Science.gov

Sample records for estuaries estuarine processes

  1. Second international symposium on the biogeochemistry of model estuaries: Estuarine processes in global change

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report consists of abstracts of papers presented at the symposium of Biogeochemistry. The main topics discussed at the meeting are; nutrient and mineral cycling, trace element distribution, sources and sinks of estuaries, sedimentation, importance of organic matter, and other biogeochemical processes of estuaries.

  2. Second International Symposium on the Biogeochemistry of Model Estuaries: Estuarine processes in global change. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Windom, H.L.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes estuary events discussed at the symposium on biogeochemistry. Topics include; sedimentation, salinity, inputs and outputs of the estuary, effects of global change, and the need for effective sampling and modeling of estuaries.

  3. Modeling centuries of estuarine morphodynamics in the Western Scheldt estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, G.; Wegen, M.; Labeur, R. J.; Roelvink, D.

    2016-04-01

    We hindcast a 110 year period (1860-1970) of morphodynamic behavior of the Western Scheldt estuary by means of a 2-D, high-resolution, process-based model and compare results to a historically unique bathymetric data set. Initially, the model skill decreases for a few decades. Against common perception, the model skill increases after that to become excellent after 110 years. We attribute this to the self-organization of the morphological system which is reproduced correctly by the numerical model. On time scales exceeding decades, the interaction between the major tidal forcing and the confinement of the estuary overrules other uncertainties. Both measured and modeled bathymetries reflect a trend of decreasing energy dissipation, less morphodynamic activity, and thus a more stable morphology over time, albeit that the estuarine adaptation time is long (approximately centuries). Process-based models applied in confined environments and under constant forcing conditions may perform well especially on long (greater than decades) time scales.

  4. The effects of estuarine processes on the fluxes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dianjun; Zhang, Longjun; Jiang, Liqing

    2009-12-01

    Riverine carbon flux is an important component of the global carbon cycle. The spatial and temporal variations of organic and inorganic carbon were examined during both dry and wet seasons in the Yellow River estuary. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Yellow River during dry seasons were higher than those during wet seasons. The effective concentrations of DOC (CDOC*) were higher than the observed DOC at zero salinity. This input of DOC in the Yellow River estuary was due to sediment desorption processes in low salinity regions. In contrast to DOC, the effective concentrations of DIC were 10% lower than the DIC measured at freshwater end, and the loss of DIC was caused by CaCO3 precipitation in low salinity region. Particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) contents of the particles stabilized to constant values (0.5%±0.05% and 1.8%±0.2%, respectively) within the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) and showed no noticeable seasonal variations. A rapid drop of PIC and rise of POC occurred simultaneously outside the TMZ due to an intense dilution of riverine inorganic-rich particles being transported into a pool of aquatic organic-poor particles outside the TMZ. Annually, the Yellow River transported 6.95×105 t of DIC, 0.64×105 t of DOC, 78.58×105 t of PIC and 2.29×105 t of POC to the sea.

  5. An 'extreme' future for estuaries? Effects of extreme climatic events on estuarine water quality and ecology.

    PubMed

    Wetz, Michael S; Yoskowitz, David W

    2013-04-15

    Recent climate observations suggest that extreme climatic events (ECE; droughts, floods, tropical cyclones, heat waves) have increased in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions, consistent with climate model projections that account for man's influence on the global climate system. A synthesis of existing literature is presented and shows that ECE affect estuarine water quality by altering: (1) the delivery and processing of nutrients and organic matter, (2) physical-chemical properties of estuaries, and (3) ecosystem structure and function. From the standpoint of estuarine scientists and resource managers, a major scientific challenge will be to project the estuarine response to ECE that will co-occur with other important environmental changes (i.e., natural climate variability, global warming, sea level rise, eutrophication), as this will affect the provisioning of important ecosystem services provided by estuaries.

  6. Infilling of the Hudson River Estuary During the Late Holocene (3000ka to Present): Implications for Estuarine Stratigraphic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Pekar, S. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Carbotte, S.; Bell, R.; Burckle, L.

    2002-12-01

    accumulating in coastal bays (Sandy Hook, New Jersey) and on the inner shelf, and sediment export to the Hudson Shelf Valley on the mid-shelf is nearly non-existent, with sediments dated at 14ka from 14-C on the outer shelf. Additionally, anthropogenic activities (construction of bridges and dredging) alter sedimentation patterns in the estuary leading to continued localized erosion and deposition. For example, sediment export onto the shelf is taking place, not by natural processes but by dredging. The variability documented for the HRE indicates that although estuarine and stratigraphic models provide a framework for continental margin studies, the models need to be interpreted, taking into consideration these factors.

  7. Large-scale spatial patterns in estuaries: estuarine macrobenthic communities in the Schelde estuary, NW Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P. M. J.; Meire, P.; Craeymeersch, J.; Verbeek, H.; Heip, C. H. R.

    2003-05-01

    Few macrobenthic studies have dealt simultaneously with the two major gradients in estuarine benthic habitats: the salinity gradient along the estuary (longitudinal) and the gradients from high intertidal to deep subtidal sites (vertical gradient). In this broad-scale study, a large data set (3112 samples) of the Schelde estuary allowed a thorough analysis of these gradients, and to relate macrobenthic species distributions and community structure to salinity, depth, current velocities and sediment characteristics. Univariate analyses clearly revealed distinct gradients in diversity, abundance, and biomass along the vertical and longitudinal gradients. In general, highest diversity and biomass were observed in the intertidal, polyhaline zone and decreased with decreasing salinity. Abundance did not show clear trends and varied between spring and autumn. In all regions, very low values for all measures were observed in the subtidal depth strata. Abundance in all regions was dominated by both surface deposit feeders and sub-surface deposit feeders. In contrast, the biomass of the different feeding guilds showed clear gradients in the intertidal zone. Suspension feeders dominated in the polyhaline zone and showed a significant decrease with decreasing salinity. Surface deposit feeders and sub-surface deposit feeders showed significantly higher biomass values in the polyhaline zone as compared with the mesohaline zone. Omnivores showed an opposite trend. Multivariate analyses showed a strong relationship between the macrobenthic assemblages and the predominant environmental gradients in the Schelde estuary. The most important environmental factor was depth, which reflected also the hydrodynamic conditions (current velocities). A second gradient was related to salinity and confirms the observations from the univariate analyses. Additionally, sediment characteristics (mud content) explained a significant part of the macrobenthic community structure not yet explained by

  8. Development of an estuarine assessment scheme for the management of a highly urbanised catchment/estuary system, Sydney estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Gunns, T J; Chapman, D; Harrison, D

    2016-05-01

    As coastal populations increase, considerable pressures are exerted on estuarine environments. Recently, there has been a trend towards the development and use of estuarine assessment schemes as a decision support tool in the management of these environments. These schemes offer a method by which complex environmental data is converted into a readily understandable and communicable format for informed decision making and effective distribution of limited management resources. Reliability and effectiveness of these schemes are often limited due to a complex assessment framework, poor data management and use of ineffective environmental indicators. The current scheme aims to improve reliability in the reporting of estuarine condition by including a concise assessment framework, employing high-value indicators and, in a unique approach, employing fuzzy logic in indicator evaluation. Using Sydney estuary as a case study, each of the 15 sub-catchment/sub-estuary systems were assessed using the current scheme. Results identified that poor sediment quality was a significant issue in Blackwattle/Rozelle Bay, Iron Cove and Hen and Chicken Bay while poor water quality was of particular concern in Duck River, Homebush Bay and the Parramatta River. Overall results of the assessment scheme were used to prioritise the management of each sub-catchment/sub-estuary assessed with Blackwattle/Rozelle Bay, Homebush Bay, Iron Cove and Duck River considered to be in need of a high priority management response. A report card format, using letter grades, was employed to convey the results of the assessment in a readily understood manner to estuarine managers and members of the public. Letter grades also provide benchmarking and performance monitoring ability, allowing estuarine managers to set improvement targets and assesses the effectiveness of management strategies. The current assessment scheme provides an effective, integrated and consistent assessment of estuarine health and

  9. Estimating tidal current amplitudes outside estuaries and characterizing the zone of estuarine tidal influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2008-02-01

    Tidal currents within many estuaries are stronger than on the adjacent continental shelf. Estuarine tidal influence extends onto the shelf elevating tidal amplitudes above ambient shelf levels over a region outside the estuary. In this paper, a kinematic theory that describes tidal flow in these estuary-shelf tidal interaction zones is derived and tested. Using these results, tidal current amplitudes outside estuaries are estimated and the range and intensity of estuarine tidal influence is characterized. The estimates for the tidal current amplitudes ( utide) of the dominant constituent are appropriate for linear or weakly nonlinear systems with predominantly barotropic tides; the ratio of tidal height to water depth is small ( η/ h≪1) in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes. Within tidal interaction zones, the tidal current amplitude is composed of an ambient shelf part ( ua) and an estuary-induced part ( ue). The characteristic shelf amplitude far from the estuary is used to set ua. Continuity arguments indicate that ue (averaged over a control volume arc centered on the mouth with radius r and a swath angle of γπ) approximately equals the ratio of the tidal volume flux through the mouth ( Vm) and the cross-sectional area of any control volume arc (u≈V/γπrh¯). This approximation holds where the squared product of the tidal wave number and radial distance is small: ( kr) 2≪1. For a shelf with constant slope α and small coastal wall depth, the arc-averaged depth is h¯≈sr (where s=2 α/ pi for γ=1). For this shelf bathymetry, ue decays with squared radial distance from the estuary mouth. Theoretical predictions are consistent with observed tidal current amplitudes outside the Delaware Bay and Block Island Sound. In both test cases, the estimated and observed amplitudes exhibit an r-2 dependence and decay over a similar distance. The relative importance of estuarine tidal influence is assessed with the tidal interaction index ( Ti= ue/ ua). The

  10. Principal processes within the estuarine salinity gradient: a review.

    PubMed

    Telesh, Irena V; Khlebovich, Vladislav V

    2010-01-01

    The salinity gradient is one of the main features characteristic of any estuarine ecosystem. Within this gradient in a critical salinity range of 5-8 PSU the major biotic and abiotic processes demonstrate non-linear dynamics of change in rates and directions. In estuaries, this salinity range acts as both external ecological factor and physiological characteristics of internal environment of aquatic organisms; it divides living conditions appropriate for freshwater and marine faunas, separates invertebrate communities with different osmotic regulation types, and defines the distribution range of high taxa. In this paper, the non-linearity of biotic processes within the estuarine salinity gradient is illustrated by the data on zooplankton from the Baltic estuaries. The non-tidal Baltic Sea provides a good demonstration of the above phenomena due to gradual changes of environmental factors and relatively stable isohalines. The non-linearity concept coupled with the ecosystem approach served the basis for a new definition of an estuary proposed by the authors. PMID:20304437

  11. Residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi, a monsoonal estuary: A three-dimensional model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijith, V.; Shetye, S. R.; Baetens, K.; Luyten, P.; Michael, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    Observations in the Mandovi estuary, located on the central west coast of India, have shown that the salinity field in this estuary is remarkably time-dependent and passes through all possible states of stratification (riverine, highly-stratified, partially-mixed and well-mixed) during a year as the runoff into the estuary varies from high values (∼1000 m3 s-1) in the wet season to negligible values (∼1 m3 s-1) at end of the dry season. The time-dependence is forced by the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and hence the estuary is referred to as a monsoonal estuary. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional, open source, hydrodynamic, numerical model to reproduce the observed annual salinity field in the Mandovi. We then analyse the model results to define characteristics of residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi. Our motivation to study this aspect of the Mandovi's dynamics is derived from the following three considerations. First, residual circulation is important to long-term evolution of an estuary; second, we need to understand how this circulation responds to strongly time-dependent runoff forcing experienced by a monsoonal estuary; and third, Mandovi is among the best studied estuaries that come under the influence of ISM, and has observations that can be used to validate the model. Our analysis shows that the residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi shows four distinct phases during a year: a river like flow that is oriented downstream throughout the estuary; a salt-wedge type circulation, with flow into the estuary near the bottom and out of the estuary near the surface restricted close to the mouth of the estuary; circulation associated with a partially-mixed estuary; and, the circulation associated with a well-mixed estuary. Dimensional analysis of the field of residual circulation helped us to establish the link between strength of residual circulation at a location and magnitude of river runoff and rate of mixing at the location. We then

  12. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. ...

  13. DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF BURROWING SHRIMP IN TWO OREGON ESTUARIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ESTUARINE-SCALE NITROGEN DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of Pacific estuarine tide flats, from British Columbia to Baja California. The spatial distribution of shrimp populations within estuaries has rarely been quantified because ...

  14. Recruitment of flatfish species to an estuarine nursery habitat (Lima estuary, NW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Sandra; Ré, Pedro; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2010-11-01

    One of the present concerns of fish biologists involves defining and identifying nursery habitats in the context of conservation and resource management strategies. Fish nursery studies usually report upon nursery occupation during the latter juvenile stages, despite the fact that recruitment to nurseries can start early in life, during the larval phase. Here we investigated the use of a temperate estuarine nursery area, the Lima estuary (NW Portugal), by initial development stages of flatfish species before and after metamorphosis, integrating the larval and juvenile phases. The Lima estuarine flatfish community comprised twelve taxa, seven of which were present as pelagic larvae, six as juveniles and three as adults. There was a general trend of increasing spring-summer abundance of both larvae and juveniles, followed by a sharp winter decrease, mainly of larval flatfishes. The Lima estuary was used by Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus and Solea solea as a nursery area, with direct settlement for the two first species. In contrast, indirect settlement was suggested for S. solea, with metamorphosis occurring outside the estuarine area. Estuarine recruitment of S. senegalensis varied between years, with young larvae occurring in the estuary throughout a prolonged period that lasted 6-9 months, corroborating the protracted spawning season. P. flesus, the second most abundant species, exhibited a typical spring estuarine recruitment, without inter-annual variations. Developed larvae arrived in the estuary during spring, whereas the 0-group juveniles emerged in the following summer period. The present study contributes new insight to our understanding of the economically important S. senegalensis, and highlights the importance of integrating the planktonic larval phase into traditional flatfish nursery studies.

  15. Utilization of organic matter by invertebrates along an estuarine gradient in an intermittently open estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschlager, Agnes D.; Matthews, Ty G.; Quinn, Gerry P.

    2014-08-01

    In intermittently open estuaries, the sources of organic matter sustaining benthic invertebrates are likely to vary seasonally, particularly between periods of connection and disconnection with the ocean and higher and lower freshwater flows. This study investigated the contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous primary production to the diet of representative invertebrate species using stable isotope analysis (SIA) during the austral summer and winter (2008, 2009) in an intermittently open estuary on the south-eastern coast of Australia. As the study was conducted towards the end of a prolonged period of drought, a reduced influence of freshwater/terrestrial organic matter was expected. Sampling was conducted along an estuarine gradient, including upper, middle and lower reaches and showed that the majority of assimilated organic matter was derived from autochthonous estuarine food sources. Additionally, there was an input of allochthonous organic matter, which varied along the length of the estuary, indicated by distinct longitudinal trends in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures along the estuarine gradient. Marine seaweed contributed to invertebrate diets in the lower reaches of the estuary, while freshwater/terrestrial organic matter had increased influence in the upper reaches. Suspension-feeding invertebrates derived large parts of their diet from freshwater/terrestrial material, despite flows being greatly reduced in comparison with non-drought years.

  16. Fish trophic structure in estuaries, with particular emphasis on estuarine typology and zoogeography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T D; Whitfield, A K

    2012-11-01

    A comparative analysis of the fish trophic structure was undertaken on some 190 South African estuaries spanning three zoogeographic regions and incorporating three broad estuarine types. Fish biomass trophic guild compositions and biomass trophic spectrum profiles were analysed using multivariate statistical techniques and included both inter-regional (zoogeographic) and intra-regional (estuarine typology) comparisons. Differences in the fish trophic structure of the various estuary types within each zoogeographic region were observed; these were linked to the relative biomass contribution of the various trophic guilds and also to differences in biomass trophic spectrum profiles of the fishes in each estuary type within each region. In spite of these differences in trophic structure, all estuaries were dominated by detritivores, which suggests that the main food source (detritus) is similar in all biogeographic regions. Preliminary indications are that a similar dependence by estuary-associated fishes on detritus food sources exists on a global basis but that detailed studies are required in order to confirm this assertion.

  17. Estuarine habitat utilization by birds in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of bird species are highly dependent on intertidal wetland habitats. Because of this dependency, birds are viewed as important indicators of wetland structure and function. Wetlands in Yaquina Bay along with the tidal wetlands in other Pacific coastal estuaries r...

  18. Using a Laboratory Simulator in the Teaching and Study of Chemical Processes in Estuarine Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Luque, E.; Ortega, T.; Forja, J. M.; Gomez-Parra, A.

    2004-01-01

    The teaching of Chemical Oceanography in the Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences of the University of Cadiz (Spain) has been improved since 1994 by the employment of a device for the laboratory simulation of estuarine mixing processes and the characterisation of the chemical behaviour of many substances that pass through an estuary. The…

  19. Influence of estuarine processes on spatiotemporal variation in bioavailable selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.; Elrick, Kent A.; Carter, James L.; van der Wegen, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes (physical, chemical and biological) challenge our ability to quantify and manage the ecological risk of chemical contaminants in estuarine environments. Selenium (Se) bioavailability (defined by bioaccumulation), stable isotopes and molar carbon-tonitrogen ratios in the benthic clam Potamocorbula amurensis, an important food source for predators, were determined monthly for 17 yr in northern San Francisco Bay. Se concentrations in the clams ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 μg g-1 over space and time. Little of that variability was stochastic, however. Statistical analyses and preliminary hydrodynamic modeling showed that a constant mid-estuarine input of Se, which was dispersed up- and down-estuary by tidal currents, explained the general spatial patterns in accumulated Se among stations. Regression of Se bioavailability against river inflows suggested that processes driven by inflows were the primary driver of seasonal variability. River inflow also appeared to explain interannual variability but within the range of Se enrichment established at each station by source inputs. Evaluation of risks from Se contamination in estuaries requires the consideration of spatial and temporal variability on multiple scales and of the processes that drive that variability.

  20. Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-15

    A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

  1. Growth and decline of shoreline industry in Sydney estuary (Australia) and influence on adjacent estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Lean, J; Gunns, T

    2015-06-01

    Sydney estuary (Australia), like many urbanised waterways, is degraded due to an extended history of anthropogenic activity. Two major sources of contamination to this estuary are discharge by former shoreline industries and historic and contemporary catchment stormwater. The objectives of the present study were to document changes in shoreline land use from European settlement to the present day and determine the influence of this trend on the metal content of adjacent estuarine sediments. Temporal analysis of land use for seven time horizons between 1788 and 2010 showed rapid expansion of industry along much of the Sydney estuary foreshore soon after European settlement due to the benefits of easy and inexpensive access and readily available water for cooling and power. Shoreline industry attained maximum development in 1978 (32-km length) and declined rapidly to the present-day (9-km length) through redevelopment of industrial sites into medium- to high-density, high-value residential housing. Cores taken adjacent to 11 long-term industrial sites showed that past industrial practices contributed significantly to contamination of estuarine sediment. Subsurface metal concentrations were up to 35 times that of present-day surface sediment and over 100 times greater than natural background concentrations. Sedimentation rates for areas adjacent to shoreline industry were between 0.6 and 2.5 cm/year, and relaxation times were estimated at 50 to 100 years. Natural relaxation and non-disturbance of sediments may be the best management practice in most locations.

  2. National estuarine inventory: Classified shellfish growing waters by estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Broutman, M.A.; Leonard, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The report is the first in a series of reports that compile information on classified shellfish waters as an indicator of coliform bacteria pollution in the Nation's estuaries. Data for the report have been derived from the 1985 National Shellfish Register. Although the Register has provided consistent data on acreage of classified shellfish waters by state, use of it as a national water-quality indicator has been hindered because of the influence of factors other than water quality on classification. The report improves the 1985 Register data by: (1) reorganizing data into 92 estuaries on the East, West, and Gulf coasts that comprise the National Estuarine Inventory, and (2) correcting data for areas that were classified for reasons other than water quality.

  3. Modelling of cohesive sediment dynamics in tidal estuarine systems: Case study of Tagus estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, G.; Pinto, L.; Ascione, I.; Mateus, M.; Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P.; Neves, R.

    2014-12-01

    Cohesive sediment dynamics in estuarine systems is a major issue in water quality and engineering problems. Numerical models can help to assess the complex dynamics of cohesive sediments, integrating the information collected in monitoring studies. Following a numerical approach we investigated the main factors that influence the cohesive sediment dynamics in an estuarine system composed of large mudflats (Tagus estuary, Portugal). After a spin up period of the bottom layer and considering the combined effect of waves and currents on the bottom shear stress, the dynamics of cohesive sediment during the fortnightly and daily erosion-sedimentation cycle was properly reproduced by the model. The results of cohesive suspended sediments were validated with data from sixteen monitoring stations located along the estuary and turbidity data measured by two multiparametric probes. The hydrodynamics were previously validated by harmonic analysis and with ADCP data. Although tidal currents are the major cause of cohesive sediment erosion, the results suggest that wind waves also play an important role. The simulated sediment mass involved in the fortnightly tidal cycle was in the same order of magnitude of the annual load from the rivers, as observed in previous studies based on field data.

  4. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  5. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation and Ecology: Examples from Varved Sediments of the Pettaquanscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and lakes are undergoing anthropogenic alterations as development and industry intensify in the modern world. Assessing the ecological health of such water bodies is difficult because accurate accounts of pre-anthropogenic estuarine/lacustrine conditions do not exist. S...

  6. Microalgal productivity in an estuarine lake during a drought cycle: The St. Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan S.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-03-01

    The St. Lucia estuarine lake on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the largest estuarine systems in Africa and of unique importance for the adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The area regularly experiences periods of drought, resulting in hypersaline conditions in its shallow lakes and the closure of the estuarine mouth. This study aimed to assess the primary production rates of phytoplankton and microphytobenthos throughout an annual cycle of this drought phase. Primary production rates were assessed at representative sites, namely the Mouth, Narrows, South and North Lakes from June 2006 to May 2007. Because of the drought, the salinity gradient from the mouth to the head of the estuary was reversed by comparison to estuarine systems with a steady freshwater inflow and regular marine exchange. In March 2007, during the study, the mouth opened as a result of rough seas, and the marine influence broke the existing reversed gradient, producing a marine salinity throughout the system. Microphytobenthic primary productivity varied between 0 and 34 mg C m -2 h -1 and showed strong correlations with salinity, DIN:DIP ratios and irradiance. Benthic productivity was high across the system after breaching of the mouth. Pelagic primary productivity (between 0 and 180 mg C m -2 h -1), showed a correlation with temperature and irradiance and was highest across the system in February 2007 when the mouth was still closed. There was no significant correlation between production rates and biomass (chl-a) in either the benthic or pelagic habitats. The negative correlation between DIN:DIP ratio and benthic primary productivity indicated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. This study shows that salinity, along with seasonally dependent parameters such as temperature and irradiance, correlates with the rate of microalgal production. Hence, in these shallow lakes, the largest primary productivity can occur in either the pelagic or benthic

  7. Estuarine research; an annotated bibliography of selected literature, with emphasis on the Hudson River estuary, New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embree, William N.; Wiltshire, Denise A.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 177 selected publications on water movement in estuaries, particularly the Hudson River estuary, are compiled for reference in Hudson River studies. Subjects represented are the hydraulic, chemical, and physical characteristics of estuarine waters, estuarine modeling techniques, and methods of water-data collection and analysis. Summaries are presented in five categories: Hudson River estuary studies; hydrodynamic-model studies; water-quality-model studies; reports on data-collection equipment and methods; and bibliographies, literature reviews, conference proceedings, and textbooks. An author index is included. Omitted are most works published before 1965, environmental-impact statements, theses and dissertations, policy or planning reports, regional or economic reports, ocean studies, studies based on physical models, and foreign studies. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary in response to river input changes and estuarine engineering projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Hua Long; Ding, Ping Xing; Wang, Zheng Bing; Ge, Jian Zhong; Yang, Shi Lun

    2016-07-01

    The Yangtze Estuary in China has been intensively influenced by human activities including altered river and sediment discharges in its catchment and local engineering projects in the estuary over the past half century. River sediment discharge has significantly decreased since the 1980s because of upstream dam construction and water-soil conservation. We analyzed bathymetric data from the Yangtze Estuary between 1958 and 2010 and divided the entire estuary into two sections: inner estuary and mouth bar area. The deposition and erosion pattern exhibited strong temporal and spatial variations. The inner estuary and mouth bar area underwent different changes. The inner estuary was altered from sedimentation to erosion primarily at an intermediate depth (5-15 m) along with river sediment decline. In contrast, the mouth bar area showed continued accretion throughout the study period. The frequent river floods during the 1990s and simultaneously decreasing river sediment probably induced the peak erosion of the inner estuary in 1986-1997. We conclude that both sediment discharge and river flood events played important roles in the decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary. Regarding the dredged sediment, the highest net accretion rate occurred in the North Passage where jetties and groins were constructed to regulate the navigation channel in 1997-2010. In this period, the jetties induced enhanced deposition at the East Hengsha Mudflat and the high accretion rate within the mouth bar area was maintained. The impacts of estuarine engineering projects on morphological change extended beyond their sites.

  9. Impact of boat generated waves over an estuarine intertidal zone of the Seine estuary (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloffre, Julien; Lafite, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Water movements in macrotidal estuaries are controlled by the tidal regime modulated seasonally by the fluvial discharge. Wind effect on hydrodynamics and sediment transport is also reported at the mouth. Besides estuaries are frequently man altered our knowledge on the human impact on hydrodynamics and sediment transport is less extended. As an example on the Seine estuary (France) port authorities have put emphasis on facilitating economic exchanges by means of embankment building and increased dredging activity over the last century. These developments led to secure sea vessel traffic in the Seine estuary but they also resulted in a change of estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport features. Consequences of boat generated waves are varied: increased water turbidity and sediment transfer, release of nutrient and contaminants in the water column, harmful to users, ecosystems and infrastructures generating important maintenance spending. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of boat generated waves on sediment transport over an intertidal area. The studied site is located on the left bank in the fluvial part of the Seine estuary. On this site the maximum tidal range ranges between 1.25 and 3.5m respectively during neap and spring tide. The sampling strategy is based on continuous ADV acquisition at 4Hz coupled with turbidimeter and altimeter measurements (1 measurement every minute) in order to decipher sediment dynamics during one year. Our results indicate that sediment dynamics are controlled by river flow while medium term scale evolution is dependent on tidal range and short term dynamics on sea-vessels waves. 64% of boat passages generated significant sediment reworking (from few mm.min-1 to 3cm.min-1). This reworking rate is mainly controlled by two parameters: (i) water height on the site and (ii) vessels characteristics; in particular the distance between seabed and keel that generate a Bernoulli wave (with maximum amplitude of 0.6m

  10. Alternative nursery habitat for estuarine associated marine fish during prolonged closure of the St Lucia estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, Leon; Cyrus, Digby P.

    2009-10-01

    The Mfolozi estuary, located on the east coast of South Africa, was historically directly linked to the adjacent St Lucia estuarine system, the largest estuarine system in Africa and a World Heritage Site. The Mfolozi used to be the main feeder system to maintain lake levels in St Lucia, but increased siltation from sugar cane farming in the Mfolozi floodplain led to artificial separation of the two systems in 1950. Reduced freshwater inflow due to drought conditions caused the St Lucia mouth to remain closed from June 2002 to present, coinciding with low lake levels and hypersaline conditions, except for a brief period during 2007 after the St Lucia mouth breached. These conditions led to disruption of larval recruitment into the system and major changes in biotic communities. Due to the importance of the St Lucia - Mfolozi System link, a study was initiated in 2007 on the fish community of the Mfolozi system, which was sampled using seine and gill nets. The 48 species recorded were dominated by juveniles of marine spawners, particularly Leiognathus equula and Valamugil cunnesius and the estuarine spawners Ambassis dussumieri and Ambassis natalensis. Estuarine dependent marine spawning species formed 68% of both the species numbers and CPUE, an indication of the regional importance of the Mfolozi estuary as an alternate refuge for juvenile marine fish during periods when the St Lucia system remained closed. Post-larval recruits of marine spawning species were particularly abundant, but low zoobenthic densities caused a rapid decline in numbers of benthic feeders shortly after their recruitment into the system. The importance of the Mfolozi estuary in maintaining marine brood stocks of estuarine dependent marine fish is discussed with particular reference to estuarine degradation and the ecological integrity of the St Lucia system.

  11. Impacts of sea-level rise on estuarine circulation: An idealized estuary and San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Vivien P.; Xu, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Estuaries lie at the interface of land and sea, and are particularly vulnerable to sea-level rise due to climate change that might lead to intrusion of salt water further upstream and affect circulation patterns. Climate change is also likely to have a major impact on hydrological cycles and consequently lead to changes in freshwater inflows into estuaries. An idealized estuary model is employed to investigate the effects of sea-level rise and freshwater inflows on estuarine circulation. Rising sea levels result in a stronger longitudinal salinity gradient ∂s/∂x, indicating an increase in the strength of the gravitational circulation UGC, higher longitudinal dispersion coefficients K and enhanced salinity intrusion. Under low-flow conditions, the effects of sea level rise on salinity intrusion are largest because sea-level rise has a greater impact due to weaker vertical stratification. Strong flows increase the strength of the gravitational circulation, resulting in higher vertical stratification, which leads to the nonlinear feedback between vertical mixing and stratification. The effect of sea-level rise on salinity intrusion is reduced owing to the suppression of mixing by stratification. Supporting three-dimensional simulations from northern San Francisco Bay are presented. The intrusion length scale L is used as a substitute for regulating inflows to ensure that sufficient fresh water is available to flush the Bay. Following a set of standards explicitly stated in the 1994 Bay-Delta Accord, a series of simulations is performed and we find that with sea-level rise stronger inflows are required to maintain L at the proposed locations.

  12. Coevolution of hydraulic, soil and vegetation processes in estuarine wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivisonno, Franco; Rodriguez, Jose F.; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia; Stenta, Hernan

    2014-05-01

    Estuarine wetlands of south eastern Australia, typically display a vegetation zonation with a sequence mudflats - mangrove forest - saltmarsh plains from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient. Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitats for fish and many terrestrial species. They also have a carbon sequestration capacity that surpasess terrestrial forest. Estuarine wetlands respond to sea-level rise by vertical accretion and horizontal landward migration, in order to maintain their position in the tidal frame. In situations in which buffer areas for landward migration are not available, saltmarsh can be lost due to mangrove encroachment. As a result of mangrove invasion associated in part with raising estuary water levels and urbanisation, coastal saltmarsh in parts of south-eastern Australia has been declared an endangered ecological community. Predicting estuarine wetlands response to sea-level rise requires modelling the coevolving dynamics of water flow, soil and vegetation. This paper presents preliminary results of our recently developed numerical model for wetland dynamics in wetlands of the Hunter estuary of NSW. The model simulates continuous tidal inflow into the wetland, and accounts for the effect of varying vegetation types on flow resistance. Coevolution effects appear as vegetation types are updated based on their preference to prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. The model also considers that accretion values vary with vegetation type. Simulations are driven using local information collected over several years, which includes estuary water levels, accretion rates, soil carbon content, flow resistance and vegetation preference to hydraulic conditions. Model results predict further saltmarsh loss under current conditions of moderate increase of estuary water levels.

  13. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes and associated contribution to nitrogen removal in sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fengyu; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Chen, Fei; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), play an important role in controlling the nitrate dynamics and fate in estuarine and coastal environments. We investigated potential rates of denitrification, ANAMMOX, and DNRA in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary via slurry incubation experiments combined with isotope-tracing techniques to reveal their respective contributions to total nitrate reduction in this hypereutrophic estuarine ecosystem. Measured rates of denitrification, ANAMMOX, and DNRA ranged from 0.06 to 4.51 µmol N kg-1 h-1, 0.01 to 0.52 µmol N kg-1 h-1, and 0.03 to 0.89 µmol N kg-1 h-1, respectively. These potential dissimilatory nitrate reduction process rates correlated significantly with salinity, sulfide, organic carbon, and nitrogen. Denitrification contributed 38-96% total nitrate reduction in the Yangtze Estuary, as compared to 3-45% for DNRA and 1-36% for ANAMMOX. In total, the denitrification and ANAMMOX processes removed approximately 25% of the external inorganic nitrogen transported annually into the estuary. In contrast, most external inorganic nitrogen was retained in the estuary and contributes substantially to the severe eutrophication of the Yangtze Estuary.

  14. Radionuclide tracers for the fate of metals in the Savannah estuary: River-ocean exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Thein, M.; Larsen, I.L.; Byrd, J.T.; Windom, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium-238 from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant labels riverborne particles, providing a unique opportunity for examining the fate of metals in estuaries and for tracing river-ocean exchange processes. Results indicate that plutonium and lead-210 are enriched on estuarine particles and that inputs of plutonium from oceanic sources greatly exceed inputs from riverborne or drainage-basin sources as far upstream as the landward limit of seawater penetration. We suggest that these radionuclides (and other chemically reactive metals) are being scavenged from oceanic water by sorption onto particles in turbid estuarine and coastal areas. Since estuaries, bays, mangroves, and intertidal areas serve as effective traps for fine particles and associated trace substances, these results have important implications concerning the disposal of chemically reactive substances in oceanic waters. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Consumption processes and food web structure in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simenstad, Charles A.; Small, Lawrence F.; David McIntire, C.

    Consumption processes at several trophic levels tend to coverage in the central (estuarine-mixing) region of the Columbia River estuary, where living and dentrital food resources are entrained within the energy null of the turbidity maximum zone. Primary consumers in this region are generalist and omnivorous feeders, capable of exploiting both autotrophic and heterotrophic food web pathways. In the presence of higher standing stocks of their prey resources, feeding by secondary and tertiary consumers is also concentrated, or more effective, in the estuarine mixing region of the estuary. During the 1980-1981 studies of the estuary, total consumer (metazoan) production averaged 5.5g C m -2 within the estuary. Of the estimated 15 x 10 3mt Cyy -1 attributed to primary consumption in the water column, 83% was the result of suspension-feeding pelagic zooplankton. In comparison to grazing on phytoplankton, it was estimated that approximately 84% of primary consumption in the water column was based on suspended detritus and, presumably, associated microbiota. Endemic primary,consumers, principally epibenthic crustaceans such as the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis, the harpacticoid copepod Scottolana canadensis, and the crangonid shrimp Crangon franciscorum, accounted for a high proportion of the consumption of suspended particles. Wertland herbivores inhabiting the estuary's extensive marshes, on the other hand, were estimated to account for only 2 to 17% of total estuarine primary consumption. Trophic linkages to secondary and tertiary consumers were more evenly apportioned among pelagic fishes, motile macroinvertebrates, and benthic infauna. High, comparatively unknown fluxes of migratory or wide-ranging tertiary consumers, such as piscivorous birds, seals and sea lions, made estimation of their annual consumption rates in the estuary highly tenuous. The physical processes of mixing and stratification, sediments accretion and erosion, and salinity intrusion appear to

  16. The influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of a coastal phytoplankton community in a micro-tidal estuary: Yura River Estuary, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Fukuzaki, K.; Akiyama, S.; Ichimi, K.; Kasai, A.; Fukushima, K.; Ueno, M.; Yoshioka, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The western side of Wakasa Bay, Tango Sea, Japan receives most of its allochthonous nutrient input from the Yura River. The Yura Estuary is classified as micro-tidal with a spring tidal range of less than 0.5 m. In summer, generally, the river discharge is low and the sea level is high, so the salt wedge extends 20 km upstream. Then, phytoplankton blooms occur due to an influx of riverine nutrients in the estuary. In contrast, during spring, river discharge is high and the salt wedge is not formed. These seasonal differences in estuarine physical and biological conditions may affect the coastal zone. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of the coastal phytoplankton community in this micro-tidal estuary. For this objective, field surveys were conducted both in the coastal zone and the river side of this estuary. Four sampling stations with depths of 5, 10, 20 and 30 m were set in the coastal zone, and weekly surveys were conducted from December 2009 to June 2011. Six sampling stations were set between the mouth of the Yura River and 16 km upstream, and monthly surveys were conducted in summer (from June 2010 to August 2010) and spring (from February 2011 to April 2011). Vertical profiles of salinity, water temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured with a CTD profiler at each station. With water samples taken from the surface, middle, and bottom layers at each station, concentrations of chlorophyll a, pheophytin, and nutrients were analyzed. The nutrients flux from the upstream to the estuary correlated strongly with river discharge, not with nutrient concentrations. In summer, when estuarine water were stratified, marine phytoplankton (mainly diatoms) developed in the middle layer of the estuary while freshwater phytoplankton (mainly green algae) increased in the surface layer of the river mouth. Nitrate concentration in riverine water was estimated to decline 15% while the water flowed from the

  17. Contribution of the upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea to the heavy metal pollution in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Yin, Su; Wu, Yuehan; Xu, Wei; Li, Yangyang; Shen, Zhenyao; Feng, Chenghong

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether the discharge control of heavy metals in the Yangtze River basin can significantly change the pollution level in the estuary, this study analyzed the sources (upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea) of ten heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn) in dissolved and particulate phases in the surface water of the estuary during wet, normal, and dry seasons. Metal sources inferred from section fluxes agree with those in statistical analysis methods. Heavy metal pollution in the surface water of Yangtze Estuary primarily depends on the sediment suspension and the wastewater discharge from estuary cities. Upper river only constitutes the main source of dissolved heavy metals during the wet season, while the estuarine region and the adjacent sea (especially the former) dominate the dissolved metal pollution in the normal and dry seasons. Particulate metals are mainly derived from sediment suspension in the estuary and the adjacent sea, and the contribution of the upper river can be neglected. Compared with the hydrologic seasons, flood-ebb tides exert a more obvious effect on the water flow directions in the estuary. Sediment suspension, not the upper river, significantly affects the suspended particulate matter concentration in the estuary. PMID:27155472

  18. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems. PMID:24933166

  19. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems.

  20. Over time and space changing characteristics of estuarine suspended particles in the German Weser and Elbe estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Schrottke, Kerstin; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Fine cohesive, suspended sediments appear in all estuarine environments in a predominately flocculated state. The transport and deposition of these flocs is influenced by their in-situ and primary particle size distribution. Especially the size of the inorganic particles influences the density and hence the settling velocity of the flocculated material. To describe both the changes in primary particle size of suspended particulate matter as well as the variability of floc sizes over time and space, the data of In-Situ Particle-Size Distributions (ISPSDs), Primary Particle Size Distributions (PPSDs) and Suspended Sediment Concentrations (SSCs) were collected. For this, Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissiometry (LISST) measurements as well as the water samples were collected in the German Elbe and Weser estuaries, covering seasonal variability of the SSC. The data of the ISPSDs show that the inorganic and organic Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM), as found in the Elbe and Weser estuaries, mostly appears in a flocculated state. The substrate for organic matter is mainly imported from the seaside and transported into the estuaries as indicated by an upstream decrease of the amount of fine particles. In winter, when the freshwater discharge is high, different PPSDs are found in the case of the Elbe estuary in the Turbidity Maximum Zone (TMZ) as well as in the landward and in the seaward sections close to the TMZ. In summer, the distance between the seaward and the landward section is too low to obtain an individual PPSD within the Elbe TMZ. A missing correlation between the PPSD and ISPSD shows that the inorganic constituents do not have an influence on the in-situ floc size. Although flocs aggregate and disaggregate over a tidal cycle and with changing SSC, they do not change their PPSD. The microflocs are therefore strong enough to withstand further breakage into their inorganic constituents.

  1. Estuarine Landcover Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Compact Ariborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and riparian habitats is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. In a recently completed comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River Estuary (CRE), Jerrick (1999) identified habitat loss and modification as one of the key threats to the integrity of the CRE ecosystem. This management plan called for an inventory of habitats as key first step in the CRE long-term restoration effort. While previous studies have produced useful data sets depicting habitat cover types along portions of the lower CRE (Thomas, 1980; Thomas, 1983; Graves et al., 1995; NOAA, 1997; Allen, 1999), no single study has produced a description of the habitats for the entire CRE. Moreover, the previous studies differed in data sources and methodologies making it difficult to merge data or to make temporal comparisons. Therefore, the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) initiated a habitat cover mapping project in 2000. The goal of this project was to produce a data set depicting the current habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River, from its mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of {approx}230-km (Fig. 1) using both established and emerging remote sensing techniques. For this project, we acquired two types of imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). Landsat and CASI imagery differ in spatial and spectral resolution: the Landsat 7 ETM+ sensor collects reflectance data in seven spectral bands with a spatial resolution of 30-m and the CASI sensor collects reflectance data in 19 bands (in our study) with a spatial resolution of 1.5-m. We classified both sets of imagery and produced a spatially linked, hierarchical habitat data set for the entire CRE and its floodplain. Landsat 7 ETM+ classification results are presented in a separate report (Garono et al., 2003). This report

  2. A Simple Model that Identifies Potential Effects of Sea-Level Rise on Estuarine and Estuary-Ecotone Habitat Locations for Salmonids in Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flitcroft, Rebecca; Burnett, Kelly; Christiansen, Kelly

    2013-07-01

    Diadromous aquatic species that cross a diverse range of habitats (including marine, estuarine, and freshwater) face different effects of climate change in each environment. One such group of species is the anadromous Pacific salmon ( Oncorhynchus spp.). Studies of the potential effects of climate change on salmonids have focused on both marine and freshwater environments. Access to a variety of estuarine habitat has been shown to enhance juvenile life-history diversity, thereby contributing to the resilience of many salmonid species. Our study is focused on the effect of sea-level rise on the availability, complexity, and distribution of estuarine, and low-freshwater habitat for Chinook salmon ( Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (anadromous O. mykiss), and coho salmon ( O. kisutch) along the Oregon Coast under future climate change scenarios. Using LiDAR, we modeled the geomorphologies of five Oregon estuaries and estimated a contour associated with the current mean high tide. Contour intervals at 1- and 2-m increments above the current mean high tide were generated, and changes in the estuary morphology were assessed. Because our analysis relied on digital data, we compared three types of digital data in one estuary to assess the utility of different data sets in predicting the changes in estuary shape. For each salmonid species, changes in the amount and complexity of estuarine edge habitats varied by estuary. The simple modeling approach we applied can also be used to identify areas that may be most amenable to pre-emptive restoration actions to mitigate or enhance salmonid habitat under future climatic conditions.

  3. A simple model that identifies potential effects of sea-level rise on estuarine and estuary-ecotone habitat locations for salmonids in Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Flitcroft, Rebecca; Burnett, Kelly; Christiansen, Kelly

    2013-07-01

    Diadromous aquatic species that cross a diverse range of habitats (including marine, estuarine, and freshwater) face different effects of climate change in each environment. One such group of species is the anadromous Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). Studies of the potential effects of climate change on salmonids have focused on both marine and freshwater environments. Access to a variety of estuarine habitat has been shown to enhance juvenile life-history diversity, thereby contributing to the resilience of many salmonid species. Our study is focused on the effect of sea-level rise on the availability, complexity, and distribution of estuarine, and low-freshwater habitat for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (anadromous O. mykiss), and coho salmon (O. kisutch) along the Oregon Coast under future climate change scenarios. Using LiDAR, we modeled the geomorphologies of five Oregon estuaries and estimated a contour associated with the current mean high tide. Contour intervals at 1- and 2-m increments above the current mean high tide were generated, and changes in the estuary morphology were assessed. Because our analysis relied on digital data, we compared three types of digital data in one estuary to assess the utility of different data sets in predicting the changes in estuary shape. For each salmonid species, changes in the amount and complexity of estuarine edge habitats varied by estuary. The simple modeling approach we applied can also be used to identify areas that may be most amenable to pre-emptive restoration actions to mitigate or enhance salmonid habitat under future climatic conditions.

  4. Delineation of estuarine management areas using multivariate geostatistics: the case of Sado Estuary.

    PubMed

    Caeiro, Sandra; Goovaerts, Pierre; Painho, Marco; Costa, M Helena

    2003-09-15

    The Sado Estuary is a coastal zone located in the south of Portugal where conflicts between conservation and development exist because of its location near industrialized urban zones and its designation as a natural reserve. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a set of multivariate geostatistical approaches to delineate spatially contiguous regions of sediment structure for Sado Estuary. These areas will be the supporting infrastructure of an environmental management system for this estuary. The boundaries of each homogeneous area were derived from three sediment characterization attributes through three different approaches: (1) cluster analysis of dissimilarity matrix function of geographical separation followed by indicator kriging of the cluster data, (2) discriminant analysis of kriged values of the three sediment attributes, and (3) a combination of methods 1 and 2. Final maximum likelihood classification was integrated into a geographical information system. All methods generated fairly spatially contiguous management areas that reproduce well the environment of the estuary. Map comparison techniques based on kappa statistics showed thatthe resultant three maps are similar, supporting the choice of any of the methods as appropriate for management of the Sado Estuary. However, the results of method 1 seem to be in better agreement with estuary behavior, assessment of contamination sources, and previous work conducted at this site. PMID:14524435

  5. Improving estuarine net flux estimates for dissolved cadmium export at the annual timescale: Application to the Gironde Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrin, Aymeric; Schäfer, Jörg; Blanc, Gérard; Strady, Emilie; Masson, Matthieu; Bossy, Cécile; Castelle, Sabine; Girardot, Naïg; Coynel, Alexandra

    2009-10-01

    D net fluxes even exceeded river borne total (dissolved + particulate) gross Cd fluxes into the estuary. These observations were attributed to progressive Cd desorption from both suspended particles and bottom sediment during various sedimentation-resuspension cycles induced by tidal currents and/or continuous dredging (navigation channel) and diverse intra-estuarine sources (wet deposition, urban sources, and agriculture). Provided that gross fluxes remain stable over time, dissolved Cd exportation from the Gironde Estuary to the coastal ocean may remain at the present level for the coming decade and the estuarine sedimentary Cd stock is forecast to decrease slowly.

  6. Estuarine intertidal habitat use by birds in a Pacific Northwest coastal estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of a year long study of the distribution of birds across five intertidal estuarine habitats reveal that tide level largely controls use of the habitats by birds. A total census of all birds observed from shoreline observation locations was made at five tide levels over s...

  7. Intertidal estuarine habitat utilization by birds in a Pacific Northwest coastal estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of a year long study of the distribution of birds across five intertidal estuarine habitats reveal that tide level largely controls use of the habitats by birds. A total census of all birds observed from shoreline locations was made at five tide levels over six, 2-month ...

  8. Net Subterranean Estuarine Export Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic C, N, P, Si, and Total Alkalinity into the Jiulong River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, Z.; Zhai, W. D.; Moore, W. S.; Li, Q.; Yan, X.; Qi, D.; Jiang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate geochemical impacts of the subterranean estuary (STE) on the Jiulong River estuary, China, we estimated seasonal fluxes of subterranean water discharge into the estuary based on the mass balance of radium isotopes and net subterranean export fluxes of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), N (DIN), Si (DSi), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), and total alkalinity (TA). Based on 226Ra data, the subterranean discharge (in 107 m3 d-1) was estimated to be 0.24~0.51 in the spring, 0.56~1.16 in the summer, 0.38~0.79 in the fall, and 0.22~0.45 in the winter. This was equivalent to 6-16% of the concomitant river discharge. The net spatially integrated material fluxes from the STE into the estuary were equivalent up to 51-89% of the concomitant riverine fluxes for DIC and TA, around 10-25% for DSi and DIN, and negligible for SRP. Paradoxically, the mixing lines along the salinity gradient revealed no apparent additions of these species. These additions are not revealed because the STE is a relatively small spatially-averaged source that spreads throughout the estuary in contrast to the major point sources of the river and the ocean for the estuary. Thus, despite apparent conservative mixing of DIC, DIN, and DSi, subterranean exports of these species into estuaries must be taken into account in evaluating geochemical impacts of estuarine exports on shelf waters.

  9. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes and associated contribution to nitrogen removal in subtidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Hou Lijun, Liu Min, Deng Fengyu State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) can determine nitrate dynamics and fate in estuarine and coastal environments. However, factors controlling the denitrification, anammox and DNRA processes and their respective contributions to the nitrogen removal remain unclear for specific aquatic environments. In this study, we investigate potential rates of denitrification, anammox and DNRA in the subtidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary via slurry incubation experiments combined with isotope-tracing techniques to reveal their respective contributions to total nitrate reduction in this hypereutrophic estuarine ecosystem. Measured rates of denitrification, anammox and DNRA ranged from 0.06 to 4.51 μmol N kg-1 h-1, 0.01 to 0.52 μmol N kg-1 h-1, and 0.03 to 0.89 μmol N kg-1 h-1, respectively. These potential dissimilatory nitrate reduction process rates correlated significantly with salinity, sulfide, organic carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification contributed 38 - 96 % total nitrate reduction in the Yangtze Estuary, as compared to 3 - 45 % for DNRA and 1 - 36 % for anammox. In total, the denitrification and anammox processes removed approximately 25% of the external inorganic nitrogen transported annually into the estuary. In contrast, most external inorganic nitrogen was retained in the estuary and contributes substantially to the severe eutrophication of the Yangtze Estuary. Keywords: Nitrogen; Ammonium; Nitrate; Denitrification; Anaerobic ammonium oxidation; Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium; Sediment

  10. The dynamics of the yeast community of the Tagus river estuary: testing the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marco A; Almeida, João M F; Martins, Inês M; da Silva, A Jorge; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2010-10-01

    Yeasts are common inhabitants of different types of aquatic habitats, including marine and estuarine waters and rivers. Although numerous studies have surveyed yeast occurrence in these habitats, the identification of autochthonous populations has been problematic because several yeast species seem to be very versatile and therefore mere presence is not sufficient to establish an ecological association. In the present study we investigated the dynamics of the yeast community in the Tagus river estuary (Portugal) by combining a microbiological study involving isolation, quantification, and molecular identification of dominant yeast populations with the analysis of hydrological and hydrographical data. We set out to test the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeast populations in a transect of the Tagus estuary and we postulate four possible sources: open sea, terrestrial, gastrointestinal and the estuary itself in the case of populations that have become resident. Candida parapsilosis and Pichia guilliermondii were correlated with Escherichia coli, which indicated an intestinal origin. Other cream-colored yeasts like Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides had similar dynamics, but no association with E. coli and quite distinct ecological preferences. They might represent a group of resident estuarine populations whose primary origin is diverse and can include marine, terrestrial, and gastrointestinal habitats. Another major yeast population was represented by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The cosmopolitan nature of that species and its moderate association with E. coli point to terrestrial sources as primary habitats. PMID:20422287

  11. The dynamics of the yeast community of the Tagus river estuary: testing the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marco A; Almeida, João M F; Martins, Inês M; da Silva, A Jorge; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2010-10-01

    Yeasts are common inhabitants of different types of aquatic habitats, including marine and estuarine waters and rivers. Although numerous studies have surveyed yeast occurrence in these habitats, the identification of autochthonous populations has been problematic because several yeast species seem to be very versatile and therefore mere presence is not sufficient to establish an ecological association. In the present study we investigated the dynamics of the yeast community in the Tagus river estuary (Portugal) by combining a microbiological study involving isolation, quantification, and molecular identification of dominant yeast populations with the analysis of hydrological and hydrographical data. We set out to test the hypothesis of the multiple origins of estuarine yeast populations in a transect of the Tagus estuary and we postulate four possible sources: open sea, terrestrial, gastrointestinal and the estuary itself in the case of populations that have become resident. Candida parapsilosis and Pichia guilliermondii were correlated with Escherichia coli, which indicated an intestinal origin. Other cream-colored yeasts like Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides had similar dynamics, but no association with E. coli and quite distinct ecological preferences. They might represent a group of resident estuarine populations whose primary origin is diverse and can include marine, terrestrial, and gastrointestinal habitats. Another major yeast population was represented by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The cosmopolitan nature of that species and its moderate association with E. coli point to terrestrial sources as primary habitats.

  12. An Overview of Ecological Processes in the Rio de la Plata Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acha, M.; Mianzan, H.

    2005-05-01

    picnocline, meanwhile the upper layer is biologically poor. Marine species penetrate the estuary advected or following the saline waters. The surface salinity front is the offshore end of the salt wedge. At this portion of the estuary, mixing of estuarine and marine waters and enhancement of vertical nutrient flux fertilize the frontal area and another maximum chlorophyll-a concentrations is observed. Zooplankton concentrations, mainly gelatinous plankton have been reported here. Reproduction of some fishes seem also associated to this surface front. This front is the more subtle and high dynamic portion of the wedge, showing a seasonal pattern driven by winds. It delineates the boundary between the estuary and the continental shelf waters. The influence of this large river in the ecological processes of the continental shelf is largely unknown. The knowledge on the ecology of the Rio de la Plata estuary has been remarkably enlarged during the last ten years, and some ongoing researches such as the study of different sources of primary production and the complexity of the trophic pathways, looks promissory and surely will contribute to the understanding of the regional importance of the estuary.

  13. Effect of river discharge and geometry on tides and net water transport in an estuarine network, an idealized model applied to the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebregtse, N. C.; de Swart, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    Tidal propagation in, and division of net water transport over different channels in an estuarine network are analyzed using a newly developed idealized model. The water motion in this model is governed by the cross-sectionally averaged shallow water equations and is forced by tides at the seaward boundaries and by river discharge. Approximate analytical solutions are constructed by means of a harmonic truncation and a perturbation expansion in a small parameter, being the ratio of tidal amplitude and depth. The net water transport results from an imposed river discharge and from residual water transport generated by nonlinear tidal rectification. Two new drivers are identified that contribute to the net water transport in tidal estuarine networks, viz. the generation of residual water transport due to gradients in dynamic pressure and due to a coupling between the tidally averaged and quarter diurnal currents through the quadratic bottom stress. The model is applied in a case study on the Yangtze Estuary, to investigate tides and division of net water transport over its multiple channels during the wet and dry season, as well as before and after the construction of the Deepwater Navigation Channel. Model results agree fairly well with observations. Process analysis reveals that the decrease in tides from dry to wet season is due to enhanced bottom stress generated by river-tide interactions. Also, the seasonal variations in net water transport are explained. It is furthermore shown and explained that due to the Deepwater Navigation Channel tidal currents have increased and net water transport has decreased in the North Passage. These changes have profound implications for net sediment transport and salinity intrusion.

  14. Applications of remote sensing to estuarine problems. [estuaries of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A variety of siting problems for the estuaries of the lower Chesapeake Bay have been solved with cost beneficial remote sensing techniques. Principal techniques used were repetitive 1:30,000 color photography of dye emitting buoys to map circulation patterns, and investigation of water color boundaries via color and color infrared imagery to scales of 1:120,000. Problems solved included sewage outfall siting, shoreline preservation and enhancement, oil pollution risk assessment, and protection of shellfish beds from dredge operations.

  15. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, António M.

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary

  16. Influence of paleotopography, base level and sedimentation rate on estuarine system response to the Holocene sea-level rise: The example of the Marais Vernier, Seine estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Millena; Sebag, David; Durand, Alain; Laignel, Benoit; Saliege, Jean-François; Mahler, Barbara J.; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2007-08-01

    The response of coastal systems to allogenic forcing factors is of interest to diverse research communities, including those interested in global change, sequence stratigraphy and modelling. Quaternary systems are of particular interest because they provide analogues for ancient rock records. To understand the processes responsible for the sedimentary evolution of estuarine systems, it is necessary to study as many fluvial systems as possible. The objective of this review of the sedimentary evolution of a coastal marsh is to describe the influence of glacial paleotopography on the record of climatic and sea-level changes. The Marais Vernier, located at the interface between the marine and fluvial parts of the estuary, is a part of the Lower Seine Valley wetland network, which formed after the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous studies have described the Holocene filling, which is composed of peat and detrital material deposited following climatic and sea-level changes. To understand the sedimentary evolution, a paleotopographical (based on drillings and electromagnetic surveys) and a chronological framework (based on radiocarbon dates) for the southern peat marsh were defined. The peat marsh paleotopography has three erosional surfaces. The S1 surface is the oldest and also the highest, topographically; the S2 surface is younger, wider, and incised below the S1 surface; the S3 surface, the youngest of the three, is narrow and deeply incised. Radiometric ages were considered on the basis of their geographical position in relation to the S3 surface. Prior to 7.5 ka cal BP, sediments accumulated only above the narrow area described by the S3 surface, at a rate of 5.5 mm yr - 1 . After 7.5 ka cal BP, shortly after the flooding of the Seine estuary, sediments accumulated as peat deposits over the entire peat marsh at a rate of 3 mm yr - 1 in response to the sea-level rise. The paleotopography delimits the area of deposition during the Holocene, and thus plays a critical

  17. Biogeochemical processes driving mercury cycling in estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that has been enriched in the environment through human activities, particularly in the coastal zone. Bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in marine fishposes health risks for fish-consuming populations and is a worldwide health concern. A broader understanding of major environmental processes controlling Hg cycling and MeHg production and bioaccumulation in estuaries is therefore needed. Recent fieldwork and modeling show diverse sources of MeHg production in estuaries. We present geochemical modeling results for Hg and MeHg acrossmultiple estuaries with contrasting physical, chemical and biological characteristics. We report new measurements of water column and sediment mercury speciation and methylation data from the subarctic (Lake Melville, Labrador Canada) and temperate latitudes (Long Island Sound, Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay). We find that benthic sediment is a relatively small source of MeHg to the water column in all systems. Water column methylation drives MeHg levels in Lake Melville, whereas in more impacted shallow systems such as Chesapeake Bay and Long Island Sound, external inputs and sediment resuspension are more dominant. All systems are a net source of MeHg to the ocean through tidal exchange. In light of these inter-system differences, we will evaluate timescales of coastal ecosystem responses to changes in Hg loading that can help predict potential responses to future perturbations.

  18. Exploring Physical and Biological Mechanisms for Zooplankton Retention in the Estuarine Transition Zone of a Riverine Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, R. D.; Monismith, S. G.

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we use a coupled three-dimensional physical-biological model to investigate zooplankton retention in the estuarine transition zone (ETZ) of the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE). Varying from well-mixed to partially stratified, the hydrodynamic environment of the SLE is defined by a large tidal range, strong salinity gradients, a large freshwater river flow, and complex bathymetry. The physical-biological model used for this study consisted of two parts: a circulation model and a zooplankton transport model. The circulation model is a three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic model (TRIM3D) driven by the wind, tides, and freshwater outflow. The zooplankton transport model is a three-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model which simulates zooplankton movement using velocity fields derived from the three-dimensional circulation model. The circulation model is calibrated using field data such as salinity, pressure, and current time series from different locations in the ETZ. The transport and distribution of three zooplankton taxa, non-native zebra mussel veligers, resident mysids, and larval smelt, were simulated for this study. By simulating these three taxa, we were able to investigate the effect of a range of swimming speeds on zooplankton retention in the ETZ. We present the results of simulations exploring the efficiency of tidal vertical migration, a commonly described biological retention mechanism that is characterized by zooplankton migration up to the surface on flood and down to the bottom on ebb. Tidal vertical migration, also known as selective tidal stream transport, was investigated for several swimming speeds and endogenous rhythms.

  19. Choice chamber experiments to test the attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to water of estuarine and riverine origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Nicola C.; Cowley, Paul D.; Whitfield, Alan K.; Kaiser, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Although the recruitment of larvae and juveniles of marine fishes into estuaries has been well documented, little is known about the factors governing the immigration of estuary-associated marine fishes into estuaries. Fishes have a well-developed sense of smell and it has been suggested by several workers that olfactory cues of freshwater or estuarine origin serve as stimuli, attracting larvae and juveniles of estuary-associated species into estuaries. Attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to estuary and river water from the Kowie estuarine system, South Africa, was measured using a rectangular choice chamber. In experiments, conducted during peak recruitment periods, larvae selected estuary and river water with a significantly higher frequency than sea water. This study, the first to assess the possible role of olfaction in the recruitment process of an estuary-associated marine fish species, demonstrates that larvae are able to recognise water from different origins, probably based on odour.

  20. Estuarine Food Webs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries provide habitat for abundant plants, animals and micro-organisms, ranging from microscopic plankton (bacteria, yeasts, algae, protozoa) to larger benthic and pelagic organisms (seagrass, clams, crabs, sea trout, pelicans and dolphins). Estuarine biota can be characteri...

  1. Faecal-indicator bacteria and sedimentary processes in estuarine mudflats (Seine, France).

    PubMed

    Berthe, Thierry; Touron, Aurélie; Leloup, Julie; Deloffre, Julien; Petit, Fabienne

    2008-01-01

    Over a three-year period, quantification of faecal indicators and the molecular detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella were monitored in sediments from three contrasting mudflats of the Seine estuary (France). The elevation of the mudflat surface was monitored concurrently using a high-resolution altimeter. During the period of the study, estuarine mudflats were areas of deposition for faecal-indicator bacteria and were mainly controlled by sedimentary processes. In the intertidal freshwater and subtidal mudflats, the highest abundances of faecal-indicator bacteria were counted during a depositional period. Maximum levels were observed in the freshwater mudflats during periods of high flow: thermotolerant coliforms: 3.9 x 10(4) cfu cm(-2), enterococci: 1.2 x 10(4) cfu cm(-2), Clostridium perfringens spores: 9.8 x 10(5) spores cm(-2). Loss of culturability of enteric bacteria in sediment microcosms demonstrated the remediatory capacity of the mudflats, even if they might be a secondary source of bacteria-forming spores to the water column through erosion and resuspension events.

  2. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of estuaries and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.

  3. Contributions of Abiotic and Biotic Processes to the Aerobic Removal of Phenolic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in a Simulated Estuarine Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Tam, Nora F Y; Lin, Li; Su, Weiqi; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-04-19

    The contributions of abiotic and biotic processes in an estuarine aquatic environment to the removal of four phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were evaluated through simulated batch reactors containing water-only or water-sediment collected from an estuary in South China. More than 90% of the free forms of all four spiked EDCs were removed from these reactors at the end of 28 days under aerobic conditions, with the half-life of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) longer than those of propylparaben (PP), nonylphenol (NP) and 17β-estradiol (E2). The interaction with dissolved oxygen contributed to NP removal and was enhanced by aeration. The PP and E2 removal was positively influenced by adsorption on suspended particles initially, whereas abiotic transformation by estuarine-dissolved matter contributed to their complete removal. Biotic processes, including degradation by active aquatic microorganisms, had significant effects on the removal of EE2. Sedimentary inorganic and organic matter posed a positive effect only when EE2 biodegradation was inhibited. Estrone (E1), the oxidizing product of E2, was detected, proving that E2 was removed by the naturally occurring oxidizers in the estuarine water matrixes. These results revealed that the estuarine aquatic environment was effective in removing free EDCs, and the contributions of abiotic and biotic processes to their removal were compound specific.

  4. Nutrient variability and its influence on nitrogen processes in a highly turbid tropical estuary (Bangpakong, Gulf of Thailand).

    PubMed

    Bordalo, Adriano A; Chalermwat, Kashane; Teixeira, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Estuarine ecosystems in SE Asia have been poorly studied when compared to other tropical environments. Important gaps exist particularly in the understanding of their biogeochemical function and contribution to global change. In this work we looked into N-turnover in the water column and sediments of the Bangpakong estuary (13°N). A seasonal sampling program was performed along the salinity gradient covering different stretches of the estuary (68km). Key physical and chemical characteristics were also monitored in order to unravel possible environmental controls. Results showed the occurrence of active denitrification in sediments (5.7-50.9nmol N-N2/(cm(3)·hr)), and water column (3.5-1044pmol N-N2/(cm(3)·hr)). No seasonal or spatial variability was detected for denitrification potential in sediment samples. However, in the water column, the denitrification activity peaked during the transition season in the downstream sites coinciding with high turbidity levels. Therefore, in that period of the year, the water column compartment may be an important contributor to nitrate reduction within the estuary. The rather low nitrification rates detected were not always measurable, probably due to the reduced oxygen content and high siltation. This study is one of the few dealing simultaneously with sediments and water column processes in a highly turbid tropical estuary. Therefore, it emerges as a valuable contribution for the understanding of the dynamics of the nitrogen cycle in tropical environments by exploring the role of estuarine N microbial activity in reducing the effects of increased nitrogen loads. PMID:27372127

  5. Hydrodynamic and suspended sediment patterns in the estuarine turbidity zone of a mesotidal estuary from cross-sectional ADCP measurements and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorndt, Anna Christina; Grünler, Steffen; Schiller, Ulrike; Kösters, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Carefully assessing impacts of human interventions on hydrodynamics, salinity and sediment transport in estuaries has become increasingly important due to the high ecological importance of these systems. Quantifying these changes is commonly done by numerical modeling. However, model results highly rely on the applied model formulations and model parameters. Therefore, validation of the results with measurements is necessary. In case of suspended particulate matter, the use of stationary point measurements is limited due to the high spatial variability of sediments in the water column. This study focusses on modeling the estuarine turbidity maximum of the Weser estuary (Germany), which is a mesotidal and well- to partially mixed estuary. The estuarine turbidity maximum evolves due to known physical effects such as the gravitational circulation, tidal velocity and tidal mixing asymmetries as well as vertical and lateral advection. Those effects also contribute to high lateral and vertical variations which may in nature superposed with secondary currents by local bathymetric features. To increase the understanding of the high spatial and temporal variability of the suspended particulate matter and to validate numerical simulations, 13-hour measurements of three cross-profiles within the estuarine turbidity maximum were carried out in three consecutive years (2009 - 2011). Those consisted of continuous measurements of two vessel-mounted acoustic doppler current profiler, one of which was tilted by 20°. Also, a movable unit (with conductivity, temperature and depth probes, a laser in-situ scattering transmitter and an optical backscatter sensor) was used, also taking a water sample for calibration every 30 minutes. The employed hydrodynamical modeling tool based on the 3D shallow water equations is UnTRIM, described by Casulli and Zanolli (2002), together with the SediMorph module for calculation of transport of suspended and bed load. The model domain has a size of

  6. Nutrient processes and chlorophyll in the estuaries and plume of the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Peter

    2004-12-01

    This paper investigates the waters of the Gulf of Papua during three cruises of the TROPICS (Tropical River Ocean Processes In Coastal Settings) programme. Plume characteristics were investigated during Leg 1 (May 1997), and estuarine properties during Leg 5a (September 1997) and Leg 7 (January 1999). During Leg 1 the plume was apparent as a well mixed layer up to 30 m deep extending offshore to a distance of 150 km off the Fly River. Lowest salinities were found off the Taruma Delta. Highest chlorophyll concentrations were found at the inner plume close to the river mouth. Dissolved phosphate and nitrate are removed in this zone, whereas silicate behaves conservatively. Primary productivity within the plume appears to rely upon recycled nutrients, with organic fractions representing the majority of the nutrient pool. In the estuaries nutrients were found to behave differently during the monsoon than during the low flow of the extremely dry conditions associated with the 1997 El Niño event. Normally the Fly is characterised by remineralisation of organic nitrogen in the upper estuary, but during drought conditions DON production and NH4+ uptake suggest that bacterial activity is more prevalent. Ocean Colour and Temperature Scanner imagery shows a number of features of the plume, but generally overestimates chlorophyll concentrations due to the effects of high suspended sediment concentrations and, to a lesser extent, coloured dissolved organic matter.

  7. Anthropogenic forcing of estuarine hypoxic events in sub-tropical catchments: landscape drivers and biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa N L; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A; Slavich, Peter G

    2011-11-15

    Episodic hypoxic events can occur following summer floods in sub-tropical estuaries of eastern Australia. These events can cause deoxygenation of waterways and extensive fish mortality. Here, we present a conceptual model that links key landscape drivers and biogeochemical processes which contribute to post-flood hypoxic events. The model provides a framework for examining the nature of anthropogenic forcing. Modification of estuarine floodplain surface hydrology through the construction of extensive drainage networks emerges as a major contributing factor to increasing the frequency, magnitude and duration of hypoxic events. Forcing occurs in two main ways. Firstly, artificial drainage of backswamp wetlands initiates drier conditions which cause a shift in vegetation assemblages from wetland-dominant species to dryland-dominant species. These species, which currently dominate the floodplain, are largely intolerant of inundation and provide abundant labile substrate for decomposition following flood events. Decomposition of this labile carbon pool consumes oxygen in the overlying floodwaters, and results in anoxic conditions and waters with excess deoxygenation potential (DOP). Carbon metabolism can be strongly coupled with microbially-mediated reduction of accumulated Fe and Mn oxides, phases which are common on these coastal floodplain landscapes. Secondly, artificial drainage enhances discharge rates during the flood recession phase. Drains transport deoxygenated high DOP floodwaters rapidly from backswamp wetlands to the main river channel to further consume oxygen. This process effectively displaces the natural carbon metabolism processes from floodplain wetlands to the main channel. Management options to reduce the impacts of post-flood hypoxia include i) remodifying drainage on the floodplain to promote wetter conditions, thereby shifting vegetation assemblages towards inundation-tolerant species, and ii) strategic retention of floodwaters in the backswamp

  8. Estuarine and Tidal Freshwater Habitat Cover Types Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and tidal floodplain ecosystems is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. Columbia River plants, fish, and wildlife require specific physicochemical and ecological conditions to sustain their populations. As habitats are degraded or lost, this capability is altered, often irretrievably; those species that cannot adapt are lost from the ecosystem. The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) completed a comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary in 1999 (Jerrick, 1999). The plan identified habitat loss and modification as a critical threat to the integrity of the lower Columbia River ecosystem and called for a habitat inventory as a key first step in its long term restoration efforts. In 2000, the Estuary Partnership initiated a multiphase project to produce a spatial data set describing the current location and distribution of estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam using a consistent methodology and data sources (Fig. 1). The first phase of the project was the development of a broadbrush description of the estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover classes for the entire study area ({approx}146 river miles) using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery. Phase II of the project entailed analysis of the classified satellite imagery from Phase I. Analysis of change in landcover and a summary of the spatial relationships between cover types are part of Phase II. Phase III of the project included the classification of the high resolution hyperspectral imagery collected in 2000 and 2001 for key focal areas within the larger study area. Finally, Phase IV consists of this final report that presents results from refining the Landsat ETM+ classification and provides recommendations for future actions

  9. Spatial and temporal variability of contaminants within estuarine sediments and native Olympia oysters: A contrast between a developed and an undeveloped estuary.

    PubMed

    Granek, Elise F; Conn, Kathleen E; Nilsen, Elena B; Pillsbury, Lori; Strecker, Angela L; Rumrill, Steve S; Fish, William

    2016-07-01

    Chemical contaminants can be introduced into estuarine and marine ecosystems from a variety of sources including wastewater, agriculture and forestry practices, point and non-point discharges, runoff from industrial, municipal, and urban lands, accidental spills, and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of potential sources contributes to the likelihood of contaminated marine waters and sediments and increases the probability of uptake by marine organisms. Despite widespread recognition of direct and indirect pathways for contaminant deposition and organismal exposure in coastal systems, spatial and temporal variability in contaminant composition, deposition, and uptake patterns are still poorly known. We investigated these patterns for a suite of persistent legacy contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and chemicals of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals within two Oregon coastal estuaries (Coos and Netarts Bays). In the more urbanized Coos Bay, native Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida) tissue had approximately twice the number of PCB congeners at over seven times the total concentration, yet fewer PBDEs at one-tenth the concentration as compared to the more rural Netarts Bay. Different pharmaceutical suites were detected during each sampling season. Variability in contaminant types and concentrations across seasons and between species and media (organisms versus sediment) indicates the limitation of using indicator species and/or sampling annually to determine contaminant loads at a site or for specific species. The results indicate the prevalence of legacy contaminants and CECs in relatively undeveloped coastal environments highlighting the need to improve policy and management actions to reduce contaminant releases into estuarine and marine waters and to deal with legacy compounds that remain long after prohibition of use. Our results point to the need for better understanding of the ecological and

  10. Spatial and temporal variability of contaminants within estuarine sediments and native Olympia oysters: A contrast between a developed and an undeveloped estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granek, Elise F.; Conn, Kathleen E.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Pillsbury, Lori; Strecker, Angela; Rumrill, Steve; Fish, William

    2016-01-01

    Chemical contaminants can be introduced into estuarine and marine ecosystems from a variety of sources including wastewater, agriculture and forestry practices, point and non-point discharges, runoff from industrial, municipal, and urban lands, accidental spills, and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of potential sources contributes to the likelihood of contaminated marine waters and sediments and increases the probability of uptake by marine organisms. Despite widespread recognition of direct and indirect pathways for contaminant deposition and organismal exposure in coastal systems, spatial and temporal variability in contaminant composition, deposition, and uptake patterns are still poorly known. We investigated these patterns for a suite of persistent legacy contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and chemicals of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals within two Oregon coastal estuaries (Coos and Netarts Bays). In the more urbanized Coos Bay, native Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida) tissue had approximately twice the number of PCB congeners at over seven times the total concentration, yet fewer PBDEs at one-tenth the concentration as compared to the more rural Netarts Bay. Different pharmaceutical suites were detected during each sampling season. Variability in contaminant types and concentrations across seasons and between species and media (organisms versus sediment) indicates the limitation of using indicator species and/or sampling annually to determine contaminant loads at a site or for specific species. The results indicate the prevalence of legacy contaminants and CECs in relatively undeveloped coastal environments highlighting the need to improve policy and management actions to reduce contaminant releases into estuarine and marine waters and to deal with legacy compounds that remain long after prohibition of use. Our results point to the need for better understanding of the ecological and

  11. How U-Th series radionuclides have come to trace estuarine processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Some forty years ago, the essence of estuarine processes was pioneered in terms of property-property (salinity) parameterization and end member mixing experiments. The result revealed how scavenging via "flocculation" of organic material such as humic acids affect primary nutrients and trace elements, many of pollutant interest. Defined in the Delaware are estuarine reaction zones, including one more "geochemical" in upper turbid areas and another more" biochemical" in more productive photic zones of lower areas. Since then, the natural U-Th radionuclide series have been employed to quantify estuarine transport and scavenging processes. Parent U appears negatively non-conserved during summer in estuarine and coastal waters, while that of Ra isotopes positively non-conservative dominated by a ground water end member. For both U and Ra, the biogeochemical influence of marginal salt marshes is significant. Indeed in the marsh atmospheric 210-Pb has become the metric of choice for the chronology of estuarine pollutant records. Using the more particle reactive isotopes in quantifying estuarine mixing processes (e.g. Th or Pb) proves to be fruitful in the Delaware and upper Chesapeake. While Th simply tracks that of particle abundance, both 210-Pb and 210-Po show differential scavenging with residence times of weeks to a month according to lithogenic and biogenic cycling processes, respectively.

  12. Young of the year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) as a bioindicator of estuarine health: Establishing a new baseline for persistent organic pollutants after Hurricane Sandy for selected estuaries in New Jersey and New York.

    PubMed

    Smalling, Kelly L; Deshpande, Ashok D; Blazer, Vicki S; Dockum, Bruce W; Timmons, DeMond; Sharack, Beth L; Baker, Ronald J; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J

    2016-06-30

    Atlantic coastal bays of the US are essential habitat for young of year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix). Their residence in these estuaries during critical life stages, high lipid content, and piscivory make bluefish an ideal bioindicator species for evaluating estuarine health. Individual whole fish from four estuaries impacted by Hurricane Sandy were collected in August 2013, analyzed for a suite of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides and evaluated using health metrics. Concentrations in whole bluefish differed by estuary; however, concentrations for many POPs decreased or were similar to those observed prior to the hurricane. Prevalence of the ectoparasitic gill isopod (Lironeca ovalis) varied by estuary and no relationships between contaminants and lesions were observed. Bluefish should be considered for monitoring programs and, if sampled frequently, could be an effective bioindicator of incremental and episodic changes in contaminants within aquatic food webs.

  13. Young of the year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) as a bioindicator of estuarine health: Establishing a new baseline for persistent organic pollutants after Hurricane Sandy for selected estuaries in New Jersey and New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Bruce W Dockum,; DeMond Timmons,; Beth L. Sharack,; Baker, Ronald J.; Jennifer Samson,; Reilly, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Atlantic coastal bays of the US are essential habitat for young of year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix). Their residence in these estuaries during critical life stages, high lipid content, and piscivory make bluefish an ideal bioindicator species for evaluating estuarine health. Individual whole fish from four estuaries impacted by Hurricane Sandy were collected in August 2013, analyzed for a suite of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides and evaluated using health metrics. Concentrations in whole bluefish differed by estuary; however, concentrations for many POPs decreased or were similar to those observed prior to the hurricane. Prevalence of the ectoparasitic gill isopod (Lironeca ovalis) varied by estuary and no relationships between contaminants and lesions were observed. Bluefish should be considered for monitoring programs and, if sampled frequently, could be an effective bioindicator of incremental and episodic changes in contaminants within aquatic food webs.

  14. Young of the year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) as a bioindicator of estuarine health: Establishing a new baseline for persistent organic pollutants after Hurricane Sandy for selected estuaries in New Jersey and New York.

    PubMed

    Smalling, Kelly L; Deshpande, Ashok D; Blazer, Vicki S; Dockum, Bruce W; Timmons, DeMond; Sharack, Beth L; Baker, Ronald J; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J

    2016-06-30

    Atlantic coastal bays of the US are essential habitat for young of year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix). Their residence in these estuaries during critical life stages, high lipid content, and piscivory make bluefish an ideal bioindicator species for evaluating estuarine health. Individual whole fish from four estuaries impacted by Hurricane Sandy were collected in August 2013, analyzed for a suite of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides and evaluated using health metrics. Concentrations in whole bluefish differed by estuary; however, concentrations for many POPs decreased or were similar to those observed prior to the hurricane. Prevalence of the ectoparasitic gill isopod (Lironeca ovalis) varied by estuary and no relationships between contaminants and lesions were observed. Bluefish should be considered for monitoring programs and, if sampled frequently, could be an effective bioindicator of incremental and episodic changes in contaminants within aquatic food webs. PMID:27039958

  15. Determination of water ages and flushing rates using short-lived radium isotopes in large estuarine system, the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo-Chao; Dimova, Natasha T.; Zhao, Liang; Jiang, Xue-Yan; Yu, Zhi-Gang

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of naturally-occurring short-lived radium isotopes (224Ra, t1/2 = 3.6 d and 223Ra, t1/2 = 11 d) to examine coastal water mixing dynamics of the third world largest estuary, Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) during two field trips in April 2010 and May 2011. Distributions of the 224Ra/223Ra activity ratios within the YRE area were used to calculate apparent estuarine water ages. Field-derived results were then compared to hydrodynamic assessments obtained by a Lagrangian particle tracking simulation experiment performed using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). Water ages obtained via both geotracers and particle tracking agree very well. During both field trips an anomalously "younger" water mass (low salinity and higher radium activities) was observed at about 90-170 km offshore distance from the mouth of the river, suggesting an additional terrestrial water source influenced this area. The temporal distribution of the radium isotopes indicated a semi-diurnal tidal pattern in the YRE with relatively constant isotopic composition of less than a 20% variation during our observations. An integrated water flushing rate based on our observations (excluding the additional anomalous source area) was 8.4 km day-1.

  16. Monitoring Rehabilitation in Temperate North American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Casimir A.; Hood, W Gregory; Tear, Lucinda M.; Simenstad, Charles; Williams, Gregory D.; Johnson, L. L.; Feist, B. E.; Roni, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this chapter, we propose that monitoring rehabilitation in estuarine ecosystems by necessity requires quantifying relationships between dynamic estuarine processes and sensitive indicators of ecosystem function. While we do discuss temperate systems in general, emphasis is placed on anadromous salmon habitats in the Pacific Northwest because anadromous fishes are such a major focus of rehabilitation efforts, and present some of the greater challenges in linking function of one segment of their life history to conditions in a specific habitat. We begin with a basic overview of the ecological and socioeconomic significance of, as well as anthropogenic effects on, estuaries. Next, we briefly summarize the various kinds of estuarine rehabilitation historically practiced in temperate regions, and review estuarine rehabilitation monitoring design and methods, highlighting the unique challenges involved in monitoring estuarine systems. We then close with a summary and conclusions.

  17. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  18. Lateral Mixing Processes in an Estuary: San Francisco Bay and its Exchange With Perimeter Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVean, L. J.; Stacey, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Observations from the South San Francisco Bay are presented to examine lateral mixing processes in an estuary. Irregularities in the shoreline lead to lateral density gradients that are set up by tidal trapping, which disrupts the phasing of flows and scalar concentrations along the estuary's axis. In South San Francisco Bay, thousands of acres of salt ponds are being breached to the Bay's influence for the first time in decades as part of a landscape-scale salt marsh restoration project. The tides deliver salt, sediment, and nutrients to the subsided ponds, aggrading their surfaces and converting them to marsh. These newly inter-tidal ponds around the perimeter of the South San Francisco Bay constitute a highly irregular shoreline, capable of initiating steep, periodic lateral density gradients. In this study, we focus on a small cluster of salt ponds and the tidal slough to which they were breached. The exchange between the tidal slough and the ponds is representative of the larger estuary, but of a spatial scale small enough that we can conduct field experiments to examine the flows and transport of scalars in detail. We conducted two boat-mounted transecting surveys of the tidal slough in June and July of 2008, during which we collected profiles of velocity with a down-looking 1200 kHz ADCP, continuous CTD measurements of surface water temperature and salinity, and discrete CTD profiles of salinity and temperature. We have observed that water and salt are trapped in the ponds on the flood tide, and released on the ebb out of phase with the slough's primary salinity gradient. Additionally, the momentum of the ebbing flow in the channel confines the pond effluent to the near bank just down-estuary of the breach. This leads to the coincidence of two distinct water masses, and a sharp change in salinity of 3 PSU over a distance less than 10 meters. We use our data to construct detailed velocity and density fields across and along the tidal slough as the lateral

  19. ESTUARINE AND SCALAR PATTERNS OF INVASION IN THE SOFT-BOTTOM BENTHIC COMMUNITIES OF THE SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial patterns of nonindigenous species in seven subtidal soft-bottom communities in the San Francisco Estuary were quantified. Sixty nonindigenous species were found out of the 533 taxa enumerated (11%). Patterns of invasion across the communities were evaluated using a ...

  20. From seasonal patterns to a reference situation in an estuarine environment: Example of the small fish and shrimp fauna of the Gironde estuary (SW France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobry, Jérémy; Lepage, Mario; Rochard, Eric

    2006-10-01

    Detecting changes in animal communities suggests that a reference situation exists. It is a particularly difficult task in estuarine environments that are complex and fluctuate with time. Effects of human pressures are difficult to assess due to the scarcity or even the lack of evaluation and monitoring systems. In order to detect anomalies in the functioning of the system and to identify effects of perturbations upon populations and communities, it is necessary to analyse the dynamics in order to infer a reference state. This work aims to describe an approach based on K-Tab analyses and allows to define an average situation called "compromise" which is then compared to a single year of data. In this situation, the Gironde estuary, which has been monitored monthly from the 1980s, appears to be a very relevant case study. This paper focuses on spatial and temporal variations in species composition of fish and shrimp assemblages in the mesohaline and oligohaline stretches of the estuary and demonstrates a strong downstream-upstream structuring of species composition. Seasonal structure of the biological assemblages is highlighted and a biomass transfer in the water column between summer and winter is noticed. The habitat suitability is mainly discussed in terms of hydraulic regime but could also be discussed in terms of trophic resources availability. No important differences in the spatial distribution of the fish and shrimp assemblages can be detected between the year 2000 and the reference situation however the method is probably more relevant when detecting trends rather than single anomalies in the structure of the assemblages.

  1. Morphological responses of an estuarine intertidal mudflat to constructions since 1978 to 2005: The Seine estuary (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvilliez, Antoine; Deloffre, Julien; Lafite, Robert; Bessineton, Christophe

    2009-03-01

    Since 1834 the Seine estuary (France) has been the site of numerous construction projects with the aim to accommodate and secure boat traffic. Since 1978, the increasing of the activities of Le Havre port, located at the mouth of the estuary, has accelerated the construction work rate. Several dykes, a bridge, and new port facilities have been constructed in rapid succession, modifying considerably the hydrodynamic conditions which sustain a partially vegetated sandy-muddy tidal flat located in the North bank of the estuary between the new port of Le Havre and the Normandy bridge achieved in 1995. The present study deals with the morphological evolution of this zone from 1978 to 2005. The use of a low altitude remote sensing technique combined with traditional methods of ground survey and probes allow to demonstrate the impact of human activities on sedimentary and vegetation dynamics. The Northern mudflat of the estuary is the most affected by these human activities, which surface have reduced of 62% during the last 27 years with an intensified local erosion during the last 27 months corresponding to a loss 1 250 000 m 3 of fine-grained sediment. At the same time, the general sanding up in the channel of the zone has caused a loss of more than 31% of the tidal prism, more than three quarters of which occurred during the last three years. Results also establish that the response times of the sedimentary or topographic readjustment to an installation depend on the extent and the nature of the construction. In fact, the sedimentary readjustments to an installation can be delayed by up to 10 years in the case of the Seine estuary. This delay is explained by a rapid succession of construction works which may occult the effect of a single installation. Except in the case of a dyke built perpendicular to ebb and flood currents, the impacts of these installations reach a hydro-sedimentary equilibrium on the level between 1 and 7 years after their completion.

  2. Comparison of the basin-scale effect of dredging operations and natural estuarine processes on suspended sediment concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) data from San Pablo Bay, California, were analyzed to compare the basin-scale effect of dredging and disposal of dredged material (dredging operations) and natural estuarine processes. The analysis used twelve 3-wk to 5-wk periods of mid-depth and near-bottom SSC data collected at Point San Pablo every 15 min from 1993-1998. Point San Pablo is within a tidal excursion of a dredged-material disposal site. The SSC data were compared to dredging volume, Julian day, and hydrodynamic and meteorological variables that could affect SSC. Kendall's ??, Spearman's ??, and weighted (by the fraction of valid data in each period) Spearman's ??w correlation coefficients of the variables indicated which variables were significantly correlated with SSC. Wind-wave resuspension had the greatest effect on SSC. Median water-surface elevation was the primary factor affecting mid-depth SSC. Greater depths inhibit wind-wave resuspension of bottom sediment and indicate greater influence of less turbid water from down estuary. Seasonal variability in the supply of erodible sediment is the primary factor affecting near-bottom SSC. Natural physical processes in San Pablo Bay are more areally extensive, of equal or longer duration, and as frequent as dredging operations (when occurring), and they affect SSC at the tidal time scale. Natural processes control SSC at Point San Pablo even when dredging operations are occurring.

  3. Seasonal variation in sources and processing of particulate organic carbon in the Pearl River estuary, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Ye, Feng; Xu, Shendong; Jia, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) in the Pearl River estuary (PRE), South China, along a salinity gradient from freshwater to seawater in four months was studied in order to determine its temporal and spatial changes in source and processing. Analytical parameters included chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), POC, and carbon isotopic composition of POC and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CPOC, δ13CDIC). POC varied greatly from freshwater to seawater, exhibiting a significant power law distribution with a rapid decrease (from >2.5 mg l-1 to <0.9 mg l-1) in a narrow salinity range of 0-5 and then a slow decline to ˜0.4 mg l-1 along the large salinity gradient in the estuary. POC was sourced predominantly from in situ phytoplankton, and hence largely reflective of primary production, in February, August, and November as indicated by mostly lower POC/Chl-a values (<200), and significant correlation between POC and Chl-a, as well as between δ13CPOC and δ13CDIC. But in May, soil-derived OC was dominant in freshwater and low salinity estuarine water, as suggested by low POC% in total suspended substance, low Chl-a values and high POC/Chl-a ratios, and higher δ13CPOC values that was not in parallel with δ13CDIC excursion. The offset between δ13CPOC and phytoplankton δ13C (inferred from δ13CDIC) was trivial or positive in salinity <12, but then became negative downstream, which was likely suggestive of biogeochemical change from net respiration in the upper estuary to net production in the lower and outer estuary. Our results demonstrated that in situ phytoplankton was the dominant source to the estuarine POC pool during most seasons of a year, except in May in the first phase of wet season when rainfall and river flux increased abruptly causing intensive flushing effect. We further suggested that POC may be undergone intensive processing within the PRE, which is important for understanding organic carbon delivery in this vigorous land-ocean interface.

  4. Major hydrogeochemical processes in an acid mine drainage affected estuary.

    PubMed

    Asta, Maria P; Calleja, Maria Ll; Pérez-López, Rafael; Auqué, Luis F

    2015-02-15

    This study provides geochemical data with the aim of identifying and quantifying the main processes occurring in an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) affected estuary. With that purpose, water samples of the Huelva estuary were collected during a tidal half-cycle and ion-ion plots and geochemical modeling were performed to obtain a general conceptual model. Modeling results indicated that the main processes responsible for the hydrochemical evolution of the waters are: (i) the mixing of acid fluvial water with alkaline ocean water; (ii) precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates (schwertmannite) and hydroxides (ferrihydrite); (iii) precipitation of Al hydroxysulfates (jurbanite) and hydroxides (amorphous Al(OH)3); (iv) dissolution of calcite; and (v) dissolution of gypsum. All these processes, thermodynamically feasible in the light of their calculated saturation states, were quantified by mass-balance calculations and validated by reaction-path calculations. In addition, sorption processes were deduced by the non-conservative behavior of some elements (e.g., Cu and Zn). PMID:25530015

  5. Shock, stress or signal? Implications of freshwater flows for a top-level estuarine predator.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew D; van der Meulen, Dylan E; Ives, Matthew C; Walsh, Chris T; Reinfelds, Ivars V; Gray, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River). Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47-89 cm total length) were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time) in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4) tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8). High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed.

  6. Shock, Stress or Signal? Implications of Freshwater Flows for a Top-Level Estuarine Predator

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew D.; van der Meulen, Dylan E.; Ives, Matthew C.; Walsh, Chris T.; Reinfelds, Ivars V.; Gray, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River). Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47–89 cm total length) were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time) in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4) tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8). High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed. PMID:24752585

  7. Changes to processes in estuaries and coastal waters due to intense multiple pressures - An introduction and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Steven B.; Jennerjahn, Tim C.; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Zhang, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    From the 2013 ECSA conference 'Estuaries and Coastal Areas in Times of Intense Change' a theme emerged that has ended up being the focus of this Special Issue of Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science, namely 'Changes to processes in estuaries and coastal waters due to intense multiple pressures'. Many parts of the world are continuing to experience unprecedented rates of economic growth, and those responsible for managing coastal and estuarine areas must respond accordingly. At the same time, global climate change and sea level rise are also continuing, placing new or more intense pressures on coastal areas that must be dealt with in ways that are as far as possible managed as a result of good scientific understanding. There are other pressures too, which depend on the system concerned. This article provides an overview of the papers contained within the Special Issue and provides a discussion of how these fit within the main theme of intense multiple stressors, considering how a balance can be achieved between the needs of various different stakeholders and interest groups, and the sustainability of the system concerned. We categorise the papers in four main groupings: (1) stressors related to sea level rise; (2) stressors related to changes in fresh water inputs; (3) stressors related to anthropogenic pollution; and (4) the use of indicators as a means of assessing the effects of stressors, and reflect on the fact that despite the diversity of different challenges and geographical regions involved many of the approaches and discussions contained within the Special Issue have strong similarities, leading to a set of overarching principles that should be considered when making recommendations on management strategies.

  8. Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical estuaries are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), a small and shallow estuary located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the estuary. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the estuary are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the estuary. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire estuary. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern.

  9. Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E-Estuary has three elements: an estuarine geo-referenced relational database, watershed GIS coverages, and tools to support decision-making. To facilita...

  10. Loss and self-restoration of macrobenthic diversity in reclamation habitats of estuarine islands in Yangtze Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weiwei; Liu, Zhiquan; Yang, Yang; Huang, Youhui; Fan, Bin; Jiang, Qichen; Zhao, Yunlong

    2016-02-15

    In this study, macrobenthic diversity data were collected from intertidal habitats of island wetlands in Yangtze Estuary before and after reclamation. Three survey regions based on habitat features were investigated: protected region, normal region, and self-restored region. The pattern of diversity variation showed a sharp decrease in reclamation sites and an obvious increase in vegetated sites of the self-restored region before and after reclamation. A declining trend in habitat health was observed in reclamation sites, but the degree of perturbation was relatively weaker in protected region than in normal region. The vegetated site showed a better self-restoration of biodiversity than the bald site. These results suggest that reclamation may have a negative influence on biodiversity and habitat health status in the intertidal wetland. Also, there is a possibility of self-restoration in tidal flats disturbed by reclamation and the resistance effect in nature reserve may reduce the disturbances resulting from reclamation.

  11. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Ecology of Estuaries: Anthropogenic Effects represents the most definitive and comprehensive source of reference information available on the human impact on estuarine ecosystems. The book discusses both acute and insidious pollution problems plaguing these coastal ecotones. It also provides a detailed examination of the deleterious and pervasive effects of human activities on biotic communities and sensitive habitat areas in estuaries. Specific areas covered include organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, dredging and dredge-spoil disposal, radionuclides, as well as other contaminants and processes. The diverse components of these anthropogenic influences are assembled in an organized framework and presented in a clear and concise style that will facilitate their understanding.

  12. Circulation and physical processes within the San Gabriel River Estuary during summer 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Xu, Jingping; Stein, Eric D.; Noble, Marlene A.; Gartner, Anne L.

    2007-01-01

    The Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP) is developing a hydrodynamic model of the SGR estuary, which is part of the comprehensive water-quality model of the SGR estuary and watershed investigated by SCCWRP and other local agencies. The hydrodynamic model will help understanding of 1) the exchange processes between the estuary and coastal ocean; 2) the circulation patterns in the estuary; 3) upstream natural runoff and the cooling discharge from PGS. Like all models, the SGR hydrodynamic model is only useful after it is fully calibrated and validated. In May 2005, SCCWRP requested the assistance of the U.S. geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology team (CMG) in collecting data on the hydrodynamic conditions in the estuary during the summer dry season. The summer was chosen for field data collection as this was assumed to be the season with the greatest potential for chronic degraded water quality due to low river flow and high thermal stratification within the estuary (due to both higher average air temperature and PGS output). Water quality can be degraded in winter as well, when higher river discharge events bring large volumes of water from the Los Angeles basin into the estuary. The objectives of this project were to 1) collect hydrodynamic data along the SGR estuary; 2) study exchange processes within the estuary through analysis of the hydrodynamic data; and 3) provide field data for model calibration and validation. As the data only exist for the summer season, the results herein only apply to summer conditions.

  13. Mechanisms driving estuarine water quality: A 3D biogeochemical model for informed management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild-Allen, Karen; Skerratt, Jenny; Whitehead, Jason; Rizwi, Farhan; Parslow, John

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries are amongst the most productive marine ecosystems of the world but are also some of the most degraded due to coastal urban development. Sparse sampling of complex interactions between estuarine physics, sediment transport, chemistry, and biology limits understanding of the processes controlling estuarine water quality and confounds active management. We use a 3D coupled hydrodynamic, sediment and biogeochemical model to identify the key mechanisms driving fine-scale fluctuations in water quality in a temperate micro-tidal salt wedge estuary [Derwent Estuary, Tasmania]. Model results are dynamically consistent with relatively sparse monitoring data collected over a seasonal cycle and are considered to be a plausible hypothesis of sub-monitoring scale processes occurring in the estuary. The model shows enhanced mixing of nutrients across the pycnocline downstream of the salt wedge front that supports a persistent phytoplankton bloom. The length and flow regime of the estuary results in nutrient recycling and retention in the estuarine circulation driving a decline in bottom water dissolved oxygen in the mid- and upper-reaches. A budget analysis of modelled nitrogen suggests high levels of denitrification are critical to the maintenance of existing water quality. Active estuarine management focused on the improvement of bottom water dissolved oxygen for ecological health reasons must either concurrently reduce anthropogenic nitrogen loads or be sure to maintain high levels of microbial denitrification for net water quality improvement.

  14. Simple processes drive unpredictable differences in estuarine fish assemblages: Baselines for understanding site-specific ecological and anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheaves, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Predicting patterns of abundance and composition of biotic assemblages is essential to our understanding of key ecological processes, and our ability to monitor, evaluate and manage assemblages and ecosystems. Fish assemblages often vary from estuary to estuary in apparently unpredictable ways, making it challenging to develop a general understanding of the processes that determine assemblage composition. This makes it problematic to transfer understanding from one estuary situation to another and therefore difficult to assemble effective management plans or to assess the impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbance. Although system-to-system variability is a common property of ecological systems, rather than being random it is the product of complex interactions of multiple causes and effects at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. I investigate the drivers of differences in estuary fish assemblages, to develop a simple model explaining the diversity and complexity of observed estuary-to-estuary differences, and explore its implications for management and conservation. The model attributes apparently unpredictable differences in fish assemblage composition from estuary to estuary to the interaction of species-specific, life history-specific and scale-specific processes. In explaining innate faunal differences among estuaries without the need to invoke complex ecological or anthropogenic drivers, the model provides a baseline against which the effects of additional natural and anthropogenic factors can be evaluated.

  15. Two-dimensional distribution of living benthic foraminifera in anoxic sediment layers of an estuarine mudflat (Loire estuary, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Metzger, E.; Mouret, A.; Cesbron, F.; Knoery, J.; Rozuel, E.; Launeau, P.; Nardelli, M. P.; Jorissen, F. J.; Geslin, E.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new rapid and accurate protocol to simultaneously sample benthic living foraminifera in two dimensions in a centimetre-scale vertical grid and dissolved iron and phosphorus in two dimensions at high resolution (200 μm). Such an approach appears crucial for the study of foraminiferal ecology in highly dynamic and heterogeneous sedimentary systems, where dissolved iron shows a strong variability at the centimetre scale. On the studied intertidal mudflat of the Loire estuary, foraminiferal faunas are dominated by Ammonia tepida, which accounts for 92 % of the living (CellTracker Green(CTG)-labelled) assemblage. The vertical distribution shows a maximum density in the oxygenated 0-0.4 cm surface layer. A sharp decrease is observed in the next 2 cm, followed by a second, well-defined maximum in the suboxic sediment layer (3-8 cm depth). The presented method yields new information concerning the 2-D distribution of living A. tepida in suboxic layers. First, the identification of recent burrows by visual observation of the sediment cross section and the burrowing activity as deduced from the dissolved iron spatial distribution show no direct relation to the distribution of A. tepida at the centimetre scale. This lack of relation appears contradictory to previous studies (Aller and Aller, 1986; Berkeley et al., 2007). Next, the heterogeneity of A. tepida in the 3-8 cm depth layer was quantified by means of Moran's index to identify the scale of parameters controlling the A. tepida distribution. The results reveal horizontal patches with a characteristic length of 1-2 cm. These patches correspond to areas enriched in dissolved iron likely generated by anaerobic degradation of labile organic matter. These results suggest that the routine application of our new sampling strategy could yield important new insights about foraminiferal life strategies, improving our understanding of the role of these organisms in coastal marine ecosystems.

  16. Persistent organochlorine residues in estuarine and marine sediments from Ha Long Bay, Hai Phong Bay, and Ba Lat Estuary, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hong, S H; Yim, U H; Shim, W J; Oh, J R; Viet, P H; Park, P S

    2008-07-01

    To assess the organochlorine contamination in the northeast coastal environment of Vietnam, a total of 41 surface sediments were collected from Ha Long Bay, Hai Phong Bay, and Ba Lat estuary, and analyzed for their organochlorine content. Organochlorine compounds (OCs) were widely distributed in the Vietnamese coastal environment. Among the OCs measured, DDT compounds predominated with concentrations ranging from 0.31 to 274 ng g(-1). The overall contamination level of DDTs in coastal sediments from northern Vietnam is comparable with those from other Asian countries. However, concentrations exceeding 100 ng g(-1) are comparable with high concentrations reported from India and China, the largest DDT consumers in the world. The overall concentrations of PCBs, HCHs, and chlordanes in surface sediments were in the ranges of 0.04-18.71 ng g(-1), not detected (n.d.) - 1.00 ng g(-1), and n.d. - 0.75 ng g(-1), respectively. Ha Long Bay and Hai Phong Bay were relatively more contaminated with DDTs and PCBs than other regions, respectively. In contrast, the distribution of HCHs was relatively homogeneous. OCs contamination in the coastal environment of Vietnam is closely related to shipping and industrial activities. The levels of DDT compounds in harbors and industrial areas exceeded their sediment quality guideline values suggested by Environment Canada [CCME (Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment), 2002. Canadian sediment quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. In: Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines. Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, Winnipeg, MB] and Australian and New Zealand [ANZECC and ARMCANZ, 2000. National water quality management strategy. Paper No. 4, Australian and New Zealand Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Water Quality, vol. 1, The Guidelines. Australia. Document: http://www.deh.gov.au/water/quality/nwqms/volume1.html], indicating that adverse effects may occur to marine species in that areas.

  17. SUSPENDED AND BENTHIC SEDIMENT RELATIONSHIPS IN THE YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON: NUTRIENT PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of nutrient loading and subsequent nutrient processing are fundamental for determining biogeochemical processes in rivers and estuaries. In Oregon coastal watersheds, nutrient transport is strongly seasonal with up to 94% of the riverine dissolved nitrate and silic...

  18. Tidal resuspension and transport processes of fine sediment within the river plume in the partially-mixed Changjiang River estuary, China: A personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, John Z.

    2010-09-01

    This paper summarizes process-oriented field and numerical studies undertaken on the river plume in the partially-mixed Changjiang River estuary. Both estuarine circulation and tidal asymmetry are of great importance to the fine sediment processes. Mean suspended sediment concentration (C¯) and bottom shear stress are the dominant physical parameters controlling the flocculation and settling velocities ( ws) of mud flocs in suspension. Two important physical processes are revealed by acoustic imaging, i.e. (i) the near-bed impulsive resuspension and (ii) the transport processes driven by fine sediment-induced plumes during a spring tide. A turbidity maximum, associated with a suspended sediment front, is observed. Its formation is caused mainly by tidal asymmetry, near-bed periodic tidal resuspension and turbulence suppression by suspension/salinity stratifications. A conceptual sketch of the turbidity maximum is cautiously proposed for the Changjiang River estuary. Four different settling velocity equations, taking flocculation into account, have different effects on the modeled concentration profiles of fine sediment: apparently, Cao and Wang (1994, pp. 252-253) would be the best for spring tide and Thorn (1982, Fig. 3/page 66) for neap tide. Both tidal acceleration and tidal deceleration have strong effects on the concentration profiles of fine sediment within the Changjiang River estuary.

  19. Focusing on the Interfaces, Estuaries and Redox Transition Zones, for Understanding the Microbial Processes and Biogeochemical Cycling of Carbon under the Looming Influence of Global Warming and Anthropogenic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries are the natural interface between terrestrial and marine ecosystems. These are also the zones where human activities exert the strongest impact on the earth and ocean environments. Due to high pressure from the effects of global warming and anthropogenic activities, many estuaries are deteriorating and experiencing significant change of the ecological processes and environmental functions. Certain fundamental microbial processes, including carbon fixation and respiration, have been changing as responses to and consequences of the altered estuarine environment and geochemistry. Increased inputs of terrigenous and anthropogenic organic materials and nutrients and elevated temperature make estuaries easy to be subjected to harmful algal blooms and hypoxic and even anoxic events. The change of the redox status of the estuarine and coastal waters and the increased nutrient loads such as that from terrestrial nitrate stimulate anaerobic respiration processes, such as nitrate reduction and denitrification. This may have strong negative impact on the marine environment, ecosystem and even climate, such as those caused by greenhouse gas production (N2O, CH4) by anaerobic microbial processes. In addition, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation. In this regard, the ecological function of the estuarine ecosystem may be altered and the ecological efficiency may be lowered, as less energy is produced by the microbial respiration process and less carbon is fixed by phytoplankton. However, on the other side, in hypoxic and anoxic waters, inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic microorganisms may happen, such as those via the chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying sulfur oxidizing process and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process. Global warming and anthropogenic perturbations may have lowered the diversity, complexity, stability and sustainability of

  20. Straining and advection contributions to the mixing process in the Patos Lagoon estuary, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Wilian C.; Fernandes, Elisa H. L.; Rocha, Luiz A. O.

    2011-03-01

    The estuarine area of coastal lagoons and freshwater-influenced regions presents periodically stratified and destratified conditions. The Patos Lagoon, one of the most important hydrological resources in South America, is located in the southernmost part of Brazil and exhibits such variable conditions. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the contributions of straining and advection to the modulation of stratification conditions in the Patos Lagoon estuarine region using potential energy anomaly budgets. This study was based a three-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical model that provided information for the potential energy anomaly equation and wavelet analysis. Results from the potential energy anomaly time series revealed strong variability over a timescale of several days following local wind action and the river discharge pattern. Each part of the estuary exhibited contrasting regimes that were spatially distributed with a different balance of terms. The upper part was dominated by along-shore currents associated with east-west wind component and gravitational flux. Contribution from cross-shore advection became important in the middle part of the estuary, where there was an increase in superficial area observed. The lower region was controlled by the north-south wind component being influenced by advection, cross-shore straining, and transversal circulation, suggesting that current velocity maintained transversal pressure gradients and further circulation. Nonlinear interactions between deviations in the dispersion terms and vertical density and velocity were important everywhere but were associated with modulation effects.

  1. Biogeochemistry of Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdige, David J.

    2007-12-01

    Whether you are interested in material flux from the continents to the oceans or whether the oysters set down in front of you at a waterfront restaurant may have come from polluted waters, we know estuaries are important places. However, anyone attempting to summarize and synthesize the long and rich literature of estuarine research is presented with a daunting task. This is because beyond the concept of an estuary being the transition zone where ``fresh water meets seawater,'' the exact definition of an estuary is not uniformly agreed upon by scientists in this field. Also, estuaries-regardless of how they are defined-tend to be highly heterogeneous, in both space and time. Against this backdrop, Thomas Bianchi's Biogeochemistry of Estuaries successfully tackles its subject matter and is an exciting addition to the field of estuarine research.

  2. The use of mechanistic descriptions of algal growth and zooplankton grazing in an estuarine eutrophication model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, M. E.; Walker, S. J.; Wallace, B. B.; Webster, I. T.; Parslow, J. S.

    2003-03-01

    A simple model of estuarine eutrophication is built on biomechanical (or mechanistic) descriptions of a number of the key ecological processes in estuaries. Mechanistically described processes include the nutrient uptake and light capture of planktonic and benthic autotrophs, and the encounter rates of planktonic predators and prey. Other more complex processes, such as sediment biogeochemistry, detrital processes and phosphate dynamics, are modelled using empirical descriptions from the Port Phillip Bay Environmental Study (PPBES) ecological model. A comparison is made between the mechanistically determined rates of ecological processes and the analogous empirically determined rates in the PPBES ecological model. The rates generally agree, with a few significant exceptions. Model simulations were run at a range of estuarine depths and nutrient loads, with outputs presented as the annually averaged biomass of autotrophs. The simulations followed a simple conceptual model of eutrophication, suggesting a simple biomechanical understanding of estuarine processes can provide a predictive tool for ecological processes in a wide range of estuarine ecosystems.

  3. Using stable isotopes and models to explore estuarine linkages at multiple scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine managers need tools to respond to dynamic stressors that occur in three linked environments – coastal ocean, estuaries and watersheds. Models have been the tool of choice for examining these dynamic systems because they simplify processes and integrate over multiple sc...

  4. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-03-01

    This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ≤1 day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

  5. Foraging ecology of sanderlings Calidris alba wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine intertidal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Pedro M.; Alves, José A.; Catry, Teresa; Granadeiro, José P.

    2015-10-01

    Outside the breeding season, most shorebirds use either estuarine or non-estuarine intertidal areas as foraging grounds. The sanderling Calidris alba is mostly associated with coastal sandy beaches, a habitat which is currently at risk worldwide due to increasing coastal erosion, but may also use estuarine sites as alternative foraging areas. We aimed to compare the trophic conditions for sanderlings wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine sites within and around the Tejo estuary, Portugal, where these two alternative wintering options are available within a relatively small spatial scale. To achieve this, we analysed sanderling diet, prey availability, foraging behaviour, and time and energy budgets in the different substrates available in estuarine and non-estuarine sites. In terms of biomass, the most important sanderling prey in the estuarine sites were siphons of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana, polychaetes, staphylinids and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae. In non-estuarine sites the main prey were polychaetes, the bivalve Donax trunculus and chironomid larvae. Both food availability and energetic intake rates were higher on estuarine sites, and sanderlings spent a higher proportion of time foraging on non-estuarine sites. In the estuary, sanderlings foraged in muddy-sand substrate whenever it was available, achieving higher intake rates than in sandy substrates. In the non-estuarine sites they used both sandy and rocky substrates throughout the tidal cycle but had higher intakes rates in sandy substrate. Estuarine sites seem to offer better foraging conditions for wintering sanderlings than non-estuarine sites. However, sanderlings only use muddy-sand and sandy substrates, which represent a small proportion of the intertidal area of the estuary. The extent of these substrates and the current sanderling density in the estuary suggest it is unlikely that the estuary could provide alternative wintering habitat for sanderlings if they face habitat loss and

  6. Estuarine Food for Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M�ller-Solger, A. B.; M�ller-Navarra, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in animal and human nutrition has shown the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as the n-3 LC-PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These LC-PUFA are needed for healthy development and functioning of the nervous and vascular systems. De novo synthesis or elongation to LC-PUFA in animals is inefficient at best; thus sufficient amounts of these PUFA must be supplied by food sources. Algae, especially diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes, are the quantitatively most important producers of EPA and DHA. These types of algae often dominate estuarine producer communities. The upper San Francisco Estuary is no exception, and we found its LC-PUFA-rich phytoplankton biomass, but not the quantitatively prevalent terrestrial plant detritus, to be highly predictive of zooplankton (Daphnia) growth. In contrast, in freshwater lakes dominated by relatively LC-PUFA-poor phytoplankton, EPA, not total phytoplankton biomass, best predicted Daphnia growth. The commonly high abundance of LC-PUFA-rich algae in estuaries may help explain the high trophic efficiencies in these systems and resulting high consumer production. Moreover, LC-PUFA-rich estuarine food resources may also provide essential nutrition and associated health and evolutionary benefits to land-dwelling consumers of such foods, including humans. Ensuring LC-PUFA-rich, uncontaminated estuarine production is thus an important goal for estuarine restoration and a convincing argument for estuarine conservation.

  7. Measuring hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the Dee estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños, R.; Souza, A.

    2010-03-01

    The capability of monitoring and predicting the marine environment leads to a more sustainable development of coastal and offshore regions. Therefore, the continuous measurement of environmental processes become an important source of information. The present paper shows data collected during 6 years, and in particular during 2008, in the Dee Estuary. The data aims to improve the observations of the mobile sediments in coastal areas and its forcing hydrodynamics and turbulence. Data involves the deployment of instrumented rigs measuring sediment in suspension, currents, waves, sea level, sediment size and bedforms as well as cruise work including grab sampling, CTD profiles and side-scan sonar. The data covers flood and ebb tides during spring and neap periods with moderate and mild wave events, thus, having a good coverage of the processes needed to improve knowledge of sediment transport and the parameterizations used in numerical modelling. The data, in raw and treated, is being banked at BODC (British Oceanographic Data Centre, http://www.bodc.ac.uk/) which is the formal British organization for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environment.

  8. Measuring hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños, R.; Souza, A.

    2010-06-01

    The capability of monitoring and prediction in the marine environment provides information that may allow sustainable development of coastal and offshore regions. Therefore, the continuous measurement of environmental processes becomes an important source of information. The present paper shows data collected during 6 years, and in particular during 2008, in the Dee Estuary. The aim of the data collection is to improve the observations of the mobile sediments in coastal areas and its forcing hydrodynamics and turbulence. Data includes information from the deployment of instrumented rigs measuring sediment in suspension, currents, waves, sea level, sediment size and bedforms as well as cruise work including grab sampling, CTD profiles and side-scan sonar. The data cover flood and ebb tides during spring and neap periods with moderate and mild wave events, thus, having a good coverage of the processes needed to improve knowledge of sediment transport and the parameterizations used in numerical modelling. The data, in raw and treated, are being banked at BODC (British Oceanographic Data Centre, http://www.bodc.ac.uk/) which is the formal British organization for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environment.

  9. Circulation and suspended sediment dynamics in a tropical estuary under different morphological setting.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bárbara P; Schettini, Carlos A F; Pereira, Marçal D; Siegle, Eduardo; Miranda, Luiz B; Andutta, Fernando P

    2016-09-01

    Estuarine processes are directly related to the interaction of its forcing conditions with the local morphology. In this study we assess the implications of the opening of a new inlet on the hydrodynamics and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). A set of physical parameters have been measured in the Itanhém river estuary, a small, shallow and mangrove fringed tropical estuary in Northeastern Brazil. Field surveys have been conducted in August 2007 and January 2008, separated by an important morphological change. Our observations show that even shortening the lower estuary channel in 2 km, the inlet opening did not imply in changes in the estuarine circulation. However, SSC increased after the inlet opening. General estuarine circulation showed synodical modulation of tidal asymmetry and residual suspended sediment transport. The estuary showed flood dominance at spring tide and ebb dominance at neap tide. Although not directly changing the estuarine hydrodynamics, the morphological change resulted in an important increase in SSC. This increase might be related to a facilitated import of inner shelf sediment through a shorter channel, having important implications for the estuarine sedimentation processes.

  10. Circulation and suspended sediment dynamics in a tropical estuary under different morphological setting.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bárbara P; Schettini, Carlos A F; Pereira, Marçal D; Siegle, Eduardo; Miranda, Luiz B; Andutta, Fernando P

    2016-09-01

    Estuarine processes are directly related to the interaction of its forcing conditions with the local morphology. In this study we assess the implications of the opening of a new inlet on the hydrodynamics and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). A set of physical parameters have been measured in the Itanhém river estuary, a small, shallow and mangrove fringed tropical estuary in Northeastern Brazil. Field surveys have been conducted in August 2007 and January 2008, separated by an important morphological change. Our observations show that even shortening the lower estuary channel in 2 km, the inlet opening did not imply in changes in the estuarine circulation. However, SSC increased after the inlet opening. General estuarine circulation showed synodical modulation of tidal asymmetry and residual suspended sediment transport. The estuary showed flood dominance at spring tide and ebb dominance at neap tide. Although not directly changing the estuarine hydrodynamics, the morphological change resulted in an important increase in SSC. This increase might be related to a facilitated import of inner shelf sediment through a shorter channel, having important implications for the estuarine sedimentation processes. PMID:27598844

  11. Sources, Ages, and Alteration of Organic Matter in Estuaries.

    PubMed

    Canuel, Elizabeth A; Hardison, Amber K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes influencing the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in estuaries is important for quantifying the contributions of carbon from land and rivers to the global carbon budget of the coastal ocean. Estuaries are sites of high OM production and processing, and understanding biogeochemical processes within these regions is key to quantifying organic carbon (Corg) budgets at the land-ocean margin. These regions provide vital ecological services, including nutrient filtration and protection from floods and storm surge, and provide habitat and nursery areas for numerous commercially important species. Human activities have modified estuarine systems over time, resulting in changes in the production, respiration, burial, and export of Corg. Corg in estuaries is derived from aquatic, terrigenous, and anthropogenic sources, with each source exhibiting a spectrum of ages and lability. The complex source and age characteristics of Corg in estuaries complicate our ability to trace OM along the river-estuary-coastal ocean continuum. This review focuses on the application of organic biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analyses to estuarine environments and on how these tools have enhanced our ability to discern natural sources of OM, trace their incorporation into food webs, and enhance understanding of the fate of Corg within estuaries and their adjacent waters. PMID:26407145

  12. Sources, Ages, and Alteration of Organic Matter in Estuaries.

    PubMed

    Canuel, Elizabeth A; Hardison, Amber K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes influencing the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in estuaries is important for quantifying the contributions of carbon from land and rivers to the global carbon budget of the coastal ocean. Estuaries are sites of high OM production and processing, and understanding biogeochemical processes within these regions is key to quantifying organic carbon (Corg) budgets at the land-ocean margin. These regions provide vital ecological services, including nutrient filtration and protection from floods and storm surge, and provide habitat and nursery areas for numerous commercially important species. Human activities have modified estuarine systems over time, resulting in changes in the production, respiration, burial, and export of Corg. Corg in estuaries is derived from aquatic, terrigenous, and anthropogenic sources, with each source exhibiting a spectrum of ages and lability. The complex source and age characteristics of Corg in estuaries complicate our ability to trace OM along the river-estuary-coastal ocean continuum. This review focuses on the application of organic biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analyses to estuarine environments and on how these tools have enhanced our ability to discern natural sources of OM, trace their incorporation into food webs, and enhance understanding of the fate of Corg within estuaries and their adjacent waters.

  13. Sources, Ages, and Alteration of Organic Matter in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Hardison, Amber K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes influencing the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in estuaries is important for quantifying the contributions of carbon from land and rivers to the global carbon budget of the coastal ocean. Estuaries are sites of high OM production and processing, and understanding biogeochemical processes within these regions is key to quantifying organic carbon (Corg) budgets at the land-ocean margin. These regions provide vital ecological services, including nutrient filtration and protection from floods and storm surge, and provide habitat and nursery areas for numerous commercially important species. Human activities have modified estuarine systems over time, resulting in changes in the production, respiration, burial, and export of Corg. Corg in estuaries is derived from aquatic, terrigenous, and anthropogenic sources, with each source exhibiting a spectrum of ages and lability. The complex source and age characteristics of Corg in estuaries complicate our ability to trace OM along the river-estuary-coastal ocean continuum. This review focuses on the application of organic biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analyses to estuarine environments and on how these tools have enhanced our ability to discern natural sources of OM, trace their incorporation into food webs, and enhance understanding of the fate of Corg within estuaries and their adjacent waters.

  14. Evidence for enhanced mercury reactivity in response to estuarine mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R.; Lamborg, Carl H.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Balcom, Prentiss H.

    2003-11-01

    Bioaccumulation of methylmercury in coastal U.S. fisheries has led to the issuance of numerous fish consumption advisories, and yet little is known about the processes that make Hg species chemically labile in coastal and estuarine systems. This study examined the role of estuarine mixing in formation of labile Hg complexes (reactive Hg) from relatively refractory Hg-organic associations in river water and characterized the behavior and distribution of Hg species in the Connecticut River estuary during three distinct collection periods. Results indicate that while total Hg partitioning and concentrations remained fairly constant with increasing salinity, the fraction present as reactive Hg concentrations increased, primarily in the particulate phase. Mixing experiments using both natural and prepared waters indicate that riverine organic ligands rapidly scavenge reactive Hg from natural waters on timescales of minutes to hours, while samples free of riverine influence remained much more "reactive." Modeling of the estuarine system suggests that elevated concentrations of chloride and dilution of the dominant organic ligand associated with estuarine mixing enhance reactive Hg and predict a bulk log formation constant for the binding ligand of approximately 21. Analysis of Hg0 production from Hg(II)-spiked, incubated estuarine samples supports the speciation data as higher reactive Hg concentrations and Hg0 production rates were observed in the more saline samples. These results suggest that estuarine mixing may exacerbate Hg methylation, evasion, and bioaccumulation in some systems by promoting the formation of Hg species that are readily labile.

  15. Patterns and processes of larval emergence in an estuarine parasite system.

    PubMed

    Fingerut, Jonathan T; Zimmer, Cheryl Ann; Zimmer, Richard K

    2003-10-01

    Trematode parasites in intertidal estuaries experience constantly varying conditions, with the presence or absence of water potentially limiting larval transport between hosts. Given the short life spans (< or =24 h) of cercariae, emergence timing should be optimized to enhance the probability of successful transmission. In the present study, field measurements and laboratory experiments identified processes that regulate the emergence of cercariae from their first intermediate snail hosts in an intertidal marsh. Larvae emerged over species-specific temperature ranges, exclusively during daylight hours, and only when snails were submerged. The three factors operate over different temporal scales: temperature monthly, light diurnally (24-h period), and water depth tidally (12-h period). Each stimulus creates a necessary condition for the next, forming a hierarchy of environmental cues. Emergence as the tide floods would favor transport within the estuary, and light may trigger direct (downward or upward) swimming toward host habitats. Abbreviated dispersal would retain asexually reproduced cercariae within the marsh, and local mixing would diversify the gene pool of larvae encysting on subsequent hosts. In contrast to the timing of cercarial release, emergence duration was under endogenous control. Duration of emergence decreased from sunrise to sunset, perhaps in response to the diminishing lighted interval as the day progresses. Circadian rhythms that control cercarial emergence of freshwater species (including schistosomes) are often set by the activity patterns of subsequent hosts. In this estuary, however, the synchronizing agent is the tides. Together, exogenous and endogenous factors control emergence of trematode cercariae, mitigating the vagaries of an intertidal environment.

  16. Regional CO2 flux estimates from estuarine environments: a reactive-transport modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Nicolas; Laruelle, Goulven G.; Arndt, Sandra; Regnier, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Estuaries are key components of the land-ocean continuum and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large amounts of terrestrial carbon are channelled through estuaries before reaching the ocean. During estuarine transit, numerous biogeochemical processes transform the carbon flux, resulting in a significant CO2 evasion flux to the atmosphere. The global estuarine CO2 outgassing is evaluated at 0.25±0.25 PgC yr-1. Yet, these estimates rely on the extrapolation of local measurements and the scarcity of such measurements conducts to large uncertainties. Furthermore, the global quantification is biased towards anthropogenically impacted estuarine systems located in industrialized countries. Here we provide a first assessment of the estuarine carbon budget and, in particular, CO2 evasion fluxes using a generic and effective reactive-transport model (RTM) approach that is applicable at the regional scale. The new approach is based on the mutual dependency between estuarine geometry and hydrodynamics and uses idealized estuarine geometries. Global river databases (GLORICH) and watershed model outputs (GlobalNEWS) are used to quantify input fluxes for the generic estuarine model. The new modeling approach provides not only a quantification of the estuarine carbon budget, but also allows disentangling the relative contributions of biogeochemical and physical processes to estuarine CO2 emissions. Preliminary results are presented for the North Eastern coast of the US. Model results are consistent with observations and indicate that the net heterotrophy of these systems is the major contributor to estuarine CO2 fluxes (>50%), followed by outgassing of supersaturated riverine waters and nitrification. Results also highlight the strong seasonality in the biogeochemical dynamics. In addition, significant heterogeneity is observed across different estuaries due to spatial heterogeneities in climate forcing, estuarine geometry or riverine input fluxes. The proposed

  17. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification — Concept and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simenstad, Charles A.; Burke, Jennifer L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Cannon, Charles; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Waite, Ian R.; Counihan, Timothy D.; Jones, Krista L.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the concept, organization, and application of a hierarchical ecosystem classification that integrates saline and tidal freshwater reaches of estuaries in order to characterize the ecosystems of large flood plain rivers that are strongly influenced by riverine and estuarine hydrology. We illustrate the classification by applying it to the Columbia River estuary (Oregon-Washington, USA), a system that extends about 233 river kilometers (rkm) inland from the Pacific Ocean. More than three-quarters of this length is tidal freshwater. The Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification ("Classification") is based on six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. We define and map Levels 1-3 for the entire Columbia River estuary with existing geospatial datasets, and provide examples of Levels 4-6 for one hydrogeomorphic reach. In particular, three levels of the Classification capture the scales and categories of ecosystem structure and processes that are most tractable to estuarine research, monitoring, and management. These three levels are the (1) eight hydrogeomorphic reaches that embody the formative geologic and tectonic processes that created the existing estuarine landscape and encompass the influence of the resulting physiography on interactions between fluvial and tidal hydrology and geomorphology across 230 kilometers (km) of estuary, (2) more than 15 ecosystem complexes composed of broad landforms created predominantly by geologic processes during the Holocene, and (3) more than 25 geomorphic catenae embedded within ecosystem complexes that represent distinct geomorphic landforms, structures, ecosystems, and habitats, and components of the estuarine landscape most likely to change over short time periods.

  18. PREDICTIONS IN AN INVADED WORLD - PART II: USING NICHE MODELS TO PREDICT DISTRIBUTIONS OF MARINE/ESTUARINE SPECIES AT THE ESTUARY SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the potential geographical distributions of nonindigenous species (NIS), we are evaluating the ability of niche models to predict the presence of existing native and NIS species within individual estuaries based on landscape characteristics. One model being ...

  19. Final Report Collaborative Project. Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; MacCready, Parker; Whitney, Michael

    2015-11-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation. The main computational objectives were: 1. To develop computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterizations of estuary and continental shelf mixing processes for use in an Earth System Model (CESM). 2. To develop a two-way nested regional modeling framework in order to dynamically downscale the climate response of particular coastal ocean regions and to upscale the impact of the regional coastal processes to the global climate in an Earth System Model (CESM). 3. To develop computational infrastructure to enhance the efficiency of data transfer between specific sources and destinations, i.e., a point-to-point communication capability, (used in objective 1) within POP, the ocean component of CESM.

  20. Regional carbon and CO2 budgets of North Sea tidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volta, C.; Laruelle, G. G.; Regnier, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the first regional application of the generic estuarine reactive-transport model C-GEM (Carbon-Generic Estuary Model) that is here combined with high-resolution databases to produce a carbon and CO2 budget for all tidal estuaries discharging into the North Sea. Steady-state simulations are performed for yearly-averaged conditions to quantify the carbon processing in the six main tidal estuaries Elbe, Ems, Humber, Scheldt, Thames, and Weser, which show contrasted physical and biogeochemical dynamics and contribute the most to the regional filter. The processing rates derived from these simulations are then extrapolated to the riverine carbon loads of all the other North Sea catchments intercepted by smaller tidal estuarine systems. The Rhine-Meuse estuarine system is also included in the carbon budget and overall, we calculate that the export of organic and inorganic carbon from tidal estuaries to the North sea amounts to 44 and 409 Gmol C yr-1, respectively, while 41 Gmol C are lost annually through CO2 outgassing. The carbon is mostly exported from the estuaries in its inorganic form (>90%), a result that reflects the low organic/inorganic carbon ratio of the riverine waters, as well as the very intense decomposition of organic carbon within the estuarine systems. Our calculations also reveal that with a filtering capacity of 15% for total carbon, the contribution of estuaries to the CO2 outgassing is relatively small. Organic carbon dynamics is dominated by heterotrophic degradation, which also represents the most important contribution to the estuarine CO2 evasion. Nitrification only plays a marginal role in the CO2 dynamics, while the contribution of riverine oversaturated waters to the CO2 outgassing is generally significant and strongly varies across systems.

  1. Human effects on estuarine shoreline decadal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rilo, A.; Freire, P.; Ceia, R.; Mendes, R. N.; Catalão, J.; Taborda, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their sheltered conditions and natural resources, estuaries were always attractive to human activities (industrial, agriculture, residential and recreation). Consequently, the complex interactions between anthropogenic and natural drivers increase estuarine shoreline vulnerability to climate changes impacts. The environmental sustainability of these systems depends on a fragile balance between societal development and natural values that can be further disturbed by climate change effects. This challenging task for scientific community, managers and stakeholders can only be accomplished with interdisplinary approaches. In this context, it seems clear that estuarine management plans should incorporate the concept of change into the planning of policy decisions since these natural dynamic areas are often under human pressure and are recognized as sensitive to climate change effects. Therefore, the knowledge about historical evolution of estuarine shoreline is important to provide new insights on the spatial and temporal dimensions of estuarine change. This paper aims to present and discuss shoreline changes due to human intervention in Tagus estuary, located on the west coast of Portugal. Detailed margins cartography, in a 550m fringe (drawn inland from the highest astronomical tide line), was performed based on 2007 orthophotos (spatial resolution of 0.5 m) analysis. Several classification categories were considered, as urbanized areas, industrial, port and airport facilities, agriculture spaces, green areas and natural zones. The estuarine bed (area bellow the highest astronomical tide line) was also mapped (including human occupation, natural habitats, morpho-sedimentary units) based on the geographic information above and LANSAT 7 TM+ images using image processing techniques. Aerial photographs dated from 1944, 1946, 1948, 1955 and 1958 were analyzed for a set of pilot zones in order to fully understand the decadal shoreline change. Estuarine bed presents

  2. Physical processes and landforms on beaches in short fetch environments in estuaries, small lakes and reservoirs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Karl F.; Jackson, Nancy L.

    2012-02-01

    structures are common and have greater survivability in low-energy environments than high-energy environments; they are cheaper to build; and they have been implemented more frequently to control erosion. Their effect has been to reduce the extent of beach in small water bodies. Beach nourishment projects have been fewer than on exposed shores and the quantities smaller. Many nourishment projects have been implemented for amenity value and have been placed in locations where waves have not been able to create an equilibrium landform. The biggest difference in process controls between estuaries and lakes and reservoirs is in the mechanism for water level change. Tides and surges from external basins are important on estuarine beaches, whereas rainfall, runoff, groundwater flow, evapotranspiration and control by dams are more important in reservoirs and lakes. Future sea level rise will threaten beach environments in estuaries where shore parallel walls will prevent onshore migration of landforms and habitats and will change the number and locations of beaches in unarmored areas. Dam removal will pose a threat to the existence of reservoirs and dammed lakes. Water levels are more dependent on human actions in lakes and reservoirs, so changes can be minimal or increased to a greater extent than in estuaries. Lesser stability and predictability of beaches will complicate future management efforts.

  3. Utilizing remote sensing of Thematic Mapper data to improve our understanding of estuarine processes and their influence on the productivity of estuarine-dependent fisheries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browder, J. A. (Principal Investigator); Rosenthal, A.; May, L. N., Jr.; Bauman, R. H.; Gosselink, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to refine and validate a probabilistic spatial computer model through the analyses of thematic mapper imagery. The model is designed to determine how the interface between marshland and water changes as marshland is converted to water in a disintegrating marsh. Coastal marshland in Louisiana is disintegrating at the rate of approximately 40 sq mi a year, and an evaluation of the potential impact of this loss on the landings of estuarine-dependent fisheries is needed by fisheries managers. Understanding how marshland-water interface changes as coastal marshland is lost is essential to the process of evaluating fisheries effects, because several studies suggest that the production of estuarine-dependent fish and shellfish may be more closely related to the interface between marshland and water than to acreage of marshland. The need to address this practical problem has provided an opportunity to apply some scientifically interesting new techniques to the analyses of satellite imagery. Progress with the development of these techniques is the subject of this report.

  4. Estuaries of the northeastern United States: Habitat and land use signatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman, C.T.; Jaworski, N.; Short, F.T.; Findlay, S.; Warren, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Geographic signatures are physical, chemical, biotic, and human-induced characteristics or processes that help define similar or unique features of estuaries along latitudinal or geographic gradients. Geomorphologically, estuaries of the northeastern U.S., from the Hudson River estuary and northward along the Gulf of Maine shoreline, are highly diverse because of a complex bedrock geology and glacial history. Back-barrier estuaries and lagoons occur within the northeast region, but the dominant type is the drowned-river valley, often with rocky shores. Tidal range and mean depth of northeast estuaries are generally greater when compared to estuaries of the more southern U.S. Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico. Because of small estuarine drainage basins, low riverine flows, a bedrock substrate, and dense forest cover, sediment loads in northeast estuaries are generally quite low and water clarity is high. Tidal marshes, seagrass meadows, intertidal mudflats, and rocky shores represent major habitat types that fringe northeast estuaries, supporting commercially-important fauna, forage nekton and benthos, and coastal bird communities, while also serving as links between deeper estuarine waters and habitats through detritus-based pathways. Regarding land use and water quality trends, portions of the northeast have a history of over a century of intense urbanization as reflected in increased total nitrogen and total phosphorus loadings to estuaries, with wastewater treatment facilities and atmospheric deposition being major sources. Agricultural inputs are relatively minor throughout the northeast, with relative importance increasing for coastal plain estuaries. Identifying geographic signatures provides an objective means for comparing the structure function, and processes of estuaries along latitudinal gradients.

  5. Anthropogenic Carbon Pump in an Urbanized Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Yoon, T. K.; Jin, H.; Begum, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of estuaries as a carbon source has been increasingly recognized over the recent decades. However, constraining sources of CO2 evasion from urbanized estuaries remains incomplete, particularly in densely populated river systems receiving high loads of organic carbon from anthropogenic sources. To account for major factors regulating carbon fluxes the tidal reach of the Han River estuary along the metropolitan Seoul, characterization of organic carbon in the main stem and major urban tributaries were combined with continuous, submersible sensor measurements of pCO2 at a mid-channel location over a year and continuous underway measurements using a submersible sensor and two equilibrator sytems across the estuarine section receiving urban streams. Single-site continuous measurements exhibited large seasonal and diurnal variations in pCO2, ranging from sub-ambient air levels to exceptionally high values approaching 10,000 ppm. Diurnal variations of pCO2 were pronounced in summer and had an inverse relationship with dissolved oxygen, pointing to a potential role of day-time algal consumption of CO2. Cruise measurements displayed sharp pCO2 pulses along the confluences of urban streams as compared with relatively low values along the upper estuary receiving low-CO2 outflows from upstream dams. Large downstream increases in pCO2, concurrent with increases in DOC concentrations and fluorescence intensities indicative of microbially processed organic components, imply a translocation and subsequent dilution of CO2 carried by urban streams and/or fast transformations of labile C during transit along downstream reaches. The unique combination of spatial and temporal continuous measurements of pCO2 provide insights on estuarine CO2 pulses that might have resulted from the interplay between high loads of CO2 and organic C of anthropogenic origin and their priming effects on estuarine microbial processing of terrigenous and algal organic matter.

  6. Particulate organic matter predicts bacterial productivity in a river dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries act as coastal filters for organic and inorganic fluvial materials in which microbial, biogeochemical, and ecological processes combine to transform organic matter and nutrients prior to export to the coastal ocean. The function of this estuarine 'bioreactor' is linked to the residence times of those materials and to rates of microbial heterotrophic activity. Our ability to forecast the impact of global change on estuarine bioreactor function requires an understanding of the basic controls on microbial community activity and diversity. In the Columbia River estuary, the microbial community undergoes a dramatic seasonal shift in species composition during which a spring bacterioplankton community, dominated by Flavobacteriaceae and Oceanospirillales, is replaced by a summer community, dominated by Rhodobacteraceae and several common marine taxa. This annual shift occurs in July, following the spring freshet, when river flow and river chlorophyll concentration decrease and when estuarine water residence time increases. Analysis of a large dataset from 17 research cruises (1990-2014) showed that the composition of particulate organic matter in the estuary changes after the freshet with decreasing organic carbon and nitrogen content, and increasing contribution of marine and autochthonous estuarine organic matter (based on PO13C and pigment ratios). Bacterial production rates (measured as leucine or thymidine incorporation rates) in the estuary respond to this change, and correlate strongly with labile particulate nitrogen concentration and temperature during individual sampling campaigns, and with the concentration of chlorophyll in the Columbia River across all seasons. Regression models suggest that the concentration of labile particulate nitrogen and the rate of bacterial production can be predicted from sensor measurements of turbidity, salinity, and temperature in the estuary and chlorophyll in the river. These results suggest that the quality of

  7. Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

    2006-08-03

    A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding and drainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The

  8. Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

    2006-01-01

    A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding anddrainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The

  9. Global change effects on biogeochemical processes of Argentinian estuaries: an overview of vulnerabilities and ecohydrological adaptive outlooks.

    PubMed

    Kopprio, Germán A; Biancalana, Florencia; Fricke, Anna; Garzón Cardona, John E; Martínez, Ana; Lara, Rubén J

    2015-02-28

    The aims of this work are to provide an overview of the current stresses of estuaries in Argentina and to propose adaptation strategies from an ecohydrological approach. Several Argentinian estuaries are impacted by pollutants, derived mainly from sewage discharge and agricultural or industrial activities. Anthropogenic impacts are expected to rise with increasing human population. Climate-driven warmer temperature and hydrological changes will alter stratification, residence time, oxygen content, salinity, pollutant distribution, organism physiology and ecology, and nutrient dynamics. Good water quality is essential in enhancing estuarine ecological resilience to disturbances brought on by global change. The preservation, restoration, and creation of wetlands will help to protect the coast from erosion, increase sediment accretion rates, and improve water quality by removing excess nutrients and pollutants. The capacity of hydrologic basin ecosystems to absorb human and natural impacts can be improved through holistic management, which should consider social vulnerability in complex human-natural systems.

  10. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  11. Sedimentary environment and facies of St Lucia Estuary Mouth, Zululand, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. I.; Mason, T. R.

    The St. Lucia Estuary is situated on the subtropical, predominantly microtidal Zululand coast. Modern sedimentary environments within the estuary fall into three categories: (1) barrier environments; (2) abandoned channel environments; and (3) estuarine/lagoonal environments. The barrier-associated environment includes tidal inlet channel, inlet beach face, flood-tidal delta, ebb-tidal delta, spit, backspit and aeolian dune facies. The abandoned channel environment comprises washover fan, tidal creek tidal creek delta and back-barrier lagoon facies. The estuarine/lagoonal environment includes subtidal estuarine channel, side-attached bar, channel margin, mangrove fringe and channel island facies. Each sedimentary facies is characterised by sedimentary and biogenic structures, grain-size and sedimentary processes. Vertical facies sequences produced by inlet channel migration and lagoonal infilling are sufficiently distinct to be recognized in the geological record and are typical of a prograding shoreline.

  12. Processing watershed-derived nitrogen in a well-flushed New England estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.R.; Cieri, M.; Peterson, B.J.; Deegan, Linda A.; Vallino, J.; Hughes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Isotopically labeled nitrate (15NO3-) was added continuously to the Rowley estuary, Massachusetts, for 22 d to assess the transport, uptake, and cycling of terrestrially derived nitrogen during a period of high river discharge and low phytoplankton activity. Isotopic enrichment of the 3.5-km tidal prism (150,000 m3) was achieved for the 3 weeks and allowed us to construct a nitrogen mass balance model for the upper estuary. Mean ??15NO3- in the estuary ranged from 300??? to 600???, and approximately 75%-80% of the 15N was exported conservatively as 15NO 3- to the coastal ocean. Essentially all of the 20%-25% of the 15N processed in the estuary occurred in the benthos and was evenly split between direct denitrification and autotrophic assimilation. The lack of water-column 15N uptake was attributed to low phytoplankton stocks and short water residence times (1.2-1.4 d). Uptake of water-column NO3- by benthic autotrophs (enriched in excess of 100???) was a function of NO3- concentration and satisfied up to 15% and 25% of the total nitrogen demand for benthic microalgae and macroalgae, respectively. Approximately 10% of tracer assimilated by benthic autotrophs was mineralized and released back to the water column as 15NH4+. By the end of the study, 15N storage in sediments and marsh macrophytes accounted for 50%-70% of the 15N assimilated in the estuary. These compartments may sequester watershed-derived nitrogen in the estuary for time scales of months to years.

  13. PHYTOPLANKTON-AND DETRITUS-BASED FOOD WEBS IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIERS: LESSONS FROM PENSACOLA BAY FL, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A central theme in estuarine ecology is understanding the connection between riverine delivery of nutrients and organic matter and how these materials are processed within the estuary. Key to this understanding is the ability to quantify the importance of detrital carbon in suppo...

  14. Scavenging Rate Ecoassay: A Potential Indicator of Estuary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Augustine G.; Scanes, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress. PMID:26024225

  15. Assessment of the zinc diffusion rate in estuarine zones.

    PubMed

    Sámano, María Luisa; Pérez, María Luisa; Claramunt, Inigo; García, Andrés

    2016-03-15

    Industrial pressures suffered by estuarine zones leave a pollution record in their sediment. Thus, high concentrations of many heavy metals and some organic compounds are often found in estuarine sediment. This work aims to contribute to the enhancement of water quality management strategies in these zones by studying in detail the diffusive processes that take place between the water and sediment using a two-pronged approach: experimental practice and numerical simulation. To provide an example of the practical application of the methodologies proposed in this paper, the Suances Estuary (northern Spain) was selected as the study zone. This estuary exhibits significant historical pollution and its sediment acts as a continuous internal source of zinc, mainly due to diffusive processes derived from the concentration gradient between the interstitial water at the solid particles of the sediment and the bottom of the water column. The experimentally obtained results, based on 6 case studies, demonstrated the buffering capacity of the system and allowed the determination of the required time for the mass transfer processes to reach an equilibrium state. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of zinc was approximately modeled taking into consideration the high concentration variability observed in sediment along the entire estuary. The convergence between the modeled and the experimental results indicated the required contact time to reach an equilibrium state in a real field situation. PMID:26851870

  16. Comparison of methods for the removal of organic carbon and extraction of chromium, iron and manganese from an estuarine sediment standard and sediment from the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Hatcher, S.A.; Demas, C.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) estuarine sediment 1646 from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and surface sediment collected at two sites in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, were used to evaluate the dilute hydrochloric acid extraction of Cr, Fe and Mn from air-dried and freeze-dried samples that had been treated by one of three methods to remove organic carbon. The three methods for the oxidation and removal of organic carbon were: (1) 30% hydrogen peroxide; (2) 30% hydrogen peroxide plus 0.25 mM pyrophosphate; and (3) plasma oxidation (low-temperature ashing). There was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the percent of organic carbon removed by the three methods. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between air- and freeze-dried samples with respect to the concentration of Cr, Fe and Mn that was extracted, regardless of the extraction technique that was used. Hydrogen peroxide plus pyrophosphate removed the most organic carbon from sediment collected at the site in the Calcasieu River that was upstream from industrial outfalls. Plasma oxidation removed the most organic carbon from the sediment collected at a site in the Calcasieu River close to industrial outfalls and from the NBS estuarine sediment sample. Plasma oxidation merits further study as a treatment for removal of organic carbon. Operational parameters can be chosen to limit the plasma oxidation of pyrite which, unlike other Fe species, will not be dissolved by dilute hydrochloric acid. Preservation of pyrite allows the positive identification of Fe present as pyrite in sediments. ?? 1992.

  17. DEVELOPING A NATIONALLY CONSISTENT APPROACH FOR ASSESSING REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN NUTRIENTS AND BENTHIC BIOLOGICAL CONDITION IN ESTUARINE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying candidate water quality criteria in estuarine waters is confounded by differences among estuaries and biogeographic regions. Addressing these differences is paramount to assess estuarine water quality impairment successfully. We outline an approach to investigate rela...

  18. A framework for investigating general patterns of benthic β-diversity along estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Francisco; Blanchet, Hugues; Hammerstrom, Kamille; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Oliver, John

    2014-08-01

    The description of major patterns in beta (β) diversity is important in order to understand changes in community composition and/or richness at different spatial and temporal scales, and can interrogate processes driving species distribution and community dynamics. Human impacts have pushed many estuarine systems far from their historical baseline of rich, diverse, and productive ecosystems. Despite the ecological and social importance of estuaries, there has not yet been an attempt to investigate patterns of β-diversity and its partitioning along estuarine systems of different continents. We aimed to evaluate if benthic assemblages would show higher turnover than nestedness in tropical than in temperate systems, if well-known impacted estuaries would show greater nestedness than less polluted systems, and to propose a conceptual framework for studying benthic macrofauna beta diversity along estuaries. We analyzed subtidal benthic macrofaunal data from estuaries in Brazil, USA and France. We estimated alpha (α), beta (β) and gamma (γ) diversity for each sampling time in each system, investigated patterns of β -diversity as multivariate dispersion and the partitioning (nestedness and replacement) of β-diversity along each estuary. There was a decrease in the α-diversity along marine to freshwater conditions at most of the estuaries and sampling dates. Beta diversity as multivariate dispersion showed high variability. Most of the estuaries showed a greater proportion of the β-diversity driven by replacement than nestedness. We suggest a conceptual framework for estuaries where relatively pristine estuaries would have their β-diversity mostly driven by replacement while impacted estuaries subjected to several anthropogenic stressors would show total nestedness or total replacement, depending on the stress.

  19. The role of nutrient loading and eutrophication in estuarine ecology.

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J L; Paerl, H W; Tester, P; Richardson, T L

    2001-01-01

    Eutrophication is a process that can be defined as an increase in the rate of supply of organic matter (OM) to an ecosystem. We provide a general overview of the major features driving estuarine eutrophication and outline some of the consequences of that process. The main chemical constituent of OM is carbon (C), and therefore rates of eutrophication are expressed in units of C per area per unit time. OM occurs in both particulate and dissolved forms. Allochthonous OM originates outside the estuary, whereas autochthonous OM is generated within the system, mostly by primary producers or by benthic regeneration of OM. The supply rates of limiting nutrients regulate phytoplankton productivity that contributes to inputs of autochthonous OM. The trophic status of an estuary is often based on eutrophication rates and can be categorized as oligotrophic (<100 g C m(-2) y(-1), mesotrophic (100-300 g C m(-2) y(-1), eutrophic (300-500 g C m(-2) y(-1), or hypertrophic (>500 g C m(-2) y(-1). Ecosystem responses to eutrophication depend on both export rates (flushing, microbially mediated losses through respiration, and denitrification) and recycling/regeneration rates within the estuary. The mitigation of the effects of eutrophication involves the regulation of inorganic nutrient (primarily N and P) inputs into receiving waters. Appropriately scaled and parameterized nutrient and hydrologic controls are the only realistic options for controlling phytoplankton blooms, algal toxicity, and other symptoms of eutrophication in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:11677178

  20. Radium isotopes assess water mixing processes and its application in the Zhujiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyi; Xu, Bochao; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Xiuqin; Nan, Haiming; Jian, Huimin; Jiang, Xueyan; Diao, Shaobo; Gao, Maosheng

    2016-10-01

    Radium (Ra) isotopes are useful for tracing water mass transport and examining estuarine hydrological dynamics. In this study, several hydrological parameters, nutrients, chlorophyll-a (chl-a), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Ra isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra) of surface waters of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary (ZRE) were measured. This was done for both winter (December) and summer (July) seasons, to quantitatively understand the seasonal characteristics of river plume flow rate and trajectories, as well as the ecological response. The results show that Ra concentrations in summer were higher than in winter, especially 224Ra (about 2-5 times higher). The spatial distribution of three Ra isotopes and relative Ra water ages indicated that river water mainly flushed out of ZRE through the western side in winter, where the water transport was about 5 days faster than in the eastern zone. In summer, diluted river water expended to the east side, resulting in fairly similar water ages for both sides of the river mouth. Although nutrients were higher during the summer season, lower chl-a concentrations indicated that reduced primary production might be caused by high SPM (low light penetration). The results obtained from this study will provide knowledge needed for effectively developing and managing the ZRE.

  1. VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE CDOM CAUSED BY PARTITIONING ONTO RIVER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The optical properties and geochemical cycling of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are altered by its sorption to freshwater and estuarine sediments. Measured partition coefficients (Kp) of Satilla River (Georgia) and Cape Fear River estuary (North Carolina) CDOM ran...

  2. Carbon dioxide emissions from estuaries of northern and northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Carlos; Araujo, Moacyr

    2014-01-01

    The carbon dioxide flux through the air–water interface of coastal estuarine systems must be quantified to understand the regional balance of carbon and its transport through adjacent coastal regions. We estimated and calculated the emissions of carbon dioxide (FCO2) and the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) values in 28 estuarine environments at a variety of spatial scales in the northern and northeastern regions of Brazil. The results showed a mean FCO2 (water to air) of 55 ± 45 mmol·m−2·d−1. Additionally, a negative correlation between dissolved oxygen saturation and pCO2 was observed, indicating a control by biological processes and especially by organic matter degradation. This leads to increased dissolved CO2 concentration in estuarine waters which results in a pCO2 that reached 8,638 μatm. Our study suggests that northern and northeastern Brazilian estuaries act as sources of atmospheric CO2. The range of pCO2 observed were similar to those found in inner estuaries in other places around the world, with the exception of a few semi-arid estuaries (Köppen climate classification – BSh) in which record low levels of pCO2 have been detected. PMID:25145418

  3. Processing of the chemical components of estuarine sediment by the lugworm, Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew; Bishop, Ellen

    2006-06-01

    The ability of the deposit feeder, Arenicola marina, to process components of oxic estuarine sediment has been examined by comparing the chemical composition of freshly-voided faecal casts and surficial ambient sediment. Analysis of C, H and N, and major metals (Al and Fe) and trace metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb) was undertaken on the <63 μm fraction of cast-sediment pairs in order to minimise potential effects of grain size variation among samples. In all cases, C, H and N concentrations were lower in biodeposits than in local sediment, and averaged results suggested digestion of between about 15 and 30% of these elements. Nitric acid-extractable metal concentrations in casts and corresponding sediment samples were, in general, analytically indistinguishable. However, after further data normalisation with respect to Al or Fe, casts exhibited slight metal enrichment, presumably because of the weight loss incurred by digestion of (non-metal-bearing) organic matter and the egestion of metals derived from other sources. A protein known to mimic the digestive fluids of A. marina, bovine serum albumin, released between <0.5% (Al, Fe, Mn and Pb) and 15-25% (Cu, Zn and Cd) of acid-soluble metal from both sediment and cast samples. This suggests that, although A. marina is capable of mobilising certain metals in its gut, they tend to re-combine with particles during the formation or egestion of the cast.

  4. A re-examination of fish estuarine dependence: Evidence for connectivity between estuarine and ocean habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Able, Kenneth W.

    2005-07-01

    Our understanding of the recruitment of estuarine fishes has been strongly influenced by two views: first, that estuaries are important nurseries and second, that many species are estuarine dependent. Based on an attempt to review the world-wide literature on these topics, it appears that both of these views have merit but could benefit from additional attention and clarification. The term estuarine dependency is used in a variety of ways depending on the author and context and even how one defines estuary. Further, and perhaps most importantly, we often lack the comparative data on habitat use by fishes in the ocean vs. the estuary to make judgments about dependency. To that end we have analyzed the distribution patterns of fish species along the estuarine-coastal ocean ecotone in southern New Jersey, U.S. to evaluate the fish response. As a result, it appears the degree of estuarine use is quite variable among species, as well as at geographic, annual and cohort-specific scales. Thus, further synthesis is necessary and it might focus on: first, more information on fish use in different types of estuaries across a broad geographical range; second, a better understanding of the functional significance of habitats across the habitat landscapes of the estuary-ocean ecotone; third, any further synthesis needs to incorporate of the role of biotic variables (e.g. predation, competition) in order to enhance our understanding of the degree of estuarine dependency; fourth, we need to determine how freshwater flow into estuaries might influence habitat use especially with regard to the potential role of the offshore estuary.

  5. Deschutes estuary feasibility study: hydrodynamics and sediment transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Douglas A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Lesser, Giles; Stevens, Andrew W.

    2006-01-01

    - Provide the completed study to the CLAMP Steering Committee so that a recommendation about a long-term aquatic environment of the basin can be made. The hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling task developed a number of different model simulations using a process-based morphological model, Delft3D, to help address these goals. Modeling results provide a qualitative assessment of estuarine behavior both prior to dam construction and after various post-dam removal scenarios. Quantitative data from the model is used in the companion biological assessment and engineering design components of the overall study. Overall, the modeling study found that after dam removal, tidal and estuarine processes are immediately restored, with marine water from Budd Inlet carried into North and Middle Basin on each rising tide and mud flats being exposed with each falling tide. Within the first year after dam removal, tidal processes, along with the occasional river floods, act to modify the estuary bed by redistributing sediment through erosion and deposition. The morphological response of the bed is rapid during the first couple of years, then slows as a dynamic equilibrium is reached within three to five years. By ten years after dam removal, the overall hydrodynamic and morphologic behavior of the estuary is similar to the pre-dam estuary, with the exception of South Basin, which has been permanently modified by human activities. In addition to a qualitative assessment of estuarine behavior, process-based modeling provides the ability address specific questions to help to inform decision-making. Considering that predicting future conditions of a complex estuarine environment is wrought with uncertainties, quantitative results in this report are often expressed in terms of ranges of possible outcomes.

  6. Some observations on the effect of vertical density gradients on estuarine turbulent transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. R.; Oduyemi, K. O. K.; Shiono, K.

    1991-04-01

    Measurements of the turbulent fluctuations of the vertical and horizontal components of velocity, salinity and suspended solids concentration have been made near to the limit of salinity intrusion in a moderately high tidal range estuary. Velocity and salinity were monitored at four points up to 3 m above the bed and suspended solids concentration was monitored at 0·5 m above the bed. The data show that the vertical gradients created by solutes and particulate matter affect the velocity turbulence field and hence modify the turbulent mean velocity field. Turbulent fluctuations can be generated either internally or at the bed. The velocity turbulence field is shown to be dependent on relative depth, local gradient Richardson number and acceleration effects. The scalar turbulence fields are shown to depend on at least relative depth, the vertical component of the turbulent velocity fluctuations and the relevant scalar gradient. The mixing length functions used to quantify the turbulent transport processes are shown to depend on the local gradient Richardson number.

  7. PCB-resistant diatoms in the Hudson River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosper, Elizabeth M.; Wurster, Charles F.; Bautista, Mark F.

    1988-02-01

    Diatom cells that are resistant, as well as sensitive, to the toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are widespread throughout the highly polluted Hudson River estuary. A study of the distribution of PCB resistance among populations of the diatoms, Thalassiosira nordenskioldii and Asterionella glacialis, revealed few spatial or temporal patterns for the trait during spring and summer. The number of estuarine clones of A. glacialis tolerant of more than 25 ppb of PCB was greater than twice the number of clones isolated from nearshore waters at Sandy Hook, NJ. This suggests that selection pressure for PCB resistance is greater in the estuary than in the New York Bight apex. If specific sites of selection exist, the mixing of cells within the estuary may be rapid enough to distribute resistant clones throughout the estuary, or the selection process may involve a generalized response to a multitude of pollutants. Several clones of both species tested were not only tolerant of PCB, but were actually enhanced in their growth in the presence of PCB. Such clones were distributed throughout the estuary during both seasons. Selection in the estuary favours not only resistant strains of diatoms, but forms that may utilize organic pollutants.

  8. Fate, bioavailability and toxicity of silver in estuarine environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Ho, Y.B.; Bryan, G.W.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry and bioavailability of Ag contribute to its high toxicity in marine and estuarine waters. Silver is unusual, in that both the dominant speciation reaction in seawater and the processes important in sorbing Ag in sediments favour enhanced bioavailability. Formation of a stable chloro complex favours dispersal of dissolved Ag, and the abundant chloro complex is available to biota. Sequestration by sediments also occurs, but with relatively slow kinetics. Amorphous aggregated coatings enhance Ag accumulation in sediments, as well as Ag uptake from sediments by deposit feeders. In estuaries, the bioaccumulation of Ag increases 56-fold with each unit of increased Ag concentration in sediments. Toxicity for sensitive marine species occurs at absolute concentrations as low as those observed for any nonalkylated metal, partly because bioaccumulation increases so steeply with contamination. The environmental window of tolerance to Ag in estuaries could be narrower than for many elements.

  9. Estuarine fish communities respond to climate variability over both river and ocean basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feyrer, Frederick V.; Cloern, James E.; Brown, Larry R.; Fish, Maxfield; Hieb, Kathryn; Baxter, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are dynamic environments at the land–sea interface that are strongly affected by interannual climate variability. Ocean–atmosphere processes propagate into estuaries from the sea, and atmospheric processes over land propagate into estuaries from watersheds. We examined the effects of these two separate climate-driven processes on pelagic and demersal fish community structure along the salinity gradient in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA. A 33-year data set (1980–2012) on pelagic and demersal fishes spanning the freshwater to marine regions of the estuary suggested the existence of five estuarine salinity fish guilds: limnetic (salinity = 0–1), oligohaline (salinity = 1–12), mesohaline (salinity = 6–19), polyhaline (salinity = 19–28), and euhaline (salinity = 29–32). Climatic effects propagating from the adjacent Pacific Ocean, indexed by the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the euhaline and polyhaline guilds. Climatic effects propagating over land, indexed as freshwater outflow from the watershed (OUT), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the oligohaline, mesohaline, polyhaline, and euhaline guilds. The effects of OUT propagated further down the estuary salinity gradient than the effects of NPGO that propagated up the estuary salinity gradient, exemplifying the role of variable freshwater outflow as an important driver of biotic communities in river-dominated estuaries. These results illustrate how unique sources of climate variability interact to drive biotic communities and, therefore, that climate change is likely to be an important driver in shaping the future trajectory of biotic communities in estuaries and other transitional habitats.

  10. Estuarine fish communities respond to climate variability over both river and ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Feyrer, Frederick; Cloern, James E; Brown, Larry R; Fish, Maxfield A; Hieb, Kathryn A; Baxter, Randall D

    2015-10-01

    Estuaries are dynamic environments at the land-sea interface that are strongly affected by interannual climate variability. Ocean-atmosphere processes propagate into estuaries from the sea, and atmospheric processes over land propagate into estuaries from watersheds. We examined the effects of these two separate climate-driven processes on pelagic and demersal fish community structure along the salinity gradient in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA. A 33-year data set (1980-2012) on pelagic and demersal fishes spanning the freshwater to marine regions of the estuary suggested the existence of five estuarine salinity fish guilds: limnetic (salinity = 0-1), oligohaline (salinity = 1-12), mesohaline (salinity = 6-19), polyhaline (salinity = 19-28), and euhaline (salinity = 29-32). Climatic effects propagating from the adjacent Pacific Ocean, indexed by the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the euhaline and polyhaline guilds. Climatic effects propagating over land, indexed as freshwater outflow from the watershed (OUT), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the oligohaline, mesohaline, polyhaline, and euhaline guilds. The effects of OUT propagated further down the estuary salinity gradient than the effects of NPGO that propagated up the estuary salinity gradient, exemplifying the role of variable freshwater outflow as an important driver of biotic communities in river-dominated estuaries. These results illustrate how unique sources of climate variability interact to drive biotic communities and, therefore, that climate change is likely to be an important driver in shaping the future trajectory of biotic communities in estuaries and other transitional habitats. PMID:25966973

  11. Estuarine fish communities respond to climate variability over both river and ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Feyrer, Frederick; Cloern, James E; Brown, Larry R; Fish, Maxfield A; Hieb, Kathryn A; Baxter, Randall D

    2015-10-01

    Estuaries are dynamic environments at the land-sea interface that are strongly affected by interannual climate variability. Ocean-atmosphere processes propagate into estuaries from the sea, and atmospheric processes over land propagate into estuaries from watersheds. We examined the effects of these two separate climate-driven processes on pelagic and demersal fish community structure along the salinity gradient in the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA. A 33-year data set (1980-2012) on pelagic and demersal fishes spanning the freshwater to marine regions of the estuary suggested the existence of five estuarine salinity fish guilds: limnetic (salinity = 0-1), oligohaline (salinity = 1-12), mesohaline (salinity = 6-19), polyhaline (salinity = 19-28), and euhaline (salinity = 29-32). Climatic effects propagating from the adjacent Pacific Ocean, indexed by the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the euhaline and polyhaline guilds. Climatic effects propagating over land, indexed as freshwater outflow from the watershed (OUT), affected demersal and pelagic fish community structure in the oligohaline, mesohaline, polyhaline, and euhaline guilds. The effects of OUT propagated further down the estuary salinity gradient than the effects of NPGO that propagated up the estuary salinity gradient, exemplifying the role of variable freshwater outflow as an important driver of biotic communities in river-dominated estuaries. These results illustrate how unique sources of climate variability interact to drive biotic communities and, therefore, that climate change is likely to be an important driver in shaping the future trajectory of biotic communities in estuaries and other transitional habitats.

  12. Upwelling relaxation and estuarine plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shivanesh; Pringle, James; Austin, Jay

    2011-09-01

    After coastal upwelling, the water properties in the nearshore coastal region close to estuaries is determined by the race between the new estuarine plume traveling along the coast and the upwelled front (a marker for the old upwelled plume and the coastal pycnocline) returning to the coast under downwelling winds. Away from an estuary, downwelling winds can return the upwelled front to the coast bringing less dense water nearshore. Near the estuary, the estuarine plume can arrive along the coast and return less dense water to the nearshore region before the upwelled front returns to the coast. Where the plume brings less dense water to the coast first, the plume keeps the upwelled front from returning to the coast. In this region, only the plume and the anthropogenic input and larvae associated with the plume waters influence the nearshore after upwelling. We quantify the extent of the region where the plume is responsible for bringing less dense water to the nearshore and keeping the upwelled front from returning to the coast after upwelling. We successfully tested our predictions against numerical experiments and field observations of the Chesapeake plume near Duck, North Carolina. We argue that this alongshore region exists for other estuaries where the time-integrated upwelling and downwelling wind stresses are comparable.

  13. Food Webs in an Estuary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Barbara B.

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on food chains in an estuary. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  14. The Estuary Book: A Guide to Promoting Understanding and Regional Management of Maine's Estuaries and Embayments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffing, Jenny

    The objective of this document is to provide information about estuaries, the impact of uses on the environmental health of an estuary, and what communities and concerned individuals can do to manage and protect their local estuarine resources successfully. Much of the information presented here pertains to other embayments along the Maine coast…

  15. Estuarine environments as rearing habitats for juvenile Coho Salmon in contrasting south-central Alaska watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoem Neher, Tammy D.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Walker, Coowe M.; Baird, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    For Pacific salmon, estuaries are typically considered transitional staging areas between freshwater and marine environments, but their potential as rearing habitat has only recently been recognized. The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine if Coho Salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were rearing in estuarine habitats, and (2) to characterize and compare the body length, age, condition, and duration and timing of estuarine occupancy of juvenile Coho Salmon between the two contrasting estuaries. We examined use of estuary habitats with analysis of microchemistry and microstructure of sagittal otoliths in two watersheds of south-central Alaska. Juvenile Coho Salmon were classified as estuary residents or nonresidents (recent estuary immigrants) based on otolith Sr : Ca ratios and counts of daily growth increments on otoliths. The estuaries differed in water source (glacial versus snowmelt hydrographs) and in relative estuarine and watershed area. Juvenile Coho Salmon with evidence of estuary rearing were greater in body length and condition than individuals lacking evidence of estuarine rearing. Coho Salmon captured in the glacial estuary had greater variability in body length and condition, and younger age-classes predominated the catch compared with the nearby snowmelt-fed, smaller estuary. Estuary-rearing fish in the glacial estuary arrived later and remained longer (39 versus 24 d of summer growth) during the summer than did fish using the snowmelt estuary. Finally, we observed definitive patterns of overwintering in estuarine and near shore environments in both estuaries. Evidence of estuary rearing and overwintering with differences in fish traits among contrasting estuary types refute the notion that estuaries function as only staging or transitional habitats in the early life history of Coho Salmon.

  16. Modelling the water exchanges between an estuary and its underlying aquifer units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratelli, Fulvia; Flipo, Nicolas; David, Pierre-Yann; Pennequin, Didier; Lemoine, Jean Philippe; Bacq, Nicolas; Dupont, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at developing a coupled hydrological surface-subsurface model of estuarine processes. The exchanges between surface water and subsurface water affect the hydro-sedimentary and biogeochemical processes in estuarine environments. The thickness and the hydrodynamic properties of the sediments in an estuary are often characterized by significant spatial variations which influence the exchanges with the subsurface water. A methodology based on the conductance approach is proposed to quantify the water exchanges between an estuary and its underlying aquifer units. An application to the case of the Seine estuary (France) is presented. To this aim, an integrated distributed physically-based hydrological-hydrogeological model (CAWAQS) is used to simulate the surface and groundwater flows in a 9 500 km2 watershed representing the downstream part of the regional Seine River basin (80 000 km2) including its estuary. At the bottom of the estuary, a layer of low-permeability Holocene sediments overlays the aquifer formations (mainly Pleistocene alluvial sediments and Cretaceous chalk). The conductance coefficient is estimated by assuming a vertical flow in series through the low-permeability sediments and the aquifer. Moreover, the low-permeability sediments have been partially dredged to create a navigation channel, were the estuary water is in direct contact with the aquifer. These specificities are taken into account in the model. The water fluxes in the estuary are simulated at a resolution ranging from 100 m to 800 m and daily time step. As a preliminary result, the distribution of the average water fluxes over a 17 year period (1997-2014) has been calculated using an average distribution of water elevation in the estuary. The navigation channel is shown to drain the aquifer system as a consequence of the removal of the low-permeability sediments.

  17. Metagenomic 16s rRNA investigation of microbial communities in the Black Sea estuaries in South-West of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Bobrova, Oleksandra; Kristoffersen, Jon Bent; Oulas, Anastasis; Ivanytsia, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The Black Sea estuaries represent interfaces of the sea and river environments. Microorganisms that inhabit estuarine water play an integral role in all biochemical processes that occur there and form unique ecosystems. There are many estuaries located in the Southern-Western part of Ukraine and some of them are already separated from the sea. The aim of this research was to determine the composition of microbial communities in the Khadzhibey, Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries by metagenomic 16S rDNA analysis. This study is the first complex analysis of estuarine microbiota based on isolation of total DNA from a biome that was further subjected to sequencing. DNA was extracted from water samples and sequenced on the Illumina Miseq platform using primers to the V4 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Computer analysis of the obtained raw sequences was done with QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) software. As the outcome, 57970 nucleotide sequences were retrieved. Bioinformatic analysis of bacterial community in the studied samples demonstrated a high taxonomic diversity of Prokaryotes at above genus level. It was shown that majority of 16S rDNA bacterial sequences detected in the estuarine samples belonged to phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes. The Khadhzibey estuary was dominated by the Proteobacteria phylum, while Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries were characterized by dominance of Cyanobacteria. The differences in bacterial populations between the Khadzhibey, Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries were demonstrated through the Beta-diversity analysis. It showed that the Khadzhibey estuary's microbial community significantly varies from the Sukhyi and Dniester estuaries. The majority of identified bacterial species is known as typical inhabitants of marine environments, however, for 2.5% of microbial population members in the studied estuaries no relatives were determined.

  18. Modeling ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, southwest Florida. II. Nutrient loading, submarine light, and seagrasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, Christopher; Doering, Peter; Wan, Yongshan; Sun, Detong

    2014-12-01

    Short- and long-term changes in estuarine biogeochemical and biological attributes are consequences of variations in both the magnitude and composition of freshwater inputs. A common conceptualization of estuaries depicts nutrient loading from coastal watersheds as the stressor that promotes algal biomass, decreases submarine light penetration, and degrades seagrass habitats. Freshwater inflow depresses salinity while simultaneously introducing colored dissolved organic matter (color or CDOM) which greatly reduces estuarine light penetration. This is especially true for sub-tropical estuaries. This study applied a model of the Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) in southwest Florida to explore the relationships between freshwater inflow, nutrient loading, submarine light, and seagrass survival. In two independent model series, the loading of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus (DIN and DIP) was reduced by 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50% relative to the base model case from 2002 to 2009 (2922 days). While external nutrient loads were reduced by lowering inflow (Q0) in the first series (Q0 series), reductions were accomplished by decreasing the incoming concentrations of DIN and DIP in the second series (NP Series). The model also was used to explore the partitioning of submarine light extinction due to chlorophyll a, CDOM, and turbidity. Results suggested that attempting to control nutrient loading by decreasing freshwater inflow could have minor effects on water column concentrations but greatly influence submarine light and seagrass biomass. This is because of the relative importance of Q0 to salinity and submarine light. In general, light penetration and seagrass biomass decreased with increased inflow and CDOM. Increased chlorophyll a did account for more submarine light extinction in the lower estuary. The model output was used to help identify desirable levels of inflow, nutrient loading, water quality, salinity, and submarine light for seagrass in the lower CRE

  19. The ecology of Mugu Lagoon, California: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Onuf, C.P.

    1987-06-01

    Mugu Lagoon is significant as one of the least disturbed and best protected estuaries in southern California; thus this small estuarine system can serve as a baseline model for the region. This report summarizes and synthesizes scientific data on the ecological structure and functioning of the estuary, including discussions of climate, hydrology, geology, physiography, biotic assemblages, and ecological processes and interactions. The estuary exhibits extreme variability in freshwater inputs, being at times totally marine and at other times flushed by stormwater runoff from the watershed. Major storms in 1978 and 1980 resulted in sedimentation that drastically altered benthic communities and resulted in changes in the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation and benthos, and fish and shorebird use of these food resources. Mugu Lagoon is part of a naval base and therefore not subject to the development pressures facing many other southern California estuaries. Storm-produced sedimentation remains a management concern, as well as closure of the mouth of the lagoon due to littoral drift of sand along the barrier spit.

  20. Variation in tidal wetland plant diversity and composition within and among coastal estuaries: assessing the relative importance of environmental gradients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Question: Does wetland plant composition vary more by estuarine type (differentiated by the degree of riverine versus oceanic influence) or habitat type within estuaries (defined by US National Wetlands Inventory [NWI] marsh classes)? Location: Oregon estuaries: Netarts Bay, ...

  1. RELATIONS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH DISTRIBUTIONS TO HABITAT AND WATER QUALITY IN THE MOBILE BAY ESTUARY, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mobile Bay estuary provides rich habitat for many fish and shellfish, including those identified as economically and ecologically important. The National Estuary Program has focused on restoration of degraded estuarine habitat on which these species depend. To support this ...

  2. Developing a salinity-based approach for the evaluation of DIN removal rate in estuarine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Wang, Shuailong; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Wu, Jiapeng; Liu, Ling; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Wang, Youshao

    2015-10-01

    Estuaries play an important role in the removal of overloading nitrogen to relieve the eutrophic pressure of coastal seawater. However, the exact amount of nitrogen removed in estuarine ecosystems is difficult to be estimated because of the complex dynamic mixing process between riverine water and coastal seawater. In this study, a new method was developed to calculate the removal rate of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuarine waters attributed to the mixing process and was based on the assumption that relative salinity can serve as an indicator of the degree of mixing. This assumption was supported by the experimental results that demonstrated a linear regression relationship between DIN decline and salinity increase Thus, the decreased amount of DIN in mixing waters attributed to the dilution effect could be determined with the salinity as an index. With this model, the DIN removal rate in both Chesapeake Bay and Pearl River Estuary were defined. As predicted, our analysis demonstrated that the DIN removal rate increased gradually from upstream to downstream in both studied estuaries with obvious seasonable variation pattern: high in warm seasons and low in cold seasons. The practical application of this method might be affected by multiple factors, including the geographic landform of estuaries, initial estuaries DIN concentration, the DIN concentration in seawater, DIN importing from tributaries, sewage discharge and hydrodynamic mixing. Therefore, the results supported the hypothesis that estuaries have a strong capability to remove the nitrogen inputted from human activities, especially in warm season and therefore should play an important role in regulating the balance of global nitrogen biogeochemical cycle. PMID:25957975

  3. Developing a salinity-based approach for the evaluation of DIN removal rate in estuarine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Wang, Shuailong; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Wu, Jiapeng; Liu, Ling; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Wang, Youshao

    2015-10-01

    Estuaries play an important role in the removal of overloading nitrogen to relieve the eutrophic pressure of coastal seawater. However, the exact amount of nitrogen removed in estuarine ecosystems is difficult to be estimated because of the complex dynamic mixing process between riverine water and coastal seawater. In this study, a new method was developed to calculate the removal rate of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuarine waters attributed to the mixing process and was based on the assumption that relative salinity can serve as an indicator of the degree of mixing. This assumption was supported by the experimental results that demonstrated a linear regression relationship between DIN decline and salinity increase Thus, the decreased amount of DIN in mixing waters attributed to the dilution effect could be determined with the salinity as an index. With this model, the DIN removal rate in both Chesapeake Bay and Pearl River Estuary were defined. As predicted, our analysis demonstrated that the DIN removal rate increased gradually from upstream to downstream in both studied estuaries with obvious seasonable variation pattern: high in warm seasons and low in cold seasons. The practical application of this method might be affected by multiple factors, including the geographic landform of estuaries, initial estuaries DIN concentration, the DIN concentration in seawater, DIN importing from tributaries, sewage discharge and hydrodynamic mixing. Therefore, the results supported the hypothesis that estuaries have a strong capability to remove the nitrogen inputted from human activities, especially in warm season and therefore should play an important role in regulating the balance of global nitrogen biogeochemical cycle.

  4. Spatial variation in the environmental control of crab larval settlement in a micro-tidal austral estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Luis Miguel; Cardyn, Carlos Simón; Garcés-Vargas, José

    2012-09-01

    Settlement of benthic marine invertebrates is determined by the interaction between physical factors and biological processes, in which the tide, wind, and predation can play key roles, especially for species that recruit within estuaries. This complexity promotes high variability in recruitment and limited predictability of the size of annual cohorts. This study describes the settlement patterns of megalopae of the commercially important crab Cancer edwardsii at three locations (one in the center and two at the mouth of the estuary) within the Valdivia River estuary (~39.9°S), over three consecutive years (2006-2008). At each location, 12 passive benthic collectors with a natural substratum were deployed for 48 h at 7-day intervals, over a lunar cycle. Half of the collectors were covered with mesh to exclude predators. The main findings were as follows: (1) circulation changes due to upwelling relaxation or onshore winds controlled crab settlement at sites within the mouth of the estuary, (2) at the internal estuarine site, settlement was dominated by tidal effects, and (3) the effect of predation on settlement was negligible at all scales. The results show that the predominant physical factor controlling the return of competent crab larvae to estuarine environments varies spatially within the estuary. The lack of tidal influence on settlement at the mouth of the estuary can be explained by the overwhelming influence of the intense upwelling fronts and the micro-tidal regime in the study area.

  5. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xianbiao; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg(-1) d(-1) in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 10(5) t N yr(-1), and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12-15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication.

  6. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xianbiao; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg(-1) d(-1) in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 10(5) t N yr(-1), and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12-15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication. PMID:26991904

  7. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg-1 d-1 in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 105 t N yr-1, and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12–15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication. PMID:26991904

  8. MAPPING BURROWING SHRIMP AND SEAGRASS IN YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burrowing shrimp and seagrasses create extensive intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats within Pacific NW estuaries. Maps of their populations are useful to inform estuarine managers of locations that deserve special consideration for conservation, and to inform oyster farmers...

  9. Landscape Thresholds and the Condition of Northeastern Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impacts to northeastern estuaries have been well documented and many researchers have quantified the associations between broad scale human land uses in contributing landscapes and impacted estuarine condition. However, associations alone are not adequate for ident...

  10. HIGH CYANOBACTERIAL ABUNDANCE IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic phytoplankton comprise a wide variety of taxa spanning more than 2 orders of magnitude in size, yet studies of estuarine phytoplankton often overlook the picoplankton, particularly chroococcoid cyanobacteria (c.f. Synechocococcus). Three Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Apalachi...

  11. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  12. Metal fate and effects in estuaries: A review and conceptual model for better understanding of toxicity.

    PubMed

    de Souza Machado, Anderson Abel; Spencer, Kate; Kloas, Werner; Toffolon, Marco; Zarfl, Christiane

    2016-01-15

    Metal pollution is a global problem in estuaries due to the legacy of historic contamination and currently increasing metal emissions. However, the establishment of water and sediment standards or management actions in brackish systems has been difficult because of the inherent transdisciplinary nature of estuarine processes. According to the European Commission, integrative comprehension of fate and effects of contaminants in different compartments of these transitional environments (estuarine sediment, water, biota) is still required to better establish, assess and monitor the good ecological status targeted by the Water Framework Directive. Thus, the present study proposes a holistic overview and conceptual model for the environmental fate of metals and their toxicity effects on aquatic organisms in estuaries. This includes the analysis and integration of biogeochemical processes and parameters, metal chemistry and organism physiology. Sources of particulate and dissolved metal, hydrodynamics, water chemistry, and mechanisms of toxicity are discussed jointly in a multidisciplinary manner. It is also hypothesized how these different drivers of metal behaviour might interact and affect metal concentrations in diverse media, and the knowledge gaps and remaining research challenges are pointed. Ultimately,estuarine physicochemical gradients, biogeochemical processes, and organism physiology are jointly coordinating the fate and potential effects of metals in estuaries, and both realistic model approaches and attempts.

  13. Long-Term Changes in Nitrogen Budgets and Retention in the Elbe Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, Annika; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Wirtz, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Eutrophication remains one of the major factors influencing the ecological state of coastal ecosystems. Coastal eutrophication is in turn intimately linked to riverine nutrient loads. At the freshwater side of the estuary, nutrient loads can easily be quantified but estuarine processes including organic matter import from the sea and loss factors like denitrification can modify the actual nutrient loads reaching the coastal seas. We quantified and localized nutrient retention processes by analyzing changes of nutrient concentrations along the estuary and constructing nutrient budgets. Two methods -the Officer method based on conservative mixing and a new method based on changes in nitrogen concentrations along the freshwater part of the estuary- were compared using long term records for the Elbe River, a major European waterway. Nutrient budgets and dynamics reveal that nutrient retention processes in the water column play a substantial role in the Elbe River. Overall, ~25 mio mol/day N are imported into the Elbe estuary and ~20 mio mol/day DIN is exported, with obvious variations depending on river discharge and season. A nitrogen loss of about 20% falls within the range found in other studies. Whereas in the 1980s a significant part of the nitrogen input was retained by the estuary, in the 1990s and 2000s most of the imported total nitrogen was exported as DIN. At present, the retention of nitrogen -presumably due to increased denitrification- increases again. As these long-term changes in the retention capacity of the Elbe were supported by both methods, the calibrated station-based approach can now be used to calculate nutrient budgets in estuaries where no or only few transect data are available, such as the Weser and Ems estuary. Our presentation will finally discuss the possible impact of increased phytoplankton import from the Elbe River and increased import of suspended matter from the North Sea ecosystem on estuarine nitrogen dynamics.

  14. Ecohydraulics and Estuarine Wetland Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saintilan, N.; Spencer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The hydraulics or water flow in wetlands is known to be a key factor influencing ecosystem development in estuarine wetland environments. The relationship is indirect, with the hydraulics of wetlands influencing a host of factors including soil salinity, waterlogging, sediment transport, sediment chemistry, vegetation dispersal and growth and nutrient availability and cycling. The relationship is also not one way, with the hydraulics of wetlands being influenced by plant and animal activity. Understanding these complex interactions is fundamental for the adequate management of estuarine wetlands. Listed as a Wetland of International Importance under the 1971 Ramsar Convention, the Hunter River estuary is regarded as the most significant site for migratory shorebirds in New South Wales, Australia. Over the past 20 years, the number of migratory shorebirds in the estuary has sharply declined from 8,000 to 4,000 approx. Alteration of bird habitat is believed to be one of the reasons for this alarming trend. In 2004 we started a three-year program to investigate the links between hydraulics, sediment, benthic invertebrates, vegetation and migratory shorebird habitat in the estuary. During the first year we have focused on a highly disturbed part of the Hunter estuary wetlands located on Ash Island. The area is one of the major roosting sites in the estuary and is characterized by a complex hydraulic regime due to a restricted tidal interchange with the Hunter River and the presence of infrastructure for the maintenance of power lines (i.e., roads, bridges, culverts). Salt marshes, mudflat and mangroves are the dominant vegetation types. The monitoring program includes measurements of water levels, salinity, discharge, velocity, turbulence, sediment transport and deposition, plant species and density, soil composition and benthic invertebrates coordinated with observations of bird habitat utilization on a number of locations throughout the wetland and for different flow

  15. Using modelling to predict impacts of sea level rise and increased turbidity on seagrass distributions in estuarine embayments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Tom R.; Harasti, David; Smith, Stephen D. A.; Kelaher, Brendan P.

    2016-11-01

    Climate change induced sea level rise will affect shallow estuarine habitats, which are already under threat from multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we present the results of modelling to predict potential impacts of climate change associated processes on seagrass distributions. We use a novel application of relative environmental suitability (RES) modelling to examine relationships between variables of physiological importance to seagrasses (light availability, wave exposure, and current flow) and seagrass distributions within 5 estuarine embayments. Models were constructed separately for Posidonia australis and Zostera muelleri subsp. capricorni using seagrass data from Port Stephens estuary, New South Wales, Australia. Subsequent testing of models used independent datasets from four other estuarine embayments (Wallis Lake, Lake Illawarra, Merimbula Lake, and Pambula Lake) distributed along 570 km of the east Australian coast. Relative environmental suitability models provided adequate predictions for seagrass distributions within Port Stephens and the other estuarine embayments, indicating that they may have broad regional application. Under the predictions of RES models, both sea level rise and increased turbidity are predicted to cause substantial seagrass losses in deeper estuarine areas, resulting in a net shoreward movement of seagrass beds. Seagrass species distribution models developed in this study provide a valuable tool to predict future shifts in estuarine seagrass distributions, allowing identification of areas for protection, monitoring and rehabilitation.

  16. Immigration and early life stages recruitment of the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to an estuarine nursery: The influence of environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Eva; Ramos, Sandra; Elliott, Michael; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2016-01-01

    Connectivity between coastal spawning grounds and estuarine nurseries is a critical step in the life cycle of many fish species. Larval immigration and transport-associated physical-biological processes are determinants of recruitment success to nursery areas. The recruitment of the European flounder, Platichthys flesus, to estuarine nurseries located at the southern edge of the species distribution range, has been usually investigated during its juvenile stages, while estuarine recruitment during the earlier planktonic life stage remains largely unstudied. The present study investigated the patterns of flounder larval recruitment and the influence of environmental factors on the immigration of the early life stages to the Lima estuary (NW Portugal), integrating data on fish larvae and post-settlement individuals (< 50 mm length), collected over 7 years. Late-stage larvae arrived at the estuary between February and July and peak abundances were observed in April. Post-settlement individuals (< 50 mm) occurred later between April and October, whereas newly-settled ones (< 20 mm) were found only in May and June. Variables associated with the spawning, survival and growth of larvae in the ocean (sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a and inland hydrological variables) were the major drivers of flounder occurrence in the estuarine nursery. Although the adjacent coastal area is characterized by a current system with strong seasonality and mesoscale variability, we did not identify any influence of variables related with physical processes (currents and upwelling) on the occurrence of early life stages in the estuary. A wider knowledge on the influence of the coastal circulation variability and its associated effects upon ocean-estuarine connectivity is required to improve our understanding of the population dynamics of marine spawning fish that use estuarine nurseries.

  17. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF NUTRIENT LOADING, NUTRIENT RETENTION AND NET ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN THREE TIDAL RIVER ESTUARIES DIFFERING PREDOMINATELY BY THEIR WATERSHED LAND USE TYPES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract and oral presentation for the Estuarine Research Federation Conference.

    Estuarine retention of watershed nutrient loads, system-wide nutrient biogeochemical fluxes, and net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) were determined in three estuaries exhibiting differing magnitud...

  18. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats - A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-12-01

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Lastly, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  19. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existingmore » baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.« less

  20. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  1. Towards Sustainable Water Quality In Estuarine Impoundments: The Current State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Worrall, F.

    Several estuarine impoundment schemes have been built or are proposed in the UK and worldwide. The impounding of estuaries is currently a popular approach to urban regeneration in the UK. By creation of an aesthetically pleasing amenity impound- ment, including the drowning of "unsightly" tidal mud flats, it is hoped that prestige development will be encouraged in the estuarine area. Impounding fundamentally alters the dynamics of estuaries, with consequences in terms of sedimentation patterns and rates, and water quality. The SIMBA Project at- tempts to understand the controls on water quality in impoundments, with a view to- wards long term and sustainable high water quality through good barrage design and management practice. Detailed water quality surveys have been carried out on a total of 79 dates on the Tees, Tawe, Wansbeck and Blyth estuaries. Water quality parameters which have been determined are pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), conductivity, transparency, suspended solids, alkalinity, temperature, nutri- ents (nitrate+nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate), and a large range of dissolved metals. Statistical analyses are used to demonstrate the major controls on water qual- ity in impoundments. A distinction is made between total tidal exclusion (freshwater) systems, in which water quality is primarily influenced by external/catchment factors, and partial tidal exclusion systems, in which water quality is processed internally. This internal processing is due to density stratification creating compartments of saline wa- ter in contact with oxygen demanding sediments and isolated from the atmosphere, which leads to conditions of low DO and changes in redox conditions which may lead to release of metals and phosphate from the sediment.

  2. Impact of climate change on UK estuaries: A review of past trends and potential projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter E.; Skov, Martin W.; Lewis, Matt J.; Giménez, Luis; Davies, Alan G.; Malham, Shelagh K.; Neill, Simon P.; McDonald, James E.; Whitton, Timothy A.; Jackson, Suzanna E.; Jago, Colin F.

    2016-02-01

    UK estuarine environments are regulated by inter-acting physical processes, including tidal, wave, surge, river discharge and sediment supply. They regulate the fluxes of nutrients, pollutants, pathogens and viruses that determine whether coastlines achieve the Good Environmental Status (GEnS) required by the EU's Marine Strategy Directive. We review 20th century trends and 21st century projections of changes to climatic drivers, and their potential for altering estuarine bio-physical processes. Sea-level rise will cause some marine habitats to expand, and others diminish in area extent. The overall consequences of estuarine morphodynamics to these habitat shifts, and vice-versa, are unknown. Increased temperatures could intensify microbial pathogen concentrations and increase public health risk. The patterns of change of other climatic drivers are difficult to predict (e.g., river flows and storm surges). Projected increased winter river flows throughout UK catchments will enhance the risks of coastal eutrophication, harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in some contexts, although there are spatial variabilities in river flow projections. The reproductive success of estuarine biota is sensitive to saline intrusion and corresponding turbidity maxima, which are projected to gradually shift landwards as a result of sea-level rise. Although more-frequent flushing events in winter and longer periods of drought in summer are predicted, whereby the subsequent estuarine mixing and recovery rates are poorly understood. With rising estuarine salinities, subtidal species can penetrate deeper into estuaries, although this will depend on the resilience/adaptation of the species. Many climate and impact predictions lack resolution and spatial cover. Long-term monitoring and increased research, which considers the catchment-river-estuary-coast system as a whole, is needed to support risk predicting and mitigatory strategies.

  3. RESPONSE OF GHOST SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS) BIOTURBATION TO ORGANIC MATTER ENRICHMENT OF ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Populations of burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia p;ugettensis) are the dominant invertebrate fauna on Pacific estuarine tide flats, occupying >80% of intertidal area in some estuaries. Burrowing shrimp are renowned for their bioturbation of intertidal sedi...

  4. Historical changes in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jay, David A.; Bradford Harvey, R.; Hamilton, Peter; Simenstad, Charles A.

    salinity intrusion length and the transport of salt into the estuary. The overall effects of human intervention in the physical processes of the Columbia River Estuary (i.e. decrease in freshwater inflow, tidal prism, and mixing; increase in flushing time and fine sediment deposition, and net accumulation of sediment) are qualitatively similar to those observed in less energetic and more obviously altered estuarine systems. A concurrent reduction in wetland habitats has resulted in an estimated 82% reduction in emergent plant production and a 15% reduction in benthic macroalgae production, a combined production loss of 51,675 metric tons of organic carbon per year. This has been at least partially compensated by a large increase in the supply of riverine detritus derived from freshwater phytoplankton primary production. Comparison of modern and estimated preregulation organic carbon budgets for the estuary indicates a shift from a food web based on comparatively refractory macrodetritus derived from emergent vegetation to one involving more labile microdetritus derived from allochthonous phytoplankton. The shift has been driven by human-induced changes to the physical environment of the estuary. While this is a relatively comprehensive study of historical physical changes, it is incomplete in that the sediment budget is still uncertain. More precise quantification of the modern estuarine sediment budget will require both a better understanding of the fluvial input and dredging export terms and a sediment tranport model designed to explain historical changes in the sediment budget. Oceanographic studies to better determine the mechanisms leading to the formation of the turbidity maximum are also needed. The combination of cartography and modelling used in this study should be applicable in other systems where large changes in morphology have occurred in historical time.

  5. Alkaline Phosphatase Activity : an overlooked player on the phosphate behavior in macrotidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Daniel; Labry, Claire; Youenou, Agnes; Quere, Julien; Auguet, Jean Christophe; Montanie, Helene

    2014-05-01

    The non-conservative behavior of phosphate within the estuarine salinity gradient is essentially assigned to physico-chemical processes, such as desorption at low salinity and to benthic exchanges. Microbial phosphatase activity (APA), generally related to phosphate deficiency, is seldom studied in phosphate rich estuarine waters. In order to address the impact of microbial activity (bacterial abundance, production BSP, APA) on phosphate behavior, we studied these activities on a seasonal basis within the salinity gradient of two macrotidal estuaries presenting different levels of suspended solids. Whatever the season the Charente estuary is characterized by high levels of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM > 1g.L-1), particularly in the Maximum Turbidity Zone (MTZ) located at the 5-10 psu. In this area characterized by high BSP and APA there is a significant increase of PO4 levels especially during summer. In the Aulne estuary the particle load is significantly lower (1/10) but high BSP and APA are equally recorded. In the highly turbid waters of the Charente estuary, active phytoplankton is virtually absent as pheopigments constitute up to 80% of the total pigments, particularly in the MTZ, therefore APA may essentially have a bacterial origin. In the Aulne estuary attached bacteria are dominant, both in numbers and production, and their distribution along the haline gradient perfectly follows those of APA and phosphate levels. These observations, associated with the very close relationships observed between APA, SPM and BSP, suggest that APA derive mainly from bacterial (attached) origin and operate at the expense of particulate phosphorus and hence contribute to PO4 regeneration, especially in spring and summer. Finally, as APA increased as PO4, whereas the reverse is observed in both fresh and marine waters, an original scheme for APA regulation, related to the large dominance of attached bacteria can be described for the estuarine waters.

  6. Trace metals in estuaries in the Russian Far East and China: case studies from the Amur River and the Changjiang.

    PubMed

    Shulkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-15

    This paper compares the distributions of dissolved and particulate forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the estuaries of the largest rivers in East Asia: the Amur River and the Changjiang (Yangtze River). High suspended solid concentrations, elevated pH, and relatively low dissolved trace metal concentrations are characteristics of the Changjiang. Elevated dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations, neutral pH, and relatively low suspended solid concentrations are characteristics of the Amur River. The transfer of dissolved Fe to suspended forms is typical in the Amur River estuary, though Cd and Mn tend to mobilize to solution, and Cu and Ni are diluted in the estuarine system. Metal concentrations in suspended matter in the Amur River estuary are controlled by the ratio of terrigenous riverine material, enriched in Al and Fe, and marine biogenic particles, enriched in Cu, Mn, Cd, and in some cases Ni. The increase in dissolved forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb compared with river end-member is unique to the Changjiang estuary. Particle-solution interactions are not reflected in bulk suspended-solid metal concentrations in the Changjiang estuary due to the dominance of particulate forms of these metals. Cd is an exception in the Changjiang estuary, where the increase in dissolved Cd is of comparable magnitude to the decrease in particulate Cd. Despite runoff in the Amur River being lower than that in the Changjiang, the fluxes of dissolved Mn, Zn and Fe in the Amur River exceed those in the Changjiang. Dissolved Ni, and Cd fluxes are near equal in both estuaries, but dissolved Cu is lower in the Amur River estuary. The hydrological and physico-chemical river characteristics are dominated at the assessment of river influence on the adjoining coastal sea areas despite differences in estuarine processes.

  7. Utilizing remote sensing of thematic mapper data to improve our understanding of estuarine processes and their influence on the productivity of estuarine-dependent fisheries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browder, Joan A.; May, L. Nelson; Rosenthal, Alan; Baumann, Robert H.; Gosselink, James G.

    1988-01-01

    The land-water interface of coastal marshes may influence the production of estuarine-dependent fisheries more than the area of these marshes. To test this hypothesis, a spatial model was created to explore the dynamic relationship between marshland-water interface and level of disintegration in the decaying coastal marshes of Louisiana's Barataria, Terrebonne, and Timbalier basins. Calibrating the model with Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery, a parabolic relationship was found between land-water interface and marsh disintegration. Aggregated simulation data suggest that interface in the study area will soon reach its maximum and then decline. A statistically significant positive linear relationship was found between brown shrimp catch and total interface length over the past 28 years. This relationship suggests that shrimp yields will decline when interface declines, possibly beginning about 1995.

  8. Estuarine 'collaboratories:' regional and global perspectives (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, A. M.; Needoba, J. A.; Davis, M.; Leinen, M.

    2013-12-01

    There is an urgent need to anticipate and manage environmental changes in estuaries, as these critical ecosystems provide services that are essential for regional and global sustainability. Collaboratively designed and operated estuarine observation and prediction systems are progressively enabling long-term and high-resolution characterizations of estuarine variability and function, thus providing a powerful foundation for stewardship activities. The benefits of these 'collaboratories' have been demonstrated regionally in various estuaries, and their broader scale potential is being explored through an emerging national and international initiative. The first part of this presentation will address the lessons learned from SATURN (http://www.stccmop.org), a mature multi-institutional 'collaboratory' for the Columbia River estuary. SATURN innovatively integrates sensors, models, flows of information, and communities of practice. This integration has fueled advances in understanding and prediction of the estuary as a complex and highly variable bioreactor, subject to shifts from global climate change and from evolving regional uses. Our focus will be on describing the aspects of the design and practice that make SATURN transformative as a scientific and management-support tool at a regional scale. The second part of the presentation will address the translation of lessons learned from and beyond SATURN into requirements for a global network of estuarine observation and prediction systems. 'Our Global Estuary' is an initiative designed to create and use such a network, to maximize the aggregate potential of estuaries as sentinels and key players in global sustainability. We will report on the main recommendations of the first planning workshop for this initiative, which will take place on October 2013.

  9. An empirical model for salinity intrusion in alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Javad; Etemad-Shahidi, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The main parameters that affect the salinity intrusion in estuaries are their geometric, hydrologic and hydrodynamic characteristics. The recognition of effective parameters and understanding their roles in the salinity intrusion are required for estuarine water management. In this study, the governing equations of the salinity intrusion processes were scaled to derive the effective dimensionless parameters. Then, a previously verified model, CE-QUAL-W2, was utilized as a virtual laboratory to investigate the effects of different governing parameters on the salinity intrusion. Analysis of the results showed that logarithmic functions can be used to describe the effect of dimensionless parameters obtained by scaling of governing equations. Finally, a formula was suggested to predict the salinity intrusion length based on geometrical and hydrodynamic characteristics of alluvial estuaries.

  10. Trophic functioning of the St. Lucia estuarine lake during a drought phase assessed using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Natasha; Smit, Albertus J.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-06-01

    The St. Lucia Estuary is Africa's largest estuarine system and is currently experiencing the stress of prolonged freshwater deprivation, manifested by extremely low water levels and hypersalinity. These unprecedented conditions have raised questions regarding the trophic functioning of the ecosystem. Despite the substantial amount of research previously undertaken within this system, no studies of food web structure and function have yet been documented. This study therefore aimed to examine the food web structure of the St. Lucia estuary system through the use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis. Analysis of carbon isotope ratios indicates that benthic carbon sources are most utilised at sites with low water levels and generally higher salinity (Catalina Bay, Charter's Creek). Conversely, the estuarine region of the mouth and Narrows, with its elevated water levels and lower salinity, still sustains a viable pelagic food web. Analysis of δ15N ratios indicates that the number of trophic transfers (food chain length) might be related to water levels. Overall, the study provides a greater understanding of the ecological processes of this complex estuarine lake, which may allow for future comparisons of trophic functioning under drought and normal/wet conditions to be made.

  11. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. II: The role of horizontal transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Cloern, J.E.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development and distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are functions of both local conditions (i.e. the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location) and large-scale horizontal transport. In this study, the second of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged hydrodynamic-biological model to identify transport-related mechanisms impacting phytoplankton biomass accumulation and distribution on a system level. We chose South San Francisco Bay as a model domain, since its combination of a deep channel surrounded by broad shoals is typical of drowned-river estuaries. Five general mechanisms involving interaction of horizontal transport with variability in local conditions are discussed. Residual (on the order of days to weeks) transport mechanisms affecting bloom development and location include residence time/export, import, and the role of deep channel regions as conduits for mass transport. Interactions occurring on tidal time scales, i.e. on the order of hours) include the phasing of lateral oscillatory tidal flow relative to temporal changes in local net phytoplankton growth rates, as well as lateral sloshing of shoal-derived biomass into deep channel regions during ebb and back into shallow regions during flood tide. Based on these results, we conclude that: (1) while local conditions control whether a bloom is possible, the combination of transport and spatial-temporal variability in local conditions determines if and where a bloom will actually occur; (2) tidal-time-scale physical-biological interactions provide important mechanisms for bloom development and evolution. As a result of both subtidal and tidal-time-scale transport processes, peak biomass may not be observed where local conditions are most favorable to phytoplankton production, and inherently unproductive areas may be regions of high biomass accumulation.

  12. Non-conservative behaviors of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in a turbid estuary: Roles of multiple biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liyang; Guo, Weidong; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Guizhi

    2013-11-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) may show notable non-conservative behaviors in many estuaries due to a variety of biogeochemical processes. The partition between CDOM and chromophoric particulate organic matter (CPOM) was examined in the Jiulong Estuary (China) using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, which was also compared with microbial and photochemical degradations. The absorption coefficient of water-soluble CPOM (aCPOM(280)) at ambient Milli-Q water pH (6.1) ranged from 0.11 to 7.94 m-1 in the estuary and was equivalent to 5-101% of CDOM absorption coefficient. The aCPOM(280) correlated significantly with the concentration of suspended particulate matter and was highest in the bottom water of turbidity maximum zone. Absorption spectral slope (S275-295) and slope ratio (SR) correlated positively with salinity for both CPOM and CDOM, suggesting decreases in the average molecular weight with increasing salinity. The adsorption of CDOM to re-suspended sediments (at 500 mg L-1) within 2 h was equivalent to 4-26% of the initial aCDOM(280). The adsorption of CDOM to particles was less selective with respect to various CDOM constituents, while the microbial degradation resulted decreases in S275-295 and SR of CDOM and preferential removal of protein-like components. The partition between CPOM and CDOM represented a rapid and important process for the non-conservative behavior of CDOM in turbid estuaries.

  13. Climate variability in an estuary: Effects of riverflow on San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David H.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Festa, John F.; Nichols, Frederic H.; Walters, Roy A.; Slack, James V.; Hager, Stephen E.; Schemel, Laurence E.; Peterson, David H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple conceptual model of estuarine variability in the context of climate forcing has been formulated using up to 65 years of estimated mean-monthly delta flow, the cumulative freshwater flow to San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River, and salinity observations near the mouth, head, mid-estuary, and coastal ocean. Variations in delta flow, the principal source of variability in the bay, originate from anomalous changes in northern and central California streamflow, much of which is linked to anomalous winter sea level pressure (“CPA”) in the eastern Pacific. In years when CPA is strongly negative, precipitation in the watershed is heavy, delta flow is high, and the bay's salinity is low; similarly, when CPA is strongly positive, precipitation is light, delta flow is low, and the bay's salinity is high. Thus the pattern of temporal variability in atmospheric pressure anomalies is reflected in the streamflow, then in delta flow, then in estuarine variability. Estuarine salinity can be characterized by river to ocean patterns in annual cycles of salinity in relation to delta flow. Salinity (total dissolved solids) data from the relatively pristine mountain streams of the Sierra Nevada show that for a given flow, one observes higher salinities during the rise in winter flow than on the decline. Salinity at locations throughout San Francisco Bay estuary are also higher during the rise in winter flow than the decline (because it takes a finite time for salinity to fully respond to changes in freshwater flow). In the coastal ocean, however, the annual pattern of sea surface salinity is reversed: lower salinities during the rise in winter flow than on the decline due to effects associated with spring upwelling. Delta flow in spring masks these effects of coastal upwelling on estuarine salinity, including near the mouth of the estuary and, in fact, explains in a statistical sense 86 percent of the variance in salinity at the mouth of the estuary. Some

  14. Challenging paradigms in estuarine ecology and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, M.; Whitfield, A. K.

    2011-10-01

    For many years, estuarine science has been the 'poor relation' in aquatic research - freshwater scientists ignored estuaries as they tended to get confused by salt and tides, and marine scientists were more preoccupied by large open systems. Estuaries were merely regarded by each group as either river mouths or sea inlets respectively. For the past four decades, however, estuaries (and other transitional waters) have been regarded as being ecosystems in their own right. Although often not termed as such, this has led to paradigms being generated to summarise estuarine structure and functioning and which relate to both the natural science and management of these systems. This paper defines, details and affirms these paradigms that can be grouped into those covering firstly the science (definitions, scales, linkages, productivity, tolerances and variability) and secondly the management (pressures, valuation, health and services) of estuaries. The more 'science' orientated paradigms incorporate the development and types of ecotones, the nature of stressed and variable systems (with specific reference to resilience and redundancy), the relationship between generalists and specialists produced by environmental tolerance, the relevance of scale in relation to functioning and connectivity, the sources of production and degree of productivity, the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning and the stress-subsidy debates. The more 'management' targeted paradigms include the development and effects of exogenic unmanaged pressures and endogenic managed pressures, the perception of health and the ability to manage estuaries (related to internal and external influences), and the influence of all of these on the production of ecosystem services and societal benefits.

  15. Are there general spatial patterns of mangrove structure and composition along estuarine salinity gradients in Todos os Santos Bay?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Patrícia; Dórea, Antônio; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; Barros, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Species distribution and structural patterns of mangrove fringe forests along three tropical estuaries were evaluated in northeast of Brazil. Interstitial water salinity, percentage of fine sediments and organic matter content were investigated as explanatory variables. In all estuaries (Jaguaripe, Paraguaçu and Subaé estuaries), it was observed similar distribution patterns of four mangrove species and these patterns were mostly related with interstitial water salinity. Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia schaueriana tended to dominate sites under greater marine influence (lower estuary), while Avicennia germinans and Laguncularia racemosa dominated areas under greater freshwater influence (upper estuary), although the latter showed a wider distribution over these tropical estuarine gradients. Organic matter best explained canopy height and mean height. At higher salinities, there was practically no correlation between organic matter and density, but at lower salinity, organic matter was related to decreases in abundances. The described patterns can be related to interspecific differences in salt tolerance and competitive abilities and they are likely to be found at other tropical Atlantic estuaries. Future studies should investigate anthropic influences and causal processes in order to further improve the design of monitoring and restoration projects.

  16. C-GEM (v 1.0): a new, cost-efficient biogeochemical model for estuaries and its application to a funnel-shaped system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volta, C.; Arndt, S.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Laruelle, G. G.; Regnier, P.

    2014-07-01

    Reactive transport models (RTMs) are powerful tools for disentangling the complex process interplay that drives estuarine biogeochemical dynamics, for assessing the quantitative role of estuaries in global biogeochemical cycles and for predicting their response to anthropogenic disturbances (land-use change, climate change and water management). Nevertheless, the application of RTMs for a regional or global estimation of estuarine biogeochemical transformations and fluxes is generally compromised by their high computational and data demands. Here, we describe C-GEM (Carbon-Generic Estuary Model), a new one-dimensional, computationally efficient RTM that reduces data requirements by using a generic, theoretical framework based on the direct relationship between estuarine geometry and hydrodynamics. Despite its efficiency, it provides an accurate description of estuarine hydrodynamics, salt transport and biogeochemistry on the appropriate spatio-temporal scales. We provide a detailed description of the model, as well as a protocol for its set-up. The new model is then applied to the funnel-shaped Scheldt estuary (BE/NL), one of the best-surveyed estuarine systems in the world. Its performance is evaluated through comprehensive model-data and model-model comparisons. Model results show that C-GEM captures the dominant features of the biogeochemical cycling in the Scheldt estuary. Longitudinal steady-state profiles of oxygen, ammonium, nitrate and silica are generally in good agreement with measured data. In addition, simulated, system-wide integrated reaction rates of the main pelagic biogeochemical processes are comparable with those obtained using a high-resolved, two-dimensional RTM. A comparison of fully transient simulations results with those of a two-dimensional model shows that the estuarine net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) only differs by about 10%, while system-wide estimates of individual biogeochemical processes never diverge by more than 40%. A sensitivity

  17. Numerical modelling of fish eggs dispersion at the Patos Lagoon estuary — Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, I. M.; Dias, J. M.; Fernandes, E. H.; Muelbert, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    The Patos Lagoon estuary is the most important nursery ground for commercially relevant species of fish and crustaceans in the South of Brazil, maintaining fisheries that sustain 3500 fisher families throughout the Rio Grande do Sul State coastline. Around 80% of the interior estuarine area is very shallow (< 2 m), and recruitment of fish eggs and larvae to the inner parts of the Patos Lagoon estuary is directly related to the circulation pattern in the area, which is controlled by local and non-local wind effects and freshwater discharge. The objective of this study is to investigate the processes controlling the transport of estuarine dependent fish eggs between the Atlantic Ocean and the Patos Lagoon estuary. An integrated numerical system based on a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic model and a Lagrangean transport model of passive particles is applied to a selection of scenarios representing the passage of weather fronts over the area. At this stage, fish eggs are represented as buoyant passive particles. Modelling results are compared against field data for the period under investigation (September/October 1999) and historical records. Short term results are analysed in terms of the meteorological conditions (wind direction, intensity and duration) controlling the transport of eggs to the inner parts of the estuary and the extension of their excursion. This experiment is the first attempt to couple biological and physical information to study fish eggs transport, and to enhance the current knowledge about recruitment of important fisheries resources in southern Brazil.

  18. A biological condition gradient model for historical assessment of estuarine habitat structure.

    PubMed

    Shumchenia, Emily J; Pelletier, Marguerite C; Cicchetti, Giancarlo; Davies, Susan; Pesch, Carol E; Deacutis, Christopher F; Pryor, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are affected by ever-increasing natural and human pressures. Because the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics unique to estuarine ecosystems control the ways that biological resources respond to ecosystem stressors, we present a flexible and adaptable biological assessment method for estuaries. The biological condition gradient (BCG) is a scientific framework of biological response to increasing anthropogenic stress that is comprehensive and ecosystem based and evaluates environmental conditions and the status of ecosystem services in order to identify, communicate, and prioritize management action. Using existing data, we constructed the first estuarine BCG framework that examines changes in habitat structure through time. Working in a New England (U.S.) estuary with a long history of human influence, we developed an approach to define a reference level, which we described as a "minimally disturbed" range of conditions for the ecosystem, anchored by observations before 1850 AD. Like many estuaries in the U.S., the relative importance of environmental stressors changed over time, but even qualitative descriptions of the biological indicators' status provided useful information for defining condition levels. This BCG demonstrated that stressors rarely acted alone and that declines in one biological indicator influenced the declines of others. By documenting the biological responses to cumulative stressors, the BCG inherently suggests an ecosystem-based approach to management. Additionally, the BCG process initiates thinking over long time scales and can be used to inspire scientists, managers, and the public toward environmental action.

  19. A Biological Condition Gradient Model for Historical Assessment of Estuarine Habitat Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumchenia, Emily J.; Pelletier, Marguerite C.; Cicchetti, Giancarlo; Davies, Susan; Pesch, Carol E.; Deacutis, Christopher F.; Pryor, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are affected by ever-increasing natural and human pressures. Because the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics unique to estuarine ecosystems control the ways that biological resources respond to ecosystem stressors, we present a flexible and adaptable biological assessment method for estuaries. The biological condition gradient (BCG) is a scientific framework of biological response to increasing anthropogenic stress that is comprehensive and ecosystem based and evaluates environmental conditions and the status of ecosystem services in order to identify, communicate, and prioritize management action. Using existing data, we constructed the first estuarine BCG framework that examines changes in habitat structure through time. Working in a New England (U.S.) estuary with a long history of human influence, we developed an approach to define a reference level, which we described as a "minimally disturbed" range of conditions for the ecosystem, anchored by observations before 1850 AD. Like many estuaries in the U.S., the relative importance of environmental stressors changed over time, but even qualitative descriptions of the biological indicators' status provided useful information for defining condition levels. This BCG demonstrated that stressors rarely acted alone and that declines in one biological indicator influenced the declines of others. By documenting the biological responses to cumulative stressors, the BCG inherently suggests an ecosystem-based approach to management. Additionally, the BCG process initiates thinking over long time scales and can be used to inspire scientists, managers, and the public toward environmental action.

  20. Natural and management influences on freshwater inflows and salinity in the San Francisco Estuary at monthly to interannual scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Noah

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the processes controlling the physics, chemistry, and biology of the San Francisco Estuary and their relation to climate variability is complicated by the combined influence on freshwater inflows of natural variability and upstream management. To distinguish these influences, alterations of estuarine inflow due to major reservoirs and freshwater pumping in the watershed were inferred from available data. Effects on salinity were estimated by using reconstructed estuarine inflows corresponding to differing levels of impairment to drive a numerical salinity model. Both natural and management inflow and salinity signals show strong interannual variability. Management effects raise salinities during the wet season, with maximum influence in spring. While year-to-year variations in all signals are very large, natural interannual variability can greatly exceed the range of management effects on salinity in the estuary.

  1. Natural and management influences on freshwater inflows and salinity in the San Francisco Estuary at monthly to interannual scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, Noah

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the processes controlling the physics, chemistry, and biology of the San Francisco Estuary and their relation to climate variability is complicated by the combined influence on freshwater inflows of natural variability and upstream management. To distinguish these influences, alterations of estuarine inflow due to major reservoirs and freshwater pumping in the watershed were inferred from available data. Effects on salinity were estimated by using reconstructed estuarine inflows corresponding to differing levels of impairment to drive a numerical salinity model. Both natural and management inflow and salinity signals show strong interannual variability. Management effects raise salinities during the wet season, with maximum influence in spring. While year-to-year variations in all signals are very large, natural interannual variability can greatly exceed the range of management effects on salinity in the estuary.

  2. Ecoengineering with Ecohydrology: Successes and failures in estuarine restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Michael; Mander, Lucas; Mazik, Krysia; Simenstad, Charles; Valesini, Fiona; Whitfield, Alan; Wolanski, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Ecological Engineering (or Ecoengineering) is increasingly used in estuaries to re-create and restore ecosystems degraded by human activities, including reduced water flow or land poldered for agricultural use. Here we focus on ecosystem recolonization by the biota and their functioning and we separate Type A Ecoengineering where the physico-chemical structure is modified on the basis that ecological structure and functioning will then follow, and Type B Ecoengineering where the biota are engineered directly such as through restocking or replanting. Modifying the physical system to create and restore natural processes and habitats relies on successfully applying Ecohydrology, where suitable physical conditions, especially hydrography and sedimentology, are created to recover estuarine ecology by natural or human-mediated colonisation of primary producers and consumers, or habitat creation. This successional process then allows wading birds and fish to reoccupy the rehabilitated areas, thus restoring the natural food web and recreating nursery areas for aquatic biota. We describe Ecohydrology principles applied during Ecoengineering restoration projects in Europe, Australia, Asia, South Africa and North America. These show some successful and sustainable approaches but also others that were less than successful and not sustainable despite the best of intentions (and which may even have harmed the ecology). Some schemes may be 'good for the ecologists', as conservationists consider it successful that at least some habitat was created, albeit in the short-term, but arguably did little for the overall ecology of the area in space or time. We indicate the trade-offs between the short- and long-term value of restored and created ecosystems, the success at developing natural structure and functioning in disturbed estuaries, the role of this in estuarine and wetland management, and the costs and benefits of Ecoengineering to the socio-ecological system. These global case

  3. Use of radium isotopes to examine pore-water exchange in an estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, I.T.; Hancock, G.J.; Murray, A.S.

    1994-12-01

    The measured distributions of four isotopes of Ra along the estuary of the Bega River are used to examine sediment-water columns exchange. Ra is created in estuarine sediments by the radioactive decay of insoluble Th parents residing close to or on the surfaces of the sediment grains. Ra desorbed into the pore water is continuously lost to the water column due to the cyclical draining and filling of the sediments by the tides. The distribution of Ra in the estuary is governed by its rate of loss from the sediments, its advection along the estuary resulting from river discharge into the estuary`s head, tidal mixing, and radioactive decay. These processes are all described in a model. Matching of model-predicted Ra concentrations with measurements allows an estimate of the effective depth in the sediments to which the pore water is exchanged every tidal cycle. This depth is large (15 cm), but it is shown to be reasonable for the Bega estuary. 19 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Transport, Mixing and Stirring Processes in a Louisiana Estuary: A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Wiseman, W. J.

    2000-04-01

    Transport and mixing processes in a broad and shallow estuary in Louisiana, Terrebonne/Timbalier Basin, are examined using a depth-integrated two-dimensional numerical model. Using current meter records previously obtained, the model calibration yielded correlation coefficients between simulated and observed current components of 0·89-0·95. It appears that the bottom friction in the bay is relatively large with a Manning's coefficient of 0·07 producing the best results. The large bottom friction appears to be due to a combined effect of currents and the surface wave field which is not explicitly accounted for in the numerical model. Despite the small tidal range, tidal forcing dominates circulation in the bay. During equatorial tides, tidal currents on the order of 20 cm s -1could develop in a broad area of the bay while in tidal passes currents could reach 50-60 cm s -1. During tropic tides, strengths of the currents in the bay could easily be double those during equatorial tides. Local wind forcing is also important in controlling general flow direction inside the bay, in particular during equatorial tides. Flushing time, estimated by a particle tracking technique, was 27 days, that appears to be in agreement with observations. Horizontal diffusivities computed using tracer particles are comparable to the previous estimates of horizontal diffusion coefficients compiled by Okubo (1974). The larger values appear to be due to coastal trapping. Mixing of water masses, based on particle tracking, is found to consist of continuous stretching, folding and break-up of material lines due to interaction of wind-driven and tidal currents with bottom and coastal topography. Time evolution of the boundary between the two water masses depends on the initial tidal phase. However, this dependence lasts only until coastal trapping becomes dominant in controlling the time evolution of the boundary. Coastal trapping appears to be an important process by which stirring and mixing

  5. Distribution and seasonal variation of trace metals in surface sediments of the Mandovi estuary, west coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagarsamy, Rengasamy

    2006-03-01

    The concentration and distribution of selected trace metals in surface sediments of the Mandovi estuary were studied to determine the extent of anthropogenic inputs from mining activities and to estimate the effects of the monsoon on geochemical processes in this tropical estuarine system. Analysis of bulk sediments from the Mandovi estuary shows that the concentrations of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc and lead vary from 2.2 to 49.7%; estuary indicates that there is a detectable anthropogenic input to the Mandovi estuary. The enrichment of Fe and Mn reflects the intensity of anthropogenic inputs related to iron ore processing in the upstream region of the estuary, however, the highest enrichment levels were not found near the mouth region. Igeo values calculated for Fe (2.5) and Mn (3.4) showed higher values in the pre-monsoon period in the upstream region of the estuary than in the post-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Cu and Zn enrichment in the river mouth region, associated with high organic carbon contents, is indicative of the influence of organic wastes from municipal sewage entering the estuary. The intermetallic relationship revealed the identical behaviour of metals during its transport in the estuarine environment.

  6. Controls on monthly estuarine residuals: Eulerian circulation and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jennifer M.; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Souza, Alejandro J.

    2014-04-01

    The Dee Estuary, at the NW English-Welsh border, is a major asset, supporting: one of the largest wildlife habitats in Europe, industrial importance along the Welsh coastline and residential and recreational usage along the English coast. Understanding of the residual elevation is important to determine the total water levels that inundate intertidal banks, especially during storms. Whereas, improved knowledge of the 3D residual circulation is important in determining particle transport pathways to manage water quality and morphological change. Using mooring data obtained in February-March 2008, a 3D modelling system has been previously validated against in situ salinity, velocity, elevation and wave observations, to investigate the barotropic-baroclinic wave interaction within this estuary under full realistic forcing. The system consists of a coupled circulation-wave-turbulence model (POLCOMS-WAM-GOTM). Using this modelling system the contribution of different processes and their interactions to the monthly residuals in both elevation and circulation is now assessed. By studying a tidally dominated estuary under wave influence, it is found that baroclinicity induced by a weak river flow has greater importance in generating a residual circulation than the waves, even at the estuary mouth. Although the monthly residual circulation is dominated by tidal and baroclinic processes, the residual estuarine surface elevation is primarily influenced by the seasonal external forcing to the region, with secondary influence from the local wind conditions. During storm conditions, 3D radiation stress becomes important for both elevation and circulation at the event scale but is found here to have little impact over monthly time scales.

  7. INDICATORS OF ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY FOR ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jordan, Stephen J. and Lisa M. Smith. In press. Indicators of Ecosystem Integrity for Estuaries. In: Proceedings of the Estuarine Indicators Workshop, 29-31 October 2003, Sanibel Island, FL. Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, Sanibel, FL. 23 p. (ERL,GB 1194).

    Ideal ...

  8. Utilizing remote sensing of thematic mapper data to improve our understanding of estuarine processes and their influence on the productivity of estuarine-dependent fisheries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browder, Joan A.; May, L. Nelson, Jr.; Rosenthal, Alan; Baumann, Robert H.; Gosselink, James G.

    1988-01-01

    The continuing disintegration of the coastal marshes of Louisiana is one of the major environmental problems of the nation. The problem of marsh loss in Louisiana is relevant to fishery management because Louisiana leads the nation in landings of fishery products, and most of the landed species are dependent upon estuaries and their associated tidal marshes. In evaluating the potential effect of marshland loss on fisheries, the first two critical factors to consider are: whether land-water interface in actual disintegrating marshes is currently increasing or decreasing, and the magnitude of the change. In the present study, LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) data covering specific marshes in coastal Louisiana were used to test conclusions from the Browder et al (1984) model with regard to the stage in disintegration at which maximum interface occurs; to further explore the relationship between maximum interface and the pattern of distribution of land and water suggested by the model; and to determine the direction and degree of change in land-water interface in relation to land loss in actual marshes.

  9. Modelling Oxygen Dynamics in an Intermittently Stratified Estuary: Estimation of Process Rates Using Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, M. E.; Stow, C. A.; Luettich, R. A.; Paerl, H. W.; Pinckney, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration, vertical stratification, and temperature was investigated for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina, a shallow, intermittently-mixed estuary using approximately 10 years of weekly/biweekly, mid-channel data. A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to initially explore the major relationships among observed variables. The results of this statistical model guided the specification of a process-based model of oxygen dynamics that is consistent with theory yet simple enough to be parameterized using available field data. The nonlinear optimization procedure employed allows for the direct estimation of microbial oxygen consumption and physical reoxygenation rates, including the effects of temperature and vertical stratification. These estimated rates may better represent aggregate system behaviour than closed chamber measurements made in the laboratory and in situ. The resulting model describes 79% of the variation in dissolved oxygen concentration and is robust when compared across separate locations and time periods. Model predictions suggest that the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia in the bottom waters of the Neuse are controlled by the balance between the net oxygen depletion rate and the frequency of vertical mixing events. During cool months, oxygen consumption rates remain low enough to keep oxygen concentration well above levels of concern even under extended periods of stratification. A concentration below 4 mg l -1is only expected under extended periods without vertical mixing when bottom water temperature exceeds 15 °C, while a concentration below 2 mg l -1is only expected when water temperature exceeds 20 °C. To incorporate the effects of parameter uncertainty, model error, and natural variability on model prediction, we used Monte Carlo simulation to generate distributions for the predicted number of days of hypoxia during the summer season. The expected number of days with

  10. A Comparative Ecological Approach to Assess the Role of Watersheds in Estuarine Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the geophysical nature of the estuary, the ocean (and atmospheric) system, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to a mixture of natural and anthropogenic drivers and pressures each compartment...

  11. The Role of Watershed Characteristics in Estuarine Condition: An Empirical Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures, each compartment must be characterized. For example, eutrophication ef...

  12. Comparative Ecological Approach to Assess the Role of Watersheds in Estuarine Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures, each compartment must be characterized. For example, eutrophication ef...

  13. Understanding and managing a complex estuary: the process towards more congruence between the physical system characteristics and the management system of the Westerschelde (Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buuren, A.; Gerrits, L.

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we expand on the relationship between the social processes of policymaking, management and research in the context of the Westerschelde estuary. This complex estuary system, located in Belgium and the Netherlands, has its own morphological and ecological characteristics and dynamics, and has three core functions: economically, it makes the port of Antwerp accessible; ecologically, it generates habitats for certain unique species; and in terms of safety, it prevents the hinterland from being flooded. We analyze how the social processes of policymaking, management and analysis have focused on these three aspects, and how they have affected the estuary. We proceed to develop a framework for evaluating the social system of policy-making, management and research. This framework focuses on the social system's adaptive capabilities (how it evolved in a non-linear fashion), integrative capacity (how the system's interconnectivity was taken into account), and participative competencies (how the different interests and insights regarding the estuary were absorbed). This framework was then applied to twenty years of policymaking about, management of, and research on the Westerschelde estuary. We conclude that, because of policy learning effects, policy/management and research take the estuary's self-organizing capacities into account much more than they did in the past. However, the self-referential behaviour of policymakers, managers and researchers makes it possible that an anthropocentric and technocratic approach towards managing the estuary, indicating a disconnection between the social and physical systems, could return.

  14. Response of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to inorganic nitrogen fluctuations in temperate estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) highlighted the importance of alternative metabolic pathways to inorganic nitrogen removal in natural environments, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate inputs, such as estuaries. Laboratory enrichment experiments were used to test the effect of increasing loads of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and ammonium (NH4+) on the anammox process. Three Atlantic temperate estuaries (NW Portugal) were investigated along a salinity gradient, and anammox activity was measured under different NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ treatments, using the isotope pairing technique. Obtained results showed that NO3- stimulated denitrification but not anammox, whereas NO2- additions had a positive effect on anammox activity, confirming its role as a key environmental control. On the other hand, increasing NH4+ concentrations seemed to inhibit anammox for low salinity sites. Our findings suggested an important role of the natural availability of nitrogen compounds in regulating anammox and the magnitude of anammox versus denitrification in estuarine environments.

  15. Impact of estuarine pollution on birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Kerwin, J.A.; Stendell, R.C.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Stickel, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Pollution of estuaries affects bird populations indirectly through changes in habitat and food supply. The multi-factor pollution of Chesapeake Bay has resulted in diminution of submerged aquatic plants and consequent change in food habits of the canvasback duck. Although dredge-spoil operations can improve wildlife habitat, they often result in its demise. Pollution of estuaries also affects birds directly, through chemical toxication, which may result in outright mortality or in reproductive impairment. Lead from industrial sources and roadways enters the estuaries and is accumulated in tissues of birds. Lead pellets deposited in estuaries as a result of hunting are consumed by ducks with sufficient frequency .to result m large annual die-offs from lead poisoning. Fish in certain areas, usually near industrial sources, may contain levels of mercury high enough to be hazardous to birds that consume them. Other heavy metals are present in estuarine birds, but their significance is poorly known. Oil exerts lethal or sublethal effects on birds by oiling their feathers, oiling eggs and young by contaminated parents, and by ingestion of oil-contaminated food. Organochlorine chemicals, of both agricultural and industrial origin, travel through the food chains and reach harmful levels in susceptible species of birds in certain estuarine ecosystems. Both outright mortality and reproductive impairment have occurred.

  16. Responses of estuarine salinity and transport processes to potential future sea-level rise in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Shen, Jian

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the changes of hydrodynamics in estuaries with respect to magnitudes of sea-level rise is important to understanding the changes of biogeochemical processes that are coupled tightly with the physical processes. Based on the 21st century sea-level rise scenarios projected by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP, 2009), the Chesapeake Bay was chosen as a prototype to study the responses of the estuary to potential future sea-level rise. The numerical model results show that the average salt content, salt intrusion length, and stratification will increase as sea level rises. The changes of these parameters have obvious seasonal and inter-annual variations. Both the salt content and stratification show more increase in spring (following the high-flow periods) and wet years than in autumn (following the low-flow periods) and dry years. The salt intrusion length has larger increase and greater standard deviation in autumn than in spring. The transport time scales are used to illustrate the variations of transport processes as sea level rises, and results indicate that (1) the exchange flow would be strengthened but the downstream transport of fresh water would be slower; (2) the residence time of the Bay would increase due to the increased volume and change of circulation; (3) the vertical transport time (reference to water surface) has more pronounced increase and the volume of water mass with different age groups increases with different rates. As a result, the retention time of dissolved substances in the Bay would increase. Although the increased tidal currents would strengthen the vertical mixing, the increased stratification would weaken the vertical exchange. The increase of vertical transport time is due to the impact of stratification changes, which overwhelms the impact of tidal changes. As the bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) supply is predominated by the vertical exchanges in the Chesapeake Bay, the increased upstream transport time has a

  17. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC ESTUARIES: THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA-Estuaries) evaluated ecological conditions in US Mid-Atlantic estuaries during the summers of 1997 and 1998. Over 800 probability-based stations were monitored in four main estuarine systems?Chesapeake Bay, the Delaware Estuary, Maryla...

  18. Seasonality in Frequency of Marine Access to an Intermittently Open Estuary: Implications for Recruitment Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. N. I.; Cowley, P. D.; Whitfield, A. K.

    2001-03-01

    Timing of life-history stages and environmental conditions is key to recruitment success. We examine the seasonal pattern in access between the surf zone and an estuary, and the implications for recruitment success and process in fish that spawn at sea but spend their juvenile phase in estuaries. About 70% of South African estuaries are closed by barrier sand bars that open intermittently; an alternative but brief access opportunity is marine overwash (overtopping), when the surf zone extends over the bar to contact estuarine waters. Larval fish have limited ability to wait for an access opportunity (overtopping or opening event), so timing of settlement is important with respect to the seasonal distribution of waiting times for access opportunities. Periodic regression on daily observations (1993-1999) at the East Kleinemonde Estuary profiled the seasonal variation in expected waiting time. The data set is dominated by overwash events. Waiting time (for all events) is significantly related to both the first and second harmonics of season, and tends to be longest in December-January, and shortest in April-May. If the analysis is restricted to openings alone waiting times are shortest near November, and longest from February to September. The seasonal variation shown has implications for recruitment processes, population sizes, and productivity in estuaries.

  19. Quantification of storm-induced bathymetric change in a back-barrier estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, Neil K.; Suttles, Steven E.; Beudin, Alexis; Nowacki, Daniel; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Geomorphology is a fundamental control on ecological and economic function of estuaries. However, relative to open coasts, there has been little quantification of storm-induced bathymetric change in back-barrier estuaries. Vessel-based and airborne bathymetric mapping can cover large areas quickly, but change detection is difficult because measurement errors can be larger than the actual changes over the storm timescale. We quantified storm-induced bathymetric changes at several locations in Chincoteague Bay, Maryland/Virginia, over the August 2014 to July 2015 period using fixed, downward-looking altimeters and numerical modeling. At sand-dominated shoal sites, measurements showed storm-induced changes on the order of 5 cm, with variability related to stress magnitude and wind direction. Numerical modeling indicates that the predominantly northeasterly wind direction in the fall and winter promotes southwest-directed sediment transport, causing erosion of the northern face of sandy shoals; southwesterly winds in the spring and summer lead to the opposite trend. Our results suggest that storm-induced estuarine bathymetric change magnitudes are often smaller than those detectable with methods such as LiDAR. More precise fixed-sensor methods have the ability to elucidate the geomorphic processes responsible for modulating estuarine bathymetry on the event and seasonal timescale, but are limited spatially. Numerical modeling enables interpretation of broad-scale geomorphic processes and can be used to infer the long-term trajectory of estuarine bathymetric change due to episodic events, when informed by fixed-sensor methods.

  20. Ordination of the estuarine environment: What the organism experiences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators customarily schedule estuary sampling trips with regard to a variety of criteria, especially tide stage and the day-night cycle. However, estuarine organisms experience a wide suite of continuously changing tide and light conditions. Such organisms may undertake i...

  1. Geospatial Habitat Analysis in Pacific Northwest Coastal Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Borde, Amy B. ); Thom, Ronald M. ); Rumrill, Steven; Miller, L M.

    2003-08-01

    We assessed historical changes in the location and amount of estuarine habitat in three of the four largest coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest (Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, and Coos Bay) as part of the Pacific Northwest Coastal Ecosystem Regional Study (PNCERS). To accomplish this, navigation charts, hydrographic survey data, maps, and published descriptions were used to gain information on the location of the shoreline, bathymetry, and vegetated habitats, which was then digitized and subjected to geospatial analysis using a geographic information system. In addition, we used present-day elevational boundaries for marshes, flats, and eelgrass meadows to help define habitat areas where they were not indicated on historical maps. The analysis showed that tidal flats have decreased in all study areas; potential eelgrass habitat has increased in Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay and decreased slightly in Coos Bay; tidal wetland area has declined in all three coastal estuaries, with increases in localized areas due to filling and sedimentation; and dramatic changes have occurred at the mouths of Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay. As has been shown before, these data illustrate that direct physical alteration (filling and diking) has resulted in large changes to habitats. However, indirect impacts from forest practices in the watershed, as well as variation in climatic factors and oceanographic processes, may also have contributed to changes. The information provides more evidence for managing estuarine habitats in the region and a employing a historical template to plan habitat restoration in the future.

  2. Measuring the acute toxicity of estuarine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, T.H.; Swartz, R.C.; Lanberson, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Estuarine sediments frequently are repositories and sources of anthropogenic contaminants. Toxicity is one method of assessing the environmental quality of sediments, yet because of the extreme range of salinities that characterize estuaries few infaunal organisms have both the physiological tolerance and sensitivity to chemical contaminants to serve in estuarine sediment toxicity tests. The study describes research on the estuarine burrowing amphipod, Eohaustorius estuarius Bosworth, 1973, whose survival was >95% in control sediments across a 2 to 28% salinity range over 10-d periods. E. estuarius also was acutely sensitive to low sediment concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, fluoranthene (LC50 approximately = 10.6 mg/kg), and its sensitivity to fluoranthene was not affected by salinity. E. estuarius was almost as sensitive as Rhepoxynius abronius to fluoranthene and to field-collected sediments from Puget Sound urban and industrial bays. E. estuarius was also more tolerant of very fine, uncontaminated sediments than R. abronius. Furthermore, E. estuarius was more sensitive to sediments spiked with fluoranthene than the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. E. estuarius, and possibly other estuarine haustoriid species, appears to be an excellent candidate for testing the acute toxicity if estuarine and marine sediments.

  3. Silicon isotopic chemistry in the Changjiang Estuary and coastal regions: Impacts of physical and biogeochemical processes on the transport of riverine dissolved silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. Y.; Zhang, J.; Hu, J.; Zhang, R. F.; Zhang, G. S.

    2015-10-01

    The dissolved silica (DSi) concentration and silicon isotopic composition (δ30Si) of surface water samples from the Changjiang Estuary was measured in summer and winter to study the behavior of DSi fluvial inputs into the estuary. The DSi concentration decreased away from the estuary and had a linear relationship with salinity, suggesting that mixing between river water and seawater is the dominant effect on DSi levels in the study area. Measured δ30Si in the Changjiang Estuary ranged from +1.48‰ to +2.35‰ in summer, and from +1.54‰ to +1.95‰ in winter. As a result of low light levels and abundant DSi riverine inputs, DSi remains relatively unaffected by biological utilization and fractionation in the near-shore region, and the isotopic imprint of water from the Changjiang can still be detected up to a salinity level of 20 in summer. An obvious increase in δ30Si was observed beyond this salinity level, indicating a significant increase in biological utilization and fractionation of DSi in high salinity waters. Lower water temperatures and light levels that prevail over the winter lead to the reduced fractionation of DSi compared with that in summer. The fractionation factor (30ɛ) was estimated using a steady state model to the high salinity waters, yielding a value of -0.95‰, which is in agreement with previous results obtained for Skeletonema costatum in cultivation experiments. The results of this study suggest that silicon isotopes can be used to identify the impact of biological utilization on the behavior of DSi in highly dynamic estuarine environments.

  4. Evaluation of HCMM satellite data for estuarine tidal circulation patterns and thermal inertia soil moisture measurements. [Delaware Bay, Cooper River, and the Potomac River estuaries; Luverne, Minnesota, soil moisture, and water temperature of Lake Anna, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesnet, D. R.; Mcginnis, D. F., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Matson, M.; Pritchard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Digital thermal maps of the Cooper River (SC) and the Potomac River estuaries were prepared from heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) tapes. Tidal phases were correctly interpreted and verified. Synoptic surface circulation patterns were charted by location thermal fronts and water mass boundaries within the estuaries. Thermal anomalies were detected adjacent of a conventional power plant on the Potomac. Under optimum conditions, estuaries as small as the Cooper River can be monitored for generalized thermal/tidal circulation patterns by the HCMM-type IR sensors. The HCMM thermal inertia approach to estimating soil moisture at the Luverne (MN) test site was found to be unsatisfactory as a NESS operational satellite technique because of cloud cover interference. Thermal-IR data show similar structure of the Baltimore and Washington heat islands when compared to NOAA AVHRR thermal-IR data. Thermal anomalies from the warm water discharge water of a nuclear power plant were mapped in Lake Anna, Virginia.

  5. Spatial patterns in soil biogeochemical process rates along a Louisiana wetland salinity gradient in the Barataria Bay estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. J.; Rich, M. W.; Sullivan, H. L.; Bledsoe, R.; Dawson, M.; Donnelly, B.; Marton, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Louisiana has the highest rates of coastal wetland loss in the United States. In addition to being lost, Louisiana wetlands experience numerous other environmental stressors including changes in salinity regime (both increases from salt water intrusion and decreases from the creation of river diversions) and climate change induced changes in vegetation (e.g. the northward expansion of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) into salt marshes). In this study, we examined how these changes might influence biogeochemical process rates important in regulating carbon balance and the cycling, retention, and removal of nutrients in Louisiana wetlands. Specifically, we measured net soil greenhouse gas fluxes and collected cores for the determination of rates of greenhouse gas production, denitrification potential, nitrification potential, iron reduction, and phosphorus sorption from surface (0-5cm) and subsurface (10-15cm) depths for three plots in each of 4 sites along the salinity gradient: a freshwater marsh site, a brackish (7 ppt) marsh site, a salt marsh (17 ppt), and a Avicennia germinans stand (17 ppt; adjacent to salt marsh site) in the Barataria Bay estuarine system. Most biogeochemical processes displayed similar spatial patterns with salt marsh rates being lower than rates in freshwater and/or brackish marsh sites and not having significantly different rates than in Avicennia germinans stands. Rates in surface soils were generally higher than in subsurface soils. These patterns were generally consistent with spatial patterns in soil properties with soil water content, organic matter quantity and quality, and extractable nutrients generally being higher in freshwater and brackish marsh sites than salt marsh and Avicennia germinans sites, especially in surface soils. These spatial patterns suggest that the ability of coastal wetlands to retain and remove nutrients might change significantly in response to future climate changes in the region and that these

  6. Home advantage? Decomposition across the freshwater-estuarine transition zone varies with litter origin and local salinity.

    PubMed

    Franzitta, Giulio; Hanley, Mick E; Airoldi, Laura; Baggini, Cecilia; Bilton, David T; Rundle, Simon D; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-09-01

    Expected increases in the frequency and intensity of storm surges and river flooding may greatly affect the relative salinity of estuarine environments over the coming decades. In this experiment we used detritus from three contrasting environments (marine Fucus vesiculosus; estuarine Spartina anglica; terrestrial Quercus robur) to test the prediction that the decomposition of the different types of litter would be highest in the environment with which they are associated. Patterns of decomposition broadly fitted our prediction: Quercus detritus decomposed more rapidly in freshwater compared with saline conditions while Fucus showed the opposite trend; Spartina showed an intermediate response. Variation in macro-invertebrate assemblages was detected along the salinity gradient but with different patterns between estuaries, suggesting that breakdown rates may be linked in part to local invertebrate assemblages. Nonetheless, our results suggest that perturbation of salinity gradients through climate change could affect the process of litter decomposition and thus alter nutrient cycling in estuarine transition zones. Understanding the vulnerability of estuaries to changes in local abiotic conditions is important given the need to better integrate coastal proceses into a wider management framework at a time when coastlines are increasingly threatened by human activities. PMID:26247807

  7. Evolution of mid-Atlantic coastal and back-barrier estuary environments in response to a hurricane: Implications for barrier-estuary connectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miselis, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Brian D.; Nicholson, Robert S.; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.; Navoy, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessments of coupled barrier island-estuary storm response are rare. Hurricane Sandy made landfall during an investigation in Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor estuary that included water quality monitoring, geomorphologic characterization, and numerical modeling; this provided an opportunity to characterize the storm response of the barrier island-estuary system. Barrier island morphologic response was characterized by significant changes in shoreline position, dune elevation, and beach volume; morphologic changes within the estuary were less dramatic with a net gain of only 200,000 m3 of sediment. When observed, estuarine deposition was adjacent to the back-barrier shoreline or collocated with maximum estuary depths. Estuarine sedimentologic changes correlated well with bed shear stresses derived from numerically simulated storm conditions, suggesting that change is linked to winnowing from elevated storm-related wave-current interactions rather than deposition. Rapid storm-related changes in estuarine water level, turbidity, and salinity were coincident with minima in island and estuarine widths, which may have influenced the location of two barrier island breaches. Barrier-estuary connectivity, or the transport of sediment from barrier island to estuary, was influenced by barrier island land use and width. Coupled assessments like this one provide critical information about storm-related coastal and estuarine sediment transport that may not be evident from investigations that consider only one component of the coastal system.

  8. 2004 AND 2006 COHO SMOLT MOVEMENT IN THE YAQUINA RIVER AND ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  9. Colloidal size spectra, composition and estuarine mixing behavior of DOM in river and estuarine waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.

    2016-05-01

    Flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled on-line with UV absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to examine the colloidal composition and size distribution of optically active dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the lower Mississippi River (MR), the East Pearl River (EPR), the St. Louis Bay (SLB) estuary, and coastal waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. In addition to field studies, laboratory mixing experiments using river and seawater end-members were carried out to study the processes controlling the estuarine mixing behavior and size partitioning of colloids with different sizes and composition. The colloidal size spectra of chromophoric DOM and humic-like DOM showed one dominant peak in the 0.5-4 nm size range, representing >75% of the total FlFFF-recoverable colloids. In contrast, protein-like DOM showed a bi-modal distribution with peaks at 0.5-4 nm and 4-8 nm, as well as a major portion (from ∼41% in the EPR to ∼72% in the Mississippi Bight) partitioned to the >20 nm size fraction. Bulk DOM was lower in abundance and molecular-weight in the MR compared with the EPR, while the proportion of colloidal protein-like DOM in the >20 nm size range was slightly larger in the MR compared with the EPR. These features are consistent with differences in land use, hydrological conditions, and water residence time between the two river basins, with more autochthonous DOM in MR waters. In the SLB estuary, different DOM components demonstrated different mixing behaviors. The abundance of colloidal chromophoric DOM decreased with increasing salinity and showed evident removal during estuarine mixing even though the bulk DOM appeared to be conservative. In contrast, colloidal humic-like DOM behaved conservatively inside SLB and during laboratory mixing experiments. The ratio of colloidal protein-like to humic-like DOM generally increased with increasing salinity, consistent with increasing autochthonous protein-like DOM and removal of terrestrially

  10. USING IMAGE PROCESSING METHODS WITH RASTER EDITING TOOLS FOR MAPPING EELGRASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN PACIFIC NORHWEST ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    False-color near-infrared (CIR) aerial photography of seven Oregon estuaries was acquired at extreme low tides and digitally orthorectified with a ground pixel resolution of 25 cm to provide data for intertidal vegetation mapping. Exposed, semi-exposed and some submerged eelgras...

  11. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  12. Identifying the sources and processes of mercury in subtropical estuarine and ocean sediments using Hg isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Runsheng; Feng, Xinbin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Junjun; Wang, Wenxiong; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    The concentrations and isotopic compositions of mercury (Hg) in surface sediments of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the South China Sea (SCS) were analyzed. The data revealed significant differences between the total Hg (THg) in fine-grained sediments collected from the PRE (8-251 μg kg(-1)) and those collected from the SCS (12-83 μg kg(-1)). Large spatial variations in Hg isotopic compositions were observed in the SCS (δ(202)Hg, from -2.82 to -2.10‰; Δ(199)Hg, from +0.21 to +0.45‰) and PRE (δ(202)Hg, from -2.80 to -0.68‰; Δ(199)Hg, from -0.15 to +0.16‰). The large positive Δ(199)Hg in the SCS indicated that a fraction of Hg has undergone Hg(2+) photoreduction processes prior to incorporation into the sediments. The relatively negative Δ(199)Hg values in the PRE indicated that photoreduction of Hg is not the primary route for the removal of Hg from the water column. The riverine input of fine particles played an important role in transporting Hg to the PRE sediments. In the deep ocean bed of the SCS, source-related signatures of Hg isotopes may have been altered by natural geochemical processes (e.g., Hg(2+) photoreduction and preferential adsorption processes). Using Hg isotope compositions, we estimate that river deliveries of Hg from industrial and urban sources and natural soils could be the main inputs of Hg to the PRE. However, the use of Hg isotopes as tracers in source attribution could be limited because of the isotope fractionation by natural processes in the SCS.

  13. Relative importance of estuarine flatfish nurseries along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Henrique N.; Vasconcelos, Rita; Vinagre, Catarina; França, Susana; Fonseca, Vanessa; Maia, Anabela; Reis-Santos, Patrick; Lopes, Marta; Ruano, Miguel; Campos, Joana; Freitas, Vânia; Santos, Paulo T.; Costa, Maria José

    2007-02-01

    The relative importance of nursery areas and their relationships with several environmental variables were evaluated in nine estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast based on trawl surveys. Historical data were used to outline changes and trends in the nursery function of some of these estuaries over the past decades. The dominant flatfish species in Portuguese estuaries were Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858 and Monochirus hispidus Rafinesque, 1814, but their occurrence differed among the estuaries. P. flesus only occurred in estuaries north of the Tejo estuary (39°N), S. solea was quite rare along the southern Portuguese coast (south of 37°30'N), S. senegalensis occurred in estuaries throughout the coast, but its abundance varied considerably, and the occurrence of M. hispidus was limited to the Sado estuary and Ria Formosa. A Correspondence Analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between flatfish species abundance and geomorphologic and hydrologic characteristics of estuaries (latitude, freshwater flow, estuarine area, intertidal area, mean depth and residence time). Abiotic characteristics (depth, temperature, salinity, sediment type) of nursery grounds of each flatfish species were also evaluated. Results showed that some estuaries along the Portuguese coast have nursery grounds used by several flatfish species (e.g. Ria de Aveiro, Sado estuary), while in other systems a segregation was noticed, with juveniles of different species occurring in distinct estuarine areas (e.g. Minho and Mondego estuaries). This emphasizes the relevance of niche overlap, but the potential for competition may be considerably minimized by differences in resource use patterns and by an extremely high abundance of resources. Peak densities of flatfishes recorded in nurseries areas along the Portuguese coast were within the range of values reported for other geographical areas. Inter-annual abundance

  14. Observations of subtidal and tidal flow in the Rı´o de la Plata Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Héctor H.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Framiñan, Mariana B.

    2004-03-01

    We present the first measurements obtained with a combination of a towed acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder in the Rı´o de la Plata Estuary. Subtidal and tidal flows are described for austral winter and summer conditions. Data were collected at three transects 15 km long for 25 h during August 11-17, 1999 (austral winter) and February 2-6, 2000 (austral summer) at the transition zone between fresh and brackish waters. Two transects covered cross-estuary tracks off the northern and southern coastlines of the estuary. A central transect was oriented along the estuarine axis near the up-stream limit of saltwater intrusion. The observations indicated that the dominant dynamical processes were different at each of the transects sampled. The most relevant feature was the dominance of tidal currents in the southern side of the estuary and the lesser role they played in the northern side (Uruguayan coast). The pressure gradient produced by the freshwater outflow was modified differently at the southern than at the northern sides of the estuary. At the southern side tidal mixing, from strong tidal currents, allowed the development of gravitational circulation. At the northern side weak tidal currents allowed modifications by ambient forcing and surface stresses, consistent with theoretical results of surface-advected freshwater outflows.

  15. 18O and 226Ra in the Minjiang River estuary, China and their hydrological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huatai; Guo, Zhanrong; Gao, Aiguo; Yuan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the 2H, 18O and 226Ra values in groundwater and surface water in the Minjiang River estuary were investigated in the dry and wet seasons. The δ18O values in the dry season were always higher than those in the wet season in both groundwater and surface water because of the presence of evaporation in the water cycle process. During the dry season, the δ18O values in groundwater on the southern bank of the Minjiang River are much higher than those on the northern bank because evaporation is more intense in the farmland of the southern bank than in the urbanized northern bank. The δ18O values in the estuarine water exhibit a good positive correlation with salinity, with a coefficient of 0.96 (p = 0.05) in both seasons. The 226Ra activities in the estuarine water increase with increasing salinity because of desorption from riverine suspended particles. The 226Ra activity reaches a peak value at a salinity of 20.5. Based on a three-endmember model, the average proportions of the estuarine water are calculated to be 0.02 for groundwater, 0.39 for river water and 0.59 for seawater. From this mixing ratio, the groundwater discharge into the estuary is estimated to be 9.31 × 106 m3 d-1 in the wet season.

  16. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  17. Mineralogy and Sr-Nd isotopes of SPM and sediment from the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries: Influence of weathering and anthropogenic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnachandra Rao, V.; Shynu, R.; Singh, Sunil K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Kessarkar, Pratima M.

    2015-04-01

    Clay minerals and Sr-Nd isotopes of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and bottom sediment were investigated along transect stations of the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, western India to determine the provenance and role of estuarine processes on their distribution. Kaolinite and illite, followed by minor goethite, gibbsite and chlorite were present in SPM and bottom sediment at all stations, both during monsoon and pre-monsoon. Smectite occurred in traces at river end stations but its contents increased downstream in both estuaries. Smectite contents were much higher in Zuari than in Mandovi estuary. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd of SPM were higher than those in hinterland rocks and laterite soils. The Sr ratios were highest at river end stations of both estuaries and decreased sharply seaward. The Sm/Nd ratios of SPM and sediment were close to that of iron ore material flushed into the estuaries. The mean ɛNd of SPM and sediment were similar in both estuaries. It is suggested that the smectite is formed in coastal plains and its distribution downstream is controlled by lithology and drainage basin of rivers. Abundant kaolinite and high Sr ratios reflect chemical weathering and lateritization of source rocks. Sr isotopic ratios along transects are influenced by changes in salinity, organic matter and turbidity. High and near identical ɛNd values along transect stations of both estuaries suggest that the Nd isotopic compositions are influenced by the lateritization of source rocks and anthropogenic contribution of ore material.

  18. Water organic pollution and eutrophication influence soil microbial processes, increasing soil respiration of estuarine wetlands: site study in jiuduansha wetland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lei; Hu, Yu; Xi, Xuefei; Tang, Yushu; Chen, Jinhai; Fu, Xiaohua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Undisturbed natural wetlands are important carbon sinks due to their low soil respiration. When compared with inland alpine wetlands, estuarine wetlands in densely populated areas are subjected to great pressure associated with environmental pollution. However, the effects of water pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine and their mechanism have still not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, two representative zones of a tidal wetland located in the upstream and downstream were investigated to determine the effects of water organic pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine wetlands and its mechanism. The results showed that eutrophication, which is a result of there being an excess of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and organic pollutants in the water near Shang shoal located upstream were higher than in downstream Xia shoal. Due to the absorption and interception function of shoals, there to be more nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter in Shang shoal soil than in Xia shoal. Abundant nitrogen, phosphorus and organic carbon input to soil of Shang shoal promoted reproduction and growth of some highly heterotrophic metabolic microorganisms such as β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria which is not conducive to carbon sequestration. These results imply that the performance of pollutant interception and purification function of estuarine wetlands may weaken their carbon sequestration function to some extent.

  19. Water organic pollution and eutrophication influence soil microbial processes, increasing soil respiration of estuarine wetlands: site study in jiuduansha wetland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lei; Hu, Yu; Xi, Xuefei; Tang, Yushu; Chen, Jinhai; Fu, Xiaohua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Undisturbed natural wetlands are important carbon sinks due to their low soil respiration. When compared with inland alpine wetlands, estuarine wetlands in densely populated areas are subjected to great pressure associated with environmental pollution. However, the effects of water pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine and their mechanism have still not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, two representative zones of a tidal wetland located in the upstream and downstream were investigated to determine the effects of water organic pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine wetlands and its mechanism. The results showed that eutrophication, which is a result of there being an excess of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and organic pollutants in the water near Shang shoal located upstream were higher than in downstream Xia shoal. Due to the absorption and interception function of shoals, there to be more nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter in Shang shoal soil than in Xia shoal. Abundant nitrogen, phosphorus and organic carbon input to soil of Shang shoal promoted reproduction and growth of some highly heterotrophic metabolic microorganisms such as β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria which is not conducive to carbon sequestration. These results imply that the performance of pollutant interception and purification function of estuarine wetlands may weaken their carbon sequestration function to some extent. PMID:25993326

  20. Water Organic Pollution and Eutrophication Influence Soil Microbial Processes, Increasing Soil Respiration of Estuarine Wetlands: Site Study in Jiuduansha Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lei; Hu, Yu; Xi, Xuefei; Tang, Yushu; Chen, Jinhai; Fu, Xiaohua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Undisturbed natural wetlands are important carbon sinks due to their low soil respiration. When compared with inland alpine wetlands, estuarine wetlands in densely populated areas are subjected to great pressure associated with environmental pollution. However, the effects of water pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine and their mechanism have still not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, two representative zones of a tidal wetland located in the upstream and downstream were investigated to determine the effects of water organic pollution and eutrophication on soil respiration of estuarine wetlands and its mechanism. The results showed that eutrophication, which is a result of there being an excess of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus, and organic pollutants in the water near Shang shoal located upstream were higher than in downstream Xia shoal. Due to the absorption and interception function of shoals, there to be more nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter in Shang shoal soil than in Xia shoal. Abundant nitrogen, phosphorus and organic carbon input to soil of Shang shoal promoted reproduction and growth of some highly heterotrophic metabolic microorganisms such as β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria which is not conducive to carbon sequestration. These results imply that the performance of pollutant interception and purification function of estuarine wetlands may weaken their carbon sequestration function to some extent. PMID:25993326

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments: metal influence.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Raquel; Mucha, Ana P; Teixeira, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the potential effect of metals, such as Cd, Cu and Pb, on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments was investigated under laboratory conditions. Sandy and muddy non-vegetated sediments were collected in the Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) and spiked with crude oil and each of the metals. Spiked sediments were left in the dark under constant shaking for 15 days, after which crude oil biodegradation was evaluated. To estimate microbial abundance, total cell counts were obtained by DAPI staining and microbial community structure was characterized by ARISA. Culturable hydrocarbon degraders were determined using a modified most probable number protocol. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations were analysed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy after their extraction by sonication, and metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained showed that microbial communities had the potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with a maximum of 32 % degradation obtained for sandy sediments. Both crude oil and metals changed the microbial community structure, being the higher effect observed for Cu. Also, among the studied metals, only Cu displayed measurable deleterious effect on the hydrocarbons degradation process, as shown by a decrease in the hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance and in the hydrocarbon degradation rates. Both degradation potential and metal influence varied with sediment characteristics probably due to differences in contaminant bioavailability, a feature that should be taken into account in developing bioremediation strategies for co-contaminated estuarine sites.

  2. Fish composition and assemblage structure in three Eastern English Channel macrotidal estuaries: A comparison with other French estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleslagh, Jonathan; Amara, Rachid; Laffargue, Pascal; Lesourd, Sandric; Lepage, Mario; Girardin, Michel

    2009-01-01

    This study has analysed for the first time fish composition and assemblage structures of three small macrotidal estuaries of the Eastern English Channel (EEC) and has explored the influences of 19 biotic and abiotic variables on the fish assemblages. Fish from Canche, Authie and Somme estuaries were collected during spring (June 2006 and May 2007) and autumn (September 2006) along the estuarine gradients using a 1.5 m beam trawl. Using identical sampling protocols, the study also analysed and compared for the first time taxonomic and functional aspects of the fish assemblages in 15 estuaries located along the Atlantic and English Channel coasts. SIMPER analysis showed high similarities in fish assemblages in the three EEC estuaries and during either spring or autumn periods. However, intra-estuary similarities were relatively low, indicating that fish assemblage structures (species richnesses or abundances) were more variable within the estuary (salinity gradient) than between estuaries and/or seasons (spring vs autumn). Although numerous environmental variables were included in the study, only 47% of the variability observed in the fish distribution was explained. Fish spatial variations in the EEC estuaries are mostly driven by abiotic variables as opposed to biological interactions. As indicated by CCA, salinity and muddy sediments were the two most important factors structuring the fish assemblages. The macrobenthos being very abundant in the EEC estuaries (580-1121 ind. m -2), the availability of potential prey is probably not a limiting factor in the utilization of estuaries by fish. Contrary to the majority of French estuaries dominated by estuarine species (ES), the fish assemblages of the EEC estuaries are clearly dominated by marine migrant (MM) species (65% on average) with high abundance of juveniles (mostly young-of-the-year). Cluster and SIMPROF's analyses distinguished the functional structure of the 15 estuarine fish assemblages into different

  3. Organic matter exploitation in a highly turbid environment: Planktonic food web in the Charente estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modéran, Julien; David, Valérie; Bouvais, Pierre; Richard, Pierre; Fichet, Denis

    2012-02-01

    Estuaries are highly dynamic systems where multiple organic matter sources coexist and where complex biogeochemical processes greatly affect their fate. Although zooplankton plays a key role of in the energy fluxes between primary sources and exploited macrofauna, there is still a critical lack of field information concerning the spatio-temporal variability of the trophic pathways supporting its high biomasses in estuaries. From January 2007 to January 2008, suspended matter, microphytobenthos and zooplankton were sampled along the salinity gradient of the Charente estuary to determine their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope composition. The relative homogeneity of the δ 13C values of particulate organic matter (POM) all along the estuary (-23.6 to -26.5‰ except in March and June, ˜ -28.5‰) was attributed to physical mixing of marine and terrestrially derived organic matter with the great load of tidally resuspended particles. The five zooplankton taxa analysed displayed a wide range of δ 13C (from -34.9 to -17.4‰) and δ 15N values (3.4-15.2‰) over the year, providing strong evidence for high selectivity toward different organic matter sources and reinforcing the idea that a spatio-temporal succession of species assemblages lead to multiple trophic pathways and may stabilize the estuarine trophic network. The high δ 15N values of Eurytemora affinis in the maximum turbidity zone were believed to reflect a higher carnivorous tendency as a functional response to the strong decrease of phytoplankton availability. Conversely, Acartia spp. appeared unable to change their diet in the same way and was thus unable to colonize upstream areas. Stable isotope analysis also revealed that Mesopodopsis slabberi mostly relied on fresh phytoplankton and microphytobenthos while Neomysis integer presented a clear carnivorous tendency toward copepods, at least during the warm period. Additionally evidence was provided for passive (downstream advection of freshwater

  4. Residues in fish, wildlife, and estuaries. Indicator species near top of food chain chosen for assessment of pesticide base levels in fish and wildlife--clams, oysters, and sediment in estuarine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.E.; Carver, T.C.; Dustman, E.H.

    1967-01-01

    Federal efforts to determine pesticide levels in fish and wildlife are being carried out by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, U. S. Department of the Interior. Monitoring estuarine pesticide levels in clams, oysters, and sediments is a joint endeavor of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, U. S. Department of the Interior, and the Water Supply and Sea Resources Program of the National Center for Urban and Industrial Health, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

  5. Trace elements and heavy metals in the Grand Bay National Estuarine Reserve in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve has the highest biotic diversity of habitats and offer a reserve of food resources and commercially significant species. Rapid human civilization has led to accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in estuaries. The Grand Bay National Estuarin...

  6. Benthic and pelagic pathways of methylmercury bioaccumulation in estuarine food webs of the northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Celia Y; Borsuk, Mark E; Bugge, Deenie M; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H; Ward, Darren M; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column.

  7. Benthic and Pelagic Pathways of Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Estuarine Food Webs of the Northeast United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia Y.; Borsuk, Mark E.; Bugge, Deenie M.; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Ward, Darren M.; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column. PMID:24558491

  8. A 9-year continuous monitoring of salinity in the Gironde estuary (S-W France) reveals marked inter-annual variability in marine intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    Estuaries form a transition zone in which rivers and oceans meet, including both fresh and salt waters. Thus conditions in estuary are more variable than those in either rivers or marine environments. In particular salinity presents a large temporal and lateral variations, depending of the degree of water mixing. The limit of salinity intrusion along an estuary is determined by the balance between the landward transport of salt by tidal processes and its seaward return by freshwater discharges. The major factor that affects the limit of saline intrusion along an estuary is freshwater inflow. In a context of global change, salinity intrusion in estuaries is expected to increase due to the cumulative effect of decrease in freshwater flows (changes in rain rate, decrease of riverine discharge due to upstream land use) and to sea level rives. At present, it is still difficult to establish changes in marine intrusion in estuaries due to the limited available data set. With its 625 km2, the Gironde estuary (S-W France) is one of the largest European estuaries. Since 2004, a real-time continuous system (MAGEST network) records four selected parameters (salinity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen) to establish a reference database of water-quality of this fluvio-estuarine system to address current and future water-quality issues. Here we present in details the 9-year time series of salinity in the Gironde estuary, recorded at four stations representative of the central and up estuary. Not surprisingly there are large difference among the four instrumented stations depending on their localization. But the time-series had allowed to highlight marked inter-annual variability in relation with the local hydrology. This example clearly illustrates the interest of long-term time series to detect potential changes in salinity, related to global changes, from inter-annual variability.

  9. A cost-efficient biogeochemical model for estuaries: a case-study of a funnel-shaped system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volta, Chiara; Arndt, Sandra; Regnier, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The hydrodynamics exerts an important influence on the biogeochemical functioning of estuarine systems. Comparative studies have long recognized this tight coupling and, for instance, have attempted to correlate key estuarine biogeochemical processes to simple hydrodynamic properties, such as the residence time or the tidal forcing. Yet, these correlations fail to resolve the estuarine spatio-temporal variability and do not provide powerful means to disentangle the complex interplay of multiple reaction and transport processes. In this context, reaction-transport models (RTMs) are useful tools to resolve the variability inherent to the estuarine environment. They ideally complement field observations, because their integrative power provides the required extrapolation means for a system-scale analysis over the entire spectrum of changing forcing conditions, including the long-term response to land-use and climate changes. However, RTM simulations are associated with high computational costs, especially when the biogeochemical dynamics are to be resolved on a regional or global scale. Furthermore, specific data requirements, such as boundary conditions or bathymetric and geometric information may limit their applicability. Here, a generic one-dimensional RTM approach which relies on idealized geometries to support the estuarine physics is used to quantify the biogeochemical dynamics. The model is cost-efficient and requires only a limited number of readily available input data. The approach is applied to a case-study of a funnel-shaped estuary (The Scheldt, BE/NL) and is tested by comparing integrative measures of the estuarine biogeochemical functioning (e.g. Net Ecosystem Metabolism, integrated CO2 fluxes) with those derived from observations (Frankignoulle et al., 1996, 1998) and highly-resolved model simulations (Vanderborght et al., 2002; Arndt et al., 2009). The method provides a robust quantitative tool to carry sensitivity and uncertainty analyses and to

  10. Benthic phosphorus regeneration in the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.

    1982-01-01

    The flux of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac riverine and estuarine sediments is controlled by processes occurring at the water-sediment interface and within surficial sediment. In situ benthic fluxes (0.1 to 2.0 mmoles m-2 day-1) are generally five to ten times higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.020 to 0.30 mmoles m-2 day-1). The discrepancy between the two flux estimates is greatest in the transition zone (river mile 50 to 70) and is attributd to macrofaunal irrigation. Both in situ and diffusive fluxes of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac tidal river sediments are low while those from anoxic lower estuarine sediments are high. The net accumulation rate of phosphorus in benthic sediment exhibits an inverse pattern. Thus a large fraction of phosphorus is retained by Potomac tidal river sediments, which contain a surficial oxidized layer and oligochaete worms tolerant of low oxygen conditions, and a large fraction of phosphorus is released from anoxic lower estuary sediments. Tidal river sediment pore waters are in equilibrium with amorphous Fe (OH)3 while lower estuary pore waters are significantly undersaturated with respect to this phase. Benthic regeneration of dissolved reactive phosphorus is sufficient to supply all the phosphorus requirements for net primary production in the lower tidal river and transition-zone waters of the Potomac River Estuary. Benthic regeneration supplies approximately 25% as much phosphorus as inputs from sewage treatment plants and 10% of all phosphorus inputs to the tidal Potomac River. When all available point source phosphorus data are put into a steady-state conservation of mass model and reasonable coefficients for uptake of dissolved phosphorus, remineralization of particulate phosphorus, and sedimentation of particulate phosphorus are used in the model, a reasonably accurate simulation of dissolved and particulate phosphorus in the water column is obtained for the summer of 1980. ?? 1982 Dr W. Junk

  11. Occurrence of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, a large quantity of reactive nitrogen has been transported into the Yangtze estuarine and coastal water, due to intense human activities in the Yangtze River Basin. At present, it annually receives a high load of anthropogenic inorganic nitrogen (about 1.1 × 1011 mol N) from increased agricultural activities, fish farming, and domestic and industrial wastewater discharge in the Yangtze River Basin, consequently leading to severe eutrophication and frequent occurrences of harmful algal blooms in the estuary and adjacent coastal areas. Hence, the microbial nitrogen transformations are of major concern in the Yangtze Estuary. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been reported to play a significant role in the removal of reactive nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the occurrences of anammox bacteria and associated activity in the Yangtze Estuary were evidenced with molecular and isotope-tracing techniques. It is observed that the anammox bacteria at the study area mainly consisted of Candidatus Scalindua, Brocadia, Kuenenia. Salinity was found to be a key environmental factor controlling distribution and diversity of the anammox bacterial community at the estuarine ecosystem. Also, temperature and organic carbon had significant influences on anammox bacterial biodiversity. Q-PCR assays of anammox bacteria indicated that their abundance had a range of 2.63 ×106 - 9.48 ×107 copies g-1 dry sediment, with high spatiotemporal heterogeneity. The potential anammox activities measured in the present work varied between 0.94 - 6.61nmol N g-1 dry sediment h-1, which were related to temperature, nitrite and anammox bacterial abundance. On the basis of the 15N tracing experiments, the anammox process was estimated to contribute 6.6 - 12.9 % to the total nitrogen loss whereas the remainder was attributed to denitrification.

  12. Controls on the Efficiency of Estuarine Particle Trapping: Ecosystem Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, D. A.; Orton, P. M.; Chisholm, T. A.

    2002-12-01

    Comparisons between the Columbia and Fraser river estuaries suggest several important controls on retention of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM). Observations were carried out in spring 1997 and 1999 in the Columbia under moderate to high-flow conditions. Because of flow regulation, flow levels were ~60% of their natural values, considerably increasing the salinity intrusion length and efficiency of particle trapping. Observations in the Fraser were made under extreme high-flow conditions (1999) and under normal spring conditions (2000). Concentrations of coarse material (sand and flocs landward of salinity intrusion, primarily large aggregates within the salt-water mass) were inferred from acoustic backscatter (ABS). Concentrations of silt and clay were estimated from optical backscatter (OBS). Both were calibrated through gravimetric analysis of pump samples and Owen tube results. The very high flows in the Fraser prevented efficient SPM retention for several reasons, and no permanent ETM was observed. First, the salinity intrusion was forced out of the estuary mouth on every greater ebb, exposing the bed to high bedstress levels. Moreover, the estuary was so short that individual silt particles could not settle to the bed before being exported by the river flow. Finally, aggregation appeared to be rate-limited, such that fluvial particles were unable to form into large aggregates during their rapid transit through the estuary. Aggregation occurred instead in the buoyant plume outside the estuary. Thus, the time scale for particle retention in the Fraser was <1 day. Conditions for ETM particle trapping were more favorable in the Columbia, because salt was never totally expelled from the system, and the fronts at the upstream limit of salinity intrusion were never forced back to the plume lift-off zone at the mouth. Also, near-surface waters required most of a tide to transit the length of salinity intrusion, allowing formation

  13. The Estuary: A Special Place. Student Guide and Teacher Guide. OEAGLS Investigation 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne; Mischler, Ron

    In this unit students examine Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Sanctuary on Lake Erie to study the characteristics and importance of estuaries in general. Activities include the analysis of a pictured plankton sample, a transect study using computer data, a consideration of the ecological roles of various estuarine species, and a discussion of…

  14. Climate change impacts on wave and surge processes in a Pacific Northwest (USA) estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T. K.; Hill, D. F.; Beamer, J.; García-Medina, G.

    2015-01-01

    water levels (TWLs) within estuaries are influenced by tides, wind, offshore waves, and streamflow, all of which are uniquely affected by climate change. The magnitude of TWL associated with various return periods is relevant to understanding how the hydrodynamics of a bay or estuary may evolve under distinct climate scenarios. A methodology for assessing the hydrodynamic response of a small estuary under major boundary condition perturbations is presented in this study. The coupled Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) and Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) model was used to simulate wave and water elevation conditions within Tillamook Bay, OR, USA for two long-term scenarios; 1979-1998 and 2041-2060. The model output provided multidecadal time series of TWLs for statistical analysis. Regional climate data from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) were used to drive streamflow modeling (MicroMet/SnowModel/HydroFlow) and meteorological forcing within ADCIRC-SWAN. WAVEWATCH III, which was forced with global climate data from the Community Climate Science Model (CCSM, a contributing model to NARCCAP), was used to produce open boundary wave forcing. Latitudinal and seasonal gradients were found in TWLs associated with varying return periods for both the hindcast and forecast. Changes in TWLs from hindcast to forecast included the sea level rise component and were also modulated by changes in boundary conditions.

  15. Recent estuarine deposits, Chesapeake Bay and Apalachicola Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Estuarine facies are not easily discernible in the ancient record, because they represent a transition stage between fluvial and marine deposits. Modern estuarine sediments, nevertheless, are widespread because of the ongoing marine transgression. This widespread occurrence indicates that, during a highstand, estuaries are important centers for deposition of sediments shed from the continents. Sedimentologic studies have been made of 2 major estuaries: Chesapeake Bay (the largest US estuary) and Apalachicola Bay (estuary of the largest river in Florida). A detailed sediment budget for the Chesapeake, using radiotracers, clay mineralogy, magnetic stratigraphy, and other methods, demonstrates that the estuary is filling rapidly with sediment. Its remaining sedimentologic lifetime can be measured in centuries. Most of this filling has come at the expense of shoreline erosion. The rate of sedimentation, as measured by C-14, Pb-210, and Cs-137, has accelerated sharply over the past 2 centuries, from a few millimeters per year to present rates of a few centimeters per year. Sediment trapping effectiveness of the Chesapeake is nearly 100%. For Apalachicola Bay, the filling rate has been slower, although it appears to be nearly as efficient in retaining sediment. It has undergone a comparable change in sedimentation rates and sources over the past few centuries, as shown by magnetic stratigraphy and clay mineralogy. Given favorable conditions, such estuaries might be expected to contribute relatively thin but areally extensive bodies of fine-grained sediment to the rock record.

  16. Utilizing remote sensing of thematic mapper data to improve our understanding of estuarine processes and their influence on the productivity of estuarine-dependent fisheries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browder, Joan A.; May, L. Nelson, Jr.; Rosenthal, Alan; Baumann, Robert H.; Gosselink, James G.

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic spatial computer model addressing coastal resource problems in Lousiana is being refined and validated using thematic mapper (TM) imagery. The TM images of brackish marsh sites were processed and data were tabulated on spatial parameters from TM images of the salt marsh sites. The Fisheries Image Processing Systems (FIPS) was used to analyze the TM scene. Activities were concentrated on improving the structure of the model and developing a structure and methodology for calibrating the model with spatial-pattern data from the TM imagery.

  17. Modeling tidal circulation and stratification in Skagit River estuary using an unstructured grid ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    Tidal circulation and river plume dynamics in shallow-water estuarine systems with large intertidal zones are complex. Strong asymmetries in tidal currents and stratification often occur in the intertidal zones and subtidal channels over a tidal cycle. The Skagit River is the largest estuary with respect to the discharge of a significant amount of freshwater and sediment into Puget Sound, Washington. It consists of a large intertidal zone with multiple tidal channels near the mouth of the estuary. To simulate the tidal circulation and salinity stratification accurately in the intertidal region, an unstructured grid numerical model with wetting-drying capability and the capability to accurately represent the bathymetry of tidal flats and the geometry of shallow distributary channels is necessary. In this paper, a modeling study for the Skagit River estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured grid, finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) supported by high-resolution LIDAR data is presented. The hydrodynamic model was validated with observed water surface elevation, velocity, and salinity data over spring and neap tidal cycles under low-river-flow and high-river-flow conditions. Wetting and drying processes in the intertidal zone and strong stratification in the estuary were simulated successfully by the model. Model results indicate that the Skagit River estuary is a highly stratified estuary, but destratification can occur during flood tide. Tides and baroclinic motion are the dominant forcing in the Skagit River estuary, but strong wind events can affect the currents in the intertidal zone significantly. Preliminary analysis also indicated that the salinity intrusion length scale is proportional to the river flow to the -¼ power.

  18. Microplastic in three urban estuaries, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2015-11-01

    Estuarine Microplastics (MPs) are limited to know globally. By filtering subsurface water through 330 μm nets, MPs in Jiaojiang, Oujiang Estuaries were quantified, as well as that in Minjiang Estuary responding to Typhoon Soulik. Polymer matrix was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. MP (<5 mm) comprised more than 90% of total number plastics. The highest MPs density was found in Minjiang, following Jiaojiang and Oujiang. Fibers and granules were the primary shapes, with no pellets found. Colored MPs were the majority. The concentrations of suspended microplastics determine their bioavailability to low trophic organisms, and then possibly promoting the transfer of microplastic to higher trophic levels. Polypropylene and polyethylene were the prevalent types of MPs analyzed. Economic structures in urban estuaries influenced on MPs contamination levels. Typhoon didn't influence the suspended MP densities significantly. Our results provide basic information for better understanding suspended microplastics within urban estuaries and for managerial actions.

  19. The discharge of nitrate-contaminated groundwater from developed shoreline to marsh-fringed estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portnoy, J.W.; Nowicki, B.L.; Roman, C.T.; Urish, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    As residential development, onsite wastewater disposal and groundwater contamination increase in the coastal zone, assessment of nutrient removal by soil and sedimentary processes becomes increasingly important. Nitrogen removal efficiency depends largely upon the specific flow paths taken by groundwater as it discharges into nitrogen-limited estuarine waters. Shoreline salinity surveys, hydraulic studies and thermal infrared imagery indicated that groundwater discharge into the Nauset Marsh estuary (Eastham, MA) occurred in high-velocity seeps immediately seaward of the upland-fringing salt marsh. Discharge was highly variable spatially and occurred through permeable, sandy sediments during low tide. Seepage chamber monitoring showed that dissolved inorganic nitrogen (principally nitrate) traversed nearly conservatively from the aquifer through shallow estuarine sediments to coastal waters at flux rates of 13 mmoles m2 h1. A significant relationship found between porewater NO3N concentrations and NO3N flux rates may provide a rapid method of estimating nitrogen loading from groundwater to the water column.

  20. Trace metals in the Góta river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Lars-Göran; Magnusson, Bertil; Westerlund, Stig; Zhang, Kerong

    1983-07-01

    The concentrations of the trace metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn in the Göta River estuary have been investigated. The following metal fractions have been determined: acid-leachable, dissolved, labile and particulate. The estuary represents a salt wedge type estuary and is situated in a densely populated region of Sweden. The metal concentrations found for the dissolved fraction is in the range of what can be considered as background levels for freshwater. It is difficult to evaluate any estuarine processes other than conservative mixing for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn. The dissolved levels in the freshwater end member are Cd, 9-25 ngl -1; Cu, 1·1-1·4 μgl -1; Fe, 20-75 μg l -1: Ni, 0·7-0·9 μg l -1: Pb 0·09-0·2 μg l -1; and Zn, 6-7 μg l -1: The results from the acid-leachable fraction show that at high suspended load the particles sediment in the river mouth. The trace metal levels in this fraction are subject to large variations.

  1. Chlorinated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in riverine and estuarine sediments from Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mai, Bi-Xian; Fu, Jia-Mo; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Kang, Yue-Hui; Lin, Zheng; Zhang, Gan; Min, Yu-Shuan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2002-01-01

    Spatial distribution of chlorinated hydrocarbons [chlorinated pesticides (CPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)] and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was measured in riverine and estuarine sediment samples from Pearl River Delta, China, collected in 1997. Concentrations of CPs of the riverine sediment samples range from 12 to 158 ng/g, dry weight, while those of PCBs range from 11 to 486 ng/g. The CPs concentrations of the estuarine sediment samples are in the range 6-1658 ng/g, while concentrations of PCBs are in the range 10-339 ng/g. Total PAH concentration ranges from 1168 to 21,329 ng/g in the riverine sediment samples, whereas the PAH concentration ranges from 323 to 14,812 ng/g in the sediment samples of the Estuary. Sediment samples of the Zhujiang River and Macao harbor around the Estuary show the highest concentrations of CPs, PCBs, and PAHs. Possible factors affecting the distribution patterns are also discussed based on the usage history of the chemicals, hydrologic condition, and land erosion due to urbanization processes. The composition of PAHs is investigated and used to assess petrogenic, combustion and naturally derived PAHs of the sediment samples of the Pearl River Delta. In addition, the concentrations of a number of organic compounds of the Pearl River Delta samples indicate that sediments of the Zhujiang river and Macao harbor are most likely to pose biological impairment.

  2. Assessing environmental drivers of microbial communities in estuarine soils of the Aconcagua River in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Ding, Guo-Chun; Cárdenas, Franco; Smalla, Kornelia; Seeger, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Aconcagua River basin (Central Chile) harbors diverse economic activities such as agriculture, mining and a crude oil refinery. The aim of this study was to assess environmental drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils, which may be influenced by anthropogenic activities taking place upstream and by natural processes such as tides and flood runoffs. Physicochemical parameters were measured in floodplain soils along the estuary. Bacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Fungi were studied by DGGE fingerprinting of 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal ITS-1 amplified from community DNA. Correlations between environment and communities were assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. Mainly hydrocarbons, pH and the composed variable copper/arsenic/calcium but in less extent nitrogen and organic matter/phosphorous/magnesium correlated with community structures at different taxonomic levels. Aromatic hydrocarbons degradation potential by bacterial community was studied. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases genes were detected only at upstream sites. Naphthalene dioxygenase ndo genes were heterogeneously distributed along estuary, and related to Pseudomonas, Delftia, Comamonas and Ralstonia. IncP-1 plasmids were mainly present at downstream sites, whereas IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids showed a heterogeneous distribution. This study strongly suggests that pH, copper, arsenic and hydrocarbons are main drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils.

  3. Assessing environmental drivers of microbial communities in estuarine soils of the Aconcagua River in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Ding, Guo-Chun; Cárdenas, Franco; Smalla, Kornelia; Seeger, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Aconcagua River basin (Central Chile) harbors diverse economic activities such as agriculture, mining and a crude oil refinery. The aim of this study was to assess environmental drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils, which may be influenced by anthropogenic activities taking place upstream and by natural processes such as tides and flood runoffs. Physicochemical parameters were measured in floodplain soils along the estuary. Bacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Fungi were studied by DGGE fingerprinting of 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal ITS-1 amplified from community DNA. Correlations between environment and communities were assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. Mainly hydrocarbons, pH and the composed variable copper/arsenic/calcium but in less extent nitrogen and organic matter/phosphorous/magnesium correlated with community structures at different taxonomic levels. Aromatic hydrocarbons degradation potential by bacterial community was studied. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases genes were detected only at upstream sites. Naphthalene dioxygenase ndo genes were heterogeneously distributed along estuary, and related to Pseudomonas, Delftia, Comamonas and Ralstonia. IncP-1 plasmids were mainly present at downstream sites, whereas IncP-7 and IncP-9 plasmids showed a heterogeneous distribution. This study strongly suggests that pH, copper, arsenic and hydrocarbons are main drivers of microbial communities in Aconcagua River estuarine soils. PMID:26362923

  4. Red waters of Myrionecta rubra are biogeochemical hotspots for the Columbia River estuary with impacts on primary/secondary productions and nutrient cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McCue, Lee Ann; Needoba, Joe A.; Crump, Byron C.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Campbell, Victoria; Zuber, Peter A.

    2012-02-29

    The localized impact of blooms of the mixotrophic ciliate Myrionecta rubra in the Columbia River estuary during 2007-2010 was evaluated with biogeochemical, light microscopy, physiological and molecular data. M. rubra affected surrounding estuarine nutrient cycles, as indicated by high and low concentrations of organic nutrients and inorganic nitrogen, respectively, associated with red waters. M. rubra blooms also altered the energy transfer pattern in patches of the estuarine water that contain the ciliate by creating areas characterized by high primary production and elevated levels of fresh autochthonous particulate organic matter, therefore shifting the trophic status in emergent red water areas of the estuary from net heterotrophy towards autotrophy. The pelagic estuarine bacterial community structure was unaffected by M. rubra abundance, but red waters of the ciliate do offer a possible link between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes since they were associated with elevated dissolved organic matter and enhanced microbial secondary production. Taken together these findings suggest that M. rubra red waters are biogeochemical hotspots of the Columbia River estuary.

  5. Biogeochemical transport in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida: The role of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Orem, W.H.; McPherson, B.F.; Baskaran, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Ba, U, and a suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during high- and low-discharge conditions in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida to examine the role of submarine groundwater discharge in estuarine transport. The fresh water endmember of this still relatively pristine estuary may reflect not only river-borne constituents, but also those advected during active groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange. During both discharge conditions, Ba concentrations indicated slight non-conservative mixing. Such Ba excesses could be attributed either to submarine groundwater discharge or particle desorption processes. Estuarine dissolved organic carbon concentrations were highest at salinities closest to zero. Uranium distributions were lowest in the fresh water sites and mixed mostly conservatively with an increase in salinity. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations were generally lowest ( 28??dpm L- 1) at the freshwater endmember of the estuary and appear to identify regions of the river most influenced by the discharge of fresh groundwater. Activities of four naturally occurring isotopes of Ra (223,224,226,228Ra) in this estuary and select adjacent shallow groundwater wells yield mean estuarine water-mass transit times of less than 1 day; these values are in close agreement to those calculated by tidal prism and tidal frequency. Submarine groundwater discharge rates to the Loxahatchee River estuary were calculated using a tidal prism approach, an excess 226Ra mass balance, and an electromagnetic seepage meter. Average SGD rates ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 ?? 105??m3 d- 1 (20-74??L m- 2 d- 1), depending on river-discharge stage. Such calculated SGD estimates, which must include both a recirculated as well as fresh water component, are in close agreement with results obtained from a first-order watershed mass balance. Average submarine

  6. Bar dimensions and bar shapes in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuven, Jasper; Kleinhans, Maarten; Weisscher, Steven; van der Vegt, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Estuaries cause fascinating patterns of dynamic channels and shoals. Intertidal sandbars are valuable habitats, whilst channels provide access to harbors. We still lack a full explanation and classification scheme for the shapes and dimensions of bar patterns in natural estuaries, in contrast with bars in rivers. Analytical physics-based models suggest that bar length in estuaries increases with flow velocity, tidal excursion length or estuary width, depending on which model. However, these hypotheses were never validated for lack of data and experiments. We present a large dataset and determine the controls on bar shape and dimensions in estuaries, spanning bar lengths from centimeters (experiments) to 10s of kilometers length. First, we visually identified and classified 190 bars, measured their dimensions (width, length, height) and local braiding index. Data on estuarine geometry and tidal characteristics were obtained from governmental databases and literature on case studies. We found that many complex bars can be seen as simple elongated bars partly cut by mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels. Data analysis shows that bar dimensions scale with estuary dimensions, in particular estuary width. Breaking up the complex bars in simple bars greatly reduced scatter. Analytical bar theory overpredicts bar dimensions by an order of magnitude in case of small estuarine systems. Likewise, braiding index depends on local width-to-depth ratio, as was previously found for river systems. Our results suggest that estuary dimensions determine the order of magnitude of bar dimensions, while tidal characteristics modify this. We will continue to model bars numerically and experimentally. Our dataset on tidal bars enables future studies on the sedimentary architecture of geologically complex tidal deposits and enables studying effects of man-induced perturbations such as dredging and dumping on bar and channel patterns and habitats.

  7. Use of dynamic simulation to assess the behaviour of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates and their biodegradation intermediates (sulfophenylcarboxylic acids) in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Luque, E.; González-Mazo, E.; Forja, J. M.; Gómez-Parra, A.

    2009-02-01

    Dynamic laboratory simulation of processes affecting chemical species in their transit through estuaries is a very useful tool to characterize these littoral systems. To date, laboratory studies concerning biodegradation and sorption (onto suspended particulate matter) of LAS in an estuary are scarce. For this reason, a dynamic automated estuarine simulator has been employed to carry out different experiments in order to assess the biodegradability of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) and their biodegradation intermediates (sulfophenylcarboxylic acids, SPCs) using environmentally representative LAS concentrations in estuaries by a continuous injection of LAS into the system. During the experiments, a great affinity of LAS for the solid phase has been found, as well as an increased adsorption in line with increased chain length. On the other hand, the presence of SPCs with chain length between 6 and 13 carbon atoms was detected. Accumulation and persistence of medium chain length SPCs (C 6-C 8) along the experiments show that their degradation constitutes the limiting step for the process of LAS mineralization. In the final zone of the simulated estuarine system, the levels of SPCs were below the limits of detection. Thus, the disappearance of SPCs indicated that LAS biodegradation had been completed along the estuary. Similar results have been described for different Iberian littoral ecosystems. Therefore, the simulator employed in this research appears to be a useful tool to anticipate the behaviour of a xenobiotic chemical in its transit through littoral systems with different salinity gradients.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Sedimentary Environments in the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, A. L.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B.; Bell, R.

    2004-05-01

    Sitting at the interface between marine and terrestrial systems, estuaries are sensitive to natural climatic, sea-level and tectonic changes as well as to anthropogenic impacts. Research on estuarine systems has led to improved understanding of estuarine processes, but relation of those processes to the long-term evolution of estuaries is still uncertain. A geophysical survey funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation resolves details of spatial and temporal variability of sedimentary processes in the Hudson River Estuary. Here we present interpreted sedimentary environments and evidence of past environments for a 30-km stretch of the Lower Hudson River Estuary, between Piermont and Haverstraw Bay. Integration of high-resolution seismic surveys, side-scan sonar imagery and multibeam bathymetry with sediment samples allows differentiation of three distinct sedimentary environments in the estuary: depositional, erosional and dynamic. Modern deposition occurs mainly in Haverstraw Bay on shallow marginal flats bounding the river channel as well as the channel floor. South of Haverstraw Bay, deposition is limited to a local region in a sharp channel bend, and to areas of anthropogenic disturbance. Erosion in the Lower Estuary dominates the broad, shallow western marginal flats in Tappan Zee and Piermont. Man-made and natural obstructions to river flow, such as a relic oyster bed that outcrops on the river bottom in Haverstraw Bay, create local erosional areas. Dynamic environments, incorporating both erosion and deposition, occur where sediment is actively moving through the estuary. Flow-perpendicular sediment waves dominate the channel floor and walls of the Lower Estuary. Dynamic sediment drifts and scouring are associated with man-made constructions, such as the Tappan Zee Bridge and a pipeline crossing the river south of Piermont Pier. Information from sub-bottom seismics and sediment coring provide evidence that sedimentary environments

  9. A CLASSIFICATION OF U.S. ESTUARIES BASED ON PHYSICAL, HYDROLOGIC ATTRIBUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A classification of U.S. estuaries is presented based on estuarine characteristics that have been identified as important for quantifying stressor-response

    relationships in coastal systems. Estuaries within a class have similar physical/hydrologic and land use characteris...

  10. Potential Climate-Induced Runoff Changes and Associated Uncertainty in Four Pacific Northwest Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger investigation into potential impacts of climate change on estuarine habitats in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), we estimated changes in freshwater inputs into four estuaries. These were the Coquille River estuary, the South Slough of Coos Bay, and the Yaquina Bay...

  11. Demonstration and Hands-on Exercises with the Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for applications of the Clean Water Act in coastal management. E-Estuary has three elements: an estuarine geo-referenced relational database, watershed GIS coverages, and tools t...

  12. Linking Data Access to Data Models to Applications: The Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E-Estuary has three elements: an estuarine geo-referenced relational database, watershed GIS coverages, and tools to support decision-making. To facilita...

  13. Decadal-scale Evolution of Sediment Flux in the Aulne Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalski, S. M.; Deschamps, A.; Floc'h, F.; Verney, R.; Piete, H.; Fromant, G.; Delacourt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Estuarine sediment transport processes have the potential to evolve over time in response to alterations in various factors both internal and external to the estuary, such as sediment supply, river discharge, tidal forcing, or changes to bathymetry. Changes in sediment transport can affect many estuarine processes (e.g. budgets of sediment-adsorbed contaminants or nutrients) and ecosystem services, such as aquaculture, primary production and the need to dredge shipping channels. Most studies of decadal-scale changes in estuaries focus on geomorphology or bathymetry, or are performed using models calibrated by a limited set of observational studies. Because of the potential for sediment flux to both affect and be affected by geomorphology and bathymetry, observational studies oriented to sediment flux evolution are needed. This study focuses on two intensive observational studies separated by 30 years to quantify change in suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the Aulne river, a shallow macrotidal estuary in western Brittany. Moored and vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers and YSIs were deployed over a three-week period in the winter of 2013 to examine hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes. The results of the modern study were compared to a 1977 investigation of currents, suspended sediment concentration, and erosion/deposition. The 1977 study found that SSC during spring tide and average river discharge was less than 30 mg/L near the mouth and above 300 mg/L landward, with near-bottom concentrations in the turbidity maximum zone occasionally greater than 1000 mg/L. SSC was highest during low tide and remained elevated throughout, in the upstream part of the estuary. Sediment deposition was stronger after flood tide due to a longer slack period, which implies landward sediment transport in the estuary. In the 2013 study, near-bottom SSC during spring tide and average river discharge was also highest during low tide, but SSC was above 1000 mg

  14. Modeling ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, southwest Florida. I. Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, Christopher; Doering, Peter H.; Wan, Yongshan; Sun, Detong; Fugate, David

    2014-12-01

    Variations in freshwater inflow have ecological consequences for estuaries ranging among eutrophication, flushing and transport, and high and low salinity impacts on biota. Predicting the potential effects of the magnitude and composition of inflow on estuaries over a range of spatial and temporal scales requires reliable mathematical models. The goal of this study was to develop and test a model of ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the sub-tropical Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) in southwest Florida from 2002 to 2009. The modeling framework combined empirically derived inputs of freshwater and materials from the watershed, daily predictions of salinity, a box model for physical transport, and simulation models of biogeochemical and seagrass dynamics. The CRE was split into 3 segments to estimate advective and dispersive transport of water column constituents. Each segment contained a sub-model to simulate changes in the concentrations of organic nitrogen and phosphorus (ON and OP), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate-nitrite (NOx-), ortho-phosphate (PO4-3), phytoplankton chlorophyll a (CHL), and sediment microalgae (SM). The seaward segment also had sub-models for seagrasses (Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum). The model provided realistic predictions of ON in the upper estuary during wet conditions since organic nitrogen is associated with freshwater inflow and low salinity. Although simulated CHL concentrations were variable, the model proved to be a reliable predictor in time and space. While predicted NOx- concentrations were proportional to freshwater inflow, NH4+ was less predictable due to the complexity of internal cycling during times of reduced freshwater inflow. Overall, the model provided a representation of seagrass biomass changes despite the absence of epiphytes, nutrient effects, or sophisticated translocation in the formulation. The model is being used to investigate the relative importance of colored dissolved organic

  15. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. I: The local production-loss balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Cloern, J.E.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and spatial distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are controlled by (1) local mechanisms, which determine the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location (i.e. control if a bloom is possible), and (2) transport-related mechanisms, which govern biomass distribution (i.e. control if and where a bloom actually occurs). In this study, the first of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged numerical model as a theoretical tool to describe how interacting local conditions (water column height, light availability, benthic grazing) influence the local balance between phytoplankton sources and sinks. We also explore trends in the spatial variability of the production-loss balance across the topographic gradients between deep channels and lateral shoals which are characteristic of shallow estuaries. For example, under conditions of high turbidity and slow benthic grazing the highest rates of phytoplankton population growth are found in the shallowest regions. On the other hand, with low turbidity and rapid benthic grazing the highest growth rates occur in the deeper areas. We also explore the effects of semidiurnal tidal variation in water column height, as well as spring-neap variability. Local population growth in the shallowest regions is very sensitive to tidal-scale shallowing and deepening of the water column, especially in the presence of benthic grazing. A spring-neap signal in population growth rate is also prominent in the shallow areas. Population growth in deeper regions is less sensitive to temporal variations in tidal elevation. These results show that both shallow and deep regions of estuaries can act as sources or sinks for phytoplankton biomass, depending on the local conditions of mean water column height, tidal amplitude, light-limited growth rate, and consumption by grazers.

  16. Plastic pollution in five urban estuaries of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Trishan; Glassom, David; Smit, Albertus J

    2015-12-15

    Monitoring plastic concentrations in estuaries is vital in assessing the magnitude of terrestrial inputs to oceanic environments. Data on plastics ≤ 5 mm in estuaries are scant. This study determined microplastic levels within five estuaries along the Durban coastline and on intervening beaches. Plastics were isolated from estuarine sediment, beach sediment and the surface water of each estuary and characterised. Sediment at the Bayhead area of Durban harbour had the highest average plastic concentrations (745.4 ± 129.7 particles per 500 ml) and an attenuating concentration trend away from the city centre was found. Prevailing south to north longshore drift was hypothesised to result in plastic accumulation on the northern shores of beaches with estuarine effluents, however, this was not found. Fragments composed the largest percent of plastics (59%) found in Bayhead, whereas fibres dominated other estuaries with proportions ranging from 38% of total plastics in the uMgeni estuary to 66% in the Mdloti.

  17. Plastic pollution in five urban estuaries of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Trishan; Glassom, David; Smit, Albertus J

    2015-12-15

    Monitoring plastic concentrations in estuaries is vital in assessing the magnitude of terrestrial inputs to oceanic environments. Data on plastics ≤ 5 mm in estuaries are scant. This study determined microplastic levels within five estuaries along the Durban coastline and on intervening beaches. Plastics were isolated from estuarine sediment, beach sediment and the surface water of each estuary and characterised. Sediment at the Bayhead area of Durban harbour had the highest average plastic concentrations (745.4 ± 129.7 particles per 500 ml) and an attenuating concentration trend away from the city centre was found. Prevailing south to north longshore drift was hypothesised to result in plastic accumulation on the northern shores of beaches with estuarine effluents, however, this was not found. Fragments composed the largest percent of plastics (59%) found in Bayhead, whereas fibres dominated other estuaries with proportions ranging from 38% of total plastics in the uMgeni estuary to 66% in the Mdloti. PMID:26476863

  18. The Role of Heterotrophic Microbial Communities in Estuarine C Budgets and the Biogeochemical C Cycle with Implications for Global Warming: Research Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O Roger

    2016-05-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive and economically important marine ecosystems at the land-ocean interface and contribute significantly to exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Estuarine microbial communities are major links in the biogeochemical C cycle and flow of C in food webs from primary producers to higher consumers. Considerable attention has been given to bacteria and autotrophic eukaryotes in estuarine ecosystems, but less research has been devoted to the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes. Current research is reviewed here on the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes in C biogeochemistry and ecology of estuaries, with particular attention to C budgets, trophodynamics, and the metabolic fate of C in microbial communities. Some attention is given to the importance of these processes in climate change and global warming, especially in relation to sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 , while also documenting the current paucity of research on the role of eukaryotic microbes that contribute to this larger question of C biogeochemistry and the environment. Some recommendations are made for future directions of research and opportunities of applying newer technologies and analytical approaches to a more refined analysis of the role of C in estuarine microbial community processes and the biogeochemical C cycle.

  19. Evaluation of a long-term hindcast simulation for the Columbia River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärnä, Tuomas; Baptista, António M.

    2016-03-01

    In order to simulate the biogeochemical function of estuaries across the land-ocean continuum, circulation models must represent a cascade of complex physical processes spanning several spatial and temporal scales. Furthermore, governing physical processes tend to vary under different flow regimes, in response to external forcings. Model validation must therefore cover all relevant flow regimes and span sufficiently long time to represent transient and slowly-varying phenomena. We focus in a multi-year hindcast simulation of the Columbia River estuary - a mesotidal, river-dominated estuary that is also influenced by coastal upwelling in an Eastern Boundary Current system. Model skill is assessed against long-term observational time series, covering the lower estuary (for salinity) as well as most of the tidal river (for water temperature and elevation). In addition, high-resolution profiles of velocity and salinity are used to study salt transport mechanisms at a single station. Results indicate that the model captures the estuarine dynamics of the system, but the skill depends on the flow regime: In general the model performs far better during spring tides (i.e., under partially mixed or time-dependent salt wedge regimes) than under neap tides (i.e., salt wedge and strongly stratified regimes). While the model accurately represents tidal salt transport mechanisms, it tends to underestimate gravitational transport which becomes more important under neap tide conditions. Furthermore, the skill decreases during high river discharge periods, because the model has difficulty capturing the extremely strong stratification characteristic to those periods.

  20. Study on nutrient distribution and interaction with sediments in a macro-tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dongfang; Wang, Xiaolin; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina N.; Falconer, Roger A.

    2013-02-01

    An integrated hydro-environmental model has been developed for predicting the distribution of nutrients in estuarine and coastal waters. This paper also reports on an application of the model to the Loughor Estuary in the UK, which has a high tidal range. The horizontal two-dimensional model considers the hydrodynamic, sediment transport, dissolved oxygen and nutrient cycling processes. In particular, the effect of sediment suspension and deposition on the nutrient distribution in the water column has been included in the model. A TVD-MacCormack scheme has been adopted to numerically solve the coupled partial differential equations. Field surveys and laboratory experiments in connection with the Loughor Estuary were conducted to obtain measured data for model calibration and verification. It was found that the linear isotherm model gave a good approximation of the adsorption/desorption processes over the range of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations measured in the natural estuary. Through experiments on the collected soil samples, the salinity-dependent partition ratios between the adsorbed and dissolved nutrients were determined. The results of the established model showed good agreement with the measured data. Finally, the model was used to examine the implications of changing the sewage effluent discharge scheme on the nutrient distributions in the estuary.

  1. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the upper Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Bergeron, Emile M.; Meunier, Jeff K.; Crusius, John; Koopmans, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina has suffered impacts of eutrophication in recent years. As part of a larger project to better constrain nutrient budgets in the estuary, field investigations were performed to study occurrence and discharge of fresh and brackish ground water and nutrients beneath the estuary itself (fig. 1). A Continuous Resistivity Profiling (CRP) system (Manheim and others, 2004) was used to map the depth of the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) in sub-estuarine groundwater. This study area serves as a typological representation of a submarine groundwater environment characteristic of a shallow estuary in a wide coastal plain that has not experienced glaciation. Similar settings extend from New Jersey to Georgia, and along the Gulf of Mexico in the U.S. This report archives 29 lines of data collected during 2004 and 2005 surveys representing almost 210 km of survey lines. These data are further explained in the Data Processing section of the report and previews available of the processed data are available.

  2. Chemical and physical characteristics of water in estuaries of Texas; October 1978-September 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, J.C.; Grozier, R.U.

    1985-01-01

    Streamfl ow-measuring sites are used to monitor both the amount and quality of water that enter the estuarine embayments. The farthest downstream sites available are located many miles upstream from the estuaries because of the effect of changes in water stage in the estuaries. Consequently, there is inflow into the bays below these sites that can and do affect the amount and quality of water entering the estuaries.

  3. Determining bathymetric distributions of the eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three turbid estuaries of the eastern North Pacific coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved methods for determining bathymetric distributions of dominant intertidal plants throughout their estuarine range are needed. Zostera marina is a seagrass native to estuaries of the northeastern Pacific and many other sectors of the world ocean. The technique described ...

  4. Size matters: The contribution of mega-infauna to the food webs and ecosystem services of an Oregon estuary - ESA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Questions/Methods Large-bodied invertebrates (bivalves, polychaetes, burrowing shrimps) are common to infaunal communities of NE Pacific estuaries, but their contribution to estuarine community structure, function and ecosystem services is poorly understood because ...

  5. Pathobiology of marine and estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, J.A.; Fournie, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    The book is an up-to-date compendium of scientific findings related to diseases of marine and estuarine organisms. The information was presented at the Gulf Breeze Symposium on Marine and Estuarine Disease Research sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) held in October 1990 on Pensacola Beach, Florida. Authors review the state-of-the-science and recommend research for future studies of the impact of xenobiotics and other anthropogenic stress factors on disease processes in marine and estuarine organisms.

  6. Freshwater scarcity effects on the aquatic macrofauna of a European Mediterranean-climate estuary.

    PubMed

    González-Ortegón, Enrique; Baldó, Francisco; Arias, Alberto; Cuesta, Jose A; Fernández-Delgado, Carlos; Vilas, César; Drake, Pilar

    2015-01-15

    In the Mediterranean-climate zone, recurrent drought events and increasing water demand generally lead to a decrease in freshwater input to estuaries. This water scarcity may alter the proper function of estuaries as nursery areas for marine species and as permanent habitat for estuarine species. A 12-year data set of the aquatic macrofauna (fish, decapod and mysid crustaceans) in a Mediterranean estuary (Guadalquivir estuary, South Spain) was analysed to test if water scarcity favours the nursery function of regional estuaries to the detriment of permanent estuarine inhabitants. Target species typically displayed a salinity-related distribution and estuarine salinisation in dry years resulted in a general upstream community displacement. However, annual densities of marine species were neither consistently higher in dry years nor estuarine species during wet years. Exceptions included the estuarine mysid Neomysis integer and the marine shrimp Crangon crangon, which were more abundant in wet and dry years, respectively. High and persistent turbidity, a collateral effect of water scarcity, altered both the structural (salinity-related pattern) and functional (key prey species and predator density) community characteristics, chiefly after the second drought period of the analysis. The observed high inter-year environmental variability, as well as species-specific effects of water scarcity, suggests that exhaustive and long-term sampling programmes will be required for rigorously monitoring the estuarine communities of the Mediterranean-climate region.

  7. Post-glacial sedimentary evolution of a microtidal estuary, Dyfi Estuary, west Wales, U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhong; Lamb, H. F.

    1991-10-01

    The,Dyfi Estuary is a microtidal estuary located on the shores of Cardigan Bay on the west coast of Wales. The inundation of the post-glacial sea-level rise has produced transgressive muddy or silly, late-glacial and post-glacial unconsolidated sediments in the pre-existing valley. These sediments are complicated by sea-level fluctuations and changes in tidal range. Modern facies-distribution patterns and sedimentary characteristics, extensive core data, and chronostratigraphic cross-sections provide a detailed history of the post-glacial sedimentary evolution of the Dyfi Estuary. The post-glacial estuarine evolution of the Dyfi Estuary has been subdivided into four phases. Phase 1: 15,000-10,000 yr BP, shallow-water, high-energy fluvially dominated facies. Phase 2: 10,000-6,000 yr BP, deep-water, low-energy, estuarine dominated facies. Phase 3: 6,000-3,500 yr BP, shallow-water, high-energy, tidally dominated facies. Phase 4: 3,500 yr BP-present, shallow-water, low-energy, estuarine salt-marshes dominated facies.

  8. Assessment of the trophic status of four coastal lagoons and one estuarine delta, eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cotovicz Junior, Luiz Carlos; Brandini, Nilva; Knoppers, Bastiaan Adriaan; Mizerkowski, Byanka Damian; Sterza, José Mauro; Ovalle, Alvaro Ramon Coelho; Medeiros, Paulo Ricardo Petter

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems continues to be one of the major environmental issues worldwide and also of Brazil. Over the last five decades, several approaches have been proposed to discern the trophic state and the natural and cultural processes involved in eutrophication, including the multi-parameter Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) index model. This study applies ASSETS to four Brazilian lagoons (Mundaú, Manguaba, Guarapina, and Piratininga) and one estuarine delta (Paraíba do Sul River), set along the eastern Brazilian coast. The model combines three indices based on the pressure-state-response (PSR) approach to rank the trophic status and forecast the potential eutrophication of a system, to which a final ASSETS grade is established. The lagoons were classified as being eutrophic and highly susceptible to eutrophication, due primarily to their longer residence times but also their high nutrient input index. ASSETS classified the estuary of the Paraíba do Sul river with a low to moderate trophic state (e.g., largely mesotrophic) and low susceptibility to eutrophication. Its nutrient input index was high, but the natural high dilution and flushing potential driven by river flow mitigated the susceptibility to eutrophication. Eutrophication forecasting provided more favorable trends for the Mundaú and Manguaba lagoons and the Paraíba do Sul estuary, in view of the larger investments in wastewater treatment and remediation plans. The final ASSETS ranking system established the lagoons of Mundaú as "moderate," Manguaba as "bad," Guarapina as "poor," and Piratininga as "bad," whereas the Paraíba do Sul River Estuary was "good."

  9. From headwaters to coast: influence of human activities on water quality of the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Suzanne B.; Rice, Karen C.; Bricker, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    The natural aging process of Chesapeake Bay and its tributary estuaries has been accelerated by human activities around the shoreline and within the watershed, increasing sediment and nutrient loads delivered to the bay. Riverine nutrients cause algal growth in the bay leading to reductions in light penetration with consequent declines in sea grass growth, smothering of bottom-dwelling organisms, and decreases in bottom-water dissolved oxygen as algal blooms decay. Historically, bay waters were filtered by oysters, but declines in oyster populations from overfishing and disease have led to higher concentrations of fine-sediment particles and phytoplankton in the water column. Assessments of water and biological resource quality in Chesapeake Bay and tributaries, such as the Potomac River, show a continual degraded state. In this paper, we pay tribute to Owen Bricker’s comprehensive, holistic scientific perspective using an approach that examines the connection between watershed and estuary. We evaluated nitrogen inputs from Potomac River headwaters, nutrient-related conditions within the estuary, and considered the use of shellfish aquaculture as an in-the-water nutrient management measure. Data from headwaters, nontidal, and estuarine portions of the Potomac River watershed and estuary were analyzed to examine the contribution from different parts of the watershed to total nitrogen loads to the estuary. An eutrophication model was applied to these data to evaluate eutrophication status and changes since the early 1990s and for comparison to regional and national conditions. A farm-scale aquaculture model was applied and results scaled to the estuary to determine the potential for shellfish (oyster) aquaculture to mediate eutrophication impacts. Results showed that (1) the contribution to nitrogen loads from headwater streams is small (about 2 %) of total inputs to the Potomac River Estuary; (2) eutrophic conditions in the Potomac River Estuary have improved in

  10. Aquatic distribution and heterotrophic degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in the Tamar Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Readman, J. W.; Mantoura, R. F. C.; Rhead, M. M.; Brown, L.

    1982-04-01

    Variations in the concentrations and microheterotrophic degradation rates of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in the water column of the Tamar Estuary were investigated in relation to the major environmental variables. Concentrations of individual PAH varied typically between i and 50 ng l -1 Based on their observed environmental behaviour the PAH appeared divisible into two groupings: (1) low molecular weight PAH incorporating naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracence and (a) the larger molecular weight homologues (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)-pyrene). Group 1 PAH showed a complex distribution throughout the estuary with no significant correlations with either salinity or suspended particulates. Based on their relatively low particle affinity and high water solubilities and vapour pressures, volatilization is proposed as an important process in determining their fate. Microheterotrophic turnover times of naphthalene varied between x and 30 days, and were independent of suspended solids with maximum degradation rates located in the central and urban regions of the Estuary. When compared with the flushing times for the Tamar (3-5 days), it is probable that heterotrophic activity is important in the removal of naphthalene (and possibly the other Group 1 PAH) from the estuarine environment. In contrast Group 2 PAH concentrations exhibited highly significant correlations with suspended particulates. Highest concentrations occurred at the turbidity maximum, with a secondary concentration maximum localized to the industrialized portion of the estuary and associated with anthropogenic inputs. Laboratory degradation studies of benzo(a)pyrene in water samples taken from the estuary showed turnover times for the compound of between 2000 and 9000 days. Degradation rates correlated positively with suspended solids. The high particulate affinity and microbial refractivity of Group 2 PAH

  11. Connectivity of the Habitat-Forming Kelp, Ecklonia radiata within and among Estuaries and Open Coast

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    With marine protected areas being established worldwide there is a pressing need to understand how the physical setting in which these areas are placed influences patterns of dispersal and connectivity of important marine organisms. This is particularly critical for dynamic and complex nearshore marine environments where patterns of genetic structure of organisms are often chaotic and uncoupled from broad scale physical processes. This study determines the influence of habitat heterogeneity (presence of estuaries) on patterns of genetic structure and connectivity of the common kelp, Ecklonia radiata. There was no genetic differentiation of kelp between estuaries and the open coast and the presence of estuaries did not increase genetic differentiation among open coast populations. Similarly, there were no differences in level of inbreeding or genetic diversity between estuarine and open coast populations. The presence of large estuaries along rocky coastlines does not appear to influence genetic structure of this kelp and factors other than physical heterogeneity of habitat are likely more important determinants of regional connectivity. Marine reserves are currently lacking in this bioregion and may be designated in the future. Knowledge of the factors that influence important habitat forming organisms such as kelp contribute to informed and effective marine protected area design and conservation initiatives to maintain resilience of important marine habitats. PMID:23717648

  12. Potential rates and environmental controls of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in a temperate urbanized estuary.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Boaventura, Rui A R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2010-12-01

    Denitrification may play a major role in inorganic nitrogen removal from estuarine ecosystems, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate and organic matter loads. The Douro estuary (NW Portugal) suffers from both problems: freshwater input of nitrate and organic load from untreated wastewater discharges. To assess how these factors might control sediment denitrification, a 12-month survey was designed. Denitrification potential and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production were measured at different locations using the slurry acetylene blockage technique. Denitrification rate ranged from 0.4 to 38 nmol N g⁻¹ h⁻¹, increasing towards the river mouth following an urban pollution gradient. N(2)O production, a powerful greenhouse gas implicated on the destruction of the ozone layer, was significantly related with sediment organic matter and accounted for 0.5-47% of the N gases produced. Additional enrichment experiments were consistent with the results found in the environment, showing that sediments from the upper less urban stretch of the estuary, mostly sandy, respond positively to carbon and, inversely, in organic rich sediments from the lower estuary, the denitrification potential was limited by nitrate availability. The obtained results confirmed denitrification as an important process for the removal of nitrate in estuaries. The presence of wastewater discharges appears to stimulate nitrogen removal but also the production of N(2)O, a powerful greenhouse gas, exacerbating the N(2)O:N(2) ratio and thus should be controlled. PMID:20688382

  13. Potential rates and environmental controls of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in a temperate urbanized estuary.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Boaventura, Rui A R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2010-12-01

    Denitrification may play a major role in inorganic nitrogen removal from estuarine ecosystems, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate and organic matter loads. The Douro estuary (NW Portugal) suffers from both problems: freshwater input of nitrate and organic load from untreated wastewater discharges. To assess how these factors might control sediment denitrification, a 12-month survey was designed. Denitrification potential and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production were measured at different locations using the slurry acetylene blockage technique. Denitrification rate ranged from 0.4 to 38 nmol N g⁻¹ h⁻¹, increasing towards the river mouth following an urban pollution gradient. N(2)O production, a powerful greenhouse gas implicated on the destruction of the ozone layer, was significantly related with sediment organic matter and accounted for 0.5-47% of the N gases produced. Additional enrichment experiments were consistent with the results found in the environment, showing that sediments from the upper less urban stretch of the estuary, mostly sandy, respond positively to carbon and, inversely, in organic rich sediments from the lower estuary, the denitrification potential was limited by nitrate availability. The obtained results confirmed denitrification as an important process for the removal of nitrate in estuaries. The presence of wastewater discharges appears to stimulate nitrogen removal but also the production of N(2)O, a powerful greenhouse gas, exacerbating the N(2)O:N(2) ratio and thus should be controlled.

  14. Arsenic distribution in waters and its geochemical behavior in sediment of Mahanadi estuary in India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Majumder, Natasha; Chowdhury, Chumki; Jana, T K; Dutta, Buddhadeb

    2016-08-01

    Distribution of arsenic in the marine environment is associated with its biogeochemical behavior. Indeed, very few studies have been conducted along the seasonal cycle to show its non-conservative behavior in the tropical estuary. The Mahanadi River, one of the major tropical rivers in the peninsular India, drains densely populated and industrialized region of Paradeep port. Over this 1-year study, the variations of inorganic arsenic were examined along the salinity gradient of the Mahanadi estuary, with the aim to provide some insights into the mechanisms that control arsenic concentrations and behavior under estuarine mixing. Arsenic in the estuary was derived from both natural and anthropogenic sources, and it displayed partial removal from the water in the mixing zone. Results of geo-accumulation index indicated that sediments were uncontaminated and they acted as a sink for arsenic. The diffusive fluxes from water to sediment were estimated to be 9.05 μg m(-2) day(-1) at Chaumohona, 9.83 μg m(-2) day(-1) at Kaudia, and 11.85 μg m(-2) day(-1) at Neherubunglow. The findings of the study suggest that both the removal of arsenic by biogeochemical processes and its diffusive transport from water to sediment are of major importance for both the non-conservative behavior of arsenic in the estuary and its export to the coastal water. PMID:27401504

  15. Spatial distributions of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) populations in southeastern estuarine ecosystems influenced by urbanization

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, G.; Daugomah, J.; Devane, J.; Porter, D.; Edwards, D.

    1995-12-31

    Urbanization of coastal regions has resulted in the increased discharge of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons trace metals and habitat changes/modifications in adjacent upland areas which may affect grass shrimp populations. A study was conducted comparing larval abundance and adult grass shrimp biomass, abundance, size structure and sex ratios in an urbanized estuary, Murrells Inlet with pristine North Inlet, a NOAA national estuarine research reserve and sanctuary site. A total of 60 sites were sampled during the peak of grass shrimp abundance and compared in terms of spatial distributions and other relevant ancillary information. Factors such as sediment contaminant levels, physico-chemical parameters and land-use habitat modification were statistically compared using a Geographical Information Processing (GIP) techniques and appropriate spatial statistical methods. GIP results indicated similar levels of larval abundance in both estuaries and identified specific nursery ground regions in both estuaries. Adult grass shrimp abundances were greatly reduced in urban areas and grass shrimp desert regions were identified. These areas were correlated with regions having high levels of chemical contaminants and greatest physical disturbances. The mortality rate between larval and adult stages was much higher in urban areas suggesting that urbanization had a profound impact on grass shrimp.

  16. Sources and Loading of Nitrogen to U.S. Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous assessments of land-based nitrogen loading and sources to U.S. estuaries have been limited to estimates for larger systems with watersheds at the scale of 8-digit HUCs and larger, in part due to the coarse resolution of available data, including estuarine watershed bound...

  17. Iron ore pollution in Mandovi and Zuari estuarine sediments and its fate after mining ban.

    PubMed

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Suja, S; Sudheesh, V; Srivastava, Shubh; Rao, V Purnachandra

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore was mined from the banded iron formations of Goa, India, and transported through the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries for six decades until the ban on mining from September 2012. Here we focus on the environmental magnetic properties of sediments from the catchment area, upstream and downstream of these estuaries, and adjacent shelf during peak mining time. Magnetic susceptibility (χ lf) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) values of sediments were highest in upstream (catchment area and estuaries), decreased gradually towards downstream (catchment area and estuaries), and were lowest on the adjacent shelf. The χ lf values of the Mandovi estuary were two to fourfold higher than those in the Zuari. The sediments of these two estuaries after the mining ban showed enrichment of older magnetite and sharp decrease in the SIRM values. Although the input of ore material has been reduced after mining ban, more flushing of estuarine sediments is required for healthier environment.

  18. Longitudinal distribution and lateral pattern of megalopal settlement and juvenile recruitment of Carcinus maenas (L.) (Brachyura, Portunidae) in the Mira River Estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Inês C.; Dinis, Ana M.; Francisco, Sara M.; Flores, Augusto A. V.; Paula, José

    2006-08-01

    Settlement is a critical process in the life history of crabs, and thus affecting the abundance, distribution and structure of estuarine communities. The spatial pattern of settlement of megalopae of the shore crab Carcinus maenas along a longitudinal estuarine gradient (Mira River Estuary, Portugal) was examined, as well as its effects on the juvenile population. To measure megalopal settlement, four replicate collectors were deployed in six equally spaced stations along the estuarine axis. Juveniles were collected on the same locations with a quadrat randomly deployed on the substrate. To assess fine-scale megalopal settlement within a curved region of the estuary, replicate collectors were deployed on both margins along Moinho da Asneira curve. Megalopae settled differently along the six longitudinal points, with a tendency to attenuate their settlement upstream. Within the curved region, megalopae preferentially settled on the left margin collectors, probably due to the weaker velocity speeds felt on this margin. Concerning the overall juvenile density, there were significant differences among the stations distributed along the estuary, but they did no reflect a longitudinal dispersion attenuation pattern. Size-frequency distribution of the juvenile population showed that the average size is higher on the left margin. Recruits (carapace length between 1.0 mm and 3.4 mm) were more abundant on the upstream stations. Density of early juveniles (3.4 mm-6.5 mm) and juveniles (6.5 mm-10 mm) was more stable throughout the estuary axis than that of recruits. This distribution pattern may result from tidal excursion processes or mechanisms to avoid biotic interactions, such as predation and competition.

  19. Simulating entrainment and particle fluxes in stratified estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, A.; Jirka, G.; Lion, L.W.; Brunk, B.

    1999-04-01

    Settling and entrainment are the dominant processes governing noncohesive particle concentration throughout the water column of salt-wedge estuaries. Determination of the relative contribution of these transport processes is complicated by vertical gradients in turbulence and fluid density. A differential-turbulence column (DTC) was designed to simulate a vertical section of a natural water column. With satisfactory characterization of turbulence dissipation and saltwater entrainment, the DTC facilitates controlled studies of suspended particles under estuarine conditions. The vertical decay of turbulence in the DTC was found to obey standard scaling law relations when the characteristic length scale for turbulence in the apparatus was incorporated. The entrainment rate of a density interface also followed established grid-stirred turbulence scaling laws. These relations were used to model the change in concentration of noncohesive particles above a density interface. Model simulations and experimental data from the DTC were consistent over the range of conditions encountered in natural salt-wedge estuaries. Results suggest that when the ratio of entrainment rate to particle settling velocity is small, sedimentation is the dominant transport process, while entrainment becomes significant as the ratio increases.

  20. Juvenile fish condition in estuarine nurseries along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Fonseca, V.; Ruano, M.; Tanner, S.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2009-03-01

    Connectivity between estuarine fish nurseries and coastal adult habitats can be affected by variations in juvenile growth and survival. Condition indices are renowned proxies of juvenile nutritional status and growth rates and are valuable tools to assess habitat quality. Biochemical (RNA:DNA ratio) and morphometric (Fulton's condition factor K) condition indices were determined in juveniles of Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax collected in putative nursery areas of nine estuaries along the Portuguese coast (Minho, Douro, Ria de Aveiro, Mondego, Tejo, Sado, Mira, Ria Formosa and Guadiana) in the Spring and Summer of two consecutive years (2005 and 2006) with distinct climatic characteristics. Individual condition showed significant variation amongst species. The combined use of both condition indices highlighted the low correlation between them and that RNA:DNA had a higher sensitivity. RNA:DNA varied between years but overall the site relative patterns in condition were maintained from one year to the other. Higher RNA:DNA values were found in Spring than in Summer in most species. Intra-estuarine variation also occurred in several cases. Species specific trends in the variability of condition amongst estuaries were highlighted. Some estuaries had higher juvenile condition for more than one species but results did not reveal an identical trend for all species and sites, hindering the hypotheses of one estuarine nursery promoting superior growth for all present species. Significant correlations were found between condition indices, juvenile densities and environmental variables (water temperature, salinity and depth) in the estuarine nurseries. These influenced juvenile nutritional condition and growth, contributing to the variability in estuarine nursery habitat quality. Management and conservation wise, interest in multi-species approaches is reinforced as assessments based on a single species may not

  1. Connectivities of estuarine fishes to the coastal realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, G. Carleton

    2005-07-01

    Connectivity is an important concept in landscape ecology, but has several meanings. Here, I treat this term generically, including interactions among land- and seascape elements, transfers of nutrients among them, and interactions among closely related species comprising guilds. Complex relationships between the natural histories of estuary-dependent fishes are best understood in the context of the "coastal realm", the heterogeneous and diverse portion of Earth where land, sea, and atmosphere interact with great intensity through exchanges of energy and materials. Especially for anadromous fishes, estuaries form especially important conduits between terrestrial watersheds and the coastal ocean. For this reason, these species may be termed "estuary-dependent". However, for many species that use estuaries, dependency may be difficult to define. I illustrate coastal-realm connectivities for two groups of closely related estuarine species from different latitudes: (1) clupeids of the US east coast, and (2) salmonids of the Bering Sea. These groups inhabit coastal-ocean waters as adults and use estuaries and/or freshwaters for reproduction or as nursery areas. Both groups have evolved metapopulation structures, perhaps also contingent patterns of behavior, that indicate hierarchical interactions within metaestuarine or metafluvial systems. Their natural histories suggest an estuary-dependent adaptive complex involving opportunistic life histories and redundancies within species guilds, which offer resiliency for these guilds under conditions of ecological and/or environmental change. I conclude that: (1) estuarine connectivities are best illustrated for fishes that can be shown to be estuary dependent at some life-history stage; (2) resiliency for functionally important guilds may also offer resiliency to their ecosystems; and (3) further understanding connectivities among coastal fishes and their changing environments depends on the fusion of natural history with land

  2. Multibiomarker assessment of three Brazilian estuaries using oysters as bioindicators

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez Domingos, F.X. Azevedo, M.; Silva, M.D.; Randi, M.A.F.; Freire, C.A.; Silva de Assis, H.C.; Oliveira Ribeiro, C.A.

    2007-11-15

    Oysters have been largely employed as bioindicators of environmental quality in biomonitoring studies. Crassostrea rhizophorae was selected to evaluate the health status of three estuarine areas impacted by anthropogenic activities along the Brazilian coast, in three estuarine complexes, ranging in latitude from 7 to 25 deg. S. In each estuary three sites were sampled in Winter and in Summer: a site considered as reference, and two sites next to contamination sources. Condition index was similar at all sites and estuaries, with the highest values found for Itamaraca oysters in Summer. Necrosis, hyperplasia, mucocyte hypertrophy and fusion of ordinary filaments were the main histopathological lesions observed. Muscle cholinesterase activity was overall similar, but with a strong seasonal effect. Inhibition or activation of branchial total ATPase and Na,K-ATPase activities at the contaminated sites was observed. The health status of these estuarine areas is quite similar, and the combined use of biomarkers is recommended.

  3. Inter- and intra-estuarine fish assemblage variability patterns along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, Susana; Costa, Maria José; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries along the Portuguese coast differ considerably in terms of their structure, geomorphologic and hydrologic characteristics. They play an important ecological role for different fish species, namely acting as important nursery areas. The fish assemblages of nine estuaries of the Portuguese coast were investigated in order to evaluate their main inter- and intra-estuarine variability patterns. Fish sampling surveys were conducted in May and July 2006, covering the full estuarine gradient. The different saline areas in each estuary were mapped using a Geographic Information System and fish assemblages' were described and compared using a functional guilds approach. Generalized linear models were used to relate fish species richness to geomorphologic, hydrologic and environmental characteristics of the estuaries considered and correspondence analyses were performed to evaluate similarities in fish assemblages' structure. At a large scale, river flow was the most important factor explaining the variability in species richness in estuaries along the Portuguese coast. At a regional scale, different abiotic factors explained the occurrence and abundance of fish species in the estuaries. Nonetheless, the overall role of the estuary was strongly related with the dominant saline zone within each estuary.

  4. Habitat modeling and genetic signatures of postglacial recolonization for tidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolby, G. A.; Jacobs, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Pleistocene glacial cycles are a foremost influence on the genetic diversity and species distribution patterns observed today. Though much work has centered on biotic response to such climatic forcing, little of it has regarded estuarine or other aquatic coastal taxa whose habitat formation is a function of sea level, hydrography, and coastal geomorphology. These physical parameters required for habitat formation suggest that glacial cycles impart a significant effect on such taxa through glacially driven eustatic changes. Additionally, the steepened coastline and rainfall-limited Mediterranean climate suggest limited glacial habitat for estuarine species in southern and Baja California. Here we present GIS modeled habitat for tidal estuaries for three co-distributed estuarine fishes (Gillichthys mirabilis, Quietula y-cauda, Fundulus parvipinnis) since the last glacial maximum. Parameterization of sea level and slope enables biologically relevant temporal resolution of near-millennial scale. At lowstand our approach reveals two refuges along the coast at 1000km distance from each other, with habitat rapidly increasing 15 - 12 ka during meltwater pulse 1A. Habitat area peaked in the early Holocene and began decreasing with the current stillstand roughly 7 ka, probably as a result of coastal maturation towards less tidal systems. To target the postglacial recolonization process we applied discriminant function analysis to highly polymorphic microsatellite data to partition out the alleles associated with refuges identified a priori by habitat modeling. The frequencies of these alleles were calculated for all individuals at intervening populations and regressed against geographic distance. This analysis revealed nonlinear mixing curves, suggesting uneven allelic mixing efficiency along the coastline, perhaps as a result of differential habitat origination times as indicated by the habitat models. These results highlight the dynamism of estuarine habitat in recent

  5. Molybdenum behaviour in the low salinity zone during estuarine mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Rebecca A.; Wouters, Hanne; Dickson, Alex J.; Pearce, Christopher R.; Porcelli, Don; Gíslason, Sigurður R.; Burton, Kevin W.

    2015-04-01

    Molybdenum is the most abundant trace metal in the oceans (~10 ppb) [1], with a residence time of ~800 ka, and an almost uniform isotope composition of 2.1 o [2] and it has been thought to behave conservatively upon mixing between rivers and oceans [3]. However, more recent studies have shown examples of non-conservative behaviour in estuaries [4], [5]. In order to improve the quantitative interpretation of the Mo palaeo-proxy for redox conditions this study presents preliminary data from two estuaries, with a view to understanding the potential for estuarine modification of rivers, the most dominant source of Mo to the oceans. The Kalix and Råne rivers, drain into the Bothnian Bay, Sweden. Samples are from three locations along each estuary at 0.5, 5.0 and 10.0 m depths, collected under ice conditions. The salinity range was 0.1-2.3 PSU (Kalix) and 0.04-2.5 PSU (Råne). Mo concentrations increase with salinity from 0.3 to 1.0 ppb (Kalix) and 0.4 to 0.9 ppb (Råne) (±10%). In the Kalix, the measured [Mo] values fit closely with the theoretical conservative mixing line between the river and sea water endmembers (measured R2=0.93) whilst in the Råne estuary the measured [Mo] have a poor fit (measured R2=0.25). The dissolved load was analysed for Mo isotopes relative to NIST 3134 with the Kalix δ98Mo of 1.07-1.97 o (2s.e. 0.02 ) with an R2=0.51 (against 1/[Mo]) and Råne δ98Mo of 1.54-2.16 o (2s.e. 0.05) with an R2=0.01 (against 1/[Mo]). It is clear from concentration and isotope data that non conservative behaviour is observed in these estuaries with isotope exchange that has not greatly altered Mo concentration. This is especially notable in the Råne estuary. Similar non-conservative behaviour has been observed in Li isotopes in the same estuaries [6]. This work explores the interactions between the dissolved and suspended phases, and processes controlling Mo input to the oceans. [1] Collier, R. W. 1985. Limnology and Oceanography, 1351-1354 [2] Nakagawa, Y et

  6. Minimal incorporation of Deepwater Horizon oil by estuarine filter feeders.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brian; Anderson, Laurie C

    2014-03-15

    Natural abundance carbon isotope analyses are sensitive tracers for fates and use of oil in aquatic environments. Use of oil carbon in estuarine food webs should lead to isotope values approaching those of oil itself, -27‰ for stable carbon isotopes reflecting oil origins and -1000‰ for carbon-14 reflecting oil age. To test for transfer of oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill into estuarine food webs, filter-feeding barnacles (Balanus sp.) and marsh mussels (Geukensia demissa) were collected from Louisiana estuaries near the site of the oil spill. Carbon-14 analyses of these animals from open waters and oiled marshes showed that oil use was <1% and near detection limits estimated at 0.3% oil incorporation. Respiration studies showed no evidence for enhanced microbial activity in bay waters. Results are consistent with low dietary impacts of oil for filter feeders and little overall impact on respiration in the productive Louisiana estuarine systems.

  7. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  8. The Across Shelf and Hudson River Estuary: a Synoptic Glimpse of Hydrographic, Biogeochemical, and Biological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillis, W.; Gallager, S.; Geyer, W. R.; Miller, E.; Salisbury, J.; Vandemark, D.; Katz, D.; McNeil, C.

    2004-12-01

    In July 2004, oceanographic data were measured from the shelf edge to fresh water in the Hudson River estuary onboard the research vessel Tioga by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, the University of New Hampshire, and the University of Rhode Island. Multi-disciplinary observations including parts of the life cycle and carbon cycle were performed. Data included surface temperature, salinity, fluorescence, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, colored dissolved organic matter, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and a focus on zebra mussel larvae. The very large gradients observed from shelf waters to fresh water provided a wide range of environmental conditions governing the carbonate system and the life cycle of phytoplankton and larvae. This unique suite of measurements provides insight into the transport, distribution, and dynamics of the physiology of the Hudson River plume. The relationship between hydrographic conditions, biogeochemistry, and biology will be discussed.

  9. Impact of Mississippi River freshwater reintroduction on enhancing marsh accretionary processes in a Louisiana estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Jugsujinda, A.; Peterson, G. W.; Patrick, W. H.

    2003-11-01

    To counteract extensive wetland loss a series of diversion projects have been implemented to introduce freshwater and sediment from the Mississippi River into Louisiana coastal wetlands. To keep pace with increases in water level due to subsidence Louisiana coastal marshes must vertically accrete through the accumulation of both organic matter and mineral sediment. The impact of Mississippi River freshwater diversion on enhancing vertical marsh accretion (mineral and organic matter accumulation) was examined in Breton Sound estuary, a coastal wetland experiencing marsh deterioration as result of subsidence and salt water intrusion. Using 137Cs dating and artificial marker horizons, increases in the rate of vertical marsh accretion were measured at marsh sites along a spatial gradient which has been receiving diverted water from the Mississippi River (Caernarvon diversion) since 1991. Vertical accretion and accumulation of mineral sediment organic matter and nutrients in the marsh soil profile, increased at marsh sites receiving freshwater and sediment input. Iron and manganese content of the marsh surface sediment were shown to be an excellent signature of riverine sediment deposition. Soil extractable phosphorus was higher and extractable sodium was lower at sites nearest freshwater and sediment input. Results demonstrated that freshwater diversion through sediment input and lowering of salinity will enhance marsh accretion and stability, slowing or reversing the rate of wetland loss.

  10. Temporal dynamics of estuarine phytoplankton: A case study of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Wong, R.L.J.; Alpine, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed surveys throughout San Francisco Bay over an annual cycle (1980) show that seasonal variations of phytoplankton biomass, community composition, and productivity can differ markedly among estuarine habitat types. For example, in the river-dominated northern reach (Suisun Bay) phytoplankton seasonality is characterized by a prolonged summer bloom of netplanktonic diatoms that results from the accumulation of suspended particulates at the convergence of nontidal currents (i.e. where residence time is long). Here turbidity is persistently high such that phytoplankton growth and productivity are severely limited by light availability, the phytoplankton population turns over slowly, and biological processes appear to be less important mechanisms of temporal change than physical processes associated with freshwater inflow and turbulent mixing. The South Bay, in contrast, is a lagoon-type estuary less directly coupled to the influence of river discharge. Residence time is long (months) in this estuary, turbidity is lower and estimated rates of population growth are high (up to 1-2 doublings d-1), but the rapid production of phytoplankton biomass is presumably balanced by grazing losses to benthic herbivores. Exceptions occur for brief intervals (days to weeks) during spring when the water column stratifies so that algae retained in the surface layer are uncoupled from benthic grazing, and phytoplankton blooms develop. The degree of stratification varies over the neap-spring tidal cycle, so the South Bay represents an estuary where (1) biological processes (growth, grazing) and a physical process (vertical mixing) interact to cause temporal variability of phytoplankton biomass, and (2) temporal variability is highly dynamic because of the short-term variability of tides. Other mechanisms of temporal variability in estuarine phytoplankton include: zooplankton grazing, exchanges of microalgae between the sediment and water column, and horizontal dispersion which

  11. Evidencing the natural and anthropogenic processes controlling trace metals dynamic in a highly stratified estuary: The Krka River estuary (Adriatic, Croatia).

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Ana-Marija; Garnier, Cédric; Oursel, Benjamin; Pižeta, Ivanka; Omanović, Dario

    2015-05-15

    Distributions of trace metals (TM), organic carbon, SPM and physico-chemical parameters were studied in the highly stratified Krka River estuary in winter/summer periods. The non-conservative behaviour of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in the brackish layer (plume), easily spotted due to very low inputs by the river, was mainly caused by their inputs from the pleasure boats, nautical marinas and harbour (e.g. release from antifouling paints). Contrarily, Ni and Co followed near-conservative behaviour. The extremely low SPM discharged by the river, resulted in a predominant dissolved fraction (>80%) of all TM, except Pb. Vertical scavenging, coupled with the long residence time, caused accumulation and progressive upstream increase of TM and SPM in the bottom seawater. Decrease of distribution coefficient (KD) in the brackish layer for winter period was ascribed to the change of SPM nature (terrestrial vs. biogenic), whereas a variable and increased biogenic component of SPM caused scattered KDs in summer.

  12. Geologic effects on groundwater salinity and discharge into an estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russonielloa, Christopher J.; Fernandeza, Cristina; Brattonb, John F.; Banaszakc, Joel F.; Krantzc, David E.; Andresd, Scott; Konikowe, Leonard F.; Michaela, Holly A.

    2013-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be an important pathway for transport of nutrients and contaminants to estuaries. A better understanding of the geologic and hydrologic controls on these fluxes is critical for their estimation and management. We examined geologic features, porewater salinity, and SGD rates and patterns at an estuarine study site. Seismic data showed the existence of paleovalleys infilled with estuarine mud and peat that extend hundreds of meters offshore. A low-salinity groundwater plume beneath this low-permeability fill was mapped with continuous resistivity profiling. Extensive direct SGD measurements with seepage meters (n = 551) showed fresh groundwater discharge patterns that correlated well with shallow porewater salinity and the hydrogeophysical framework. Small-scale variability in fresh and saline discharge indicates influence of meter-scale geologic heterogeneity, while site-scale discharge patterns are evidence of the influence of the paleovalley feature. Beneath the paleovalley fill, fresh groundwater flows offshore and mixes with saltwater before discharging along paleovalley flanks. On the adjacent drowned interfluve where low-permeability fill is absent, fresh groundwater discharge is focused at the shoreline. Shallow saltwater exchange was greatest across sandy sediments and where fresh SGD was low. The geologic control of groundwater flowpaths and discharge salinity demonstrated in this work are likely to affect geochemical reactions and the chemical loads delivered by SGD to coastal surface waters. Because similar processes are likely to exist in other estuaries where drowned paleovalleys commonly cross modern shorelines, the existence and implications of complex hydrogeology are important considerations for studies of groundwater fluxes and related management decisions.

  13. [Contribution of different processes in wetland soil N2O production in different restoration phases of the Yellow River estuary, China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Guang; Sun, Zhi-Gao; Gan, Zhuo-Ting; Sun, Wan-Long; Wang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    By using the method of time-space mutual substitution, the contribution of different processes in wetland soil N2O production was studied in the un-restoration wetland (R0), restoration wetland since 2007 (R2007) and restoration wetland since 2002 (R2002) of the Yellow River estuary to evaluate the effectiveness of the restoration projects. Results showed wetland soil total N2O production had a significant difference in different restoration phases, but the N2O release was the main source. The N2O production in restoration wetland was higher than that in un-restoration wetland. The N2O production wss mainly due to the nitrification and nitrifier denitrification processes, while the denitrification process had great weakening effects on N2O production, which was closely related to the physical and chemical properties of wetland soils in different restoration phases. The non-biological processes made greater contributions to N2O production and these were mainly due to that iron was reductive, while the Yellow River estuary was an area of highly active iron. Although N2O production in wetland soils was the results of biological processes combined with non-biological processes in different restoration phases, non-biological processes had larger influences and should be paid a special attention. There were different influences on wetland soil processes generating N2O between temperature and water content, indicating responses of soil microbial activities to temperature and water content were different. In addition, the N2O production contents ranged from 0.37 +/- 0.08 nmol x (kg x h) (-1) to 9.75 +/- 7.64 nmol x (kg x h) (-1) in marshes of the Yellow River estuary, which was slightly higher than those in the S. alterniflora wetland soils of the Min River estuary, but significantly lower than those in the C. malaccensis wetland soils of the Min River estuary, the grassland soils and the aerobic forest soils. We found that the long-term implements of ecological

  14. [Contribution of different processes in wetland soil N2O production in different restoration phases of the Yellow River estuary, China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Guang; Sun, Zhi-Gao; Gan, Zhuo-Ting; Sun, Wan-Long; Wang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    By using the method of time-space mutual substitution, the contribution of different processes in wetland soil N2O production was studied in the un-restoration wetland (R0), restoration wetland since 2007 (R2007) and restoration wetland since 2002 (R2002) of the Yellow River estuary to evaluate the effectiveness of the restoration projects. Results showed wetland soil total N2O production had a significant difference in different restoration phases, but the N2O release was the main source. The N2O production in restoration wetland was higher than that in un-restoration wetland. The N2O production wss mainly due to the nitrification and nitrifier denitrification processes, while the denitrification process had great weakening effects on N2O production, which was closely related to the physical and chemical properties of wetland soils in different restoration phases. The non-biological processes made greater contributions to N2O production and these were mainly due to that iron was reductive, while the Yellow River estuary was an area of highly active iron. Although N2O production in wetland soils was the results of biological processes combined with non-biological processes in different restoration phases, non-biological processes had larger influences and should be paid a special attention. There were different influences on wetland soil processes generating N2O between temperature and water content, indicating responses of soil microbial activities to temperature and water content were different. In addition, the N2O production contents ranged from 0.37 +/- 0.08 nmol x (kg x h) (-1) to 9.75 +/- 7.64 nmol x (kg x h) (-1) in marshes of the Yellow River estuary, which was slightly higher than those in the S. alterniflora wetland soils of the Min River estuary, but significantly lower than those in the C. malaccensis wetland soils of the Min River estuary, the grassland soils and the aerobic forest soils. We found that the long-term implements of ecological

  15. Linking Data Access to Geospatial Data Models to Applications at Local to National Scales: The Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for Clean Water Act applications in coastal management. E-Estuary has three elements: an estuarine geo-referenced relational database, watershed GIS coverages, and tools to suppo...

  16. Reactive iron and manganese in estuarine sediments of the Baltic Sea: Impacts of flocculation and redox shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Asmala, Eero; Hietanen, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) play important roles in sedimentary carbon cycling in both freshwater and marine systems. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe and Mn oxides is known to be a major pathway of suboxic organic matter remineralization in surface sediments, while recent studies have shown that Fe and Mn oxides may be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane deeper in the sediment column (e.g., Egger et al., 2015). Estuaries are transitional environments, characterized by gradients of salinity and redox conditions which impact on the mobility of Fe and Mn. In turn, the distribution of Fe and Mn in estuarine sediments, and the role of the two metals in carbon cycling, is expected to be spatially heterogeneous. However, few studies have attempted to describe the sedimentary distribution of Fe and Mn in the context of processes occurring in the estuarine water column. In particular, salinity-driven flocculation and redox shuttling are two key processes whose relative impacts on sedimentary Fe and Mn have not been clearly demonstrated. In this study we investigated the coupled water column and sedimentary cycling of Fe and Mn along a 60km non-tidal estuarine transect in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. We show that riverine Fe entering the estuary as colloidal oxides associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) is quickly flocculated and sedimented within 5 km of the river mouth, despite the shallow lateral salinity gradient. Sediments within this range are enriched in Fe (up to twice the regional average), principally in the form of crystalline Fe oxides as determined by sequential extractions. The high crystallinity implies relative maturity of the oxide mineralogy, likely due to sustained oxic conditions and long residence time in the river catchment. Despite the reducing conditions below the sediment-water interface, Fe is largely retained in the sediments close to the river mouth. In contrast, sedimentary Mn concentrations are highest in a deep silled

  17. Delta smelt habitat in the San Francisco Estuary: A reply to Manly, Fullerton, Hendrix, and Burnham’s “Comments on Feyrer et al. Modeling the effects of future outflow on the abiotic habitat of an imperiled estuarine fish"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feyrer, Frederick V.; Newman, Ken B.; Nobriga, Matthew; Sommer, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Manly et al. (2015) commented on the approach we (Feyrer et al. 2011) used to calculate an index of the abiotic habitat of delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus. The delta smelt is an annual fish species endemic to the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) in California, USA. Conserving the delta smelt population while providing reliability to California’s water supply with water diverted from the SFE ecosystem is a major management and policy issue. Feyrer et al. (2011) evaluated historic and projected future abiotic habitat conditions for delta smelt. Manly et al. (2015) specifically commented regarding the following: (1) use of an independent abundance estimate, (2) spatial bias in the habitat index, and (3) application of the habitat index to future climate change projections. Here, we provide our reply to these three topics. While we agree that some of the concepts raised by Manly et al. (2015) have the potential to improve habitat assessments and their application to climate change scenarios as knowledge is gained, we note that the Feyrer et al. (2011) delta smelt habitat index is essentially identical to one reconstructed using Manly et al.’s (2015) preferred approach (their model 8), as shown here in Fig. 1.

  18. A study of anthropogenic and climatic disturbance of the New River Estuary using a Bayesian belief network.

    PubMed

    Nojavan A, Farnaz; Qian, Song S; Paerl, Hans W; Reckhow, Kenneth H; Albright, Elizabeth A

    2014-06-15

    The present paper utilizes a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) approach to intuitively present and quantify our current understanding of the complex physical, chemical, and biological processes that lead to eutrophication in an estuarine ecosystem (New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). The model is further used to explore the effects of plausible future climatic and nutrient pollution management scenarios on water quality indicators. The BBN, through visualizing the structure of the network, facilitates knowledge communication with managers/stakeholders who might not be experts in the underlying scientific disciplines. Moreover, the developed structure of the BBN is transferable to other comparable estuaries. The BBN nodes are discretized exploring a new approach called moment matching method. The conditional probability tables of the variables are driven by a large dataset (four years). Our results show interaction among various predictors and their impact on water quality indicators. The synergistic effects caution future management actions. PMID:24814252

  19. The contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen loss in two temperate eutrophic estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2014-04-01

    Studies of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) continue to show the significance of this metabolic pathway for the removal of nitrogen (N) in several natural environments, including estuaries. However, the seasonal dynamics of the anammox process and related environmental controls within estuarine systems remains poorly explored. We evaluated the seasonal anammox activity along a salinity gradient in two temperate Atlantic estuaries, the Ave and the Douro (NW Portugal). Anammox potential rates were measured in anaerobic sediment slurries using 15N-labeled NO3- and NH4+ amendments. Production of 29N2 and 30N2 in the slurries was quantified using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). Environmental characteristics of the sediment and water column were also monitored. Anammox potentials in the Ave and Douro estuarine sediments varied between 0.8-8.4, and 0-2.9 nmol cm-3 wet sediment h-1, respectively, with high seasonal and spatial fluctuations. Inorganic nitrogen availability emerged as the primary environmental control of anammox activity, while water temperature appeared to modulate seasonal variations. The contribution of anammox to overall N2 production averaged over 20%, suggesting that the role of anammox in removing fixed N from these two systems cannot be neglected.

  20. Loss of Heterotrophic Biomass Structure in an Extreme Estuarine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Oreja, J. A.; Saiz-Salinas, J. I.

    1999-03-01

    Macrozoobenthic assemblages inhabiting estuarine mudflats in areas located at high intertidal levels or close to the mouth had: (1) higher values of abundance, biomass and production; (2) larger mean body sizes; and (3) lower turnover rates than at the remaining stations located elsewhere in the organically enriched, severely polluted Bilbao Estuary. All these community descriptors were similar to those from the nearby and relatively unpolluted Plentzia Estuary, considered here as a reference location. Biomass was irregularly distributed among logarithmic classes of individual body dry weight (DW i). However, a tendency to increase biomass with mean DW iwas found at the reference estuary and at the seaward end of the polluted estuary. This indicated the prevalence of more stable and regular environmental conditions which favoured larger-bodied, K-selected species. In fact, a biomass 'sink' was identified in the adult individuals of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana(Da Costa), which were only found at the reference estuary (DW i=256 to 512 mg) and close to the mouth of the polluted estuary (DW i=128 to 256 mg). However, biomass was strongly centred around the smallest size classes (DW i<0·250 mg) in the middle and upper reaches of the polluted estuary. Only r-selected species of Oligochaeta and Nematoda were favoured under the influence of catastrophic events, indicating the existence of heavily disturbed habitats. Oxygen depletion in the water column was causing a clear segregation of two ecological strategies along the longitudinal axis of the polluted estuary. On the one hand, large sized 'persisters' were successful close to the mouth of the polluted estuary. On the other hand, small sized 'invaders' (or even the absence of macrofauna) characterized the other extreme of the gradient. Spectral methods revealed a reliable tool for quantifying faunal responses in relation to the stress induced by adverse environmental conditions.

  1. The impact of channel deepening and dredging on estuarine sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Maren, D. S.; van Kessel, T.; Cronin, K.; Sittoni, L.

    2015-03-01

    Many estuaries worldwide are becoming more urbanised with heavier traffic in the waterways, requiring continuous channel deepening and larger ports, and increasing suspended sediment concentration (SSC). An example of a heavily impacted estuary where SSC levels are rising is the Ems Estuary, located between the Netherlands and Germany. In order to provide larger and larger ships access to three ports and a shipyard, the tidal channels in the Ems Estuary have been substantially deepened by dredging over the past decades. This has led to tidal amplification and hyper concentrated sediment conditions in the upstream tidal river. In the middle and outer reaches of the Ems Estuary, the tidal amplification is limited, and mechanisms responsible for increasing SSC are poorly understood. Most likely, channel and port deepening lead to larger SSC levels because of resulting enhanced siltation rates and therefore an increase in maintenance dredging. Additionally, channel deepening may increase up-estuary suspended sediment transport due to enhanced salinity-induced estuarine circulation. The effect of channel deepening and port construction on SSC levels is investigated using a numerical model of suspended sediment transport forced by tides, waves and salinity. The model satisfactorily reproduces observed water levels, velocity, sediment concentration and port deposition in the estuary, and therefore is subsequently applied to test the impact of channel deepening, historical dredging strategy and port construction on SSCs in the Estuary. These model scenarios suggest that: (1) channel deepening appears to be a main factor for enhancing the transport of sediments up-estuary, due to increased salinity-driven estuarine circulation; (2) sediment extraction strategies from the ports have a large impact on estuarine SSC; and (3) maintenance dredging and disposal influences the spatial distribution of SSC but has a limited effect on average SSC levels.

  2. Microbe-assisted phytoremediation of hydrocarbons in estuarine environments.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vanessa; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Silva, Artur M S; Silva, Helena; Cunha, Ângela

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are sinks for various anthropogenic contaminants, such as petroleum hydrocarbons, giving rise to significant environmental concern. The demand for organisms and processes capable of degrading pollutants in a clean, effective, and less expensive process is of great importance. Phytoremedition approaches involving plant/bacteria interactions have been explored as an alternative, and halophyte vegetation has potential for use in phytoremedition of hydrocarbon contamination. Studies with plant species potentially suitable for microbe-assisted phytoremediation are widely represented in scientific literature. However, the in-depth understanding of the biological processes associated with the re-introduction of indigenous bacteria and plants and their performance in the degradation of hydrocarbons is still the limiting step for the application of these bioremediation solutions in a field context. The intent of the present review is to summarize the sources and effects of hydrocarbon contamination in estuarine environments, the strategies currently available for bioremediation (potential and limitations), and the perspectives of the use of halophyte plants in microbe-assisted phytoremediation approaches.

  3. The negative role of turbulence in estuarine mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes Vaz, Richard A.; Lennon, Geoffrey W.; de Silva Samarasinghe, Jayantha R.

    1989-04-01

    It is competition between the various stratifying and mixing influences which determines the character of stratification in an estuary. Borrowing concepts which have been successfully applied to the discussion of stratification in shelf seas, a quantitative basis for determining the potential energy associated with vertical structure in estuaries is derived. The formulation, along similar lines to that of Bowden (1981), provides a simple but comprehensive method of incorporating many relevant stratifying and mixing influences in a given problem, and is also shown to be capable of rearrangement into forms akin to the estuarine Richardson number which is commonly found in discussions of estuarine statification. The paper argues, based on a survey of the literature, that in wide, relatively well-mixed estuaries, the greatest longitudinal mass flux occurs at times when stratification is most developed, that is, when the turbulent kinetic energy in the water column is at a minimum. Modulation of turbulence, principally at various tidal frequencies, causes a pulsing of the mass flux in which the contribution of each pulse increases non-linearly as the period of the modulation increases. Some, possibly significant, changes to the state of stratification and to the corresponding mass transport may occur in association with slack water periods. However, the spring-neap cycle is proposed to have a far greater influence on stratification, mass transport and the long-term mass balance in estuaries, and recent observational studies lend support to this position.

  4. The Impacts of Climate-Change on Estuarine Flooding: a Pacific Northwest Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. A.; Cheng, T.; Hill, D. F.; Beamer, J. P.; Garcia-Medina, G.

    2014-12-01

    While understanding of climate change's impact on coastal systems has recently seen great improvements, there still remains much to be understood, especially for systems as hydraulically complex as estuaries. The hydrodynamic climate in estuarine waters is controlled by multiple factors such as boundary conditions offshore (tides, waves), across the surface (winds), at the upper estuary margin (streamflow), as well as mean sea level. On the decadal to century scale, climate change modulated variability in these forcings will effect state of the overall system resulting in changes to experienced extreme water level events. A study of climate change impacts on two Pacific Northwest estuaries is presently underway. ADCIRC-SWAN is being used to conduct multi-decadal simulations of water levels across the study estuaries. A GCM-RCM configuration was selected from the NARCCAP project and then bias-corrected against the observation-based NARR data. This was separated into two data streams (historical and future) which were then run through a set of models in order to develop forcing for ADCIRC-SWAN. At the open ocean boundary, the model is forced with wave output from the WaveWatch III model. The free surface of the model is forced with surface winds and pressure. The streamflow boundaries are forced with hydrographs obtained from the Micromet - Snowmodel - Hydroflow suite of runoff routing models. The ADCIRC-SWAN output provides time series data on total water levels (TWLs) throughout the model domain. These time series can be used to construct CDFs of water elevation at any site of interest and also to derive return periods for extreme water level events. Of particular interest to this study is how these products change from the historical to future runs and which processes (changing offshore waves, changing streamflow) are primarily responsible for the observed changes in flooding characteristics.

  5. Nutrients (organic C, P, N, Si) in the eutrophic River Loire (France) and its estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meybeck, M.; Cauwet, G.; Dessery, S.; Somville, M.; Gouleau, D.; Billen, G.

    1988-12-01

    The Loire estuary has been surveyed from 1982 to 1985 by 13 isochronous longitudinal profiles realized at low tide. Nutrient (SiO 2, NO 3-, NH 4+, PO 3-4, particulate organic carbon or POC) patterns are very variable depending on the season, the estuarine section [river, upper-inner estuary, upstream of the fresh-water-saline-water interphase FSI, the lower-inner estuary characterized by the high turbidity zone (HTZ), the outer estuary] and the river discharge. Biological processes are dominant. In the eutrophied River Loire (summer pigment > 100 μg l -1), the high algal productivity (algal POC > 3 mg l -1) results in severe depletion of SiO 2, PO 43-, NO 3-. The enormous biomass (55 000 ton algal POC/year) is degraded in the HTZ where bacterial activity is intense. As a result, there is generally a regeneration of dissolved SiO 2 and PO 43-, a marked NH 4+ maximum, while NO 3- is conservative or depleted when the HTZ is nearly anoxic. Other processes can be considered including pollution from fertilizer plans (PO 43-, NH 4+) and from a hydrothermal power plant (NH 4+). In the less turbid outer estuary, nutrients are generally conservative. Major variations of concentrations are observed in the lowest chlorinity section (Cl - < 1 g kg -) and also upstream the FSI, defined here as a 100% increase in Cl -. Nutrient inputs to the ocean are not significantly modified for SiO 2 and NO 2-, but are increased by 70% and 180% for PO 43- and NH 4+ and depleted by 60% for POC. Odd hydrological events, especially some floods, may perturbate or even mask the usual seasonal pattern observed in profiles.

  6. Dynamical controls on estuarine bathymetry: Assessment against UK database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, David

    2006-06-01

    New theories for estuarine bathymetry provide formulations for: (1) depth at the mouth, D versus river flow, Q; (2) tidal intrusion length L versus D and Z (tidal amplitude) and (3) a zone of morphological existence, delineated on a framework of Z versus D. Here, these theories are assessed against a database for 80 UK estuaries. Overall there is good agreement between theory and observations for the sizes and shapes of estuaries classified as either 'Coastal Plain' or 'Bar Built'. Likewise, most estuaries are shown to lie within the theoretical 'zone of bathymetric existence'. These encouraging agreements enable the theories to be used to: (1) enhance our understanding of existing morphologies, (2) identify anomalous estuaries and (3) make future predictions regarding likely impacts from global climate change and related management scenarios. Subsequent examination of regional historical patterns of morphological evolution, introducing detailed local knowledge, should help to explain these anomalies and refine the new theories. By 2100, we anticipate changes in UK estuaries due to ('precautionary') projected 25% changes in river flow of: Order (0.5-5 km) in lengths and Order (50-250 m) in breadths. Corresponding changes due to a projected sea level rise of 50 cm are increases in both lengths of Order (1-2.5 km) and breadths of Order (70-100 m). In both cases, the bigger changes will occur in larger estuaries.

  7. Sediment dissolved iron:phosphate ratios as indicators of phosphate fluxes and benthic processes in two temperate small estuaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieux, Françoise; Raimonet, Mélanie; Kerouel, Roger; Philippon, Xavier; Youenou, Agnès; Caradec, Florian; Labry, Claire; Ragueneau, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is known to be the most limiting nutrient in marine ecosystems. However in transition areas such as estuaries, phosphorus can locally and seasonally play an important role. In these shallow areas, the sediment might act as a phosphorus sink, then liberating phosphate (PO4) under specific conditions (e.g. dissolution of iron-bound PO4 under anoxia, desorption of adsorbed PO4 in case of sediment resuspension…). The released PO4 may significantly increase the biologically available pool of phosphorus in the water, counteracting decreases in the external loads. One method to evaluate the contribution of benthic phosphorus is to measure phosphorus forms in the sediment matrix. Such extraction methods are robust but time consuming. Alternatively, other authors have suggested using dissolved Fe : P ratios as indicators of PO4 release to oxic waters. This study aims to investigate the relationships between dissolved Fe : P ratios in pore waters and PO4 fluxes at the sediment-water interface in two macrotidal estuaries (Aulne and Elorn, NW France). PO4 and Fe2+ pore waters concentrations and PO4 diffusive fluxes were evaluated during a seasonal cycle. PO4 fluxes increased from the outer to the inner estuary and from February to July (up to 300 µmol m-2 d-1) . In upper estuary, NH4 : PO4 and dissolved Fe : P ratios, significantly higher in the Aulne than in the Elorn, indicated a higher availability to retain P in the Aulne Estuary. In both estuaries, high dissolved Fe : P ratios (> 2 mol/mol) in the surface layer of the sediment, especially in February, indicated insignificant or low PO43-release and high NH4 : PO4 flux ratios. The lowest ratio generally occurred in July and corresponded to the highest PO4 fluxes and the lowest NH4 : PO4 fluxes. These Fe : P ratios, lower than the theorical value of 2, suggested that there were no enough diffusing Fe3+ to retain PO4. However relationships between Fe : P ratios and PO4 fluxes were specific of each part of the

  8. Metal partitioning and availability in estuarine surface sediments: Changes promoted by feeding activity of Scrobicularia plana and Liza ramada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Reis, Givaldo; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Costa, José Lino; Caçador, Isabel; Almeida, Pedro Raposo de

    2015-12-01

    Several works have evidenced in the past the importance and influence of plants and terrestrial invertebrates in metal availability in soils and sediments through changes in metal speciation. In contrast, the impact of estuarine invertebrates and fishes in this process has been poorly explored. The partition of metals in estuarine surface sediments was studied in a controlled environment according to four operationally defined fractions. Sediments were analyzed before and after the passage through the gut of two detritivorous species. Scrobicularia plana feeds on the bottom and suspended sediment particles through the inhalant siphon. Liza ramada is an interface feeder, filtering the superficial layer of the sediment and suspended particles in the water column. Cd, Cu and Ni bound to carbonates increased in the pellets of S. plana, compared with the ingested sediment, as did exchangeable Zn. Similarly, Cd and Zn bound to carbonates have also increased in the pellets of L. ramada; on the contrary, a decrease of Ni was observable in the pellets of this fish. The outcome of the controlled experiments pointed to a potential increase in some metals' availability in the estuarine environment, as a result of the more mobile metal forms in the excreted fecal pellets. This draws the attention to a relevant impact of the trophic activity of both species, alongside with the potential enhancement brought to it by the bioturbation promoted by them, in the role that the estuary itself has as a contaminants' buffer.

  9. Size matters: The contribution of mega-infauna to the food webs and ecosystem services of an Oregon estuary - 9-30-12

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large-bodied invertebrates (bivalves, polychaetes, burrowing shrimps) are common to infaunal communities of NE Pacific estuaries, but their contribution to estuarine community structure, function and ecosystem services is poorly understood because they are difficult to sample and...

  10. Influence of intermittent estuary outflow on coastal sediments of adjacent sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Jessica L.; Quinn, Gerry P.; Matthews, Ty G.; Barton, Jan; Bellgrove, Alecia

    2011-03-01

    Outflows from estuaries potentially contribute to the productivity of adjacent coastal waters, although most previous work has been on estuaries with considerable river discharge. We investigated the influence of estuary outflow on aspects of coastal sediments adjacent to two seasonally intermittent estuaries, the Curdies and Anglesea Rivers, in southwest Victoria, Australia. For each estuary, we measured sediment organic matter, microphytobenthic chlorophyll a and microbial utilization of carbon sources at three locations associated with each estuary: (1) inside estuary mouth, (2) estuary swash and (3) control swash (an open beach distant from any estuarine influences). Sampling occurred one week before and at one and nine weeks after both an artificial mouth opening and a separate natural flood at both estuaries. Significant temporal changes were detected for all three variables at the estuary mouth and estuary swash but the direction of change was inconsistent across the two estuaries and between the artificial mouth opening and natural flood. Organic matter in both estuaries showed no difference after the artificial mouth openings. Only Anglesea showed an increase in organic matter in the estuary mouth and estuary swash after the floods. Microphytobenthic chlorophyll a concentrations were highest when the estuary mouths were closed. Concentrations decreased at all locations at Curdies after the mouth was artificially opened. The estuary mouth at Anglesea sustained high chlorophyll concentrations and the estuary swash increased one week post artificial opening. The flood event resulted in an increase in chlorophyll a at the estuary mouth and swash at both estuaries, one week post flood. At Curdies, the microbial utilization of different carbon sources changed after both mouth events; estuary mouth and estuary swash showed similar patterns at one and nine weeks post opening. At Anglesea, the bacteria utilized different carbon sources between locations and the

  11. Aging and sediment characteristics of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. ); Imsand, F.D. ); Flowers, G.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Eight major estuarine systems present along the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico serve as primary depositional basins for all rivers draining into the gulf from central Louisiana eastward to the Florida peninsula. These estuaries consist of Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrews Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Pensacola Bay, Perdido Bay, Mobile Bay, Mississippi sound, and Lake Pontchartrainn. Because each receives sediment from a different river system (or systems), each estuary is characterized by sediments that are both physically and mineralogically distinct. Estuaries in the eastern Gulf, for example, possess a clay mineral suite dominated by kaolinite (derived from deeply weathered piedmont rocks), whereas those from the western Gulf are rich in smectite and mixed layer clays (reflecting a Western Interior or provenance from Paleozoic or older coastal plain sources). Similarly, weathering of rocks in the southern piedmont has provided eastern Gulf estuarine sediments with a suite of largely metamorphic rock-derived heavy minerals, whereas those in the western Gulf contain a mixed suite of both igneous- and metamorphic-derived minerals. Equally distinctive, however, are the textures of the bottom sediments themselves for each estuary when plotted on standard sand-silt-clay ternary diagrams. The relative percentages of these components are uniquely different for most of the estuaries and reflect both natural and anthropogenic conditions that exist in the watershed areas that drain into each estuary.

  12. Determination of fish trophic levels in an estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaud, S.; Pillet, M.; David, V.; Sautour, B.; Elie, P.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of trophic level is particularly relevant in order to improve knowledge of the structure and the functioning of an ecosystem. A precise estimation of fish trophic levels based on nitrogen isotopic signatures in environments as complex and fluctuant as estuaries requires a good description of the pelagic and benthic trophic chains and a knowledge of organic matter sources at the bottom. In this study these points are considered in the case of the Gironde estuary (south west France, Europe). To obtain a good picture of the food web, fish stomach content analyses and a bibliographic synthesis of the prey feeding ecology were carried out. Fish trophic levels were calculated from these results and δ 15N data. The feeding link investigation enabled us to identify qualitatively and quantitatively the different preys consumed by each fish group studied, to distinguish the prey feeding on benthos from those feeding on pelagos and to characterize the different nutritive pools at the base of the system. Among the species studied, only Liza ramada and the flatfish ( Platichthys flesus and Solea solea) depend mainly on benthic trophic compartments. All the other fish groups depend on several trophic (benthic and/or pelagic) sources. These results enabled us to correct the calculation of fish trophic levels which are coherent with their feeding ecology data obtained from the nitrogen isotopic integrative period. The present work shows that trophic positions are linked with the feeding ecology of fish species and vary according to individual size. Ecological data also allow the correction of the isotopic data by eliminating absurd results and showing the complementarity of the two methods. This work is the first to consider source variability in the fish food web. This is an indispensable step for trophic studies in a dynamic environment. The investigation of matter fluxes and recycling processes at the food web base would provide a useful improvement in future

  13. Contributions of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to U.S. estuaries: Summary and conclusions: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, Paul E.; Greening, Holly; Kremer, James N.; Peterson, David; Tomasko, David A.; Valigura, Richard A.; Alexander, Richard B.; Castro, Mark S.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Paerl, Hans W.; Stacey, Paul E.; Turner, R. Eugene

    2001-01-01

    A NOAA project was initiated in 1998, with support from the U.S. EPA, to develop state-of-the-art estimates of atmospheric N deposition to estuarine watersheds and water surfaces and its delivery to the estuaries. Work groups were formed to address N deposition rates, indirect (from the watershed) yields from atmospheric and other anthropogenic sources, and direct deposition on the estuarine waterbodies, and to evaluate the levels of uncertainty within the estimates. Watershed N yields were estimated using both a land-use based process approach and a national (SPARROW) model, compared to each other, and compared to estimates of N yield from the literature. The total N yields predicted by the national model were similar to values found in the literature and the land-use derived estimates were consistently higher. Atmospheric N yield estimates were within a similar range for the two approaches, but tended to be higher in the land-use based estimates and were not wellcorrelated. Median atmospheric N yields were around 15% of the total N yield for both groups, but ranged as high as 60% when both direct and indirect deposition were considered. Although not the dominant source of anthropogenic N, atmospheric N is, and will undoubtedly continue to be, an important factor in culturally eutrophied estuarine systems, warranting additional research and management attention.

  14. The Larval Fish Assemblage in Nearshore Coastal Waters off the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. A.; Cyrus, D. P.; Beckley, L. E.

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the composition, abundance and distribution of the larval fish assemblage in the nearshore coastal waters off the St Lucia Estuary mouth, South Africa. Ichthyoplankton samples were collected over a 12 month period from five stations located along a transect up to 2·5 km offshore, and from two stations north and south of the estuary mouth, respectively. In all, 6126 fish larvae, representing 89 families and 186 species, were collected. Larvae in the families Myctophidae and Tripterygiidae comprised 21% and 16% of the total catch, respectively. The most abundant species were an unidentified triplefin, Tripterygiid 1 and the lanternfish Benthosema fibulatum, together which contributed nearly 18% of the total catch. Larvae of marine spawners independent of estuaries dominated the catch both in terms of density (90%) and in terms of number of taxa (89%). Some larvae of estuarine-associated species were present, in addition to a few specimens of estuarine resident species. Overall the dominant environmental variable affecting larval densities was temperature, particularly for Trypterygiid 1 where temperature contributed to 9% of the variance model. Densities of fish larvae peaked in November and December 1990 (late spring and early summer) and were lowest from January to June 1991 (summer, autumn an early winter). Different taxa dominated the catch each month with reef- and shelf-associated species accounting for the peak in August and September 1990, oceanic species in November 1990 and a mixture of the two groups in December. Overall larval densities were significantly higher in bottom samples with a trend of increasing densities offshore for reef and shelf taxa. The larvae of reef and shore taxa were predominantly preflexion larvae, whilst the few estuarine spawner species that were collected were mainly postflexion. Ontogenetic patterns related to depth and distance offshore were evident for the dominant species in each estuarine

  15. Chesapeake Bay nitrogen fluxes derived from a land-estuarine ocean biogeochemical modeling system: Model description, evaluation, and nitrogen budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yang; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wilkin, John; Tian, Hanqin; Yang, Qichun; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Wiggert, Jerry D.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2015-08-01

    The Chesapeake Bay plays an important role in transforming riverine nutrients before they are exported to the adjacent continental shelf. Although the mean nitrogen budget of the Chesapeake Bay has been previously estimated from observations, uncertainties associated with interannually varying hydrological conditions remain. In this study, a land-estuarine-ocean biogeochemical modeling system is developed to quantify Chesapeake riverine nitrogen inputs, within-estuary nitrogen transformation processes and the ultimate export of nitrogen to the coastal ocean. Model skill was evaluated using extensive in situ and satellite-derived data, and a simulation using environmental conditions for 2001-2005 was conducted to quantify the Chesapeake Bay nitrogen budget. The 5 year simulation was characterized by large riverine inputs of nitrogen (154 × 109 g N yr-1) split roughly 60:40 between inorganic:organic components. Much of this was denitrified (34 × 109 g N yr-1) and buried (46 × 109 g N yr-1) within the estuarine system. A positive net annual ecosystem production for the bay further contributed to a large advective export of organic nitrogen to the shelf (91 × 109 g N yr-1) and negligible inorganic nitrogen export. Interannual variability was strong, particularly for the riverine nitrogen fluxes. In years with higher than average riverine nitrogen inputs, most of this excess nitrogen (50-60%) was exported from the bay as organic nitrogen, with the remaining split between burial, denitrification, and inorganic export to the coastal ocean. In comparison to previous simulations using generic shelf biogeochemical model formulations inside the estuary, the estuarine biogeochemical model described here produced more realistic and significantly greater exports of organic nitrogen and lower exports of inorganic nitrogen to the shelf.

  16. Occurrence and use of an estuarine habitat by giant manta ray Manta birostris.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, A M; Luiz, O J; Domit, C

    2015-06-01

    Based on the knowledge of local artisanal fishermen and on direct observations, this study presents evidence that the giant manta ray Manta birostris uses the Paranaguá estuarine complex in south Brazil, south-western Atlantic Ocean, in a predictable seasonal pattern. Behavioural observations suggest that the estuary can act as a nursery ground for M. birostris during the summer.

  17. Occurrence and use of an estuarine habitat by giant manta ray Manta birostris.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, A M; Luiz, O J; Domit, C

    2015-06-01

    Based on the knowledge of local artisanal fishermen and on direct observations, this study presents evidence that the giant manta ray Manta birostris uses the Paranaguá estuarine complex in south Brazil, south-western Atlantic Ocean, in a predictable seasonal pattern. Behavioural observations suggest that the estuary can act as a nursery ground for M. birostris during the summer. PMID:25898851

  18. Modeling aspects of estuarine eutrophication. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning mathematical modeling of existing water quality stresses in estuaries, harbors, bays, and coves. Both physical hydraulic and numerical models for estuarine circulation are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Anthropogenic disturbance on nursery function of estuarine areas for marine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrat, A.; Lobry, J.; Nicolas, D.; Laffargue, P.; Amara, R.; Lepage, M.; Girardin, M.; Le Pape, O.

    2009-01-01

    Estuaries serve as nursery grounds for many marine fish species. However increasing human activities within estuaries and surrounding areas lead to significant habitat loss for the juveniles and decrease the quality of the remaining habitats. This study is based on the data of 470 beam trawls from surveys that were conducted in 13 French estuaries for the purpose of the European Water Framework Directive. It aimed at testing the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on the nursery function of estuaries. With a multispecific approach based on ecological guilds, two fish metrics, abundance and species richness of Marine Juvenile migrant fishes, were used as proxies for the estuarine nursery function. Indices of heavy metal and organic contaminations were used to estimate anthropogenic disturbances impacting these estuaries. Fish metrics were described with statistical models that took into account: (a) sampling protocol, (b) estuarine features and (c) contamination. The results of these models showed that the fish metrics highly depend on the sampling protocol, and especially type of gear, depth and salinity, which highlights the necessity of considering such metrics at the sampling (trawl haul) scale. Densities and species richness of Marine Juvenile fishes appeared to be strongly and negatively correlated to contamination indices. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that human disturbances impact the nursery function of estuaries. Finally, the densities of Marine Juvenile migrant species appeared as a potential robust and useful fish indicator for the assessment of the ecological status of estuaries within the Water Framework Directive.

  20. Experimental research on the marine hydrodynamic action on the consolidation process of the sediments in the Yellow River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Juan; Jia, Yong-Gang; Li, Xiang-Ran; Shan, Hong-Xian

    2011-03-01

    Based on the in-situ measurements, the impact of the marine hydrodynamics, such as wave and tide, in the rapidly deposited sediments consolidation process was studied. In the tide flat of Diaokou delta-lobe, one 2 m×1m×1 m test pit was excavated. The seabed soils were dug and dehydrated, and then the powder of the soil was mixed with seawater to be fluid sediments. And an iron plate covered part of the test pit to cut off the effect of the marine hydrodynamics. By field-testing methods, like static cone penetration test (SPT) and vane shear test (VST), the variation of strength is measured as a function of time, and the marine hydrodynamics impact on the consolidation process of the sediments in the Yellow River estuary was studied. It is shown that the self-consolidated sediments' strength linearly increases with the depth. In the consolidation process, in the initial, marine hydrodynamics play a decisive role, about 1.5 times as much as self-consolidated in raising the strength of the sea-bed soils, and with the extension of the depth the role of the hydrodynamics is reduced. In the continuation of the consolidation process, the trend of the surface sediments increased-strength gradually slows down under the water dynamics, while the sediments below 50 cm are in opposite ways. As a result, the rapidly deposited silt presents a nonuniform consolidation state, and the crust gradually forms. The results have been referenced in studying the role of the hydrodynamics in the soil consolidation process.

  1. Effect of environmental parameters on pathogen and faecal indicator organism concentrations within an urban estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Rebekah; Schang, Christelle; Kolotelo, Peter; Coleman, Rhys; Rooney, Graham; Schmidt, Jonathan; Deletic, Ana; McCarthy, David T.

    2016-06-01

    Current World Health Organisation figures estimate that ∼2.5 million deaths per year result from recreational contact with contaminated water sources. Concerns about quantitative risk assessments of waterways using faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) as surrogates to infer pathogenic risk currently exist. In Melbourne, Australia, the Yarra River has come under public scrutiny due to perceived public health risks associated with aquatic recreation; a characteristic shared with urban estuaries worldwide. A 10-month study of the Yarra estuary investigated the processes that affect FIOs and pathogens within this system. A total of 74 samples were collected from three estuarine and two upstream, freshwater, locations under different climatic and hydrological conditions, and the levels of Escherichia coli, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, fRNA coliphages, Campylobacter spp. Cryptosporidium oocysts, Giardia cysts, adenoviruses, and enteroviruses were monitored. Reference pathogenic bacteria, protozoa, and viruses were detected in 81%, 19%, and 8% of samples, respectively. Variations in FIO concentrations were found to be associated with changes in specific climatic and hydrological variables including: temperature, flow, humidity and rainfall. In contrast, pathogen levels remained unaffected by all variables investigated. Limitations of current national and international culture-based standard methods may have played a significant role in limiting the identification of correlative relationships The data demonstrate the differences between FIOs and microbial pathogens in terms of sources, sinks, and survival processes within an urban estuary and provide further evidence of the inadequacy of FIO inclusion in the development of worldwide regulatory water quality criteria and risk assessment models.

  2. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  3. Nutrient fluctuations in the Quatipuru river: A macrotidal estuarine mangrove system in the Brazilian Amazonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamplona, Fábio Campos; Paes, Eduardo Tavares; Nepomuceno, Aguinaldo

    2013-11-01

    The temporal and spatial variability of dissolved inorganic nutrients (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, PO43- and DSi), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), nutrient ratios, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) were evaluated for the macrotidal estuarine mangrove system of the Quatipuru river (QUATIES), east Amazon coast, North Brazil. Temporal variability was assessed by fortnightly sampling at a fixed station within the middle portion of the estuary, from November 2009 to November 2010. Spatial variability was investigated from two field surveys conducted in November 2009 (dry season) and May 2010 (rainy season), along the salinity gradient of the system. The average DIN (NO3- + NO2- + NH4+) concentration of 9 μM in the dry season was approximately threefold greater in comparison to the rainy season. NH4+ was the main form of DIN in the dry season, while NO3- predominated in the rainy season. The NH4+ concentrations in the water column during the dry season are largely attributed to release by tidal wash-out of the anoxic interstitial waters of the surficial mangrove sediments. On the other hand, the higher NO3- levels during the wet season, suggested that both freshwater inputs and nitrification processes in the water column acted in concert. The river PO43- concentrations (DIP < 1 μM) were low and similar throughout the year. DIN was thus responsible for the major temporal and spatial variability of the dissolved DIN:DIP (N:P) molar ratios and nitrogen corresponded, in general, to the prime limiting nutrient for the sustenance of phytoplankton biomass in the estuary. During the dry season, P-limitation was detected in the upper estuary. PO43- adsorption to SPM was detected during the rainy season and desorption during the dry season along the salinity gradient. In general, the average Chl-a level (14.8 μg L-1) was 2.5 times higher in the rainy season than in the dry season (5.9 μg L-1). On average levels reached maxima at about 14 km from

  4. Modelling the effect of hydrological change on estuarine health: An Australian Perspective. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. C.; Adiyanti, S.; Ruibal, A. L.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries provide an important role in the filtering and transformation of carbon and nutrients from coastal catchments into the marine environment. Global trends including climate change, increased population, industrialization and agriculture have led to the rapid deterioration of estuarine ecosystems across the world. Within the Australian context, a particular concern is how changes to hydrological regimes, due to both water diversions and climate variability, are contributing to increased stress and consequent decline in estuarine health. In this study we report the modeling output of five Australian estuaries, each with different hydrological regimes and alternative management issues relating to altered hydrology: 1) The Yarra River estuary is a highly urbanized system, also receiving agriculturally derived nutrients, where the concern is the role of periodic hypoxia in reducing the assimilation capacity of nitrogen and thus increased risk of algal blooms forming in the coastal environment; 2) The upper Swan River estuary in Western Australia, which experiences persistent anoxia and hypoxia brought about by reduced flows has led to the commissioning of several oxygenation plants to alleviate stress on biodiversity and overall estuarine health; 3) The health of the Caboolture estuary in Queensland has deteriorated in the past decade with the aim of model development to quantify the various sources of surface and groundwater derived nutrients; 4) The construction of an additional channel to increase flushing in the Peel Harvey estuary in Western Australia was designed to control persistent harmful algal blooms; and 5) The Lower River Murray estuary experienced a prolonged drought that led to the development of acid sulfate soils and acid drainage deteriorating water quality. For these applications we applied 3-D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical models to determine underlying relationships between altered flow regimes, increased temperatures and the response of

  5. Elemental composition, distribution and control of biogenic silica in the anthropogenically disturbed and pristine zone inter-tidal sediments of Indian Sundarbans mangrove-estuarine complex.

    PubMed

    Dhame, Shreya; Kumar, Alok; Ramanathan, Al; Chaudhari, Punarbasu

    2016-10-15

    Spatial distribution and interrelationship among organic nutrients - silica and carbon - and various lithogenic elements were investigated in the surficial sediments of Matla estuary and Core Zone of Indian Sundarbans Reserve Forest using spatial analysis and multivariate statistics. Biogenic silica (BSi), an important parameter for coastal biogeochemisry, was measured using Si-time alkaline leaching method. BSi concentration ranged from 0.01% to 0.85% with higher concentrations in upstream region of Matla estuary and attenuated values towards the bay, seemingly due to changes in hydrodynamics and land use conditions. Spatial distribution of BSi did not exhibit significant correlation with sediment parameters of organic carbon (OC), elemental composition and clay content. However, it showed significant contrasting trends with total phosphorus (TP) and total silica of human influenced Matla estuary sediments as well as the dissolved silica (DSi) of its surface waters. Anthropogenic influence on sediment geochemistry is discernable with the presence of higher concentrations of organic and inorganic elements in Matla estuary than in Core Zone sediments. Spatial variation trends are often challenging to interpret due to multiple sources of input, varying energy and salinity conditions and constant physical, chemical and biological alterations occurring in the environment. Nonetheless, it is certain that anthropogenic activities have a substantial influence on biogeochemical processes of Sundarbans mangrove-estuarine complex and potentially the coastal ocean. PMID:27480337

  6. Effects of Human Activities on Submarine Topography in Lingding Bay of the Pearl River Estuary During the Last Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Z. Y.; Saito, Y.; Milliman, J. D.; Zhao, D.; Zhou, J.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries have been the site of intensive human activities. During the past century, decreased fluvial water and sediment discharge, increasing land reclamation, changing climate, and rising sea level have had an ever-increasing impact on river deltas, particularly those deltas bordering Southeast Asia. Using six stages of navigational and bathymetric chart data from 1906 to 2013 and 2 years (2012,2013) single-beam bathymetric data, together with more than 50 years of fluvial discharge data, we document the impact of human activities on the Pearl River Delta and its estuary at Lingding Bay. Between 1906 and 2010, land reclamation decreased the bay's water area by ~300 km2 (>17%), mostly at the expense of the shrinking intertidal and shallow subtidal mudflats. Before 1980, the estuary was mainly governed by natural processes with slight net deposition, whereas after 1980 dredging in the estuary and large port engineering projects changed the estuarine topography by shallowing the shoals and deepening the troughs. From 1955 to 2010, the water volume of Lingding Bay decreased by 536 × 106 m3 for a net decrease of 9.7 × 106 m3 a year, which indicates that approximately 9.7 Mt/yr of sediment was deposited in Lingding Bay during that period. In 2012 and 2013, large-scale human activities within Lingding Bay included continued dredging plus a surge of sand excavation that changed local water depths by ±5 m/yr, far exceeding the range of natural topographic evolution in the estuary. The impacts of various human activities have significantly changed submarine topography in Lingding Bay of the complex Pearl River Estuary. With continuing economic expansion in the Pearl River Delta, Lingding Bay should continue to shrink in both area and water volume.

  7. Spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles in the Daliao River Estuary, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yanwen; Han, Chaonan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Yingqun; Shi, Yao; Liu, Zhichao; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-08-01

    The transport and storage of phosphorus in estuary is a complex biogeochemical process as the result of the convergence of fresh and saline water. The objective of the current study is to investigate the spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles of Daliao River Estuary, China. Samples were collected in August (wet season) and November (dry season), 2013. The results showed that total particulate phosphorus (TPP) in water accounted for more than 50 % of the total phosphorus (TP). Meanwhile, in suspended particles, more than 62 % of particulate phosphorus was in the form of bioavailable phosphorus, including exchangeable phosphorus (Exc-P), extractable organic phosphorus (Exo-P), and iron-bound phosphorus (Fe-P), which meant that the potential impacts of bioavailable phosphorus in suspended particles on estuarine water environment cannot be ignored. There were significantly seasonal variations of phosphorus fractions in the Daliao River Estuary. The concentrations of phosphorus fractions in water in wet season were much lower than that in dry season because of the dilution effect of larger rainfall in wet season. In addition, spatial distribution characteristics of phosphorus fractions were also obvious. Due to terrigenous phosphorus input from the upstream of tidal reach and seawater dilution effect in coastal estuary, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations in water gradually decreased from tidal reach to coastal estuary. However, the concentrations of TPP and TP in water and Exo-P in suspended particles presented spatial fluctuation, and these were greatly attributed to sediment re-suspension in coastal estuary. PMID:27155833

  8. Partitioning Nitrification Between Specific Archaeal and Bacterial Clades in a Large, Nitrogen-Rich Estuary (San Francisco Bay, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damashek, J.; Casciotti, K. L.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrification is the sole link between nitrogen inputs and losses in marine ecosystems, and understanding the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of nitrification is therefore crucial for understanding how aquatic ecosystems process nitrogen. Recently-discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), appear to drive ammonia oxidation in many ecosystems, including much of the ocean. However, few studies have investigated these microbes in estuary waters, despite the fact nitrogen concentrations in estuaries are often far higher than the ocean, and can cause drastic ecological harm. We sought to determine the roles of AOA and AOB in driving pelagic nitrification throughout San Francisco Bay, by combining biogeochemical rate measurements with a suite of measurements of the abundance and diversity of AOA and AOB. It addition to traditional functional gene analyses and high-throughput 16S amplicon sequencing, we developed novel qPCR assays to selectively target the ammonia-oxidizing clades found in this estuary, which gave insights into clade-specific distributional patterns. Our biogeochemical data suggest a sizable fraction of ammonium in the bay is oxidized in the water column, likely by AOA, with nitrification in bottom waters also oxidizing a substantial portion of the ammonium exuded by sediments. Generally, Sacramento River waters and Suisun Bay bottom waters had the highest nitrification rates. AOA outnumbered AOB at most stations, and were present in high abundance at both the marine and freshwater ends of the estuary, while AOB abundance was highest in the low-salinity, brackish regions. Different archaeal clades were found at either end of the estuary, suggesting strong niche partitioning along the salinity gradient, with a third clade present largely in brackish waters. This work helps to assess the ability of ammonia-oxidizing microbes in estuaries to transform nitrogen prior to water discharge into the sea, and

  9. Wind-induced variability of estuarine circulation in a tidally energetic inlet with curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkiani, Kaveh; Becherer, Johannes; Klingbeil, Knut; Burchard, Hans

    2016-05-01

    In numerous studies, the functioning of estuarine circulation has been investigated, under idealized conditions, by means of numerical models. This has led to a deep understanding of the theory of estuarine residual flows. However, the question as to how estuarine circulation is established in real estuaries, in response to their topographical and forcing characteristics, remains. The present study uses a highly accurate three-dimensional numerical model simulation to calculate estuarine circulation in a curved, tidally energetic channel of the Wadden Sea in the southeastern North Sea. The specific momentum balance of this curved inlet shows an approximate pressure-gradient—frictional balance in the longitudinal direction and a pressure gradient—centrifugal balance in the lateral direction. A local Wedderburn number is introduced to quantify the varying contributions of wind stress and gravitational forcing on estuarine circulation. A total exchange flow (TEF) analysis is combined with an analysis of the intensity of the vertical overturning circulation to understand the dynamics of estuarine exchange in this inlet. The results show how established forcing mechanisms of residual circulation, such as horizontal buoyancy gradients and wind stress, act in a combined way. In general, the strength of estuarine circulation is always positively correlated with wind stress, with frequent reversals of residual flow for wind stress directed toward higher buoyancy. Only during calm weather conditions are longitudinal and lateral estuarine circulation highly correlated with the respective buoyancy gradients.

  10. Contaminants of emerging concern in a large temperate estuary.

    PubMed

    Meador, James P; Yeh, Andrew; Young, Graham; Gallagher, Evan P

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the occurrence and concentrations of a broad range of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) from three local estuaries within a large estuarine ecosystem. In addition to effluent from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), we sampled water and whole-body juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) in estuaries receiving effluent. We analyzed these matrices for 150 compounds, which included pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs), and several industrial compounds. Collectively, we detected 81 analytes in effluent, 25 analytes in estuary water, and 42 analytes in fish tissue. A number of compounds, including sertraline, triclosan, estrone, fluoxetine, metformin, and nonylphenol were detected in water and tissue at concentrations that may cause adverse effects in fish. Interestingly, 29 CEC analytes were detected in effluent and fish tissue, but not in estuarine waters, indicating a high potential for bioaccumulation for these compounds. Although concentrations of most detected analytes were present at relatively low concentrations, our analysis revealed that overall CEC inputs to each estuary amount to several kilograms of these compounds per day. This study is unique because we report on CEC concentrations in estuarine waters and whole-body fish, which are both uncommon in the literature. A noteworthy finding was the preferential bioaccumulation of CECs in free-ranging juvenile Chinook salmon relative to staghorn sculpin, a benthic species with relatively high site fidelity. PMID:26907702

  11. Spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial communities in a human-perturbed estuary of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, A.; Yu, C. P.; Hou, L.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are responsible for the transport and transformation of nutrients and organic matters from the continent to the adjacent coastal zone, and therefore play critical roles in global biogeochemical cycles. They are under increasing stress from human activities, especially in China, yet we still know little about the responses of microbial communities that mediate biogeochemical processes. Here, we investigated planktonic and benthic microbial communities in the human-perturbed Jiulong River estuary (JRE), southern China by using Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing. The results of taxonomic assignments indicated that Beta- (23.32%), Alpha- (22.21%), Gammaproteobacteria (14.83%), Actinobacteria (8.67%), and Flavobacteria (7.56%) were the five most abundant classes in estuarine surface waters, while benthic microbial communities were dominated by Gamma- (20.09%), Delta- (14.68%), Beta- (9.82%), Alphaproteobacteria (7.63%), and Anaerolineae (7.25%). The results of Adnois and ANOSIM tests confirmed that the compositions of microbial communities from waters and sediments of the JRE were significantly different from each other, and then salinity may be the primary factor controlling spatial distributions of planktonic and benthic microbial communities in this estuary. At the temporal scale, planktonic communities showed a more clear variation pattern. Remarkably, the ratios of Thaumarchaeota (putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea) to Nitrosomonadales (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) either in water or sediments of the JRE increased from freshwater to marine end, suggesting that bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers occupy low-salinity and high-salinity niches, respectively. The nutrient concentrations and salinity might be the most important factors which are responsible for this niche diversification. Overall, this study shed light on our understanding of the biogeographic patterns and its ecological drivers of estuarine microbial communities.

  12. Artificial water sediment regulation scheme influences morphology, hydrodynamics and nutrient behavior in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bochao; Yang, Disong; Burnett, William C.; Ran, Xiangbin; Yu, Zhigang; Gao, Maosheng; Diao, Shaobo; Jiang, Xueyan

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic controls on water and sediment may play important roles in river system transformations and morphological evolution, which could further affect coastal hydrodynamics and nutrient behavior. We used geochemical tracers to evaluate the influence of an intentional large release of water and sediment during the so-called "Water Sediment Regulation Scheme" (WSRS) on estuarine morphology, hydrodynamics and nutrients in the Yellow River estuary, China. We discovered that there was a newly formed small delta in the river mouth after the 2013 WSRS. This new morphologic feature altered terrestrial material distribution patterns from a single plume to a two-plume pattern within the estuary. Our results show that the WSRS significantly influenced the study area in the following ways: (1) Radium and nutrient concentrations were significantly elevated (two to four times), especially along the two river outlets. (2) Estuarine mixing was about two times stronger during WSRS than before. Average aerial mixing rates before and during WSRS were 50 ± 26 km2 d-1 and 89 ± 51 km2 d-1, respectively. (3) Our data is consistent with P limitation and suggest that stoichiometrically based P limitation was even more severe during WSRS. (4) All river-derived nutrients were thoroughly consumed within one to two weeks after entry to near-shore waters. (5) The extent of the area influenced by terrestrial nutrients was two to three times greater during WSRS. Human influence, such as triggered by WSRS regulations, should thus be considered when studying biogeochemical processes and nutrient budgets in situations like the Yellow River estuary.

  13. Applications of HCMM data to soil moisture snow and estuarine current studies. [Cooper River and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesnet, D. R. (Principal Investigator); Mcginnis, D. F.; Matson, M.

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The HCMM thermal data are useful for monitoring estuarine surface thermal patterns. Estuarine thermal patterns, are, under certain conditions, indicative of the surface tidal current circulation patterns. Under optimum conditions, estuaries as small as the Cooper River (i.e., approximately 100 sq km) can be monitored for tidal/thermal circulation patterns by HCMM-type IR sensors.

  14. Carbon budgets for three autotrophic Australian estuaries: Implications for global estimates of the coastal air-water CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-03-01

    Estuaries are `hot spots' in the global carbon cycle, yet data on carbon dynamics, in particular air-sea CO2 fluxes, from autotrophic systems are rare. Estuarine carbon budgets were constructed for three geomorphically distinct warm temperate Australian estuaries over an annual cycle. All three estuaries were net autotrophic, with annual net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) ranging from 8 ± 13.4 molC m-2 yr-1 to 10 ± 14 molC m-2 yr-1. There was a net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the estuaries of between 0.4 ± 0.6 molC m-2 yr-1 and 2 ± 0.9 molC m-2 yr-1. Loading of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the estuaries varied markedly within and between the estuaries, and was directly related to freshwater inflow. While NEM was similar in all three estuaries, the ratio of benthic versus pelagic contributions to NEM differed, with NEM dominated by pelagic production in the river dominated system, benthic production dominating in the intermediate estuary, and equal contributions of benthic and pelagic production in the marine dominated lagoon. All three estuaries exported more organic carbon than was imported, fueled by additional organic carbon supplied by NEM. The estuaries essentially acted as bioreactors, transforming DIC to organic carbon. Burial of organic carbon ranged from 1.2 ± 0.3 molC m-2 yr-1 to 4.4 ± 1.2 molC m-2 yr-1 and represented up to half of NEM. The annual net uptake of atmospheric CO2 in these systems, along with previous estimates of the global estuarine CO2flux being based predominantly on heterotrophic, large river dominated estuarine systems, indicates that the global estimate of the estuarine air-water CO2flux may be over-estimated due to the lack of studies from autotrophic marine dominated estuaries.

  15. Nursery use patterns of commercially important marine fish species in estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Maia, A.; Fonseca, V.; França, S.; Wouters, N.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2010-03-01

    Analysing the estuarine use patterns of juveniles of marine migrant fish species is vital for identifying important sites for juveniles as well as the basic environmental features that characterize these sites for different species. This is a key aspect towards understanding nursery function. Various estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast (Minho, Douro, Ria de Aveiro, Mondego, Tejo, Sado, Mira, Ria Formosa and Guadiana) were sampled during Spring and Summer 2005 and 2006. Juveniles of commercially important marine fish species Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax, predominantly 0-group individuals, were amongst the most abundant species and had distinct patterns of estuarine use as well as conspicuous associations with several environmental features. Juvenile occurrence and density varied amongst estuaries and sites within them, and differed with species. Sites with consistently high juvenile densities were identified as important juvenile sites (i.e. putative nursery grounds). Through generalized linear models (GLM), intra-estuarine variation in occurrence and density of each of the individual species was largely explained by environmental variables (temperature; salinity; depth; percentage of mud in the sediment; presence of seagrass; importance of intertidal areas; relative distance to estuary mouth; macrozoobenthos densities; and latitude). Decisive environmental factors defining important sites for juveniles varied depending on the system as a result of different environmental gradients, though there were common dominant features for each species regardless of the estuary considered. Analysed environmental variables in the GLM also accounted for inter-estuarine variation in species' occurrence and density. In several estuaries, the identified important juvenile sites were used by many of these species simultaneously and may be of increased value to both management and conservation. Overall, the

  16. Assessing the effects of nutrient management in an estuary experiencing climatic change: the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Piehler, Michael F; Stow, Craig A

    2006-03-01

    Eutrophication is a serious water quality problem in estuaries receiving increasing anthropogenic nutrient loads. Managers undertaking nutrient-reduction strategies aimed at controlling estuarine eutrophication are faced with the challenge that upstream freshwater segments often are phosphorus (P)-limited, whereas more saline downstream segments are nitrogen (N)-limited. Management also must consider climatic (hydrologic) variability, which affects nutrient delivery and processing. The interactive effects of selective nutrient input reductions and climatic perturbations were examined in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, a shallow estuary with more than a 30-year history of accelerated nutrient loading and water quality decline. The NRE also has experienced a recent increase in Atlantic hurricanes and record flooding, which has affected hydrology and nutrient loadings. The authors examined the water quality consequences of selective nutrient (P but not N) reductions in the 1980s, followed by N reductions in the 1990s and an increase in hurricane frequency since the mid-1990s. Selective P reductions decreased upstream phytoplankton blooms, but increased downstream phytoplankton biomass. Storms modified these trends. In particular, upstream annual N and P concentrations have decreased during the elevated hurricane period. Increased flushing and scouring from storms and flooding appear to have enhanced nutrient retention capabilities of the NRE watershed. From a management perspective, one cannot rely on largely unpredictable changes in storm frequency and intensity to negate anthropogenic nutrient enrichment and eutrophication. To control eutrophication along the hydrologically variable freshwater-marine continuum, N and P reductions should be applied adaptively to reflect point-source-dominated drought and non-point-source-dominated flood conditions.

  17. Horizontal Trends in Larval Fish Diversity and Abundance Along an Ocean-Estuarine Gradient on the Northern KwaZulu-Natal Coast, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. A.; Cyrus, D. P.; Beckley, L. E.

    2001-08-01

    The structure of the larval fish assemblages along an ocean-estuarine gradient in the St Lucia region on the northern KwaZulu-Natal coast of South Africa was examined using a combination of univariate, distributional and multivariate techniques. The data was comprised of a full annual set of ichthyoplankton samples taken from three types of environment: nearshore coastal waters, surf zone and within the St Lucia Estuary itself. The mean monthly densities of each species in each environment were used in the species matrix, and the mean monthly values of salinity, temperature and turbidity were used in the physical variables matrix. The mean species diversity and eveness index was significantly higher in the nearshore waters than the surf zone and estuary. The patterns of relative species abundances in each environment (K-dominance curves) showed that the estuarine environment was dominated by a few species in large numbers, the surf zone was intermediate, and the nearshore coast was the most diverse. Classification and multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination analyses of larval fish densities grouped together into three main clusters based on the three different environments. The species similarity matrix (inverse analysis) clustered into four groups at the 10% similarity level. The MDS analysis of the same matrix showed that the groups separated out more or less according to the type of environment they occur in, and hence the level of estuarine dependence of the various species. Species belonging to each assemblage showed similarities with regards to their reproduction modes and/or preference to a particular physical condition. Some species were restricted to one environment, whilst others were common to two or all three environments. The occurrence of partially estuarine-dependent species in all three environments suggests that ocean-estuarine coupling is an important process for the recruitment success of these species. The ' best fitting ' physical variable

  18. Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

    PubMed

    Robb, Carolyn K

    2014-01-01

    The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

  19. Estuarine ambient toxicity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, S.I.; Dawson, C.E.; Jordahl, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    This study was to determine if sediment and water column ambient toxicity bioassay results correlate with fish community IBI assessments in tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay watersheds that are impacted by industrial, urban and agricultural land use patterns. A battery of water column and sediment toxicity tests were conducted monthly in coordination with fish community sampling in four sub estuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Fish were sampled with seines and bottom trawls. An association was found between dissolved oxygen and species richness in the trawls. Water column bioassays indicated mild toxicological contamination in industrial watershed estuaries. Results varied by month and species. Water quality in the rural and agricultural watershed estuaries was generally good. Sediment bioassays demonstrated significant toxicity in the industrialized area. Effects were seen in the urbanized estuary, but to a lesser extent. Fish egg survival effects were observed in the agricultural watershed estuary. The rural estuary sediment produced variable, but non-significant results. The industrial and urban sites were contaminated with heavy metals and organics.

  20. The role of "pump action" in coastal and estuarine sediment resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the sediment into sea carried by rivers deposited near the estuary,forming the subaqueous delta. However,previous researches has shown that sediment into sea carried by many rivers all over the world always forms a large scale of distribution along the estuarine coastal areas that thousands of kilometers away from the estuary. Resuspension of estuarine and coastal sediment plays an important role in the sediment long distance transport into sea. At present, it is widely recognized that sediment resuspension is caused by the wave and current scouring action on the surface of the seabed. This paper explored the process and mechanism of seabed sediment resuspension through flume simulation experiments; developed a conclusion that sediment resuspension is not only from the seabed surface, there is still a considerable part of sediments coming from the internal seabed through seepage "pump action";The proportion of the latter part in sediment resuspension is related to wave height, this experiment concluded that 5、10、15cm wave heights respectively accounted for 30.5%,43.8%,47.9%;The "pump action" is induced by the accumulation of excess pore water pressure inside the soil bed under the action of wave loading.

  1. Effects of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on an estuarine microbial community.

    PubMed

    Novais, Adriana; Souza, Allan T; Ilarri, Martina; Pascoal, Cláudia; Sousa, Ronaldo

    2016-10-01

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) is well recognized for its invasive behavior and high ecological and economic impacts, being classified as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe. In this study, we performed a manipulative experiment under natural conditions to assess the effects of C. fluminea on sediments biochemistry and on the structure of an estuarine microbial (fungi and bacteria) community. We placed 5 treatments (control, rock, closed, live and open) for 2months in the Minho estuary (NW Iberian Peninsula). No differences were detected between treatments regarding the values of carbon (C), nitrite (NO2(-)), ammonium (NH4(+)), phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca) in the sediments; however, potassium (K) had higher values in the open treatment. Furthermore, we found that the presence of live C. fluminea stimulated fungal biomass (but not diversity) and bacterial diversity. Bioturbation activities by C. fluminea are possibly the main mechanism explaining these results; however, other factors such as the presence of other macroinvertebrate species and/or production of feces and pseudofeces by C. fluminea cannot be excluded. To our knowledge, this is the first manipulative experiment under natural conditions that clearly shows the effects of C. fluminea on an estuarine microbial community. Given the widespread distribution of this IAS and the paucity of quantitative assessments of invasive bivalves' effects on microbial communities, it will be important that future studies further investigate these processes. PMID:27265734

  2. Pollutant flows from a phosphogypsum disposal area to an estuarine environment: An insight from geochemical signatures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Macías, Francisco; Cánovas, Carlos Ruiz; Sarmiento, Aguasanta Miguel; Pérez-Moreno, Silvia María

    2016-05-15

    Phosphogypsum wastes from phosphate fertilizer industries are stockpiled in stacks with high contamination potential. An assessment of the environmental impact, including the use of geochemical tracers such as rare earth elements (REE) and Cl/Br ratios, was carried out in the phosphogypsum stack located at the Estuary of Huelva (SW Spain). Inside the pile, highly polluted acid pore-waters flows up to the edge of the stack, emerging as small fluvial courses, known as edge outflows, which discharge directly into the estuary. The disposal area is divided into four zones; two unrestored zones with surface ponds of industrial process water and two a priori already-restored zones. However, an extensive sampling of edge outflows conducted in the perimeter of the four zones demonstrates the high potential of contamination of the whole stack, including those zones that were supposedly restored. These solutions are characterized by a pH of 1.9 and concentrations of 6100 mg/L for P, 1970 mg/L for S, 600 mg/L for F, 200mg/L for NH4(+), 100mg/L for Fe, 10-30 mg/L for Zn, As and U, and 1-10mg/L for Cr, Cu and Cd. Preliminary restoration actions and those planned for the future prioritize removal of ponded process water and cover of the phosphogypsum with artificial topsoil. These actions presuppose that the ponded process water percolates through the porous medium towards the edge up to reach the estuary. However, geochemical tracers rule out this connection and point to an estuarine origin for these leachates, suggesting a possible tidal-induced leaching of the waste pile in depth. These findings would explain the ineffectiveness of preliminary restoration measures and should be considered for the development of new action plans. PMID:26901801

  3. Nitrous oxide production by estuarine epiphyton

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.S.; Rees, A.P.; Owens, N.J.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Nitrous oxide was produced by denitrifying bacteria in epiphytic communities on the surface of the macroalgae Enteromorpha sp. and Fucus sp. during spring-summer in the Tamar estuary, SW England. Denitrification and N[sub 2]O production exhibited diel variability, in response to photosynthetic oxygen production. Temporal variability in the rate of N[sub 2]O production was observed in Enteromorpha incubations; the variability reflected the heterogeneity of the epiphytic microbial population density. N[sub 2]O production by epiphyton associated with Enteromorpha would enhance the sediment N[sub 2]O flux by 150-500% at maximal algal densities and so increase estuarine N[sub 2]O flux to the atmosphere. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  4. The dependence of estuarine turbidity on tidal intrusion length, tidal range and residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.; Stephens, J. A.; Smith, R. E.

    2002-07-01

    It is shown that there is a marked tendency for long, strongly tidal estuaries to have greater suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations within their high-turbidity regions than shorter estuaries with comparable tidal ranges at their mouths, or weakly tidal estuaries. Using consistently derived data from 44 estuaries in Europe and the Americas, contours of the logarithm of maximum estuarine SPM concentration are shown to be reasonably smooth when plotted against the logarithm of mean spring tidal range (at the estuary mouth) and the logarithm of estuarine tidal length. Predictions from the plot are compared with published observations made in the Delaware, Scheldt, Rio de la Plata, Gironde, Bay of Fundy, Changjiang (Yangtze), Amazon, Patos Lagoon and the Hawkesbury Estuary and it is shown that, qualitatively, there are no serious discrepancies. Short, weakly tidal estuaries are predicted to have very low 'intrinsic' SPM concentrations. High SPM concentrations in these estuaries would most likely be the result of either locally generated wave resuspension, high freshwater sediment loads due to freshets, or intruding seawater carrying suspended sediments derived from wave activity in the coastal zone. Application of a generic tidal model demonstrates that longer estuaries possess faster tidal currents for a given tidal range at their mouth and, in the presence of a supply of erodable fine sediment, therefore (by implication) produce greater concentrations of SPM that can be accumulated within a turbidity maximum. The same is true if the tidal range is increased for estuaries of a given length. These features are illustrated by comparing surveys of SPM data from two large estuaries possessing greatly different tidal ranges (the microtidal, medium turbidity Potomac and the macrotidal, highly turbid Humber-Ouse) and a third, much smaller but strongly tidal estuary (the low-turbidity Tweed). It is demonstrated that longer estuaries tend to have longer flushing

  5. The dependence of estuarine turbidity on tidal intrusion length, tidal range and residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uncles, R.J.; Stephens, J.A.; Smith, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that there is a marked tendency for long, strongly tidal estuaries to have greater suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations within their high-turbidity regions than shorter estuaries with comparable tidal ranges at their mouths, or weakly tidal estuaries. Using consistently derived data from 44 estuaries in Europe and the Americas, contours of the logarithm of maximum estuarine SPM concentration are shown to be reasonably smooth when plotted against the logarithm of mean spring tidal range (at the estuary mouth) and the logarithm of estuarine tidal length. Predictions from the plot are compared with published observations made in the Delaware, Scheldt, Rio de la Plata, Gironde, Bay of Fundy, Changjiang (Yangtze), Amazon, Paros Lagoon and the Hawkesbury Estuary and it is shown that, qualitatively, there are no serious discrepancies. Short, weakly tidal estuaries are predicted to have very low 'intrinsic' SPM concentrations. High SPM concentrations in these estuaries would most likely be the result of either locally generated wave resuspension, high freshwater sediment loads due to freshets, or intruding seawater carrying suspended sediments derived from wave activity in the coastal zone. Application of a generic tidal model demonstrates that longer estuaries possess faster tidal currents for a given tidal range at their mouth and, in the presence of a supply of erodable fine sediment, therefore (by implication) produce greater concentrations of SPM that can be accumulated within a turbidity maximum. The same is true if the tidal range is increased for estuaries of a given length. These features are illustrated by comparing surveys of SPM data from two large estuaries possessing greatly different tidal ranges (the microtidal, medium turbidity Potomac and the macrotidal, highly turbid Humber-Ouse) and a third, much smaller but strongly tidal estuary (the low-turbidity Tweed). It is demonstrated that longer estuaries tend to have longer flushing

  6. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, David A.

    2009-08-03

    Long-term changes and fluctuations in river flow, water properties, tides, and sediment transport in the Columbia River and its estuary have had a profound effect on Columbia River salmonids and their habitat. Understanding the river-flow, temperature, tidal, and sediment-supply regimes of the Lower Columbia River (LCR) and how they interact with habitat is, therefore, critical to development of system management and restoration strategies. It is also useful to separate management and climate impacts on hydrologic properties and habitat. This contract, part of a larger project led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), consists of three work elements, one with five tasks. The first work element relates to reconstruction of historic conditions in a broad sense. The second and third elements consist, respectively, of participation in project-wide integration efforts, and reporting. This report focuses on the five tasks within the historic reconstruction work element. It in part satisfies the reporting requirement, and it forms the basis for our participation in the project integration effort. The first task consists of several topics related to historic changes in river stage and tide. Within this task, the chart datum levels of 14 historic bathymetric surveys completed before definition of Columbia River Datum (CRD) were related to CRD, to enable analysis of these surveys by other project scientists. We have also modeled tidal datums and properties (lower low water or LLW, higher high water or HHW, mean water level or MWL, and greater diurnal tidal range or GDTR) as a function of river flow and tidal range at Astoria. These calculations have been carried for 10 year intervals (1940-date) for 21 stations, though most stations have data for only a few time intervals. Longer-term analyses involve the records at Astoria (1925-date) and Vancouver (1902-date). Water levels for any given river flow have decreased substantially (0.3-1.8 m, depending

  7. Vegetation of the Elwha River estuary: Chapter 8 in Coastal habitats of the Elwha River, Washington--biological and physical patterns and processes prior to dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Fuentes, Tracy L.; Pritekel, Cynthia; Beirne, Matthew M.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The Elwha River estuary supports one of the most diverse coastal wetland complexes yet described in the Salish Sea region, in terms of vegetation types and plant species richness. Using a combination of aerial imagery and vegetation plot sampling, we identified 6 primary vegetation types and 121 plant species in a 39.7 ha area. Most of the estuary is dominated by woody vegetation types, with mixed riparian forest being the most abundant (20 ha), followed by riparian shrub (6.3 ha) and willow-alder forest (3.9 ha). The shrub-emergent marsh transition vegetation type was fourth most abundant (2.2 ha), followed by minor amounts of dunegrass (1.75 ha) and emergent marsh (0.2 ha). This chapter documents the abundance, distribution, and floristics of these six vegetation types, including plant species richness, life form, species origin (native or introduced), and species wetland indicator status. These data will serve as a baseline to which future changes can be compared, following the impending removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha Dams upstream on the Elwha River. Dam removals may alter many of the processes, materials, and biotic interactions that influence the estuary plant communities, including hydrology, salinity, sediment and wood transport, nutrients, and plant-microbe interactions.

  8. Simulation modeling of estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed of Galveston Bay, Texas ecosystem. Secondary productivity measured by harvestable species (such as shrimp and fish) is evaluated in terms of man-related and controllable factors, such as quantity and quality of inlet fresh-water and pollutants. This simulation model used information from an existing physical parameters model as well as pertinent biological measurements obtained by conventional sampling techniques. Predicted results from the model compared favorably with those from comparable investigations. In addition, this paper will discuss remotely sensed and conventional measurements in the framework of prospective models that may be used to study estuarine processes and ecosystem productivity.

  9. Residency and movement patterns of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus relative to major estuaries.

    PubMed

    Spares, A D; Stokesbury, M J W; Dadswell, M J; O'Dor, R K; Dick, T A

    2015-06-01

    Estuarine residency and marine movements of 43 anadromous Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus (mean ± s.d. fork length = 523 ± 97 mm) were examined using acoustic tracking in inner Frobisher Bay (IFB; 63° N; 68° W), Canada, from July to September 2008 and 2009. A mean ± s.d. migration duration of 63 ± 7 days occurred from late June to early September. Detected S. alpinus were either continuously (maximum 34 days) or intermittently present in estuarine zones, on average residing approximately one third of time tracked and returning once every 9 days. Significantly higher estuarine residency during the final 15 migration days suggested that a transition phase may occur prior to freshwater re-entry. Low travel rates during flood tide suggested individuals staged before accessing intertidal and estuarine zones. Although the two main estuaries were c. 22 km apart, 19% of tagged individuals used both. Individuals remained relatively close to freshwater overwintering systems, although late-migration inter-estuarine movements may have indicated natal homing. Approximately half of the individuals exhibited extra-estuarine travel, mostly during mid-migration, but remained within 3 km of shore ranging < 30 km straight line distance (SLD) of either estuary. It was concluded that IFB S. alpinus (1) spent a significant portion of their migration within or adjacent to the estuaries and (2) had a restricted marine distribution within 30 km SLD of the river mouths.

  10. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  11. Halogen Radicals Promote the Photodegradation of Microcystins in Estuarine Systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Reichwaldt, Elke S; Ghadouani, Anas; Mitch, William A

    2016-08-16

    The transport of microcystin, a hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa), to estuaries can adversely affect estuarine and coastal ecosystems. We evaluated whether halogen radicals (i.e., reactive halogen species (RHS)) could significantly contribute to microcystin photodegradation during transport within estuaries. Experiments in synthetic and natural water samples demonstrated that the presence of seawater halides increased quantum yields for microcystin indirect photodegradation by factors of 3-6. Additional experiments indicated that photoproduced RHS were responsible for this effect. Despite the fact that dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations decreased in more saline waters, the calculated photochemical half-life of microcystin decreased 6-fold with increasing salinity along a freshwater-estuarine transect due to the halide-associated increase in quantum yield. Modeling of microcystin photodegradation along this transect indicated that the time scale for RHS-mediated microcystin photodegradation is comparable to the time scale of transport. Microcystin concentrations decline by ∼98% along the transect when considering photodegradation by RHS, but only by ∼54% if this pathway were ignored. These results suggest the importance of considering RHS-mediated photodegradation in future models of microcystin fate in freshwater-estuarine systems. PMID:27447196

  12. Generation of an estuarine sediment plume by a tropical storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Li, Yun

    2013-02-01

    Tropical Storm Lee (2011) caused a record flood in the Susquehanna River which discharged about 6.7 million tons of suspended sediments into the Bay, an amount equal to the input of 6 average years. The flood-carried sediment produced a large sediment plume that covered one half of Chesapeake Bay with the maximum suspended sediment concentration exceeding 2500 mg L-1. Three stages were identified in the development of the sediment plume, corresponding to three dominant forcing mechanisms, i.e., river flow, estuarine circulation, and sediment settling. Most of the flood-carried sediments were deposited in the Bay within 20 days. Sands were dumped in the Susquehanna Flats with a maximum thickness of 10 cm, while fine-grained sediments were dusted over a wide area in the upper Bay with a maximum thickness of 4 cm. Long-term simulation of the post-storm period showed that a majority of the flood sediments were redistributed to accumulate in the estuarine turbidity maximum region due to flood-ebb asymmetry in tidal suspension and advection by estuarine circulation and tidal flows while the rest were transported seaward and deposited in the mid-Bay. It is estimated that the flood delivered 9 months of particulate nitrogen and over 1 year of particulate phosphorus supplies to the estuary. This catastrophic event may change the geological history and exacerbate water-quality decline in the American largest estuary.

  13. Hydrology of major estuaries and sounds of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.L.; Wilder, Hugh B.; Parker, Garald G.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrology-related problems associated with North Carolina 's major estuaries and sounds include contamination of some estuaries with municipal and industrial wastes and drainage from adjacent, intensively farmed areas, and nuisance-level algal blooms. In addition, there is excessive shoaling in some navigation channels, salt-water intrusion into usually fresh estuarine reaches, too high or too-low salinities in nursery areas for various estuarine species, and flood damage due to hurricanes. The Cape Fear River is the only major North Carolina estuary having a direct connection to the sea. Short-term flow throughout most of its length is dominated by ocean tides. Freshwater entering the major estuaries is, where not contaminated, of acceptable quality for drinking with minimum treatment. However, iron concentrations in excess of 0.3 milligrams per liter sometimes occur and water draining from swampy areas along the Coastal Plain is often highly colored, but these problems may be remedied with proper treatment. Nuisance-level algal blooms have been a recurring problem on the lower estuarine reaches of the Neuse, Tar-Pamlico, and Chowan Rivers where nutrients (compounds of phosphorous and nitrogen) are abundant. The most destructive blooms tend to occur in the summer months during periods of low freshwater discharge and relatively high water temperatures. Saltwater intrusion occurs from time to time in all major estuaries except the Roanoke River, where releases from Roanoke Rapids Lake and other reservoirs during otherwise low-flow periods effectively block saline water from the estuary. New shoaling materials found in the lower channelized reaches of the Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers are primarily derived, not from upstream sources, but from nearby shore erosion, from slumping of material adjacent to the dredged channels, from old spoil areas, or from ocean-derived sediments carried upstream by near-bottom density currents.

  14. A Linked Physical and Biological Framework to Assess Biogeochemical Dynamics in a Shallow Estuarine Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C. P.; Wetzel, R. L.; Meyers, M. B.

    1999-12-01

    The littoral zone of Chesapeake Bay contains a mosaic of shallow vegetated and nonvegetated habitats with biotic components that are sensitive to changes in biological and physical driving factors. Static and dynamic modelling frameworks provide an integrative way to study complex hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes in linked estuarine habitats. In this study we describe a spatial simulation model developed and calibrated relative to a specific littoral zone, estuarine ecosystem. The model consisted of four distinct habitats that contained phytoplankton, sediment microalgae, Zostera marina (eelgrass), and Spartina alterniflora. There was tidal exchange of phytoplankton, particulate and dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen between the littoral zone ecosystem and the offshore channel. Physical exchange and biogeochemical transformations within the habitats determined water column concentrations in each habitat. Predicted subtidal water column concentrations and Z. marina and S. alterniflora biomass were within the variability of validation data and the predicted annual rates of net primary production were similar to measured rates. Phytoplankton accounted for 17%, sediment microalgae 46%, the Z. marina community 24% and S. alterniflora 13% of the annual littoral zone primary production. The linked habitat model provided insights into producer, habitat and ecosystem carbon and nitrogen properties that might not have been evident with stand-alone models. Although it was an intra-ecosystem sink for particulate carbon, the seagrass habitat was a DOC source and responsible for over 30% of the littoral zone carbon and nitrogen primary production. The model predicted that the Goodwin Islands littoral zone was a sink of channel derived POC, but a source of DOC to the surrounding estuary. The framework created in this study of estuarine ecosystem dynamics is applicable to many different aquatic systems over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers

    PubMed Central

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate). In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary). We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m), with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites) or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter, and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms. PMID:26528270

  16. Effects of Irradiance on Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Gulf of Mexico Estuary: Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of light on water column and benthic fluxes in the Pensacola Bay estuary, a river-dominated system in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Measurements were made during summer 2003 and 2004 on 16 dates at along depth and salinity gradients. Dissolved oxygen flu...

  17. Nutrient dynamics in tropical rivers, estuarine-lagoons, and coastal ecosystems along the eastern Hainan Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Liu, S. M.; Li, Y. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Ren, J. L.; Zhang, J.

    2013-06-01

    Nutrient dynamics were studied along the eastern Hainan Island based on field observations during 2006-2009, to understand nutrient biogeochemical processes and to have an overview of human perturbations on coastal ecosystems in this tropical region. The concentrations of nutrients in the rivers had seasonal variations enriched with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). High riverine concentrations of nitrate were mainly originated from agricultural fertilizer input. The ratios of DIN : PO43- ranged from 37 to 1063, suggesting preferential PO43- relative to nitrogen in the rivers. The areal yields of dissolved silicate (DSi) varied from 76 to 448 × 103 mol km-2 yr-1 due to erosion over the drainage area, inducing high levels of DSi among worldwide tropical systems. Aquaculture ponds contained high concentrations of NH4+ (up to 157 μM) and DON (up to 130 μM). Particulate phosphorus concentrations (0.5 ∼1.4 μM) were in lower level comparied with estuaries around the world. Particulate silicate levels in rivers and lagoons were lower than global average level. Nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal areas were affected by human activities (e.g. aquaculture, agriculture), as well as natural events such as typhoon. Nutrient concentrations were low because open sea water dispersed land-derived nutrients. Nutrient budgets were built based on a steady-state box model, which showed that riverine fluxes would be magnified by estuarine processes (e.g. regeneration, desorption) in the Wenchanghe/Wenjiaohe Estuary, Wanquan River estuary, and the Laoyehai Lagoon except in the Xiaohai Lagoon. Riverine and groundwater input were the major sources of nutrients to the Xiaohai Lagoon and the Laiyehai Lagoon, respectively. Riverine input and aquaculture effluent were the major sources of nutrients to the eastern coastal of Hainan Island. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ecosystem can be increased by typhoon-induced runoff of rainwater, and phytoplankton bloom in the sea would be

  18. Seasonal and spatial ontogenetic movements of Gerreidae in a Brazilian tropical estuarine ecocline and its application for nursery habitat conservation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J A A; Barletta, M; Dantas, D V; Costa, M F

    2016-07-01

    The density and biomass of different ontogenetic phases (juvenile, sub-adult and adult) of the two most important sympatric Gerreidae species in the Goiana Estuary, north-east Brazil, are described in order to determine the patterns of estuarine habitat use and to identify nursery grounds. Eugerres brasilianus and Eucinostomus melanopterus were the most abundant gerreids in the main channel and adjacent estuarine beach habitats. Eugerres brasilianus is abundant in the main channel, whereas E. melanopterus is most common in the beach habitats. Significant interaction in density and biomass of juvenile and sub-adult size classes of E. brasilianus was found between season and area. In addition, E. brasilianus adults and E. melanopterus sub-adults differed significantly in density and biomass between areas of the estuary. Both the upper estuary, during the late dry season, and the middle estuary, during the early rainy season, functioned as nursery habitats for E. brasilianus. During the early rainy season and dry season, the beaches were a nursery for the E. melanopterus. The concentration of these ontogenetic phases was mainly related to the dissolved oxygen and salinity gradients of the estuary, which drive not only gerreid movement between estuarine habitats but also moves the habitats. This study reinforces the importance of conserving the habitats of the Goiana Estuary so that species such as gerreids can complete their life cycle in the face of pressure from anthropogenic activities, such as mangrove forest deforestation, overfishing, fish contamination by plastic ingestion and domestic effluent disposal. PMID:26887637

  19. Seasonal and spatial ontogenetic movements of Gerreidae in a Brazilian tropical estuarine ecocline and its application for nursery habitat conservation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J A A; Barletta, M; Dantas, D V; Costa, M F

    2016-07-01

    The density and biomass of different ontogenetic phases (juvenile, sub-adult and adult) of the two most important sympatric Gerreidae species in the Goiana Estuary, north-east Brazil, are described in order to determine the patterns of estuarine habitat use and to identify nursery grounds. Eugerres brasilianus and Eucinostomus melanopterus were the most abundant gerreids in the main channel and adjacent estuarine beach habitats. Eugerres brasilianus is abundant in the main channel, whereas E. melanopterus is most common in the beach habitats. Significant interaction in density and biomass of juvenile and sub-adult size classes of E. brasilianus was found between season and area. In addition, E. brasilianus adults and E. melanopterus sub-adults differed significantly in density and biomass between areas of the estuary. Both the upper estuary, during the late dry season, and the middle estuary, during the early rainy season, functioned as nursery habitats for E. brasilianus. During the early rainy season and dry season, the beaches were a nursery for the E. melanopterus. The concentration of these ontogenetic phases was mainly related to the dissolved oxygen and salinity gradients of the estuary, which drive not only gerreid movement between estuarine habitats but also moves the habitats. This study reinforces the importance of conserving the habitats of the Goiana Estuary so that species such as gerreids can complete their life cycle in the face of pressure from anthropogenic activities, such as mangrove forest deforestation, overfishing, fish contamination by plastic ingestion and domestic effluent disposal.

  20. Flow-carried and active swimming migration of the glass eel (Anguilla anguilla) in the tidal area of a small estuary on the French Atlantic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel, Didier

    1986-09-01

    The study of the migration dynamics of glass eels (Anguilla anguilla) in a small estuary of the French Atlantic coast shows a two-stage sequence: (1) From November to March, the glass eels migrate upstream by using the tidal currents. The estuarine hydrology leads to a natural trapping of migrants in a typical area where the current speed slows down. The location of this zone depends on hydraulic conditions. The greater the tide is the farther upstream this area will be. This phenomenon leads to an increasing catchability of elvers. (2) From April onwards, when the water temperature reaches 10 12 °C, the glass eels swim actively upstream in the estuary. Then, fish concentrate just below the first dam. This behaviour shift shows the beginning of the colonization process of the whole riverine system.

  1. Subtidal sea level variability in a shallow Mississippi River deltaic estuary, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Wiseman, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of river, atmospheric, and tidal forcings on estuarine sea level variability are examined in Breton Sound, a shallow (0.7 m) deltaic estuary situated in an interdistributary basin on the Mississippi River deltaic plain. The deltaic landscape contains vegetated marshes, tidal flats, circuitous channels, and other features that frictionally dissipate waves propagating through the system. Direct forcing by local wind stress over the surface of the estuary is minimal, owing to the lack of significant fetch due to landscape features of the estuary. Atmospheric forcing occurs almost entirely through remote forcing, where alongshore winds facilitate estuary-shelf exchange through coastal Ekman convergence. The highly frictional nature of the deltaic landscape causes the estuary to act as a low-pass filter to remote atmospheric forcing, where high-frequency, coastally-induced fluctuations are significantly damped, and the damping increases with distance from the estuary mouth. During spring, when substantial quantities of controlled Mississippi River inputs (q?? = 62 m3 s-1) are discharged into the estuary, upper estuary subtidal sea levels are forced by a combination of river and remote atmospheric forcings, while river effects are less clear downestuary. During autumn (q?? = 7 m3 s-1) sea level variability throughout the estuary is governed entirely by coastal variations at the marine boundary. A frequency-dependent analytical model, previously used to describe sea level dynamics forced by local wind stress and coastal forcing in deeper, less frictional systems, is applied in the shallow Breton Sound estuary. In contrast to deeper systems where coastally-induced fluctuations exhibit little or no frictional attenuation inside the estuary, these fluctuations in the shallow Breton Sound estuary show strong frequency-dependent amplitude reductions that extend well into the subtidal frequency spectrum. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  2. Tropical Estuarine Macrobenthic Communities Are Structured by Turnover Rather than Nestedness.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Carlinda Raílly; Hepp, Luiz Ubiratan; Patrício, Joana; Molozzi, Joseline

    2016-01-01

    Turnover (i.e., species substitution) and nestedness (i.e., subsets of species from more diverse locations), the two main mechanisms used to explain the beta diversity of biological communities, have different implications for biodiversity conservation. To better understand how these mechanisms contribute to beta diversity, we tested the following hypotheses: (i) greater dissimilarity in community composition occurs between estuarine zones than other hierarchical level studied; (ii) beta diversity in these communities develops by turnover in estuaries with a lower degree of anthropogenic impact, but by nestedness in estuaries with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact; and (iii) the structuring mechanism is independent of season. We studied two tropical estuaries (dry and wet seasons) that vary in terms of land-use of the drainage basins. Subtidal benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled along the estuarine gradient in each of the two estuaries. The additive partitioning approach to species diversity was used to determine the hierarchical scale with the greatest dissimilarity in community composition. General beta diversity was measured using the Sorensen dissimilarity index, partitioning the turnover and nestedness components. The greatest dissimilarity in the composition of the communities occurred between the zones along the estuarine gradient in both seasons (dry = 58.6%; wet = 46.3%). In the estuary with a lower degree of anthropogenic influence, benthic macroinvertebrate diversity was generated by turnover regardless of the season. In the estuary with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact, beta diversity was structured by turnover during the dry season and a combination of both mechanisms during the wet season. We conclude that turnover is the principal mechanism responsible for beta diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate communities in tropical estuaries. PMID:27584726

  3. Tropical Estuarine Macrobenthic Communities Are Structured by Turnover Rather than Nestedness

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Carlinda Raílly; Hepp, Luiz Ubiratan; Patrício, Joana; Molozzi, Joseline

    2016-01-01

    Turnover (i.e., species substitution) and nestedness (i.e., subsets of species from more diverse locations), the two main mechanisms used to explain the beta diversity of biological communities, have different implications for biodiversity conservation. To better understand how these mechanisms contribute to beta diversity, we tested the following hypotheses: (i) greater dissimilarity in community composition occurs between estuarine zones than other hierarchical level studied; (ii) beta diversity in these communities develops by turnover in estuaries with a lower degree of anthropogenic impact, but by nestedness in estuaries with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact; and (iii) the structuring mechanism is independent of season. We studied two tropical estuaries (dry and wet seasons) that vary in terms of land-use of the drainage basins. Subtidal benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled along the estuarine gradient in each of the two estuaries. The additive partitioning approach to species diversity was used to determine the hierarchical scale with the greatest dissimilarity in community composition. General beta diversity was measured using the Sorensen dissimilarity index, partitioning the turnover and nestedness components. The greatest dissimilarity in the composition of the communities occurred between the zones along the estuarine gradient in both seasons (dry = 58.6%; wet = 46.3%). In the estuary with a lower degree of anthropogenic influence, benthic macroinvertebrate diversity was generated by turnover regardless of the season. In the estuary with a greater degree of anthropogenic impact, beta diversity was structured by turnover during the dry season and a combination of both mechanisms during the wet season. We conclude that turnover is the principal mechanism responsible for beta diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate communities in tropical estuaries. PMID:27584726

  4. Marine and Estuarine Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reish, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of various pollutants on marine and estuarine organisms, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) effects of pesticides, dredging, dumping, sludge, and petroleum hydrocarbons; and (2) diseases and tissue abnormalities. A list of 441 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Tungsten-molybdenum fractionation in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. Jade; Helz, George R.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) concentrations were measured in surface waters and sediment pore waters of Terrebonne Bay, a shallow estuary in the Mississippi River delta, to investigate the biogeochemical processes that fractionate these Group 6 elements relative to one another during transit from weathering to sedimentary environments. Although many of the chemical properties of W and Mo are similar, the two elements behave autonomously, and the fractionation mechanisms are only partly understood. In sulfidic pore waters, dissolved Mo is depleted relative to river water-seawater mixtures, whereas dissolved W is >10-fold enriched. Reductive dissolution of poorly crystalline phases like ferrihydrite, which is a preferential host of W relative to Mo in grain coatings on river-borne particles, can explain the dissolved W enrichment. Dissolved W becomes increasingly enriched as H2S(aq) rises above about 60 μM due to transformation of WO42- to thiotungstates as well as to additional reductive dissolution of phases that host W. In contrast, as rising sulfide transforms MoO42- to thiomolybdates in pore waters, dissolved Mo is suppressed, probably owing to equilibration with an Fe-Mo-S phase. This putative phase appears to control the aqueous ion product, Q = [Fe2+][MoS42-]0.6 [H2S0]0.4/[H+]0.8, at a value of 10-7.78. Concentrations of dissolved W and Mo in pore waters bear no relation to concentrations in surface waters of the same salinity. In surface waters, dissolved Mo is nearly conserved in the estuarine mixing zone. Dissolved W appears also to be conserved except for several cases where W may have been enhanced by exchange with underlying, W-rich pore waters. With increasing salinity, the molar Mo/W ratio rises from about 10 to about 1000 in surface waters whereas it is mostly <10 in underlying pore waters and in highly sulfidic pore waters is mostly near 1. Differences in two chemical properties may account for this fractionation of Mo with respect to

  6. How tides and river flows determine estuarine bathymetries [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, D.

    2004-04-01

    For strongly tidal, funnel-shaped estuaries, we examine how tides and river flows determine size and shape. We also consider how long it takes for bathymetric adjustment, both to determine whether present-day bathymetry reflects prevailing forcing and how rapidly changes might occur under future forcing scenarios. Starting with the assumption of a 'synchronous' estuary (i.e., where the sea surface slope resulting from the axial gradient in phase of tidal elevation significantly exceeds the gradient in tidal amplitude ζ̂), an expression is derived for the slope of the sea bed. Thence, by integration we derive expressions for the axial depth profile and estuarine length, L, as a function of ζ̂ and D, the prescribed depth at the mouth. Calculated values of L are broadly consistent with observations. The synchronous estuary approach enables a number of dynamical parameters to be directly calculated and conveniently illustrated as functions of ζ̂ and D, namely: current amplitude Û, ratio of friction to inertia terms, estuarine length, stratification, saline intrusion length, flushing time, mean suspended sediment concentration and sediment in-fill times. Four separate derivations for the length of saline intrusion, LI, all indicate a dependency on D 2/f ÛU o ( Uo is the residual river flow velocity and f is the bed friction coefficient). Likely bathymetries for `mixed' estuaries can be delineated by mapping, against ζ̂ and D, the conditions LI/ L<1, EX/ L<1 ( EX is the tidal excursion) alongside the Simpson-Hunter criteria D/ U3<50 m -2 s 3. This zone encompasses 24 out of 25 `randomly' selected UK estuaries. However, the length of saline intrusion in a funnel-shaped estuary is also sensitive to axial location. Observations suggest that this location corresponds to a minimum in landward intrusion of salt. By combining the derived expressions for L and LI with this latter criterion, an expression is derived relating Di, the depth at the centre of the intrusion

  7. Movements and residency of juvenile white steenbras Lithognathus lithognathus in a range of contrasting estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rhett H.; Cowley, Paul D.; Childs, Amber-Robyn; Næsje, Tor F.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to assess estuarine area use and movements of an overexploited, endemic fishery species in three South African estuaries; two permanently open systems with contrasting salinity gradients and an intermittently open system. Forty juvenile white steenbras Lithognathus lithognathus (215-379 mm FL) were surgically equipped with acoustic transmitters and tracked for up to 355 days. Tagged fish exhibited high levels of site fidelity and long-term residency within each estuary. Most of their time was spent in the lower reaches of all three estuaries and hypersalinity restricted movements into the upper reaches of the freshwater-deprived estuary. All tagged fish exhibited a distinct diel movement pattern. Most individuals (91%) in the two permanently open estuaries also exhibited a tidal-associated pattern, which comprised mainly small-scale (tens to hundreds of metres) transverse movements between deep channels and shallow banks. Observed behaviour was consistent across a range of estuary sizes, types and physico-chemical conditions. This study has identified critical habitats for juvenile white steenbras across a range of estuarine environments. Estuarine management initiatives need to consider these critical habitats, in order to enhance abundance of juveniles and ultimately recruitment to the marine (adult) population.

  8. Worldwide patterns of fish biodiversity in estuaries: Effect of global vs. local factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Vasconcelos, Rita P.; França, Susana; Henriques, Sofia; Costa, Maria José; Cabral, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    The main ecological patterns and the functioning of estuarine ecosystems are difficult to evaluate due to natural and human induced complexity and variability. Broad geographical approaches appear particularly useful. This study tested, at a worldwide scale, the influence of global and local variables in fish species richness in estuaries, aiming to determine the latitudinal pattern of species richness, and patterns which could be driven by local features such as estuary area, estuary mouth width, river flow and intertidal area. Seventy one estuarine systems were considered with data obtained from the literature and geographical information system. Correlation tests and generalized linear models (GLM) were used in data analyses. Species richness varied from 23 to 153 fish species. GLM results showed that estuary area was the most important factor explaining species richness, followed by latitude and mouth width. Species richness increased towards the equator, and higher values were found in larger estuaries and with a wide mouth. All these trends showed a high variability. A larger estuary area probably reflects a higher diversity of habitats and/or productivity, which are key features for estuarine ecosystem functioning and biota. The mouth width effect is particularly notorious for marine and diadromous fish species, enhancing connectivity between marine and freshwater realms. The effects of river flow and intertidal area on the fish species richness appear to be less evident. These two factors may have a marked influence in the trophic structure of fish assemblages.

  9. A classification of U.S. estuaries based on physical and hydrologic attributes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, V.D.; Kurtz, J.C.; Smith, L.M.; Chancy, C.; Bourgeois, P.

    2007-01-01

    A classification of U.S. estuaries is presented based on estuarine characteristics that have been identified as important for quantifying stressor-response relationships in coastal systems. Estuaries within a class have similar physical and hydrologic characteristics and would be expected to demonstrate similar biological responses to stressor loads from the adjacent watersheds. Nine classes of estuaries were identified by applying cluster analysis to a database for 138 U.S. estuarine drainage areas. The database included physical measures of estuarine areas, depth and volume, as well as hydrologic parameters (i.e., tide height, tidal prism volume, freshwater inflow rates, salinity, and temperature). The ability of an estuary to dilute or flush pollutants can be estimated using physical and hydrologic properties such as volume, bathymetry, freshwater inflow and tidal exchange rates which influence residence time and affect pollutant loading rates. Thus, physical and hydrologic characteristics can be used to estimate the susceptibility of estuaries to pollutant effects. This classification of estuaries can be used by natural resource managers to describe and inventory coastal systems, understand stressor impacts, predict which systems are most sensitive to stressors, and manage and protect coastal resources. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  10. Geographic signatures of North American West Coast estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, Robert; Llansó, Roberto; Newton, Jan; Thom, Ron; Hornberger, Michelle; Morgan, Cheryl; Levings, Colin; Copping, Andrea; Fishman, Paul

    2000-01-01

    West Coast estuaries are geologically young and composed of a variety of geomorphological types. These estuaries range from large fjords to shallow lagoons; from large to low freshwater flows. Natural hazards include E1 Niños, strong Pacific storms, and active tectonic activity. West Coast estuaries support a wide range of living resources: five salmon species, harvestable shellfish, waterfowl and marine birds, marine mammals, and a variety of algae and plants. Although populations of many of these living resources have declined (salmonids), others have increased (marine mammals). West Coast estuaries are also centers of commerce and increasingly large shipping traffic. The West Coast human population is rising faster than most other areas of the U.S. and Canada, and is distributed heavily in southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, around Puget Sound, and the Fraser River estuary. While water pollution is a problem in many of the urbanized estuaries, most estuaries do not suffer from poor water quality. Primary estuarine problems include habitat alterations, degradation, and loss; diverted freshwater flows; marine sediment contamination; and exotic species introductions. The growing West Coast economy and population are in part related to the quality of life, which is dependent on the use and enjoyment of abundant coastal natural resources.

  11. Understanding a Century of Change in an Estuary: Tampa Bay. Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, C. J.; Yates, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    During the 20th century, Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida changed from a largely pristine subtropical estuary to a busy waterway with commercial ports and extensive coastal urbanization. The estuary has been physically altered through dredging and construction and its biogeochemical, sedimentary and hydrological balances have been changed. Environmental indicators show that the health of the estuary has been significantly impacted. Long-term restoration and conservation efforts in the next decades will need to be made in the presence of sustained population expansion, increased use of water resources, developments of ports, bay-wide dredging, construction of pipelines, and increased large ship traffic. The Tampa Bay integrated modeling program has helped rationalize, and organize our understanding of the ways that the ecosystem has changed and we have simulated the bay as it was at the ends of the 19th and 20th centuries. This involves submodels of hydrodynamics, hydrology, wave climate, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes. A key element in this research is the recognition by the USGS Integrated Science Study that estuarine systems function as a dynamic interplay among biologic, geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and chemical processes. Integrated modeling also relies heavily on synthesis modeling of historical and modern data for the estuary and the Tampa Bay study has included a major collection program for physical data between 2004 and 2006. An important part of the integrated modeling program has been public outreach including training in the development of submodels by state agencies, universities and community groups. The present paper reviews the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Models with conclusions about some of the major anthropogenic impacts. Examples include restoration projects based on the predictions of submodels developed by local agencies for wetland habitats around the Bay and studies by port authorities using submodels of short

  12. Bedform signatures of channel erosion: examples from the Delaware and Hudson River estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerfield, C.; Klingbeil, A.; Walsh, D.

    2003-04-01

    Bedforms are the most ubiquitous and accessible indicators of sediment-transport conditions in river-estuaries and shed light on processes and patterns of deposition and erosion over large spatial scales. Results of recent observational studies in the Delaware and Hudson River estuaries (Mid-Atlantic Region U.S.A.) permit a provisional systemization of bedform morphologies associated with cohesive strata erosion in tidal channels. An understanding of mechanisms and scales of erosion is necessary to predict the long-term fate of pollutants buried within urbanized sections of these estuaries. Side-scan sonographs, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, and extensive sedimentological data collectively reveal at least two common signatures of channel erosion: (1) depositional bedforms, including flow-perpendicular, sand and gravel ribbons, and flow-parallel, sediment trails and furrows; and (2) sculpted forms, including cohesive sediment ripples and waves, scour depressions, and terraces. Although the ribbons and trails are created through bedload deposition, because these forms are observed only where the channels are deepening on the long term (as per historical bathymetric data), they are in fact manifestations of net erosion. Both depositional and sculpted bedforms exhibit marked cross-channel variations in distribution, presumably due to flood-ebb current asymmetry and transverse gradients in sediment transport. Additionally, sediment supply influences the along-channel continuity of depositional forms, which ranges from patchy (sediment limited) to continuous (sediment rich). Coring observations of sands and shell fragments in the vicinity of the sculpted forms suggest that abrasion is an agent of bed reworking. Indeed, these findings confirm that corrasion is an important mechanism of erosion in muddy estuarine channels, though this elusive process is generally not considered in models of channel morphodynamics. Bedforms are useful for recognizing channel

  13. Reversing circulation patterns in a tropical estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Bosley, Kathryn T.

    2003-10-01

    A combination of current velocity and water density measurements was used to characterize the basic patterns of water exchange in the Gulf of Fonseca, a tropical estuary on the Pacific Ocean side of Central America. The measurements were obtained during spring and neap tides in March (dry season) and June (wet season) of 2001 and consisted of profiles of current velocity and density along four transects. From mid-March to mid-April a time series of hourly surface current velocity maps was also obtained with a high-frequency radar system of two antennas. The sampling transects and the radar coverage concentrated in the portion of the estuary that has open communication with the ocean. During the dry season, water exchange at the entrance to the gulf suggested an inverse estuarine circulation that was more robust, and its dynamics were closer to geostrophy during neap than during spring tides. It is likely that salinity increased toward the tributaries of the system and then decreased within those tributaries because of the persistent influence of fresh water. In contrast, during the wet season, salinity decreased into the estuary, and the circulation resembled that of a typical estuary. In this season the fortnightly modulation of exchange flows was masked by wind effects, which also played a relevant role in the dynamics. The net volume inflows measured in both seasons suggested that the residence time of the Gulf of Fonseca varies from 2 weeks to 1 month.

  14. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY AND DRIVERS OF NET ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) is becoming a commonly used ecological indicator of estuarine ecosystem metabolic rates. Estuarine ecosystem processes are spatially and temporally variable, but the corresponding variability in NEM has not been properly assessed. Spatial and temp...

  15. Impact of frontal systems on estuarine sediment and pollutant dynamics.

    PubMed

    Duck, R W; Wewetzer, S F

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, a brief description of frontal systems, their modes of occurrence and impact on the estuarine environment, is presented. Previous studies of estuarine fronts have largely focused on the water surface and within the water column. New observations in the Tay Estuary, Scotland have shown that the presence of fronts within the water column may be marked, not only by surface foam bands, but also by abrupt (i.e. non-gradational) changes in the underlying bedform morphology and/or sediment facies, as detected using side-scan sonar. This preliminary evidence suggests that fronts may exert a control, not only on the surface and intra-water column sediment and pollutant partitioning, but also on the distribution and persistence of bedload transport pathways.

  16. Trace metals in sediments of a Mediterranean estuary affected by human activities (Acheloos river estuary, Greece).

    PubMed

    Dassenakis, M; Degaita, A; Scoullos, M

    1995-05-19

    Trace metals were studied in the sediments of the ecologically, economically and scientifically important estuary of the Acheloos river, in western Greece. Human activities (dams, agriculture, traffic, etc.) influence the estuarine system of Acheloos and in combination with the hydrological, mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the estuary affect the chemical behaviour and the distribution patterns of trace metals in its sediments. The large scale disturbance of the system is imminent in the near future as it is planned to divert approximately 50% of the river water. A study of the distribution patterns of trace metals revealed that in the estuary there are zones with different metal levels. The concentrations of most metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn) are elevated in three of these zones (upstream, sill, seawards). A different behaviour was observed for Mn due to its association with carbonates that were observed in significant concentrations throughout the estuarine zone. A sequential extraction procedure, applied to the sediments, indicated low percentages of easily exchangeable metals, increased mobility of Cu and Zn and increased association of Ni, Cr and Fe with the aluminosilicate lattice. Although the river is not considered to be heavily polluted, some metals have shown an enrichment in the surface sediments as a result of general anthropogenic activities not derived from point sources.

  17. Insights on the Optical Properties of Estuarine DOM – Hydrological and Biological Influences

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Luísa; Pinto, António; Filipe, Olga; Cunha, Ângela; Santos, Eduarda B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in estuaries derives from a diverse array of both allochthonous and autochthonous sources. In the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), the seasonality and the sources of the fraction of DOM that absorbs light (CDOM) were inferred using its optical and fluorescence properties. CDOM parameters known to be affected by aromaticity and molecular weight were correlated with physical, chemical and meteorological parameters. Two sites, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary, and with different hydrological characteristics, were regularly surveyed along two years, in order to determine the major influences on CDOM properties. Terrestrial-derived compounds are the predominant source of CDOM in the estuary during almost all the year and the two estuarine zones presented distinct amounts, as well as absorbance and fluorescence characteristics. Freshwater inputs have major influence on the dynamics of CDOM in the estuary, in particular at the brackish water zone, where accounted for approximately 60% of CDOM variability. With a lower magnitude, the biological productivity also impacted the optical properties of CDOM, explaining about 15% of its variability. Therefore, climate changes related to seasonal and inter-annual variations of the precipitation amounts might impact the dynamics of CDOM significantly, influencing its photochemistry and the microbiological activities in estuarine systems. PMID:27195702

  18. Quantitative relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition for mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.F.; Hale, S.S.; Comeleo, R.L.; Copeland, J.; August, P.V.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot project has been conducted that developed quantitative relationships between watershed-scale (landscape) stressors and sediment contamination for sub-estuaries within Chesapeake Bay. The landscape stressors, land use patterns (derived from classified, contemporary satellite imagery) and point source pollution, were spatially analyzed for each individual watershed of 25 sub-estuaries using a geographic information system. Sediment contamination data for the sub-estuaries, available from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), were statistically reduced to one principal component for the metals and organics. Non-parametric statistical techniques were used to develop empirical relationships between sediment contamination and developed land (positive), herbaceous land (negative) and point source loadings (positive). These analyses have been extended to (1) include approximately 80 subestuaries across the mid-Atlantic region for which EMAP data were available, and (2) relate landscape stressors with estuarine condition. The measure of estuarine condition was an index of benthic quality developed by EMAP. The only available land use data set for the entire mid-Atlantic region was from US Geological Survey Land Use Data Analysis database, which is of 1970s vintage. Because of the dramatic differences in spatial area of the sub-estuaries in the mid-Atlantic region, adjustments for differing hydrologic regimes had to be factored into the analysis. Results indicate that it is possible to develop relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition across large geographic regions.

  19. Insights on the Optical Properties of Estuarine DOM - Hydrological and Biological Influences.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luísa; Pinto, António; Filipe, Olga; Cunha, Ângela; Santos, Eduarda B H; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in estuaries derives from a diverse array of both allochthonous and autochthonous sources. In the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), the seasonality and the sources of the fraction of DOM that absorbs light (CDOM) were inferred using its optical and fluorescence properties. CDOM parameters known to be affected by aromaticity and molecular weight were correlated with physical, chemical and meteorological parameters. Two sites, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary, and with different hydrological characteristics, were regularly surveyed along two years, in order to determine the major influences on CDOM properties. Terrestrial-derived compounds are the predominant source of CDOM in the estuary during almost all the year and the two estuarine zones presented distinct amounts, as well as absorbance and fluorescence characteristics. Freshwater inputs have major influence on the dynamics of CDOM in the estuary, in particular at the brackish water zone, where accounted for approximately 60% of CDOM variability. With a lower magnitude, the biological productivity also impacted the optical properties of CDOM, explaining about 15% of its variability. Therefore, climate changes related to seasonal and inter-annual variations of the precipitation amounts might impact the dynamics of CDOM significantly, influencing its photochemistry and the microbiological activities in estuarine systems. PMID:27195702

  20. Biogeography of dinoflagellate cysts in northwest Atlantic estuaries.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrea M; Pospelova, Vera; Coffin, Michael R S; Latimer, James S; Chmura, Gail L

    2016-08-01

    Few biogeographic studies of dinoflagellate cysts include the near-shore estuarine environment. We determine the effect of estuary type, biogeography, and water quality on the spatial distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from the Northeast USA (Maine to Delaware) and Canada (Prince Edward Island). A total of 69 surface sediment samples were collected from 27 estuaries, from sites with surface salinities >20. Dinoflagellate cysts were examined microscopically and compared to environmental parameters using multivariate ordination techniques. The spatial distribution of cyst taxa reflects biogeographic provinces established by other marine organisms, with Cape Cod separating the northern Acadian Province from the southern Virginian Province. Species such as Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Polysphaeridinium zoharyi were found almost exclusively in the Virginian Province, while others such as Dubridinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare were more abundant in the Acadian Province. Tidal range, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS) are statistically significant parameters influencing cyst assemblages. Samples from the same type of estuary cluster together in canonical correspondence analysis when the estuaries are within the same biogeographic province. The large geographic extent of this study, encompassing four main estuary types (riverine, lagoon, coastal embayment, and fjord), allowed us to determine that the type of estuary has an important influence on cyst assemblages. Due to greater seasonal variations in SSTs and SSSs in estuaries compared to the open ocean, cyst assemblages show distinct latitudinal trends. The estuarine context is important for understanding present-day species distribution, the factors controlling them, and to better predict how they may change in the future. PMID:27547344

  1. Biogeography of dinoflagellate cysts in northwest Atlantic estuaries.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrea M; Pospelova, Vera; Coffin, Michael R S; Latimer, James S; Chmura, Gail L

    2016-08-01

    Few biogeographic studies of dinoflagellate cysts include the near-shore estuarine environment. We determine the effect of estuary type, biogeography, and water quality on the spatial distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from the Northeast USA (Maine to Delaware) and Canada (Prince Edward Island). A total of 69 surface sediment samples were collected from 27 estuaries, from sites with surface salinities >20. Dinoflagellate cysts were examined microscopically and compared to environmental parameters using multivariate ordination techniques. The spatial distribution of cyst taxa reflects biogeographic provinces established by other marine organisms, with Cape Cod separating the northern Acadian Province from the southern Virginian Province. Species such as Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Polysphaeridinium zoharyi were found almost exclusively in the Virginian Province, while others such as Dubridinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare were more abundant in the Acadian Province. Tidal range, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS) are statistically significant parameters influencing cyst assemblages. Samples from the same type of estuary cluster together in canonical correspondence analysis when the estuaries are within the same biogeographic province. The large geographic extent of this study, encompassing four main estuary types (riverine, lagoon, coastal embayment, and fjord), allowed us to determine that the type of estuary has an important influence on cyst assemblages. Due to greater seasonal variations in SSTs and SSSs in estuaries compared to the open ocean, cyst assemblages show distinct latitudinal trends. The estuarine context is important for understanding present-day species distribution, the factors controlling them, and to better predict how they may change in the future.

  2. A geohydrologic continuum theory for the spatial and temporal evolution of marsh-estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, R.; Childers, D.; Koepfler, E.

    Using ecosystem development theory and the River Continuum Concept as starting points, we present a new holistic theory to explain the spatial and temporal behaviour of marsh-estuarine ecosystems Along the marine-estuarine-freshwater gradient in response to sea-level rise. In this theory, a geohydrologic continuum represented by tidal channel provides a predictable physical model of how the marsh-estuarine ecosystem adapts until there is a change of state. North Inlet, South Carolina is used as an example of this marsh-estuarine continuum. Mature creeks are at the ocean-estuary interface and are strongly influenced by marine factors. Further into the estuary, less and less mature creeks are encountered which are dominated by smaller scale spatial and temporal controls such as oyster reefs. Immature or ephemeral creeks import both particulate and dissolved materials, while mature creeks export both forms of nutrients. Mid-aged creeks appear to take up particulate materials and release dissolved constituents. Ultimately, the continuum reaches the fresh-saltwater interface where a very young estuarine ecosystem invades a more mature type, under the influence of disturbance. Our new explanation satisfies most criteria for a good theory by being internally consistent to the location specified, generating testable hypothesis, not blindly adapting existing theories, agreeing with known properties of the ecosystem described and by generating new invigorating discussion within the scientific community.

  3. Spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton (Chlorophyll-a) in relation to salinity, suspended sediment concentration, and light intensity in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhikodan, Gubash; Yokoyama, Katsuhide

    2016-09-01

    The influences of environmental gradients on the spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton (Chlorophyll-a) in the macrotidal Chikugo River Estuary were studied during a two-week period of September 2010. Vertical profiles of salinity, turbidity, and light intensity were measured at 18 stations separated by a 1-km interval. Water samples for the determination of suspended sediment concentration (SSC), concentration of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Pheophytin-a (Pheo-a) were collected from the surface layer at all stations. The estuarine water column was vertically well mixed with high SSC (100-2000 mg L-1) during spring tide and the photic depth (zp) was less than 0.2 m. The mixing depth (zm) was more than 10 times the photic depth for the major part of the estuary. The estuary gradually changed to partially mixed with decrease in SSC (≤400 mg L-1) during the intermediate tide. The estuary became stratified with low SSC (20-50 mg L-1) during neap tide and the zp reached 4 m. The zm was less than 0.5 times the zp for the whole estuary. Light attenuation was dominated by SSC and the zp varied according to semidiurnal and semilunar tidal cycle. The zp: zm ratio did not show any relationship with Chl-a in the Chikugo river estuary. This is because the Chl-a concentration reached maximum two to three days after the neap tide. The peak concentration of Chl-a was located near the low salinity region and that of Pheo-a was located in the Estuarine Turbidity Maximum (ETM) zone. The Pheo-a concentration reached maximum during the spring tide. A good relation between zp: zm ratio and Pheo-a indicates that the increase in Pheo-a was caused by the light limitation due to suspended sediment and the responses of the Pheo-a on the light condition was instantaneous. These phenomena were remarkably found in the interface between freshwater and saltwater. Light availability driven by mixing and ETM process during semidiurnal and semilunar tidal cycle is the controlling factor of the

  4. Estuarine fine-particle budget determined from radionuclide tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Cutshall, N.H.; Larsen, I.L.; Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Bopp, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The sedimentary distributions of radiocesium and plutonium have been used to determine patterns of fine-particle accumulation, estimate net sediment fluxes from different sources, and develop a fine-particle budget for the Hudson-Raritan estuary. It is proposed that the rates and patterns of fine-particle accumulation reflect a sediment surface in dynamic equilibrium with the wave and current regimes. Rates of accumulation in most estuarine areas appear to equal the rate of sea-level rise or land subsidence. Localized areas, which have not yet attained or are presently out of equilibrium, serve as fine particle traps. 13 references, 1 table.

  5. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  6. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  7. Turbidity and sediment transport in a muddy sub-estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.; Stephens, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Sub-estuaries, i.e. tidal creeks and also larger estuaries that branch off the stem of their main estuary, are commonplace in many estuarine systems. Their physical behaviour is affected not only by tributary inflows, winds and tides, but also by the properties and behaviour of their main estuary. Measurements extending over more than an annual cycle are presented for the Tavy Estuary, a sub-estuary of the Tamar Estuary, UK. Generally, waves are small in the Tavy because of the short wind fetch. A several-hour period of up-estuary winds, blowing at speeds of between 7 and 10 m s -1, generates waves with significant wave heights of 0.25 m and a wave periodicity of 1.7 s that are capable of eroding the bed over the shallow, ca. 1.5 m-deep mudflats. Waves also influence sedimentation within and near salt marsh areas. An estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) occurs in the Tavy's main channel, close to the limit of salt intrusion at HW. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations typically are less than 40 mg l -1 at HW, although concentrations can exceed 80 mg l -1 when tides and winds are strong. Flood-tide SPM inputs to the Tavy from the Tamar are greater during high runoff events in the River Tamar and also at spring tides, when the Tamar has a high-concentration ETM. Higher SPM concentrations are experienced on the mudflats following initial inundation. Without wave resuspension, this is followed by a rapid decrease in SPM for most of the tide, indicating that the mudflats are depositional at those times. SPM concentrations on the mudflats again increase sharply prior to uncovering. Peak ebb tidal speeds at 0.15 m above the mudflat bed can exceed 0.26 m s -1 at spring tides and 0.4 m s -1 following high runoff events, which are sufficient to cause resuspension. Time-series measurements of sediment bed levels show strong seasonal variability. Higher and lower freshwater flows are associated with estimated, monthly-mean sediment transport that is directed out of

  8. Estuarine Total Ecosystem Metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total ecosystem metabolism (TEM), both as discrete measurements and as a theoretical concept, has an important history in ecosystem ecology, particularly in estuaries. Some of the earliest ecological studies were developed to determine how energy flowed through an ecosystem and w...

  9. Building Regional Threat-Based Networks for Estuaries in the Western United States

    PubMed Central

    Merrifield, Matthew S.; Hines, Ellen; Liu, Xiaohang; Beck, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries are ecologically and economically valuable and have been highly degraded from both land and sea. Estuarine habitats in the coastal zone are under pressure from a range of human activities. In the United States and elsewhere, very few conservation plans focused on estuaries are regional in scope; fewer still address threats to estuary long term viability.We have compiled basic information about the spatial extent of threats to identify commonalities. To do this we classify estuaries into hierarchical networks that share similar threat characteristics using a spatial database (geodatabase) of threats to estuaries from land and sea in the western U.S.Our results show that very few estuaries in this region (16%) have no or minimal stresses from anthropogenic activity. Additionally, one quarter (25%) of all estuaries in this study have moderate levels of all threats. The small number of un-threatened estuaries is likely not representative of the ecological variability in the region and will require working to abate threats at others. We think the identification of these estuary groups can foster sharing best practices and coordination of conservation activities amongst estuaries in any geography. PMID:21387006

  10. COHORT STUDIES OF HEALTH EFFECTS AMONG PEOPLE EXPOSED TO ESTUARINE WATERS: NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, AND MARYLAND. (R827084)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of human symptoms have been associated with exposure to the dinoflagellate
    Pfiesteria and have been grouped together into a syndrome termed "possible estuary-associated
    syndrome," Prospective cohort studies of health effects associated with exposure to estuarine w...

  11. Flora and ecological profile of native and exotic estuarine wetland vegetation by hydrogeomorphic setting at Rush Ranch, Suisun Marsh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The manuscript includes a profile of the ecology and distribution of estuarine wetland vegetation at the Rush Ranch reserve site in the brackish Suisun Marsh reach of San Francisco Estuary The data and analyses will serve as a baseline for future scientific research and conservation management. A ...

  12. Linking terrestrial and estuarine ecosystems: Organic matter sources supporting the high secondary production of a non-indigenous bivalve

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most pervasive species in freshwater ecosystems. Our objective was to characterize the trophic interactions of C. fluminea in the Minho river estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe), an estuarine ecosystem in which C. fluminea presen...

  13. Influence of bathymetry on hydrography and circulation at the region between an estuary mouth and the adjacent continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2012-06-01

    Bathymetry effects on the flow field at the transition between idealized estuaries and the adjacent ocean are studied with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Estuary width, depth, and channel direction at the shelf are used to determine flow characteristics in and out of an idealized estuary. The idealized estuary connects to an upstream boundary, where freshwater discharges, and an offshore tidal boundary. Tidally averaged salinity and flow structures are examined at the estuary mouth. A recirculation feature directly affects flow at the estuary mouth, especially in shallow and wide estuarine systems. The recirculation retards the exchange flow near the edges of the estuary mouth and consequently allows strengthening of the flow in the middle. The geometric shape of the estuarine channel affects the strength of the residual flow at the estuary mouth. The presence of an extended submarine channel on the shelf enhances the baroclinic circulation and stratification, and maximizes the salinity intrusion length without additional external forces. The direction of this submarine channel affects the exchange flow structures at the estuary/ocean transition zone in such a way that the salinity intrusion length increases with a left-turning channel (in the Kelvin wave sense of the fresh water flow direction). This is attributed to the competition between centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Flow characteristics described by the Kelvin and Ekman number, which outline channel geometric effects, are similar to previous studies.

  14. Flux of Total Mercury and Methylmercury to the Northern Gulf of Mexico from U.S. Estuaries.

    PubMed

    Buck, Clifton S; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Bowman, Katlin L; Gill, Gary A; Landing, William M

    2015-12-15

    To better understand the source of elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) fish, we quantified fluxes of total Hg and MeHg from 11 rivers in the southeastern United States, including the 10 largest rivers discharging to the GOM. Filtered water and suspended particles were collected across estuarine salinity gradients in Spring and Fall 2012 to estimate fluxes from rivers to estuaries and from estuaries to coastal waters. Fluxes of total Hg and MeHg from rivers to estuaries varied as much as 100-fold among rivers. The Mississippi River accounted for 59% of the total Hg flux and 49% of the fluvial MeHg flux into GOM estuaries. While some estuaries were sources of Hg, the combined estimated fluxes of total Hg (~5200 mol y(-1)) and MeHg (~120 mol y(-1)) from the estuaries to the GOM were less than those from rivers to estuaries, suggesting an overall estuarine sink. Fluxes of total Hg from the estuaries to coastal waters of the northern GOM are approximately an order of magnitude less than from atmospheric deposition. However, fluxes from rivers are significant sources of MeHg to estuaries and coastal regions of the northern GOM. PMID:26505206

  15. Flux of Total Mercury and Methylmercury to the Northern Gulf of Mexico from U.S. Estuaries.

    PubMed

    Buck, Clifton S; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Bowman, Katlin L; Gill, Gary A; Landing, William M

    2015-12-15

    To better understand the source of elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) fish, we quantified fluxes of total Hg and MeHg from 11 rivers in the southeastern United States, including the 10 largest rivers discharging to the GOM. Filtered water and suspended particles were collected across estuarine salinity gradients in Spring and Fall 2012 to estimate fluxes from rivers to estuaries and from estuaries to coastal waters. Fluxes of total Hg and MeHg from rivers to estuaries varied as much as 100-fold among rivers. The Mississippi River accounted for 59% of the total Hg flux and 49% of the fluvial MeHg flux into GOM estuaries. While some estuaries were sources of Hg, the combined estimated fluxes of total Hg (~5200 mol y(-1)) and MeHg (~120 mol y(-1)) from the estuaries to the GOM were less than those from rivers to estuaries, suggesting an overall estuarine sink. Fluxes of total Hg from the estuaries to coastal waters of the northern GOM are approximately an order of magnitude less than from atmospheric deposition. However, fluxes from rivers are significant sources of MeHg to estuaries and coastal regions of the northern GOM.

  16. Introduction to Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries, although minor geographical features at the global scale, have major importance for society and the world’s economies. This chapter introduces estuaries by presenting an overview of definitions, origins, physical, chemical and ecological attributes, and the interaction...

  17. YAQUINA ESTUARY NUTRIENT CRITERIA CASE STUDY: GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING NUTRIENT CRITERIA IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an introduction to the Yaquina Estuary Nutrient Case Study which includes considerations for development of estuarine nutrient criteria in the Pacific Northwest. As part of this effort, a database of historic and recent data has been assembled consistin...

  18. Effects of climate change on temperature and salinity in the Yaquina Estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study to examine the effect of climate change (CC) on estuarine resources, we simulated the effect of rising sea level, alterations in river discharge, and increasing atmospheric temperatures on water properties in estuaries along the Pacific coast of the Unit...

  19. Relation between inherent optical properties and land use and land cover across Gulf Coast estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land use and land cover (LULC) can affect the watershed exports of optically active constituents such as suspended particulate matter and colored dissolved organic matter, and in turn affect estuarine optical properties. We collected optical data from six estuaries in the northea...

  20. SWMPr: An R Package for Retrieving, Organizing, and Analyzing Environmental Data for Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The System-Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) was implemented in 1995 by the US National Estuarine Research Reserve System. This program has provided two decades of continuous monitoring data at over 140 fixed stations in 28 estuaries. However, the increasing quantity of data provide...

  1. Sea-level Rise Impacts on Oregon Estuaries: Biology and Hydrology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries are transitional ecosystems located at the margin of the land and ocean and as a result they are particularly sensitive to sea level rise and other climate drivers. In this presentation, we summarize the potential impacts of sea level rise on key estuarine habitats inc...

  2. Sea-level Rise Impacts on Oregon Estuaries: Biology and Hydrology - for posting on website

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries are transitional ecosystems located at the margin of the land and ocean and as a result they are particularly sensitive to sea level rise and other climate drivers. In this presentation, we summarize the potential impacts of sea level rise on key estuarine habitats incl...

  3. MODELING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHRIMP MARICULTURE AND WATER QUALITY IN THE RIO CHONE ESTUARY, ECUADOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Rio Chone estuary in Ecuador has been heavily altered by the conversion of over 90% of the original mangrove forest to shrimp ponds. We carried out computational experiments using both hydrodynamic and shrimp pond models to investigate factors leading to declines in estuarine...

  4. Padilla Bay: The Estuary Guide. Level 1. Publication No. 93-108.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Judy

    Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Washington is managed by the Washington State Department of Ecology, Shorelands and Coastal Zone management Program. This guide is designed for primary teachers to complement a visit to the reserve and is a useful resource to teach about estuaries, shorelands, and coastal resources. Activities are…

  5. Intertidal Eelgrass Response to Benthic Macroalgal Accumulation in a Pacific Northwest Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    High accumulations of benthic macroalgae from excessive nutrient inputs to estuaries is commonly cited as a major cause of seagrass decline. Two measures of macroalgal abundance, biomass and percent cover, have been used in an assessment framework for estuarine condition propose...

  6. Functional diversity in European estuaries: Relating the composition of fish assemblages to the abiotic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, D.; Lobry, J.; Le Pape, O.; Boët, P.

    2010-07-01

    Based on a large standardised data set, the present study proposed a meta-analysis to describe general patterns in the functional diversity of estuarine fish assemblage in terms of both number of species and density along the European Atlantic coast. Fish species collected from 31 European estuaries from Portugal to Scotland were allocated to functional groups according to their ecological utilization of estuaries. A clustering analysis was performed to compare the overall functional structure of estuaries based on fish composition. Generalised linear models were computed to identify relationships between large-scale abiotic and intra-estuarine descriptors and functional attributes of estuarine fish assemblages. The total number of species, and more especially of marine species, was higher in larger estuaries with a wide entrance and, locally, in polyhaline waters. The total density was mainly related to the proportion of intertidal mudflats and, locally, was greater in mesohaline waters. In terms of relative density, northern systems were dominated by marine and catadromous species, while estuarine species were prevalent in the southern ones.

  7. CONDITION OF ESTUARIES AND BAYS OF HAWAII FOR 2002: A STATISTICAL SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Assessment (NCA) of US EPA conducted the first probabilistic assessment of the condition of estuarine resources of the main islands of Hawaii in 2002. The study provided condition estimates for both the estuaries and bays of the Hawaiian Island chain, as wel...

  8. Land-use/land-cover drives variation in the specific inherent optical properties of estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in land-use/land-cover (LULC) can impact the exports of optically and biogeochemically active constituents to estuaries. Specific inherent optical properties (SIOPs) of estuarine optically active constituents (OACs) are directly related to the composition of the OACs, and...

  9. Ecology of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina: an estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, B.J.; Hodson, R.G.; Riggs, S.R.; Easley, J.E. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Albemarle Sound, a large oligohaline estuary in northeastern North Carloina, constitutes a significant portion of North Carolina's coastal system. It is shallow, wind dominated, and strongly influenced by freshwater inflow. These conditions, combined with limited oceanic access and exchange, maintain fresh- to brackish water conditions throughout most of the estuary during the year. The nekton are the most well-known biological component of this extensive estuarine system. Albemarle Sound is an important nursery area for a number of anadromous and migratory fish as well as the blue crab and supports fisheries for many of these species. Other biological components (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and benthos) in the estuary are less well studied. Declining fisheries, algal blooms in freshwater tributaries, and changing patterns of land and water use are among the critical issues facing managers of Albemarle Sound. This report discusses current steps being taken toward holistic management and provides a state-of-the-art information base and ecological synthesis of the estuary and its watershed. 89 references, 50 figures, 19 tables.

  10. Benthic infaunal community structuring in an acidified tropical estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that increasing ocean acidification (OA) should have strong direct and indirect influences on marine invertebrates. While most theory and application for OA is based on relatively physically-stable oceanic ecological systems, less is known about the effects of acidification on nearshore and estuarine systems. Here, we investigated the structuring of a benthic infaunal community in a tropical estuarine system, along a steep salinity and pH gradient, arising largely from acid-sulphate groundwater inflows (Sungai Brunei Estuary, Borneo, July 2011- June 2012). Results Preliminary data indicate that sediment pore-water salinity (range: 8.07 - 29.6 psu) declined towards the mainland in correspondence with the above-sediment estuarine water salinity (range: 3.58 – 31.2 psu), whereas the pore-water pH (range: 6.47- 7.72) was generally lower and less variable than the estuarine water pH (range: 5.78- 8.3), along the estuary. Of the thirty six species (taxa) recorded, the polychaetes Neanthes sp., Onuphis conchylega, Nereididae sp. and the amphipod Corophiidae sp., were numerically dominant. Calcified microcrustaceans (e.g., Cyclopoida sp. and Corophiidae sp.) were abundant at all stations and there was no clear distinction in distribution pattern along the estuarine between calcified and non-calcified groups. Species richness increased seawards, though abundance (density) showed no distinct directional trend. Diversity indices were generally positively correlated (Spearman’s rank correlation) with salinity and pH (p <0.05) and negatively with clay and organic matter, except for evenness values (p >0.05). Three faunistic assemblages were distinguished: (1) nereid-cyclopoid-sabellid, (2) corophiid-capitellid and (3) onuphid- nereid-capitellid. These respectively associated with lower salinity/pH and a muddy bottom, low salinity/pH and a sandy bottom, and high salinity/pH and a sandy bottom. However, CCA suggested that species distribution

  11. Estuaries as nurseries for the jacks Caranx ignobilis and Caranx melampygus (Carangidae) in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.C.; Parrish, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Estuaries provide juvenile nursery habitat for many species of fish that inhabit marine environments as adults. In Hawaii, some juvenile Caranx ignobilis and Caranx melampygus occupy estuaries opportunistically before moving to nearshore ocean habitats. This study examined the extent and nature of estuarine habitat available in the lower Hanalei River of Kauai, the relative abundance and distribution of jacks in the estuary, and their diets. Salinity measurements indicated that the upstream extent of saltwater ranged from the mouth to nearly 5 km upriver and was strongly influenced by the variable river discharge. Juvenile jacks between 80 and 310 mm FL were observed on underwater transects over the full range of mixohaline conditions. Hand-operated seine collections produced overall catch rates of ???0.64 fish/haul for each of these species. The two jacks ate much the same spectrum of food items. C. ignobilis was somewhat more piscivorous than C. melampygus, as determined by measures of frequency of predation and number and bulk of prey. Data for length at age, incorporating daily otolith increment counts from these estuarine juveniles and previous counts from non-estuarine specimens, were fitted to a lifetime von Bertalanffy growth model. The results greatly extended the age range of the model and suggested that growth rates were not much different between estuarine and non-estuarine fish. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Estuaries as Nurseries for the Jacks Caranx ignobilis and Caranx melampygus (Carangidae) in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. C.; Parrish, J. D.

    2002-09-01

    Estuaries provide juvenile nursery habitat for many species of fish that inhabit marine environments as adults. In Hawaii, some juvenile Caranx ignobilis and Caranx melampygus occupy estuaries opportunistically before moving to nearshore ocean habitats. This study examined the extent and nature of estuarine habitat available in the lower Hanalei River of Kauai, the relative abundance and distribution of jacks in the estuary, and their diets. Salinity measurements indicated that the upstream extent of saltwater ranged from the mouth to nearly 5 km upriver and was strongly influenced by the variable river discharge. Juvenile jacks between 80 and 310 mm FL were observed on underwater transects over the full range of mixohaline conditions. Hand-operated seine collections produced overall catch rates of ∼0·64 fish/haul for each of these species. The two jacks ate much the same spectrum of food items. C. ignobilis was somewhat more piscivorous than C. melampygus, as determined by measures of frequency of predation and number and bulk of prey. Data for length at age, incorporating daily otolith increment counts from these estuarine juveniles and previous counts from non-estuarine specimens, were fitted to a lifetime von Bertalanffy growth model. The results greatly extended the age range of the model and suggested that growth rates were not much different between estuarine and non-estuarine fish.

  13. Impacts of Climate Change on Estuarine Habitats in the UK: Critical Evaluation of the Saltmarshes and Sea-Level Rise Model (SLAMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylarinou, A.; French, J.; Burningham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Estuarine wetland environments are at risk of significant transformation and loss due to sea-level rise and there is an increasing need to model such impacts. In a UK context, the relatively small size and morphological complexity of many estuaries necessitates a high spatial resolution but models must also be capable of efficient application over time scales of decades to centuries that correspond to widely used IPCC climate change scenarios. Little previous work of this kind has been carried out to date in the UK. An exception is the EU-funded BRANCH project, which simulated the drowning of intertidal topography, due to sea-level rise, and potential mudflat and saltmarsh responses to a change in inundation regime. However, this approach neglects the interplay of sea-level rise and sedimentation. Accordingly, this study investigates the potential of a more dynamic spatial landscape model to represent meso-scale impacts of sea-level rise on UK estuary environments. It takes as a starting point the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which has been widely used in the USA. This is built around the US National Wetlands Inventory classification and adapting it to suit the tidal sedimentary environments and habitats typical of the UK requires changes to the source code. This paper presents results obtained from the application of an appropriately modified SLAMM code to contrasting estuarine environments in eastern England. The aim is to evaluate the ability of SLAMM to produce plausible projections of intertidal habitat change. The estuaries studied are covered by high-resolution altimetry data, and an extensive literature on their physical process regime allows the parameterisation of the various sub-models in SLAMM. A Matlab-based shell is used to perform an initial sensitivity analysis to better understand the nature of the modelled sea-level rise effects. This shell also provides a framework for Monte Carlo simulations forced by a set of UKCP09 sea-level rise

  14. The Past and Present of an Estuarine-Resident Fish, the “Four-Eyed Fish” Anableps anableps (Cyprinodontiformes, Anablepidae), Revealed by mtDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Iracilda

    2014-01-01

    Historical events, such as changes in sea level during the Pleistocene glacial cycles, had a strong impact on coastal habitats, limiting connectivity and promoting the genetic divergence of various species. In this study, we evaluated the influence of climate oscillations and the possibility of estuary function as a barrier to gene flow among populations of the four-eyed fish, Anableps anableps. This species is fully estuarine-resident, has internal fertilization, is viviparous and does not migrate across long distances. These features make the four-eyed fish an excellent model for the study of evolutionary processes related to genetic differentiation of species and populations in estuaries. The evolutionary history of A. anableps was inferred from phylogeographic and population analyses using sequences of the mitochondrial DNA Control Region of 13 populations distributed in the Amazon and Northeast Coast of Brazil from Calcoene (Amapa) to Parnaiba (Piaui). The 83 retrieved haplotypes show a pattern of four distinct mitochondrial lineages, with up to 3.4% nucleotide divergence among them. The evolutionary reconstruction suggests that these lineages diverged recently in the late Pleistocene/early Holocene after the Atlantic Ocean reaching current levels. Analysis of variability, neutrality and the genetic expansion pattern revealed that the lineages have distinct characteristics, which were shaped by the different geomorphological features of coastal regions combined with sea level oscillations over a very long period of time. Only few neighboring populations show a discreet gene flow. This study may also be helpful for designing new experiments to better understand the geomorphological evolutionary history of the estuaries of the Amazon and the Northeast Coast of Brazil using estuarine-resident species as a model. PMID:25003185

  15. A Numerical Study of Local Variations in Tidal Regime of Tagus Estuary, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Dias, João Miguel; Valentim, Juliana Marques; Sousa, Magda Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Tidal dynamics of shallow estuaries and lagoons is a complex matter that has attracted the attention of a large number of researchers over the last few decades. The main purpose of the present work is to study the intricate tidal dynamics of the Tagus estuary, which states as the largest estuary of the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most important wetlands in Portugal and Europe. Tagus has large areas of low depth and a remarkable geomorphology, both determining the complex propagation of tidal waves along the estuary of unknown manner. A non-linear two-dimensional vertically integrated hydrodynamic model was considered to be adequate to simulate its hydrodynamics and an application developed from the SIMSYS2D model was applied to study the tidal propagation along the estuary. The implementation and calibration of this model revealed its accuracy to predict tidal properties along the entire system. Several model runs enabled the analysis of the local variations in tidal dynamics, through the interpretation of amplitude and phase patterns of the main tidal constituents, tidal asymmetry, tidal ellipses, form factor and tidal dissipation. Results show that Tagus estuary tidal dynamics is extremely dependent on an estuarine resonance mode for the semi-diurnal constituents that induce important tidal characteristics. Besides, the estuarine coastline features and topography determines the changes in tidal propagation along the estuary, which therefore result essentially from a balance between convergence/divergence and friction and advection effects, besides the resonance effects. PMID:24312474

  16. A numerical study of local variations in tidal regime of Tagus estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Miguel; Valentim, Juliana Marques; Sousa, Magda Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Tidal dynamics of shallow estuaries and lagoons is a complex matter that has attracted the attention of a large number of researchers over the last few decades. The main purpose of the present work is to study the intricate tidal dynamics of the Tagus estuary, which states as the largest estuary of the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most important wetlands in Portugal and Europe. Tagus has large areas of low depth and a remarkable geomorphology, both determining the complex propagation of tidal waves along the estuary of unknown manner. A non-linear two-dimensional vertically integrated hydrodynamic model was considered to be adequate to simulate its hydrodynamics and an application developed from the SIMSYS2D model was applied to study the tidal propagation along the estuary. The implementation and calibration of this model revealed its accuracy to predict tidal properties along the entire system. Several model runs enabled the analysis of the local variations in tidal dynamics, through the interpretation of amplitude and phase patterns of the main tidal constituents, tidal asymmetry, tidal ellipses, form factor and tidal dissipation. Results show that Tagus estuary tidal dynamics is extremely dependent on an estuarine resonance mode for the semi-diurnal constituents that induce important tidal characteristics. Besides, the estuarine coastline features and topography determines the changes in tidal propagation along the estuary, which therefore result essentially from a balance between convergence/divergence and friction and advection effects, besides the resonance effects. PMID:24312474

  17. Trace element contamination in the estuarine sediments along Tuticorin coast--Gulf of Mannar, southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Magesh, N S; Chandrasekar, N; Krishna Kumar, S; Glory, M

    2013-08-15

    Sediment samples were collected from Kallar, Korampallam creek and Punnakayal estuaries of Tuticorin coast for assessing the level of contamination by trace elements in these estuarine sediments. The trace element concentration, calcium carbonate, organic carbon and mercury level were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer, Titrimetric method and SnCl2 reduction method. The results reveals that the enrichment factor, metal pollution index and geo-accumulation index of these estuarine sediments were predominantly polluted by Cd, As, Zn, Hg and Pb. The factor analysis revealed the source of trace element accumulation in the estuarine sediments particularly Mn and Fe are from riverine inputs and As and Hg from untreated industrial effluents. Among the selected estuaries, Korampallam creek was found to be highly contaminated by trace elements due to the discharge of effluents from thermal power plant, Tuticorin alkali chemicals, copper smelting, Petrochemical industries and shipping activities.

  18. Ma'adim Vallis Estuarine Delta in Elysium Basin and Its Relevance as a Landing Site for Exobiology Exploration on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    The debouche of Ma'adim Vallis in the Elysium Basin generated a transitional transported sediment structure, which planimetric shape is controlled by the enclosing topography of a deep reentrant gulf of the Basin into the highland. We defined it as an estuarine delta. The location and the importance of this estuarine delta is supported by the theoretical model of graded profile constructed for Ma'adim Vallis, and by two approaches: (i) the reconstruction of Ma'adim Vallis downstream course from Gusev to Elysium Basin, and (ii) the survey of the sediment deposit in the alleged estuary. The longitudinal graded profile of Ma'adim Vallis finds its base-level in the Elysium Basin, at a about 1000 m elevation, which is in agreement with the observed Basin shoreline. This model is supported by observational evidence of flow between the northern rim of Gusev crater, and the Elysium Basin shoreline. This downstream course of Ma'adim Vallis can be divided into three hydrogeologic regions. into three hydrogeologic regions. (a) The first region is a flooded plain (Zephiria Mensae), consisting in chaotic terrain formed by highland rocks, and disintegrated lava of the western flank of Apollinaris. Morphologic indicators of the flood process are: (1) the sediment deposit over the Gusev crater northern rim that reflects the overspilling of the crater-lake water through a 40-km wide gap provided by an ancient impact crater, (2) the tear-drop shaped feature on the northeastern flank of Apollinaris Patera, and (3) the chaotic terrain that suggest the emergence of ground water generated by the seepage of the crater lake through high-permeable broken rampart material. This underground water circulation sustained by the hydrostatic pressure of the crater-lake has likely generated a hydrothermal system in the volcanic environment of Apollinaris Patera. The stratigraphy of the flooded area is identified as Hesperian age, with occurrences of Noachian hilly individual features, and as

  19. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith Marcoe

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  20. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Geomorphic Catena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  1. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Hydrogeomorphic Reach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  2. Environmental features and macrofauna of Kahana Estuary, Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maciolek, J.A.; Timbol, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Lack of ecological information on Hawaiian estuaries prompted an intensive 2-year study of a small (5.7 ha) stream-mouth estuary on windward Oahu. Water quality and macrofauna were sampled weekly at seven stations. The water mass was strongly stratified vertically except during freshets. Average values for water column temperature and bottom salinity were 23.2°C and 12‰ at the head to 28.3°C and 28‰ at the mouth. Dissolved oxygen saturation in the water column varied from about 50% at night to 140% in the afternoon. Usually, bottom waters were 3–6°C warmer than surface waters and sometimes showed severe oxygen depletion.Macrofauna, collected primarily by seining, consisted mainly of decapod crustaceans (four species of crabs, seven species of shrimps) and fishes (24 species). Other typical estuarine taxons (mollusks, barnacles, polychaetes) were scarce or absent. Diversity increased seaward from 14 species near the estuary head to 29 species near the mouth. Three species of crustaceans and six of fishes were captured at all stations. Most abundant were the native prawn, Macrobrachium grandimanus, and mullet, Mugil cephalus. Perennially resident adults occurred among crustaceans and gobioid fishes; most other fishes were present as juveniles and sporadic adults. Comparisons with other data suggest that more than 50 species of native fishes may occur in Hawaiian estuaries, and that estuarine macrofaunal diversity on oceanic islands is much lower than on continents at similar latitudes.

  3. The role of Phragmites australis in mediating inland salt marsh migration in a Mid-Atlantic estuary.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph A M

    2013-01-01

    Many sea level rise adaptation plans emphasize the protection of adjacent uplands to allow for inland salt marsh migration, but little empirical information exists on this process. Using aerial photos from 1930 and 2006 of Delaware Estuary coastal habitats in New Jersey, I documented the rate of coastal forest retreat and the rate of inland salt marsh migration across 101.1 km of undeveloped salt marsh and forest ecotone. Over this time, the amount of forest edge at this ecotone nearly doubled. In addition, the average amount of forest retreat was 141.2 m while the amount of salt marsh inland migration was 41.9 m. Variation in forest retreat within the study area was influenced by variation in slope. The lag between the amount of forest retreat and salt marsh migration is accounted for by the presence of Phragmites australis which occupies the forest and salt marsh ecotone. Phragmites expands from this edge into forest dieback areas, and the ability of salt marsh to move inland and displace Phragmites is likely influenced by salinity at both an estuary-wide scale and at the scale of local subwatersheds. Inland movement of salt marsh is lowest at lower salinity areas further away from the mouth of the estuary and closer to local heads of tide. These results allow for better prediction of salt marsh migration in estuarine landscapes and provide guidance for adaptation planners seeking to prioritize those places with the highest likelihood of inland salt marsh migration in the near-term.

  4. The Abundance and Activity of Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Populations in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estuaries are productive ecosystems that ameliorate nutrient and metal contaminants from surficial water supplies. At the intersection of terrestrial and aquatic environments, estuarine sediments host major microbially-mediated geochemical transformations. These include denitrification (the conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide and/or dinitrogen) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Denitrification has historically been seen as the predominant nitrate attenuation process and functions as an effective sink for nitrate. DNRA has previously been believed to be a minor nitrate reduction process and transforms nitrate within the ecosystem to ammonium, a more biologically available N species. Recent studies have compared the two processes in coastal environments and determined fluctuating environmental conditions may suppress denitrification, supporting an increased role for DNRA in the N cycle. Nitrate availability and salinity are factors thought to influence the membership of the microbial communities present, and the nitrate reduction process that predominates. The aim of this study is to investigate how nitrate concentration and salinity alter the transcript abundances of N cycling functional gene markers for denitrification (nirK, nirS) and DNRA (nrfA) in estuarine sediments at the mouth of the hypernutrified Old Salinas River, CA. Short-term whole core incubations amended with artificial freshwater/artificial seawater (2 psu, 35 psu) and with varying NO3- concentrations (200mM, 2000mM) were conducted to assess the activity as well as the abundance of the nitrate-reducing microbial populations present. Gene expression of nirK, nirS, and nrfA at the conclusion of the incubations was quantified using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). High abundances of nirK, nirS, and nrfA under particular conditions coupled with the resulting geochemical data ultimately provides insight onto how the aforementioned factors

  5. Paleoenvironmental setting and description of an estuarine oyster reef in the Eocene of Patagonia, southern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raising, Martín Rodríguez; Casadío, Silvio; Pearson, Nadine; Mángano, Gabriela; Buatois, Luis; Griffin, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    A middle Eocene Crassostrea sp. reef near Río Turbio, southwestern Patagonia (Argentina), represents the earliest record of an oyster reef associated with estuarine facies in the southern hemisphere, and also one of the few known worldwide occurring in Paleogene rocks. The reef grew in an outer estuary environment subject to periodic changes in salinity and may have reached a maturing phase. The Río Turbio reef - by its dimensions, geometry, and substrate lithology- would have been located in a tidal channel convergence area. This reef provides new evidence suggesting that estuaries served as refuges for Crassostrea populations allowing them to disperse into fully marine environments many times throughout the Cenozoic.

  6. Detecting benthic community responses to pollution in estuaries: a field mesocosm approach.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Allyson L; Keough, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Biological stress responses in individuals are used as indicators of pollution in aquatic ecosystems, but detecting ecologically relevant responses in whole communities remains a challenge. We developed an experimental approach to detect the effects of pollution on estuarine communities using field-based mesocosms. Mesocosms containing defaunated sediments from four estuaries in southeastern Australia that varied in sediment contamination were transplanted and buried in sediments of the same four estuaries for six weeks. Mesocosm sediment properties and metal concentrations remained representative of their source locations. In each estuary, fauna communities associated with sediments derived from the site with the highest metal concentrations were significantly different from other communities. This pattern was evident for some of the individual taxa, in particular the polychaete Capitella sp. Consistent responses across estuaries suggest numbers of individuals, and especially Capitella sp., could be used to identify contaminated sediments in estuaries with similar fauna and site characteristics.

  7. Suwannee river basin and estuary integrated science workshop: September 22-24, 2004 Cedar Key, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian; Raabe, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    identifying information needs and priorities and developing partnerships. The USGS is seeking to define the role of the USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) in conducting integrated research in the Suwannee River Basin, and to establish a cooperative program with other agencies. Participants interested in river, floodplain, springs, estuary, or basin-wide issues are encouraged to attend. Topics for this years workshop include: Water quality and geochemistry: nutrient enrichment, reduction of nutrient loading to ground water, contaminants, and land use, Hydrogeology: interactions among ground water, surface water and ecosystem, modeling, and baseline mapping, Ecosystem dynamics: structure, process, species, and habitats (estuarine, riverine, floodplain, and wetland), and Information management: data sharing, database development, geographic information system (GIS), and basin-wide models.

  8. Methane in surface waters of Oregon estuaries and rivers

    SciTech Connect

    de Angelis, M.A.; Lilley, M.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Methane concentrations in surface waters of Oregon rivers and estuaries were measured over a four-year period. Geographic variations in riverine CH{sub 4} were observed. Results from undisturbed forest streams indicate that rivers can contain high natural levels of CH{sub 4} not attributable to pollution. Lateral diffusion and runoff from saturated forest and fertilized agricultural soils may be important in determining methane levels in rivers. Methane concentrations in well-flushed estuaries appear to be controlled mainly by mixing between high CH{sub 4}-containing river water and low CH{sub 4}-containing seawater endmembers. Rivers and estuaries were found to be sources of methane to the atmosphere. Calculated daily fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from 1.2 to 71 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for rivers and from 0.04 to 21 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for estuarine<