U0126 did not. These data suggest that GPER enhances memory via different cell-signaling mechanisms than E2. This conclusion was supported by data showing that the ability of E2 to facilitate memory and activate ERK signaling was not blocked by G-15 or SP600125, which demonstrates that the memory-enhancing effects of E2 are not dependent on JNK or GPER activation in the DH. Together, these data indicate that GPER regulates memory independently from ERα and ERβ by activating JNK signaling, rather than ERK signaling. Thus, the findings suggest that GPER in the DH may not function as an estrogen receptor to regulate object recognition and spatial memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although 17β-estradiol has long been known to regulate memory function, the molecular mechanisms underlying estrogenic memory modulation remain largely unknown. Here, we examined whether the putative membrane estrogen receptor GPER acts like the classical estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, to facilitate

  15. Estrogen-mediated mechanisms to control the growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells: a translational research success story.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Russell E; Maximov, Philipp Y; Jordan, V Craig

    2013-01-01

    The treatment and prevention of solid tumors have proved to be a major challenge for medical science. The paradigms for success in the treatment of childhood leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, Burkett's lymphoma, and testicular carcinoma with cytotoxic chemotherapy did not translate to success in solid tumors--the majority of cancers that kill. In contrast, significant success has accrued for patients with breast cancer with antihormone treatments (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) that are proved to enhance survivorship, and remarkably, there are now two approved prevention strategies using either tamoxifen or raloxifene. This was considered impossible 40 years ago. We describe the major clinical advances with nonsteroidal antiestrogens that evolved into selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) which successfully exploited the ER target selectively inside a woman's body. The standard paradigm that estrogen stimulates breast cancer growth has been successfully exploited for over 4 decades with therapeutic strategies that block (tamoxifen, raloxifene) or reduce (aromatase inhibitors) circulating estrogens in patients to stop breast tumor growth. But this did not explain why high-dose estrogen treatment that was the standard of care to treat postmenopausal breast cancer for 3 decades before tamoxifen caused tumor regression. This paradox was resolved with the discovery that breast cancer resistance to long-term estrogen deprivation causes tumor regression with physiologic estrogen through apoptosis. The new biology of estrogen action has been utilized to explain the findings in the Women's Health Initiative that conjugated equine estrogen alone given to postmenopausal women, average age 68, will produce a reduction of breast cancer incidence and mortality compared to no treatment. Estrogen is killing nascent breast cancer cells in the ducts of healthy postmenopausal women. The modulation of the ER using multifunctional medicines called SERMs has provided not only

  16. QSAR classification of estrogen receptor binders and pre-screening of potential pleiotropic EDCs.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2010-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are suspected of posing serious threats to human and wildlife health through a variety of mechanisms, these being mainly receptor-mediated modes of action. It is reported that some EDCs exhibit dual activities as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) binders. Indeed, such compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a dual complex mechanism, so steps should be taken not only to identify them a priori from their chemical structure, but also to prioritize them for experimental tests in order to reduce and even forbid their usage. To date, very few EDCs with dual activities have been identified. The present research uses QSARs, to investigate what, so far, is the largest and most heterogeneous ER binder data set (combined METI and EDKB databases). New predictive classification models were derived using different modelling methods and a consensus approach, and these were used to virtually screen a large AR binder data set after strict validation. As a result, 46 AR antagonists were predicted from their chemical structure to also have potential ER binding activities, i.e. pleiotropic EDCs. In addition, 48 not yet recognized ER binders were in silico identified, which increases the number of potential EDCs that are substances of very high concern (SVHC) in REACH. Thus, the proposed screening models, based only on structure information, have the main aim to prioritize experimental tests for the highlighted compounds with potential estrogenic activities and also to design safer alternatives.

  17. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans is internalized by receptor-mediated or 'triggered' phagocytosis, dependent on actin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both 'zipper' (receptor-mediated) and 'trigger' (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  19. D538G mutation in estrogen receptor-α: A novel mechanism for acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merenbakh-Lamin, Keren; Ben-Baruch, Noa; Yeheskel, Adva; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Jeselsohn, Rinath; Yelensky, Roman; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A; Sarid, David; Rizel, Shulamith; Klein, Baruch; Rubinek, Tami; Wolf, Ido

    2013-12-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy occurs in virtually all patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive metastatic breast cancer, and is attributed to various mechanisms including loss of ERα expression, altered activity of coregulators, and cross-talk between the ERα and growth factor signaling pathways. To our knowledge, acquired mutations of the ERα have not been described as mediating endocrine resistance. Samples of 13 patients with metastatic breast cancer were analyzed for mutations in cancer-related genes. In five patients who developed resistance to hormonal therapy, a mutation of A to G at position 1,613 of ERα, resulting in a substitution of aspartic acid at position 538 to glycine (D538G), was identified in liver metastases. Importantly, the mutation was not detected in the primary tumors obtained prior to endocrine treatment. Structural modeling indicated that D538G substitution leads to a conformational change in the ligand-binding domain, which mimics the conformation of activated ligand-bound receptor and alters binding of tamoxifen. Indeed, experiments in breast cancer cells indicated constitutive, ligand-independent transcriptional activity of the D538G receptor, and overexpression of it enhanced proliferation and conferred resistance to tamoxifen. These data indicate a novel mechanism of acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer. Further studies are needed to assess the frequency of D538G-ERα among patients with breast cancer and explore ways to inhibit its activity and restore endocrine sensitivity.

  20. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  1. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M.; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy. PMID:26935990

  2. Monoacylglycerol lipase promotes Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in microglia but does not regulate LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kouchi, Zen

    2015-08-21

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is important for neuroinflammation. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying its expression and function remain unknown. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment post-translationally upregulated MAGL expression, whereas it downregulated MAGL transcription through a Stat6-mediated mechanism in microglia. Neither MAGL knockdown nor JZL-184, a selective MAGL inhibitor, suppressed LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in microglia. Moreover, exogenous expression of MAGL in BV-2 microglial cell line, which lacks endogenous MAGL, did not promote the induction of inflammatory cytokines by LPS treatment. Interestingly, MAGL knockdown reduced Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis in primary microglia, and introduction of MAGL into the BV-2 cells increased Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Collectively, these results suggest that MAGL regulates phagocytosis, but not LPS-mediated cytokine induction in microglia.

  3. Characterization of NPY receptors mediating contraction in rat intramyocardial coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; García-Sacristán, A; Simonsen, U

    1998-09-25

    In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed in order to characterize the receptor subtypes and the mechanisms underlying the contractions induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY) in rat coronary small arteries. The rank order of potency for NPY-receptor agonist-induced increases in tension in endothelium-intact preparations was polypeptide Y (PYY)> NPY > or = [Leu31Pro34]NPY, while NPY(13-36) only induced small contractions at the highest concentration applied. The selective neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP 3226, caused rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves for NPY and the slope of the Schild plot was not significantly different from unity. The pA2 value for BIBP 3226 against NPY was 7.88+/-0.15 (n = 6). We have earlier shown that endothelial cell removal does not change the contractile responses induced by NPY, but indomethacin (3 x 10(-6) M) significantly reduced the contractions induced by the peptide. In contrast, the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ29548, which abolished the contractions induced by the thromboxane analogue, U46619, did not change the concentration-response curves for NPY. In conclusion, the present study suggests that Y1 receptors mediate NPY-induced contractions in rat coronary resistance arteries, and that a non-thromboxane prostanoid is involved in the contractile mechanism.

  4. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  5. Mechanism of Breast Cancer Preventive Action of Pomegranate: Disruption of Estrogen Receptor and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Animesh; Bishayee, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    A pomegranate emulsion (PE), containing various bioactive phytochemicals, has recently been found to exert substantial chemopreventive effect against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats via antiproliferative and proapoptotic actions. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of action are not completely understood. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of PE treatment on intratumor expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-β,β-catenin and cyclin D1 during DMBA rat mammary carcinogenesis. Mammary tumor sections were harvested from a chemopreventive study in which PE (0.2, 1.0 and 5.0 g/kg) exhibited inhibition of mammary tumorigenesis in a dose-response manner. The expressions of ER-α, ER-β, β-catenin and cyclin D1 were analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques. PE downregulated the expression of intratumor ER-α and ER-β and lowered ER-α:ER-β ratio. PE also decreased the expression, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, an essential transcriptional cofactor for Wnt signaling. Moreover, PE suppressed the expression of cell growth regulatory protein cyclin D1, which is a downstream target for both ER and Wnt signaling. Our current results in conjunction with our previous findings indicate that concurrent disruption of ER and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways possibly contributes to antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects involved in PE-mediated chemoprevention of DMBA-inflicted rat mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26703530

  6. The vas::egfp transgenic zebrafish: a practical model for studies on the molecular mechanisms by which environmental estrogens affect gonadal sex differentiation.

    PubMed

    Filby, Amy L; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren; Tyler, Charles R

    2014-03-01

    The vas::egfp transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) could significantly enhance studies on the mechanisms by which environmental estrogens disrupt sexual differentiation, because the developing gonad can be visualized during early life via fluorescence detection. There are methodological challenges regarding dissecting out the gonads in early-life-stage fish, however, and transgene responses to estrogen exposure have not been tested. The authors exposed vas::egfp transgenic zebrafish and their wild-type siblings to the model estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2; 0.62 ng/L and 3.33 ng/L measured concentrations) during sexual development (20-60 d posthatch) and used enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) fluorescence to identify and dissect single gonads (at 40 d posthatch) to provide sufficient RNA for individual gene expression analyses, retaining the remaining gonad in the body cavity for histological analyses of sex and stage of development. Genotyping confirmed that all transgenic control fish were phenotypically egfp positive (showed green fluorescence). Interestingly, however, in a few transgenic fish exposed to EE2, no phenotypic egfp signal was seen, most notably for the 3.33 ng/L EE2 exposure. It was subsequently found that gonadal vasa expression was reduced by this concentration of EE2. Hepatic vitellogenin expression demonstrated that the vas::egfp and wild-type lines responded to estrogen with an equivalent sensitivity. The authors conclude that the vas::egfp zebrafish provides an enhanced and practical system for mechanistic studies on the effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of estrogens on gonad development.

  7. Identification of novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-cancer activities via ER-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taelim; Kim, Hye-In; An, Ji-Young; Lee, Jun; Lee, Na-Rae; Heo, Jinyuk; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Jihyun; Lee, Yong Sup; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Jung

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a series of bis(4-hydroxy)benzophenone oxime ether derivatives such as 12c, 12e and 12h were identified as novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-proliferative activities via ER-independent mechanism in cancer cells. These compounds are expected to overcome the therapeutic limitation of existing ER agonists such as estradiol and tamoxifen, which have been known to induce the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26905830

  8. Receptor-Mediated Entry of Pristine Octahedral DNA Nanocages in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Giulia; Raniolo, Sofia; Ottaviani, Alessio; Falconi, Mattia; Franch, Oskar; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Desideri, Alessandro; Biocca, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    DNA offers excellent programming properties for the generation of nanometer-scaled polyhedral structures with a broad variety of potential applications. Translation to biomedical applications requires improving stability in biological fluids, efficient and selective cell binding, and/or internalization of the assembled DNA nanostructures. Here, we report an investigation on the selective mechanism of cellular uptake of pristine DNA nanocages in cells expressing the receptor "oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1" (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor associated with cardiovascular diseases and, more recently, identified as a tumor marker. For this purpose a truncated octahedral DNA nanocage functionalized with a single biotin molecule, which allows DNA cage detection through the biotin-streptavidin assays, was constructed. The results indicate that DNA nanocages are stable in biological fluids, including human serum, and are selectively bound and very efficiently internalized in vesicles only in LOX-1-expressing cells. The amount of internalized cages is 30 times higher in LOX-1-expressing cells than in normal fibroblasts, indicating that the receptor-mediated uptake of pristine DNA nanocages can be pursued for a selective cellular internalization. These results open the route for a therapeutic use of pristine DNA cages targeting LOX-1-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:27214742

  9. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Lysozyme in Renal Proximal Tubules of the Frog Rana Temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endo-somes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intra-cellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  10. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  11. Lactate Modulates the Activity of Primary Cortical Neurons through a Receptor-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism. PMID:23951229

  12. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  13. Receptor-mediated uptake of ferritin-bound iron by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kalgaonkar, Swati; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Ferritin (Ft) is a large iron (Fe)-binding protein ( approximately 450 kDa) that is found in plant and animal cells and can sequester up to 4500 Fe atoms per Ft molecule. Our previous studies on intestinal Caco-2 cells have shown that dietary factors affect the uptake of Fe from Ft in a manner different from that of Fe from FeSO4, suggesting a different mechanism for cellular uptake. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism for Ft-Fe uptake using Caco-2 cells. Binding of (59)Fe-labeled Ft at 4 degrees C showed saturable kinetics, and Scatchard analysis resulted in a K(d) of 1.6 muM, strongly indicating a receptor-mediated process. Competitive binding studies with excess unlabelled Ft significantly reduced binding, and uptake studies at 37 degrees C showed saturation after 4 h. Enhancing and blocking endocytosis using Mas-7 (a G-protein activator) and hypertonic medium (0.5 M sucrose), respectively, demonstrated that Ft-Fe uptake by Mas-7-treated cells was 140% of control cells, whereas sucrose treatment resulted in a statistically significant reduction in Ft-Fe uptake by 70% as compared to controls. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride (Na+/H+ antiport blocker) resulted in a decrease (by approximately 20%) in Ft-Fe uptake at high concentrations of Ft, suggesting that enterocytes can use more than one Ft uptake mechanism in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that Ft uptake by enterocytes is carried out via endocytosis when Ft levels are within a physiological range, whereas Ft at higher concentrations may be absorbed using the additional mechanism of macropinocytosis. PMID:18602806

  14. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  15. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  16. Scavenger Receptors Mediate the Role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval–pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi–mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  17. Antidepressant effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Price, W A; Giannini, A J

    1985-11-01

    The authors present a case report that provides support for a relationship between estrogen and the menstrual cycle on the 1 hand and affective disorders on the other. The patient in this case, a 35-year old woman, suffered from a rapid cycling affective disorder that was severely affected by her menstrual cycle and responded positively to oral contraceptives (OCs). The patient had a 24-year history of numerous manic and depressive episodes, the 1st of which coincided with menarche. She had noted that, 4 days before menses, she would experience symptoms of premenstrual tension syndrome (PMS) and often the onset of an affective episode. Treatment with a series of psychotropic agents had not been effective in controlling the number of episodes. However, the patient reported that there had been an 8-9-month period in the past when she had taken OCs and had fewer symptoms. Thus, the patient was placed on Ortho-Novum as well as imipramine. At the 9-month follow-up, she reported there had been no further episodes of depression or mania. The exact mechanism behind estrogen's psychotropic effect is unclear, although it increases the central availability of norepinephrine and induces changes in dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic receptors. Beta-endorphin levels covary with estrogen levels, and estrogen seems to affect every major neurotransmitter system. The fact that estrogen has not consistently been shown to be effective in this regard may only signify the existence of a distinct subclass of affective disorders closely linked to the menstrual cycle. This subclass may have some type of dysfunction within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that contributes to mood swings.

  18. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  19. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  20. Disruption of estrogen homeostasis as a mechanism for uterine toxicity in Wistar Han rats treated with tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J Michael; Coulter, Sherry J; Knudsen, Gabriel A; Dunnick, June K; Kissling, Grace E; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    Chronic oral treatment of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) to female Wistar Han rats resulted in increased incidence of cell proliferation at 250mg/kg and tumor formation in the uterus at higher doses. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that disruption of estrogen homeostasis was a major mode-of-action for the observed effects. Biological changes were assessed in serum, liver, and the proximal (nearest the cervix) and distal (nearest the ovaries) sections of the uterine horn of Wistar Han rats 24h following administration of the last of five daily oral doses of 250mg/kg. Expression of genes associated with receptors, biosynthesis, and metabolism of estrogen was altered in the liver and uterus. TBBPA treatment also resulted in changes in expression of genes associated with cell division and growth. Changes were also observed in the concentration of thyroxine in serum and in expression of genes in the liver and uterus associated with thyroid hormone receptors. Differential expression of some genes was tissue-dependent or specific to tissue location in the uterus. The biological responses observed in the present study support the hypothesis that perturbation of estrogen homeostasis is a major mode-of-action for TBBPA-mediated cell proliferation and tumorigenesis previously observed in the uterus of TBBPA-treated Wistar Han rats. PMID:26988606

  1. Disruption of estrogen homeostasis as a mechanism for uterine toxicity in Wistar Han rats treated with tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J Michael; Coulter, Sherry J; Knudsen, Gabriel A; Dunnick, June K; Kissling, Grace E; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    Chronic oral treatment of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) to female Wistar Han rats resulted in increased incidence of cell proliferation at 250mg/kg and tumor formation in the uterus at higher doses. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that disruption of estrogen homeostasis was a major mode-of-action for the observed effects. Biological changes were assessed in serum, liver, and the proximal (nearest the cervix) and distal (nearest the ovaries) sections of the uterine horn of Wistar Han rats 24h following administration of the last of five daily oral doses of 250mg/kg. Expression of genes associated with receptors, biosynthesis, and metabolism of estrogen was altered in the liver and uterus. TBBPA treatment also resulted in changes in expression of genes associated with cell division and growth. Changes were also observed in the concentration of thyroxine in serum and in expression of genes in the liver and uterus associated with thyroid hormone receptors. Differential expression of some genes was tissue-dependent or specific to tissue location in the uterus. The biological responses observed in the present study support the hypothesis that perturbation of estrogen homeostasis is a major mode-of-action for TBBPA-mediated cell proliferation and tumorigenesis previously observed in the uterus of TBBPA-treated Wistar Han rats.

  2. Selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate stromal proliferation in human benign prostatic hyperplasia by multiple beneficial mechanisms--action of two new agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, J P; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Sharma, V L; Dalela, Diwakar; Gupta, Gopal

    2012-04-01

    The existing drugs for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are partially effective with undesirable side-effects; hence new agents acting by different mechanism(s) are required as supplements. Modulation of estrogen receptor signaling using selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) offers an alternative approach for BPH management. Using human BPH-derived stromal cells and tissue explants in culture we evaluated two SERMs, DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2 H-1-benzopyran (BP) and Ormeloxifene (Orm) in comparison to Tamoxifen (Tam) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). BP, OHT and Tam were more effective than Orm in reducing stromal cell proliferation of human BPH. BP was either equipotent or more effective than OHT and Tam in increasing estrogen receptor(ER)-ß, TGFß1, Fas and FasL, and in decreasing ER-α, AR, EGF-R and IGF-I expressions in BPH stromal cells. BP, Tam and Orm (1.0 mg/Kg) reduced rat prostate weights by almost same extent as Finasteride (Fin, 5.0 mg/Kg); however combination treatment (SERM+Fin) was more effective. BP was exceptionally efficient in reducing IGF-1 and cleaving PARP while combination treatments more effectively increased bax:bcl-2 ratio. Fin reduced acinar diameter and prostatic DHT level but increased testosterone, estradiol (E(2)) and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. SERMs, especially BP, reduced epithelial cell height drastically without significantly altering steroid hormone levels and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. Combination treatment reduced both acinar diameter and epithelial cell height with modest increase in E(2), T and E(2)/T+DHT. The study reveals the potential of SERMs per se for BPH management, and more effectively in combination with a 5α-reductase inhibitor. BP appears promising for further evaluation as a drug candidate for BPH and prostate cancer.

  3. Insulin-Independent GABAA Receptor-Mediated Response in the Barrel Cortex of Mice with Impaired Met Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by genetic variants, susceptibility alleles, and environmental perturbations. The autism associated gene MET tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many behavioral domains and endophenotypes of autism, including abnormal neural signaling in human sensory cortex. We investigated somatosensory thalamocortical synaptic communication in mice deficient in Met activity in cortical excitatory neurons to gain insights into aberrant somatosensation characteristic of ASD. The ratio of excitation to inhibition is dramatically increased due to decreased postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the trigeminal thalamocortical pathway of mice lacking active Met in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, insulin failed to increase GABAA receptor-mediated response in the barrel cortex of mice with compromised Met signaling. Thus, lacking insulin effects may be a risk factor in ASD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A proposed common cause of neurodevelopmental disorders is an imbalance in excitatory neural transmission, provided by the glutamatergic neurons, and the inhibitory signals from the GABAergic interneurons. Many genes associated with autism spectrum disorders impair synaptic transmission in the expected cell type. Previously, inactivation of the autism-associated Met tyrosine kinase receptor in GABAergic interneurons led to decreased inhibition. In thus report, decreased Met signaling in glutamatergic neurons had no effect on excitation, but decimated inhibition. Further experiments indicate that loss of Met activity downregulates GABAA receptors on glutamatergic neurons in an insulin independent manner. These data provide a new mechanism for the loss of inhibition and subsequent abnormal excitation/inhibition balance and potential molecular candidates for treatment or prevention. PMID:27030755

  4. ERK/MAPK regulates ERRγ expression, transcriptional activity and receptor-mediated tamoxifen resistance in ER+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heckler, Mary M; Thakor, Hemang; Schafer, Cara C; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2014-05-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen (TAM) significantly improve breast cancer-specific survival for women with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) disease. However, resistance to TAM remains a major clinical problem. The resistant phenotype is usually not driven by loss or mutation of the estrogen receptor; instead, changes in multiple proliferative and/or survival pathways over-ride the inhibitory effects of TAM. Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that promotes TAM resistance in ER+ breast cancer cells. This study sought to clarify the mechanism(s) by which this orphan nuclear receptor is regulated, and hence affects TAM resistance. mRNA and protein expression/phosphorylation were monitored by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to disrupt consensus extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) target sites. Cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression were measured by flow cytometric methods. ERRγ transcriptional activity was assessed by dual-luciferase promoter-reporter assays. We show that ERRγ protein levels are affected by the activation state of ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase, and mutation of consensus ERK target sites impairs ERRγ-driven transcriptional activity and TAM resistance. These findings shed new light on the functional significance of ERRγ in ER+ breast cancer, and are the first to demonstrate a role for kinase regulation of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  5. Estrogen Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Aft, Rebecca L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to estrogens correlates with increased risk for breast cancer. One explanation is that estrogen metabolites cause mutations by reacting with DNA, leading to depurination. We describe an extraction procedure and a liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) assay to detect estrone-metabolite-modified adenine (Ade) in 100-200 mg samples of human breast tissue. To insure reliable analyses, we used a synthetic estrone-metabolite-modified, U-15N labeled Ade as an internal standard (IS). Appropriate high pressure liquid chromatography gives sharp (∼ 5 s at half height) with identical retention times for the analyte and the IS. In breast tissue from women with and without cancer, we found a co-eluting material with similar MS/MS fragmentation as the IS, providing high specificity in the identification of the modified Ade; the recovery was approximately 50%. For women with and without breast cancer, the levels of the modified Ade are in the range of 20-70 fmol/g of breast tissue from five women and not detectable in tissue from another women. The sample size and detection limits are not yet sufficient to permit distinctions between cancer and noncancer patients. PMID:18672910

  6. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate inhibit glucose uptake and metabolism by breast cancer cells by an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Liliana; Araújo, Isabel; Costa, Tito; Correia-Branco, Ana; Faria, Ana; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2013-07-15

    In this study we characterized {sup 3}H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 3}H -DG) uptake by the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 and the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines and investigated the effect of quercetin (QUE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) upon {sup 3}H-DG uptake, glucose metabolism and cell viability and proliferation. In both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells {sup 3}H-DG uptake was (a) time-dependent, (b) saturable with similar capacity (V{sub max}) and affinity (K{sub m}), (c) potently inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), (d) sodium-independent and (e) slightly insulin-stimulated. This suggests that {sup 3}H-DG uptake by both cell types is mediated by members of the GLUT family, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4 or GLUT12, while being independent of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). QUE and EGCG markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited {sup 3}H-DG uptake by MCF7 and by MDA-MB-231 cells, and both compounds blocked lactate production by MCF7 cells. Additionally, a 4 h-treatment with QUE or EGCG decreased MCF7 cell viability and proliferation, an effect that was more potent when glucose was available in the extracellular medium. Our results implicate QUE and EGCG as metabolic antagonists in breast cancer cells, independently of estrogen signalling, and suggest that these flavonoids could serve as therapeutic agents/adjuvants even for ER-negative breast tumors. -- Highlights: • Glucose uptake by MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is mainly mediated by GLUT1. • QUE and EGCG inhibit cellular glucose uptake thus abolishing the Warburg effect. • This process induces cytotoxicity and proliferation arrest in MCF7 cells. • The flavonoids’ effects are independent of estrogen receptor signalling.

  7. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Üçpunar, Habibe K.; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly’s high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans. PMID:27145030

  8. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ashiq; Zhang, Mo; Üçpunar, Habibe K; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C

    2016-05-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly's high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans. PMID:27145030

  9. Resveratrol inhibits glycine receptor-mediated ion currents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Joon-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is found in grapes, red wine, and berries. Resveratrol has been known to have many beneficial health effects, such as anti-cancer, neuroprotective, anti-nociceptive, and life-prolonging effects. However, the single cellular mechanisms by which resveratrol acts are relatively unknown, especially in terms of possible regulation of receptors involved in synaptic transmission. The glycine receptor is an inhibitory ligand-gated ion channel involved in fast synaptic transmission in spinal cord. In the present study, we investigated the effect of resveratrol on human glycine receptor channel activity. Glycine α1 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and glycine receptor channel activity was measured using a two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Treatment with resveratrol alone had no effect on oocytes injected with H2O or on oocytes injected with glycine α1 receptor cRNA. In the oocytes injected with glycine α1 receptor cRNA, co- or pre-treatment of resveratrol with glycine inhibited the glycine-induced inward peak current (IGly) in a reversible manner. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on IGly was also concentration dependent, voltage independent, and non-competitive. These results indicate that resveratrol regulates glycine receptor channel activity and that resveratrol-mediated regulation of glycine receptor channel activity is one of several cellular action mechanisms of resveratrol for pain regulation. PMID:24694604

  10. Dynamics of receptor-mediated nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process.

  11. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  12. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  13. Estrogen receptor variant ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection against oxidative toxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Zhao, B; Pan, X; Song, Z; Liu, J; Gong, Y; Wang, M

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that estrogen exerts neuroprotective effect against various neuronal damages. However, the estrogen receptor (ER) that mediates estrogen neuroprotection has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the potential receptor that mediates estrogen neuroprotection and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was chosen as an agent in our study to mimic free radicals that are often involved in the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. We found that in human SY5Y and IMR-32 cells, the estrogen neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by knockdown of a variant of estrogen receptor-α, ER-α36. We also studied the rapid estrogen signaling mediated by ER-α36 in neuroprotective effect and found the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling mediated by ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection. We also found that GPER, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, is not involved in ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen response. Our study thus demonstrates that ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen signaling is involved in the neuroprotection activity of estrogen against oxidative toxicity. PMID:26383254

  14. Enhancement of steroid receptor-mediated transcription for the development of highly responsive bioassays.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Philippe; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Martial, Joseph A; Muller, Marc

    2005-06-01

    We have previously generated several transformed human mammary cell lines for the detection of steroid receptor-mediated activities and used these cell lines to detect and characterize steroid hormone (ant)agonistic compounds. In this report, we describe the specific optimization procedures used to enhance receptor-mediated transcription through the human glucocorticoid, progesterone and androgen receptors, respectively. Sodium arsenite-induced chemical stress leads to a substantial and specific increase in the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription, resulting in maximal stimulations of more than 2000-fold by the agonist dexamethasone. Similarly, a combined treatment with forskolin (an activator of adenylate cyclase) and trichostatin A (an inhibitor of histone deacetylases) leads to a synergistic enhancement of progesterone or androgen stimulation, resulting in a maximal induction of more than 200-fold or about 100-fold, respectively. The enhanced responses to specific steroids are mediated by the corresponding nuclear receptor. We show that by using these enhanced transcriptional stimulation protocols, it is possible to detect lower amounts of steroid hormones without substantially affecting the relative biological activities of various agonists. Finally, the application of these enhanced reporter cell assays to real biological samples from meat-producing animals is evaluated, and some validation parameters are presented.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Kodama, Yukio; Kaneko, Toyozo; Kanno, Jun; Kim, Dae-Yong; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    Benzene can induce hematotoxicity and leukemia in humans and mice. Since a review of the literature shows that the CYP2E1 knockout mouse is not known to possess any benzene toxicity, the metabolism of benzene by CYP2E1 in the liver is regarded to be prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, although the mechanism is not fully understood yet. Because it was found some years ago that benzene was also a substrate for CYP1A1, we investigated the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in benzene hematotoxicity using AhR wild-type (AhR(+/+)), heterozygous (AhR(+/-)), and homozygous (AhR(-/-)) male mice. Interestingly, following a 2-week inhalation of 300 ppm benzene (a potent dose for leukemogenicity), no hematotoxicity was induced in AhR(-/-) mice. Further, there were no changes in cellularity of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM), nor in levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units in BM. This lack of hematotoxicity was associated with the lack of p21 overexpression, which was regularly seen in the wild-type mice following benzene inhalation. Combined treatment with two major benzene metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, induced hemopoietic toxicity, although it was not known whether this happened due to a surprising lack of expression of CYP2E1 by AhR knockout, or due to a lack of other AhR-mediated CYP enzymes, including 1A1 (i.e., a possible alternative pathway of benzene metabolism). The former possibility, evaluated in the present study, failed to show a significant relationship between AhR and the expression of CYP2E1. Furthermore, a subsequent evaluation of AhR expression after benzene inhalation tended to show higher but less significant expression in the liver, and none in the BM, compared with sham control. Although this study failed to identify the more likely of the above-mentioned two possibilities, the study using AhR knockout mice on benzene inhalation presents the unique possibility that the benzene toxicity may be

  16. The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Welc, Steven S.; Morse, Deborah A.; Mattingly, Alex J.; Laitano, Orlando; King, Michelle A.; Clanton, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic

  17. Estrogen increases Nrf2 activity through activation of the PI3K pathway in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juanjuan; Williams, Devin; Walter, Grant A.; Thompson, Winston E.; Sidell, Neil

    2014-11-01

    The actions of the transcription factor Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) in breast cancer have been shown to include both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic activities which is influenced, at least in part, by the hormonal environment. However, direct regulation of Nrf2 by steroid hormones (estrogen and progesterone) has received only scant attention. Nrf2 is known to be regulated by its cytosolic binding protein, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), and by a Keap1-independent mechanism involving a series of phosphorylation steps mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Here, we report that estrogen (E2) increases Nrf2 activity in MCF7 breast cancer cells through activation of the PI3K/GSK3β pathway. Utilizing antioxidant response element (ARE)-containing luciferase reporter constructs as read-outs for Nrf2 activity, our data indicated that E2 increased ARE activity >14-fold and enhanced the action of the Nrf2 activators, tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) and sulforaphane (Sul) 4 to 9 fold compared with cells treated with tBHQ or Sul as single agents. This activity was shown to be an estrogen receptor-mediated phenomenon and was antagonized by progesterone. In addition to its action on the reporter constructs, mRNA and protein levels of heme oxygenase 1, an endogenous target gene of Nrf2, was markedly upregulated by E2 both alone and in combination with tBHQ. Importantly, E2-induced Nrf2 activation was completely suppressed by the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 and Wortmannin while the GSK3β inhibitor CT99021 upregulated Nrf2 activity. Confirmation that E2 was, at least partly, acting through the PI3K/GSK3β pathway was indicated by our finding that E2 increased the phosphorylation status of both GSK3β and Akt, a well-characterized downstream target of PI3K. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which E2 can regulate Nrf2 activity in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

  18. Open-channel block of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses by memantine: therapeutic advantage against NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Pellegrini, J W; Aggarwal, S K; Lei, S Z; Warach, S; Jensen, F E; Lipton, S A

    1992-11-01

    Excessive activation of NMDA receptors is thought to mediate the calcium-dependent neurotoxicity associated with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, trauma, epilepsy, and several neurodegenerative diseases. For this reason, various NMDA antagonists have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in these diseases, but heretofore none have proven to be both effective and safe. In the present study, memantine, an adamantane derivative similar to the antiviral drug amantadine, is shown to block the channels activated by NMDA receptor stimulation. From whole-cell and single-channel recording experiments, the mechanism of action of memantine is deduced to be open-channel block, similar to MK-801; however, unlike MK-801, memantine is well tolerated clinically. Compared to MK-801, memantine's safety may be related to its faster kinetics of action with rapid blocking and unblocking rates at low micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, at these levels memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist and should theoretically allow near-normal physiological NMDA activity throughout the brain even in the face of pathologically high focal concentrations of glutamate. These pharmacological properties confer upon memantine a therapeutic advantage against NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity with few side effects compared with other organic NMDA open-channel blockers. Moreover, memantine is increasingly effective against escalating levels of glutamate, such as those observed during a stroke. Low micromolar concentrations of memantine, levels known to be tolerated by patients receiving the drug for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, prevent NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in cultures of rat cortical and retinal ganglion cell neurons; memantine also appears to be both safe and effective in a rat stroke model. These results suggest that memantine has considerable therapeutic potential for the myriad of clinical entities associated with NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity.

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  20. Mechanism of metabolic activation and DNA adduct formation by the human carcinogen diethylstilbestrol: The defining link to natural estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Muhammad; Rogan, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a human carcinogen, based on sufficient epidemiological evidence. DES is mainly metabolized to its catechol, 3′-hydroxyDES (3′-OH-DES), which can further oxidize to DES-3′,4′-quinone (DES-3′,4′-Q). Similarly to estradiol-3,4-quinone, the reaction of DES-3′,4′-Q with DNA would form the depurinating 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua adducts. To prove this hypothesis, synthesis of DES-3′,4′-Q by oxidation of 3′-OH-DES with Ag2O was tried; this failed due to instantaneous formation of a spiro-quinone. Oxidation of 3′-OH-DES by lactoperoxidase or tyrosinase in the presence of DNA led to the formation of 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua adducts. These adducts were tentatively identified by LC-MS/MS as 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade, m/z = 418 [M+H]+, and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua, m/z = 434 [M+H]+. Demonstration of their structures derived from their oxidation by MnO2 to the DES quinone adducts and subsequent tautomerization to the dienestrol (DIES) catechol adducts, which are identical to the standard 3′-OH-DIES-6′-N3Ade, m/z = 416 [M+H]+, and 3′-OH-DIES-6′-N7Gua, m/z = 432 [M+H]+, adducts. The reaction of DIES-3′,4′-Q or lactoperoxidase-activated 3′-OH-DIES with DNA did not produce any depurinating adducts, due to the dienic chain being perpendicular to the phenyl planes, which impedes the intercalation of DIES into the DNA. Enzymic oxidation of 3′-OH-DES suggests that the catechol of DES intercalates into DNA and is then oxidized to its quinone to yield N3Ade and N7Gua adducts. These results suggest that the common denominator of tumor initiation by the synthetic estrogen DES and the natural estrogen estradiol is formation of their catechol quinones, which react with DNA to afford the depurinating N3Ade and N7Gua adducts. PMID:19089919

  1. Receptor-mediated delivery of photoprotective agents by low-density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, S.T.; Yang, Y.L.; Falck, J.R.; Anderson, R.G.W.

    1984-12-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been used to deliver toxic molecules to cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In these studies, the cholesteryl ester core of LDL was replaced with a lipophilic, toxic molecule. The authors report that photoprotective azo dyes can be stably incorporated into LDL, and that this reconstituted LDL protects cells from the photosensitizing action of pyrene methanol (PM) in a receptor-dependent process. The photoprotective action of the azo dye is due to its ability to scavenge singlet oxygen that is produced by the photosensitive agent in response to UV light.

  2. Investigations of receptor-mediated phagocytosis by hormone-induced (imprinted) Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Sundermann, C A; Csaba, G

    1996-08-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis by Tetrahvmena pyriformis was studied using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled concanavalin A (TRITC-Con A) with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. In the presence of insulin, or 24 h after insulin pretreatment (hormonal imprinting), the binding and uptake of TRITC-Con A increased when compared to controls, owing to the binding of TRITC-Con A to sugar oligomers of insulin receptors. Mannose inhibited the binding of Con A, thus demonstrating the specificity of binding. Histamine, a phagocytosis-promoting factor in mammals and Tetrahymena, and galactose, did not influence the uptake of TRITC-Con A.

  3. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  4. An In Vitro Dormancy Model of Estrogen-sensitive Breast Cancer in the Bone Marrow: A Tool for Molecular Mechanism Studies and Hypothesis Generation.

    PubMed

    Tivari, Samir; Korah, Reju; Lindy, Michael; Wieder, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The study of breast cancer dormancy in the bone marrow is an exceptionally difficult undertaking due to the complexity of the interactions of dormant cells with their microenvironment, their rarity and the overwhelming excess of hematopoietic cells. Towards this end, we developed an in vitro 2D clonogenic model of dormancy of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells in the bone marrow. The model consists of a few key elements necessary for dormancy. These include 1) the use of estrogen sensitive breast cancer cells, which are the type likely to remain dormant for extended periods, 2) incubation of cells at clonogenic density, where the structural interaction of each cell is primarily with the substratum, 3) fibronectin, a key structural element of the marrow and 4) FGF-2, a growth factor abundantly synthesized by bone marrow stromal cells and heavily deposited in the extracellular matrix. Cells incubated with FGF-2 form dormant clones after 6 days, which consist of 12 or less cells that have a distinct flat appearance, are significantly larger and more spread out than growing cells and have large cytoplasm to nucleus ratios. In contrast, cells incubated without FGF-2 form primarily growing colonies consisting of>30 relatively small cells. Perturbations of the system with antibodies, inhibitors, peptides or nucleic acids on day 3 after incubation can significantly affect various phenotypic and molecular aspects of the dormant cells at 6 days and can be used to assess the roles of membrane-localized or intracellular molecules, factors or signaling pathways on the dormant state or survival of dormant cells. While recognizing the in vitro nature of the assay, it can function as a highly useful tool to glean significant information about the molecular mechanisms necessary for establishment and survival of dormant cells. This data can be used to generate hypotheses to be tested in vivo models. PMID:26168083

  5. Repeated exposure of adult rats to Aroclor 1254 induces neuronal injury and impairs the neurochemical manifestations of the NMDA receptor-mediated intracellular signaling in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Łazarewicz, Jerzy W; Strużynska, Lidia; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Aroclor 1254 is a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of environmental toxins which cause a wide spectrum of neurotoxic effects. Learning and memory deficits are the profound effects of PCBs which may be related to hippocampal dysfunction. To get insight into the underlying neurochemical mechanisms, we employed the microdialysis technique to investigate the effect of repeated exposure of adult male Wistar rats to Aroclor 1254 (10mg/kg b.w., daily, ig., for 14days), on the neurochemical parameters of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus in vivo assessed using the microdialysis technique. The results demonstrated that exposure to Aroclor 1254, which was associated with substantial neuronal damage and loss in the hippocampus, markedly decreased the NMDA-induced extracellular accumulation of newly loaded (45)CaCl(2), cGMP and glutamate, and reduced the basal content of the NO precursor, arginine, indicating inhibition of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway. Aroclor 1254 exposure also decreased the basal microdialysate content of glutamate and glutamine, which may cause inadequate supply of the neurotransmitter glutamate, while the level of two other neuroactive amino acids, aspartate or taurine was not affected by the exposure. The results underscore neuronal lesion and inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in hippocampus as a potential major contributor to the cognitive deficits associated with exposure to PCB.

  6. Combined estrogenic and anti-estrogenic properties of estetrol on breast cancer may provide a safe therapeutic window for the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Céline; Mestdagt, Mélanie; Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Communal, Laudine; Gompel, Anne; Silva, Elisabete; Arnal, Jean-François; Lenfant, Françoise; Noel, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Péqueux, Christel

    2015-07-10

    Increased risk of breast cancer is a critical side effect associated with the use of a menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Estetrol (E4) is a natural estrogen produced by the human fetal liver and is a promising compound for clinical use in MHT. However, its impact on breast cancer is controversial and poorly defined. In this preclinical study, we show that E4 acts as a weak estrogen by stimulating the growth of hormone-dependent breast cancer only at concentrations exceeding menopausal therapeutic needs. E4 presents also an antitumor activity by decreasing the strong proliferative effect of estradiol (E2). While estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is the predominant receptor mediating its effects, the dual weak-estrogenic/anti-estrogenic feature of E4 results from differential signaling pathways activation. Both nuclear and rapid extra-nuclear signaling pathway are necessary for a complete estrogenic effect of E4. However, the antitumor action of E4 is not due to a capacity to antagonize E2-induced nuclear activity. Altogether, our results highlight that E4 has a limited impact on breast cancer and may offer a safe therapeutic window for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26056044

  7. Combined estrogenic and anti-estrogenic properties of estetrol on breast cancer may provide a safe therapeutic window for the treatment of menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Céline; Mestdagt, Mélanie; Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Communal, Laudine; Gompel, Anne; Silva, Elisabete; Arnal, Jean-François; Lenfant, Françoise; Noel, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Péqueux, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Increased risk of breast cancer is a critical side effect associated with the use of a menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Estetrol (E4) is a natural estrogen produced by the human fetal liver and is a promising compound for clinical use in MHT. However, its impact on breast cancer is controversial and poorly defined. In this preclinical study, we show that E4 acts as a weak estrogen by stimulating the growth of hormone-dependent breast cancer only at concentrations exceeding menopausal therapeutic needs. E4 presents also an antitumor activity by decreasing the strong proliferative effect of estradiol (E2). While estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is the predominant receptor mediating its effects, the dual weak-estrogenic/anti-estrogenic feature of E4 results from differential signaling pathways activation. Both nuclear and rapid extra-nuclear signaling pathway are necessary for a complete estrogenic effect of E4. However, the antitumor action of E4 is not due to a capacity to antagonize E2-induced nuclear activity. Altogether, our results highlight that E4 has a limited impact on breast cancer and may offer a safe therapeutic window for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26056044

  8. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  9. Resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury by inhibiting death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways in a cisplatin-induced rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qiufa; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Zhen, Junhui; Feng, Jinbo; Song, Chun; Jiang, Bei; Hu, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of renal function and acute tubular necrosis. Resveratrol exerts a wide range of pharmacological effects based on its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The present study aimed to evaluate whether resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury in a cisplatin-induced rat model and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: Control, cisplatin, resveratrol, and cisplatin plus resveratrol. Rats exposed to cisplatin displayed acute kidney injury, identified by analysis of renal function and histopathological observation. Resveratrol significantly ameliorated the increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal index and histopathological damage induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, compared with untreated control animals, cisplatin lead to significantly increased expression of Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), caspase-8 and Bcl-2 associated protein X apoptosis regulator (Bax), and decreased expression of anti-apoptosis regulators, BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID) and B cell lymphoma 2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl-2). Administration of resveratrol significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced alteration in these apoptosis-associated proteins. In conclusion, these findings suggest that resveratrol attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury through inactivation of the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, and may provide a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the process of acute kidney injury. PMID:27600998

  10. Melatonin as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator.

    PubMed

    Cos, S; González, A; Martínez-Campa, C; Mediavilla, M D; Alonso-González, C; Sánchez-Barceló, E J

    2008-12-01

    Melatonin exerts oncostatic effects on different kinds of tumors, especially on hormone-dependent breast cancer. The general conclusion is that melatonin, in vivo, reduces the incidence and growth of chemically-induced mammary tumors in rodents, and, in vitro, inhibits the proliferation and invasiveness of human breast cancer cells. Both studies support the hypothesis that melatonin inhibits the growth of breast cancer by interacting with estrogen-signaling pathways through three different mechanisms: (a) the indirect neuroendocrine mechanism which includes the melatonin down-regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-reproductive axis and the consequent reduction of circulating levels of gonadal estrogens, (b) direct melatonin actions at tumor cell level by interacting with the activation of the estrogen receptor, thus behaving as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and (c) the regulation of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens in peripheral tissues, thus behaving as a selective estrogen enzyme modulator (SEEM). As melatonin reduces the activity and expression of aromatase, sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and increases the activity and expression of estrogen sulfotransferase, it may protect mammary tissue from excessive estrogenic effects. Thus, a single molecule has both SERM and SEEM properties, one of the main objectives desired for the breast antitumoral drugs. Since the inhibition of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogens is currently one of the first therapeutic strategies used against the growth of breast cancer, melatonin modulation of different enzymes involved in the synthesis of steroid hormones makes, collectively, this indolamine an interesting anticancer drug in the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent mammary tumors.

  11. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  12. Mechanisms for the activity of heterocyclic cyclohexanone curcumin derivatives in estrogen receptor negative human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Somers-Edgar, Tiffany J; Taurin, Sebastien; Larsen, Lesley; Chandramouli, Anupama; Nelson, Mark A; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form that currently requires more drug treatment options. Thus, we have further modified cyclohexanone derivatives of curcumin and examined them for cytotoxicity towards ER-negative human breast cancer cells. Two of the analogs screened elicited increased cytotoxic potency compared to curcumin and other previously studied derivatives. Specifically, 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL90) and 2,6-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL91) elicited EC(50) values of 1.54 and 1.10 µM, respectively, in MDA-MB-231 cells and EC(50) values of 0.51 and 0.23 in SKBr3 cells. All other new compounds examined were less potent than curcumin, which elicited EC(50) values of 7.6 and 2.4 µM in MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3 cells, respectively. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated that RL90 and RL91 significantly induced G(2)/M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RL90 and RL91 also modulated the expression of key cell signaling proteins, specifically, in SKBr3 cells, protein levels of Her-2, Akt, and NFκB were decreased in a time-dependent manner, while activity of stress kinases JNK1/2 and P38 MAPK were increased. Signaling events in MDA-MB-231 cells were differently implicated, as EGFR protein levels were decreased and activity of GSK-3β transiently decreased, while β-catenin protein level and activity of P38 MAPK, Akt, and JNK1/2 were transiently increased. In conclusion replacement of the phenyl group of cyclohexanone derived curcumin derivatives with heterocyclic rings forms a class of second-generation analogs that are more potent than both curcumin and other derivatives. These new derivatives provide a platform for the further development of drugs for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer.

  13. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  14. CD44, α4 integrin, and fucoidin receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jacob D.; Hess, Krista L.; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    Various types of phagocytes mediate the clearance of apoptotic cells. We previously reported that human and murine high endothelial venule (HEV) cells ingest apoptotic cells. In this report, we examined endothelial cell fucoidin receptor-mediated phagocytosis using a murine endothelial cell model mHEV. mHEV cell recognition of apoptotic leukocytes was blocked by fucoidin but not by other phagocytic receptor inhibitors such as mannose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, phosphatidylserine (PS), or blocking anti-PS receptor antibodies. Thus, the mHEV cells used fucoidin receptors for recognition and phagocytosis of apoptotic leukocytes. The fucoidin receptor-mediated endothelial cell phagocytosis was specific for apoptotic leukocytes, as necrotic cells were not ingested. This is in contrast to macrophages, which ingest apoptotic and necrotic cells. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of apoptotic cells did not alter viable lymphocyte migration across these endothelial cells. Antibody blocking of CD44 and α4 integrin on the apoptotic leukocyte inhibited this endothelial cell phagocytosis, suggesting a novel function for these adhesion molecules in the removal of apoptotic targets. The removal of apoptotic leukocytes by endothelial cells may protect the microvasculature, thus ensuring that viable lymphocytes can successfully migrate into tissues. PMID:12960273

  15. Melanocortin MC(4) receptor-mediated feeding and grooming in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; Spruijt, Berry M; Brakkee, Jan H; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-11-01

    Decades ago it was recognized that the pharmacological profile of melanocortin ligands that stimulated grooming behavior in rats was strikingly similar to that of Xenopus laevis melanophore pigment dispersion. After cloning of the melanocortin MC1 receptor, expressed in melanocytes, and the melanocortin MC4 receptor, expressed mainly in brain, the pharmacological profiles of these receptors appeared to be very similar and it was demonstrated that these receptors mediate melanocortin-induced pigmentation and grooming respectively. Grooming is a low priority behavior that is concerned with care of body surface. Activation of central melanocortin MC4 receptors is also associated with meal termination, and continued postprandial stimulation of melanocortin MC4 receptors may stimulate natural postprandial grooming behavior as part of the behavioral satiety sequence. Indeed, melanocortins fail to suppress food intake or induce grooming behavior in melanocortin MC4 receptor-deficient rats. This review will focus on how melanocortins affect grooming behavior through the melanocortin MC4 receptor, and how melanocortin MC4 receptors mediate feeding behavior. This review also illustrates how melanocortins were the most likely candidates to mediate grooming and feeding based on the natural behaviors they induced.

  16. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  17. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  18. The molecular, cellular and clinical consequences of targeting the estrogen receptor following estrogen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y; Curpan, Ramona F; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V Craig

    2015-12-15

    During the past 20 years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed "morning after pill", was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite "antiestrogen" resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women's health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells.

  19. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  20. Distribution and regulation by estrogen of progesterone receptor in the hypothalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Seroogy, K B; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    The diencephalon is critically involved in the estrogen-dependent receptor-mediated stimulation of respiration by progesterone in cats. To identify a neuroanatomic basis for this effect of progesterone, the diencephalon of the ovariectomized cat was examined immunohistochemically with an antiprogesterone receptor (anti-PR) monoclonal antibody. No immunostaining was found in ovariectomized animals pretreated with sesame oil alone. In contrast, numerous cells in the ventromedial aspect of the hypothalamus from cats pretreated with estradiol benzoate were PR immunoreactive. Thus, PR is induced by estrogen in hypothalamic neurons of cats. In animals pretreated with estradiol benzoate, the highest density of immunostained neurons was found throughout the infundibular nucleus, especially in the region of the mammillary recess of the third ventricle. PR-immunoreactive cells were also distributed throughout the periventricular nucleus, with the highest density located rostrally and immediately above the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Notably and in contrast to a number of other species (e.g. rat and guinea pig), only very few weakly stained PR-containing cells were found in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus. This latter finding could reflect the progesterone independence of sexual behaviors in cat. Overall, we have identified hypothalamic areas that may subserve estrogen-dependent receptor-mediated effects of progesterone in the cat, such as the stimulation of respiration. PMID:2019267

  1. Functional significance of the rapid regulation of brain estrogens: Where do the estrogens come from?

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens exert a wide variety of actions on reproductive and non-reproductive functions. These effects are mediated by slow and long lasting genomic as well as rapid and transient non-genomic mechanisms. Besides the host of studies demonstrating the role of genomic actions at the physiological and behavioral level, mounting evidence highlights the functional significance of non-genomic effects. However, the source of the rapid changes in estrogen availability that are necessary to sustain their fast actions is rarely questioned. For example, the rise of plasma estrogens at pro-estrus that represents one of the fastest documented changes in plasma estrogen concentration appears too slow to explain these actions. Alternatively, estrogen can be synthesized in the brain by the enzyme aromatase providing a source of locally high concentrations of the steroid. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrate that brain aromatase can be rapidly modulated by afferent inputs, including glutamatergic afferents. A role for rapid changes in estrogen production in the central nervous system is supported by experiments showing that acute aromatase inhibition affects nociception as well as male sexual behavior and that preoptic aromatase activity is rapidly (within min) modulated following mating. Such mechanisms thus fulfill the gap existing between the fast actions of estrogen and their mode of production and open new avenues for the understanding of estrogenic effects on the brain. PMID:16978590

  2. Estrogen Receptors, the Hippocampus, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Linda A.; Ianov, Lara; Foster, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol effects on memory depend on hormone levels and the interaction of different estrogen receptors within neural circuits. Estradiol induces gene transcription and rapid membrane signaling mediated by estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ), and a recently characterized G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, each with distinct distributions and ability to influence estradiol-dependent signaling. Investigations using receptor specific agonists suggest that all three receptors rapidly activate kinase-signaling and have complex dose-dependent influences on memory. Research employing receptor knockout mice demonstrate that ERα maintains transcription and memory as estradiol levels decline. This work indicates a regulatory role of ERβ in transcription and cognition, which depends on estradiol levels and the function of ERα. The regulatory role of ERβ is due in part to ERβ acting as a negative regulator of ERα-mediated transcription. Vector-mediated expression of estrogen receptors in the hippocampus provides an innovative research approach and suggests that memory depends on the relative expression of ERα and ERβ interacting with estradiol levels. Notably, the ability of estradiol to improve cognition declines with advanced age along with decreased expression of estrogen receptors. Thus, it will be important for future research to determine the mechanisms that regulate estrogen receptor expression during aging. PMID:24510074

  3. Estrogenic effects of natural and synthetic compounds including tibolone assessed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the human estrogen alpha and beta receptors.

    PubMed

    Hasenbrink, Guido; Sievernich, André; Wildt, Ludwig; Ludwig, Jost; Lichtenberg-Fraté, Hella

    2006-07-01

    The human estrogen receptors (hER)alpha and hERbeta, differentially expressed and localized in various tissues and cell types, mediate transcriptional activation of target genes. These encode a variety of physiological reproductive and nonreproductive functions involved in energy metabolism, salt balance, immune system, development, and differentiation. As a step toward developing a screening assay for the use in applications where significant numbers of compounds or complex matrices need to be tested for (anti) estrogenic bioactivity, hERalpha and hERbeta were expressed in a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, devoid of three endogenous xenobiotic transporters (PDR5, SNQ2, and YOR1). By using receptor-mediated transcriptional activation of the green fluorescent protein optimized for expression in yeast (yEGFP) as reporter 17 natural, comprising estrogens and phytoestrogens or synthetic compounds among which tibolone with its metabolites, gestagens, and antiestrogens were investigated. The reporter assay deployed a simple and robust protocol for the rapid detection of estrogenic effects within a 96-well microplate format. Results were expressed as effective concentrations (EC50) and correlated to other yeast based and cell line assays. Tibolone and its metabolites exerted clear estrogenic effects, though considerably less potent than all other natural and synthetic compounds. For the blood serum of two volunteers, considerable higher total estrogenic bioactivity than single estradiol concentrations as determined by immunoassay was found. Visualization of a hERalpha/GFP fusion protein in yeast revealed a sub cellular cytosolic localization. This study demonstrates the versatility of (anti) estrogenic bioactivity determination using sensitized S. cerevisiae cells to assess estrogenic exposure and effects.

  4. An engineered substance P variant for receptor-mediated delivery of synthetic antibodies into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Shahir S; Luchniak, Anna; Uysal, Serdar; Brawley, Crista M; Rock, Ronald S; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2009-07-01

    We have developed and tested a robust delivery method for the transport of proteins to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells without compromising the integrity of the cell membrane. This receptor-mediated delivery (RMD) technology utilizes a variant of substance P (SP), a neuropeptide that is rapidly internalized upon interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R). Cargos in the form of synthetic antibody fragments (sABs) were conjugated to the engineered SP variant (SPv) and efficiently internalized by NK1R-expressing cells. The sABs used here were generated to bind specific conformational forms of actin. The internalized proteins appear to escape the endosome and retain their binding activity within the cells as demonstrated by co-localization with the actin cytoskeleton. Further, since the NK1R is over-expressed in many cancers, SPv-mediated delivery provides a highly specific method for therapeutic utilization of affinity reagents targeting intracellular processes in diseased tissue.

  5. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.

  6. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  7. Targeting receptor-mediated transport for delivery of biologics across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Biologics are an emerging class of medicines with substantial promise to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a formidable obstacle that appreciably limits brain uptake and hence, therapeutic potential, of biologics following intravenous administration. One promising strategy for overcoming the BBB to deliver biologics is the targeting of endogenous receptor-mediated transport (RMT) systems that employ vesicular trafficking to transport ligands across the BBB endothelium. If a biologic is modified with an appropriate targeting ligand, it can gain improved access to the brain via RMT. Various RMT targeting strategies have been developed over the past 20 years, and this review will explore exciting recent advances, with a particular emphasis on those studies showing brain targeting in vivo. PMID:25340933

  8. Effects of 2-phenoxyethanol on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated ion currents.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, U; Madeja, M; Binding, N; Witting, U; Speckmann, E J

    1999-02-01

    The actions were examined of 17 frequently used glycol ether compounds on the glutamate receptor-mediated ion currents. The receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of rat brain mRNA. Most of the 17 glycol ethers exerted no effects on the glutamate subreceptors activated by kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), whereas 2-phenoxyethanol (ethylene glycol monophenyl ether) caused a considerable reduction of NMDA-induced membrane currents in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The threshold concentration of the ethylene glycol monophenyl ether effect was < 10 mumol/l. The concentration for a 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 360 mumol/l. The results indicate a neurotoxic potential for 2-phenoxyethanol.

  9. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs.

  10. Relationship between Ah receptor-mediated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced humoral immunosuppression and thymic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L

    1985-12-01

    Thymic atrophy and humoral immunosuppression by certain polychlorinated biphenyls is associated with the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice. We examined the relationship between these two toxic effects. 3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB), which causes immunosuppression and thymic atrophy, and 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexachlorobiphenyl, which causes immunosuppression without thymic atrophy, were administered i.p. to C57BL/6 mice at 0, 35 and 350 mumol/kg b.wt. 2 days before i.v. immunization with 10 micrograms of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Both congeners caused significant suppression of the day 4 anti-lipopolysaccharide plaque-forming cell response/spleen (less than or equal to 46% of control). TCB (350 mumol/kg) was also administered 2 days before either a primary or secondary i.p. immunization with sheep erythrocytes. TCB treatment before primary immunization had no effects on the day 5 secondary response, whereas treatment before the secondary immunization significantly inhibited both day 5 immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G plaque-forming cells (less than 10 and less than 2% of control, respectively) and decreased serum antibody. TCB administered either 8 or 2 days before or 2 or 4 days after immunization with sheep erythrocytes demonstrated that significant suppression of both plaque-forming cells and serum antibody could occur without thymic atrophy. Immunity was most impaired when TCB was given 2 days before immunization. These results demonstrate that thymic atrophy does not always accompany the severe immunosuppression caused by Ah receptor ligands and suggests that it may not be a sensitive measure of Ah receptor-mediated immunosuppression. The data also suggests that differentiation of B lymphocytes into antibody producing cells is impaired during Ah receptor-mediated gene activation.

  11. Modeling receptor-mediated processes with dioxin: Implications for pharmacokinetics and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.E.; Mills, J.J.; Gargas, M.L. ); Keddersi, L. ); Birnbaum, L.S. ); Neubert, D. ); Greenlee, W.F. )

    1993-02-01

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD), a widespread aromatic hydrocarbon, caused tumors in the liver and other sites when administered chronically to rats at doses as low as 0.01 [mu]g/kg/day. It functions in combination with a cellular protein, the Ah receptor, to alter gene regulation, and this resulting modulation of gene expression is believed to be obligatory for both dioxin toxicity and carcinogenicity. The U.S. EPA is reevaluating its dioxin risk assessment and, as part of this process, will be developing risk assessment approaches for chemicals, such as dioxin, whose toxicity is receptor-mediated. This paper describes a receptor-mediated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for the tissue distribution and enzyme-inducing properties of dioxin and discusses the potential role of these models in a biologically motivated risk assessment. In this model, ternary interactions among the Ah receptor, dioxin, and DNA binding sites lead to enhance production of specific hepatic proteins. This model was used to examine the tissue disposition of dioxin and the induction of both a dioxin-binding protein (presumably, cytochrome P4501A2), and cytochrome P4501A1. Tumor promotion correlated more closely with predicted induction of P4501A1 than with induction of hepatic binding proteins. Although increased induction of these proteins is not expected to be causally related to tumor formation, these physiological dosimetry and gene-induction response models will be important for biologically motivated dioxin risk assessments in determining both target tissue dose of dioxin and gene products and in examining the relationship between these gene products and the cellular events more directly involved in tumor promotion.

  12. Fluid Shear Stress Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis via Trimeric Death Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to receptor-mediated apoptosis has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlated with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increased in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis was not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress did not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments revealed that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear force can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents. PMID:25110459

  13. Aripiprazole has functionally selective actions at dopamine D2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jonathan D; Vargas, Gabriel A; von Zastrow, Mark; Mailman, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a unique atypical antipsychotic drug with an excellent side-effect profile presumed, in part, to be due to lack of typical D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist properties. Whether aripiprazole is a typical D(2) partial agonist, or a functionally selective D(2) ligand, remains controversial (eg D(2)-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is system dependent; aripiprazole antagonizes D(2) receptor-mediated G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels and guanosine triphosphate nucleotide (GTP)gammaS coupling). The current study examined the D(2L) receptor binding properties of aripiprazole, as well as the effects of the drug on three downstream D(2) receptor-mediated functional effectors: mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, potentiation of arachidonic acid (AA) release, and D(2) receptor internalization. Unlike quinpirole (a full D(2) agonist) or (-)3PPP (S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride, a D(2) partial agonist), the apparent D(2) affinity of aripiprazole was not decreased significantly by GTP. Moreover, full or partial agonists are expected to have Hill slopes <1.0, yet that of aripiprazole was significantly >1.0. Whereas aripiprazole partially activated both the MAPK and AA pathways, its potency vs MAPK phosphorylation was much lower relative to potencies in assays either of AA release or inhibition of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation. In addition, unlike typical agonists, neither aripiprazole nor (-)3PPP produced significant internalization of the D(2L) receptor. These data are clear evidence that aripiprazole affects D(2L)-mediated signaling pathways in a differential manner. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that aripiprazole is a functionally selective D(2) ligand rather than a simple partial agonist. Such data may be useful in understanding the novel clinical actions of this drug.

  14. Potential insight for drug discovery from high fidelity receptor-mediated transduction mechanisms in insects

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B.; Raffa, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is a pervasive and growing concern about the small number of new pharmaceutical agents. There are many proposed explanations for this trend that do not involve the drug-discovery process per se, but the discovery process itself has also come under scrutiny. If the current paradigms are indeed not working, where are novel ideas to come from? Perhaps it is time to look to novel sources. Areas covered The receptor-signaling and 2nd-messenger transduction processes present in insects are quite similar to those in mammals (involving G proteins, ion channels, etc.). However, a review of these systems reveals an unprecedented degree of high potency and receptor selectivity to an extent greater than that modeled in most current drug-discovery approaches. Expert opinion A better understanding of insect receptor pharmacology could stimulate novel theoretical and practical ideas in mammalian pharmacology (drug discovery) and, conversely, the application of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry principles could stimulate novel advances in entomology (safer and more targeted control of pest species). PMID:21984882

  15. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  16. Binding of Estrogenic Compounds to Recombinant Estrogen Receptor-α: Application to Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Arnaud; Boussioux, Anne-Marie; Escande, Aurélie; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Gomez, Elena; Fenet, Hélène; Ruff, Marc; Moras, Dino; Vignon, Françoise; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Casellas, Claude; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Balaguer, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic activity in environmental samples could be mediated through a wide variety of compounds and by various mechanisms. High-affinity compounds for estrogen receptors (ERs), such as natural or synthetic estrogens, as well as low-affinity compounds such as alkylphenols, phthalates, and polychlorinated biphenyls are present in water and sediment samples. Furthermore, compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which do not bind ERs, modulate estrogen activity by means of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In order to characterize compounds that mediate estrogenic activity in river water and sediment samples, we developed a tool based on the ER-αligand-binding domain, which permitted us to estimate contaminating estrogenic compound affinities. We designed a simple transactivation assay in which compounds of high affinity were captured by limited amounts of recombinant ER-αand whose capture led to a selective inhibition of transactivation. This approach allowed us to bring to light that water samples contain estrogenic compounds that display a high affinity for ERs but are present at low concentrations. In sediment samples, on the contrary, we showed that estrogenic compounds possess a low affinity and are present at high concentration. Finally, we used immobilized recombinant ER-αto separate ligands for ER and AhR that are present in river sediments. Immobilized ER-α, which does not retain dioxin-like compounds, enabled us to isolate and concentrate ER ligands to facilitate their further analysis. PMID:15743715

  17. Low Concentrations of o,p’-DDT Inhibit Gene Expression and Prostaglandin Synthesis by Estrogen Receptor-Independent Mechanism in Rat Ovarian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p’-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p’-DDT at range of 0.3–500 ng/g (8.46×10−10 M−1.41×10−6 M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p’-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p’-DDT (10−12−10−8 M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p’-DDT at 0.5–1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p’-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p’-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p’-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p’-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction. PMID:23209616

  18. Inhibitory effects of nordihydroguaiaretic acid on ETA-receptor-mediated contractions to endothelin-1 in rat trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. It has been shown previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibits endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contractions in rat isolated tracheal smooth muscle. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, this study examined the effects of NDGA on various aspects of the ETA and ETB receptor-effector systems which mediate ET-1-induced contractions in this preparation. 2. NDGA inhibited contractions induced by each of the isoforms of ET (ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3) but not those induced by the ETB receptor-selective agonist, sarafotoxin S6c, the cholinoceptor agonist, carbachol or the depolarizing spasmogen, KCl. 3. Quantitative autoradiographic studies of [125I]-ET-1 binding to rat tracheal smooth muscle indicated that NDGA was not an ET receptor antagonist. 4. NDGA inhibited the ETA receptor-mediated, intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent contractions induced by 100 nM ET-1 in Ca(2+)-free solution (by 75%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, NDGA markedly inhibited the contractions induced by ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid; contractions purportedly due to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. 5. Like NDGA, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin inhibited contractions to ET-1, but not carbachol or KCl. However, cyclopiazonic acid, but not NDGA, also (a) induced transient contractions in rat trachea, (b) potentiated contractions induced by KCl, and (c) potentiated the extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent phase of ET-1-induced contractions, indicating that NDGA did not inhibit ET-1-induced contractions through Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+. 6. In control preparations, ET-1 induced a slowly developing, sustained contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004399

  19. Gonadotrophin-releasing activity of neurohypophysial hormones: II. The pituitary oxytocin receptor mediating gonadotrophin release differs from that of corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Evans, J J; Catt, K J

    1989-07-01

    Neurohypophysial hormones stimulate gonadotrophin release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro, acting through receptors distinct from those which mediate the secretory response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The LH response to oxytocin was not affected by the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, methyl isobutylxanthine, but was diminished in the absence of extracellular calcium and was progressively increased as the calcium concentration in the medium was raised to normal. In addition, the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine, suppressed oxytocin-stimulated secretion of LH. It is likely that the mechanisms of LH release induced by GnRH and neurohypophysial hormones are similar, although stimulation of gonadotrophin secretion is mediated by separate receptor systems. Oxytocin was more active than vasopressin in releasing LH, but less active in releasing ACTH. The highly selective oxytocin agonist, [Thr4,Gly7]oxytocin, elicited concentration-dependent secretion of LH but had little effect on corticotrophin secretion. The neurohypophysial hormone antagonist analogues, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2Val4,Cit8]vasopressin, inhibited the LH response to both oxytocin and vasopressin. However, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin was much less effective in inhibiting the ACTH response to the neurohypophysial hormones, and [d(CH2)5Tyr-(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Cit8]vasopressin exhibited no inhibitory activity against ACTH release. Thus, agonist and antagonist analogues of neurohypophysial hormones display divergent activities with regard to LH and ACTH responses, and the neuropeptide receptor mediating gonadotroph activation is clearly different from that on the corticotroph. Whereas the corticotroph receptor is a vasopressin-type receptor an oxytocin-type receptor is responsible for gonadotrophin release by neurohypophysial hormones.

  20. Estrogen and estrogen receptors in cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Muehlfelder, Melanie; Pelzer, Theo

    2013-05-01

    The cardiovascular system of a premenopausal woman is prepared to adapt to the challenges of increased cardiac output and work load that accompany pregnancy. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether enhanced adaptability of the female cardiovascular system might be advantageous under conditions that promote cardiovascular disease. In support of this concept, 17β-estradiol as the major female sex hormone has been shown to confer protective cardiovascular effects in experimental studies. Mechanistically, these have been partially linked to the prevention and protection against oxidative stress. Current evidence indicates that estrogens attenuate oxidative stress at two levels: first, by preventing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, second, by scavenging ROS in the myocardium and in the vasculature. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on current concepts on conditions and mechanisms by which estrogens protect the cardiovascular system against ROS-mediated cellular injury.

  1. Decreases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species initiate GABAA receptor-mediated electrical suppression in anoxia-tolerant turtle neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, David W; Pamenter, Matthew E; Dukoff, David J; Buck, Leslie T

    2015-01-01

    Key points Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) enhanced GABA transmission prevents injury. The mechanism responsible for increased GABA transmission is unknown; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria may play a role because this is an oxygen-sensitive process. In this study, we show that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production is sufficient to initiate a redox-sensitive GABA signalling cascade that suppresses pyramidal neuron action potential frequency. These results further our understanding of the turtle's unique strategy for reducing ATP consumption during anoxia and highlights a natural mechanism in which to explore therapies to protect mammalian brain from low-oxygen insults (e.g. cerebral stroke). Abstract Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the anoxia-tolerant western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) neuronal electrical activity is suppressed (i.e. spike arrest), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption is reduced, and cell death does not occur. Electrical suppression is primarily the result of enhanced γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for initiating oxygen-sensitive GABAergic spike arrest is unknown. In turtle cortical pyramidal neurons there are three types of GABAA receptor-mediated currents: spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), giant IPSCs and tonic currents. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging on these three currents since ROS levels naturally decrease with anoxia and may serve as a redox signal to initiate spike arrest. We found that anoxia, pharmacological ROS scavenging, or inhibition of mitochondrial ROS generation enhanced all three types of GABA currents, with tonic currents comprising ∼50% of the total current. Application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited

  2. Estrogen Replacement Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pabon, Mibel; Tamboli, Cyrus; Tamboli, Sarosh; Acosta, Sandra; De La Pena, Ike; Sanberg, Paul R.; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death and severe disability among Western populations. Overall, the incidence of stroke is uniformly higher in men than in women. Stroke is rare in women during the reproductive years and rapidly increases after menopause, strongly suggesting that estrogen (E2) plays an important role in the prevention of stroke. Ongoing studies are currently evaluating both the benefits and the risks associated with E2 replacement therapy and hormone replacement therapy in stroke. Equally important is the role of E2 receptor (ER), as studies indicate that ER populations in several tissue sites may significantly change during stress and aging. Such changes may affect the patient’s susceptibility to neurological disorders including stroke and greatly affect the response to selective E2 receptor modulators (SERMs). Replacement therapies may be inefficient with low ER levels. The goal of this review paper is to discuss an animal model that will allow investigations of the potential therapeutic effects of E2 and its derivatives in stroke. We hypothesize that E2 neuroprotection is, in part, receptor mediated. This hypothesis is a proof-of-principle approach to demonstrate a role for specific ER subtypes in E2 neuroprotection. To accomplish this, we use a retroviral-mediated gene transfer strategy that expresses subtypes of the ER gene in regions of the rat brain most susceptible to neuronal damage, namely, the striatum and the cortex. The animal model is exposed to experimental stroke conditions involving middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) method, and eventually the extent of neuronal damage will be evaluated. A reduction in neuronal damage is expected when E2 is administered with specific ER subtypes. From this animal model, an optimal E2 dose and treatment regimen can be determined. The animal model can help identify potential E2-like therapeutics in stroke and screen for beneficial or toxic additives present in commercial E2

  3. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods become less frequent and stop and women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent osteoporosis (condition in which the bones ... and break easily) in women who have undergone menopause. Estrogen is in a ...

  4. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  5. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  6. Steroid induction of therapy-resistant cytokeratin-5-positive cells in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer through a BCL6-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, C R; Sato, T; Peck, A R; Girondo, M A; Yang, N; Liu, C; Yanac, A F; Kovatich, A J; Hooke, J A; Shriver, C D; Mitchell, E P; Hyslop, T; Rui, H

    2016-01-01

    Therapy resistance remains a major problem in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. A subgroup of ERα-positive breast cancer is characterized by mosaic presence of a minor population of ERα-negative cancer cells expressing the basal cytokeratin-5 (CK5). These CK5-positive cells are therapy resistant and have increased tumor-initiating potential. Although a series of reports document induction of the CK5-positive cells by progestins, it is unknown if other 3-ketosteroids share this ability. We now report that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids effectively expand the CK5-positive cell population. CK5-positive cells induced by 3-ketosteroids lacked ERα and progesterone receptors, expressed stem cell marker, CD44, and displayed increased clonogenicity in soft agar and broad drug-resistance in vitro and in vivo. Upregulation of CK5-positive cells by 3-ketosteroids required induction of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 based on suppression of BCL6 by two independent BCL6 small hairpin RNAs or by prolactin. Prolactin also suppressed 3-ketosteroid induction of CK5+ cells in T47D xenografts in vivo. Survival analysis with recursive partitioning in node-negative ERα-positive breast cancer using quantitative CK5 and BCL6 mRNA or protein expression data identified patients at high or low risk for tumor recurrence in two independent patient cohorts. The data provide a mechanism by which common pathophysiological or pharmacologic elevations in glucocorticoids or other 3-ketosteroids may adversely affect patients with mixed ERα+/CK5+ breast cancer. The observations further suggest a cooperative diagnostic utility of CK5 and BCL6 expression levels and justify exploring efficacy of inhibitors of BCL6 and 3-ketosteroid receptors for a subset of ERα-positive breast cancers. PMID:26096934

  7. Evaluation of Immortalized AVPV- and Arcuate-Specific Neuronal Kisspeptin Cell Lines to Elucidate Potential Mechanisms of Estrogen Responsiveness and Temporal Gene Expression in Females.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Dakota C; Veitch, Rebecca E; Chappell, Patrick E

    2016-09-01

    In females, ovarian estradiol modulates kisspeptin (Kiss-1) synthesis to act as an obligatory regulator of downstream gonadotropin release in vivo, via stimulation of GnRH neurons. Changes in the ovarian condition are relayed to the neuroendocrine hypothalamus via two sexually dimorphic Kiss-1 populations, located in the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate nuclei, conveying estradiol-positive and -negative feedback, respectively. To elucidate how differential responsiveness to estradiol is mediated in these populations, we generated two kisspeptin-secreting cell lines from an adult kiss1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) female mouse. These lines recapitulate in vivo responsiveness to estradiol, with KTaV-3 (AVPV) cells demonstrating significantly increased kiss1 expression under high physiological estradiol exposure, whereas KTaR-1 (arcuate) cells exhibit kiss1 suppression after lower estradiol exposure. Baseline expression of estrogen receptor-α (esr1) differs significantly between KTaV-3 and KTaR-1 cells, with KTaR-1 cells demonstrating higher basal expression of esr1. Estradiol stimulation of kiss1 expression in KTaV-3 cells is modulated in a dose-dependent manner up to 25.0 pM, with less responsiveness observed at higher doses (>50.0 pM). In contrast, KTaR-1 kiss1 attenuates at lower estradiol doses (2.0-5.0 pM), returning to baseline levels at 25.0 pM and greater. Furthermore, the expression of the core clock genes bmal1 and per2 show normal rhythms in KTaV-3 cells, regardless of estradiol treatment. Conversely, KTaR-1 antiphasic transcription of bmal1 and per2 is phase delayed by low estradiol treatment. Strikingly, estradiol induces circadian rhythms of kiss1 expression only in KTaV-3 cells. Further exploration into estradiol responsiveness will reveal mechanisms responsible for the differential expression pattern demonstrated in vivo between these cell types. PMID:27409645

  8. Steroid induction of therapy-resistant cytokeratin-5-positive cells in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer through a BCL6-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C R; Sato, T; Peck, A R; Girondo, M A; Yang, N; Liu, C; Yanac, A F; Kovatich, A J; Hooke, J A; Shriver, C D; Mitchell, E P; Hyslop, T; Rui, H

    2016-03-17

    Therapy resistance remains a major problem in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. A subgroup of ERα-positive breast cancer is characterized by mosaic presence of a minor population of ERα-negative cancer cells expressing the basal cytokeratin-5 (CK5). These CK5-positive cells are therapy resistant and have increased tumor-initiating potential. Although a series of reports document induction of the CK5-positive cells by progestins, it is unknown if other 3-ketosteroids share this ability. We now report that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids effectively expand the CK5-positive cell population. CK5-positive cells induced by 3-ketosteroids lacked ERα and progesterone receptors, expressed stem cell marker, CD44, and displayed increased clonogenicity in soft agar and broad drug-resistance in vitro and in vivo. Upregulation of CK5-positive cells by 3-ketosteroids required induction of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 based on suppression of BCL6 by two independent BCL6 small hairpin RNAs or by prolactin. Prolactin also suppressed 3-ketosteroid induction of CK5+ cells in T47D xenografts in vivo. Survival analysis with recursive partitioning in node-negative ERα-positive breast cancer using quantitative CK5 and BCL6 mRNA or protein expression data identified patients at high or low risk for tumor recurrence in two independent patient cohorts. The data provide a mechanism by which common pathophysiological or pharmacologic elevations in glucocorticoids or other 3-ketosteroids may adversely affect patients with mixed ERα+/CK5+ breast cancer. The observations further suggest a cooperative diagnostic utility of CK5 and BCL6 expression levels and justify exploring efficacy of inhibitors of BCL6 and 3-ketosteroid receptors for a subset of ERα-positive breast cancers.

  9. Extra-gonadal sites of estrogen biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Radwa; Oakley, Oliver; Kim, Heehyen; Jin, Jooyoung; Ko, CheMyong Jay

    2016-09-01

    Estrogens are the key hormones regulating the development and function of reproductive organs in all vertebrates. Recent evidence indicates that estrogens play important roles in the immune system, cancer development, and other critical biological processes related to human well-being. Obviously, the gonads (ovary and testis) are the primary sites of estrogen synthesis, but estrogens synthesized in extra- gonadal sites play an equally important role in controlling biological activities. Understanding non-gonadal sites of estrogen synthesis and function is crucial and will lead to therapeutic interventions targeting estrogen signaling in disease prevention and treatment. Developing a rationale targeting strategy remains challenging because knowledge of extra-gonadal biosynthesis of estrogens, and the mechanism by which estrogen activity is exerted, is very limited. In this review, we will summarize recent discoveries of extra-gonadal sites of estrogen biosynthesis and their local functions and discuss the significance of the most recent novel discovery of intestinal estrogen biosynthesis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 488-496]. PMID:27530684

  10. Concomitant activation of two types of glutamate receptor mediates excitation of salamander retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mittman, S; Taylor, W R; Copenhagen, D R

    1990-01-01

    1. Cells in the ganglion cell layer of salamander retinal slices were voltage clamped using patch pipettes. Light elicited transient excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in on-off ganglion cells and sustained EPSCs in on ganglion cells. Light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in these cells could be blocked by 100 microM-bicuculline methobromide and 500 nM-strychnine. 2. In the presence of external Cd2+, at a concentration that blocked light-evoked synaptic inputs, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the non-NMDA-receptor agonists, quisqualate and kainate, gated conductances in both on-off and on ganglion cells. The current-voltage (I-V) curve for the conductance elicited by NMDA had a negative slope between -40 and -70 mV and a reversal potential near 0 mV. The I-V curves for the non-NMDA-receptor-mediated conductances were nearly linear and also had reversal potentials near 0 mV. 3. I-V curves were measured at an early time point near the peak of transient EPSCs and at a later time point during the decay phase of the responses. The late I-V curve had a negative slope below -40 mV. The early I-V curve had a positive slope over the entire voltage range but the slope was greater at positive than at negative potentials. The evoked current reversed near 0 mV at both time points. 4. The region of negative slope of the late I-V curve was eliminated when Mg2+ was removed from the external saline. A slowly decaying component of transient EPSCs was eliminated in 20 microM-DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP7), an NMDA-receptor antagonist. 5. Application of 1 microM-6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a non-NMDA-receptor antagonist at this concentration, blocked a fast component of transient EPSCs. 6. Our results demonstrate that the synaptic inputs to on-off ganglion cells have two components: a slower NMDA-receptor-mediated component having a time-to-peak of 110 +/- 45 ms and an e-fold decay time of 209 +/- 35 ms at -31 mV (mean +/- S.D., n = 5), and a

  11. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  12. Estrogen-related Receptor β Reduces the Subnuclear Mobility of Estrogen Receptor α and Suppresses Estrogen-dependent Cellular Function*

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Takashi; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Yamada, Shunji; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has strong homology with estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERR has three subtypes (α, β, and γ) expressed in estrogen-sensitive organs, including ovary, breast, and brain. No endogenous ligands of ERRs have been identified, but these receptors share a common DNA element with ERα and control estrogen-mediated gene transcription. Recent evidence suggests a role of ERRs in estrogen-related pathophysiology, but the detailed mechanisms of ERR functions in estrogen-related tissues are unclear. Using live-cell imaging with fluorescent protein labeling, we found that only ERRβ among the ERRs exhibits a punctate intranuclear pattern overlapping with ERα following 17β-estradiol (E2)-stimulation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed significant reduction of the mobility of ligand-activated ERα with co-expression of ERRβ. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer revealed that ERRβ directly interacts with ERα. The N-terminal domain of ERRβ was identified as the region that interacts with ERα. We also found a correlation between punctate cluster formation of ERα and interaction between the receptors. Expression of ERRβ significantly repressed ERα-mediated transactivity, whereas that of other ERR subtypes had no effect on the transactivity of ERα. Consistent with this finding, E2-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and bcl-2 expression was significantly inhibited by expression of ERRβ. These results provide strong evidence for a suppressive effect of ERRβ on estrogen signaling through reduction of the intranuclear mobility of ERα. The findings further suggest a unique inhibitory role for ERRβ in estrogen-dependent cellular function such as cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25805499

  13. Sympathoexcitatory effects of estrogen in the insular cortex are mediated by GABA.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tarek M; Connell, Barry J; Cribb, Alastair E

    2005-03-10

    The current investigation examined the effect of estrogen in the insular cortex (IC) on autonomic tone and cardiac baroreceptor reflex function and sought to determine if modulation of neurotransmission was responsible for mediating this effect. Experiments were performed in Inactin-anaesthetized, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, vagal parasympathetic and renal sympathetic nerve activities, as well as cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Direct, bilateral injection of 17beta-estradiol (0.5 microM; 200 nl/side) into the IC resulted in a significant increase in sympathetic tone (from 10 +/- 4 to 24 +/- 3) with no significant change in blood pressure, heart rate, parasympathetic tone or BRS measured at 30 min post-injection. This estrogen-induced effect was completely blocked by the co-injection of estrogen with the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182, 780 (20 microM; 200 nl/side). Co-injection of estrogen with a GABA(B), NMDA or non-NMDA receptor antagonists did not effect the estrogen-induced increase in sympathetic tone. Co-injection of a sub-threshold dose of estradiol (0.125 microM; 200 nl/side) with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, (+)-bicuculline (0.025 microM; 200 nl/side), resulted in an additive response to increase sympathetic nerve activity. These results suggest that estrogen acts on estrogen receptors to modulate GABA(A)-receptor-mediated neurotransmission within the IC to modulate sympathetic tone. PMID:15777759

  14. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an Endogenous Estrogen Metabolite, Sensitizes Radioresistant MCF-7/FIR Breast Cancer Cells Through Multiple Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Salama; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Botting, Shaleen; Hatch, Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The requirement for a well-tolerated and highly effective radiosensitizer that preferentially sensitizes tumor cells at multiple levels of radioresistance remains largely unmet. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME) has polypharmacological profiles that target multiple signaling pathways involved in the development of radioresistance. In the current study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of 2ME on the radioresistant breast cancer MCF-7/FIR cell line and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitizing effect of 2ME was evaluated on the basis of cell death and clonogenic survival. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and cell cycle progression were assessed by flow cytometry. Radiation-induced DNA damage was evaluated on the basis of histone {gamma}-H2AX phosphorylation and foci formation. Immunoblotting was used to assess the effects of {gamma} radiation and/or 2ME on radioresistance pathways. Results: Our data demonstrate that MCF-7/FIR cells expressed higher levels of Bcl-2 and HIF-1{alpha} and displayed a lower ROS phenotype than the parental MCF-7 cells. Treatment of parental MCF-7 cells with 2ME (0.5 {mu}M) had minimal effect on {gamma} radiation-induced cell proliferation and surviving fractions. On the contrary, in MCF-7/FIR cells, treatment with 2ME significantly enhanced {gamma} radiation-induced reduction in cell proliferation and surviving fraction. This combination was effective in activating apoptosis, arresting the cell cycle at the G{sub 2}/M phase, and increasing the level of {gamma} radiation-induced ROS and the number of {gamma}-H2AX foci. In addition, 2ME significantly ameliorated {gamma} radiation-induced expression of the HIF-1{alpha} transcription factor and its downstream targets AKT/mTOR. Conclusion: 2ME preferentially sensitizes radioresistant MCF-7/FIR cells to {gamma} radiation by targeting multiple signaling pathways involved in the development of radioresistance. This

  15. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  16. Estrogen withdrawal from osteoblasts and osteocytes causes increased mineralization and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M Á; Haugh, M G; O'Brien, F J; McNamara, L M

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated increased bone mineral heterogeneity following estrogen withdrawal in vivo. Such changes likely contribute to fracture risk during post-menopausal osteoporosis since tissue mineralization is correlated with bone strength and stiffness. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for increased mineral variability have not yet been distinguished. The objective of this study is to elucidate how alterations in mineral distribution are initiated during estrogen depletion. Specifically, we tested two separate hypotheses; (1) estrogen deficiency directly alters osteoblast mineralization and (2) estrogen deficiency increases bone cell apoptosis. Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) and osteocyte-like cells (MLO-Y4) were pretreated with or without estrogen (17β-estradiol) for 14 days. Estrogen deficiency was subsequently induced by either withdrawing estrogen from cells or blocking estrogen receptors using an estrogen antagonist, fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). Cell number (Hoechst DNA), alkaline phosphatase activity (p-NPP), mineralization (alizarin red) and apoptosis (Caspase 3/7) were evaluated. Whether estrogen withdrawal altered apoptosis rates in the presence of an apoptosis promoting agent (etoposide) was also determined. Interestingly, estrogen withdrawal from cells accustomed to estrogen exposure caused significantly increased osteoblast mineralization and osteocyte apoptosis compared with continued estrogen treatment. In contrast, blocking estrogen receptors with fulvestrant abrogated the mineralization induced by estrogen treatment. When apoptosis was induced using etoposide, cells undergoing estrogen withdrawal increased apoptosis compared to cells with continued estrogen treatment. Recognizing the underlying mechanisms regulating bone cell mineralization and apoptosis during estrogen deficiency and their consequences is necessary to further our knowledge of osteoporosis.

  17. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  18. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  19. Coated vesicles participate in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have purified coated vesicles from rat liver by differential ultracentrifugation. Electron micrographs of these preparations reveal only the polyhedral structures typical of coated vesicles. SDS PAGE of the coated vesicle preparation followed by Coomassie Blue staining of proteins reveals a protein composition also typical of coated vesicles. We determined that these rat liver coated vesicles possess a latent insulin binding capability. That is, little if any specific binding of 125I-insulin to coated vesicles is observed in the absence of detergent. However, coated vesicles treated with the detergent octyl glucoside exhibit a substantial specific 125I-insulin binding capacity. We visualized the insulin binding structure of coated vesicles by cross- linking 125I-insulin to detergent-solubilized coated vesicles using the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberate followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography. The receptor structure thus identified is identical to that of the high-affinity insulin receptor present in a variety of tissues. We isolated liver coated vesicles from rats which had received injections of 125I-insulin in the hepatic portal vein. We found that insulin administered in this fashion was rapidly and specifically taken up by liver coated vesicles. Taken together, these data are compatible with a functional role for coated vesicles in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin. PMID:6131074

  20. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways.

  1. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  2. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  3. Peptides in Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy: From Design to the Clinical Application in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Catherine; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Vivès, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Short peptides can show high affinity for specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. Some of these are already used in cancerology as diagnostic tools and others are in clinical trials for therapeutic applications. Therefore, peptides exhibit great potential as a diagnostic tool but also as an alternative or an additional antitumoral approach upon the covalent attachment of a therapeutic moiety such as a radionuclide or a cytotoxic drug. The chemistry offers flexibility to graft onto the targeting-peptide either fluorine or iodine directly, or metallic radionuclides through appropriate chelating agent. Since short peptides are straightforward to synthesize, there is an opportunity to further improve existing peptides or to design new ones for clinical applications. However, several considerations have to be taken into account to optimize the recognition properties of the targeting-peptide to its receptor, to improve its stability in the biological fluids and its residence in the body, or to increase its overall therapeutic effect. In this review, we highlight the different aspects which need to be considered for the development of an efficient peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy in different neoplasms. PMID:24093086

  4. Modulation of receptor-mediated gonadotropin action in rat testes by dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, E; Garg, M L; Clandinin, M T

    1988-06-01

    The effect of feeding diets enriched with 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, or saturated fatty acids on lipid composition and receptor-mediated action of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) in rat testicular plasma membranes was investigated. Linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid treatments reduced total phospholipid and cholesterol content of the testicular plasma membrane and altered membrane phospholipid composition. Change in phospholipid and cholesterol content after feeding the polyunsaturated fats decreased cholesterol to phospholipid ratios and binding capacity of the LH/hCG receptor in the testicular plasma membrane. LH-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was decreased in animals fed the linolenic acid-rich diet. NaF-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was decreased in animals fed diets high in either polyunsaturated fatty acid. Decreased plasma membrane LH/hCG receptor content was associated with decreased testosterone production in Leydig cells in response to LH in the linolenic acid-fed group. It is suggested that change in cholesterol-to-phospholipid ratios alters the physical properties of testicular plasma membranes in a manner that influences accessibility of LH/hCG receptors in testicular tissue. PMID:2897795

  5. Tonic GABAA Receptor-Mediated Inhibition in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors expressed in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV) critically regulate the activity of vagal motor neurons and, by inference, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Two types of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition have been identified in the brain, represented by phasic (Iphasic) and tonic (Itonic) inhibitory currents. The hypothesis that Itonic regulates neuron activity was tested in the DMV using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse brain stem slices from rats. An Itonic was present in a subset of DMV neurons, which was determined to be mediated by different receptors than those mediating fast, synaptic currents. Preapplication of tetrodotoxin significantly decreased the resting Itonic amplitude in DMV neurons, suggesting that most of the current was due to action potential (AP)–dependent GABA release. Blocking GABA transport enhanced Itonic and multiple GABA transporters cooperated to regulate Itonic. The Itonic was composed of both a gabazine-insensitive component that was nearly saturated under basal conditions and a gabazine-sensitive component that was activated when extracellular GABA concentration was elevated. Perfusion of THIP (10 μM) significantly increased Itonic amplitude without increasing Iphasic amplitude. The Itonic played a major role in determining the overall excitability of DMV neurons by contributing to resting membrane potential and AP frequency. Our results indicate that Itonic contributes to DMV neuron membrane potential and activity and is thus an important regulator of vagally mediated GI function. PMID:20018836

  6. Toll Receptor-Mediated Hippo Signaling Controls Innate Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zheng, Yonggang; Yin, Feng; Yu, Jianzhong; Silverman, Neal; Pan, Duojia

    2016-01-28

    The Hippo signaling pathway functions through Yorkie to control tissue growth and homeostasis. How this pathway regulates non-developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here, we report an essential role for Hippo signaling in innate immunity whereby Yorkie directly regulates the transcription of the Drosophila IκB homolog, Cactus, in Toll receptor-mediated antimicrobial response. Loss of Hippo pathway tumor suppressors or activation of Yorkie in fat bodies, the Drosophila immune organ, leads to elevated cactus mRNA levels, decreased expression of antimicrobial peptides, and vulnerability to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, Gram-positive bacteria acutely activate Hippo-Yorkie signaling in fat bodies via the Toll-Myd88-Pelle cascade through Pelle-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of the Cka subunit of the Hippo-inhibitory STRIPAK PP2A complex. Our studies elucidate a Toll-mediated Hippo signaling pathway in antimicrobial response, highlight the importance of regulating IκB/Cactus transcription in innate immunity, and identify Gram-positive bacteria as extracellular stimuli of Hippo signaling under physiological settings. PMID:26824654

  7. NK-1 receptor mediation of neurogenic plasma extravasation in rat skin.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, P. V.; Helme, R. D.; Thomas, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    1. Plasma extravasation was induced by electrical nerve stimulation and by perfusion of tachykinins over a vacuum-induced blister base on rat footpad. 2. Stimulation of the sciatic nerve (18 V, 15 Hz, 0.5 ms) for 20 min produced a significant increase in the protein content of the perfusate. The response in capsaicin pretreated rats was only 4% of the control response. This indicates that the electrically-induced plasma extravasation response was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory fibres. 3. Exogenous perfusion of the mammalian tachykinins substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B and the non-mammalian tachykinins physalaemin, kassinin and eledoisin was used to determine the tachykinin receptor type mediating the plasma extravasation response. Dose-response curves of the tachykinins (10(-9) M-10(-4) M) gave a rank order of potency of substance P = physalaemin greater than eledoisin greater than or equal to kassinin greater than neurokinin B = neurokinin A. 4. In addition, specific agonists of neurokinin receptors were perfused. Perfusion of [Glp6, D-Pro9] SP6-11 and [Glp6, L-Pro9]SP6-11 demonstrated that the L-Pro isomer was much more potent than the D-Pro isomer. 5. The rank order of potency and the greater potency of [Glp6, L-Pro9]SP6-11 over its D-isomer indicate an NK-1 neurokinin receptor mediates plasma extravasation in rat footpad skin. PMID:2477105

  8. Dynamics of Cytoskeletal Proteins during Fcγ Receptor-mediated Phagocytosis in MacrophagesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Diakonova, Maria; Bokoch, Gary; Swanson, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    Particle ingestion by phagocytosis results from sequential rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and overlying membrane. To assemble a chronology of molecular events during phagosome formation and to examine the contributions of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) to these dynamics, a method was developed for synchronizing Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis by murine macrophages. Erythrocytes opsonized with complement component C3bi were bound to macrophages at 37°C, a condition that does not favor particle phagocytosis. Addition of soluble anti-erythrocyte IgG resulted in rapid opsonization of the bound erythrocytes, followed by their immediate internalization via phagocytosis. Cellular content of F-actin, as measured by binding of rhodamine-phalloidin, increased transiently during phagocytosis, and this increase was not diminished by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase. Immunofluorescence localization of myosins in macrophages fixed at various times during phagocytosis indicated that myosins II and IXb were concentrated in early phagosomes, myosin IC increased later, and myosin V appeared after phagosome closure. Other cytoskeletal proteins showed similar variations in the timing of their appearance in phagosomes. The PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin did not change the dynamics of PI 3-kinase or ezrin localization but prevented the loss of PAK1 from phagosomes. These results suggest that PI 3-kinase deactivates PAK1, and that this may be needed for phagosome closure. PMID:11854399

  9. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasunori; Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Kuninori; Matoba, Kazuaki; Kirisako, Hiromi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Noda, Nobuo N

    2016-06-28

    Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1), and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity. PMID:27320913

  10. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteoglycans by human fibroblasts involves recognition of the protein core.

    PubMed Central

    Glössl, J; Schubert-Prinz, R; Gregory, J D; Damle, S P; von Figura, K; Kresse, H

    1983-01-01

    Endocytosis by cultured human skin fibroblasts of 35SO4(2-)-labelled or [3H]leucine-labelled proteoglycans from fibroblast secretions and of 125I-proteodermatan sulphate from pig skin was quantitatively investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) Core proteins prepared by digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase were at least as efficiently endocytosed as native proteoglycans. Pig skin proteodermatan sulphate was a competitive inhibitor of endocytosis of 35SO4(2-)-labelled proteoglycans. (2) Proteoglycans produced in the presence of tunicamycin and native proteoglycans degraded with endoglycosaminidase H were internalized at a normal rate. Several monosaccharides that can be bound by mammalian lectins were unable to influence the internalization of proteoglycans. Treatment of proteoglycans with neuraminidase, however, resulted in an increased clearance rate. (3) Reductive methylation or acetoacetylation of lysine residues was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the rate of proteoglycan endocytosis. Reversal of acetoacetylation normalized the uptake properties. Endocytosis of native proteoglycans was also reduced in the presence of poly-L-lysine, and this reduction in endocytosis was observed as well with proteoglycans synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethylcysteine. These results suggest that the recognition marker required for receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteodermatan sulphate resides in its protein moiety and involves lysine residues. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6316923

  11. Receptor-mediated adhesion phenomena. Model studies with the Radical-Flow Detachment Assay.

    PubMed

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenberger, D A

    1990-07-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion phenomena play a vital role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. To investigate the physical and chemical factors that influence the cell/surface interaction, we have used a radial flow device, a so-called Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA). The RFDA allows us to make direct observations of the detachment process under specified experimental conditions. In results reported here, we have studied the detachment of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) from ligand-coated glass surfaces. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine several aspects of the adhesion process with particles having uniform properties that can be varied systematically. Advantages of the RFDA are many, especially direct observation of cell detachment over a range of shear stresses with quantitative measurement of the adhesive force. We focus our studies on the effects of ligand and receptor densities, along with the influence of pH and ionic strength of the medium. These data are analyzed with a mathematical model based on the theoretical framework of Bell, G. I. (1978. Science [Wash. DC]. 200:618-627) and Hammer, D. A. and D. A. Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487). We demonstrate experimental validation of a theoretical expression for the critical shear stress for particle detachment, and show that it is consistent with reasonable estimates for the receptor-ligand bond affinity.

  12. Tamoxifen and estradiol improved locomotor function and increased spared tissue in rats after spinal cord injury: their antioxidant effect and role of estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Laurivette; Colón, Jennifer M; Santiago, José M; Torrado, Aranza I; Meléndez, Margarita; Segarra, Annabell C; Rodríguez-Orengo, José F; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-05-01

    17β-Estradiol is a multi-active steroid that imparts neuroprotection via diverse mechanisms of action. However, its role as a neuroprotective agent after spinal cord injury (SCI), or the involvement of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) in locomotor recovery, is still a subject of much debate. In this study, we evaluated the effects of estradiol and of Tamoxifen (an estrogen receptor mixed agonist/antagonist) on locomotor recovery following SCI. To control estradiol cyclical variability, ovariectomized female rats received empty or estradiol filled implants, prior to a moderate contusion to the spinal cord. Estradiol improved locomotor function at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post injury (DPI), when compared to control groups (measured with the BBB open field test). This effect was ER-α mediated, because functional recovery was blocked with an ER-α antagonist. We also observed that ER-α was up-regulated after SCI. Long-term treatment (28 DPI) with estradiol and Tamoxifen reduced the extent of the lesion cavity, an effect also mediated by ER-α. The antioxidant effects of estradiol were seen acutely at 2 DPI but not at 28 DPI, and this acute effect was not receptor mediated. Rats treated with Tamoxifen recovered some locomotor activity at 21 and 28 DPI, which could be related to the antioxidant protection seen at these time points. These results show that estradiol improves functional outcome, and these protective effects are mediated by the ER-α dependent and independent-mechanisms. Tamoxifen׳s effects during late stages of SCI support the use of this drug as a long-term alternative treatment for this condition.

  13. Estrogen stimuli promote osteoblastic differentiation via the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase PACE4 in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Tabata, Atsushi; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Ueno, Tomomi; Uchiyama, Shigeto; Yuasa, Keizo; Tsuji, Akihiko; Nagamune, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic compounds include endogenous estrogens such as estradiol as well as soybean isoflavones, such as daidzein and its metabolite equol, which are known phytoestrogens that prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Indeed, mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells, a murine osteoblastic cell line, was significantly decreased in medium containing fetal bovine serum treated with charcoal-dextran to deplete endogenous estrogens, but estradiol and these soybean isoflavones dose-dependently restored the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells; equol was tenfold more effective than daidzein. These differentiation-promoting effects were inhibited by the addition of fulvestrant, which is a selective downregulator of estrogen receptors. Analysis of the expression pattern of bone-related genes by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)/quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which focused on responsiveness to the estrogen stimuli, revealed that the transcription of PACE4, a subtilisin-like proprotein convertase, was tightly linked with the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells induced by estrogen stimuli. Moreover, treatment with RNAi of PACE4 in MC3T3-E1 cells resulted in a drastic decrease of mineralization in the presence of estrogen stimuli. These results strongly suggest that PACE4 participates in bone formation at least in osteoblast differentiation, and estrogen receptor-mediated stimuli induce osteoblast differentiation through the upregulation of PACE4 expression. PMID:24557631

  14. Neuroprotection by a selective estrogen receptor beta agonist in a mouse model of global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Carswell, H V O; Macrae, I M; Gallagher, L; Harrop, E; Horsburgh, K J

    2004-10-01

    The present study employs selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists to determine whether 17beta-estradiol-induced neuroprotection in global ischemia is receptor mediated and, if so, which subtype of receptor (ERalpha or ERbeta) is predominantly responsible. Halothane-anesthetized female C57Bl/6J mice were ovariectomized, and osmotic minipumps containing ERbeta agonist diarylpropiolnitrile (DPN) (8 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), n = 12) or vehicle (50% DMSO in 0.9% saline) (n = 9) or ERalpha agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) (2 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), n = 13) or vehicle (50% DMSO in 0.9% saline) (n = 10) were implanted subcutaneously. One week later transient global ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion under halothane anesthesia, and the mice were perfusion fixed 72 h later. ERbeta agonist DPN significantly reduced ischemic damage by 70% in the caudate nucleus and 55% in the CA1 region compared with vehicle controls (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U-statistic). In contrast, pretreatment with the ERalpha agonist PPT had no effect on the extent of neuronal damage compared with controls. The data indicate a significant estrogen receptor-mediated neuroprotection in a global cerebral ischemia model involving ERbeta.

  15. Bone marrow oxytocin mediates the anabolic action of estrogen on the skeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen withdrawal in women due to natural or artificial menopause is followed by rapid bone loss, osteoporosis, and a high fracture risk. Replacement with estrogen prevents this bone loss and reduces the risk of fracture. Estrogen uses two mechanisms to exert this effect: it inhibits bone resorpti...

  16. Receptor and non-receptor mediated formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils of intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Manhart, N; Oismüller, C; Lassnig, A; Spittler, A; Sautner, T; Götzinger, P; Függer, R; Roth, E

    1998-11-27

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) has been implicated in tissue damage in a variety of disease states including sepsis and trauma. On the other hand, generation of ROI in polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) presents a crucial element in the defence of the host against invading microorganisms. In the present study we investigated the generation of superoxide anions (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by neutrophils (PMN)5 of 17 critically ill patients treated at a intensive care unit (ICU) after polytrauma (n = 6), heart operation (n = 6) or during septic shock (n = 5) using flow cytometry. O2- production of PMN from ICU patients was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than that in healthy volunteers (HV) during non-receptor mediated stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA) but higher (p < 0.001) during receptor mediated stimulation with formylmethionine-leucine-phenylalanine (FMLP). H2O2 generation of PMN from ICU patients was increased after stimulation with FMLP (p < 0.01) and remained unchanged after stimulation with PMA. Patients in septic shock had lower O2(-)-generation of PMN than did injured patients and patients after heart operations. We conclude that receptor mediated formation of O2- and H2O2 is stimulated in ICU patients. However, in patients in septic shock O2(-)-generation decreases, which potentially might contribute to the immunoparalysis present in septic shock.

  17. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an endogenous 17β-estradiol metabolite, inhibits microglial proliferation and activation via an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schaufelberger, Sara A; Rosselli, Marinella; Barchiesi, Federica; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (estradiol) inhibits microglia proliferation. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) is an endogenous metabolite of estradiol with little affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). We hypothesize that 2-ME inhibits microglial proliferation and activation and contributes to estradiol's inhibitory effects on microglia. We compared the effects of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol [2-OE; estradiol metabolite produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP450)], and 2-ME [formed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) acting upon 2-OE] on microglial (BV2 cells) DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, activation, and phagocytosis. 2-ME and 2-OE were approximately three- and 10-fold, respectively, more potent than estradiol in inhibiting microglia DNA synthesis. The antimitogenic effects of estradiol were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of CYP450 and COMT. Inhibition of COMT blocked the conversion of 2-OE to 2-ME and the antimitogenic effects of 2-OE but not 2-ME. Microglia expressed ERβ and GPR30 but not ERα. 2,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERβ agonist), but not 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (ERα agonist) or G1 (GPR30 agonist), inhibited microglial proliferation. The antiproliferative effects of estradiol, but not 2-OE or 2-ME, were partially reversed by ICI-182,780 (ERα/β antagonist) but not by 1,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole (ERα antagonist) or G15 (GPR30 antagonist). Lipopolysaccharide increased microglia iNOS and COX-2 expression and phagocytosing activity of microglia; these effects were inhibited by 2-ME. We conclude that in microglia, 2-ME inhibits proliferation, proinflammatory responses, and phagocytosis. 2-ME partially mediates the effects of estradiol via ER-independent mechanisms involving sequential metabolism of estradiol to 2-OE and 2-ME. 2-ME could be of potential therapeutic use in postischemic stroke injuries. Interindividual differences in estradiol metabolism might affect the

  18. Prolonged GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in the cat spinal cord: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, D R; Lacey, G

    1998-08-01

    methochloride. Intravenously administered bicuculline hydrochloride, however, had little or no effect on the inhibition of reflexes following continuous flexor-nerve stimulation. These observations are discussed in the context of possible intraspinal pathways and pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of the monosynaptic excitation of spinal motoneurones and of the functional significance of central GABA(B) receptor-associated inhibitory processes, given the relatively minimal effects on motor activity and behaviour produced by baclofen antagonists that penetrate the mammalian blood-brain barrier.

  19. Oligodendrocytes Are Targets of HIV-1 Tat: NMDA and AMPA Receptor-Mediated Effects on Survival and Development

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shiping; Fuss, Babette; Fitting, Sylvia; Hahn, Yun Kyung; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin pallor in HIV+ individuals can occur very early during the disease process. While myelin damage might partly originate from HIV-induced vascular changes, the timing suggests that myelin and/or oligodendrocytes (OLs) may be directly affected. Histological (Golgi–Kopsch, electron microscopy) and biochemical studies have revealed an increased occurrence of abnormal OL/myelin morphology and dysregulated myelin protein expression in transgenic mice expressing the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein. This suggests that viral proteins by themselves might cause OL injury. Since Tat interacts with NMDARs, we hypothesized that activation of NMDARs and subsequent disruption of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis might be one cause of white matter injury after HIV infection. In culture, HIV-1 Tat caused concentration-dependent death of immature OLs, while more mature OLs remained alive but had reduced myelin-like membranes. Tat also induced [Ca2+]i increases and Thr-287 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II β (CaMKIIβ) in OLs. Tat-induced [Ca2+]i was attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist MK801, and also by the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX. Importantly, both MK801 and CNQX blocked Tat-induced death of immature OLs, but only MK801 reversed Tat effects on myelin-like membranes. These results suggest that OLs can be direct targets of HIV proteins released from infected cells. Although viability and membrane production are both affected by glutamatergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, and possibly the ensuing CaMKIIβ activation, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs appear to be different and dependent on the stage of OL differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Over 33 million individuals are currently infected by HIV. Among these individuals, ∼60% develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Myelin damage and white matter injury have been frequently reported in HIV patients but not extensively studied. Clinical studies

  20. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  1. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  2. Central beta-adrenergic receptors mediate renal nerve activity during stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Koepke, J P; DiBona, G F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (d,l-propranolol or timolol, 30 micrograms in 2 microL of isotonic saline) on the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) responses to stressful environmental stimulation (air jet to head) in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were examined. Before i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress increased renal activity (68% from 10.6 +/- 2.1 and 63% from 8.2 +/- 0.9 integrator resets/min respectively). In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol in the same conscious SHR, air stress had no effect on renal sympathetic nerve activity (+7% from 8.1 +/- 1.7 and +7% from 5.5 +/- 1.0 integrator resets/min respectively). Air stress decreased UNaV in conscious SHR given i.c.v. saline vehicle (25% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 microEq/min/100 g body weight), but had no effect on effective renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress had no effect on UNaV (0% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 and +9% from 3.3 +/- 0.3 microEq/min/100 g body weight respectively). Mean arterial pressure increased similarly during air stress with i.c.v. saline-vehicle or beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists. Intravenous administration of the same doses of d,l-propranolol or timolol did not prevent the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity or decreased UNaV responses resulting from air stress. These results suggest that central nervous system beta-adrenergic receptors mediate the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased UNaV responses resulting from stressful environmental stimulation in conscious SHR.

  3. Antihistamine terfenadine potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated calcium influx, oxygen radical formation, and neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Trelles, R; Novelli, A; Vega, J A; Marini, A; Fernández-Sánchez, M T

    2000-10-13

    We previously reported that the histamine H1 receptor antagonist terfenadine enhances the excitotoxic response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonists in cerebellar neurons. Here we investigated whether this unexpected action of terfenadine relates to its antihistamine activity, and which specific events in the signal cascade coupled to NMDA receptors are affected by terfenadine. Low concentrations of NMDA (100 microM) or glutamate (15 microM) that were only slightly (<20%) toxic when added alone, caused extensive cell death in cultures pre-exposed to terfenadine (5 microM) for 5 h. Terfenadine potentiation of NMDA receptor response was mimicked by other H1 antagonists, including chlorpheniramine (25 microM), oxatomide (20 microM), and triprolidine (50 microM), was prevented by histamine (1 mM), and did not require RNA synthesis. Terfenadine increased NMDA-mediated intracellular calcium and cGMP synthesis by approximately 2.4 and 4 fold respectively. NMDA receptor-induced cell death in terfenadine-treated neurons was associated with a massive production of hydrogen peroxides, and was significantly inhibited by the application of either (+)-alpha-tocopherol (200 microM) or the endogenous antioxidant melatonin (200 microM) 15 min before or up to 30 min after receptor stimulation. This operational time window suggests that an enduring production of reactive oxygen species is critical for terfenadine-induced NMDA receptor-mediated neurodegeneration, and strengthens the importance of antioxidants for the treatment of excitotoxic injury. Our results also provide direct evidence for antihistamine drugs enhancing the transduction signaling activated by NMDA receptors in cerebellar neurons.

  4. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin and recycling of the transferrin receptor in rat reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    At 4 degrees C transferrin bound to receptors on the reticulocyte plasma membrane, and at 37 degrees C receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin occurred. Uptake at 37 degrees C exceeded binding at 4 degrees C by 2.5-fold and saturated after 20-30 min. During uptake at 37 degrees C, bound transferrin was internalized into a trypsin- resistant space. Trypsinization at 4 degrees C destroyed surface receptors, but with subsequent incubation at 37 degrees C, surface receptors rapidly appeared (albeit in reduced numbers), and uptake occurred at a decreased level. After endocytosis, transferrin was released, apparently intact, into the extracellular space. At 37 degrees C colloidal gold-transferrin (AuTf) clustered in coated pits and then appeared inside various intracellular membrane-bounded compartments. Small vesicles and tubules were labeled after short (5-10 min) incubations at 37 degrees C. Larger multivesicular endosomes became heavily labeled after longer (20-35 min) incubations. Multivesicular endosomes apparently fused with the plasma membrane and released their contents by exocytosis. None of these organelles appeared to be lysosomal in nature, and 98% of intracellular AuTf was localized in acid phosphatase-negative compartments. AuTf, like transferrin, was released with subsequent incubation at 37 degrees C. Freeze-dried and freeze-fractured reticulocytes confirmed the distribution of AuTf in reticulocytes and revealed the presence of clathrin-coated patches amidst the spectrin coating the inner surface of the plasma membrane. These data suggest that transferrin is internalized via coated pits and vesicles and demonstrate that transferrin and its receptor are recycled back to the plasma membrane after endocytosis. PMID:6309857

  5. Desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phosphate production in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, D. R.; Zamani, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Histamine stimulated the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates (IPn) in control HeLa cells with an EC50 of 3.7 +/- 0.7 microM in the presence of 10 mM LiCl. The maximum response to histamine after 15 min incubation was 43 +/- 5% over basal accumulation and occurred at a concentration of 1 mM histamine. 2. The histamine-induced IPn production in HeLa cells was confirmed as H1 receptor-mediated, since the H1 antagonist mepyramine (10(-6) M) inhibited the histamine response (10(-4) M) by 83 +/- 7%, whereas the H2 antagonist, ranitidine (10(-4) M), and H3 antagonist, thioperamide (10(-6) M), were ineffective. 3. Histamine (10(-4) M) pretreatment of HeLa cells for 30 min desensitized the subsequent histamine-induced IPn accumulation. The desensitized cells accumulated IPn in response to histamine with an EC50 of 1.7 +/- 0.7 microM after 15 min incubation. The maximum histamine-induced IPn accumulation at 10(-4) M was 19 +/- 5% over basal and was significantly lower (P < 0.03) than the maximum response in control cells. 4. The desensitization of histamine-induced IPn accumulation was time-dependent and, at a desensitizing histamine concentration of 10(-4) M, the half-maximal attenuation occurred after approximately 9 min and maximum desensitization was achieved by 15-20 min. The desensitization of the IPn accumulation was a reversible phenomenon and full recovery of the response occurred 150 min after the removal of the desensitizing histamine-containing medium. The half-time for the recovery of the histamine-induced response was estimated at 120 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358540

  6. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasoconstriction in pulmonary arteries from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Sweeney, G.; Baird, M.; McCulloch, K. M.; Houslay, M.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-receptor mediated vasoconstriction in the main, first branch and resistance pulmonary arteries removed from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats. Contractile responses to 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), and sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist) were studied. The effects of methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1 + 2-receptor antagonist) and ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and GR55562 (a novel selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) on 5-HT-mediated responses were also studied. Basal levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic AMP]i) and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic GMP]i) were determined and we assessed the degree of inherent tone in the vessels under study. 2. 5-HT was most potent in the resistance arteries. pEC50 values were 5.6 +/- 0.1, 5.3 +/- 0.1, 5.0 +/- 0.2 in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively (n = at least 5 from 5 animals). The sensitivity to, and maximum response of, 5-HT was increased in all the arteries removed from the chronic hypoxic (CH) rats. In CH rats the pEC50 values were 5.9 +/- 0.2, 6.3 +/- 0.2, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and the increase in the maximum response was 35%, 51% and 41% in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively. Sumatriptan did not contract any vessel from the control rats whilst 5-CT did contract the resistance arteries. In the CH rats, however, they both contracted the resistance arteries (responses to sumatriptan were small) (pEC50: 5-CT; 5.4 +/- 0.2) and the pulmonary artery branches (pEC50: sumatriptan, 5.4 +/- 0.2; 5-CT, 5.4 +/- 0.2). 5-CT also caused a contraction in the main pulmonary artery (pEC50: 6.0 +/- 0.3). 3. Ketanserin (1 nM-1 microM) caused a competitive antagonism of the 5-HT response in all vessels tested. In control rats, the estimated pKb values for ketanserin in resistance arteries, pulmonary branches and main pulmonary

  7. Molecular mechanisms of selective estrogen receptor modulator activity in human breast cancer cells: identification of novel nuclear cofactors of antiestrogen-ERα complexes by interaction proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Francesca; Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; Stellato, Claudia; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Ambrosino, Concetta; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Weisz, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls key cellular pathways via protein-protein interactions involving multiple components of transcriptional coregulator and signal transduction complexes. Natural and synthetic ERα ligands are classified as agonists (17β-estradiol/E(2)), selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs: Tamoxifen/Tam and Raloxifene/Ral), and pure antagonists (ICI 182,780-Fulvestrant/ICI), according to the response they elicit in hormone-responsive cells. Crystallographic analyses reveal ligand-dependent ERα conformations, characterized by specific surface docking sites for functional protein-protein interactions, whose identification is needed to understand antiestrogen effects on estrogen target tissues, in particular breast cancer (BC). Tandem affinity purification (TAP) coupled to mass spectrometry was applied here to map nuclear ERα interactomes dependent upon different classes of ligands in hormone-responsive BC cells. Comparative analyses of agonist (E(2))- vs antagonist (Tam, Ral or ICI)-bound ERα interacting proteins reveal significant differences among ER ligands that relate with their biological activity, identifying novel functional partners of antiestrogen-ERα complexes in human BC cell nuclei. In particular, the E(2)-dependent nuclear ERα interactome is different and more complex than those elicited by Tam, Ral, or ICI, which, in turn, are significantly divergent from each other, a result that provides clues to explain the pharmacological specificities of these compounds. PMID:23170835

  8. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  9. Removal of estrogens and estrogenicity through drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura; Wiese, Thomas E; Wymer, Larry; Dugan, Nicholas; Williams, Daniel; Mash, Heath; Merriman, Betty; Speth, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drinking waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conventional drinking water treatment using a natural water. Bench-scale studies utilizing chlorine, alum coagulation, ferric chloride coagulation, and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were conducted using Ohio River water spiked with three estrogens, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, and estriol. Treatment of the estrogens with chlorine, either alone or with coagulant, resulted in approximately 98% reductions in the concentrations of the parent estrogens, accompanied by formation of by-products. The MVLN reporter gene and MCF-7 cell proliferation assays were used to characterize the estrogenic activity of the water before and after treatment. The observed estrogenic activities of the chlorinated samples showed that estrogenicity of the water was reduced commensurate with removal of the parent estrogen. Therefore, the estrogen chlorination by-products did not contribute appreciably to the estrogenic activity of the water. Coagulation alone did not result in significant removals of the estrogens. However, addition of PAC, at a typical drinking water plant dose, resulted in removals ranging from approximately 20 to 80%. PMID:22361701

  10. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  11. Activation of estrogen receptor α by raloxifene through an activating protein-1-dependent tethering mechanism in human cervical epithelial cancer cells: a role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Matulis, Christina K; Kraus, W Lee

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) regulates target gene expression in response to ligands through two distinct mechanisms: direct binding to DNA and indirect tethering through other DNA-bound transcription factors, such as AP-1. In the studies described herein, we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of ERα in the AP-1 tethering pathway by the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene (Ral). Our results with the MMP1 and PRUNE genes indicate that the c-Fos component of the AP-1 tethering factor and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) are constitutively bound at the promoter regions prior to Ral exposure. Ral then promotes the binding of ERα at the promoter in a c-Fos-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that JNK1 enzymatic activity is required for Ral-dependent gene activation through ERα. Our results suggest that one role for Ral-dependent recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 binding site is to stimulate JNK1 enzymatic activity. Alternatively, Ral-occupied ERα might recruit protein substrates to promoter-bound JNK1 without any change in JNK1 activity. Collectively, our studies have revealed a new role for JNK1 in determining gene regulatory outcomes by ERα.

  12. Activation of Estrogen Receptor α by Raloxifene Through an Activating Protein-1-Dependent Tethering Mechanism in Human Cervical Epithelial Cancer Cells: A Role for c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Matulis, Christina K.; Kraus, W. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) regulates target gene expression in response to ligands through two distinct mechanisms: direct binding to DNA and indirect tethering through other DNA-bound transcription factors, such as AP-1. In the studies described herein, we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of ERα in the AP-1 tethering pathway by the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene (Ral). Our results with the MMP1 and PRUNE genes indicate that the c-Fos component of the AP-1 tethering factor and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) are constitutively bound at the promoter regions prior to Ral exposure. Ral then promotes the binding of ERα at the promoter in a c-Fos-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that JNK1 enzymatic activity is required for Ral-dependent gene activation through ERα. Our results suggest that one role for Ral-dependent recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 binding site is to stimulate JNK1 enzymatic activity. Alternatively, Ral-occupied ERα might recruit protein substrates to promoter-bound JNK1 without any change in JNK1 activity. Collectively, our studies have revealed a new role for JNK1 in determining gene regulatory outcomes by ERα. PMID:21964465

  13. Chronic estrogen deficiency in mice alters FoxO1 signaling in a mixed fiber skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Menopause, characterized by reduced estrogen levels, is associated with increased adiposity and metabolic pathology. Molecular mechanisms underlying this association between low estrogen status and metabolic disease are not fully elucidated. Dysregulated skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pr...

  14. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  15. Manure-borne estrogens as potential environmental contaminants: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2003-12-15

    Livestock wastes are potential sources of endocrine disrupting compounds to the environment. Steroidal estrogen hormones such as estradiol, estrone, and estriol are a particular concern because there is evidence that low nanogram per liter concentrations of estrogens in water can adversely affect the reproductive biology of fish and other aquatic vertebrate species. We performed a literature review to assess the current state of science regarding estrogen physicochemical properties, livestock excretion, and the fate of manure-borne estrogens in the environment. Unconjugated steroidal estrogens have low solubility in water (0.8-13.3 mg L(-1)) and are moderately hydrophobic (log Kow 2.6-4.0). Cattle excrete mostly 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts, whereas swine and poultry excrete mostly 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts. The environmental fate of estrogens is not clearly known. Laboratory-based studies have found that the biological activity of these compounds is greatly reduced or eliminated within several hours to days due to degradation and sorption. On the other hand, field studies have demonstrated that estrogens are sufficiently mobile and persistent to impact surface and groundwater quality. Future research should use standardized methods for the analysis of manure, soil, and water. More information is needed about the types and amounts of estrogens that exist in livestock wastes and the fate of manure-borne estrogens applied to agricultural lands. Field and laboratory studies should work toward revealing the mechanisms of estrogen degradation, sorption, and transport so that the risk of estrogen contamination of waterways can be minimized.

  16. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  17. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  18. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs): new alternatives for osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Lugo, L; Villalvilla, A; Largo, R; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Roman-Blas, J A

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic rise in the prevalence rate of osteoarthritis (OA) after the menopause and the presence of estrogen receptors in joint tissues suggest that estrogen may help protect against the development of OA. Trials of estrogen therapy have produced inconclusive results, however, partly because of flaws in study design and partly because of the complexity of the mechanisms underlying estrogen's effects on joint tissues. Initial studies of the use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have reported beneficial effects in OA. These agents may exert both a direct effect upon joint cartilage and indirect effects on subchondral bone, synovium, muscle, tendons and ligaments. SERMs may be particularly beneficial for postmenopausal patients with osteoporotic OA, a phenotype defined by decreased bone density, associated with high remodeling in subchondral bone. More research is needed, though, before SERMs can become a therapeutic option for OA.

  19. Comparison of estrogen mixtures in vitro vs. in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous sources contribute to widespread contamination of drinking water sources with both natural and synthetic estrogens, which isa concern for potential ecological and human health effects. In vitro screening assays are valuable tools for identifying mechanisms of toxicity bu...

  20. Effectiveness of estrogen replacement in restoration of cognitive function after long-term estrogen withdrawal in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Alicja L; Savonenko, Alena V

    2002-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that some aspects of learning and memory may be altered by a midlife loss of estrogen, indicating a potential causal relationship between the deficiency of ovarian hormones and cognitive aging. In this study, the effects of estrogen withdrawal and replacement were tested in middle-aged Fischer-344 rats using different memory tasks. Estrogen withdrawal accelerated the rate of cognitive aging. A deficit first occurred 4 months after ovariectomy in working memory, which was tested in a delayed-nonmatching-to-position task, and progressed from long-delay to short-delay trials. Reference memory, which was tested in a place discrimination task and a split-stem T-maze, was not affected by aging or ovariectomy. The efficacy of estrogen in ameliorating the cognitive deficit in old rats depended on the type of treatment (acute vs chronic) and whether the aging-related decline in a particular cognitive process was aggravated by estrogen withdrawal. Chronic estrogen treatment (implants) was effective in improving working memory only when primed with repeated injections of estrogen, indicating that simulating the estrogen fluctuations of the estrous cycle may be more effective than the widely used mode of chronic pharmacological treatment. A challenge with scopolamine revealed that ovariectomy-induced cognitive deterioration coincided with a compromised cholinergic system. Importantly, the estrogen treatment that had restored effectively the cognitive abilities of old ovariectomized rats did not reduce their sensitivity to scopolamine. Taking into consideration that estrogen was highly effective against the amnestic action of scopolamine when tested in young-adult rats, these data emphasize that mechanisms of the protective effect of estrogen differ in young and old rats.

  1. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2) release. The thromboxane A(2) pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The "Timing Hypothesis," which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  2. The Endocrine Role of Estrogens on Human Male Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Kara, Elda; Carani, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Before the characterization of human and animal models of estrogen deficiency, estrogen action was confined in the context of the female bone. These interesting models uncovered a wide spectrum of unexpected estrogen actions on bone in males, allowing the formulation of an estrogen-centric theory useful to explain how sex steroids act on bone in men. Most of the principal physiological events that take place in the developing and mature male bone are now considered to be under the control of estrogen. Estrogen determines the acceleration of bone elongation at puberty, epiphyseal closure, harmonic skeletal proportions, the achievement of peak bone mass, and the maintenance of bone mass. Furthermore, it seems to crosstalk with androgen even in the determination of bone size, a more androgen-dependent phenomenon. At puberty, epiphyseal closure and growth arrest occur when a critical number of estrogens is reached. The same mechanism based on a critical threshold of serum estradiol seems to operate in men during adulthood for bone mass maintenance via the modulation of bone formation and resorption in men. This threshold should be better identified in-between the ranges of 15 and 25 pg/mL. Future basic and clinical research will optimize strategies for the management of bone diseases related to estrogen deficiency in men. PMID:25873947

  3. Vascular Aging in Women: is Estrogen the Fountain of Youth?

    PubMed Central

    Novella, Susana; Dantas, Ana Paula; Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with structural and functional changes in the vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular risk is similar for older men and women, but lower in women during their fertile years. This age- and sex-related difference points to estrogen as a protective factor because menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Experimental and some clinical studies have attributed most of the protective effects of estrogen to its modulatory action on vascular endothelium. Estrogen promotes endothelial-derived NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release. The thromboxane A2 pathway is key to regulating vascular tone in females. Despite all the experimental evidence, some clinical trials have reported no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in older postmenopausal women. The “Timing Hypothesis,” which states that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature, offers a possible explanation for these discrepancies. Nevertheless, a gap remains in current knowledge of cardiovascular aging mechanisms in women. This review comprises clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens, and hormone replacement therapy on vascular function of females. We aim to clarify how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates vascular response at different ages. PMID:22685434

  4. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  5. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  6. Gender and cataract--the role of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine; Celojevic, Dragana

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence from epidemiologic data that cataract is more common in women than men. This is not solely due to a higher rate of cataract extraction in women, as is the case in the western world, but several population-based studies show that females have a higher prevalence of lens opacities, especially cortical. There is no firm evidence that lifestyle-related factors are the cause of this gender discrepancy. Focus has therefore been directed towards the role of estrogen in cataract formation. Although data on endogenous and exogenous estrogen involvement in cataractogenesis are conflicting, some studies have indicated that hormone therapy may decrease the risk of cataract and thus be protective. It has been hypothesized that the decrease in estrogen at menopause cause increased risk of cataract in women, i.e. not strictly the concentration of estrogen, but more the withdrawal effect. Estrogens are known to exert several anti-aging effects that may explain the longer lifespan in women, including metabolically beneficial effects, neuroprotection, preservation of telomeres and anti-oxidative properties. Since oxidative stress is considered important in cataractogenesis, studies have investigated the effects of estrogens on lens epithelial cells in culture or in animal models. Several investigators have found protection by physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in cultured lens epithelial cells. Although both main types of estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, have been demonstrated in lens epithelium, most studies so far indicate that the estrogen-mediated protection in the lens is exerted through non-genomic, i.e. receptor-independent mechanisms, possibly through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathway. Further studies are needed, both epidemiologic as to the role of hormone therapies, and laboratory studies

  7. The role of estrogens and estrogen receptor signaling pathways in cancer and infertility: the case of schistosomes.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Mónica C; Alves, Helena; Barros, Alberto; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J; Sousa, Mário

    2015-06-01

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. Schistosomiasis haematobia also appears to negatively influence fertility, and is particularly associated with female infertility. Given that estrogens and estrogen receptors are key players in human reproduction, we speculate that schistosome estrogen-like molecules may contribute to infertility through hormonal imbalances. Here, we review recent findings on the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors on both carcinogenesis and infertility associated with urogenital schistosomiasis and discuss the basic hormonal mechanisms that might be common in cancer and infertility.

  8. Membrane estrogen receptors: genomic actions and post transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Julie; Sebastian, K S; Devassy, Sony; Priyadarsini, Lakshmi; Farook, Mohamed Febin; Shameem, A; Mathew, Deepa; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2006-02-26

    The primary cellular location of the nuclear estrogen receptor II (nER II) is the plasma membrane. A number of reports that have appeared in the recent past indicate that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) also exists. Whether the membrane localized ERalpha represents the receptor that binds to the estrogen responsive element (ERE) remains to be known. The mechanisms that underlie the internalization of nER II (non-activated estrogen receptor, deglycosylated) have been identified to a certain extent. The question remains: is the primary location of the ERalpha also the plasma membrane? If that is the case, it will be a challenging task to identify the molecular events that underlie the plasma membrane-to-nucleus movement of ERalpha. The internalization mechanisms for the two 66kDa plasma membrane ERs, following hormone binding, appear to be distinct and without any overlaps. Interestingly, while the major gene regulatory role for ERalpha appears to be at the level of transcription, the nER II has its major functional role in post transcriptional mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum associated anchor protein-55 (ap55) that was recently reported from the author's laboratory needs a closer look. It is a high affinity estrogen binding protein that anchors the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) in an estrogen-mediated event. It will be interesting to examine whether ap55 bears any structural similarity with either ERalpha or ERbeta. PMID:16423448

  9. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg(-1), in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR.

  10. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Dzal, Yvonne A.; Milsom, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1, and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min−1 kg−1, respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg−1, in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  11. Escitalopram attenuates β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Juan; Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wu, Di; Tang, Xiang; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Fang-Fang; Bai, Feng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-03-22

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether escitalopram could inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the underlying mechanisms, we treated the rat primary hippocampal neurons with Aβ1-42 and examined the effect of escitalopram on tau hyperphosphorylation. Results showed that escitalopram decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, escitalopram activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Moreover, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway and decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 blocked the activation of Akt/GSK-3β pathway and the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Finally, escitalopram improved Aβ1-42 induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and spine density, and reversed Aβ1-42 induced reduction of synaptic proteins. Our results demonstrated that escitalopram attenuated Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26950279

  12. Impact of estrogen therapy on Alzheimer's disease: a fork in the road?

    PubMed

    Brinton, Roberta D

    2004-01-01

    The results of recent clinical studies have challenged our previously held view that estrogen therapy promotes neurological health and prevents or ameliorates Alzheimer's disease. A major question emerging from these studies is: how can there be such disparity between the basic science and epidemiological data that show that estrogen can protect neurons against degenerative insults and reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and the recent data (from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study [WHIMS] trial and the trial of estrogen treatment for Alzheimer's disease), which show that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) showed no benefit and even a potential deleterious effect? Which set of data is correct? The proposition put forth in this review is that both sets of data are correct and that two major factors determine the efficacy of estrogen or HRT. First is the time at which estrogen therapy is initiated. The data indicate that initiation of therapy early in menopause and when neurons are in a healthy state, reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease; whereas, estrogen therapy initiated after the disease has developed or decades following menopause is without benefit. Second, estrogen therapy is not the same as HRT and the type of progestogen used determines the outcome of the therapeutic intervention. Insights into the mechanisms of action of estrogen and progestogen in the brain provide a framework for understanding the paradox of the benefit of estrogen in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease versus the lack of benefit in treatment trials and in trials when HRT is instituted many years after menopause. Based on estrogen-inducible mechanisms, which have been elucidated in healthy neuron model systems, it would be predicted that estrogen therapy could be highly effective in preventing neurodegenerative disease by promoting neuronal defence and memory mechanisms. The mechanisms of action of estrogen also predict that estrogen therapy would be an ineffective strategy

  13. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    '-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 0.5-1.0 microM) did not significantly affect the EPSPm. 4. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.2 microM) fully reversed the depressant effects of both adenosine (100 microM) and CADO (1 microM) on the EPSPm and the stimulus-evoked reductions in spike frequency adaptation. 5. DPCPX (0.2 microM) alone caused a small but variable mean increase in the EPSPm of 22 +/- 19% and enabled activation of an EPSPm by a previously subthreshold stimulus. In contrast, the selective adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-IT; 10 microM) inhibited the EPSPm by 74 +/- 10%, an effect that was reversed by DPCPX. 6. The concentration-response relationship for the depressant action of CADO on the EPSPm more closely paralleled that for its presynaptic depressant action on glutamate-mediated EPSPs than that for postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The respective mean IC50 and EC50 concentrations for these effects were 0.3, 0.8 and 3.0 microM. 7. CADO (1-5 microM) did not have a significant effect on the postsynaptic depolarization, increase in input resistance and reduction in spike frequency adaptation evoked by carbachol (0.5-3.0 microM). All these effects were abolished by atropine (1 microM). 8. These data provide good evidence for an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of mAChR-mediated synaptic responses in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. This inhibition is mediated predominantly presynaptically, is active tonically and can be enhanced when extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine are raised. PMID:9234198

  14. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  15. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2006-05-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins.

  16. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-05-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  17. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  18. Mechanism of phytoestrogen puerarin-mediated cytoprotection following oxidative injury: Estrogen receptor-dependent up-regulation of PI3K/Akt and HO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-15

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. The phytoestrogen puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside found in the root of Pueraria lobata, has been used for various medicinal purposes in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Recent studies have indicated that the estrogen receptor (ER), through interaction with p85, regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, revealing a physiologic, non-nuclear function of ER that may be relevant in cytoprotection. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen puerarin inhibits tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells with puerarin significantly reduced t-BHP-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Also, puerarin up-regulated HO-1 expression and this expression conferred cytoprotection against oxidative injury induced by t-BHP. Moreover, puerarin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of puerarin-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Puerarin-induced up-regulation of HO-1 and cytoprotection against t-BHP were abolished by silencing Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA. Also, puerarin-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that puerarin augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress.

  19. AIB1 is required for the acquisition of epithelial growth factor receptor-mediated tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wenhui; Zhang Qingyuan Kang Xinmei; Jin Shi; Lou Changjie

    2009-03-13

    Acquired resistance to tamoxifen has become a serious obstacle in breast cancer treatment. The underlying mechanism responsible for this condition has not been completely elucidated. In this study, a tamoxifen-resistant (Tam-R) MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was developed to mimic the occurrence of acquired tamoxifen resistance as seen in clinical practice. Increased expression levels of HER1, HER2 and the estrogen receptor (ER)-AIB1 complex were found in tamoxifen-resistant cells. EGF stimulation and gefitinib inhibition experiments further demonstrated that HER1/HER2 signaling and AIB1 were involved in the proliferation of cells that had acquired Tam resistance. However, when AIB1 was silenced with AIB1-siRNA in Tam-R cells, the cell growth stimulated by the HER1/HER2 signaling pathway was significantly reduced, and the cells were again found to be inhibited by tamoxifen. These results suggest that the AIB1 protein could be a limiting factor in the HER1/HER2-mediated hormone-independent growth of Tam-R cells. Thus, AIB1 may be a new therapeutic target, and the removal of AIB1 may decrease the crosstalk between ER and the HER1/HER2 pathway, resulting in the restoration of tamoxifen sensitivity in tamoxifen-resistant cells.

  20. PI3K in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus mediates estrogenic actions on energy expenditure in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens act in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) to regulate body weight homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these estrogenic effects are unknown. We show that activation of estrogen receptor-a (ERa) stimulates neural firing of VMH neurons expressing ERa, and these ...

  1. Role of estrogen in lung cancer based on the estrogen receptor-epithelial mesenchymal transduction signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-zhen; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Li-juan; Wang, Zhong-qi; Wu, Zhong-hua; Yang, Xiao-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Estrogen is reported to promote the occurrence and development of several human cancers. Increasing evidence shows that most human lung tumors exert estrogen receptor expression. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of estrogen effect in lung cancer through estrogen receptor-epithelial–mesechymal-transition signaling pathways for the first time. Materials and methods A total of 36 inbred C57BL/6 mice (18 male and 18 female) were injected subcutaneously with human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, Lewis. After the lung tumor model was established, mice with lung adenocarcinoma were randomly divided into three groups for each sex (n=6), such as vehicle group, estrogen group, and estrogen plus tamoxifen group. The six groups of mice were sacrificed after 21 days of drug treatment. Tumor tissue was stripped and weighed, and tumor inhibition rate was calculated based on average tumor weight. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K), AKT, E-cadherin, and vimentin were detected in both tumor tissue and lung tissue by using immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results 1) For male mice: in the estrogen group, estrogen treatment significantly increased ERα protein and mRNA expressions in tumor tissue and protein expression of PI3K, AKT, and vimentin in both tumor tissue and lung tissue compared with the vehicle-treated group. Besides, mRNA expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in estrogen-treated tumor tissues than that in vehicle-treated tissues. In the estrogen plus tamoxifen group, protein and mRNA expressions of ERα and AKT were dramatically reduced by tamoxifen treatment in tumor tissue compared with the estrogen group; mRNA expression of E-cadherin was increased in tumor tissue; protein expression of vimentin and PI3K were downregulated in tumor tissue; protein

  2. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated toxicity in nonneuronal cell lines: characterization using fluorescent measures of cell viability and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Anegawa, N J; Guttmann, R P; Grant, E R; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J; Lynch, D R

    2000-05-01

    Cells transfected with specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes undergo cell death that mimics glutamate-induced excitotoxicity pharmacologically. We have further characterized the mechanisms of cell death resulting from NMDA receptor activation in such cells through development of cell counting methods based on co-transfection with green fluorescent protein. When co-transfected with NMDA receptors, GFP expression was limited to live cells as indicated by the observation that GFP was only detected in cells which were positive for markers of live cells, and was found in no cells which were trypan blue or propidium iodide positive. Using co-transfection with green fluorescent protein and cell counting of viable cells with a fluorescence activated cells sorter, we confirmed the subunit-specific profile of NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in cells transfected with NMDA receptors. Toxicity was greatest in the NR1A/2A receptor, less in the NR1A/2B receptor, and least in NR1A/2C receptors. Cell death also differed pharmacologically between subunit combinations. Cell death in cells transfected with NR 1A/2A was blocked by amino-phosphonovaleric acid at lower concentrations than in cells transfected with NR 1A/2B. In cells transfected with the NR1A/2A or NR1A/2B combinations but not NR1A/2C, cell death was also associated with production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, removal of the final 400 amino acids of the C-terminal region of NR2A decreased cell death. The use of GFP based cell counting provides a sensitive mechanism for assessing the mechanism of excitotoxicity in transfected cell models.

  3. Rapid control of male typical behaviors by brain-derived estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Beside their genomic mode of action, estrogens also activate a variety of cellular signaling pathways through non-genomic mechanisms. Until recently, little was known regarding the functional significance of such actions in males and the mechanism that control local estrogen concentration with a spatial and time resolution compatible with these non-genomic actions had rarely been examined. Here, we review evidence that estrogens rapidly modulate a variety of behaviors in male vertebrates. Then, we present in vitro work supporting the existence of a control mechanism of local brain estrogen synthesis by aromatase along with in vivo evidence that rapid changes in aromatase activity also occur in a region-specific manner in response to changes in the social or environmental context. Finally, we suggest that the brain estrogen provision may also play a significant role in females. Together these data bolster the hypothesis that brain-derived estrogens should be considered as neuromodulators. PMID:22983088

  4. Estrogen Receptors and Their Implications in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Francesco; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; Doherty, Glen; Winter, Desmond C.; Sheahan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding their cognate receptors, ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2), estrogens activate intracellular signaling cascades that have important consequences for cellular behavior. Historically linked to carcinogenesis in reproductive organs, estrogens have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of different cancer types of non-reproductive tissues including the colon. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor expressed in both normal and malignant colonic epithelium. However, during colon cancer progression, ERβ expression is lost, suggesting that estrogen signaling may play a role in disease progression. Estrogens may in fact exert an anti-tumor effect through selective activation of pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by ERβ, inhibition of inflammatory signals and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we analyze the estrogen pathway as a possible therapeutic avenue in colorectal cancer, we report the most recent experimental evidence to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of estrogen-mediated protection against colorectal tumorigenesis, and we discuss future challenges and potential avenues for targeted therapy. PMID:25699240

  5. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  6. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  7. Angiotensin II attenuates NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal cell death and prevents the associated reduction in Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Schelman, William R; Andres, Robert; Ferguson, Paul; Orr, Brent; Kang, Evan; Weyhenmeyer, James A

    2004-09-10

    While angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a major role in the regulation of blood pressure, fluid homeostasis and neuroendocrine function, recent studies have also implicated the peptide hormone in cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. In support of this, we have previously demonstrated that Ang II attenuates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling [Molec. Brain Res. 48 (1997) 197]. To further examine the modulatory role of Ang II on NMDA receptor function, we investigated the effect of angiotensin receptor (AT) activation on NMDA-mediated cell death and the accompanying decrease in Bcl-2 expression. The viability of differentiated N1E-115 and NG108-15 neuronal cell lines was reduced following exposure to NMDA in a dose-dependent manner. MTT analysis (mitochondrial integrity) revealed a decrease in cell survival of 49.4+/-12.3% in NG108 cells and 79.9+/-6.8% in N1E cells following treatment with 10 mM NMDA for 20 h. Cytotoxicity in N1E cells was inhibited by the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801. Further, NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in NG108 cells was attenuated by treatment with Ang II. The Ang II effect was inhibited by both AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, losartan and PD123319, respectively, suggesting that both receptor subtypes may play a role in the survival effect of Ang II. Since it has been shown that activation of NMDA receptors alters the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, Western blot analysis was performed in N1E cells to determine whether Ang II alters the NMDA-induced changes in Bcl-2 expression. A concentration-dependent decrease of intracellular Bcl-2 protein levels was observed following treatment with NMDA, and this reduction was inhibited by MK801. Addition of Ang II suppressed the NMDA receptor-mediated reduction in Bcl-2. The Ang II effect on NMDA-mediated changes in Bcl-2 levels was blocked by PD123319, but was not significantly changed by losartan, suggesting AT2 receptor specificity. Taken together, these

  8. Cobaltous chloride and hypoxia inhibit aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated responses in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-ER{alpha} crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NF{kappa}B which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 h, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 h, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 h enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide.

  9. A Trypanosoma cruzi Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (TcVps34) Is Involved in Osmoregulation and Receptor-mediated Endocytosis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Girard-Dias, Wendell; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has the ability to respond to a variety of environmental changes during its life cycle both in the insect vector and in the vertebrate host. Because regulation of transcription initiation seems to be nonfunctional in this parasite, it is important to investigate other regulatory mechanisms of adaptation. Regulatory mechanisms at the level of signal transduction pathways involving phosphoinositides are good candidates for this purpose. Here we report the identification of the first phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in T. cruzi, with similarity with its yeast counterpart, Vps34p. TcVps34 specifically phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol to produce phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, thus confirming that it belongs to class III PI3K family. Overexpression of TcVps34 resulted in morphological and functional alterations related to vesicular trafficking. Although inhibition of TcVps34 with specific PI3K inhibitors, such as wortmannin and LY294,000, resulted in reduced regulatory volume decrease after hyposmotic stress, cells overexpressing this enzyme were resistant to these inhibitors. Furthermore, these cells were able to recover their original volume faster than wild type cells when they were submitted to severe hyposmotic stress. In addition, in TcVps34-overexpressing cells, the activities of vacuolar-H+-ATPase and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase were altered, suggesting defects in the acidification of intracellular compartments. Furthermore, receptor-mediated endocytosis was partially blocked although fluid phase endocytosis was not affected, confirming a function for TcVps34 in membrane trafficking. Taken together, these results strongly support that TcVps34 plays a prominent role in vital processes for T. cruzi survival such as osmoregulation, acidification, and vesicular trafficking. PMID:18801733

  10. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  11. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  12. Inhibition of the Fc receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages by the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bliska, J B; Black, D S

    1995-01-01

    Suppression of host-cell-mediated immunity is a hallmark feature of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection. To better understand this process, the interaction of Y. pseudotuberculosis with macrophages and the effect of the virulence plasmid-encoded Yersinia tyrosine phosphatase (YopH) on the oxidative burst was analyzed in a chemiluminescence assay. An oxidative burst was generated upon infection of macrophages with a plasmid-cured strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis opsonized with immunoglobulin G antibody. Infection with plasmid-containing Y. pseudotuberculosis inhibited the oxidative burst triggered by secondary infection with opsonized bacteria. The tyrosine phosphatase activity of YopH was necessary for this inhibition. These results indicate that YopH inhibits Fc receptor-mediated signal transduction in macrophages in a global fashion. In addition, bacterial protein synthesis was not required for macrophage inhibition, suggesting that YopH export and translocation are controlled at the posttranslational level. PMID:7822039

  13. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and calcium signaling of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sawada, C; Higuchi, H; Teraoka, H; Yamaguchi, M

    1997-01-01

    Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling of complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-deficient neutrophils from a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were compared to those of control heifers. The mean phagocytic activity of IgG-coated yeasts and aggregated bovine IgG (Agg-IgG)-induced superoxide production of CR3-deficient neutrophils were 10% and 77.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i signals in CR3-deficient neutrophils stimulated with Agg-IgG or concanavalin A were different with mean peak [Ca2+]i concentrations of 78% and 41.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. These findings suggest that Fc receptor-mediated neutrophil functions are closely dependent on the presence of CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on the neutrophil cell surfaces. PMID:9343828

  14. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  15. Imaging receptor-mediated endocytosis with a polymeric nanoparticle-based coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering probe.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Lu, Yanhui; Lee, Robert J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2007-08-23

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was used to visualize receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with the aid of a CARS probe. The probe was made of 200-nm polystyrene particles encapsulated in folate-targeted liposomes. By tuning (omega(p) - omega(s)) to 3045 cm(-1), which corresponds to the aromatic C-H stretching vibration, the polystyrene nanoparticles with a high density of aromatic C-H bonds were detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, while the epi-detected CARS signal from cellular organelles was cancelled by the destructive interference between the resonant contribution from the aliphatic C-H vibration and the nonresonant contribution. Without any photobleaching, the CARS probe allowed single-particle tracking analysis of intracellular endosome transport. No photodamage to cells was observed under the current experimental conditions. These results show the advantages and potential of using a CARS probe to study cellular processes. PMID:17663581

  16. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  18. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  19. Differing species responsiveness of estrogenic contaminants in fish is conferred by the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Lange, Anke; Hirakawa, Ikumi; Tohyama, Saki; Ogino, Yukiko; Mizutani, Takeshi; Kagami, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Teruhiko; Ihara, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Katsu, Yoshinao; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induces a range of adverse effects, notably on reproduction and reproductive development. These responses are mediated via estrogen receptors (ERs). Different species of fish may show differences in their responsiveness to environmental estrogens but there is very limited understanding on the underlying mechanisms accounting for these differences. We used custom developed in vitro ERα reporter gene assays for nine fish species to analyze the ligand- and species-specificity for 12 environmental estrogens. Transcriptonal activities mediated by estradiol-17β (E2) were similar to only a 3-fold difference in ERα sensitivity between species. Diethylstilbestrol was the most potent estrogen (∼ 10-fold that of E2) in transactivating the fish ERαs, whereas equilin was about 1 order of magnitude less potent in all species compared to E2. Responses of the different fish ERαs to weaker environmental estrogens varied, and for some considerably. Medaka, stickleback, bluegill and guppy showed higher sensitivities to nonylphenol, octylphenol, bisphenol A and the DDT-metabolites compared with cyprinid ERαs. Triclosan had little or no transactivation of the fish ERαs. By constructing ERα chimeras in which the AF-containing domains were swapped between various fish species with contrasting responsiveness and subsequent exposure to different environmental estrogens. Our in vitro data indicate that the LBD plays a significant role in accounting for ligand sensitivity of ERα in different species. The differences seen in responsiveness to different estrogenic chemicals between species indicate environmental risk assessment for estrogens cannot necessarily be predicted for all fish by simply examining receptor activation for a few model fish species. PMID:24689804

  20. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M.; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  1. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  2. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  3. Estrogen withdrawal selectively increases serotonin reactivity in rabbit basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Shay, J; Futo, J; Badrov, N; Moss, J

    1994-01-01

    Clinical observations and laboratory investigations suggest that gender and menstrual status modulate cerebrovascular reactivity. We prepared 7 groups of rabbits (I) males (II) oophorectomized untreated females, (III) testosterone treated oophorectomized females, (IV) superovulated females, (V) superovulated estrogen withdrawn females, (VI) estrogen treated oophorectomized females, and (VII) estrogen withdrawn females to mimic phases of the estrous cycle and compare cerebral basilar artery reactivity to serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) in vitro. Basilar artery sensitivity to 5-HT vasoconstriction was increased in oophorectomized, acutely estrogen withdrawn females (Group VII) when compared to estrogen maintained and the other groups (p < 0.0001). There was a significant reduction in 5-HT sensitivity in superovulated females (Group IV) (p < 0.001). The change in 5-HT sensitivity is selective and was not observed for NE. Nitroarginine treatment and mechanical denudement resulted in higher Tmax and lower ED50 for both NE and 5-HT regardless of hormonal manipulation. We conclude that estrogen withdrawal increases 5-HT vasoreactivity by an endothelium independent mechanism. PMID:8084212

  4. Neuroprotective effects of preconditioning ischaemia on ischaemic brain injury through inhibition of mixed-lineage kinase 3 via NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Guang; Miao, Bei; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2005-05-01

    A number of works show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway responds actively in cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion. We undertook our present studies to clarify the role of mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) in MAPK cascades, in global ischaemia and ischaemic tolerance. The mechanism concerning NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation underlying ischaemic tolerance, was also investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 min of ischaemia and differing times of reperfusion. Our results showed MLK3 was activated in the hippocampal CA1 region with two peaks occurring at 30 min and 6 h, respectively. This activation returned to base level 3 days later. Both preconditioning with 3 min of sublethal ischaemia and NMDA pretreatment inhibited the 6-h peak of activation. However, pretreatment of ketamine before preconditioning reversed the inhibiting effect of preconditioning on MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion. In the case of Akt1, however, preconditioning and NMDA pretreatment enhanced Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. Furthermore, ketamine pretreatment reversed preconditioning-induced increase of Akt1 activation. We also noted that pretreatment of LY294002 before preconditioning reversed both the inhibition of MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion and the increase in Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. The above-mentioned results lead us to conclude that, in the hippocampal CA1 region, preconditioning inhibits MLK3 activation after lethal ischaemia and reperfusion and, furthermore, this effect is mediated by Akt1 activation through NMDA receptor stimulation.

  5. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  6. The heterogeneity in GABAA receptor-mediated IPSC kinetics reflects heterogeneity of subunit composition among inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in spinal lamina II

    PubMed Central

    Labrakakis, Charalampos; Rudolph, Uwe; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition displays rich functional diversity throughout the CNS, which arises from variations in the nature of inputs, subunit composition, subcellular localization of receptors and synapse geometry, or reuptake mechanisms. In the spinal dorsal horn (SDH), GABAA and glycine receptors play a major role in the control of excitability and accuracy of nociceptive processing. Identifying which components shape the properties of the inhibitory synapses in different cell types is necessary to understand how nociceptive information is integrated. To address this, we used transgenic mice where inhibitory interneurons express GAD65-EGFP. We found that GABAA, but not glycine receptor-mediated evoked IPSCs displayed slower kinetics in EGFP+ vs. EGFP− interneurons. GABAA miniature IPSC decay kinetics showed a large variability in both populations, however the distribution of decays differed between EGFP+ and EGFP− interneurons. The range of mIPSC decay kinetics observed was replicated in experiments using rapid application of GABA on outside-out patches taken from SDH neurons in slices. Furthermore, GABAA decay kinetics were not affected by uptake blockers and were not different in mice lacking δ or α5 subunits, indicating that intrinsic channel properties likely underlie the heterogeneity. To identify whether other α subunits shape the various kinetic properties observed we took advantage of knock-in mice carrying point mutations in either the α1, α2, or α3 subunits rendering Ro 15-4513 a selective agonist at the benzodiazepine modulatory site. We found that α1 and α2 subunit underlie the fast decaying component of IPSCs while the slow component is determined by the α3 subunit. The differential distribution of GABAA subunits at inhibitory synapses thus sculpts the heterogeneity of the SDH inhibitory circuitry. This diversity of inhibitory elements can be harnessed to selectively modulate different components of the spinal nociceptive circuitry for

  7. Evidence for the involvement of PECAM-1 in a receptor mediated signal-transduction pathway regulating capacitation-associated tyrosine phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Paul, Jonathan W; Spiller, Cassy M; Attwell-Heap, Abigail G; Ashman, Leonie K; Aitken, R John

    2005-10-15

    Mammalian spermatozoa must become ;capacitated' in the female reproductive tract before they gain the ability to fertilize the oocyte. The attainment of a capacitated state has been correlated with a number of biochemical changes, the most notable of which is a dramatic increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation status of these cells. Despite its biological importance, the mechanisms responsible for initiating this tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in vivo are unknown. Here, we report that this signalling pathway can be elicited in a rapid, dose-dependent and lectin-specific manner by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), but none of 18 other lectins assessed. This response was abrogated by prior enzymatic cleavage of either sialic acid or GlcNAc residues from the sperm surface and by treatment with a range of pharmacological inhibitors directed against protein kinase A, protein tyrosine kinases and intermediates including Src. Proteomic analysis of the WGA-binding sites on the sperm surface identified the putative cognate receptor as platelet cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31). This conclusion was supported by the following evidence: (i) anti-PECAM-1 antibodies identified a molecule of the correct molecular mass in human spermatozoa, (ii) PECAM-1 could be isolated from a pool of sperm surface proteins using WGA immobilized on a solid phase support, (iii) PECAM-1 and WGA co-localized to the sperm surface and (iv) anti-PECAM-1 antibodies could completely block the ability of WGA to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence that a receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway triggers human sperm capacitation and identifies PECAM-1 as the probable initiator of this second messenger cascade. PMID:16219692

  8. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants. PMID:24798317

  9. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants.

  10. The TGR5 receptor mediates bile acid–induced itch and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Farzad; Kwon, Edwin; Poole, Daniel P.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Lyo, Victoria; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Cevikbas, Ferda; Steinhoff, Martin; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Vanner, Stephen J.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Corvera, Carlos U.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cholestatic disease exhibit pruritus and analgesia, but the mechanisms underlying these symptoms are unknown. We report that bile acids, which are elevated in the circulation and tissues during cholestasis, cause itch and analgesia by activating the GPCR TGR5. TGR5 was detected in peptidergic neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord that transmit itch and pain, and in dermal macrophages that contain opioids. Bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist induced hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and stimulated the release of the itch and analgesia transmitters gastrin-releasing peptide and leucine-enkephalin. Intradermal injection of bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist stimulated scratching behavior by gastrin-releasing peptide– and opioid-dependent mechanisms in mice. Scratching was attenuated in Tgr5-KO mice but exacerbated in Tgr5-Tg mice (overexpressing mouse TGR5), which exhibited spontaneous pruritus. Intraplantar and intrathecal injection of bile acids caused analgesia to mechanical stimulation of the paw by an opioid-dependent mechanism. Both peripheral and central mechanisms of analgesia were absent from Tgr5-KO mice. Thus, bile acids activate TGR5 on sensory nerves, stimulating the release of neuropeptides in the spinal cord that transmit itch and analgesia. These mechanisms could contribute to pruritus and painless jaundice that occur during cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:23524965

  11. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    An, Ki-Chan

    2016-08-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  12. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  13. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Snelten, Courtney S; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women's health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  14. Sex, Stroke, and Inflammation: The potential for Estrogen-mediated immunoprotection in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ritzel, Rodney M.; Capozzi, Lori A.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the primary cause of disability in the developed world. Experimental and clinical data indicate that stroke is a sexually dimorphic disease, with males demonstrating an enhanced intrinsic sensitivity to ischemic damage throughout most of their lifespan. The neuroprotective role of estrogen in the female brain is well established, however, estrogen exposure can also be deleterious, especially in older women. The mechanisms for this remain unclear. Our current understanding is based on studies examining estrogen as it relates to neuronal injury, yet cerebral ischemia also induces a robust sterile inflammatory response involving local and systemic immune cells. Despite the potent anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen, few studies have investigated the contribution of estrogen to sex differences in the inflammatory response to stroke. This review examines the potential role for estrogen-mediated immunoprotection in ischemic injury. PMID:22561337

  15. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  16. Estrogenic followed by anti-estrogenic effects of PCBs exposure in juvenil fish (Spaurus aurata).

    PubMed

    Calò, M; Alberghina, D; Bitto, A; Lauriano, E R; Lo Cascio, P

    2010-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a phospho-lipo-glycoprotein produced by oviparous animals in response to estrogen receptor (ER) binding. The presence of Vtg in juvenile and male fish liver and plasma has been used as biomarker to evaluate levels of environmental contaminants as dioxin and PCBs. Interaction of dioxins and PCBs with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) may affect reproduction by recruitment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PCB-126, a co-planar PCB prototypical AhR agonist, and of PCB-153, a non-coplanar PCB lacking dioxine-like activity, on Vtg expression in young fish (Spaurus aurata) after a 12 or 24h exposure to PCBs as well as 48h following PCBs removal. Vtg expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by Western-blot analysis. Our results showed an increased Vtg expression following PCBs administration, with a maximum level after 12h of exposure to either PCB-126, PCB-153 or a mixture of both PCBs. Following this estrogenic activity, an anti-estrogenic activity was detected after 24h of incubation with PCB-126 (alone or mixed with PCB-153), suggested by a decrease in Vtg expression likely through AhR, as a consequence of a hypothetic defence mechanism to endogenous or exogenous ligands.

  17. Bisphenol-A acts as a potent estrogen via non-classical estrogen triggered pathways.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ropero, Ana Belén; Soriano, Sergi; García-Arévalo, Marta; Ripoll, Cristina; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Iván; Nadal, Ángel

    2012-05-22

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an estrogenic monomer commonly used in the manufacture of numerous consumer products such as food and beverage containers. Widespread human exposure to significant doses of this compound has been reported. Traditionally, BPA has been considered a weak estrogen, based on its lower binding affinity to the nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) compared to 17-β estradiol (E2) as well as its low transcriptional activity after ERs activation. However, in vivo animal studies have demonstrated that it can interfere with endocrine signaling pathways at low doses during fetal, neonatal or perinatal periods as well as in adulthood. In addition, mounting evidence suggests a variety of pathways through which BPA can elicit cellular responses at very low concentrations with the same or even higher efficiency than E2. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to analyze with substantiated scientific evidence the strong estrogenic activity of BPA when it acts through alternative mechanisms of action at least in certain cell types.

  18. Bisphenol-A acts as a potent estrogen via non-classical estrogen triggered pathways.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ropero, Ana Belén; Soriano, Sergi; García-Arévalo, Marta; Ripoll, Cristina; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Iván; Nadal, Ángel

    2012-05-22

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an estrogenic monomer commonly used in the manufacture of numerous consumer products such as food and beverage containers. Widespread human exposure to significant doses of this compound has been reported. Traditionally, BPA has been considered a weak estrogen, based on its lower binding affinity to the nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) compared to 17-β estradiol (E2) as well as its low transcriptional activity after ERs activation. However, in vivo animal studies have demonstrated that it can interfere with endocrine signaling pathways at low doses during fetal, neonatal or perinatal periods as well as in adulthood. In addition, mounting evidence suggests a variety of pathways through which BPA can elicit cellular responses at very low concentrations with the same or even higher efficiency than E2. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to analyze with substantiated scientific evidence the strong estrogenic activity of BPA when it acts through alternative mechanisms of action at least in certain cell types. PMID:22227557

  19. Structure of unliganded HSV gD reveals a mechanism for receptor-mediated activation of virus entry

    SciTech Connect

    Krummenacher, Claude; Supekar, Vinit M.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Lazear, Eric; Connolly, Sarah A.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Wiley, Don C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2010-07-19

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into cells requires binding of the envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to one of several cell surface receptors. The 50 C-terminal residues of the gD ectodomain are essential for virus entry, but not for receptor binding. We have determined the structure of an unliganded gD molecule that includes these C-terminal residues. The structure reveals that the C-terminus is anchored near the N-terminal region and masks receptor-binding sites. Locking the C-terminus in the position observed in the crystals by an intramolecular disulfide bond abolished receptor binding and virus entry, demonstrating that this region of gD moves upon receptor binding. Similarly, a point mutant that would destabilize the C-terminus structure was nonfunctional for entry, despite increased affinity for receptors. We propose that a controlled displacement of the gD C-terminus upon receptor binding is an essential feature of HSV entry, ensuring the timely activation of membrane fusion.

  20. Estrogen receptor agonists alleviate cardiac and renal oxidative injury in rats with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Özdemir Kumral, Zarife Nigâr; Kolgazi, Meltem; Üstünova, Savaş; Kasımay Çakır, Özgür; Çevik, Özge Dağdeviren; Şener, Göksel; Yeğen, Berrak Ç

    2016-01-01

    Although endogenous estrogen is known to offer cardiac and vascular protection, the involvement of estrogen receptors in mediating the protective effect of estrogen on hypertension-induced cardiovascular and renal injury is not fully explained. We aimed to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists on oxidative injury, cardiovascular and renal functions of rats with renovascular hypertension (RVH). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided as control and RVH groups, and RVH groups had either ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-OVX. Sham-OVX-RVH and OVX-RVH groups received either ERβ agonist diarylpropiolnitrile (1 mg/kg/day) or ERα agonist propyl pyrazole triol (1 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks starting at the third week following the surgery. At the end of the 9(th) week, systolic blood pressures were recorded, cardiac functions were determined, and the contraction/relaxation responses of aortic rings were obtained. Serum creatinine levels, tissue malondialdehyde, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase levels, and myeloperoxidase activity in heart and kidney samples were analyzed, and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was measured in kidney samples. In both sham-OVX and OVX rats, both agonists reduced blood pressure and reversed the impaired contractile performance of the heart, while ERβ agonist improved renal functions in both the OVX and non-OVX rats. Both agonists reduced neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation, and elevated antioxidant levels in the heart, but a more ERβ-mediated protective effect was observed in the kidney. Our data suggest that activation of ERβ might play a role in preserving the function of the stenotic kidney and delaying the progression of renal injury, while both receptors mediate similar cardioprotective effects. PMID:27399230

  1. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Gattner, Michael; Weiss, Veronika; Brunner, Korbinian; Bretzler, Johanna; von Schirnding, Constantin; Torrano, Adriano A.; Spada, Fabio; Vrabel, Milan; Engelke, Hanna; Bräuchle, Christoph; Carell, Thomas; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the

  2. Role of the Ventral Tegmental Area in Methamphetamine Extinction: AMPA Receptor-Mediated Neuroplasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen Han-Ting; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying drug extinction remain largely unknown, although a role for medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamate neurons has been suggested. Considering that the mPFC sends glutamate efferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), we tested whether the VTA is involved in methamphetamine (METH) extinction via conditioned…

  3. Application of an in silico liver model to determine nuclear receptor mediated pathways in liver cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs in rodents can result in increased incidence of liver tumors. These are generally thought to develop through a non-genotoxic mechanism with...

  4. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Davídková, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERα, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with γ rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  5. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  6. PTH/PTHrP Receptor Mediates Cachexia in Models of Kidney Failure and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kir, Serkan; Komaba, Hirotaka; Garcia, Ana P; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Liu, Wei; Lanske, Beate; Hodin, Richard A; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-02-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with elevated basal energy expenditure and loss of adipose and muscle tissues. It accompanies many chronic diseases including renal failure and cancer and is an important risk factor for mortality. Our recent work demonstrated that tumor-derived PTHrP drives adipose tissue browning and cachexia. Here, we show that PTH is involved in stimulating a thermogenic gene program in 5/6 nephrectomized mice that suffer from cachexia. Fat-specific knockout of PTHR blocked adipose browning and wasting. Surprisingly, loss of PTHR in fat tissue also preserved muscle mass and improved muscle strength. Similarly, PTHR knockout mice were resistant to cachexia driven by tumors. Our results demonstrate that PTHrP and PTH mediate wasting through a common mechanism involving PTHR, and there exists an unexpected crosstalk mechanism between wasting of fat tissue and skeletal muscle. Targeting the PTH/PTHrP pathway may have therapeutic uses in humans with cachexia. PMID:26669699

  7. PTH/PTHrP Receptor Mediates Cachexia in Models of Kidney Failure and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kir, Serkan; Komaba, Hirotaka; Garcia, Ana P; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Liu, Wei; Lanske, Beate; Hodin, Richard A; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-02-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with elevated basal energy expenditure and loss of adipose and muscle tissues. It accompanies many chronic diseases including renal failure and cancer and is an important risk factor for mortality. Our recent work demonstrated that tumor-derived PTHrP drives adipose tissue browning and cachexia. Here, we show that PTH is involved in stimulating a thermogenic gene program in 5/6 nephrectomized mice that suffer from cachexia. Fat-specific knockout of PTHR blocked adipose browning and wasting. Surprisingly, loss of PTHR in fat tissue also preserved muscle mass and improved muscle strength. Similarly, PTHR knockout mice were resistant to cachexia driven by tumors. Our results demonstrate that PTHrP and PTH mediate wasting through a common mechanism involving PTHR, and there exists an unexpected crosstalk mechanism between wasting of fat tissue and skeletal muscle. Targeting the PTH/PTHrP pathway may have therapeutic uses in humans with cachexia.

  8. Pattern recognition receptor-mediated cytokine response in infants across 4 continents⋆☆

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Kinga K.; Ruck, Candice E.; Fortuno, Edgardo S.; Ho, Kevin; Dimitriu, Pedro; Mohn, William W.; Speert, David P.; Cooper, Philip J.; Esser, Monika; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Marchant, Arnaud; Kollmann, Tobias R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to infection as well as response to vaccination varies among populations. To date, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these clinical observations have not been fully delineated. Because innate immunity instructs adaptive immunity, we hypothesized that differences between populations in innate immune responses may represent a mechanistic link to variation in susceptibility to infection or response to vaccination. Objective Determine whether differences in innate immune responses exist among infants from different continents of the world. Methods We determined the innate cytokine response following pattern recognition receptor (PRR) stimulation of whole blood from 2-year-old infants across 4 continents (Africa, North America, South America, and Europe). Results We found that despite the many possible genetic and environmental exposure differences in infants across 4 continents, innate cytokine responses were similar for infants from North America, South America, and Europe. However, cells from South African infants secreted significantly lower levels of cytokines than did cells from infants from the 3 other sites, and did so following stimulation of extracellular and endosomal but not cytosolic PRRs. Conclusions Substantial differences in innate cytokine responses to PRR stimulation exist among different populations of infants that could not have been predicted. Delineating the underlying mechanism(s) for these differences will not only aid in improving vaccine-mediated protection but possibly also provide clues for the susceptibility to infection in different regions of the world. PMID:24290283

  9. A possibly sigma-1 receptor mediated role of dimethyltryptamine in tissue protection, regeneration, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Szabo, Attila; Winkelman, Michael J; Luna, Luis E; McKenna, Dennis J

    2013-09-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is classified as a naturally occurring serotonergic hallucinogen of plant origin. It has also been found in animal tissues and regarded as an endogenous trace amine transmitter. The vast majority of research on DMT has targeted its psychotropic/psychedelic properties with less focus on its effects beyond the nervous system. The recent discovery that DMT is an endogenous ligand of the sigma-1 receptor may shed light on yet undiscovered physiological mechanisms of DMT activity and reveal some of its putative biological functions. A three-step active uptake process of DMT from peripheral sources to neurons underscores a presumed physiological significance of this endogenous hallucinogen. In this paper, we overview the literature on the effects of sigma-1 receptor ligands on cellular bioenergetics, the role of serotonin, and serotoninergic analogues in immunoregulation and the data regarding gene expression of the DMT synthesizing enzyme indolethylamine-N-methyltransferase in carcinogenesis. We conclude that the function of DMT may extend central nervous activity and involve a more universal role in cellular protective mechanisms. Suggestions are offered for future directions of indole alkaloid research in the general medical field. We provide converging evidence that while DMT is a substance which produces powerful psychedelic experiences, it is better understood not as a hallucinogenic drug of abuse, but rather an agent of significant adaptive mechanisms that can also serve as a promising tool in the development of future medical therapies.

  10. Direct interaction of avermectin with epidermal growth factor receptor mediates the penetration resistance in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of avermectins (AVMs) for managing parasitic and agricultural pests, the resistance of worms and insects to AVMs has emerged as a serious threat to human health and agriculture worldwide. The reduced penetration of AVMs is one of the main reasons for the development of the resistance to the chemicals. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster as the model organism to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to AVMs. We clearly show that the chitin layer is thickened and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in the AVM-resistant larvae epidermis. We reveal that the activation of the transcription factor Relish by the over-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/AKT/ERK pathway induces the overexpression of the chitin synthases DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp in the resistant larvae. Interestingly, we discover for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AVM directly interacts with EGFR and leads to the activation of the EGFR/AKT/ERK pathway, which activates the transcription factor Relish and induces the overexpression of DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to drugs. PMID:27249340

  11. The positive feedback action of vasopressin on its own release from rat septal tissue in vitro is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Ramirez, A D; Ramirez, V D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on its own septal release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion procedure. As compared to basal release from septal fragments, pulses of synthetic AVP (15 pg/5 min) resulted in a 25-fold augmented release of endogenous AVP, indicating a positive feedback action. Both the basal and stimulated AVP release were significantly increased by 60 mM potassium and markedly reduced by omission of calcium. Preincubation of the septal fragments with the V2/V1 AVP receptor antagonist d(CH2)5 [D-Tyr (Et)2,Val4]AVP resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the positive feedback action of AVP which was nearly completely blocked at doses between 1.25 and 5 ng per 100 microliters incubation medium. As compared to this effect, the V1 antagonist d(CH2)5 Tyr (Me)2 AVP as well as oxytocin were significantly less potent. The results suggest that the positive feedback action of AVP on its own release from septal fragments is potassium-stimulated, calcium-dependent and mainly V2 receptor-mediated. The physiological significance of this phenomenon remains to be shown. PMID:1830507

  12. An special epithelial staining agents: folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Han; Hu, Ling-Yun; Du, Xin-Xin; Yang, Min; Zhang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Ke; Li, Li-An; Jiang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    High-quality screening with cytology has markedly reduced mortality from cervical cancer. However, it needs experienced pathologists to review and make the final decisions. We have developed folic acid receptor-mediated diagnosis (FRD) kits to effectively and conveniently screen patients with cervical cancer. We conduct present study aim to assess clinical significances of FRD in screening cervical cancer. A total of 169 patients were enrolled at Chinese People's liberation Army (PLA) general hospital. We compared diagnostic significances of FRD with thinprep cytology test (TCT). Meanwhile, colposcopy was also performed to confirm any lesion suspicious for cervical cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of FRD were 71.93% and 66.07% in diagnosis cervical cancer, respectively. Meanwhile, the positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV), Youden index were 51.90%, 82.22%, 0.38, respectively. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of TCT in diagnosis cervical cancer were 73.68% and 61.61% respectively. PPV, NPV and Youden index for TCT were 49.41%, 82.14% and 0.35 respectively. Overall, FRD have high values of sensitivity, specificity and Youden index. However, this difference failed to statistical significance. FRD have comparable diagnostic significance with TCT. Therefore, FRD might serve as one effective method to screen cervical cancer. Especially for those patients living in remote regions of China, where cytology was unavailable.

  13. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  14. Modulation of AMPA receptor mediated current by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in layer I neurons of rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bo; Luo, Dong; Yang, Jie; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Bing-Lin; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yan, Zhen; Chen, Guo-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Layer I neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibit extensive synaptic connections with deep layer neurons, implying their important role in the neural circuit. Study demonstrates that activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) increases excitatory neurotransmission in this layer. Here we found that nicotine selectively increased the amplitude of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated current and AMPA/NMDA ratio, while without effect on NMDA receptor-mediated current. The augmentation of AMPAR current by nicotine was inhibited by a selective α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA. In addition, nicotinic effect on mEPSC or paired-pulse ratio was also prevented by MLA. Moreover, an enhanced inward rectification of AMPAR current by nicotine suggested a functional role of calcium permeable and GluA1 containing AMPAR. Consistently, nicotine enhancement of AMPAR current was inhibited by a selective calcium-permeable AMPAR inhibitor IEM-1460. Finally, the intracellular inclusion of synthetic peptide designed to block GluA1 subunit of AMPAR at CAMKII, PKC or PKA phosphorylation site, as well as corresponding kinase inhibitor, blocked nicotinic augmentation of AMPA/NMDA ratio. These results have revealed that nicotine increases AMPAR current by modulating the phosphorylation state of GluA1 which is dependent on α7-nAChR and intracellular calcium. PMID:26370265

  15. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid–polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle–membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand–receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand–receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle–membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH–membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor–ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle–cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest. PMID:25438167

  16. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  17. Receptor-mediated activation of a plant Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Wirtz, Wolfgang; Guern, Jean; Hedrich, Rainer; Scheel, Dierk

    1997-01-01

    Pathogen recognition at the plant cell surface typically results in the initiation of a multicomponent defense response. Transient influx of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane is postulated to be part of the signaling chain leading to pathogen resistance. Patch-clamp analysis of parsley protoplasts revealed a novel Ca2+-permeable, La3+-sensitive plasma membrane ion channel of large conductance (309 pS in 240 mM CaCl2). At an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of 1 mM, which is representative of the plant cell apoplast, unitary channel conductance was determined to be 80 pS. This ion channel (LEAC, for large conductance elicitor-activated ion channel) is reversibly activated upon treatment of parsley protoplasts with an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a cell wall protein of Phytophthora sojae. Structural features of the elicitor found previously to be essential for receptor binding, induction of defense-related gene expression, and phytoalexin formation are identical to those required for activation of LEAC. Thus, receptor-mediated stimulation of this channel appears to be causally involved in the signaling cascade triggering pathogen defense in parsley. PMID:11038609

  18. Trans-activation of EphA4 and FGF receptors mediated by direct interactions between their cytoplasmic domains

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Hideyuki; Fujita, Koji; Jing, Xuefeng; Sawada, Takahiro; Liang, Sitai; Yao, Li; Yan, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yueqiang; Schlessinger, Joseph; Sakaguchi, Kazushige

    2005-01-01

    A yeast two-hybrid analysis has shown that the juxtamembrane region of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of EphA4, which is a member of the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Complex formation between the two receptors was shown to be mediated by direct interactions between the juxtamembrane domain of FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4 and the N-terminal portion of the tyrosine kinase domain of EphA4. Activation of FGFR1 in transfected cells resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-negative EphA4 mutant and activation of EphA4 led to tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-negative FGFR1 mutant. Moreover, both receptors stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the docking protein FRS2α and induce mitogen-activated protein kinase stimulation with a time course and intensity that depends on the ligand that is applied. We also demonstrate that FGF-receptor-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase stimulation is potentiated in cells costimulated with ephrin-A1. The direct interaction between EphA4 and FGFRs and the potentiation of FGF response that is induced by ephrin-A1 stimulation may modulate the biological responses that are mediated by these receptor families in cells or tissues in which the two receptors are coexpressed. PMID:16365308

  19. The overexpressed human 46-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor mediates endocytosis and sorting of. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors studied the function of the human small (46-kDa) mannose 6-phosphate receptor (SMPR) in transfected mouse L cells that do not express the larger insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Cells overexpressing human SMPR were studied for enzyme binding to cell surface receptors, for binding to intracellular receptors in permeabilized cells, and for receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human {beta}-glucuronidase. Specific binding to human SMPR in permeabilized cells showed a pH optimum between pH 6.0 and pH 6.5. Binding was significant in the present of EDTA but was enhanced by added divalent cations. Up to 2.3{percent} of the total functional receptor could be detected on the cell surface by enzyme binding. They present experiments showing that at very high levels of overexpression, and at pH 6.5, human SMPR mediated the endocytosis of {beta}-glucuronidase. At pH 7.5, the rate of endocytosis was only 14{percent} the rate seen at pH 6.5. Cells overexpressing human SMPR also showed reduced secretion of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase when compared to cells transfected with vector only, suggesting that overexpressed human SMPR can participate in sorting of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase and partially correct the sorting defect in mouse L cells that do not express the insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

  20. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  1. Histaminergic H1 receptors mediate L-histidine-induced anxiety in elevated plus-maze test in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuchibhotla Vijaya; Krishna, Devarakonda Rama; Palit, Gautam

    2007-05-01

    The central histaminergic system is reported to mediate behavioural, hormonal and physiological homeostasis of living organisms. Recent reports indicate its prominent role in various neurobehavioural disorders such as depression and psychosis. This study evaluated the effect of activation of the central histaminergic system in anxiety-like conditions, using the elevated plus-maze test in mice, and elucidated the role of different histaminergic receptors mediating such effects. Peripheral administration of L-histidine (L-His), in a dose-dependent manner, significantly decreased the exploration time in open arms and number of entries into open arms without modifying the number of entries into closed arms of the elevated plus-maze, indicating anxiogenesis. Further, such effects of central histamine were significantly attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, by pretreatment with pyrilamine (H1 receptor antagonist). Pretreatment with either zolantidine (H2 receptor antagonist) or thioperamide (H3 receptor antagonist), however, failed to attenuate the L-His-induced anxiogenesis. Our results indicate that anxiogenic effects of central histaminergic system appear to be mediated prominently by activation of H1 receptors.

  2. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  3. Fatty acyl specificity of the receptor-mediated release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.D.

    1987-05-01

    Histamine and bradykinin appear to exhibit the same fatty acid specificity as thrombin. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 10 ..mu..M histamine for 10 min in buffered saline containing 50 ..mu..M fat-free albumin stimulates the release of previously incorporated (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) or (/sup 14/C)20:3(n-6). Similarly calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells release (/sup 14/C)arachidonate but not (/sup 14/C)22:4(n-6) in response to either bradykinin (1 /sup +/g/ml) or histamine (10..mu..M). In both types of endothelial cells, the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M) exhibits the same pattern of fatty acyl specificity as the receptor-mediated agonists. By contrast, mellitin (2-4 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the release of free 22:4(n-6) and oleate in addition to arachidonate; release of 22:4(n-6) is 30-70% that of arachidonate. These results suggest that histamine, bradykinin and thrombin stimulate a common calcium-dependent fatty acyl-specific phospholipase activity.

  4. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  5. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-01-14

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  6. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-won

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7–8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  7. The complement component C5a receptor mediates pain and inflammation in a postsurgical pain model.

    PubMed

    Liang, De-Yong; Li, XiangQi; Shi, Xiaoyu; Sun, Yuan; Sahbaie, Peyman; Li, Wen-Wu; Clark, J David

    2012-02-01

    The complement system is an important part of innate immunity. Complement activation generates a set of effector molecules with diverse biological functions. C5a is a crucial terminal component of the complement cascade. Several reports suggest that C5a can support nociceptive sensitization and inflammation in various models, including models of incisional pain. However, information concerning the differential effects of C5a on specific modalities of nociception, the role of C5a in supporting neutrophil infiltration, secondary nociceptive mediator generation, and the location of the relevant populations of C5a receptors supporting incisional sensitization are needed. In these studies we utilized C5a receptor-null mice (C5aR(-/-)) and matched controls to study nociceptive changes after hind paw incision. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured for 4 days after incision. We also followed hind paw edema, wound area neutrophil infiltration using the myeloperoxidase assay, and interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor levels using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical techniques. The main findings were: (1) Heat vs mechanical nociceptive sensitization after incision were differentially reduced in C5aR(-/-) mice, with thermal sensitization affected throughout the postincisional period but mechanical sensitization affected only at later time points; (2) Edema developed after incision in wild-type mice but only slightly and transiently in C5aR(-/-) mice, and (3) Deletion of C5aR blocked interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor production near the wound site. These findings demonstrate that the complement system component C5a is a novel biomarker and mediator associated with postsurgical nociceptive processing. C5aR may provide a novel target for the control of pain and inflammation after surgery.

  8. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-Won

    2016-08-31

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7-8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  9. Autocrine ligands of the epithelial growth factor receptor mediate inflammatory responses to diesel exhaust particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and morbidity. Acute exposure leads to increased IL-8 expression and airway neutrophilia, however the mechanism of this response is unknown. Objectives: As cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 expression by epithelial cells involves transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), we studied the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on IL-8 release and the role of the EGFR. Methods Primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were exposed to DEPs or carbon black. IL-8 and EGFR ligand expression (transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, and amphiregulin (AR)) were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Results DEP, but not carbon black, caused a dose-dependent increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and IL-8 expression, however above 50 μg/ml there was an increase in cytotoxicity. At 50 μg/ml, DEPs stimulated transcription and release of IL-8 and EGFR ligands. IL-8 release was blocked by EGFR neutralizing antibodies, an EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor and by the metalloprotease inhibitor, GM6001, which blocks EGFR ligand shedding. Neutralizing antibodies to AR, TGFα and heparin-binding (HB)-EGF reduced DEP-induced IL-8 by >50%. Conclusion Expression of IL-8 in response to DEPs is dependent on EGFR activation and that autocrine production of EGFR ligands makes a substantial contribution to this response. Capsule Summary: This study identifies a mechanism whereby diesel particles stimulates IL-8 release from bronchial epithelial cells. This mechanism may help to explain the recruitment of neutrophils into the airways of people exposed to particulate air pollution. PMID:24555532

  10. Receptor-Mediated Liposome Fusion Kinetics at Aqueous/Liquid Crystal Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Macri, Katherine M; Noonan, Patrick S; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-09-16

    Membrane fusion events are essential to cell biology, and a number of reductionist systems have been developed to mimic the behavior of these biological motifs. One such system monitors the DNA hybridization-mediated fusion of liposomes with the liquid crystal (LC) interface by observing changes in LC orientation using a simple optical detection scheme. We have systematically explored key parameters of this system to determine their effects on individual elementary steps of the complex fusion mechanism. The liposome composition, specifically the degree of lipid unsaturation and PE content, decreased the bilayer rigidity, thereby increasing the rate of vesicle rupture under the stress applied by DNA hybridization. In contrast, the presence of cholesterol had the opposite effect on the mechanical properties of the bilayer, and hence of the membrane fusion rates. The accessibility of receptor moieties (i.e., complementary DNA oligonucleotides) affected the fusion kinetics by modulating the rate of hybridization events. DNA accessibility was controlled by systematic variation of the length of the DNA receptor molecules and the thickness of the steric barrier comprised of adsorbed PEGylated lipids. These results provide design rules for understanding the trade-offs between response kinetics and other important system properties, such as nonspecific adsorption. Moreover, these findings improve our understanding of the biophysical properties of membrane fusion, an important process in both natural and model systems used for bioassay and bioimaging applications. PMID:26317496

  11. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  12. Adaptor Protein 2 Regulates Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Cyst Formation in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Maria R.; Vranych, Cecilia V.; Bisbal, Mariano; Maletto, Belkys A.; Ropolo, Andrea S.; Touz, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The parasite Giardia lamblia possesses peripheral vacuoles (PVs) that function as both endosomes and lysosomes and are implicated in the adaptation, differentiation, and survival of the parasite in different environments. The mechanisms by which Giardia traffics essential proteins to these organelles and regulates their secretion have important implications in the control of parasite dissemination. In this study, we describe the participation of the heterotetrameric clathrin-adaptor protein gAP2 complex in lysosomal protein trafficking. A specific monoclonal antibody against the medium subunit (gμ2) of gAP2 showed localization of this complex to the PVs, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane in the growing trophozoites. gAP2 also colocalized with clathrin in the PVs, suggesting its involvement in endocytosis. Uptake experiments using standard molecules for the study of endocytosis revealed that gAP2 specifically participated in the endocytosis of LDL. Targeted downregulation of the gene encoding gμ2 in growing and encysting trophozoites resulted in a large decrease in the amount of cell growth and cyst wall formation, suggesting a distinct mechanism in which gAP2 is directly involved in both endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. PMID:20199400

  13. Receptor-Mediated Liposome Fusion Kinetics at Aqueous/Liquid Crystal Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Macri, Katherine M; Noonan, Patrick S; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-09-16

    Membrane fusion events are essential to cell biology, and a number of reductionist systems have been developed to mimic the behavior of these biological motifs. One such system monitors the DNA hybridization-mediated fusion of liposomes with the liquid crystal (LC) interface by observing changes in LC orientation using a simple optical detection scheme. We have systematically explored key parameters of this system to determine their effects on individual elementary steps of the complex fusion mechanism. The liposome composition, specifically the degree of lipid unsaturation and PE content, decreased the bilayer rigidity, thereby increasing the rate of vesicle rupture under the stress applied by DNA hybridization. In contrast, the presence of cholesterol had the opposite effect on the mechanical properties of the bilayer, and hence of the membrane fusion rates. The accessibility of receptor moieties (i.e., complementary DNA oligonucleotides) affected the fusion kinetics by modulating the rate of hybridization events. DNA accessibility was controlled by systematic variation of the length of the DNA receptor molecules and the thickness of the steric barrier comprised of adsorbed PEGylated lipids. These results provide design rules for understanding the trade-offs between response kinetics and other important system properties, such as nonspecific adsorption. Moreover, these findings improve our understanding of the biophysical properties of membrane fusion, an important process in both natural and model systems used for bioassay and bioimaging applications.

  14. Food Restriction Increases Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Burst Firing of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Sarah Y.; Goertz, R. Brandon; Sharpe, Amanda L.; Pierce, Janie; Roy, Sudip; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Restriction of food intake increases the acquisition of drug abuse behavior and enhances the reinforcing efficacy of those drugs. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms responsible for the interactions between feeding state and drug use are largely unknown. Here we show that chronic mild food restriction increases the burst firing of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine neurons from food-restricted mice exhibited increased burst firing in vivo, an effect that was enhanced by an injection of the psychomotor stimulant cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Food restriction also enhanced aspartic acid-induced burst firing of dopamine neurons in an ex vivo brain slice preparation, consistent with an adaptation occurring in the somatodendritic compartment and independent of a circuit mechanism. Enhanced burst firing persisted after 10 d of free feeding following chronic food restriction but was not observed following a single overnight fast. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that food restriction also increased electrically evoked AMPAR/NMDAR ratios and increased D2 autoreceptor-mediated desensitization in dopamine neurons. These results identify dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra as a convergence point for the interactions between feeding state and drugs of abuse. Furthermore, increased glutamate transmission combined with decreased autoreceptor inhibition could work in concert to enhance drug efficacy in response to food restriction. PMID:23966705

  15. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  16. Androgens and estrogens in benign prostatic hyperplasia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Ricke, William A

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology. While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, sex steroids have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Sufficient data exists linking androgens and androgen receptor pathways to BPH and use of androgen reducing compounds, such as 5α-reductase inhibitors which block the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, are a component of the standard of care for men with LUTS attributed to an enlarged prostate. However, BPH is a multifactorial disease and not all men respond well to currently available treatments, suggesting factors other than androgens are involved. Testosterone, the primary circulating androgen in men, can also be metabolized via CYP19/aromatase into the potent estrogen, estradiol-17β. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of endogenous and exogenous estrogens in directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation signifying potential roles in BPH. Recent research has demonstrated that estrogen receptor signaling pathways may be important in the development and maintenance of BPH and LUTS; however, new models are needed to genetically dissect estrogen regulated molecular mechanisms involved in BPH. More work is needed to identify estrogens and associated signaling pathways in BPH in order to target BPH with dietary and therapeutic SERMs.

  17. Preparation and characterization of folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan for intracellular transport of protein through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiangrong; Darby, Michael; Liang, Yufeng; He, Ling; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiuhong; Bi, Yueqi; Yang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jiapeng; Li, Yuanbo; Sun, Yiyi; Lee, Robert J; Hou, Shixiang

    2010-01-01

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins to specific tumor cells, folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan (folate-PEG-g-TMC) was synthesized. Nano-scaled spherical polyelectrolyte complexes between the folate-PEG-g-TMC and fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) were prepared under suitable weight ratio of copolymer to FITC-BSA by ionic interaction between the positively charged copolymers and the negatively charged FITC-BSA. Intracellular uptake of FITC-BSA was specifically enhanced in SKOV3 cells (folate receptor over-expressing cell line) through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with A549 cells (folate receptor deficient cell line). Folate-PEG-g-TMC shows promise for intracellular transport of negatively charged therapeutic proteins into folate receptor over-expressing tumor cells.

  18. Dopamine D2 Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Pancreatic β Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Choi, Sungik; Kataoka, Masateru; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Uesugi, Motonari; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate β cell mass and proliferation is important for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we identified domperidone (DPD), a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) antagonist that enhances β cell mass. Over time, islet β cell loss occurs in dissociation cultures, and this was inhibited by DPD. DPD increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of β cells through increasing intracellular cAMP. DPD prevented β cell dedifferentiation, which together highly contributed to the increased β cell mass. DRD2 knockdown phenocopied the effects of domperidone and increased the number of β cells. Drd2 overexpression sensitized the dopamine responsiveness of β cells and increased apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that the adenosine agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, a previously identified promoter of β cell proliferation, acted with DPD to increase the number of β cells. In humans, dopamine also modulates β cell mass through DRD2 and exerts an inhibitory effect on adenosine signaling. PMID:27373926

  19. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  20. P2U-receptor mediated endothelium-dependent but nitric oxide-independent vascular relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Malmsjö, M; Edvinsson, L; Erlinge, D

    1998-01-01

    The dilator effect of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has mainly been characterized as a direct effect on smooth muscle or as an endothelium-dependent effect mediated by nitric oxide (NO) or prostaglandins. We tested the hypothesis that endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) may also be involved. Dilator effects were studied in vitro by continuous recording of isomeric tension in cylindrical segments of rat blood vessels precontracted by noradrenaline (NA), in the presence of indomethacin (10 μM). By screening different blood vessels in the rat we found that both acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP dilate mesenteric arteries with a resting tone of 1 mN by an endothelium-dependent non-NO mechanism. With an increased resting tone (4 mN) the dilatation was mediated by NO. Thus by varying the resting tension the different dilator mechanisms could be examined. However, in the carotid artery the dilatation was solely mediated by an endothelium-dependent NO mechanism, even at different resting tones (1 and 4 mN). The N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-resistant dilatation to ACh and ATP was further inhibited by the NO-scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), indicating L-NAME insensitive NO-synthesis. In carotid arteries and mesenteric arteries at high resting tones (4 mN) the ATP-dilatation was totally inhibited by endothelium removal or L-NAME (10−3 M). In mesenteric arteries at low resting tone (1 mN) the ATP, UTP (uridine-triphosphate) and 2-MeSATP (2methylthioATP)-dilatation was totally inhibited by endothelium removal. However, L-NAME in combination with indomethacin attenuated only 5% of the UTP dilatation, 70% of the ATP dilatation but all of the 2-MeSATP-dilatation. The inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ channels charybdotoxin (0.5×10−7 M) together with apamin (10−6 M), and the cytochrome P450 inhibitor, SKF 525A (10−4 M), each in combination with indomethacin, L-NAME and PTIO (0.5×10

  1. P2U-receptor mediated endothelium-dependent but nitric oxide-independent vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Malmsjö, M; Edvinsson, L; Erlinge, D

    1998-02-01

    1. The dilator effect of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has mainly been characterized as a direct effect on smooth muscle or as an endothelium-dependent effect mediated by nitric oxide (NO) or prostaglandins. We tested the hypothesis that endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) may also be involved. Dilator effects were studied in vitro by continuous recording of isomeric tension in cylindrical segments of rat blood vessels precontracted by noradrenaline (NA), in the presence of indomethacin (10 microM). 2. By screening different blood vessels in the rat we found that both acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP dilate mesenteric arteries with a resting tone of 1 mN by an endothelium-dependent non-NO mechanism. With an increased resting tone (4 mN) the dilatation was mediated by NO. Thus by varying the resting tension the different dilator mechanisms could be examined. However, in the carotid artery the dilatation was solely mediated by an endothelium-dependent NO mechanism, even at different resting tones (1 and 4 mN). 3. The N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-resistant dilatation to ACh and ATP was further inhibited by the NO-scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), indicating L-NAME insensitive NO-synthesis. 4. In carotid arteries and mesenteric arteries at high resting tones (4 mN) the ATP-dilatation was totally inhibited by endothelium removal or L-NAME (10(-3) M). In mesenteric arteries at low resting tone (1 mN) the ATP, UTP (uridine-triphosphate) and 2-MeSATP (2methylthioATP)-dilatation was totally inhibited by endothelium removal. However, L-NAME in combination with indomethacin attenuated only 5% of the UTP dilatation, 70% of the ATP dilatation but all of the 2-MeSATP-dilatation. The inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ channels charybdotoxin (0.5 x 10(-7) M) together with apamin (10(-6) M), and the cytochrome P450 inhibitor, SKF 525A (10(-4) M), each in combination with indomethacin. L-NAME and PTIO (0.5 x 10

  2. Alpha-adrenergic receptors mediate imipramine/alarm substance-induced reaction in rats.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L

    1994-08-01

    The mechanism of adverse imipramine-induced reactions (jitteriness, convulsions) was investigated by precipitating such reactions in rats with three injections (IP) of imipramine (5-40 mg/kg) at 24, 5, and 1 h before testing, and comparing their occurrence with comparable treatments using specific noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake inhibitors [nortriptyline (10 or 30 mg/kg, IP), citalopram (0.5-5.0 mg/kg, IP)]. This initial study indicated that these reactions were mediated by imipramine's noradrenergic effects. Subsequent combinations of imipramine and an alpha 2 agonist (clonidine, 5 mg/kg) and antagonist (yohimbine, 2 mg/kg), and a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol, 2 or 5 mg/kg) (all administered IP 0.5 h after the last injection of imipramine) suggested imipramine's adverse effects were mediated by alpha 2 receptors. The possible involvement of the locus ceruleus in these effects was considered.

  3. Androgen receptor-mediated non-genomic regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ross S.; Ma, Shihong; Miao, Lu; Li, Rui; Yin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is necessary for prostate cancer cell proliferation and an important target for therapeutic drug development. Canonically, AR signals through a genomic or transcriptional pathway, involving the translocation of androgen-bound AR to the nucleus, its binding to cognate androgen response elements on promoter, with ensuing modulation of target gene expression, leading to cell proliferation. However, prostate cancer cells can show dose-dependent proliferation responses to androgen within minutes, without the need for genomic AR signaling. This proliferation response known as the non-genomic AR signaling is mediated by cytoplasmic AR, which facilitates the activation of kinase-signaling cascades, including the Ras-Raf-1, phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn converge on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, leading to cell proliferation. Further, since activated ERK may also phosphorylate AR and its coactivators, the non-genomic AR signaling may enhance AR genomic activity. Non-genomic AR signaling may occur in an ERK-independent manner, via activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, or modulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration through plasma membrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These data suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing AR nuclear translocation and genomic AR signaling alone may not completely abrogate AR signaling. Thus, elucidation of mechanisms that underlie non-genomic AR signaling may identify potential mechanisms of resistance to current anti-androgens and help developing novel therapies that abolish all AR signaling in prostate cancer. PMID:26816736

  4. Calcitonin receptor-mediated CFTR activation in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongguang; Singla, Amika; Ao, Mei; Gill, Ravinder K; Venkatasubramanian, Jayashree; Rao, Mrinalini C; Alrefai, Waddah A; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract High levels of calcitonin (CT) observed in medullary thyroid carcinoma and other CT-secreting tumours cause severe diarrhoea. Previous studies have suggested that CT induces active chloride secretion. However, the involvement of CT receptor (CTR) and the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of intestinal electrolyte secreting intestinal epithelial cells have not been investigated. Therefore, current studies were undertaken to investigate the direct effects of CT on ion transport in intestinal epithelial cells. Real time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of CTR in intestinal epithelial T84 cells. Exposure of T84 cells to CT from the basolateral but not from apical side significantly increased short circuit current (ISC) in a dose-dependent manner that was blocked by 1 μM of CTR antagonist, CT8–32. CT-induced ISC was blocked by replacing chloride in the bath solutions with equimolar gluconate and was significantly inhibited by the specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitor, CFTR127inh. Further, biotinylation studies showed that CT increased CFTR levels on the apical membrane. The presence of either the Ca2+ chelator, bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl (BAPTA-AM) ester or the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, significantly inhibited ISC induced by CT (∼32–58% reduction). Response to CT was retained after permeabilization of the basolateral or the apical membranes of T84 cells with nystatin. In conclusion, the activation of CTR by CT induced chloride secretion across T84 monolayers via CFTR channel and the involvement of PKA- and Ca2+-dependent signalling pathways. These data elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying CT-induced diarrhoea. PMID:21251218

  5. Swim stress differentially blocks CRF receptor mediated responses in dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Christophe M; Beck, Sheryl G

    2010-10-01

    Modulation of the serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmitter system arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is thought to support the behavioral effects of swim stress, i.e., immobility. In vivo pharmacological and anatomical studies suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synaptic transmission closely interact to set the response of the DR to swim stress. To investigate the cellular basis of these physiological mechanisms the effects of ovine CRF (oCRF) on GABA(A)-dependent miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons in acute mesencephalic slices obtained from rats either naïve or 24h after a 15 min swim stress session were tested. In this study, the effect of swim stress alone was to decrease the holding current, i.e., hyperpolarize the neuron, and to increase the amplitude and charge of mIPSCs recorded from non-5-HT neurons. Ovine CRF (10 nM) induced an increase in mIPSC frequency in 5-HT neurons recorded from naïve rats, an effect that was suppressed by swim stress. The inward current elicited by oCRF in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons was also blocked by swim stress. Ovine CRF increased mIPSCs amplitude and charge in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons, but this effect was not modified by swim stress. In concert with our previous findings that swim stress decreased input resistance, action potential threshold and action potential duration and increased glutamatergic synaptic activity the overall primary effect of swim stress is to increase the excitability of 5-HT neurons. These data provide a mechanism at the cellular level for the immobility induced by swim stress and identifies critical components of the raphe circuitry responsible for the altered output of 5-HT neurons induced by swim stress.

  6. Competitive product inhibition of aromatase by natural estrogens.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Yarborough, C; Osawa, Y

    1993-03-01

    In order to better understand the function of aromatase, we carried out kinetic analyses to assess the ability of natural estrogens, estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), 16 alpha-OHE1, and estriol (E3), to inhibit aromatization. Human placental microsomes (50 micrograms protein) were incubated for 5 min at 37 degrees C with [1 beta-3H]testosterone (1.24 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 35-150 nM) or [1 beta-3H,4-14C]androstenedione (3.05 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 3H/14C = 19.3, 7-65 nM) as substrate in the presence of NADPH, with and without natural estrogens as putative inhibitors. Aromatase activity was assessed by tritium released to water from the 1 beta-position of the substrates. Natural estrogens showed competitive product inhibition against androgen aromatization. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for testosterone aromatization was 1.5, 2.2, 95, and 162 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 61.8 +/- 2.0 nM (n = 5) for testosterone. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for androstenedione aromatization was 10.6, 5.5, 252, and 1182 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 35.4 +/- 4.1 nM (n = 4) for androstenedione. These results show that estrogen inhibit the process of androgen aromatization and indicate that natural estrogens regulate their own synthesis by the product inhibition mechanism in vivo. Since natural estrogen binds to the active site of human placental aromatase P-450 complex as competitive inhibitors, natural estrogens might be further metabolized by aromatase. This suggests that human placental estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity is catalyzed by the active site of aromatase cytochrome P-450 and also agrees with the fact that the level of catecholestrogens in maternal plasma increases during pregnancy. The relative affinities and concentration of androgens and estrogens would control estrogen and catecholestrogen biosynthesis by aromatase.

  7. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A-receptor mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT2A receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex has not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT2A receptors was consistent with 5-HT2A receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex. PMID:18294819

  8. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J

    2008-07-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT(2A) receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex have not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT(2A) receptors were consistent with 5-HT(2A) receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex.

  9. Essential role of endocytosis for interleukin-4-receptor-mediated JAK/STAT signalling.

    PubMed

    Kurgonaite, Kristina; Gandhi, Hetvi; Kurth, Thomas; Pautot, Sophie; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas; Bökel, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Many important signalling cascades operate through specialized signalling endosomes, but a corresponding mechanism has as yet not been described for hematopoietic cytokine receptors. Based on live-cell affinity measurements, we recently proposed that ligand-induced interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) complex formation and thus JAK/STAT pathway activation requires a local subcellular increase in receptor density. Here, we show that this concentration step is provided by the internalization of IL-4R subunits through a constitutive, Rac1-, Pak- and actin-mediated endocytosis route that causes IL-4R subunits to become enriched by about two orders of magnitude within a population of cortical endosomes. Consistently, ligand-induced receptor dimers are preferentially detected within these endosomes. IL-4 signalling can be blocked by pharmacological inhibitors targeting the actin polymerization machinery driving receptor internalization, placing endocytosis unambigously upstream of receptor activation. Taken together, these observations demonstrate a role for endocytosis that is mechanistically distinct from the scaffolding function of signalling endosomes in other pathways.

  10. Rectification of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor mediated by FK506 binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J; Bhat, M B; Zhao, J

    1995-01-01

    The cytosolic receptor for immunosuppressant drugs, FK506 binding protein (FKBP12), maintains a tight association with ryanodine receptors of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane in skeletal muscle. The interaction between FKBP12 and ryanodine receptors resulted in distinct rectification of the Ca release channel. The endogenous FKBP-bound Ca release channel conducted current unidirectionally from SR lumen to myoplasm; in the opposite direction, the channel deactivated with fast kinetics. The binding of FKBP12 is likely to alter subunit interactions within the ryanodine receptor complex, as revealed by changes in conductance states of the channel. Both on- and off-rates of FKBP12 binding to the ryanodine receptor showed clear dependence on the membrane potential, suggesting that the binding sites of FKBP12 reside in or near the conduction pore of the Ca release channel. Rectification of the Ca release channel would prevent counter-current flow during the rapid release of Ca from SR membrane, and thus may serve as a negative feedback mechanism that participates in the process of muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:8599646

  11. Histamine H2 Receptor-Mediated Suppression of Intestinal Inflammation by Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunxu; Major, Angela; Rendon, David; Lugo, Monica; Jackson, Vanessa; Shi, Zhongcheng; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Probiotics and commensal intestinal microbes suppress mammalian cytokine production and intestinal inflammation in various experimental model systems. Limited information exists regarding potential mechanisms of probiotic-mediated immunomodulation in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that specific probiotic strains of Lactobacillus reuteri suppress intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced mouse colitis model. Only strains that possess the hdc gene cluster, including the histidine decarboxylase and histidine-histamine antiporter genes, can suppress colitis and mucosal cytokine (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and IL-1β in the colon) gene expression. Suppression of acute colitis in mice was documented by diminished weight loss, colonic injury, serum amyloid A (SAA) protein concentrations, and reduced uptake of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) in the colon by positron emission tomography (PET). The ability of probiotic L. reuteri to suppress colitis depends on the presence of a bacterial histidine decarboxylase gene(s) in the intestinal microbiome, consumption of a histidine-containing diet, and signaling via the histamine H2 receptor (H2R). Collectively, luminal conversion of l-histidine to histamine by hdc+ L. reuteri activates H2R, and H2R signaling results in suppression of acute inflammation within the mouse colon. PMID:26670383

  12. Astragaloside IV inhibits microglia activation via glucocorticoid receptor mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Shuai; Shi, Hai-Lian; Huang, Fei; Peterson, Karin E.; Wu, Hui; Lan, Yun-Yi; Zhang, Bei-Bei; He, Yi-Xin; Woods, Tyson; Du, Min; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of microglia activation may provide therapeutic treatment for many neurodegenerative diseases. Astragaloside IV (ASI) with anti-inflammatory properties has been tested as a therapeutic drug in clinical trials of China. However, the mechanism of ASI inhibiting neuroinflammation is unknown. In this study, we showed that ASI inhibited microglia activation both in vivo and in vitro. It could enhance glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-luciferase activity and facilitate GR nuclear translocation in microglial cells. Molecular docking and TR-FRET GR competitive binding experiments demonstrated that ASI could bind to GR in spite of relative low affinity. Meanwhile, ASI modulated GR-mediated signaling pathway, including dephosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, I κB and NF κB, therefore, decreased downstream production of proinflammatory mediators. Suppression of microglial BV-2 activation by ASI was abrogated by GR inhibitor, RU486 or GR siRNA. Similarly, RU486 counteracted the alleviative effect of ASI on microgliosis and neuronal injury in vivo. Our findings demonstrated that ASI inhibited microglia activation at least partially by activating the glucocorticoid pathway, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential for neuroinflammation in neurological diseases. PMID:26750705

  13. [Opioid μ receptors mediate the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment].

    PubMed

    Cao, Lan-Qin; Wen, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-04-25

    Learning/memory impairment is one of the most serious problems induced by stress, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Opiates and opioid receptors are implicated in multiple physiological functions including learning and memory. However, there is no clear evidence whether the endogenous opioid system is involved in the formation of the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of μ opioid receptor in the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment by means of Morris water maze (MWM) test in a mouse elevated platform stress model. The mice were trained in the MWM for four trials a session for 4 consecutive days after receiving the elevated platform stress, and intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO, antagonist CTAP or saline. Retention of the spatial training was assessed 24 h after the last training session with a 60-s free-swim probe trial using a new starting position. The results showed that intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO but not antagonist CTAP before MWM training impaired the memory retrieval of mice. Elevated platform stress before MWM training also impaired memory retrieval, which could be reversed by pre-injection of CTAP, and aggravated by DAMGO. These results suggest that endogenous opioid system may play a crucial role in the formation of the stress-induced memory impairment.

  14. Scara5 is a Ferritin Receptor Mediating Non-Transferrin Iron Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jau Yi; Paragas, Neal; Ned, Renee M.; Qiu, Andong; Viltard, Melanie; Leete, Thomas; Drexler, Ian R.; Chen, Xia; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Mohammed, Farah; Williams, David; Lin, Chyuan Sheng; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Andrews, Nancy C.; Barasch, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Summary Developing organs require iron for a myriad of functions, but embryos deleted of the major adult transport protein, transferrin or its receptor transferrin receptor1 (TfR1−/−) initiate organogenesis, suggesting that non-transferrin pathways are important. To examine these pathways, we developed chimeras composed of fluorescence-tagged TfR1−/− cells and untagged wild type cells. In the kidney, TfR1−/− cells populated capsule and stroma, mesenchyme and nephron, but were underrepresented in ureteric bud tips. Consistently, TfR1 provided transferrin to the ureteric bud, but not to the capsule or the stroma. Instead of transferrin, we found that the capsule internalized ferritin. Since the capsule expressed a novel receptor called Scara5, we tested its role in ferritin uptake and found that Scara5 bound serum ferritin and stimulated its endocytosis from the cell surface with consequent iron delivery. These data implicate cell type-specific mechanisms of iron traffic in organogenesis, which alternatively utilize transferrin or non-transferrin iron delivery pathways. PMID:19154717

  15. Peripheral tackykinin and excitatory amino acid receptors mediate hyperalgesia induced by Phoneutria nigriventer venom.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, Eliane Maria; Cury, Yara

    2003-04-25

    The generation of hyperalgesia by Phoneutria nigriventer venom was investigated in rats using the paw pressure test, through the intraplantar injection of the venom. Hyperalgesia was significantly inhibited by N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl) ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamide (capsazepine), a vanilloid receptor antagonist, by the local administration of pGlu-Ala-Asp-Pro-Asn-Lys-Phe-Tyr-Pro (spiro-gamma-lactam) Leu-Trp-NH(2) (GR82334) or of Phenyl-CO-Ala-Ala-D-Trp-Phe-D-Pro-Pro-Nle-NH(2) (GR94800), inhibitors of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors, respectively, or by the local injection of dizocilpine (MK 801), (+/-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid ((+/-)-AP-5), or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA excitatory amino acid receptors. The correlation between hyperalgesia and the inflammatory response induced by the venom was also investigated. The venom-induced edematogenic response was not modified by the pharmacological treatments. These results suggest that hyperalgesia induced by P. nigriventer venom is mediated by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons, with activation of peripheral tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors and of both the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Distinct mechanisms are involved in the development of hyperalgesia and edema induced by the venom.

  16. Asialoglycoprotein Receptor-Mediated Gene Delivery to Hepatocytes Using Galactosylated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bindu; Kumar, Piyush; Zeng, Hongbo; Narain, Ravin

    2015-09-14

    Highly efficient, specific, and nontoxic gene delivery vector is required for gene therapy to the liver. Hepatocytes exclusively express asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), which can recognize and bind to galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine. Galactosylated polymers are therefore explored for targeted gene delivery to the liver. A library of safe and stable galactose-based glycopolymers that can specifically deliver genes to hepatocytes were synthesized having different architectures, compositions, and molecular weights via the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer process. The physical and chemical properties of these polymers have a great impact on gene delivery efficacy into hepatocytes, as such block copolymers are found to form more stable complexes with plasmid and have high gene delivery efficiency into ASGPR expressing hepatocytes. Transfection efficiency and uptake of polyplexes with these polymers decreased significantly by preincubation of hepatocytes with free asialofetuin or by adding free asialofetuin together with polyplexes into hepatocytes. The results confirmed that polyplexes with these polymers were taken up specifically by hepatocytes via ASGPR-mediated endocytosis. The results from transfection efficiency and uptake of these polymers in cells without ASGPR, such as SK Hep1 and HeLa cells, further support this mechanism. Since in vitro cytotoxicity assays prove these glycopolymers to be nontoxic, they may be useful for delivery of clinically important genes specifically to the liver.

  17. Inhibitory effect of ginsenosides on NMDA receptor-mediated signals in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunoh; Ahn, Kwangseog; Oh, Tae Hwan; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2002-08-16

    Alternative medicines such as herbal products are increasingly being used for preventive and therapeutic purposes. Ginseng is the best known and most popular herbal medicine used worldwide. In spite of some beneficial effects of ginseng on the CNS, little scientific evidence shows at the cellular level. In the present study, we have examined the direct modulation of ginseng on the activation of glutamate, especially NMDA, receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons. Using fura-2-based digital imaging techniques, we found ginseng total saponins inhibited NMDA-induced but less effectively glutamate-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Ginseng total saponins also modulated Ca2+ transients evoked by depolarization with 50mM KCl along with its own effects on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3 is an active component for ginseng actions on NMDA receptors. The data obtained suggest that the inhibition of NMDA receptors by ginseng, in particular by ginsenoside Rg3, could be one of the mechanisms for ginseng-mediated neuroprotective actions.

  18. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Elvenes, Julianne; Thomassen, Ernst Ivan Simon; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  19. Pax6 Represses Androgen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation by Inhibiting Recruitment of the Coactivator SPBP

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  20. Pregnane X Receptor Mediates Dyslipidemia Induced by the HIV Protease Inhibitor Amprenavir in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Helsley, Robert N.; Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Welsh, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) have been used successfully in extending the life span of people infected with HIV. The use of PIs has also been associated with dyslipidemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Several PIs have been implicated in activating the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR), which acts as a xenobiotic sensor to regulate xenobiotic metabolism in the liver and intestine. Recent studies indicate that PXR may also play an important role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we identified amprenavir, a widely used HIV PI, as a potent PXR-selective agonist. Computational docking studies combined with site-direct mutagenesis identified several key residues within the ligand-binding pocket of PXR that constitute points of interaction with amprenavir. Amprenavir efficiently activated PXR and induced PXR target gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Short-term exposure to amprenavir significantly increased plasma total cholesterol and atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in wild-type mice, but not in PXR-deficient mice. Amprenavir-mediated PXR activation stimulated the expression of several key intestinal genes involved in lipid homeostasis. These findings provide critical mechanistic insight for understanding the impact of PIs on cardiovascular disease and demonstrate a potential role of PXR in mediating the adverse effects of HIV PIs in humans. PMID:23519392

  1. Biophysical and functional consequences of receptor-mediated nerve fiber transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanelian, D L; Markin, V S

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system by substance P, a G protein-coupled receptor, and subsequent receptor internalization causes dendrites to change their shape from homogeneous cylinders to a heterogeneous string of swollen varicosities (beads) connected by thin segments. In this paper we have analyzed this phenomenon and propose quantitative mechanisms to explain this type of physical shape transformation. We developed a mathematical solution to describe the relationship between the initial radius of a cylindrical nerve fiber and the average radii of the subsequently created varicosities and connecting segments, as well as the periodicity of the varicosities along the nerve fiber. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with our own and published experimental data from dorsal root ganglion neurons, spinal cord, and brain. Modeling the electrical properties of these beaded fibers has led to an understanding of the functional biophysical consequences of nerve fiber transformation. Several hypotheses for how this shape transformation can be used to process information within the nervous system have been put forth. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:9138558

  2. Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptors Mediate a Cell Type-Specific Plasticity in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Stempel, A Vanessa; Stumpf, Alexander; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Özdoğan, Tuğba; Pannasch, Ulrike; Theis, Anne-Kathrin; Otte, David-Marian; Wojtalla, Alexandra; Rácz, Ildikó; Ponomarenko, Alexey; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Zimmer, Andreas; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2016-05-18

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) exert major control over neuronal activity by activating cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). The functionality of the eCB system is primarily ascribed to the well-documented retrograde activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. We find that action potential-driven eCB release leads to a long-lasting membrane potential hyperpolarization in hippocampal principal cells that is independent of CB1Rs. The hyperpolarization, which is specific to CA3 and CA2 pyramidal cells (PCs), depends on the activation of neuronal CB2Rs, as shown by a combined pharmacogenetic and immunohistochemical approach. Upon activation, they modulate the activity of the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter, leading to a hyperpolarization of the neuron. CB2R activation occurred in a purely self-regulatory manner, robustly altered the input/output function of CA3 PCs, and modulated gamma oscillations in vivo. To conclude, we describe a cell type-specific plasticity mechanism in the hippocampus that provides evidence for the neuronal expression of CB2Rs and emphasizes their importance in basic neuronal transmission. PMID:27133464

  3. G-protein coupled receptor-mediated nutrient sensing and developmental control in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Caldana, Camila; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient sensing and utilisation are fundamental for all life forms. As heterotrophs, fungi have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms for sensing and taking up various nutrients. Despite its importance, only a limited number of nutrient receptors and their corresponding ligands have been identified in fungi. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of transmembrane receptors. The Aspergillus nidulans genome encodes 16 putative GPCRs, but only a few have been functionally characterised. Our previous study showed the increased expression of an uncharacterised putative GPCR, gprH, during carbon starvation. GprH appears conserved throughout numerous filamentous fungi. Here, we reveal that GprH is a putative receptor involved in glucose and tryptophan sensing. The absence of GprH results in a reduction in cAMP levels and PKA activity upon adding glucose or tryptophan to starved cells. GprH is pre-formed in conidia and is increasingly active during carbon starvation, where it plays a role in glucose uptake and the recovery of hyphal growth. GprH also represses sexual development under conditions favouring sexual fruiting and during carbon starvation in submerged cultures. In summary, the GprH nutrient-sensing system functions upstream of the cAMP-PKA pathway, influences primary metabolism and hyphal growth, while represses sexual development in A. nidulans. PMID:26179439

  4. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Tieber, V.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1997-03-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and other chemicals that act as aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AhR) agonists cause a variety of toxicity effects. In sac fry of many fish species, these effects include blue-sac disease and mortality. Because HAHs occur in complex mixtures, their toxicity in the environment is difficult to predict. A bioassay useful in predicting AhR-mediated toxicity to fish was developed using the RTH-149 rainbow trout hepatoma cell line. Stable transfection of this cell line with the pGudLuc 1.1 plasmid, which contains a firefly luciferase reporter gene under the transcriptional regulation of dioxin responsive enhancers, has produced a recombinant cell line designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT 2.0). The RLT 2.0 bioassay method detection limit for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is 4 pM. The responses of the RLT 2.0 bioassay to TCDD and several HAH congeners closely matched the responses observed in vivo in fish. The RLT 2.0 bioassay can provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxic activity of complex mixtures to fish. The assay will be useful in screening environmental extracts, guiding chemical analysis, and interpreting the AhR-mediated mechanism of toxicity.

  5. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP.

  6. A putative octopamine/tyramine receptor mediating appetite in a hungry fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yuko; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2011-07-01

    In the blowfly Phormia regina, experience of simultaneous feeding with d-limonene exposure inhibits proboscis extension reflex (PER) due to decreased tyramine (TA) titer in the brain. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of TA signaling pathway related to the associated feeding behavior, we cloned cDNA encoding the octopamine/TA receptor (PregOAR/TAR). The deduced protein is composed of 607 amino acid residues and has 7 predicted transmembrane domains. Based on homology and phylogenetic analyses, this protein belongs to the OAR/TAR family. The PregOAR/TAR was mainly expressed in head, with low levels of expression in other tissues at adult stages. Gene expression profile is in agreement with a plethora of functions ascribed to TA in various insect tissues. The immunolabeled cell bodies and processes were localized in the medial protocerebrum, outer layer of lobula, antennal lobe, and subesophageal ganglion. These results suggest that decrease of TA level in the brain likely affects neurons expressing PregOAR/TAR, causing mediation of the sensitivity in the sensillum and/or output of motor neurons for PER.

  7. Role of the ventral tegmental area in methamphetamine extinction: AMPA receptor-mediated neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ting; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying drug extinction remain largely unknown, although a role for medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamate neurons has been suggested. Considering that the mPFC sends glutamate efferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), we tested whether the VTA is involved in methamphetamine (METH) extinction via conditioned place preference (CPP). Among various METH-CPP stages, we found that the amount of phospho-GluR1/Ser845 increased in the VTA at behavioral extinction, but not the acquisition or withdrawal stage. Via surface biotinylation, we found that levels of membrane GluR1 were significantly increased during METH-CPP extinction, while no change was observed at the acquisition stage. Specifically, the number of dendritic spines in the VTA was increased at behavioral extinction, but not during acquisition. To validate the role of the mPFC in METH-CPP extinction, we lesioned the mPFC. Ibotenic acid lesioning of the mPFC did not affect METH-CPP acquisition, however, it abolished the extinction stage and reversed the enhanced phospho-GluR1/Ser845 levels as well as increases in VTA dendritic spines during METH-CPP extinction. Overall, this study demonstrates that the mPFC plays a critical role in METH-CPP extinction and identifies the VTA as an alternative target in mediating the extinction of drug conditioning.

  8. Molecular Pathways: AXL, a Membrane Receptor Mediator of Resistance to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Maurizio; Elkabets, Moshe; Baselga, José

    2016-01-01

    AXL is a tyrosine kinase membrane receptor that signals via PI3K, MAPK, and protein kinase C (PKC), among other pathways. AXL has oncogenic potential and interacts with other membrane receptors, depending on their relative abundance and availability. The increased expression of AXL in cancer is often the result of pharmacologic selective pressure to a number of chemotherapies and targeted therapies and acts as a mechanism of acquired drug resistance. This resistance phenotype, frequently accompanied by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, can be reversed by AXL inhibition. In tumors with high levels of EGFR, including lung, head and neck, and triple-negative breast cancer, AXL dimerizes with this receptor and initiates signaling that circumvents the antitumor effects of anti-EGFR therapies. Likewise, AXL overexpression and dimerization with EGFR can overcome PI3K inhibition by activating the phospholipase C-γ-PKC cascade that, in turn, sustains mTORC1 activity. The causative role of AXL in inducing drug resistance is underscored by the fact that the suppression of AXL restores sensitivity to these agents. Hence, these observations indicate that AXL is selectively expressed in tumor cells refractory to therapy and that cotargeting AXL in this setting would potentially overcome drug resistance. The use of AXL inhibitors should be considered in the clinic. PMID:26763248

  9. Adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors mediate the immunological activation of corticosterone secretion in male rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, A L; Petraglia, F; Criscuolo, M; Ficarra, G; Salvestroni, C; Nappi, R E; Trentini, G P; Genazzani, A R

    1996-06-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of immune agents on corticosterone secretion, the present study evaluated the possible involvement of some neuronal pathways (serotoninergic, noradrenergic/adrenergic) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced corticosterone release in male rats. Serotoninergic antagonists, mianserin (5-HT2C receptor blocker) or pindolol (5HT1A receptor blocker) or noradrenergic/adrenergic antagonists, prazosin (alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocker) or propranolol (beta-adrenoceptor blocker), were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected before (5 min) the administration of LPS. In each experiment a group of rats i.p. injected with vehicle served as controls. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 90 min after administration of LPS and trunk blood was collected for corticosterone radioimmunoassay. Results showed that pretreatment with mianserin, but not with pindolol, significantly reduced plasma corticosterone levels following administration of LPS (p < 0.05); prazosin attenuated the plasma corticosterone response to LPS (p < 0.05), while propranolol did not induce significant change. The present study indicated that serotoninergic and noradrenergic/adrenergic pathways are involved in the immunoneuroendocrine modulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal function in rats. In particular, it is probably mediated by the activation of 5-HT2C receptors and of alpha 1-adrenoceptors, while type 1A serotonin receptors or beta-adrenoceptors do not seem to be involved in such a phenomenon.

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor-mediated behavioral effects of nitrous oxide in the rat social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Quock, R M; Wetzel, P J; Maillefer, R H; Hodges, B L; Curtis, B A; Czech, D A

    1993-09-01

    The present study was conducted to ascertain whether an anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide was demonstrable in rats using the social interaction test and whether this drug effect might be mediated by benzodiazepine receptors. Compared to behavior of vehicle-pretreated, room air-exposed rats, rat pairs exposed to nitrous oxide showed a generally inverted U-shaped dose-response curve with the maximum increase in social interaction encounters occurring at 25% and significant increase in time of active social interaction at 15-35%; higher concentrations produced a sedative effect that reduced social interaction. Treatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide also increased social interaction. Pretreatment with 10 mg/kg of the benzodiazepine receptor blocker flumazenil, which alone had no effect, significantly antagonized the social interaction-increasing effects of both nitrous oxide and chlordiazepoxide. In summary, these findings suggest that nitrous oxide produces a flumazenil-sensitive effect comparable to that of chlordiazepoxide and implicate central benzodiazepine mechanisms in mediation of the anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide.

  12. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated anti-nociception in models of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Sagar, Devi R; Elmes, Steven J R; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2007-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, endogenous ligands and their synthesising/metabolising enzymes. Cannabinoid receptors are present at key sites involved in the relay and modulation of nociceptive information. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been well documented. The usefulness of nonselective cannabinoid agonists can, however, be limited by psychoactive side effects associated with activation of CB(1) receptors. Following the recent evidence for CB(2) receptors existing in the nervous system and reports of their up-regulation in chronic pain states and neurodegenerative diseases, much research is now aimed at shedding light on the role of the CB(2) receptor in human disease. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects of selective CB(2) receptor agonists in animal models of pain in the absence of CNS side effects. This review focuses on the analgesic potential of CB(2) receptor agonists for inflammatory, post-operative and neuropathic pain states and discusses their possible sites and mechanisms of action.

  13. Identification of resolvin D2 receptor mediating resolution of infections and organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Nan; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous mechanisms that orchestrate resolution of acute inflammation are essential in host defense and the return to homeostasis. Resolvin (Rv)D2 is a potent immunoresolvent biosynthesized during active resolution that stereoselectively stimulates resolution of acute inflammation. Here, using an unbiased G protein–coupled receptor-β-arrestin–based screening and functional sensing systems, we identified a receptor for RvD2, namely GPR18, that is expressed on human leukocytes, including polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), monocytes, and macrophages (MΦ). In human MΦ, RvD2-stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP was dependent on GPR18. RvD2-stimulated phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and apoptotic PMN (efferocytosis) were enhanced with GPR18 overexpression and significantly reduced by shRNA knockdown. Specific binding of RvD2 to recombinant GPR18 was confirmed using a synthetic 3H-labeled-RvD2. Scatchard analysis gave a Kd of ∼10 nM consistent with RvD2 bioactive concentration range. In both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus infections, RvD2 limited PMN infiltration, enhanced phagocyte clearance of bacteria, and accelerated resolution. These actions were lost in GPR18-deficient mice. During PMN-mediated second organ injury, RvD2’s protective actions were also significantly diminished in GPR18-deficient mice. Together, these results provide evidence for a novel RvD2–GPR18 resolution axis that stimulates human and mouse phagocyte functions to control bacterial infections and promote organ protection. PMID:26195725

  14. Plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of alcohol-dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Lindemeyer, A. Kerstin; Suryanarayanan, Asha; Meyer, Edward M.; Marty, Vincent N.; Ahmad, S. Omar; Shao, Xuesi Max; Olsen, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure-induced changes in reinforcement mechanisms and motivational state are thought to contribute to the development of cravings and relapse during protracted withdrawal. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is a key structure of the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system and plays an important role in mediating alcohol-seeking behaviors. Here we describe the long-lasting alterations of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the NAcc after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment, a rat model of alcohol dependence. CIE treatment and withdrawal (>40 days) produced decreases in the ethanol and Ro15-4513 potentiation of extrasynaptic GABAARs, which mediate the picrotoxin-sensitive tonic current (Itonic), while potentiation of synaptic receptors, which give rise to miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), was increased. Diazepam sensitivity of both Itonic and mIPSCs was decreased by CIE treatment. The average magnitude of Itonic was unchanged, but mIPSC amplitude and frequency decreased and mIPSC rise time increased after CIE treatment. Rise-time histograms revealed decreased frequency of fast-rising mIPSCs after CIE treatment, consistent with possible decreases in somatic GABAergic synapses in MSNs from CIE rats. However, unbiased stereological analysis of NeuN-stained NAcc neurons did not detect any decreases in NAcc volume, neuronal numbers, or neuronal cell body volume. Western blot analysis of surface subunit levels revealed selective decreases in α1 and δ and increases in α4, α5, and γ2 GABAAR subunits after CIE treatment and withdrawal. Similar, but reversible, alterations occurred after a single ethanol dose (5 g/kg). These data reveal CIE-induced long-lasting neuroadaptations in the NAcc GABAergic neurotransmission. PMID:24694935

  15. Dopamine D3 Receptor Mediates Preadolescent Stress-Induced Adult Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joon H.; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that repeated stressful experiences during childhood increases the likelihood of developing depression- and anxiety-related disorders in adulthood; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We subjected drd3-EGFP and drd3-null mice to daily, two hour restraint stress episodes over a five day period during preadolescence (postnatal day 35 to 39), followed by social isolation. When these mice reached adulthood (post-natal day > 90), we assessed locomotor behavior in a novel environment, and assessed depression-related behavior in the Porsolt Forced Swim test. We also measured the expression and function of dopamine D3 receptor in limbic brain areas such as hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and amygdala in control and stressed drd3-EGFP mice in adulthood. Adult male mice subjected to restraint stress during preadolescence exhibited both anxiety- and depression-related behaviors; however, adult female mice subjected to preadolescent restraint stress exhibited only depression-related behaviors. The development of preadolescent stress-derived psychiatric disorders was blocked by D3 receptor selective antagonist, SB 277011-A, and absent in D3 receptor null mice. Adult male mice that experienced stress during preadolescence exhibited a loss of D3 receptor expression and function in the amygdala but not in hippocampus or nucleus accumbens. In contrast, adult female mice that experienced preadolescent stress exhibited increased D3 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens but not in amygdala or hippocampus. Our results suggest that the dopamine D3 receptor is centrally involved in the etiology of adult anxiety- and depression-related behaviors that arise from repeated stressful experiences during childhood. PMID:26619275

  16. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Masanao; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH), which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the recognition

  17. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-10-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  18. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  19. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  20. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor mediates excitotoxicity-induced neural progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Tania; Romero, Eva; Monory, Krisztina; Palazuelos, Javier; Sendtner, Michael; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2007-08-17

    Endocannabinoids are lipid signaling mediators that exert an important neuromodulatory role and confer neuroprotection in several types of brain injury. Excitotoxicity and stroke can induce neural progenitor (NP) proliferation and differentiation as an attempt of neuroregeneration after damage. Here we investigated the mechanism of hippocampal progenitor cell engagement upon excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid administration and the putative involvement of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in this process. Adult NPs express kainate receptors that mediate proliferation and neurosphere generation in vitro via CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Similarly, in vivo studies showed that excitotoxicity-induced hippocampal NPs proliferation and neurogenesis are abrogated in CB1-deficient mice and in wild-type mice administered with the selective CB1 antagonist rimonabant (N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazolecarboxamide; SR141716). Kainate stimulation increased basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression in cultured NPs in a CB1-dependent manner as this response was prevented by rimonabant and mimicked by endocannabinoids. Likewise, in vivo analyses showed that increased hippocampal expression of bFGF, as well as of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and epidermal growth factor, occurs upon excitotoxicity and that CB1 receptor ablation prevents this induction. Moreover, excitotoxicity increased the number of CB1+ bFGF+ cells, and this up-regulation preceded NP proliferation. In summary, our results show the involvement of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in NP proliferation and neurogenesis induced by excitotoxic injury and support a role for bFGF signaling in this process.

  1. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors Mediate Inducible Defense in the Water Flea Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Masanao; Colbourne, John K.; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, “neckteeth,” in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as “kairomones,” in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH), which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the

  2. Quantitative comparisons of in vitro assays for estrogenic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, H; Tong, W; Perkins, R; Soto, A M; Prechtl, N V; Sheehan, D M

    2000-01-01

    Substances that may act as estrogens show a broad chemical structural diversity. To thoroughly address the question of possible adverse estrogenic effects, reliable methods are needed to detect and identify the chemicals of these diverse structural classes. We compared three assays--in vitro estrogen receptor competitive binding assays (ER binding assays), yeast-based reporter gene assays (yeast assays), and the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN assay)--to determine their quantitative agreement in identifying structurally diverse estrogens. We examined assay performance for relative sensitivity, detection of active/inactive chemicals, and estrogen/antiestrogen activities. In this examination, we combined individual data sets in a specific, quantitative data mining exercise. Data sets for at least 29 chemicals from five laboratories were analyzed pair-wise by X-Y plots. The ER binding assay was a good predictor for the other two assay results when the antiestrogens were excluded (r(2) is 0.78 for the yeast assays and 0.85 for the E-SCREEN assays). Additionally, the examination strongly suggests that biologic information that is not apparent from any of the individual assays can be discovered by quantitative pair-wise comparisons among assays. Antiestrogens are identified as outliers in the ER binding/yeast assay, while complete antagonists are identified in the ER binding and E-SCREEN assays. Furthermore, the presence of outliers may be explained by different mechanisms that induce an endocrine response, different impurities in different batches of chemicals, different species sensitivity, or limitations of the assay techniques. Although these assays involve different levels of biologic complexity, the major conclusion is that they generally provided consistent information in quantitatively determining estrogenic activity for the five data sets examined. The results should provide guidance for expanded data mining examinations and the selection of appropriate

  3. Estrogen deprivation causes estradiol hypersensitivity in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Masamura, S; Santner, S J; Heitjan, D F; Santen, R J

    1995-10-01

    Genetic and environmental factors can modulate the level of sensitivity to various hormones, including estrogens. Enhanced sensitivity to estradiol (E2) has been demonstrated in several biological conditions, such as in sheep during the nonbreeding season, in untreated patients with Turner's syndrome, and in the prepubertal state in normal girls. We postulated that secondary responses to hormonal therapy in patients with breast cancer could also result from enhanced E2 sensitivity, developing as an adaptive mechanism to E2 deprivation. The present study used the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line as a model system to test the concept that enhanced sensitivity to E2 may occur as a result of adaptation to low E2 levels. After depriving MCF-7 cells of estrogens in tissue culture medium for periods of 1-6 months, we established conditions under which replication could be stimulated maximally by 10(-14)-10(-15) mol/L E2. In contrast, wild-type cells not exposed to estrogen deprivation required 10(-10) mol/L E2 to grow at the same rate. Further, the concentration of the antiestrogen, ICI 164384, needed to inhibit growth by 50% in estrogen-deprived cells was much lower than that required in wild-type cells (i.e. 10(-15) vs. 10(-9) mol/L). Nude mice implanted with these estrogen-deprived cells demonstrated an earlier appearance of palpable tumors in response to E2 than animals bearing wild-type cells. Reexposure to 10(-10)-10(-9) mol/L E2, either in vivo or in vitro, returned these cells to the level of estrogen sensitivity observed in wild-type cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that breast cancer cells can adapt to low levels of estrogens by enhancing their sensitivity to E2.

  4. 5-HT-1A receptor-mediated modulation of medullary expiratory neurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, P M; Bischoff, A M; Richter, D W

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of the 5-HT-1A receptor in serotoninergic responses of stage 2 expiratory (E-2) neurones was investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated cats. The specific agonist of the 5-HT-1A receptor, 8-hydroxy-diproplaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT), administered systemically or by ionophoresis directly on to the neurones, had a clear depressant effect. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at doses of 10-50 micrograms kg-1 (I.V.) increased the membrane hyperpolarizations of E-2 neurones during the inspiratory and postinspiratory phases, and shortened their duration of activity in association with shortening of phrenic nerve activity. Discharges of E-2 neurones were also less intense. At doses of 50-90 micrograms kg-1, 8-OH-DPAT reduced or abolished inspiratory hyperpolarizations, and reduced expiratory depolarizations of membrane potential and discharge in parallel with inhibition of phrenic nerve discharges. The effects of the larger doses were reversed by I.V. injection of NAN-190, an antagonist at the 5-HT-1A receptor. Dose-dependent effects on the membrane potential and discharge of E-2 neurones, but not on phrenic nerve activity, were also seen by ionophoretic administration of 8-OH-DPAT on to E-2 neurones. At low currents, ejection of 8-OH-DPAT hyperpolarized the neurones without affecting the duration of inspiratory hyperpolarization and expiratory depolarization. This hyperpolarization depressed the intensity and the duration of expiratory discharges. Ejection with larger currents hyperpolarized the E-2 neurones further, and depressed expiratory depolarization leading to blockade of expiratory discharges. The effects on membrane potential were accompanied by decreased neuronal input resistance. This depressed the excitability of E-2 neurones as tested by discharge evoked by intracellular current injection. The amplitudes of action potentials decreased in parallel with the changes in input resistance. The effects were attributed to a

  5. 3-iodothyronamine differentially modulates α-2A-adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Dinter, Juliane; Mühlhaus, Jessica; Jacobi, Simon Friedrich; Wienchol, Carolin Leonie; Cöster, Maxi; Meister, Jaroslawna; Hoefig, Carolin Stephanie; Müller, Anne; Köhrle, Josef; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Mittag, Jens; Schöneberg, Torsten; Kleinau, Gunnar; Biebermann, Heike

    2015-06-01

    Most in vivo effects of 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) have been thus far thought to be mediated by binding at the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). Inconsistently, the 3-T1AM-induced hypothermic effect still persists in Taar1 knockout mice, which suggests additional receptor targets. In support of this general assumption, it has previously been reported that 3-T1AM also binds to the α-2A-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A), which modulates insulin secretion. However, the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. We tested two different scenarios that may explain the effect: the sole action of 3-T1AM at ADRA2A and a combined action of 3-T1AM at ADRA2A and TAAR1, which is also expressed in pancreatic islets. We first investigated a potential general signaling modification using the label-free EPIC technology and then specified changes in signaling by cAMP inhibition and MAPKs (ERK1/2) determination. We found that 3-T1AM induced Gi/o activation at ADRA2A and reduced the norepinephrine (NorEpi)-induced MAPK activation. Interestingly, in ADRA2A/TAAR1 hetero-oligomers, application of NorEpi resulted in uncoupling of the Gi/o signaling pathway, but it did not affect MAPK activation. However, 3-T1AM application in mice over a period of 6 days at a daily dose of 5 mg/kg had no significant effects on glucose homeostasis. In summary, we report an agonistic effect of 3-T1AM on the ADRA2A-mediated Gi/o pathway but an antagonistic effect on MAPK induced by NorEpi. Moreover, in ADRA2A/TAAR1 hetero-oligomers, the capacity of NorEpi to stimulate Gi/o signaling is reduced by co-stimulation with 3-T1AM. The present study therefore points to a complex spectrum of signaling modification mediated by 3-T1AM at different G protein-coupled receptors.

  6. Short-term changes in endogenous estrogen levels and consumption of soy isoflavones affect working and verbal memory in young adult females.

    PubMed

    Islam, Fariha; Sparkes, Cassandra; Roodenrys, Steven; Astheimer, Lee

    2008-12-01

    Estrogen is known to modulate certain cognitive functions, most notably improving working memory and verbal memory. Soy foods contain isoflavones, phytoestrogens structurally similar to estrogen that weakly bind to estrogen receptors. We investigated the effects of natural variations in estrogen levels and short-term dietary supplementation with soy isoflavones on cognitive function in 28 young women. Performance was examined across a range of cognitive tasks on three occasions during separate menstrual cycles: during a menses phase (low estrogen), during a luteal phase (highest estrogen), and once during a menses phase after a 3-day phytoestrogen-rich dietary intervention. Soy supplementation during menses led to an improvement in working memory and verbal memory. The menstrual cycle effects were mixed, with high estrogen improving performance on a verbal memory task but not on working memory. Our results suggest that soy phytoestrogens may improve working memory through estrogen-independent mechanisms. PMID:19000378

  7. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  8. Receptor-mediated hepatic uptake of M6P-BSA-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotides in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Cheng, Kun; Guntaka, Ramareddy V; Mahato, Ram I

    2006-01-01

    Excessive production of extracellular matrix, predominantly type I collagen, results in liver fibrosis. Earlier we synthesized mannose 6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) and conjugated to the type I collagen specific triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) for its enhanced delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which is the principal liver fibrogenic cell. In this report, we demonstrate a time-dependent cellular uptake of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSC-T6 cells. Both cellular uptake and nuclear deposition of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO were significantly higher than those of 33P-TFO, leading to enhanced inhibition of type I collagen transcription. Following systemic administration into rats, hepatic accumulation of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO increased from 55% to 68% with the number of M6P per BSA from 14 to 27. Unlike 33P-TFO, there was no significant decrease in the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO in fibrotic rats. Prior administration of excess M6P-BSA decreased the hepatic uptake of (M6P)20-BSA-33P-TFO from 66% to 40% in normal rats, and from 60% to 15% in fibrotic rats, suggesting M6P/insulin-like growth factor II (M6P/IGF II) receptor-mediated endocytosis of M6P-BSA-33P-TFO by HSCs. Almost 82% of the total liver uptake in fibrotic rats was contributed by HSCs. In conclusion, by conjugation with M6P-BSA, the TFO could be potentially used for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  9. Ca(2+)-independent F-actin assembly and disassembly during Fc receptor- mediated phagocytosis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles by macrophages is presumed to involve the actin-based cytoskeleton since F-actin accumulates beneath forming phagosomes, and particle engulfment is blocked by cytochalasins, drugs that inhibit actin filament assembly. However, it is unknown whether Fc receptor ligation affects the rate or extent of F- actin assembly during phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles. To examine this question we have used a quantitative spectrofluorometric method to examine F-actin dynamics during a synchronous wave of phagocytosis of IgG-coated red blood cells by inflammatory mouse macrophages. We observed a biphasic rise in macrophage F-actin content during particle engulfment, with maxima at 1 and 5 min after the initiation of phagocytosis. F-actin declined to resting levels by 30 min, by which time particle engulfment was completed. These quantitative increases in macrophage F-actin were reflected in localized changes in F-actin distribution. Previous work showed that the number of IgG-coated particles engulfed by macrophages is unaffected by buffering extracellular calcium or by clamping cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) to very low levels (Di Virgilio, F., B. C. Meyer, S. Greenberg, and S. C. Silverstein. 1988. J. Cell Biol. 106: 657-666). To determine whether clamping [Ca2+]i in macrophages affects the rate of particle engulfment, or the assembly or disassembly of F- actin during phagocytosis, we examined these parameters in macrophages whose [Ca2+]i had been clamped to approximately less than 3 nM with fura 2/AM and acetoxymethyl ester of EGTA. We found that the initial rate of phagocytosis, and the quantities of F-actin assembled and disassembled were similar in Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-depleted macrophages. We conclude that Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis in mouse macrophages is accompanied by an ordered sequence of assembly and disassembly of F-actin that is insensitive to [Ca2+]i. PMID:2026648

  10. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L A; Sack, G

    1986-12-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue.

  11. Modulation of the input–output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal input–output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency–current (f–I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input–output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f–I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f–I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation. PMID:25194049

  12. Two types of functionally different GABAA receptors mediate GABA modulation of cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, R; Pencheva, N

    1995-08-01

    1. The effects of GABA (1 microM-2 mM) on longitudinally or circularly oriented organ bath preparations of cat terminal ileum consisted of a relaxation phase with an inhibition of the rhythmic spontaneous phasic contractions, followed by a phase of contractions characterized by an elevation in basal tone and an increase in amplitude of the spontaneous phasic contractions. 2. Muscimol (100 microM), but not baclofen (100 microM), mimicked the relaxation phase of the response to applied GABA (100 microM) in all tissue preparations. In addition, muscimol induced a phase of contractile activity in the circular muscle layer whilst baclofen exerted a 'GABA-like' contractile effect on the longitudinal muscle layer. Bicuculline (30 microM) or picrotoxinin (30 microM) antagonized the GABA- or muscimol-induced relaxations in all preparations and decreased the GABA- but not the baclofen-induced contractions of the longitudinal muscle layer. 3. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) or atropine (0.1 microM) prevented the bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA or muscimol effects on both muscle layers but not the contractile effect of baclofen on the longitudinal muscle layer. 4. The bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA effect on both muscle layers were almost completely eliminated by 1 nM pirenzepine. At this concentration pirenzepine did not affect the electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions or contractile responses to applied acetylcholine of both muscle layers. 5. During electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions of both muscle layers, GABA (100 microM) had an inhibitory effect. The inhibition occurred in the presence of pirenzepine (1 nM) but not of bicuculline (30 microM). 6. It is suggested that two types of functionally different bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptors mediate an exitatory presynaptic and an inhibitory prejunctional action of GABA on the cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum.

  13. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  14. Receptor-Mediated Recognition and Uptake of Iron from Human Transferrin by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Modun, Belinda; Evans, Robert W.; Joannou, Christopher L.; Williams, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis both recognize and bind the human iron-transporting glycoprotein, transferrin, via a 42-kDa cell surface protein receptor. In an iron-deficient medium, staphylococcal growth can be promoted by the addition of human diferric transferrin but not human apotransferrin. To determine whether the staphylococcal transferrin receptor is involved in the removal of iron from transferrin, we employed 6 M urea–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which separates human transferrin into four forms (diferric, monoferric N-lobe, and monoferric C-lobe transferrin and apotransferrin). S. aureus and S. epidermidis but not Staphylococcus saprophyticus (which lacks the transferrin receptor) converted diferric human transferrin into its apotransferrin form within 30 min. During conversion, iron was removed sequentially from the N lobe and then from the C lobe. Metabolic poisons such as sodium azide and nigericin inhibited the release of iron from human transferrin, indicating that it is an energy-requiring process. To demonstrate that this process is receptor rather than siderophore mediated, we incubated (i) washed staphylococcal cells and (ii) the staphylococcal siderophore, staphyloferrin A, with porcine transferrin, a transferrin species which does not bind to the staphylococcal receptor. While staphyloferrin A removed iron from both human and porcine transferrins, neither S. aureus nor S. epidermidis cells could promote the release of iron from porcine transferrin. In competition binding assays, both native and recombinant N-lobe fragments of human transferrin as well as a naturally occurring human transferrin variant with a mutation in the C-lobe blocked binding of 125I-labelled transferrin. Furthermore, the staphylococci removed iron efficiently from the iron-loaded N-lobe fragment of human transferrin. These data demonstrate that the staphylococci efficiently remove iron from transferrin via a receptor-mediated process and

  15. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  16. Early growth response-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and lung remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Pastura, Patricia A; Acciani, Thomas H; Deutsch, Gail H; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hardie, William D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2009-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are induced after lung injury and are associated with remodeling in chronic pulmonary diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Expression of TGF-alpha in the lungs of adult mice causes fibrosis, pleural thickening, and pulmonary hypertension, in addition to increased expression of a transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 was increased in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and the vascular adventitia in the lungs of mice conditionally expressing TGF-alpha in airway epithelium (Clara cell secretory protein-rtTA(+/-)/[tetO](7)-TGF-alpha(+/-)). The goal of this study was to determine the role of Egr-1 in TGF-alpha-induced lung disease. To accomplish this, TGF-alpha-transgenic mice were crossed to Egr-1 knockout (Egr-1(ko/ko)) mice. The lack of Egr-1 markedly increased the severity of TGF-alpha-induced pulmonary disease, dramatically enhancing airway muscularization, increasing pulmonary fibrosis, and causing greater airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Smooth muscle hyperplasia, not hypertrophy, caused the ASM thickening in the absence of Egr-1. No detectable increases in pulmonary inflammation were found. In addition to the airway remodeling disease, vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension were also more severe in Egr-1(ko/ko) mice. Thus, Egr-1 acts to suppress epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway and vascular muscularization, fibrosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of inflammation. This provides a unique model to study the processes causing pulmonary fibrosis and ASM thickening without the complicating effects of inflammation.

  17. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  18. Modulation of the input-output function by GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Torres, Blas; Carrascal, Livia

    2014-11-15

    The neuronal input-output function depends on recruitment threshold and gain of the firing frequency-current (f-I) relationship. These two parameters are positively correlated in ocular motoneurons (MNs) recorded in alert preparation and inhibitory inputs could contribute to this correlation. Phasic inhibition mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) occurs when a high concentration of GABA at the synaptic cleft activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors, allowing neuronal information transfer. In some neuronal populations, low concentrations of GABA activate non-synaptic GABAA receptors and generate a tonic inhibition, which modulates cell excitability. This study determined how ambient GABA concentrations modulate the input-output relationship of rat oculomotor nucleus MNs. Superfusion of brain slices with GABA (100 μm) produced a GABAA receptor-mediated current that reduced the input resistance, increased the recruitment threshold and shifted the f-I relationship rightward without any change in gain. These modifications did not depend on MN size. In absence of exogenous GABA, gabazine (20 μm; antagonist of GABAA receptors) abolished spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and revealed a tonic current in MNs. Gabazine increased input resistance and decreased recruitment threshold mainly in larger MNs. The f-I relationship shifted to the left, without any change in gain. Gabazine effects were chiefly due to MN tonic inhibition because tonic current amplitude was five-fold greater than phasic. This study demonstrates a tonic inhibition in ocular MNs that modulates cell excitability depending on cell size. We suggest that GABAA tonic inhibition acting concurrently with glutamate receptors activation could reproduce the positive covariation between threshold and gain reported in alert preparation.

  19. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  20. Chronic oxidative stress causes estrogen-independent aggressive phenotype, and epigenetic inactivation of estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2015-08-01

    The role of chronic oxidative stress in the development and aggressive growth of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is well known; however, the mechanistic understanding is not clear. Estrogen-independent growth is one of the features of aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on estrogen sensitivity and expression of nuclear estrogen receptors in ER-positive breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide were used as a cell model in this study, and their growth in response to 17-β estradiol was evaluated by cell viability, cell cycle, and cell migration analysis. Results were further confirmed at molecular level by analysis of gene expressions at transcript and protein levels. Histone H3 modifications, expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, and the effect of DNA demethylation were also analyzed. Loss of growth in response to estrogen with a decrease in ERα expression was observed in MCF-7 cells adapted to chronic oxidative stress. Increases in mtTFA and NRF1 in these cells further suggested the role of mitochondria-dependent redox-sensitive growth signaling as an alternative pathway to estrogen-dependent growth. Changes in expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, levels of histone H3 modifications as well as significant restorations of both ERα expression and estrogen response by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further confirmed the epigenetic basis for estrogen-independent growth in these cells. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that chronic oxidative stress can convert estrogen-dependent nonaggressive breast cancer cells into estrogen-independent aggressive form potentially by epigenetic mechanism.

  1. Minireview: Obesity and breast cancer: the estrogen connection.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Margot P; Grossmann, Michael E

    2009-06-01

    There is now substantial evidence that overweight and/or obesity and/or weight gain are risk factors for the development of postmenopausal breast cancer. In addition, obesity and/or elevated body mass index at breast cancer diagnosis has a negative impact on prognosis for both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of how obesity affects the mammary tumorigenesis process is an important health issue. Elevated serum estrogen levels as well as enhanced local production of estrogen have been considered primary mediators of how increased body weight promotes breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Here, we provide an overview of estrogen's relationship with both obesity and breast cancer as separate entities. Human and relevant preclinical studies are cited. In addition, other growth factors that may be involved in this relationship are considered.

  2. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  3. The effects of soil and Trifolium repens (white clover) on the fate of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Kakumoto, Masumi; Sugahara, Masataka; Hamasaki, Tatsuhide; Umeda, Mikio; Fukui, Masami

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the behavior of estrogens in the rhizosphere of white clover (Trifolium repens, clover hereafter) with two different pot tests, using soil and agar as growth media. In a pot test using agar spiked with estrogen, the estrogen concentration in the agar with clover decreased to non-detectable levels within one month, while in the agar without clover, 60% of initially added estrogen remained after one month. The half-lives of estrone (E1) and 17beta -estradiol (E2) in the agar with clover were 2.4-3.8 and 13.2 d, respectively. The dissipation of E1 followed first-order rate law, while that of E2 fitted a zero-order reaction, indicating that they had different mechanisms of dissipation from agar. In the soil pot test, the behavior of E1 and E2 was not influenced by clover. An initial rapid decrease in the amount of estrogen extracted by methanol/acetic acid was followed by persistence for 1-3 months, regardless of presence of clover. Moreover, in three weeks E1 and E2 were only partly degraded by microbes extracted from the soil used in the pot test. In this study, abiotic degradation of estrogens and sorption of estrogen to soil, rather than the effects of soil microbes and clover, contributed to the initial rapid dissipation of estrogens in the soil. However, the results of the agar pot test suggested that vegetation such as clover may significantly contribute to removal of estrogens when estrogens in aqueous phase are discharged with surface runoff and preferential flow after heavy rain in agricultural fields, or when present in soils with low estrogen sorptivity.

  4. The effects of soil and Trifolium repens (white clover) on the fate of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Kakumoto, Masumi; Sugahara, Masataka; Hamasaki, Tatsuhide; Umeda, Mikio; Fukui, Masami

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the behavior of estrogens in the rhizosphere of white clover (Trifolium repens, clover hereafter) with two different pot tests, using soil and agar as growth media. In a pot test using agar spiked with estrogen, the estrogen concentration in the agar with clover decreased to non-detectable levels within one month, while in the agar without clover, 60% of initially added estrogen remained after one month. The half-lives of estrone (E1) and 17beta -estradiol (E2) in the agar with clover were 2.4-3.8 and 13.2 d, respectively. The dissipation of E1 followed first-order rate law, while that of E2 fitted a zero-order reaction, indicating that they had different mechanisms of dissipation from agar. In the soil pot test, the behavior of E1 and E2 was not influenced by clover. An initial rapid decrease in the amount of estrogen extracted by methanol/acetic acid was followed by persistence for 1-3 months, regardless of presence of clover. Moreover, in three weeks E1 and E2 were only partly degraded by microbes extracted from the soil used in the pot test. In this study, abiotic degradation of estrogens and sorption of estrogen to soil, rather than the effects of soil microbes and clover, contributed to the initial rapid dissipation of estrogens in the soil. However, the results of the agar pot test suggested that vegetation such as clover may significantly contribute to removal of estrogens when estrogens in aqueous phase are discharged with surface runoff and preferential flow after heavy rain in agricultural fields, or when present in soils with low estrogen sorptivity. PMID:19280482

  5. Marijuana: interaction with the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sauer, M A; Rifka, S M; Hawks, R L; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L

    1983-02-01

    Crude marijuana extract competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor of rat uterine cytosol. Condensed marijuana smoke also competed with estradiol for its receptor. Pure delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, however, did not interact with the estrogen receptor. Ten delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites also failed to compete with estradiol for its receptor. Of several other common cannabinoids tested, only cannabidiol showed any estrogen receptor binding. This was evident only at very high concentrations of cannabidiol. Apigenin, the aglycone of a flavinoid phytoestrogen found in cannabis, displayed high affinity for the estrogen receptor. To assess the biological significance of these receptor data, estrogen activity was measured in vivo with the uterine growth bioassay, using immature rats. Cannabis extract in large doses exhibited neither estrogenic nor antiestrogenic effects. Thus, although estrogen receptor binding activity was observed in crude marijuana extract, marijuana smoke condensate and several known components of cannabis, direct estrogenic activity of cannabis extract could not be demonstrated in vivo.

  6. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  7. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Estrogen-alone hormone therapy does not increase the risk of ...

  8. Rapid Actions of Xenoestrogens Disrupt Normal Estrogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.

    2014-01-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (eg. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (eg. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα ) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, Bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities. PMID:24269739

  9. Homeostasis imbalance in the endometrium of women with implantation defects: the role of estrogen and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Lessey, Bruce A; Young, Steven L

    2014-09-01

    Embryo implantation is regulated by an inflammatory process in response to sequential exposure to estrogen and progesterone, followed by resolution and repair. The actions of estrogen and progesterone on these inflammatory processes are tightly and reciprocally controlled through regulated expression of steroid receptors, cofactors, chaperone proteins, and downstream signaling components. In endometriosis, the inflammatory cascades, normally seen at menstruation, are prematurely activated and endogenous endometrial mechanisms of inflammation resolution appear defective. The temporally abnormally inflammation is also associated with an imbalance between estrogen and progesterone actions; the normal luteal-phase dominance of progesterone action appears to be lost and is replaced by progesterone resistance and estrogen dominance. In this review, we examine these relationships in greater detail and argue that estrogen action is a prime target for future therapeutic solutions to endometriosis and implantation failure that result from this chronic, inflammatory disease. PMID:24959818

  10. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  11. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  12. Gene Expression Responses in Male Fathead Minnows Exposed to Binary Mixtures of an Estrogen and Antiestrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are continuously exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, many of which can interfere with their endocrine system, resulting in impaired reproduction, development or survival, among others. In order to analyze the effects and mechanisms of action of estrogen...

  13. A2A adenosine-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery involves protein kinase C activation and betagamma subunits formed after alpha2-adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Paula; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Kunc, Filip; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2007-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of alpha2-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2A-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery, namely the type of G-protein involved in this effect and the step or steps where the signalling cascades triggered by alpha2-adrenoceptors and A2A-receptors interact. The selective adenosine A2A-receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxy ethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 100 nM) enhanced tritium overflow evoked by trains of 100 pulses at 5 Hz. This effect was abolished by the selective adenosine A2A-receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenyl ethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261; 20 nM) and by yohimbine (1 microM). CGS 21680-mediated effects were also abolished by drugs that disrupted G(i/o)-protein coupling with receptors, PTX (2 microg/ml) or NEM (40 microM), by the anti-G(salpha) peptide (2 microg/ml) anti-G(betagamma) peptide (10 microg/ml) indicating coupling of A2A-receptors to G(salpha) and suggesting a crucial role for G(betagamma) subunits in the A(2A)-receptor-mediated enhancement of tritium overflow. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 1 microM) or forskolin (1 microM), direct activators of protein kinase C and of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, also enhanced tritium overflow. In addition, PMA-mediated effects were not observed in the presence of either yohimbine or PTX. Results indicate that facilitatory adenosine A2A-receptors couple to G(salpha) subunits which is essential, but not sufficient, for the release facilitation to occur, requiring the involvement of G(i/o)-protein coupling (it disappears after disruption of G(i/o)-protein coupling, PTX or NEM) and/or G(betagamma) subunits (anti-G(betagamma)). We propose a mechanism for the interaction in study suggesting group 2 AC isoforms as a plausible candidate for the interaction site, as these isoforms can integrate inputs from G

  14. Blocking Estrogen Signaling After the Hormone: Pyrimidine-Core Inhibitors of Estrogen Receptor-Coactivator Binding

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Alexander A.; Gunther, Jillian R.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative approach to blocking estrogen action, we have developed small molecules that directly disrupt the key estrogen receptor (ER)/coactivator interaction necessary for gene activation. The more direct, protein-protein nature of this disruption might be effective even in hormone-refractory breast cancer. We have synthesized a pyrimidine-core library of moderate size, members of which act as α-helix mimics to block ERα/coactivator interaction. Structure- activity relationships have been explored with various C, N, O and S-substituents on the pyrimidine core. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer and cell-based reporter gene assays show that the most active members inhibit the ERα/steroid receptor coactivator interaction with Ki’s in the low micromolar range. Through these studies, we have obtained a refined pharmacophore model for activity in this pyrimidine series. Furthermore, the favorable activities of several of these compounds support the feasibility that this coactivator binding inhibition mechanism for blocking estrogen action might provide a potential alternative approach to endocrine therapy. PMID:18785725

  15. Estrogen Signalling and the Metabolic Syndrome: Targeting the Hepatic Estrogen Receptor Alpha Action

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Marko; Bryzgalova, Galyna; Gao, Hui; Antonson, Per; Humire, Patricia; Omoto, Yoko; Portwood, Neil; Pram