Science.gov

Sample records for estuarine system southern

  1. Integrated sediment quality assessment in Paranaguá Estuarine System, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Choueri, R B; Cesar, A; Torres, R J; Abessa, D M S; Morais, R D; Pereira, C D S; Nascimento, M R L; Mozeto, A A; Riba, I; DelValls, T A

    2009-10-01

    Sediment quality from Paranaguá Estuarine System (PES), a highly important port and ecological zone, was evaluated by assessing three lines of evidence: (1) sediment physical-chemical characteristics; (2) sediment toxicity (elutriates, sediment-water interface, and whole sediment); and (3) benthic community structure. Results revealed a gradient of increasing degradation of sediments (i.e. higher concentrations of trace metals, higher toxicity, and impoverishment of benthic community structure) towards inner PES. Data integration by principal component analysis (PCA) showed positive correlation between some contaminants (mainly As, Cr, Ni, and Pb) and toxicity in samples collected from stations located in upper estuary and one station placed away from contamination sources. Benthic community structure seems to be affected by both pollution and natural fine characteristics of the sediments, which reinforces the importance of a weight-of-evidence approach to evaluate sediments of PES. PMID:19616298

  2. Chamber-Based Estimates of Methane Production in Coastal Estuarine Systems in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, B.; Lipson, D.; Lai, C.

    2008-12-01

    Wetland systems are believed to produce between 100 - 231 Tg CH4 yr-1 which is roughly 20% of global methane emissions. The uncertainty in methane emissions models stem from the lack of detailed information about methane gas production within regional wetland systems. The aim of this study is to report the range of methane fluxes observed along salinity gradients at two San Diego coastal wetland systems, the Tijuana Estuary (Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve) and the Peñasquitos Lagoon (Torrey Pines State Park Reserve). Soil water samples are used to elucidate factors responsible for the observed variation in methane fluxes. Air samples were subsequently collected from the headspace of a static soil chamber and stored in pre- evacuated vials. Methane concentrations were analyzed within hours after collection by gas chromatography in the laboratory. The chemical and physical properties of the soil, including salinity, pH, redox potential and temperature are measured with a hand-held probe nearby soil collars. The biological properties of the soil, including dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and ammonia levels are measured from soil water samples in the laboratory. We find that saline sites under direct tidal influence produced methane fluxes ranging from -3.10 to 9.10 (mean 2.18) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. We also find that brackish sites (0.6 to 3.2 ppt in salinity) with fresh water input from residential runoff at the Peñasquitos Lagoon produced methane fluxes ranging from 0.53 to 192.10 (mean 33.34) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. Sampling was done over the course of 5 weeks during August-September of 2008. We hypothesize that the contrasting methane fluxes found between the saline and the brackish sites is due primarily to the different salinity, and in turn sulfate levels found at the two sites. The reduction of sulfate to produce energy is more energetically favorable than the reduction of carbon dioxide to produce methane. Thus the presence of sulfate may act as

  3. Integrated quality assessment of sediments from harbour areas in Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buruaem, Lucas Moreira; de Castro, Ítalo Braga; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio; Taniguchi, Satie; Fillmann, Gilberto; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Varella Petti, Mônica Angélica; Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo de Souza; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Maranho, Luciane Alves; Davanso, Marcela Bergo; Nonato, Edmundo Ferraz; Cesar, Augusto; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia Veras; Abessa, Denis Moledo de Souza

    2013-09-01

    Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System is a highly populated coastal zone in Brazil and where it is located the major port of Latin America. Historically, port activities, industrial and domestic effluents discharges have constituted the main sources of contaminants to estuarine system. This study aimed to assess the recent status of sediment quality from 5 zones of Port of Santos by applying a lines-of-evidence approach through integrating results of: (1) acute toxicity of whole sediment and chronic toxicity of liquid phases; (2) grain size, organic matter, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzenes and butyltins; (3) benthic community descriptors. Results revealed a gradient of increasing contamination for metals and organic compounds, alongside with their geochemical carriers. Sediment liquid phases were more toxic compared to whole sediment. Low number of species and individuals indicated the impoverishment of benthic community. The use of site-specific sediment quality guidelines was more appropriate to predict sediment toxicity. The integration of results through Sediment Quality Triad approach and principal component analysis allowed observing the effects of natural stressors and dredging on sediment quality and benthic distribution. Even with recent governmental efforts to control, pollution is still relevant in Port of Santos and a threat to local ecosystems.

  4. 75 FR 49887 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Estuarine Research Reserve System AGENCY... Period for Revised Management Plans for the following National Estuarine Research Reserves: Narragansett... management plans of the Narragansett Bay, RI National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Tijuana, CA...

  5. 75 FR 4349 - National Estuarine Reserve System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... solicitation period for the National Estuarine research Reserve Land Acquisition and Construction Program FY10... notice to re-open the solicitation period for the National Estuarine Research Reserve Land Acquisition and Construction Program FY10 to provide National Estuarine Research Reserve lead State agencies...

  6. Low mercury levels in marine fish from estuarine and coastal environments in southern China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Chan, Heidi; Tam, Yin Ki; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-02-01

    This study is the first comprehensive evaluation of total Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in wild marine fish from an estuarine and a coastal ecosystem in southern China. A total of 571 fish from 54 different species were examined. Our results showed that the Hg levels were generally low in the fish, and the Hg levels were below 30 ng g(-1) (wet weight) for 82% of the samples, which may be related to the reduced size of the fish and altered food web structure due to overfishing. Decreased coastal wetland coverage and different carbon sources may be responsible for the habitat-specific Hg concentrations. The degree of biomagnification was relatively low in the two systems. PMID:24292441

  7. Low mercury levels in marine fish from estuarine and coastal environments in southern China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Chan, Heidi; Tam, Yin Ki; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-02-01

    This study is the first comprehensive evaluation of total Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in wild marine fish from an estuarine and a coastal ecosystem in southern China. A total of 571 fish from 54 different species were examined. Our results showed that the Hg levels were generally low in the fish, and the Hg levels were below 30 ng g(-1) (wet weight) for 82% of the samples, which may be related to the reduced size of the fish and altered food web structure due to overfishing. Decreased coastal wetland coverage and different carbon sources may be responsible for the habitat-specific Hg concentrations. The degree of biomagnification was relatively low in the two systems.

  8. Estuarine infill and coastal progradation, southern van diemen gulf, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, C. D.; Mulrennan, M. E.; Chappell, J.

    1993-03-01

    There are several estuaries associated with the pronouncedly seasonal rivers which drain northwards from the Middle Proterozoic sandstone Arnhem Land plateau, and the Tertiary Koolpinyah land surface, into the macrotidal van Diemen Gulf, in the Northern Territory of Australia. The Holocene development of these, investigated in greatest detail for the South Alligator River with an upland catchment of > 10,000 km 2. through drilling, palynology and radiocarbon dating, comprises both estuarine infill and coastal progradation. Three phases of estuarine infill can be recognised: (i) a transgressive phase (8000-6800 years B.P.) of marine incursion; (ii) a big swamp phase (6800-5300 years B.P.) of widespread mangrove forest development; and (iii) a sinuous/cuspate phase of floodplain development since 5300 years B.P., during which the tidal river has meandered and reworked earlier estuarine sediments. Since 6000 years B.P., the South Alligator coastal plain has prograded at a decelerating rate, with two phases of chenier ridge formation. A similar pattern of estuarine infill, and decelerating coastal plain progradation, is demonstrated for the Adelaide and Mary Rivers, both with catchments of > 6000 km 2. The southern shore of van Diemem Gulf appears to have changed its overall position little during the last 2000 years. The major source for the clay, silt and fine sands which have infilled the estuary and coastal plain has been from seaward. Dispite the similarity of development, coastal sediment build up has had different effects on the morphology of each tidal river. The Adelaide has undergone a major diversion and no longer flows directly into van Diemen Gulf, but occupies a former fluvial course, and the Mary has been blocked entirely, and its former estuarine palaeochannels have been infilled with tide-transported sediment.

  9. Paleoenvironmental setting and description of an estuarine oyster reef in the Eocene of Patagonia, southern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raising, Martín Rodríguez; Casadío, Silvio; Pearson, Nadine; Mángano, Gabriela; Buatois, Luis; Griffin, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    A middle Eocene Crassostrea sp. reef near Río Turbio, southwestern Patagonia (Argentina), represents the earliest record of an oyster reef associated with estuarine facies in the southern hemisphere, and also one of the few known worldwide occurring in Paleogene rocks. The reef grew in an outer estuary environment subject to periodic changes in salinity and may have reached a maturing phase. The Río Turbio reef - by its dimensions, geometry, and substrate lithology- would have been located in a tidal channel convergence area. This reef provides new evidence suggesting that estuaries served as refuges for Crassostrea populations allowing them to disperse into fully marine environments many times throughout the Cenozoic.

  10. 75 FR 60720 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Estuarine Research Reserve System Correction In notice document 2010-24341 appearing on page 59696 in the issue of Tuesday, September 28, 2010 make...

  11. Benthic infaunal community structuring in an acidified tropical estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that increasing ocean acidification (OA) should have strong direct and indirect influences on marine invertebrates. While most theory and application for OA is based on relatively physically-stable oceanic ecological systems, less is known about the effects of acidification on nearshore and estuarine systems. Here, we investigated the structuring of a benthic infaunal community in a tropical estuarine system, along a steep salinity and pH gradient, arising largely from acid-sulphate groundwater inflows (Sungai Brunei Estuary, Borneo, July 2011- June 2012). Results Preliminary data indicate that sediment pore-water salinity (range: 8.07 - 29.6 psu) declined towards the mainland in correspondence with the above-sediment estuarine water salinity (range: 3.58 – 31.2 psu), whereas the pore-water pH (range: 6.47- 7.72) was generally lower and less variable than the estuarine water pH (range: 5.78- 8.3), along the estuary. Of the thirty six species (taxa) recorded, the polychaetes Neanthes sp., Onuphis conchylega, Nereididae sp. and the amphipod Corophiidae sp., were numerically dominant. Calcified microcrustaceans (e.g., Cyclopoida sp. and Corophiidae sp.) were abundant at all stations and there was no clear distinction in distribution pattern along the estuarine between calcified and non-calcified groups. Species richness increased seawards, though abundance (density) showed no distinct directional trend. Diversity indices were generally positively correlated (Spearman’s rank correlation) with salinity and pH (p <0.05) and negatively with clay and organic matter, except for evenness values (p >0.05). Three faunistic assemblages were distinguished: (1) nereid-cyclopoid-sabellid, (2) corophiid-capitellid and (3) onuphid- nereid-capitellid. These respectively associated with lower salinity/pH and a muddy bottom, low salinity/pH and a sandy bottom, and high salinity/pH and a sandy bottom. However, CCA suggested that species distribution

  12. Impact of frontal systems on estuarine sediment and pollutant dynamics.

    PubMed

    Duck, R W; Wewetzer, S F

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, a brief description of frontal systems, their modes of occurrence and impact on the estuarine environment, is presented. Previous studies of estuarine fronts have largely focused on the water surface and within the water column. New observations in the Tay Estuary, Scotland have shown that the presence of fronts within the water column may be marked, not only by surface foam bands, but also by abrupt (i.e. non-gradational) changes in the underlying bedform morphology and/or sediment facies, as detected using side-scan sonar. This preliminary evidence suggests that fronts may exert a control, not only on the surface and intra-water column sediment and pollutant partitioning, but also on the distribution and persistence of bedload transport pathways.

  13. Halogen Radicals Promote the Photodegradation of Microcystins in Estuarine Systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Reichwaldt, Elke S; Ghadouani, Anas; Mitch, William A

    2016-08-16

    The transport of microcystin, a hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa), to estuaries can adversely affect estuarine and coastal ecosystems. We evaluated whether halogen radicals (i.e., reactive halogen species (RHS)) could significantly contribute to microcystin photodegradation during transport within estuaries. Experiments in synthetic and natural water samples demonstrated that the presence of seawater halides increased quantum yields for microcystin indirect photodegradation by factors of 3-6. Additional experiments indicated that photoproduced RHS were responsible for this effect. Despite the fact that dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations decreased in more saline waters, the calculated photochemical half-life of microcystin decreased 6-fold with increasing salinity along a freshwater-estuarine transect due to the halide-associated increase in quantum yield. Modeling of microcystin photodegradation along this transect indicated that the time scale for RHS-mediated microcystin photodegradation is comparable to the time scale of transport. Microcystin concentrations decline by ∼98% along the transect when considering photodegradation by RHS, but only by ∼54% if this pathway were ignored. These results suggest the importance of considering RHS-mediated photodegradation in future models of microcystin fate in freshwater-estuarine systems. PMID:27447196

  14. 76 FR 2083 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...: Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Ocean Service...: Notice is hereby given that the Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal...

  15. Fine-scale movements and habitat use of juvenile southern flounder Paralichthys lethostigma in an estuarine seascape.

    PubMed

    Furey, N B; Dance, M A; Rooker, J R

    2013-05-01

    Habitat use of juvenile southern flounder Paralichthys lethostigma was examined within a shallow estuarine seascape during June and July 2011 using acoustic telemetry. Fine-scale movement and habitat use of P. lethostigma was investigated with an acoustic positioning system placed in a seascape that varied in habitat type, physicochemical conditions and bathymetry. The use of different habitat types was examined with Euclidean distance-based analyses, and generalized additive models were used to determine the relative importance of habitat type relative to physicochemical conditions and bathymetry. Tracks of P. lethostigma ranged in distance between 1477 and 8582 m and speed was 4·2 ± 1·1 m min⁻¹ (mean ± s.e.) for all P. lethostigma combined. Depth, slope and habitat type had the most influence on P. lethostigma occurrence and deep sandy areas with shallow slopes were used most frequently. In addition, depth use by P. lethostigma was influenced by tidal cycles, indicating habitat use varies temporally and is dynamic. Finally, temperatures <30·5° C were used more than warmer waters within the study area. The results successfully identify movements by juvenile P. lethostigma, and indicate that definitions of essential habitats need to account for dynamics in habitat use.

  16. 77 FR 65533 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Estuarine Research Reserve System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Estuarine Research Reserve System Science Collaborative Evaluation AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Science Collaborative was created in 2009 to put Reserve-based... intended users of the science into the research process so that their perspectives can inform...

  17. Hydrology of a Tropical Estuarine System: Itamaracá, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Carmen; Kjerfve, Björn

    1993-05-01

    The Itamaracá estuarine system, located in northeastern Brazil is formed by an elongated U-shaped channel, Canal de Santa Cruz, which connects to the South Atlantic Ocean at the two ends and receives runoff from six small rivers. The estuary is surrounded by mangrove wetlands, while its off-shore area is shielded by extensive shore-parallel sandstone reefs and sand banks, which reduce the water exchange. Tides at both entrances are semidiurnal, in phase, and have mean and spring ranges of 1·8 m and 2·2 m, respectively. Typically, flood tides last 6·9 h while ebb tides extend for 5·5 h. Tidal currents lag water elevation by 86-94° and there is a phase lag of 15-20 min. in water elevation between the inner channel and the estuarine mouth. Monthly rainfall during peak rainy season (PRS) is 0·34 m per month and during peak dry season (PDS) only 0·06 m per month. Considering evaporation, evapotranspiration, runoff and river discharge, the fresh-water input into the estuary is 57·7 m 3 s -1 during PRS, but only 0·2 m 3 s -1 during PRS, a 300-fold difference. This difference in water supply governs, to a large extent, the hydrodynamics of the system. During PDS, the channel is well mixed, and slightly hypersaline. Mean salinity ranges from 31 to 36%, reaching 38·6% near the bottom. This condition results from a combination of low river discharge, high evapotranspiration, east-southeast winds and from the presence of saline water masses at the estuarine entrances. Large concentrations of TSS inside the channel during PDS suggest that these water masses act as a dynamic harrier, inhibiting flushing. During PRS, this situation no longer exists, and exchange of material between the estuary and off-shore waters occurs more readily. The system is partially mixed, gravitational circulation prevails, and mean salinity ranges from 20 to 32%.

  18. Ecological and biological strategies of Etropus crossotus and Citharichthys spilopterus (Pleuronectiformes:Paralichthyidae) related to the estuarine plume, Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Gil, Patricia; Yáñez-Arancibia, Alejandro; Tapia, Margarito; Day, John W.; Wilson, Charles A.; Cowan, James H., Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Differences in the biological and ecological strategies of two tropical flatfishes, Etropus crossotus (fringed flounder) and Citharichthys spilopterus (bay whiff) are discussed. The comparative analysis was based on the seasonal distribution of relative abundance of the two species and flatfish movements utilizing estuarine plume influenced areas as part of their life cycles. Growth parameters of the von Bertalanffy equation and recruitment were estimated (FISAT software) to compare life cycle patterns. The recruitment patterns illustrate the key difference between "estuarine-dependent" and "estuarine-related" nekton strategies. Both species have a short life cycle with a continuous recruitment activity. E. crossotus is an estuarine-related species, with two recruitment pulses ( winter frontal season), in the estuarine plume on the shelf. C. spilopterus is an estuarine-dependent species, with a main recruitment pulse during the rainy season in the estuarine plume, and a residual secondary pulse inside the adjacent estuarine system (Terminos Lagoon). The results show that the ecological success of these tropical coastal marine flatfish, with similar biological patterns, is based upon the sequential use (in time and space) of estuarine plume influenced habitats, suggesting that fish migration to shallow waters is related to food availability changes as a strategy towards optimum recruitment.

  19. Mercury in freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes from Southern Brazil and its ecological implication.

    PubMed

    Kütter, V T; Mirlean, N; Baisch, P R M; Kütter, M T; Silva-Filho, E V

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we measured the mercury concentration in 27 different fish species with high commercial value. Samples were taken from a region characterized by the diversity of aquatic environments. Mercury concentration in marine fish species varied from 30.4 to 216 ng g(-1), while in estuarine species, it varied from 12.4 to 60.3 ng g(-1). Compared to mercury concentration in marine species, none of the specimens from estuarine environment has reached a mercury concentration of 100 ng g(-1). However, mercury concentrations in species from the freshwater Patos lagoon are remarkably higher (15.3 to 462 ng g(-1)) than those from the estuarine or marine region. Even though mercury concentrations in these fish species did not exceed the maximum level (500 ng g(-1)) allowed by WHO for human consumption, they represent the main food source for sea birds and mammals coming from South Pole during their migration period.

  20. 75 FR 59696 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...: Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Ocean Service... Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Ocean Service,...

  1. Effects of dredging operations on soft bottom macrofauna in a harbor in the Patos Lagoon estuarine region of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bemvenuti, C E; Angonesi, L G; Gandra, M S

    2005-11-01

    An evaluation was made of the effects of dredging on the soft bottom community in the channel of the Rio Grande harbor in the Patos Lagoon estuarine region of southern Brazil. During four seasonal cruises, samples were collected from nine biological stations, one of which was located outside the dredged area. Three macrobenthic samples were collected on each cruise from each station, using a 0.08 m2 van Veen grab. A cluster analysis was applied to group summer and autumn cruise stations before the dredging period, revealing larger numbers of species (35-36 spp.) and higher densities of organisms. The station located outside the dredging area was always included in this group, regardless of the sampling period or conditions of salinity. Another group comprised the winter and spring stations during the dredging period. This group was characterized by stations with the fewest species (20-18 spp.) and the lowest and most variable organism densities. The efficient strategies of resilience of the dominant estuarine species may minimize the effects of dredging on the biota through the rapid recolonization of the soft bottom of the harbor channel. PMID:16532180

  2. Benthic assemblages of a temperate estuarine system in South America: Transition from a freshwater to an estuarine zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortelezzi, Agustina; Capítulo, Alberto Rodrigues; Boccardi, Lucía; Arocena, Rafael

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of the present study were to describe the species composition, diversity and distribution of the zoobenthic assemblages, to estimate the abundance and biomass of the dominant species, and to identify the main environmental factors determining the distribution patterns of the invertebrates from a freshwater to an estuarine zone in a temperate estuary of South America. The Río de la Plata estuary is a microtidal system characterized by a high concentration of suspended solids. Fifty-three taxa of meso- and macro-invertebrates were identified in the samples collected during November and December 2001. Molluscs, annelids, crustaceans and nematodes were found at 90% of the sampling sites. Molluscs comprised up to about 90% of the total zoobenthos biomass: the remaining percentage corresponded mainly to annelids and less to nematodes and crustaceans. An ecocline along the salinity gradient could be observed for the benthic assemblages from the freshwater to the estuarine zone in Rio de la Plata. A Canonical Correspondence Analysis shows that results from sampling sites in the outer zone were strongly related to salinity, depth and pH and less to oxygen and percentage of clay. The results from stations in the inner zone, and part of the middle zone, were mainly related to the occurrence of sand and contents of NH 4+-N, NO 3--N, and PO 43--P.

  3. Determination of fish trophic levels in an estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaud, S.; Pillet, M.; David, V.; Sautour, B.; Elie, P.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of trophic level is particularly relevant in order to improve knowledge of the structure and the functioning of an ecosystem. A precise estimation of fish trophic levels based on nitrogen isotopic signatures in environments as complex and fluctuant as estuaries requires a good description of the pelagic and benthic trophic chains and a knowledge of organic matter sources at the bottom. In this study these points are considered in the case of the Gironde estuary (south west France, Europe). To obtain a good picture of the food web, fish stomach content analyses and a bibliographic synthesis of the prey feeding ecology were carried out. Fish trophic levels were calculated from these results and δ 15N data. The feeding link investigation enabled us to identify qualitatively and quantitatively the different preys consumed by each fish group studied, to distinguish the prey feeding on benthos from those feeding on pelagos and to characterize the different nutritive pools at the base of the system. Among the species studied, only Liza ramada and the flatfish ( Platichthys flesus and Solea solea) depend mainly on benthic trophic compartments. All the other fish groups depend on several trophic (benthic and/or pelagic) sources. These results enabled us to correct the calculation of fish trophic levels which are coherent with their feeding ecology data obtained from the nitrogen isotopic integrative period. The present work shows that trophic positions are linked with the feeding ecology of fish species and vary according to individual size. Ecological data also allow the correction of the isotopic data by eliminating absurd results and showing the complementarity of the two methods. This work is the first to consider source variability in the fish food web. This is an indispensable step for trophic studies in a dynamic environment. The investigation of matter fluxes and recycling processes at the food web base would provide a useful improvement in future

  4. Seafloor environments in the Long Island Sound estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Signell, R.P.; Rendigs, R. R.; Poppe, L.J.; List, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Four categories of modern seafloor sedimentary environments have been identified and mapped across the large, glaciated, topographically complex Long Island Sound estuary by means of an extensive regional set of sidescan sonographs, bottom samples, and video-camera observations and supplemental marine-geologic and modeled physical-oceanographic data. (1) Environments of erosion or nondeposition contain sediments which range from boulder fields to gravelly coarse-to-medium sands and appear on the sonographs either as patterns with isolated reflections (caused by outcrops of glacial drift and bedrock) or as patterns of strong backscatter (caused by coarse lag deposits). Areas of erosion or nondeposition were found across the rugged seafloor at the eastern entrance of the Sound and atop bathymetric highs and within constricted depressions in other parts of the basin. (2) Environments of bedload transport contain mostly coarse-to-fine sand with only small amounts of mud and are depicted by sonograph patterns of sand ribbons and sand waves. Areas of bedload transport were found primarily in the eastern Sound where bottom currents have sculptured the surface of a Holocene marine delta and are moving these sediments toward the WSW into the estuary. (3) Environments of sediment sorting and reworking comprise variable amounts of fine sand and mud and are characterized either by patterns of moderate backscatter or by patterns with patches of moderate-to-weak backscatter that reflect a combination of erosion and deposition. Areas of sediment sorting and reworking were found around the periphery of the zone of bedload transport in the eastern Sound and along the southern nearshore margin. They also are located atop low knolls, on the flanks of shoal complexes, and within segments of the axial depression in the western Sound. (4) Environments of deposition are blanketed by muds and muddy fine sands that produce patterns of uniformly weak backscatter. Depositional areas occupy

  5. Characterization Methods for Small Estuarine Systems in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various statistical methods were applied to spatially discrete data from 14 intensively sampled small estuarine systems in the mid-Atlantic U.S. The number of sites per system ranged from 6 to 37. The surface area of the systems ranged from 1.9 to 193.4 km2. Parameters examined ...

  6. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ni...

  7. NUTRIENT SOUIRCES, TRANSPORT, AND FATE IN COUPLED WATERSHED-ESTUARINE SYSTEMS OF COASTAL ALABAMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The processes regulating sources, transport, and fate of nutrients were studied in 3 coupled watershed-estuarine systems that varied mainly by differences in the dominant land use-land cover (LULC), i.e. Weeks Bay -- agriculture, Dog River -- urban, and Fowl River -- forest. Mea...

  8. A Preliminary Evaluation of ohe Sediment Dynamics in the Albemarle Estuarine System, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D. R.; Mallinson, D.; Letrick, E.; Vance, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Albemarle estuarine system (AES) drainage basin covers an area of approximately 45,500 km2 within Virginia and North Carolina, and is comprised of the Roanoke River Basin, Chowan River Basin, and Albemarle Sound Basin. The AES, a product of rising sea level (eg. drowned-river estuarine system), covers approximately 2,340 km2 and includes several major and minor embayed (lateral) tributaries. As earlier studies have pointed out, the estuarine system is the settling basin for sediments, organic matter, and anthropogenic waste from these three major drainage basins. The most abundant sediment within the AES, forming the benthic habitat for nearly 70% of the estuarine system, is a chemically active organic-rich mud (ORM). This sediment type has been shown to be important to the water quality, contaminant characteristics, and potentially the ecosystem dynamics. During the summer of 2001, several short cores (~ 50 cm) were collected in the AES, and downcore measurements for radiochemical tracers (210Pb, 137Cs) and organic matter signatures (13C, 15N, C:N, LOI) were conducted. These organic matter signatures have been used to elucidate potential temporal changes in fluxes and cycles of organic matter in the AES. Pb-210 analyses indicate temporal and spatial variations in sediment deposition rates (0.05 - 0.50 cm/yr). Sedimentation rate variations are potentially associated with dam construction on the Roanoke River and increased estuarine shoreline erosion along many banks of the Albemarle Sound. Sediment deposition varies spatially in the AES and is highest near its western limit relative to the rest of the estuary. δ13C and δ 15N concentrations from cores collected in the AES range from -21.7 to -28.3 \\permil and 0.4 to 4.6 \\permil, respectively. The variation signatures indicate typical mixing between terrestrial and marine end members, as well as potential influences associated with increased agriculture over the last century.

  9. Trace fossil assemblages in the tide-dominated estuarine system: Ameki Group, south-eastern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekwenye, O. C.; Nichols, G.; Okogbue, C. O.; Mode, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    A systematic ichnological analysis with sedimentological study of the Eocene Ameki Group in south-eastern Nigeria, was conducted to infer depositional and biogenic processes operating during basin fill, identify discontinuities using substrate controlled ichnofacies, and identify the paleocological conditions that affected the diversity of the trace fossils. The Ameki Group represents a tide-dominated estuarine system characterised by a range of trace fossils assemblages. Eighteen individual ichnogenera and nineteen ichnospecies observed in the study area, were grouped into six recurring ichnofacies namely Scoyenia, Psilonichnus, Skolithos, Cruziana, Glossifungites and Teredolites. Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies are predominant in the estuarine deposits indicating that the sedimentary successions of the Eocene are dominantly of moderate to high energy marginal marine environments. The estuarine deposits (senus stricto) were controlled by low to fluctuating salinity levels, high sedimentation rate and fluctuating hydrodynamic energy. These resulted in the occurrence of low diversity of Scoyenia and Teredolites ichnofacies and low to moderate ichnodiversity of mixed Skolithos and depauperate Cruziana ichnofacies. Low levels of dissolved oxygen in quiescent water-embayment (open estuarine) resulted in low diversity of impoverished Cruziana ichnofacies. Glossifungites ichnofacies marked an amalgamated sequence boundary/marine flooding and an initial flooding surface at the base of the tidally influenced fluvial deposits.

  10. Nursery use patterns of commercially important marine fish species in estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Maia, A.; Fonseca, V.; França, S.; Wouters, N.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2010-03-01

    Analysing the estuarine use patterns of juveniles of marine migrant fish species is vital for identifying important sites for juveniles as well as the basic environmental features that characterize these sites for different species. This is a key aspect towards understanding nursery function. Various estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast (Minho, Douro, Ria de Aveiro, Mondego, Tejo, Sado, Mira, Ria Formosa and Guadiana) were sampled during Spring and Summer 2005 and 2006. Juveniles of commercially important marine fish species Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax, predominantly 0-group individuals, were amongst the most abundant species and had distinct patterns of estuarine use as well as conspicuous associations with several environmental features. Juvenile occurrence and density varied amongst estuaries and sites within them, and differed with species. Sites with consistently high juvenile densities were identified as important juvenile sites (i.e. putative nursery grounds). Through generalized linear models (GLM), intra-estuarine variation in occurrence and density of each of the individual species was largely explained by environmental variables (temperature; salinity; depth; percentage of mud in the sediment; presence of seagrass; importance of intertidal areas; relative distance to estuary mouth; macrozoobenthos densities; and latitude). Decisive environmental factors defining important sites for juveniles varied depending on the system as a result of different environmental gradients, though there were common dominant features for each species regardless of the estuary considered. Analysed environmental variables in the GLM also accounted for inter-estuarine variation in species' occurrence and density. In several estuaries, the identified important juvenile sites were used by many of these species simultaneously and may be of increased value to both management and conservation. Overall, the

  11. ESTIMATION OF INHERENT OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND THE WATER QUALITY COMPONENTS IN THE NEUSE RIVER-PAMLICO SOUND ESTUARINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field observations carried out in the Neuse River-Pamlico Sound Estuarine System (NRE-PS), North Carolina, USA were used to develop optical algorithms for assessing inherent optical properties, IOPs (absorption and backscattering) associated with water quality components (WQC).

  12. Distribution of butyltin compounds in Brazil's southern and southeastern estuarine ecosystems: assessment of spatial scale and compartments.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Dayana Moscardi; Turra, Alexander; de Marchi, Mary Rosa Rodrigues; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Butyltin compounds (BTs), including tributyltin (TBT) and its degradation products, dibutyltin and monobutyltin, have been found in a diversity of aquatic systems and causing toxic effects in target and nontarget organisms. They enter in coastal systems through different sources (as antifouling paints, industrial effluents, etc.) where they interact with biotic and abiotic components, and their distribution is commonly determined by the morphological and hydrodynamic conditions of the coastal systems. In this study, we discuss the contamination by BTs on a spatial scale (eight estuaries with three subareas each) and in different compartments of the estuaries (sediments, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and estuarine catfish tissues (liver and gills). Lower concentrations of BTs were found in the sediments (n.d. to 338 ng g(-1)) in comparison to studies before a ban of TBT in antifouling paints was enacted, mostly indicating an old input or preservation related with sediment properties and composition. For SPM samples (n.d. to 175 ng L(-1)) as well as in fish tissues (n.d. to 1426 ng g(-1)), the presence of these compounds was frequent, especially in the fish due to their movement throughout the estuaries and the potential to assess point sources of BTs. These results indicate that BTs persist in the environment, with variation in amounts between investigated estuaries and even at locations inside the same estuary, because of ideal preservation conditions, transport to remote areas, and input from different sources. PMID:27151240

  13. Sponge-rhodolith interactions in a subtropical estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Enrique; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Hinojosa-Arango, Gustavo

    2013-06-01

    The interactions between sponges and red macroalgae have been widely documented in tropical and subtropical environments worldwide, and many of them have been documented as mutualistic associations. Sponges, however, have also been frequently described as part of the associated fauna of rhodolith habitats (aggregations of free-living non-geniculated coralline macroalgae). Nonetheless, the types of interaction they establish as well as the role of sponges in these habitats remain unknown. In this study, the associations between sponges and rhodoliths were investigated in an estuarine ecosystem of the Mexican Pacific based on qualitative and quantitative data. A total of 13 sponge species were identified in five newly discovered rhodolith beds dominated by the non-geniculate coralline macroalga Lithophyllum margaritae. The sponge assemblages were strongly restricted to rhodolith habitats. The best predictor of sponge abundance (from 5.1 to 51.7 ind m-2) and species richness (from 2.6 to 6.1 sponge species m-2) was the rhodolith density rather than other population descriptors assessed (e.g., average size, branch density and sphericity). The identified sponges included a variety of forms: massive (46 %), encrusting (23 %), excavating (15 %), cushion-shape (8 %) and digitate (8 %). Moreover, more than 50 % of sponge species recorded (mainly massive and encrusting forms) were frequently found overgrowing and binding rhodoliths. Halichondria cf. semitubulosa and Mycale cecilia were the most common binding agents; these species bind an average of 3.1 and 6.6 rhodoliths per sponge individual, respectively. These findings reveal the importance of rhodoliths as habitat forming species, since these seaweed beds notably increased the substrate complexity in soft bottom environments. In addition, the relatively high abundance of sponges and their capability to bind rhodoliths suggest that these associated organisms could have an important contribution to rhodolith bed stability.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder as indicators of inputs to estuarine systems.

    PubMed

    Pruell, Richard J; Taplin, Bryan K

    2015-12-30

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several Rhode Island, USA estuarine systems. These included three coastal lagoons, an estuarine river and Narragansett Bay. The δ(13)C trends observed along transects in several systems showed isotopically depleted terrestrial signals in the upper reaches of the estuaries. Significant differences (P<0.05) in δ(15)N were observed among all estuarine systems and these differences correlated (P<0.01) with human population densities in the watersheds. Although Narragansett Bay has a strong north-south gradient in nutrient concentrations this trend was not reflected in flounder δ(15)N. The northernmost station with the highest nutrient concentrations unexpectedly had significantly lower δ(15)N values. Depleted δ(15)N values at this nutrient-rich station may indicate that concentration-dependent fractionation needs to be considered when using nitrogen isotope ratios in biota to monitor anthropogenic nitrogen inputs in systems with high nitrogen loadings. PMID:26541984

  15. Spatial patterns of fish communities along two estuarine gradients in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, D.P.J.; Trexler, J.C.; Lorenz, J.J.; McIvor, C.C.; Philippi, T.

    2006-01-01

    In tropical and subtropical estuaries, gradients of primary productivity and salinity are generally invoked to explain patterns in community structure and standing crops of fishes. We documented spatial and temporal patterns in fish community structure and standing crops along salinity and nutrient gradients in two subtropical drainages of Everglades National Park, USA. The Shark River drains into the Gulf of Mexico and experiences diurnal tides carrying relatively nutrient enriched waters, while Taylor River is more hydrologically isolated by the oligohaline Florida Bay and experiences no discernable lunar tides. We hypothesized that the more nutrient enriched system would support higher standing crops of fishes in its mangrove zone. We collected 50 species of fish from January 2000 to April 2004 at six sampling sites spanning fresh to brackish salinities in both the Shark and Taylor River drainages. Contrary to expectations, we observed lower standing crops and density of fishes in the more nutrient rich tidal mangrove forest of the Shark River than in the less nutrient rich mangrove habitats bordering the Taylor River. Tidal mangrove habitats in the Shark River were dominated by salt-tolerant fish and displayed lower species richness than mangrove communities in the Taylor River, which included more freshwater taxa and yielded relatively higher richness. These differences were maintained even after controlling for salinity at the time of sampling. Small-scale topographic relief differs between these two systems, possibly created by tidal action in the Shark River. We propose that this difference in topography limits movement of fishes from upstream marshes into the fringing mangrove forest in the Shark River system, but not the Taylor River system. Understanding the influence of habitat structure, including connectivity, on aquatic communities is important to anticipate effects of construction and operational alternatives associated with restoration of the

  16. Suspended matter and bottom deposits in the maroni estuarine system (French Guiana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jounneau, J. M.; Pujos, M.

    The purpose of the research on the major rivers in French Guiana is identification and estimation of their contribution to estuarine and inshore continental shelf sedimentation. Results are reported of field studies on the Maroni river conducted during one rainy season and one dry season. The sands of the Maroni fluvio-estuarine system are subject to seasonal variations. During the dry season the sands were distributed in two groups on either side of the lle aux Pigeons, whereas during the rainy season, greater homogeneity was noted throughout the estuary. The sands gave evidence of a lengthy history including marine, continental and finally fluviatile stages. The play a part in sedimentation on the inner continental shelf. Fine sediments had uniform characteristics throughout the year. Mineralogic and elemental composition in the vicinity of Ile Portal indicated that they were different on either side of a limit separating the fluviatile and estuarine zones. Sediment groups were respectively autochtonal (upstream) and allochtonal (downstream), while the characteristics of the clay assemblage and elemental composition in the latter zone are evidence of an Amazon river origin. Their patterns showed evidence of a local stock that is quickly diluted by the mass of sediments derived from the Amazon river, the predominant source for the region.

  17. What Determines Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Phytoplankton and Zooplankton in Strongly Estuarine Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Gargett, A.; Denman, K.

    2000-04-01

    A coupled biological-physical box model is developed to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability of marine plankton in strongly estuarine systems such as the semi-enclosed estuary of the Strait of Georgia and Juan de Fuca Strait on the west coast of Canada. The estuarine circulation not only supplies nutrients to the euphotic layer but also transports plankton between the straits, causing an asymmetrical distribution of plankton biomass in the estuary. A specific set of biological parameters can be chosen so that the model predicts a large spring bloom and nutrient limitation in the Strait of Georgia but high nutrient levels and no spring bloom in the Juan de Fuca Strait, in agreement with observations. However, as the plankton growth and mortality rate parameters are varied over a realistic range, the plankton also exhibit two other ecosystem behaviours: one with a large spring bloom in the Juan de Fuca Strait and one with a low zooplankton stock in the Strait of Georgia. To determine possible causes for observed interannual variability of the planktonic ecosystem, we have run the coupled biophysical model with stochastic variation of the Fraser River runoff and the shelf salinity. The plankton populations are found to be insensitive to the interannual variability in the estuarine circulation. It is suggested that marine phytoplankton and zooplankton might respond more significantly to climate variability (or change) through changes in their biological rate parameters.

  18. A box model approach for a long-term assessment of estuarine eutrophication, Szczecin Lagoon, southern Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humborg, Christoph; Fennel, Katja; Pastuszak, Marianna; Fennel, Wolfgang

    2000-07-01

    We develop a layered "box model" to evaluate the major effects of estuarine eutrophication of the Szczecin lagoon which can be compared with integrating measures (chlorophyll a (Chl a), sediment burial, sediment oxygen consumption (SOC), input and output of total nutrient loads) and use it to hindcast the period 1950-1996 (the years when major increase in nutrient discharges by the Oder River took place). The following state variables are used to describe the cycling of the limiting nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus): phytoplankton (Phy), labile and refractory detritus (D N, D Nref, D P, D Pref), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), and oxygen (O 2). The three layers of the model include two water layers and one sediment layer. Decrease of the carrying capacity with respect to the increased supply of organic matter of the system with advancing eutrophication over the period studied is parameterized by an exponential decrease of the sediment nitrogen fluxes with increasing burial, simulating changing properties from moderate to high accumulating sediments. The seasonal variation as well as the order of magnitude of nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton stocks in the water column remains in agreement with recent observations. Calculated annual mean values of nutrient burial of 193 mmol N m -2 a -1 and 23 mmol P m -2 a -1 are supported by observed values from geological sediment records. Estimated DIN remineralization in the sediments between 100 and 550 mmol N m -2 a -1 corresponds to SOC measurements. Simulated DIP release up to 60 mmol P m -2 a -1 corresponds to recent measurements. The conceptual framework presented here can be used for a sequential box model approach connecting small estuaries like the Szczecin lagoon and the open sea, and might also be connected with river box models.

  19. ESTUARINE HAZARD ASSESSMENT IN THE PENSACOLA BAY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ersonnel from the Gulf Ecology Division have conducted a multiyear evaluation of the environmental condition of areas in the Pensacola Bay System affected by point and nonpoint contamination. Areas of study included coastal rivers, residential canals, bayous and bays impacted by ...

  20. Human impacts on morphodynamic thresholds in estuarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Van Maren, D. S.; Ding, P. X.; Yang, S. L.; Van Prooijen, B. C.; De Vet, P. L. M.; Winterwerp, J. C.; De Vriend, H. J.; Stive, M. J. F.; He, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Many estuaries worldwide are modified, primarily driven by economic gain or safety. These works, combined with global climate changes heavily influence the morphologic development of estuaries. In this paper, we analyze the impact of human activities on the morphodynamic developments of the Scheldt Estuary and the Wadden Sea basins in the Netherlands and the Yangtze Estuary in China at various spatial scales, and identify mechanisms responsible for their change. Human activities in these systems include engineering works and dredging activities for improving and maintaining the navigation channels, engineering works for flood protection, and shoreline management activities such as land reclamations. The Yangtze Estuary is influenced by human activities in the upstream river basin as well, especially through the construction of many dams. The tidal basins in the Netherlands are also influenced by human activities along the adjacent coasts. Furthermore, all these systems are influenced by global changes through (accelerated) sea-level rise and changing weather patterns. We show that the cumulative impacts of these human activities and global changes may lead to exceeding thresholds beyond which the morphology of the tidal basins significantly changes, and loses its natural characteristics. A threshold is called tipping point when the changes are even irreversible. Knowledge on such thresholds or tipping points is important for the sustainable management of these systems. We have identified and quantified various examples of such thresholds and/or tipping points for the morphodynamic developments at various spatial and temporal scales. At the largest scale (mega-scale) we consider the sediment budget of a tidal basin as a whole. A smaller scale (macro-scale) is the development of channel structures in an estuary, especially the development of two competing channels. At the smallest scale (meso-scale) we analyze the developments of tidal flats and the connecting

  1. Modelling of cohesive sediment dynamics in tidal estuarine systems: Case study of Tagus estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, G.; Pinto, L.; Ascione, I.; Mateus, M.; Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P.; Neves, R.

    2014-12-01

    Cohesive sediment dynamics in estuarine systems is a major issue in water quality and engineering problems. Numerical models can help to assess the complex dynamics of cohesive sediments, integrating the information collected in monitoring studies. Following a numerical approach we investigated the main factors that influence the cohesive sediment dynamics in an estuarine system composed of large mudflats (Tagus estuary, Portugal). After a spin up period of the bottom layer and considering the combined effect of waves and currents on the bottom shear stress, the dynamics of cohesive sediment during the fortnightly and daily erosion-sedimentation cycle was properly reproduced by the model. The results of cohesive suspended sediments were validated with data from sixteen monitoring stations located along the estuary and turbidity data measured by two multiparametric probes. The hydrodynamics were previously validated by harmonic analysis and with ADCP data. Although tidal currents are the major cause of cohesive sediment erosion, the results suggest that wind waves also play an important role. The simulated sediment mass involved in the fortnightly tidal cycle was in the same order of magnitude of the annual load from the rivers, as observed in previous studies based on field data.

  2. Maps showing textural characteristics of benthic sediments in the Corpus Christi Bay estuarine system, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Stelting, Charles E.; McGowen, Joseph H.

    1981-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay is a heavily used estuary on the south Texas coast in the northwest Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1).  The Bay is stressed by diverse activities which could substantially affect its ecosystem.  Such activities include shipping, resource production (oil, gas, and construction aggregate), commercial and sport fishing, and recreation.  Shipping activities alone have had a substantial impact on the bay.  For example, the past maintenance of navigation channels has required extensive dredging and spoil disposal within the estuarine system.  Numerous subaqueous spoil disposal sites and subaerial spoil banks are present throughout the bay (fig. 1), and the selection of future spoil disposal sites is becoming a critical local problem.  As activities in the bay increase, the need for effective environmental management becomes increasingly important, and effective management necessitates a good understanding of the bay's physical characteristics.  The objective of this study is to provide detailed information about the textural composition of bottom sediments within the estuarine system, information which could be used in making environmental-management decisions.  Visual descriptions of bottom sediments in Corpus Christi Bay and adjacent areas have been presented by McGowen and Morton (1979).  Additionally, a study of the textures of sediments on the Inner Continental Shelf adjacent to the bay has been presented by Shideler and Berryhill (1977).

  3. Habitat and hydrology: assessing biological resources of the Suwannee River Estuarine System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Edwards, Randy E.; McIvor, Carole C.; Grubbs, Jack W.; Dennis, George D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a pilot integrated-science study during 2002 and 2003 to map, describe, and evaluate benthic and emergent habitats in the Suwannee River Estuary on the Gulf Coast of Florida. Categories of aquatic, emergent, and terrestrial habitats were determined from hyperspectral imagery and integrated with hydrologic data to identify estuarine fish habitats. Maps of intertidal and benthic habitat were derived from 12-band, 4-m resolution hyperspectral imagery acquired in September 2002. Hydrologic data were collected from tidal creeks during the winter of 2002-03 and the summer-fall of 2003. Fish were sampled from tidal creeks during March 2003 using rivulet nets, throw traps, and seine nets. Habitat characteristics, hydrologic data, and fish assemblages were compared for tidal creeks north and south of the Suwannee River. Tidal creeks north of the river had more shoreline edge and shallow habitat than creeks to the south. Tidal creeks south of the river were generally of lower salinity (fresher) and supported more freshwater marsh and submerged aquatic vegetation. The southern creeks tended to be deeper but less sinuous than the northern creeks. Water quality and inundation were evaluated with hydrologic monitoring in the creeks. In-situ gauges, recording pressure and temperature, documented a net discharge of brackish to saline groundwater into the tidal creeks with pronounced flow during low tide. Groundwater flow into the creeks was most prominent north of the river. Combined fish-sampling results showed an overall greater abundance of organisms and greater species richness in the southern creeks, nominally attributed a greater range in water quality. Fish samples were dominated by juvenile spot, grass shrimp, bay anchovy, and silverside. The short time frame for hydrologic monitoring and the one-time fish-sampling effort were insufficient for forming definitive conclusions. However, the combination of hyperspectral imagery and

  4. Linking DNRA community structure and activity in a shallow lagoonal estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bongkeun; Lisa, Jessica A.; Tobias, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and denitrification are two nitrate respiration pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Diversity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria have been extensively examined in various ecosystems. However, studies on DNRA bacterial diversity are limited, and the linkage between the structure and activity of DNRA communities has yet to be discovered. We examined the composition, diversity, abundance, and activities of DNRA communities at five sites along a salinity gradient in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA, a shallow temporal/lagoonal estuarine system. Sediment slurry incubation experiments with 15N-nitrate were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates, while the abundance of DNRA communities was calculated using quantitative PCR of nrfA genes encoding cytochrome C nitrite reductase, commonly found in DNRA bacteria. A pyrosequencing method targeting nrfA genes was developed using an Ion Torrent sequencer to examine the diversity and composition of DNRA communities within the estuarine sediment community. We found higher levels of nrfA gene abundance and DNRA activities in sediments with higher percent organic content. Pyrosequencing analysis of nrfA genes revealed spatial variation of DNRA communities along the salinity gradient of the New River Estuary. Percent abundance of dominant populations was found to have significant influence on overall activities of DNRA communities. Abundance of dominant DNRA bacteria and organic carbon availability are important regulators of DNRA activities in the eutrophic New River Estuary. PMID:25232351

  5. Blue carbon in human-dominated estuarine and shallow coastal systems.

    PubMed

    Kuwae, Tomohiro; Kanda, Jota; Kubo, Atsushi; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sohma, Akio; Suzumura, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine and shallow coastal systems (ESCS) are recognized as not only significant organic carbon reservoirs but also emitters of CO2 to the atmosphere through air-sea CO2 gas exchange, thus posing a dilemma on ESCS's role in climate change mitigation measures. However, some studies have shown that coastal waters take up atmospheric CO2 (Catm), although the magnitude and determinants remain unclear. We argue that the phenomenon of net uptake of Catm by ESCS is not unusual under a given set of terrestrial inputs and geophysical conditions. We assessed the key properties of systems that show the net Catm uptake and found that they are often characteristic of human-dominated systems: (1) input of high terrestrial nutrients, (2) input of treated wastewater in which labile carbon is highly removed, and (3) presence of hypoxia. We propose that human-dominated ESCS are worthy of investigation as a contributor to climate change mitigation. PMID:26531815

  6. Development of an estuarine assessment scheme for the management of a highly urbanised catchment/estuary system, Sydney estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Gunns, T J; Chapman, D; Harrison, D

    2016-05-01

    As coastal populations increase, considerable pressures are exerted on estuarine environments. Recently, there has been a trend towards the development and use of estuarine assessment schemes as a decision support tool in the management of these environments. These schemes offer a method by which complex environmental data is converted into a readily understandable and communicable format for informed decision making and effective distribution of limited management resources. Reliability and effectiveness of these schemes are often limited due to a complex assessment framework, poor data management and use of ineffective environmental indicators. The current scheme aims to improve reliability in the reporting of estuarine condition by including a concise assessment framework, employing high-value indicators and, in a unique approach, employing fuzzy logic in indicator evaluation. Using Sydney estuary as a case study, each of the 15 sub-catchment/sub-estuary systems were assessed using the current scheme. Results identified that poor sediment quality was a significant issue in Blackwattle/Rozelle Bay, Iron Cove and Hen and Chicken Bay while poor water quality was of particular concern in Duck River, Homebush Bay and the Parramatta River. Overall results of the assessment scheme were used to prioritise the management of each sub-catchment/sub-estuary assessed with Blackwattle/Rozelle Bay, Homebush Bay, Iron Cove and Duck River considered to be in need of a high priority management response. A report card format, using letter grades, was employed to convey the results of the assessment in a readily understood manner to estuarine managers and members of the public. Letter grades also provide benchmarking and performance monitoring ability, allowing estuarine managers to set improvement targets and assesses the effectiveness of management strategies. The current assessment scheme provides an effective, integrated and consistent assessment of estuarine health and

  7. Literature assessment of the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system and surrounding area, Southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Yvonne E.; Karavitis, George A.

    1983-01-01

    The Governor of Florida established the Charlotte Harbor Resource Planning and Management committee to recommend the course of action Florida should take in planning for potential growth in the rapidly growing area surrounding Charlotte Harbor. In May 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey began a planning study to determine detailed hydrologic study needs of the Charlotte Harbor area. A literature search of available data and reports pertaining to the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system and surrounding area resulted in almost 1,300 references. This report contains all references collected during this search. Some of the major reference topics are altered freshwater flow, water quality of the harbor and drainage systems, circulation and tides, coastal and marine resources, fisheries, geology and hydrology of the area, impact studies, water resources, flora and fauna of the area, and water supply. Sixty-eight key words or subject identifiers are used to the index report. (USGS)

  8. Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder as an Indicator of Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs to Estuarine Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (15N) were measured in muscle tissue of juvenile winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems (lagoons, river, bay) along the coast of Rhode Island, USA over a three-year period. Significant differences i...

  9. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  10. Impact of a major cyclone on a southeast African estuarine lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. T.; Cyrus, D. P.

    The St Lucia lake and estuarine system in northern Natal, South Africa was struck by Cyclone Domoina on 31 January 1984. This is the only cyclone known to have traversed part of South Africa. The ensuing flood levels in the St Lucia system (which have been exceeded perhaps only one other time in recorded history) provided an opportunity to assess the effect of a major disturbance on a subtropical estuarine system. Major geomorphological changes occurred in the mouth area where all man-made structures were obliterated. The two river channels were scoured from 2-3 m to 10-14 m in depth and widened by up to 300 m, while the shoreline between the two channels retreated in places up to 100 m. An estimated 16∗10 6 m 3 of sediment were removed from the lower reaches of the system including areas of mangrove and Phragmites australis swamp. One-metre tall mangrove saplings died following inundation lasting days to weeks. Effects on the fauna included redistribution of the tanaid Apseudes digitalis, the mysid Mesopodopsis africana, the copepod Pseudodiaptomus stuhlmanni, the polychaete Scololepis squamata and the bivalve Solen cylindraceus, all typical lake species which appeared in the tidal channel linking the lake with the sea. Responses of other species such as the penaeid prawns, the crab Scylla serrata and the sole Solea bleekeri suggested that physiological tolerance, extended larval or juvenile recruitment periods and prey switching minimized long-term flood effects. No large-scale mortalities were noted, and the absence of a temperature shock is considered to be a significant feature.

  11. THE PACIFIC COAST ESTUARINE INFORMATION SYSTEM: CREATING A BASELINE FOR THE FUTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal researchers and managers have a growing need for ready access to a diversity of
    data types, including estuarine-specific lists of native and nonindigenous species and estuarine/landscape characteristics. These data are key components in ecological risk assessments in g...

  12. Seasonal distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the Vaza Barris Estuarine System, Sergipe, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, José Carlos S; Santos, Lukas G G V; Sant'Anna, Mércia V S; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-03-15

    The seasonal assessment of anthropogenic activities in the Vaza Barris estuarine river system, located in the Sergipe state, northeastern Brazil, was performed using the aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution. The aliphatic hydrocarbon and isoprenoid (Pristane and Phytane) concentrations ranged between 0.19 μg g(-1) and 8.5 μg g(-1) of dry weight. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, with significance level set at p<0.05, and no seasonality distribution change was observed. The Carbon Preference Index (CPI), associated with n-alkanes/n-C16, Low Molecular Weight/High Molecular Weight ratio (LMW/HMW) and Terrigenous to Aquatic Ratio (TAR) suggested biogenic input of aliphatic hydrocarbons for most samples, with significant contribution of higher plants.

  13. Core sediment biogeochemistry in specific zones of Cochin Estuarine System (CES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhil, P. S.; Nair, Manju P.; Sujatha, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Geochemical composition is a set of data for predicting the climatic condition existing in an ecosystem. Both the surficial and core sediment geochemistry are helpful in monitoring, assessing and evaluating the marine environment. The aim of the research work is to assess the relationship between the biogeochemical constituents in the Cochin Estuarine System (CES), their modifications after a long period of anoxia and also to identify the various processes which control the sediment composition in this region, through a multivariate statistical approach. Therefore the study of present core sediment geochemistry has a critical role in unraveling the benchmark of their characterization. Sediment cores from four prominent zones of CES were examined for various biogeochemical aspects. The results have served as rejuvenating records for the prediction of core sediment status prevailing in the CES.

  14. Evaluation of anthropogenic contamination using sterol markers in a tropical estuarine system of northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frena, Morgana; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Madureira, Luiz A S; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-08-15

    The São Francisco River estuarine system, located in the Northeast coast of Brazil, has great economic, tourist and social importance. Its waters are used for activities such as agriculture, aquaculture, navigation and fishery, which supplies the surrounding communities. In this study, sterols markers were determined in twenty-eight sediment samples from São Francisco River estuary by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sterol analysis was useful to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic organic matter (OM) sources in the studied area. Six sterols were quantified, suggesting different sources. Concentrations of fecal sterol (coprostanol) were lower than 500ngg(-1), suggesting no indicative of severe sewage contamination.However, two stations showed concentrations around 100ngg(-1) and the values for the coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol ratios indicates sewage contamination. The results in this study may be considered as baseline concentrations to be used as future reference for monitoring programs to prevent anthropogenic impacts.

  15. Decision-support Systems: Do they have a Future in Estuarine Management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. D.; Tyler, A. O.; Wither, A. W.

    2002-12-01

    Estuaries are highly complex ecosystems. Consequently they present daunting challenges to planners and regulators responsible for devising ' sustainable development ' strategies or for taking rapid decisions with respect to ' crisis management '. Over the lifetime of the Estuarine and Coastal Sciences Association, there have been significant developments in both the range and sophistication of the tools available to assist with these tasks. Indeed, managers are now faced with a confusing plethora of possibilities that may, or may not, help in achieving the optimum solution to a given problem. Typical problems confronting managers and the systems available to resolve the issues are considered. By way of illustration, we present some examples based on our experience over the last 25 years in the Mersey Estuary (which has seen dramatic improvements in water quality and a number of major proposed developments), from the Ribble Estuary and from along the north-west coast of the U.K.

  16. The macrobenthic community along a mercury contamination in a temperate estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Nunes, M; Coelho, J P; Cardoso, P G; Pereira, M E; Duarte, A C; Pardal, M A

    2008-11-01

    Mercury is a widely distributed environmental pollutant and a toxic element to all living organisms. This study represents an attempt to evaluate its correlation with the macrobenthic community structure in a temperate estuarine system, the Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). The macrobenthic community structure showed significant differences along the mercury gradient. Overall, the increase of mercury contamination was associated with reduced total abundance, lower species richness, and dominance of tolerant taxa. The polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Alkmaria romijni, and the isopod Cyathura carinata were associated with high levels of mercury in sediment, while the bivalves Scrobicularia plana, Cerastoderma edule and Abra alba showed higher density in lesser contaminated sites. Furthermore, highly contaminated sites showed substantially lower abundances of surface-deposit feeders and herbivores, and higher abundances of subsurface-deposit feeders and omnivores. Salinity was also a significant factor affecting the community, being responsible for seasonal variations in the macrobenthic assemblages.

  17. Ichthyoplankton in a southern african surf zone: Nursery area for the postlarvae of estuarine associated fish species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. K.

    1989-12-01

    The surf zone ichthyoplankton of Swartvlei Bay was studied between February 1986 and June 1987, with particular emphasis on its potential role as a nursery area for estuarine associated marine fish species. Larvae and/or postlarvae of 16 families were identified from the surf zone, with the Gobiidae, Soleidae, Sparidae and Mugilidae comprising 85·7% of all teleosts sampled. The postlarvae of several taxa (including the six most common species), which utilize the Swartvlei estuary as a juvenile nursery area, were abundant in the surf zone. Conversely, species which are common in nearshore marine waters as juveniles and adults, but seldom enter estuaries, totalled less than 8% of the surf zone ichthyoplankton assemblage. Larval and postlarval densities peaked during summer when water temperatures exceeded 19°C and the estuary mouth was open. Concentrations of ichthyoplankton were highest at those sampling stations closest to the estuary mouth during the summer period. Diel changes in total catches revealed no significant difference between day and night densities; but of the four major taxa, the Mugilidae and Sparidae tended to be more abundant during the day, the Gobiidae at night and the Soleidae showed no distinct pattern. Results from a 24 h sampling session indicated that tidal phase may also be important in governing ichthyoplankton abundance in the surf zone.

  18. Estuarine Food for Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M�ller-Solger, A. B.; M�ller-Navarra, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in animal and human nutrition has shown the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as the n-3 LC-PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These LC-PUFA are needed for healthy development and functioning of the nervous and vascular systems. De novo synthesis or elongation to LC-PUFA in animals is inefficient at best; thus sufficient amounts of these PUFA must be supplied by food sources. Algae, especially diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes, are the quantitatively most important producers of EPA and DHA. These types of algae often dominate estuarine producer communities. The upper San Francisco Estuary is no exception, and we found its LC-PUFA-rich phytoplankton biomass, but not the quantitatively prevalent terrestrial plant detritus, to be highly predictive of zooplankton (Daphnia) growth. In contrast, in freshwater lakes dominated by relatively LC-PUFA-poor phytoplankton, EPA, not total phytoplankton biomass, best predicted Daphnia growth. The commonly high abundance of LC-PUFA-rich algae in estuaries may help explain the high trophic efficiencies in these systems and resulting high consumer production. Moreover, LC-PUFA-rich estuarine food resources may also provide essential nutrition and associated health and evolutionary benefits to land-dwelling consumers of such foods, including humans. Ensuring LC-PUFA-rich, uncontaminated estuarine production is thus an important goal for estuarine restoration and a convincing argument for estuarine conservation.

  19. 15 CFR 921.51 - Estuarine research guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Estuarine research guidelines. 921.51... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE SYSTEM REGULATIONS Special Research Projects § 921.51 Estuarine research guidelines. (a) Research within the National Estuarine Research Reserve System shall...

  20. 15 CFR 921.51 - Estuarine research guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Estuarine research guidelines. 921.51... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE SYSTEM REGULATIONS Special Research Projects § 921.51 Estuarine research guidelines. (a) Research within the National Estuarine Research Reserve System shall...

  1. Tracing coastal and estuarine groundwater discharge sources in a complex faulted and fractured karst aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Price, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater discharge can be an important input of water, nutrients and other constituents to coastal wetlands and adjacent marine areas, particularly in karst regions with little to no surface water flow. A combination of natural processes (e.g., sea-level rise and climate change) and anthropogenic pressures (e.g., urban growth and development) can alter the subterranean water flow to the coastline. For water management practices and environmental preservation to be better suited for the natural and human environment, a better understanding is needed of the hydrogeologic connectivity between the areas of fresh groundwater recharge and the coastal zone. The Yucatan peninsula has a unique tectonic and geologic history consisting of a Cretaceous impact crater, Miocene and Eocene tectonic plate movements, and multiple sea-level stands. These events have shaped many complex geologic formations and structures. The Sian Káan Biosphere Reserve (SKBR), a UNESCO World Heritage Site located along the Atlantic Ocean, overlaps two distinct hydrogeologic regions: the evaporate region to the south and south west, and the Holbox Fracture Zone to the north. These two regions create a complex network of layered, perched and fractured aquifers and an extensive groundwater cave network. The two regions are distinguished by bedrock mineralogical differences that can be used to trace shallow subsurface water from interior portions of the peninsula to the Bahia de la Ascension in the SKBR. The objective of this research was to use naturally occurring geochemical tracers (eg., Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, K+, Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+ and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen) to decipher the sources of groundwater flow through the coastal wetlands of the SKBR and into the Bahia de la Ascension. Surface water and groundwater samples were collected during two field campaigns in 2010 and 2012 within the coastal and estuarine waters of the SKBR. Additional water samples were collected at select cenotes along

  2. Nutrient fluctuations in the Quatipuru river: A macrotidal estuarine mangrove system in the Brazilian Amazonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamplona, Fábio Campos; Paes, Eduardo Tavares; Nepomuceno, Aguinaldo

    2013-11-01

    The temporal and spatial variability of dissolved inorganic nutrients (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, PO43- and DSi), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), nutrient ratios, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) were evaluated for the macrotidal estuarine mangrove system of the Quatipuru river (QUATIES), east Amazon coast, North Brazil. Temporal variability was assessed by fortnightly sampling at a fixed station within the middle portion of the estuary, from November 2009 to November 2010. Spatial variability was investigated from two field surveys conducted in November 2009 (dry season) and May 2010 (rainy season), along the salinity gradient of the system. The average DIN (NO3- + NO2- + NH4+) concentration of 9 μM in the dry season was approximately threefold greater in comparison to the rainy season. NH4+ was the main form of DIN in the dry season, while NO3- predominated in the rainy season. The NH4+ concentrations in the water column during the dry season are largely attributed to release by tidal wash-out of the anoxic interstitial waters of the surficial mangrove sediments. On the other hand, the higher NO3- levels during the wet season, suggested that both freshwater inputs and nitrification processes in the water column acted in concert. The river PO43- concentrations (DIP < 1 μM) were low and similar throughout the year. DIN was thus responsible for the major temporal and spatial variability of the dissolved DIN:DIP (N:P) molar ratios and nitrogen corresponded, in general, to the prime limiting nutrient for the sustenance of phytoplankton biomass in the estuary. During the dry season, P-limitation was detected in the upper estuary. PO43- adsorption to SPM was detected during the rainy season and desorption during the dry season along the salinity gradient. In general, the average Chl-a level (14.8 μg L-1) was 2.5 times higher in the rainy season than in the dry season (5.9 μg L-1). On average levels reached maxima at about 14 km from

  3. Radioactive impact in sediments from an estuarine system affected by industrial wastes releases.

    PubMed

    Bolívar, Juan Pedro; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Mas, José Luis; Vaca, Federico

    2002-03-01

    A big fertilizer industrial complex and a vast extension of phosphogypsum piles (12 km2), sited in the estuary formed by the Odiel and Tinto river mouths (southwest of Spain), are producing an unambiguous radioactive impact in their surrounding aquatic environment through radionuclides from the U-series. The levels and distribution of radionuclides in sediments from this estuarine system have been determined. The analyses of radionuclide concentrations and activity ratios have provided us with an interesting information to evaluate the extension, degree and routes of the radioactive impact, as well as for the knowledge of the different pathways followed for the radioactive contamination to disturb this natural system. The obtained results indicate that the main pathway of radioactive contamination of the estuary is through the dissolution in its waters of the radionuclides released by the industrial activities and their later fixation on the particulate materials. Tidal activity also plays an important role in the transport and homogenization along the estuary of the radioactivity released from the fertilizer plants.

  4. Meiobenthos assemblages in the mekong estuarine system with special focus on free-living marine nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Ngo Xuan; Vanreusel, Ann; Smol, Nic; Chau, Nguyen Ngoc

    2010-12-01

    Meiobenthos assemblages in eight estuaries of the Mekong river system were investigated in August 2008 (from the Cua Tieu estuary to the Tran De estuary). In each estuary, one sampling station was established for meiobenthos sampling. Twelve major taxa of meiobenthos were recorded in this estuarine system, including Nematoda, Copepoda, Turbellaria, Polychaeta, Oligochaeta, Tardigrada, Bivalvia, Ostracoda, Amphipoda, Cumacea, Gastrotricha, Gastropoda, and Crustacean Nauplii larvae. The densities of the meiobenthos range from 581 to 3168 inds/10 cm2. Nematodes always occupy the highest numbers with a percentage ranging from 64-99%. There are 135 nematode genera recorded in this study with the following as dominant genera Desmodora, Leptolaimus, Halalaimus, Thalassomonhystera, Theristus, Daptonema, Rhynchonema, Parodontophora, and Oncholaimus. Although the biodiversity of the meiobenthos at higher taxa level is not high compared to other marine environments, the estimates of nematode biodiversity at the genus level indicates high values. The increase in number of genera with increasing sampling intensity illustrate that the diversity is underestimated and would have been higher if the authors had considered a larger number of individuals, more replicates per station, and more sampling stations.

  5. Foraminiferal Distributions, Sedimentation Rates and Patterns in the Albemarle Estuarine System, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, D. J.; Corbett, D. R.; Culver, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The modern distribution of benthic foraminifera of the Albemarle Estuarine System (AES) has been characterized by studying 50 strategically chosen sites to provide a model for paleoenvironmental interpretations of short sediment cores (15-75 cm). Water bodies studied within the AES include Albemarle Sound, Currituck Sound, Roanoke Sound, Croatan Sound, northern Pamlico Sound, North River, Pasquotank River, Alligator River, as well as Oregon Inlet and the adjacent foreshore and shoreface of the Atlantic Ocean. Sedimentation rates in the study area have been addressed using 210Pb and 137Cs dating methods. Five foraminiferal assemblages are present: an inner estuary biofacies characterized by two dominant genera, Ammobaculites and Ammotium, with moderate percentages of Miliammina fusca and minor percentages of Ammoastuta salsa; an outer estuary biofacies characterized again by Ammobaculites and Ammotium, but with lower percentages of Miliammina fusca; a marsh shoreline biofacies characterized by a mixed assemblage dominated by Ammobaculites and Ammotium with minor to moderate percentages of adjacent marsh foraminifera; a marsh biofacies characterized by varying abundances of Ammoastuta inepta, Arenoparella mexicana, Haplophragmoides wilberti, Jadammina macrescens, Miliammina earlandi, Miliammina fusca, Tiphotrocha comprimata, Trochammina inflata, as well as the genera Ammobaculites and Ammotium; and a marine (normal salinity) biofacies characterized mainly by Elphidium excavatum and minor percentages of other elphidiids. Sedimentation rates were studied from 28 short cores taken along transects in all the major water bodies. Rates were as high as 0.45 cm/yr at the head of Albemarle Sound and as little as 0.05 cm/yr 60 km away in the eastern part of the Albemarle. The embayed tributaries exhibited sedimentation rates on the order of 0.25 cm/yr. Limited information on sedimentation rates was provided by cores in eastern sounds, which had only a few centimeters of recent

  6. Evaluation of anthropogenic contamination using sterol markers in a tropical estuarine system of northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frena, Morgana; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Madureira, Luiz A S; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-08-15

    The São Francisco River estuarine system, located in the Northeast coast of Brazil, has great economic, tourist and social importance. Its waters are used for activities such as agriculture, aquaculture, navigation and fishery, which supplies the surrounding communities. In this study, sterols markers were determined in twenty-eight sediment samples from São Francisco River estuary by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sterol analysis was useful to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic organic matter (OM) sources in the studied area. Six sterols were quantified, suggesting different sources. Concentrations of fecal sterol (coprostanol) were lower than 500ngg(-1), suggesting no indicative of severe sewage contamination.However, two stations showed concentrations around 100ngg(-1) and the values for the coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol ratios indicates sewage contamination. The results in this study may be considered as baseline concentrations to be used as future reference for monitoring programs to prevent anthropogenic impacts. PMID:27207024

  7. Assessment of the climate change impacts on fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chan, Wen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is one of the key factors affecting the future microbiological water quality in rivers and tidal estuaries. A coupled 3D hydrodynamic and fecal coliform transport model was developed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system for predicting the influences of climate change on microbiological water quality. The hydrodynamic and fecal coliform model was validated using observational salinity and fecal coliform distributions. According to the analyses of the statistical error, predictions of the salinity and the fecal coliform concentration from the model simulation quantitatively agreed with the observed data. The validated model was then applied to predict the fecal coliform contamination as a result of climate change, including the change of freshwater discharge and the sea level rise. We found that the reduction of freshwater discharge under climate change scenarios resulted in an increase in the fecal coliform concentration. The sea level rise would decrease fecal coliform distributions because both the water level and the water volume increased. A reduction in freshwater discharge has a negative impact on the fecal coliform concentration, whereas a rising sea level has a positive influence on the fecal coliform contamination. An appropriate strategy for the effective microbiological management in tidal estuaries is required to reveal the persistent trends of climate in the future.

  8. Seasonal patterns of alkalinity in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California, during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Salinity and alkalinity were measured in the near-surface waters of San Francisco Bay estuarine system at two-week intervals during 1980. Results are presented in figures and as numerical values, and the analytical methods are detailed. The transport of alkalinity to the Bay from the delta during 1980 was 3.8 x 10 to Ohe 10th power equivalents; this estimate is based on the freshwater alkalinity concentrations predicted by the north San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions. North San Francisco Bay distributions are primarily the result of conservative mixing of freshwater from the Delta with Pacific Ocean water. Nonlinear distributions are the consequence of alkalinity variations in the freshwater rather than the effects of in-estuary processes or sources. Seasonal inflow of agricultural waste water is a major cause of freshwater alkalinity variations. South San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions show the effects of variations in Delta outflow rate, local streams, and municipal waste-water inflows. (USGS)

  9. Assessment of the climate change impacts on fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chan, Wen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is one of the key factors affecting the future microbiological water quality in rivers and tidal estuaries. A coupled 3D hydrodynamic and fecal coliform transport model was developed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system for predicting the influences of climate change on microbiological water quality. The hydrodynamic and fecal coliform model was validated using observational salinity and fecal coliform distributions. According to the analyses of the statistical error, predictions of the salinity and the fecal coliform concentration from the model simulation quantitatively agreed with the observed data. The validated model was then applied to predict the fecal coliform contamination as a result of climate change, including the change of freshwater discharge and the sea level rise. We found that the reduction of freshwater discharge under climate change scenarios resulted in an increase in the fecal coliform concentration. The sea level rise would decrease fecal coliform distributions because both the water level and the water volume increased. A reduction in freshwater discharge has a negative impact on the fecal coliform concentration, whereas a rising sea level has a positive influence on the fecal coliform contamination. An appropriate strategy for the effective microbiological management in tidal estuaries is required to reveal the persistent trends of climate in the future. PMID:26545372

  10. Annual cycle of humic substances in a temperate estuarine system affected by agricultural practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeles, Matthieu; Riso, Ricardo; Pernet-Coudrier, Benoît; Quentel, François; Durrieu, Gaël; Tissot, Cyril

    2013-04-01

    Although widely studied for their chemical structures and properties (e.g., metal complexation, growth stimulation of planktonic species), humic substances (HS) have been very poorly quantified in fluvial and estuarine waters. In this monthly basis study, we determined HS concentrations (by Adsorptive Square Wave Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry) along the entire river-seawater gradient of the Penzé estuary (NW France), with the aim to characterize the export of these compounds. In this watershed where agricultural activities are predominant, manuring activities were identified as being the main source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and HS. HS concentrations varied usually within a narrow range in fluvial waters, i.e., 1.8 ± 0.4 mgC L-1 (150 ± 40 μM), but increased significantly as the first flood of autumn occurred (>4 mgC L-1 in river and upper estuary). At this time, HS accounted for a very high proportion of DOC (>80%). As evidenced by the increasing contribution of HS to DOC, and by the increasing contribution of small colloidal HS species; this autumnal flood increase should be attributed to a greater retention and transformation of organic matter on soils over the hotter, drier, and lighter period preceding the first autumnal flood. In the mixing zone, HS displayed mostly conservative behaviour, although some removals were occasionally observed. Overall, our study suggests that preservation of HS could be relatively important during their transfer across macrotidal temperate estuaries, at least in systems affected by agricultural practices.

  11. Phytoplankton productivity and biomass in the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Montgomery, Ralph T.; Emmons, Edward E.

    1990-01-01

    Phytoplankton carbon-14 productivity at a depth of 50 percent of surface light and chlorophyll-a concentrations were measured every other month from November 1985 through September 1986 at 12 stations in the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system. Maximum productivity and chlorophyll-a concentrations occurred during summer or early autumn near the months of tidal rivers. Most of the variability in light-normalized productivity and chlorophyll-a could be attributed to two factors derived from Principal Component Analysis of ambient water-quality characteristics. One factor related to seasonal variability and the other to spatial variability. The seasonal factor incorporated the interaction of temperature and nutrients. The spatial factor incorporated the interaction of salinity, nutrients, and water color that resulted from the mixing of freshwater inflow and seawater. Although freshwater inflow increased the availability of nutrients in low salinity (less than 10 %) waters, the highly colored freshwater restricted light penetration and phytoplankton productivity. Maximum productivity and biomass occurred where color associated with the freshwater inflow had been diluted by seawater so that light and nutrients were both available. Concentrations of inorganic nitrogen were often at or below detection limit throughout most of the high salinity (greater than 20 %) waters of the estuary and was probably the most critical nutrient in limiting phytoplankton productivity.

  12. Factors affecting the efficiency of carbon monoxide photoproduction in the St. Lawrence estuarine system (Canada).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Xie, Huixiang; Chen, Guohua

    2006-12-15

    This study examined the effects of water temperature and the origin (terrestrial vs marine) and light history of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on the apparent quantum yields of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction for water samples collected along a salinity gradient (salinity range: 0-33) in the St. Lawrence estuarine system (Canada). The solar insolation-weighted mean apparent quantum yield of CO (phico) decreased as much as fourfold with increasing salinity and showed a strong positive correlation with the dissolved organic carbon-specific absorption coefficient at 254 nm. This suggests that terrestrial CDOM is more efficient at photochemically producing CO than is marine algae-derived CDOM and that aromatic moieties are likely involved in this photoprocess. CDOM photobleaching, mainly at the very early stage, dramatically decreased phico (by up to 6.4 times) for low-salinity samples, but photobleaching had little effect on the most marine sample. For a 20 degree C increase in temperature, phico increased by approximately 70% for low-salinity samples and 30-40% for saline samples. This study demonstrates that water temperature, as well as the CDOM's origin and light history, strongly affect the efficiency of CO photoproduction. These factors should be taken into account in modeling the photochemical fluxes of CO and other related CDOM photoproducts on varying spatiotemporal scales. PMID:17256526

  13. An assessment of mercury in estuarine sediment and tissue in Southern New Jersey using public domain data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Kara; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Pamela A.; Barringer, Julia; Smalling, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is considered a contaminant of global concern for coastal environments due to its toxicity, widespread occurrence in sediment, and bioaccumulation in tissue. Coastal New Jersey, USA, is characterized by shallow bays and wetlands that provide critical habitat for wildlife but share space with expanding urban landscapes. This study was designed as an assessment of the magnitude and distribution of Hg in coastal New Jersey sediments and critical species using publicly available data to highlight potential data gaps. Mercury concentrations in estuary sediments can exceed 2 μg/g and correlate with concentrations of other metals. Based on existing data, the concentrations of Hg in mussels in southern New Jersey are comparable to those observed in other urbanized Atlantic Coast estuaries. Lack of methylmercury data for sediments, other media, and tissues are data gaps needing to be filled for a clearer understanding of the impacts of Hg inputs to the ecosystem.

  14. An assessment of mercury in estuarine sediment and tissue in Southern New Jersey using public domain data.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kara; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Pamela A; Barringer, Julia L; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-06-15

    Mercury (Hg) is considered a contaminant of global concern for coastal environments due to its toxicity, widespread occurrence in sediment, and bioaccumulation in tissue. Coastal New Jersey, USA, is characterized by shallow bays and wetlands that provide critical habitat for wildlife but share space with expanding urban landscapes. This study was designed as an assessment of the magnitude and distribution of Hg in coastal New Jersey sediments and critical species using publicly available data to highlight potential data gaps. Mercury concentrations in estuary sediments can exceed 2μg/g and correlate with concentrations of other metals. Based on existing data, the concentrations of Hg in mussels in southern New Jersey are comparable to those observed in other urbanized Atlantic Coast estuaries. Lack of methylmercury data for sediments, other media, and tissues are data gaps needing to be filled for a clearer understanding of the impacts of Hg inputs to the ecosystem. PMID:27158049

  15. Water Quality Gradients across Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System: Seasonal Variations and Model Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.

    2004-12-01

    The seasonal variations of water quality parameters as nitrite plus nitrate (NO23), total phosphate (PO4), Chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen (DO) are analyzed across the Croatan-Roanoke-Albemarle-Pamlico-Core Sounds Estuarine System (CAPES). Overall, several patterns are observed: The Chowan-Roanoke-Albemarle system is generally phosphorous limiting for phytoplankton growth, while both the Tar-Pamlico and the Neuse Rivers are generally nitrogen limiting. The largest PO4 gradients exist in the upper estuary of the Albemarle Sound and the largest NO23 gradients exist in the upper estuary of the Neuse and the Tar-Pamlico Rivers. Dissolved oxygen appears to have the strongest seasonal signal among the water quality variables with highest DO values observed during winter (within the CAPES and in the nearshore area) or spring (in the continental shelf and deeper ocean) and lowest during summer. Chlorophyll a concentrations are highest during spring (within the CAPES) or winter (offshore). In contrast, the NO23 and PO4 concentrations in both the Tar-Pamlico and Neuse River Estuaries are usually higher during the second half of the year. The time differences of the peak nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations suggest that highest algal growth rate (and hence nutrient uptake rate) occur during spring while the consumed nutrients are released to the water column through a nutrient recycling method later in the year. A coupled three-dimensional hydrodynamic water quality model is then applied to the entire system. The general model set-up and parameter derivation of the model is presented in the paper. The basic observed water quality characteristics such as the nutrient limiting pattern and the spatial gradients across the system are reproduced in the model. The model results also suggest that nutrient fluxes, generated from the diagenesis of deposited organic matters and released from the sediment bed may be an important mechanism for nutrient recycling in the region.

  16. Water use patterns of estuarine vegetation in a tidal creek system.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Lockington, David A; Poh, Seng-Chee; Gasparon, Massimo; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2013-06-01

    Water availability is a key determinant of the zonation patterns in estuarine vegetation, but water availability and the use of different water sources over space and time are not well understood. We have determined the seasonal water use patterns of riparian vegetation over an estuarine ecotone. Our aim was to investigate how the water use patterns of estuarine vegetation respond to variations in the availability of tidal creek water and rain-derived freshwater. The levels of natural stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were assessed in the stem of the mangrove Avicennia marina (tall and scrub growth forms), Casuarina glauca and Melaleuca quinquenervia that were distributed along transects from river/creek-front towards inland habitats. The isotopic composition of plant tissues and the potential water sources were assessed in both the wet season, when freshwater from rainfall is present, and the dry season, when mangrove trees are expected to be more dependent on tidal water, and when Casuarina and Melaleuca are expected to be dependent on groundwater. Our results indicate that rainwater during the wet season contributes significantly to estuarine vegetation, even to creek-side mangroves which are inundated by tidal creek water daily, and that estuarine vegetation depends primarily on freshwater throughout the year. In contrast, high intertidal scrub mangroves were found to use the greatest proportion of tidal creek water, supplemented by groundwater in the dry season. Contrary to prediction, inland trees C. glauca and M. quinquenervia were found also to rely predominantly on rainwater--even in the dry season. The results of this study reveal a high level of complexity in vegetation water use in estuarine settings.

  17. Distribution, sources and biogeochemistry of organic matter in a mangrove dominated estuarine system (Indian Sundarbans) during the pre-monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R.; Rixen, T.; Baum, A.; Malik, A.; Gleixner, G.; Jana, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    The sources and distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Indian Sundarbans mangrove and Hooghly estuarine system were examined during the pre-monsoon (summer) 2014. DOC is the dominant form of organic matter (OM) in the studied estuarine waters and represents a mixture of mangrove and riverine sources. Microbial degradation of land derived OM results in a high pCO2 in the Hooghly estuarine waters while enrichment in δ13C-DIC ascribes to CO2 uptake by phytoplankton in the Sundarbans water. Higher δ15N in the particulate organic nitrogen (PON) of the mangrove and marine zone could be associated with enhanced phytoplankton production sustained by nitrate from mangrove derived OM decomposition and/or nitrate imported from the Bay of Bengal. Low organic carbon contents and elemental ratios (TN/TOC) indicate an intense mineralization and transformation of OM in the sediments, resulting insignificantly different OM compositions compared to those of the three major sources: land derived OM, mangrove leaf litter (Avicennia marina) and in situ phytoplankton production.

  18. Habitat utilization by fishes in a shallow, semi-enclosed estuarine bay in southern Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajisamae, Sukree; Yeesin, Pun; Chaimongkol, Saweit

    2006-07-01

    One hundred and eight fish species were collected between March 2003 and February 2004 from 11 study sites in Pattani Bay, southern Gulf of Thailand. The catches consisted primarily of juveniles or adults of small-sized fishes, indicating that the bay was important as nursery ground for fishes. Of the 43 families, Leiognathidae (43.3% contribution), Centropomidae (15.2%), Siganidae (13.8%), Engraulidae (10.3%), Atheriniidae (6.9%), Clupeidae (4.8%) and Ariidae (3.1%) were dominant in the catch. Significant differences were found in relative abundance and species richness between both sampling sites and months. The sampling sites were clearly defined by fish community into four different habitats that were directly related with the bottom structure of each site. The 30 most dominant fish species were categorized according to habitat preference into five different groups. Some species exhibited preference for specific habitats, whereas others were distributed throughout the bay. Seasonally, fish community structure revealed four different recruitment and occurrence periods, which were February to April, May to September, October and November to January, which was partially related to local monsoonal seasons. Analysis of the 30 most dominant fish species demonstrated that they were clustered into six different seasonal groups, with some showing a clear preference for specific months, although many recruited and occurred throughout the year. Results of this study help to clarify the ranges of habitats, months and seasons used by a number of fish species found in tropical coastal habitat.

  19. Using a Laboratory Simulator in the Teaching and Study of Chemical Processes in Estuarine Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Luque, E.; Ortega, T.; Forja, J. M.; Gomez-Parra, A.

    2004-01-01

    The teaching of Chemical Oceanography in the Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences of the University of Cadiz (Spain) has been improved since 1994 by the employment of a device for the laboratory simulation of estuarine mixing processes and the characterisation of the chemical behaviour of many substances that pass through an estuary. The…

  20. Predicting the Spatial Distribution of Organic Contaminants in an Estuarine System using a Random Forest Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the magnitude and distribution of estuarine sediment contamination by pollutants of historic (e.g. PCB) and emerging concern (e.g., personal care products, PCP) is often limited by incomplete site knowledge and inadequate sediment contamination sampling. We tested a mode...

  1. Impact of sea level rise on the sedimentology and stratigraphy of estuarine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.F.; Kearney, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Drowned-river valley estuaries are characteristic features of trailing-edge continental margins, as exemplified by the United States Atlantic Coast. During marine transgressions, the classic cycle of estuarine development is one of initial submergence and subsequent infilling, with the latter stages marked by extensive accumulations of fine-grained sediments in expanding marshes, deltas, and floodplains. Seismic surveys, vibracoring, and radiocarbon dating in the estuarine tributaries in middle Chesapeake Bay (The largest estuary along the Atlantic Coast), indicate that thick accumulations (>25 m) of organic-rich fine-grained sediments have been deposited since the middle Holocene. However, studies of recent accretion rate (based on pollen and radionuclide analyses) suggest the marshes, which represent a near-end member of the estuarine depositional sequence, may no longer be accumulating significant volumes of sediment. Relatively rapid crustal subsidence plus eustatic sea level rise produces a local submergence of approx. 4 mm/yr. Although marsh accretion rates in the upper estuarine tributaries approach 1 cm/yr, marsh accretion rates in the middle and lower reaches are significantly less (<2 mm/yr) than submergence. Here, numerous marshes are converting to open water as they become increasingly flooded by the tides. This change in depositional regime is also reflected in the carbon content (decreasing) and grain size (coarsening) of the marsh sediments and tidal channel migrations. In the coming decades, the rate of the world sea level rise is projected to increase significantly. This acceleration in the global eustatic trend together with lower sediment inputs from surrounding watersheds may reverse the historic trend of estuarine infilling.

  2. Overview of integrative tools and methods in assessing ecological integrity in estuarine and coastal systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Borja, Angel; Bricker, Suzanne B; Dauer, Daniel M; Demetriades, Nicolette T; Ferreira, João G; Forbes, Anthony T; Hutchings, Pat; Jia, Xiaoping; Kenchington, Richard; Carlos Marques, João; Zhu, Changbo

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several sets of legislation worldwide (Oceans Act in USA, Australia or Canada; Water Framework Directive or Marine Strategy in Europe, National Water Act in South Africa, etc.) have been developed in order to address ecological quality or integrity, within estuarine and coastal systems. Most such legislation seeks to define quality in an integrative way, by using several biological elements, together with physico-chemical and pollution elements. Such an approach allows assessment of ecological status at the ecosystem level ('ecosystem approach' or 'holistic approach' methodologies), rather than at species level (e.g. mussel biomonitoring or Mussel Watch) or just at chemical level (i.e. quality objectives) alone. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of tools for different physico-chemical or biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, algae, phanerogams, fishes) elements of the ecosystems. However, few methodologies integrate all the elements into a single evaluation of a water body. The need for such integrative tools to assess ecosystem quality is very important, both from a scientific and stakeholder point of view. Politicians and managers need information from simple and pragmatic, but scientifically sound methodologies, in order to show to society the evolution of a zone (estuary, coastal area, etc.), taking into account human pressures or recovery processes. These approaches include: (i) multidisciplinarity, inherent in the teams involved in their implementation; (ii) integration of biotic and abiotic factors; (iii) accurate and validated methods in determining ecological integrity; and (iv) adequate indicators to follow the evolution of the monitored ecosystems. While some countries increasingly use the establishment of marine parks to conserve marine biodiversity and ecological integrity, there is awareness (e.g. in Australia) that conservation and management of marine ecosystems cannot be restricted to Marine Protected

  3. Overview of integrative tools and methods in assessing ecological integrity in estuarine and coastal systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Borja, Angel; Bricker, Suzanne B; Dauer, Daniel M; Demetriades, Nicolette T; Ferreira, João G; Forbes, Anthony T; Hutchings, Pat; Jia, Xiaoping; Kenchington, Richard; Carlos Marques, João; Zhu, Changbo

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several sets of legislation worldwide (Oceans Act in USA, Australia or Canada; Water Framework Directive or Marine Strategy in Europe, National Water Act in South Africa, etc.) have been developed in order to address ecological quality or integrity, within estuarine and coastal systems. Most such legislation seeks to define quality in an integrative way, by using several biological elements, together with physico-chemical and pollution elements. Such an approach allows assessment of ecological status at the ecosystem level ('ecosystem approach' or 'holistic approach' methodologies), rather than at species level (e.g. mussel biomonitoring or Mussel Watch) or just at chemical level (i.e. quality objectives) alone. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of tools for different physico-chemical or biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, algae, phanerogams, fishes) elements of the ecosystems. However, few methodologies integrate all the elements into a single evaluation of a water body. The need for such integrative tools to assess ecosystem quality is very important, both from a scientific and stakeholder point of view. Politicians and managers need information from simple and pragmatic, but scientifically sound methodologies, in order to show to society the evolution of a zone (estuary, coastal area, etc.), taking into account human pressures or recovery processes. These approaches include: (i) multidisciplinarity, inherent in the teams involved in their implementation; (ii) integration of biotic and abiotic factors; (iii) accurate and validated methods in determining ecological integrity; and (iv) adequate indicators to follow the evolution of the monitored ecosystems. While some countries increasingly use the establishment of marine parks to conserve marine biodiversity and ecological integrity, there is awareness (e.g. in Australia) that conservation and management of marine ecosystems cannot be restricted to Marine Protected

  4. Northeast Coastal Ocean Forecast System (NECOFS): A Multi-scale Global-Regional-Estuarine FVCOM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. C.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Northeast Coastal Ocean Forecast System (NECOFS) is a global-regional-estuarine integrated atmosphere/surface wave/ocean forecast model system designed for the northeast US coastal region covering a computational domain from central New Jersey to the eastern end of the Scotian Shelf. The present system includes 1) the mesoscale meteorological model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting); 2) the regional-domain FVCOM covering the Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank/New England Shelf region (GOM-FVCOM); 3) the unstructured-grid surface wave model (FVCOM-SWAVE) modified from SWAN with the same domain as GOM-FVCOM; 3) the Mass coastal FVCOM with inclusion of inlets, estuaries and intertidal wetlands; and 4) three subdomain wave-current coupled inundation FVCOM systems in Scituate, MA, Hampton River, NH and Mass Bay, MA. GOM-FVCOM grid features unstructured triangular meshes with horizontal resolution of ~ 0.3-25 km and a hybrid terrain-following vertical coordinate with a total of 45 layers. The Mass coastal FVCOM grid is configured with triangular meshes with horizontal resolution up to ~10 m, and 10 layers in the vertical. Scituate, Hampton River and Mass Bay inundation model grids include both water and land with horizontal resolution up to ~5-10 m and 10 vertical layers. GOM-FVCOM is driven by surface forcing from WRF model output configured for the region (with 9-km resolution), the COARE3 bulk air-sea flux algorithm, local river discharges, and tidal forcing constructed by eight constituents and subtidal forcing on the boundary nested to the Global-FVCOM. SWAVE is driven by the same WRF wind field with wave forcing at the boundary nested to Wave Watch III configured for the northwestern Atlantic region. The Mass coastal FVCOM and three inundation models are connected with GOM-FVCOM through one-way nesting in the common boundary zones. The Mass coastal FVCOM is driven by the same surface forcing as GOM-FVCOM. The nesting boundary conditions for the inundation models

  5. Chesapeake Bay nitrogen fluxes derived from a land-estuarine ocean biogeochemical modeling system: Model description, evaluation, and nitrogen budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yang; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wilkin, John; Tian, Hanqin; Yang, Qichun; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Wiggert, Jerry D.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2015-08-01

    The Chesapeake Bay plays an important role in transforming riverine nutrients before they are exported to the adjacent continental shelf. Although the mean nitrogen budget of the Chesapeake Bay has been previously estimated from observations, uncertainties associated with interannually varying hydrological conditions remain. In this study, a land-estuarine-ocean biogeochemical modeling system is developed to quantify Chesapeake riverine nitrogen inputs, within-estuary nitrogen transformation processes and the ultimate export of nitrogen to the coastal ocean. Model skill was evaluated using extensive in situ and satellite-derived data, and a simulation using environmental conditions for 2001-2005 was conducted to quantify the Chesapeake Bay nitrogen budget. The 5 year simulation was characterized by large riverine inputs of nitrogen (154 × 109 g N yr-1) split roughly 60:40 between inorganic:organic components. Much of this was denitrified (34 × 109 g N yr-1) and buried (46 × 109 g N yr-1) within the estuarine system. A positive net annual ecosystem production for the bay further contributed to a large advective export of organic nitrogen to the shelf (91 × 109 g N yr-1) and negligible inorganic nitrogen export. Interannual variability was strong, particularly for the riverine nitrogen fluxes. In years with higher than average riverine nitrogen inputs, most of this excess nitrogen (50-60%) was exported from the bay as organic nitrogen, with the remaining split between burial, denitrification, and inorganic export to the coastal ocean. In comparison to previous simulations using generic shelf biogeochemical model formulations inside the estuary, the estuarine biogeochemical model described here produced more realistic and significantly greater exports of organic nitrogen and lower exports of inorganic nitrogen to the shelf.

  6. Catchment controls and human disturbances on the geomorphology of small Mediterranean estuarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrany, Joan; Grimalt, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Geographic signatures are physical and human-induced characteristics or processes that identify comparable or unique features of estuaries along latitudinal gradients. In Mediterranean areas, the microtidal regime and the strong seasonal and inter-annual contrasts cause an alternation between relatively high runoff and arid conditions. Furthermore, the long history of human settlement also increases the complexity in the study of these estuarine systems. This study investigates these signatures of the estuaries located within the Mallorcan eastern coast, which are geomorphologically homogeneous because of a similar bedrock geology and Holocene history. A multi-method approach focused on the integration of geomorphometry, hydraulics, historical sources and statistics was used. We explore the role played by catchment morphometric parameters, severe flash flood events and human disturbances in controlling the geomorphology of 10 beach-barrier enclosed, fluvial incised lagoons. Most of the lagoons discharge into 'calas', ranging in size from 1345 to 17,537 m2 and their related catchments are representative of the Mediterranean hydrological systems. Multiple regression models illustrate that the size, slope and drainage network development of the catchments explain the variance in length (r2 = 0.67), volume (r2 = 0.49), area (r2 = 0.64), circularity (r2 = 0.72) and average width (r2 = 0.81) of the lagoons. Depending on these catchment morphometric variables, the shape of the lagoons is also determined by the occurrence of catastrophic flash floods, which cause scouring and dredging, whereas the ordinary flood events and sea storms promote refilling and sedimentation. A historical analysis since 1850 documented 18 flood events, 5 of which were catastrophic with destructive effects along the catchments and large morphological changes in coastal lagoons. High intensity rainfall (up to 200 mm in 2 h), the geomorphometry of the catchments and the massive construction of

  7. Sedimentary environments within a glaciated estuarine-inner shelf system: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    and both geologic and oceanographic processes. The estuarine part of the system is an effective trap for fine-grained detritus because of its protected nature, low wave climate, and large supply of sediments. The open shelf, however, is largely mantled by winnowed and sorted sediments as a result of erosion during past sea-level fluctuations, sediment resuspension and transport by modern waves and currents, and a spatially variable supply of fine-grained sediments. ?? 1993.

  8. Inferring nutrient loading of estuarine systems by remote sensing of aquatic vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    THe use of remote sensing to record algal and vascular aquatic plant growths in estuarine waters is discussed. A technique is proposed that uses a combination of data to hierarchically classify watersheds with regard to severity of potential pollution. Specific nonpoint sources of nutrients in tributaries of the watershed are identified with lower altitude photography of vegetation and selected ground sampling. It is concluded that excessive growths of some aquatic plants may be related to nutrient pollution.

  9. Impact of sea level rise don the sedimentology and stratigraphy of estuarine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, L.G.; Kearney, M.S.

    1988-02-01

    Drowned-river valley estuaries are characteristic features of trailing-edge continental margins, as exemplified by the US Atlantic Coast. During marine transgressions, the classic cycle of estuarine development is one of the initial submergence and subsequent infilling, with the latter stages marked by extensive accumulations of fine-grained sediments in expanding marshes, deltas, and floodplains. Seismic surveys, vibracoring, and radiocarbon dating in the estuarine tributaries in middle Chesapeake Bay (the largest estuary along the Atlantic Coast) indicate that thick accumulations (> 25 m) of organic-rich fine-grained sediments have been deposited since the middle Holocene. However, studies of recent accretion rates (based on pollen and radionuclide analyses) suggest the marshes, which represent a near-end member of the estuarine depositional sequence, may no longer be accumulating significant volumes of sediment. Relatively rapid crustal subsidence plus eustatic sea level rise produces a local submergence of /approximately/4 mm/yr. Although marsh accretion rates in the upper eustarine tributaries approach 1 cm/yr, marsh accretion rates in the middle and lower reaches are significantly less (< 2 mm/yr) than submergence. Here, numerous marshes are converting to open water as they become increasingly flooded by the tides. This change in depositional regime is also reflected in the carbon content (decreasing) and grain size (coarsening) of the marsh sediments and tidal channel migrations. In the coming decades, the rate of the world sea level rise is projected to increase significantly. This acceleration in the global eustatic trend together with lower sediment inputs from surrounding watersheds may reverse the historic trend of estuarine infilling.

  10. Coastal wetland response to sea level rise in a marine and fluvial estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizad, K.; Hagen, S. C.; Morris, J. T.; Bilskie, M. V.; Passeri, D. L.; Medeiros, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    . Most of the salt marshes become flooded and some of them migrate under higher SLR scenarios. These examples show how this tool can be used in any estuarine system to project salt marsh productivity and accretion under sea level change scenarios to better interpret responses and improve restoration and planning management decisions.

  11. Multi-element study of sediments from the river Khai River - Nha Trang Bay estuarine system, South China Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukina, Sofia; Lobus, Nikolai; Peresypkin, Valery; Baturin, Gleb; Smurov, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    Major (Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, Ca, Na, K), minor (Mn) and trace (Cr, Ni, Cd, V, Zn, Cu, Pb, Sb, Bi, Sn, Ag, Li, Co, As, Zr, Mo, Hg) elements along with nutrients (TOC, TS, TP) and TIC were first determined in ten surface sediment samples from the Khai River - Nha Trang Bay estuarine system, South China Sea. According to the sediment quality guidelines and reference background values, most of the element contents that were studied were below the threshold levels, while the content of Ag exceeded significantly the hazardous levels in the most of the samples along the river - sea transect. The local anthropogenic and/or environmental sources of Ag within the region need special study. Aluminum and lithium normalization indicated some specific features in the abundance and distribution of the elements along the salinity gradient. The mean grain size of the sediments decreased from the river part to the bay part of the transect. Sedimentary TOC was relatively low (1-2 %) and showed independent distribution along the river - sea transect in relation to the other elements that were studied. Ca, Ba and Sr distribution showed some sporadic enrichment and were largely controlled by the TIC content in sediments. Sedimentary TP, Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Na, K, Li, Co, Cs, Zn and V varied within the narrow range and tended to increase seaward. These elements are most likely controlled by the accumulation of their fine grained aluminosilicate host minerals and materials at sites determined by hydrodynamic conditions, i. e., in the sea floor depression. TS, As, Sn, Bi, U, Cd and Mo were relatively low in the sediments studied and tended to decrease seaward with the slight elevation in the intermediate part of the transect. These elements can be scavenged by and/or co-precipitated with the dissolved and particulate materials of the river discharge and further deposited on the river - sea geochemical barrier in the course of estuarine sedimentation. The distribution of Ni, Cr, Zr Cu, Pb, Sb, Hg and

  12. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contribution of the International GPM Program to the NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division's System-wide Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kent; Anderson, Daniel; Lewis, David

    2007-01-01

    Data collected via the International GPM Program could be used to provide a solution for the NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division s System-wide Monitoring Program by augmenting in situ rainfall measurements with data acquired via future satellite-acquired precipitation data. This Candidate Solution is in alignment with the Coastal Management National Application and will benefit society by assisting in estuary preservation.

  13. Quantification of Sterol and Triterpenol Biomarkers in Sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape Estuarine-Lagoonal System (Brazil) by UHPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Bataglion, Giovana Anceski; Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Weber, Rolf Roland; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Sterols and triterpenols present in sedimentary cores from 12 stations along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system were investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Ten sterols and three triterpenols were identified and quantified, indicating both natural and anthropogenic sources. The relative distributions of sterol and triterpenol showed that the study area is submitted to organic matter (OM) from the Ribeira de Iguape River, seawater, surrounding vegetation, and plankton production. The contribution of these sources depends on the region of the estuarine-lagoonal system and the depth of sediment. Regarding anthropogenic sources, only the samples submitted to freshwater flow from the Ribeira de Iguape River presented concentration of coprostanol higher than the threshold value and diagnostic ratios, coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol, that indicate moderate contamination by domestic sewage in that area of the estuarine-lagoonal system. Therefore, the approach used herein identified the OM sources and its transport along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system (Brazil), which is a complex of lagoonal channels located in a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve. PMID:27087811

  14. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  15. Hydrogeochemical variables regionalization--applying cluster analysis for a seasonal evolution model from an estuarine system affected by AMD.

    PubMed

    Grande, J A; Carro, B; Borrego, J; de la Torre, M L; Valente, T; Santisteban, M

    2013-04-15

    This study describes the spatial evolution of the hydrogeochemical parameters which characterise a strongly affected estuary by Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The studied estuarine system receives AMD from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) and, simultaneously, is affected by the presence of an industrial chemical complex. Water sampling was performed in the year of 2008, comprising four sampling campaigns, in order to represent seasonality. The results show how the estuary can be divided into three areas of different behaviour in response to hydrogeochemical variables concentrations that define each sampling stations: on one hand, an area dominated by tidal influence; in the opposite end there is a second area including the points located in the two rivers headwaters that are not influenced by seawater; finally there is the area that can be defined as mixing zone. These areas are moved along the hydrological year due to seasonal chemical variations. PMID:23453814

  16. Chesapeake Bay nitrogen fluxes derived from a land‐estuarine ocean biogeochemical modeling system: Model description, evaluation, and nitrogen budgets

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wilkin, John; Tian, Hanqin; Yang, Qichun; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Wiggert, Jerry D.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Chesapeake Bay plays an important role in transforming riverine nutrients before they are exported to the adjacent continental shelf. Although the mean nitrogen budget of the Chesapeake Bay has been previously estimated from observations, uncertainties associated with interannually varying hydrological conditions remain. In this study, a land‐estuarine‐ocean biogeochemical modeling system is developed to quantify Chesapeake riverine nitrogen inputs, within‐estuary nitrogen transformation processes and the ultimate export of nitrogen to the coastal ocean. Model skill was evaluated using extensive in situ and satellite‐derived data, and a simulation using environmental conditions for 2001–2005 was conducted to quantify the Chesapeake Bay nitrogen budget. The 5 year simulation was characterized by large riverine inputs of nitrogen (154 × 109 g N yr−1) split roughly 60:40 between inorganic:organic components. Much of this was denitrified (34 × 109 g N yr−1) and buried (46 × 109 g N yr−1) within the estuarine system. A positive net annual ecosystem production for the bay further contributed to a large advective export of organic nitrogen to the shelf (91 × 109 g N yr−1) and negligible inorganic nitrogen export. Interannual variability was strong, particularly for the riverine nitrogen fluxes. In years with higher than average riverine nitrogen inputs, most of this excess nitrogen (50–60%) was exported from the bay as organic nitrogen, with the remaining split between burial, denitrification, and inorganic export to the coastal ocean. In comparison to previous simulations using generic shelf biogeochemical model formulations inside the estuary, the estuarine biogeochemical model described here produced more realistic and significantly greater exports of organic nitrogen and lower exports of inorganic nitrogen to the shelf. PMID:27668137

  17. Chesapeake Bay nitrogen fluxes derived from a land‐estuarine ocean biogeochemical modeling system: Model description, evaluation, and nitrogen budgets

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wilkin, John; Tian, Hanqin; Yang, Qichun; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Wiggert, Jerry D.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Chesapeake Bay plays an important role in transforming riverine nutrients before they are exported to the adjacent continental shelf. Although the mean nitrogen budget of the Chesapeake Bay has been previously estimated from observations, uncertainties associated with interannually varying hydrological conditions remain. In this study, a land‐estuarine‐ocean biogeochemical modeling system is developed to quantify Chesapeake riverine nitrogen inputs, within‐estuary nitrogen transformation processes and the ultimate export of nitrogen to the coastal ocean. Model skill was evaluated using extensive in situ and satellite‐derived data, and a simulation using environmental conditions for 2001–2005 was conducted to quantify the Chesapeake Bay nitrogen budget. The 5 year simulation was characterized by large riverine inputs of nitrogen (154 × 109 g N yr−1) split roughly 60:40 between inorganic:organic components. Much of this was denitrified (34 × 109 g N yr−1) and buried (46 × 109 g N yr−1) within the estuarine system. A positive net annual ecosystem production for the bay further contributed to a large advective export of organic nitrogen to the shelf (91 × 109 g N yr−1) and negligible inorganic nitrogen export. Interannual variability was strong, particularly for the riverine nitrogen fluxes. In years with higher than average riverine nitrogen inputs, most of this excess nitrogen (50–60%) was exported from the bay as organic nitrogen, with the remaining split between burial, denitrification, and inorganic export to the coastal ocean. In comparison to previous simulations using generic shelf biogeochemical model formulations inside the estuary, the estuarine biogeochemical model described here produced more realistic and significantly greater exports of organic nitrogen and lower exports of inorganic nitrogen to the shelf.

  18. Water-quality trends and basin activities and characteristics for the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system, North Carolina and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, D.A.; Davenport, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system has a total basin area of nearly 31,000 square miles and includes the Neuse, Tar, Pamlico, Roanoke, Chowan, and Alligator Rivers, and the Albemarle, Pamlico, Currituck, Croatan, and Roanoke Sounds. Albemarle Sound receives the greatest freshwater inflow of all the sounds in the estuarine system. Inflow to this sound averages about 13,500 cubic feet per second. Inflow to Pamlico Sound from the Pamlico River averages around 5,400 cubic feet per second, and average inflow into the Neuse River estuary is about 6,100 cubic feet per second. Approximately one-half of the inflow into the system is from ground-water discharge. The Neuse River basin has had the greatest increases in wastewater discharges (650 percent since the 1950's) and had the greatesttotal wastewater discharges of any of the basins in the study area, averaging about 200 million gallons per day in 1988. Wastewater discharges into the Neuse and Tar Rivers were nearly equal to the 7-day, 10-year low flows for these rivers. Land-use data compiled in 1973 for the lower parts of the Neuse River basin and lower part of the Tar-Pamlico River basin indicate that 25 percent of the area was evergreen forest, 25 percent was forested wetlands, 20 percent was cropland and pasture, 12 percent was mixed forest, 10 percent was nonforested wetland, and 4 percent was urban. The amount of nonforested wetland in the part of the study area along the Outer Banks declined 6.5 percent from 1973 to 1983. The numbers of farms and acreage in agricultural use in the study area have declined since the 1920's. A decrease of more than 60 percentin the number of farms was shown between the early 1950's and 1982. Fertilizer sales increased through the 1970's, but declined in the 1980's. Manufacturing employment has increased in the last 30 years, while agricultural employment has decreased. Data from seven stations of the U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network were used to

  19. The Future of Southern Ocean Observing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talley, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the Southern Ocean's role in global climate from seasonal to millennial timescales is evolving, with rapidly increasing recognition of the centrality of the Southern Ocean to Earth's heat, carbon, nutrient, and freshwater budgets, and of the impact of interactions between the ocean and the major ice shelves and grounded ice sheets of Antarctica, which have been decreasing in mass. Observations in this data-sparse and logistically remote region have never been so important, and many nations are rising to the challenge of supporting both experiments and long-term sustained observations. As illustrated in the figure from Meredith et al. (Current Op. Env. Sustain. 2013), autonomous in situ technologies are at the fore because of the difficulty and expense of sending ships year-round and because the crucial satellite remote sensing must be accompanied by in situ observations, including beneath sea ice and ice shelves. The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) has grown out of this recognized need for coordinated observations from the Antarctic coastline northward to the subtropics, from the bottom water production regions in coastal polynyas over the continental shelves, to the regions of interaction of warm ocean waters with Antarctic ice shelves, beneath the vast seasonal sea ice region, and in the hot spots of air-sea fluxes and cross-Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) mixing where the ACC interacts with topography and continental boundaries. The future includes international coordination and collaboration and strengthening of new and existing technologies, which include satellite observing, ice-enabled profiling floats, profiling from marine mammals, moored measurements in many strategic locations, glider and other autonomous operations in all regions, and drilling through floating ice shelves to measure the ocean waters below. Improved and consistent weather observations around the Antarctic coastlines will improve forecasting and reanalysis. Ice

  20. Contaminant Interactions and Biological Effects of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Benthic Estuarine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Ashley Nicole

    The fate, bioavailability, bioaccumulation and toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have not been extensively studied to date. Pristine SWNT are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to strongly associate with natural particulate matter in aquatic environments. In light of this, I have focused my research to examine the influence of sediment and food exposure routes on bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of structurally diverse SWNT in several ecologically-important marine invertebrate species. No significant mortality was observed in any organism at concentrations up to 1000 mg/kg. Evidence of biouptake after ingestion was observed for pristine semiconducting SWNT using NIRF spectroscopy and for oxidized 14C-SWNT using liquid scintillation counting. After a 24 hour depuration period, the pristine semiconducting SWNT were eliminated from organisms to below the method detection limit (5 microg/mL), and the 14C-SWNT body burden was decreased by an order of magnitude to a bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of <0.01. Neither pristine SWNT nor oxidized 14C-SWNT caused environmentally relevant toxicity or bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates. Overall, the SWNT were not bioavailable and appear to associate with the sediment. In addition to investigating the toxicity and bioaccumulation of SWNT as an independent toxicant, it is important to consider how they will interact with other contaminants in the environment (i.e., increase or decrease toxicity and bioaccumulation of co-contaminants, alter the environmental transport of co-contaminants, induce degradation of co-contaminants, etc.). I wanted to investigate the effects of SWNT on a complex mixture of contaminants already present in a natural system. New Bedford Harbor (NBH) sediment, which is contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was amended with pristine SWNT to determine if the presence of SWNT would mitigate the toxicity and bioaccumulation of the PCBs in deposit

  1. Fish community structure of the St Lucia Estuarine System under prolonged drought conditions and its potential for recovery after mouth breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, Leon; Cyrus, Digby P.; Jerling, Hendrik L.

    2010-03-01

    The St Lucia Estuarine System, South Africa, has been under pressure due to recent drought conditions, which have led to closure of the mouth, extremely low lake levels and hypersaline conditions. The estuary mouth closed in June 2002 and remained so for almost 5 years before being breached by Cyclone Gamede in May 2007. After mouth closure in August 2007, salinities in South and North Lake gradually increased to reach highs of 68 at the end of 2008, while salinities in the Narrows gradually declined during the study. Fish were sampled biannually during 2006-2008 with seine and gill-nets at six sites throughout the system. A total of 20,422 fish from 72 species were recorded, with the number of species and CPUE gradually decreasing from the Narrows throughout the system to Hells Gate in the upper parts of the system. The fish community was dominated by the freshwater species Oreochromis mossambicus, and two estuarine species, Ambassis ambassis and Hyporamphus capensis. The fish community was dominated in terms of species numbers by marine spawning species, but in terms of fish abundance by freshwater and estuarine breeding species. Recruitment of post-larvae of 20 marine species into the system occurred following opening of the mouth in March 2007, highlighting the importance of the system as a nursery area for marine species. The fish community was structured by spatial differences between sampling areas and between the three main compartments of the system, and not by temporal changes during the study period.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF NITROGEN LOADING - RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS FOR ESTUARINE WATERS USING AN EMPIRICAL COMPARATIVE SYSTEMS APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Atlantic Ecology Division (AED) has initiated a multi-year research program to develop empirical nitrogen load-response models for embayments in southern New England. This is part of a multi-regional effort to develop nutrient load-response models for the Gulf of Mex...

  3. Advances in Estuarine Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccready, Parker; Geyer, W. Rockwell

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of estuarine circulation and salinity structure are reviewed. We focus on well- and partially mixed systems that are long relative to the tidal excursion. Dynamics of the coupled system of width- and tidally averaged momentum and salt equations are now better understood owing to the development of simple numerical solution techniques. These have led to a greater appreciation of the key role played by the time dependency of the length of the salt intrusion. Improved realism in simplified tidally averaged physics has been driven by simultaneous advances in our understanding of the detailed dynamics within the tidal cycle and across irregular channel cross-sections. The complex interactions of turbulence, stratification, and advection are now understood well enough to motivate a new generation of physically plausible mixing parameterizations for the tidally averaged equations.

  4. Influence of paleotopography, base level and sedimentation rate on estuarine system response to the Holocene sea-level rise: The example of the Marais Vernier, Seine estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Millena; Sebag, David; Durand, Alain; Laignel, Benoit; Saliege, Jean-François; Mahler, Barbara J.; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2007-08-01

    The response of coastal systems to allogenic forcing factors is of interest to diverse research communities, including those interested in global change, sequence stratigraphy and modelling. Quaternary systems are of particular interest because they provide analogues for ancient rock records. To understand the processes responsible for the sedimentary evolution of estuarine systems, it is necessary to study as many fluvial systems as possible. The objective of this review of the sedimentary evolution of a coastal marsh is to describe the influence of glacial paleotopography on the record of climatic and sea-level changes. The Marais Vernier, located at the interface between the marine and fluvial parts of the estuary, is a part of the Lower Seine Valley wetland network, which formed after the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous studies have described the Holocene filling, which is composed of peat and detrital material deposited following climatic and sea-level changes. To understand the sedimentary evolution, a paleotopographical (based on drillings and electromagnetic surveys) and a chronological framework (based on radiocarbon dates) for the southern peat marsh were defined. The peat marsh paleotopography has three erosional surfaces. The S1 surface is the oldest and also the highest, topographically; the S2 surface is younger, wider, and incised below the S1 surface; the S3 surface, the youngest of the three, is narrow and deeply incised. Radiometric ages were considered on the basis of their geographical position in relation to the S3 surface. Prior to 7.5 ka cal BP, sediments accumulated only above the narrow area described by the S3 surface, at a rate of 5.5 mm yr - 1 . After 7.5 ka cal BP, shortly after the flooding of the Seine estuary, sediments accumulated as peat deposits over the entire peat marsh at a rate of 3 mm yr - 1 in response to the sea-level rise. The paleotopography delimits the area of deposition during the Holocene, and thus plays a critical

  5. Characteristics of Southern California coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, B.D.; Hanson, R.T.; Reichard, E.G.; Johnson, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Most groundwater produced within coastal Southern California occurs within three main types of siliciclastic basins: (1) deep (>600 m), elongate basins of the Transverse Ranges Physiographic Province, where basin axes and related fluvial systems strike parallel to tectonic structure, (2) deep (>6000 m), broad basins of the Los Angeles and Orange County coastal plains in the northern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province, where fluvial systems cut across tectonic structure at high angles, and (3) shallow (75-350 m), relatively narrow fluvial valleys of the generally mountainous southern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province in San Diego County. Groundwater pumped for agricultural, industrial, municipal, and private use from coastal aquifers within these basins increased with population growth since the mid-1850s. Despite a significant influx of imported water into the region in recent times, groundwater, although reduced as a component of total consumption, still constitutes a significant component of water supply. Historically, overdraft from the aquifers has caused land surface subsidence, flow between water basins with related migration of groundwater contaminants, as well as seawater intrusion into many shallow coastal aquifers. Although these effects have impacted water quality, most basins, particularly those with deeper aquifer systems, meet or exceed state and national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Municipalities, academicians, and local water and governmental agencies have studied the stratigraphy of these basins intensely since the early 1900s with the goals of understanding and better managing the important groundwater resource. Lack of a coordinated effort, due in part to jurisdictional issues, combined with the application of lithostratigraphic correlation techniques (based primarily on well cuttings coupled with limited borehole geophysics) have produced an often confusing, and occasionally conflicting

  6. Gold coast seaway smartrelease decision support system: optimising recycled water release in a sub tropical estuarine environment.

    PubMed

    Stuart, G; Hollingsworth, A; Thomsen, F; Szylkarski, S; Khan, S; Tomlinson, R; Kirkpatrick, S; Catterall, K; Capati, B

    2009-01-01

    Gold Coast Water is responsible for the management of the water, recycled water and wastewater assets of the City of the Gold Coast on Australia's east coast. Excess treated recycled water is released at the Gold Coast Seaway, a man-made channel connecting the Broadwater Estuary with the Pacific Ocean, on an outgoing tide in order for the recycled water to be dispersed before the tide changes and re-enters the Broadwater estuary. Rapid population growth has placed increasing demands on the city's recycled water release system and an investigation of the capacity of the Broadwater to assimilate a greater volume of recycled water over a longer release period was undertaken in 2007. As an outcome, Gold Coast Water was granted an extension of the existing release licence from 10.5 hours per day to 13.3 hours per day from the Coombabah wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The Seaway SmartRelease Project has been designed to optimise the release of the recycled water from the Coombabah WWTP in order to minimise the impact to the receiving estuarine water quality and maximise the cost efficiency of pumping. In order achieve this; an optimisation study that involves intensive hydrodynamic and water quality monitoring, numerical modelling and a web-based decision support system is underway. An intensive monitoring campaign provided information on water levels, currents, winds, waves, nutrients and bacterial levels within the Broadwater. This data was then used to calibrate and verify numerical models using the MIKE by DHI suite of software. The Decision Support System will then collect continually measured data such as water levels, interact with the WWTP SCADA system, run the numerical models and provide the optimal time window to release the required amount of recycled water from the WWTP within the licence specifications. PMID:19844054

  7. Gold coast seaway smartrelease decision support system: optimising recycled water release in a sub tropical estuarine environment.

    PubMed

    Stuart, G; Hollingsworth, A; Thomsen, F; Szylkarski, S; Khan, S; Tomlinson, R; Kirkpatrick, S; Catterall, K; Capati, B

    2009-01-01

    Gold Coast Water is responsible for the management of the water, recycled water and wastewater assets of the City of the Gold Coast on Australia's east coast. Excess treated recycled water is released at the Gold Coast Seaway, a man-made channel connecting the Broadwater Estuary with the Pacific Ocean, on an outgoing tide in order for the recycled water to be dispersed before the tide changes and re-enters the Broadwater estuary. Rapid population growth has placed increasing demands on the city's recycled water release system and an investigation of the capacity of the Broadwater to assimilate a greater volume of recycled water over a longer release period was undertaken in 2007. As an outcome, Gold Coast Water was granted an extension of the existing release licence from 10.5 hours per day to 13.3 hours per day from the Coombabah wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The Seaway SmartRelease Project has been designed to optimise the release of the recycled water from the Coombabah WWTP in order to minimise the impact to the receiving estuarine water quality and maximise the cost efficiency of pumping. In order achieve this; an optimisation study that involves intensive hydrodynamic and water quality monitoring, numerical modelling and a web-based decision support system is underway. An intensive monitoring campaign provided information on water levels, currents, winds, waves, nutrients and bacterial levels within the Broadwater. This data was then used to calibrate and verify numerical models using the MIKE by DHI suite of software. The Decision Support System will then collect continually measured data such as water levels, interact with the WWTP SCADA system, run the numerical models and provide the optimal time window to release the required amount of recycled water from the WWTP within the licence specifications.

  8. Influence of variable water depth and turbidity on microalgae production in a shallow estuarine lake system - A modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirok, Katrin; Scharler, Ursula M.

    2014-06-01

    Strongly varying water levels and turbidities are typical characteristics of the large shallow estuarine lake system of St. Lucia, one of the largest on the African continent. This theoretical study investigated the combined effects of variable water depth and turbidity on seasonal pelagic and benthic microalgae production using a mathematical model, in order to ascertain productivity levels during variable and extreme conditions. Simulated pelagic and benthic net production varied between 0.3 and 180 g C m-2 year-1 and 0 and 220 g C m-2 year-1, respectively, dependent on depth, turbidity, and variability in turbidity. Although not surprising production and biomass decreased with increasing turbidity and depth. A high variability in turbidity, i.e. an alteration of calm and windy days, could reduce or enhance the seasonal pelagic and benthic production by more than 30% compared to a low variability. The day-to-day variability in wind-induced turbidity therefore influences production in the long term. On the other hand, varying water depth within a year did not significantly influence the seasonal production for turbidities representative of Lake St. Lucia. Reduced lake area and volume as observed during dry periods in Lake St. Lucia did not reduce primary production of the entire system since desiccation resulted in lower water depth and thus increased light availability. This agrees with field observations suggesting little light limitation and high areal microalgal biomass during a period with below average rainfall (2005-2011). Thus, microalgae potentially fulfil their function in the lake food-web even under extreme drought conditions. We believe that these results are of general interest to shallow aquatic ecosystems that are sensitive to drought periods due to either human or natural causes.

  9. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  10. Movement patterns of Brook Trout in a restored coastal stream system in southern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snook, Erin L.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Dubreuil, Todd L.; Zydlewski, Joseph; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Hurley, Stephen T.; Danylchuk, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations are found from northern Canada to New England. The extent of anadromy generally decreases with latitude, but the ecology and movements of more southern populations are poorly understood. We conducted a 33-month acoustic telemetry study of Brook Trout in Red Brook, MA, and adjacent Buttermilk Bay (marine system) using 16 fixed acoustic receivers and surgically implanting acoustic transmitters in 84 individuals. Tagged Brook Trout used the stream, estuary (50% of individuals) and bay (10% of individuals). Movements into full sea water were brief when occurring. GAMM models revealed that transitions between habitat areas occurred most often in spring and fall. Environmental data suggest that use of the saline environment is limited by summer temperatures in the bay. Movements may also be related to moon phase. Compared to more northern coastal populations of Brook Trout, the Red Brook population appears to be less anadromous overall, yet the estuarine segment of the system may have considerable ecological importance as a food resource.

  11. Spatial patterns in soil biogeochemical process rates along a Louisiana wetland salinity gradient in the Barataria Bay estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. J.; Rich, M. W.; Sullivan, H. L.; Bledsoe, R.; Dawson, M.; Donnelly, B.; Marton, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Louisiana has the highest rates of coastal wetland loss in the United States. In addition to being lost, Louisiana wetlands experience numerous other environmental stressors including changes in salinity regime (both increases from salt water intrusion and decreases from the creation of river diversions) and climate change induced changes in vegetation (e.g. the northward expansion of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) into salt marshes). In this study, we examined how these changes might influence biogeochemical process rates important in regulating carbon balance and the cycling, retention, and removal of nutrients in Louisiana wetlands. Specifically, we measured net soil greenhouse gas fluxes and collected cores for the determination of rates of greenhouse gas production, denitrification potential, nitrification potential, iron reduction, and phosphorus sorption from surface (0-5cm) and subsurface (10-15cm) depths for three plots in each of 4 sites along the salinity gradient: a freshwater marsh site, a brackish (7 ppt) marsh site, a salt marsh (17 ppt), and a Avicennia germinans stand (17 ppt; adjacent to salt marsh site) in the Barataria Bay estuarine system. Most biogeochemical processes displayed similar spatial patterns with salt marsh rates being lower than rates in freshwater and/or brackish marsh sites and not having significantly different rates than in Avicennia germinans stands. Rates in surface soils were generally higher than in subsurface soils. These patterns were generally consistent with spatial patterns in soil properties with soil water content, organic matter quantity and quality, and extractable nutrients generally being higher in freshwater and brackish marsh sites than salt marsh and Avicennia germinans sites, especially in surface soils. These spatial patterns suggest that the ability of coastal wetlands to retain and remove nutrients might change significantly in response to future climate changes in the region and that these

  12. Considerations on the effects of tidal regimes in the movement of floating litter in an estuarine environment: Case study of the estuarine system of Santos-São Vicente, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Gerson; Elliff, Carla Isobel; Frutuoso, Gabriela Amado; Silva, Eric Vinícius Nascimento Malaquias da; Gama, Guilherme Santiago; Sousa, João Henrique de Oliveira; Silva, Iracema Reimão

    2016-09-15

    Floating litter in the estuarine system of Santos-São Vicente is common and is part of day-to-day activities of various users of the area. The objective of the present study was to carry out a quali-quantitative evaluation of the occurrence of floating litter, to infer their sources, and to identify environmental factors that are likely to control occurrence and distribution, with particular emphasis on the effects of tidal regimes. Six sampling stations were selected along the aforementioned estuary and visited monthly between July 2010 and January 2012. Floating litter was counted from a fixed sampling station. Plastics prevailed (89.64%) and their main source was domestic activities (55.41%). More litter was found during ebb spring tides, with higher concentrations obeying confluence patterns of the estuary's channels. Results indicated that occurrence can be attributed to the deficiency in basic sewage system in the area and the deliberate disposal into the estuary by the local population. PMID:27263980

  13. Classification for Estuarine Ecosystems: A Review and Comparison of Selected Classification Schemes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine scientists have devoted considerable effort to classifying coastal, estuarine and marine environments and their watersheds, for a variety of purposes. These classifications group systems with similarities – most often in physical and hydrodynamic properties – in order ...

  14. Estuarine Food Webs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries provide habitat for abundant plants, animals and micro-organisms, ranging from microscopic plankton (bacteria, yeasts, algae, protozoa) to larger benthic and pelagic organisms (seagrass, clams, crabs, sea trout, pelicans and dolphins). Estuarine biota can be characteri...

  15. The estuarine geochemical reactivity of Zn isotopes and its relevance for the biomonitoring of anthropogenic Zn and Cd contaminations from metallurgical activities: Example of the Gironde fluvial-estuarine system, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Jérôme C. J.; Schäfer, Jörg; Coynel, Alexandra; Blanc, Gérard; Chiffoleau, Jean-François; Auger, Dominique; Bossy, Cécile; Derriennic, Hervé; Mikolaczyk, Mathilde; Dutruch, Lionel; Mattielli, Nadine

    2015-12-01

    geochemical reactivity of Zn in the estuary rather than signatures of past metallurgical contaminations in the watershed as recorded in contaminated river sediments. The study also shows that the isotopic composition of Zn is strongly fractionated by its geochemical reactivity in the Gironde Estuary, representative of meso-macrotidal estuarine systems.

  16. Final Report Collaborative Project. Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; MacCready, Parker; Whitney, Michael

    2015-11-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation. The main computational objectives were: 1. To develop computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterizations of estuary and continental shelf mixing processes for use in an Earth System Model (CESM). 2. To develop a two-way nested regional modeling framework in order to dynamically downscale the climate response of particular coastal ocean regions and to upscale the impact of the regional coastal processes to the global climate in an Earth System Model (CESM). 3. To develop computational infrastructure to enhance the efficiency of data transfer between specific sources and destinations, i.e., a point-to-point communication capability, (used in objective 1) within POP, the ocean component of CESM.

  17. The effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF6, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF6 and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  18. Computer modeling of fecal coliform contamination of an urban estuarine system.

    PubMed

    Scarlatos, P D

    2001-01-01

    This study is focused on the investigation of the sources, distribution and fate of fecal coliform populations in the North Fork of the New River that flows through the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. The dynamics of this brackish river are driven by weak tides, regulated freshwater discharges, overland runoff, storm water drainage from sewers, and groundwater exchange. Extensive field studies failed to document any alleged source(s) of contamination, including birds, domesticated and undomesticated mammals, humans, septic tank leakage, urban runoff, non-point discharges from agricultural lands, waste disposal from live-aboard vessels and/or in situ re-growth of fecal coliform. In order to facilitate field sampling, and support the data analyses efforts, computer simulations were applied to assess the likelihood of the various possible pollution scenarios. The physically based computer model used is the WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program Modeling System) of the US Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the Neural Network MATLAB Toolbox was utilized for data analysis. WASP was able to accurately simulate the water hydrodynamics and coliform concentrations within the North Fork, while the neural network assisted in identifying correlations between fecal coliform and the various parameters involved. The numerical results supported the conclusion that fecal coliform were introduced by the animal populations along the riverbanks and by storm water washout of the adjacent drainage basins and the banks. The problem is exaggerated due to the low flashing capacity of the river.

  19. Computer modeling of fecal coliform contamination of an urban estuarine system.

    PubMed

    Scarlatos, P D

    2001-01-01

    This study is focused on the investigation of the sources, distribution and fate of fecal coliform populations in the North Fork of the New River that flows through the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. The dynamics of this brackish river are driven by weak tides, regulated freshwater discharges, overland runoff, storm water drainage from sewers, and groundwater exchange. Extensive field studies failed to document any alleged source(s) of contamination, including birds, domesticated and undomesticated mammals, humans, septic tank leakage, urban runoff, non-point discharges from agricultural lands, waste disposal from live-aboard vessels and/or in situ re-growth of fecal coliform. In order to facilitate field sampling, and support the data analyses efforts, computer simulations were applied to assess the likelihood of the various possible pollution scenarios. The physically based computer model used is the WASP (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program Modeling System) of the US Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the Neural Network MATLAB Toolbox was utilized for data analysis. WASP was able to accurately simulate the water hydrodynamics and coliform concentrations within the North Fork, while the neural network assisted in identifying correlations between fecal coliform and the various parameters involved. The numerical results supported the conclusion that fecal coliform were introduced by the animal populations along the riverbanks and by storm water washout of the adjacent drainage basins and the banks. The problem is exaggerated due to the low flashing capacity of the river. PMID:11724500

  20. OVERVIEW OF GIS APPLICATIONS IN ESTUARINE MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographic information systems (GIS) tools are now considered integral in estuarine monitoring and assessment research. A synopsis is presented of our estuarine applications of GIS in the Northeast region of the U.S. The applications discussed cover sample site selection, support...

  1. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE SYSTEM REGULATIONS Special Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and... estuarine research. 921.52 Section 921.52 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce...

  2. Perspectives on the microbial carbon pump with special reference to microbial respiration and ecosystem efficiency in large estuarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2014-07-01

    Although respiration-based oxidation of reduced carbon releases CO2 into the environment, it provides an ecosystem with the metabolic energy for essential biogeochemical processes, including the newly proposed microbial carbon pump (MCP). The efficiency of MCP in heterotrophic microorganisms is related to the mechanisms of energy transduction employed and hence is related to the form of respiration utilized. Anaerobic organisms typically have lower efficiencies of energy transduction and hence lower efficiencies of energy-dependent carbon transformation. This leads to a lower MCP efficiency on a per-cell basis. Substantial input of terrigenous nutrients and organic matter into estuarine ecosystems typically results in elevated heterotrophic respiration that rapidly consumes dissolved oxygen, potentially producing hypoxic and anoxic zones in the water column. The lowered availability of dissolved oxygen and the excessive supply of nutrients such as nitrate from river discharge lead to enhanced anaerobic respiration processes such as denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Thus, some nutrients may be consumed through anaerobic heterotrophs, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for autotrophic carbon fixation. In this manner, eutrophied estuarine ecosystems become largely fueled by anaerobic respiratory pathways and their efficiency is less due to lowered ecosystem productivity when compared to healthy and balanced estuarine ecosystems. This situation may have a negative impact on the ecological function and efficiency of the MCP which depends on the supply of both organic carbon and metabolic energy. This review presents our current understanding of the MCP mechanisms from the view point of ecosystem energy transduction efficiency, which has not been discussed in previous literature.

  3. Sources and temporal patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls around a large South American grain-shipping port (Paranaguá Estuarine System, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Combi, Tatiane; Taniguchi, Satie; de Lima Ferreira, Paulo Alves; Mansur, Andressa Vianna; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela; Martins, César C

    2013-05-01

    The Paranaguá Estuarine System (PES) is an important estuarine environment on the Brazilian coast. The economic importance of the PES is mainly related to industries, fuel terminals, and the main South American grain-shipping port. The aim of this work was to determine the vertical distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in three sediment cores from the PES. The methods included Soxhlet extraction, clean-up, and quantification by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The concentrations of total PCBs ranged from lower than the detection limit to 6.65 ng g(-1). Low PCB concentrations were detected in P1 and P3, which were collected far away from direct human activities. In P2, the compositional pattern of PCB congeners showed greater concentrations of tetra- and penta-chlorinated congeners associated with urban and port activities near Paranaguá city. The differences in concentrations between the three sediment cores were attributed to the distance of the sampling points in relation to the possible sources of pollution, which are mostly related to Paranaguá city. The vertical distribution of PCBs in the sediment core P2 was related to historical anthropogenic activities. The highest PCB input was from 1970 to the early 1990s, which coincides with a period of greater use of PCBs in Brazil as well as their greater worldwide production.

  4. Spatio-temporal distribution of Atlantic searobins ( Prionotus spp.) in relation to estuarine dynamics (Río de la Plata, Southwestern Atlantic Coastal System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaureguizar, A. J.; Waessle, J. A.; Guerrero, R. A.

    2007-06-01

    The relationship between the distributions of Atlantic searobins ( Prionotus punctatus and Prionotus nudigula) and environmental factors was evaluated in the Southwestern Atlantic Coastal Ecosystem (34-41°S). Two hundred and forty-six sampling stations were analyzed between 1993 and 2000 at three different environmental scales (1000, 100, 10 km). The spatial patterns in the Atlantic searobins' distribution were examined by means of cluster analysis while, the BIO-ENV process was used to estimate the associations of the species' distribution with depth, bottom temperature and bottom salinity. The Atlantic searobin species have a persistent spatial distribution pattern in the coastal ecosystem. Prionotus punctatus inhabits the environment influenced by the estuarine waters of the Río de la Plata, while P. nudigula inhabits the coastal shelf system, with wider depth ranges, lower bottom temperatures, and higher bottom salinity. Although both species show a persistent spatial distribution, the patterns change seasonally in an onshore-offshore direction, as well as in a north-south direction. The bottom salinity has the greatest influence on the spatial distribution of both Atlantic searobins, with the variation of both distribution areas being mainly associated with the wind driven discharge of estuarine water from the Río de la Plata.

  5. A re-examination of fish estuarine dependence: Evidence for connectivity between estuarine and ocean habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Able, Kenneth W.

    2005-07-01

    Our understanding of the recruitment of estuarine fishes has been strongly influenced by two views: first, that estuaries are important nurseries and second, that many species are estuarine dependent. Based on an attempt to review the world-wide literature on these topics, it appears that both of these views have merit but could benefit from additional attention and clarification. The term estuarine dependency is used in a variety of ways depending on the author and context and even how one defines estuary. Further, and perhaps most importantly, we often lack the comparative data on habitat use by fishes in the ocean vs. the estuary to make judgments about dependency. To that end we have analyzed the distribution patterns of fish species along the estuarine-coastal ocean ecotone in southern New Jersey, U.S. to evaluate the fish response. As a result, it appears the degree of estuarine use is quite variable among species, as well as at geographic, annual and cohort-specific scales. Thus, further synthesis is necessary and it might focus on: first, more information on fish use in different types of estuaries across a broad geographical range; second, a better understanding of the functional significance of habitats across the habitat landscapes of the estuary-ocean ecotone; third, any further synthesis needs to incorporate of the role of biotic variables (e.g. predation, competition) in order to enhance our understanding of the degree of estuarine dependency; fourth, we need to determine how freshwater flow into estuaries might influence habitat use especially with regard to the potential role of the offshore estuary.

  6. An observing system simulation for Southern Ocean carbon dioxide uptake.

    PubMed

    Majkut, Joseph D; Carter, Brendan R; Frölicher, Thomas L; Dufour, Carolina O; Rodgers, Keith B; Sarmiento, Jorge L

    2014-07-13

    The Southern Ocean is critically important to the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. Up to half of the excess CO2 currently in the ocean entered through the Southern Ocean. That uptake helps to maintain the global carbon balance and buffers transient climate change from fossil fuel emissions. However, the future evolution of the uptake is uncertain, because our understanding of the dynamics that govern the Southern Ocean CO2 uptake is incomplete. Sparse observations and incomplete model formulations limit our ability to constrain the monthly and annual uptake, interannual variability and long-term trends. Float-based sampling of ocean biogeochemistry provides an opportunity for transforming our understanding of the Southern Ocean CO2 flux. In this work, we review current estimates of the CO2 uptake in the Southern Ocean and projections of its response to climate change. We then show, via an observational system simulation experiment, that float-based sampling provides a significant opportunity for measuring the mean fluxes and monitoring the mean uptake over decadal scales.

  7. Field measurement of nitrate in marine and estuarine waters with a flow analysis system utilizing on-line zinc reduction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Peter S; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Gentle, Brady S; McKelvie, Ian D

    2011-03-15

    A sensitive reagent-injection flow analysis method for the spectrophotometric determination of nitrate in marine, estuarine and fresh water samples is described. The method is based on the reduction of nitrate in a micro column containing zinc granules at pH 6.5. The nitrite formed is reacted with sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylene diamine (Griess reagent), and the resulting azo compound is quantified spectrophotometrically at 520 nm. Water samples in the range of 3-700 μg L(-1) NO(3)(-)-N can be processed with a throughput of up to 40 samples per hour, a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and reproducibility of 1.2% RSD (50 μg L(-1) NO(3)(-)-N, n=10). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of nitrate in estuarine waters and the reliability was assessed by the analyses of certified reference materials and recovery experiments. The method is suitable for waters with a wide range of salinities, and was successfully used for more than 3200 underway nitrate measurements aboard SV Pelican1 in the "Two Bays" cruise in January 2010. PMID:21315904

  8. Marine and Estuarine Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reish, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of various pollutants on marine and estuarine organisms, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) effects of pesticides, dredging, dumping, sludge, and petroleum hydrocarbons; and (2) diseases and tissue abnormalities. A list of 441 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. AMBI indices and multivariate approach to assess the ecological health of Vellar-Coleroon estuarine system undergoing various human activities.

    PubMed

    Sigamani, Sivaraj; Perumal, Murugesan; Arumugam, Silambarasan; Preetha Mini Jose, H M; Veeraiyan, Bharathidasan

    2015-11-15

    Estuaries receive a considerable amount of pollutants from various sources. Presently an attempt has been made to assess whether the aquaculture discharges and dredging activities alter the ecological conditions of Vellar-Coleroon estuarine complex. The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) established a framework for the protection of marine waters. In this commission, a variety of indices were used, among them, AMBI (AZTI Marine Biotic Index) indices along with multivariate statistical approach is unique, to assess the ecological status by using macrobenthic communities. Keeping this in view, stations VE-1 and VE-4 in Vellar; CE-6 and CE-7 in Coleroon estuaries showed moderately disturbed with the AMBI values ranging between 3.45 and 3.72. The above said stations were situated near the shrimp farm discharge point and sites of dredging activities. The present study proves that various statistical and biotic indices have great potential in assessing the nature of the ecosystem undergoing various human pressures.

  10. AMBI indices and multivariate approach to assess the ecological health of Vellar-Coleroon estuarine system undergoing various human activities.

    PubMed

    Sigamani, Sivaraj; Perumal, Murugesan; Arumugam, Silambarasan; Preetha Mini Jose, H M; Veeraiyan, Bharathidasan

    2015-11-15

    Estuaries receive a considerable amount of pollutants from various sources. Presently an attempt has been made to assess whether the aquaculture discharges and dredging activities alter the ecological conditions of Vellar-Coleroon estuarine complex. The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) established a framework for the protection of marine waters. In this commission, a variety of indices were used, among them, AMBI (AZTI Marine Biotic Index) indices along with multivariate statistical approach is unique, to assess the ecological status by using macrobenthic communities. Keeping this in view, stations VE-1 and VE-4 in Vellar; CE-6 and CE-7 in Coleroon estuaries showed moderately disturbed with the AMBI values ranging between 3.45 and 3.72. The above said stations were situated near the shrimp farm discharge point and sites of dredging activities. The present study proves that various statistical and biotic indices have great potential in assessing the nature of the ecosystem undergoing various human pressures. PMID:26323865

  11. Water chemistry and nutrient release during the resuspension of FeS-rich sediments in a eutrophic estuarine system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bree; Rate, Andrew W; Burton, Edward D

    2012-08-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of resuspending FeS-rich benthic sediment on estuarine water chemistry. To address this objective, we conducted (1) a series of laboratory-based sediment resuspension experiments and (2) also monitored changes in surface water composition during field-based sediment resuspension events that were caused by dredging activities in the Peel-Harvey Estuary, Western Australia. Our laboratory resuspension experiments showed that the resuspension of FeS-rich sediments rapidly deoxygenated estuarine water. In contrast, dredging activities in the field did not noticeably lower O(2) concentrations in adjacent surface water. Additionally, while FeS oxidation in the laboratory resuspensions caused measurable decreases in pH, the field pH was unaffected by the dredging event and dissolved trace metal concentrations remained very low throughout the monitoring period. Dissolved ammonium (NH(4)(+)) and inorganic phosphorus (PO(4)-P) were released into the water column during the resuspension of sediments in both the field and laboratory. Following its initial release, PO(4)-P was rapidly removed from solution in the laboratory-based (<1h) and field-based (<100 m from sediment disposal point) investigations. In comparison to PO(4)-P, NH(4)(+) release was observed to be more prolonged over the 2-week period of the laboratory resuspension experiments. However, our field-based observations revealed that elevated NH(4)(+) concentrations were localised to <100 m from the sediment disposal point. This study demonstrates that alongside the emphasis on acidification, deoxygenation and metal release during FeS resuspension, it is important to consider the possibility of nutrient release from disturbed sediments in eutrophic estuaries.

  12. Draft genome sequence of Psychrobacter sp. ENNN9_III, a strain isolated from water in a polluted temperate estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jaqueline Conceição Meireles; Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina de; Veras, Adonney Allan de Oliveira; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Henriques, Isabel; Correia, António; Silva, Artur Luiz da Costa da; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro

    2016-06-01

    The genus Psychrobacter includes Gram-negative coccobacilli that are non-pigmented, oxidase-positive, non-motile, psychrophilic or psychrotolerant, and halotolerant. Psychrobacter strain ENNN9_III was isolated from water in a polluted temperate estuarine system, contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy metals. The genome has a G + C content of 42.7%, 2618 open reading frames (ORFs), three copies of the rRNAs operon, and 29 tRNA genes. Twenty-five sequences related to the degradation of aromatic compounds were predicted, as well as numerous genes related to resistance to metals or metal(loid)s. The genome sequence of Psychrobacter strain ENNN9_III provides the groundwork for further elucidation of the mechanisms of metal resistance and aromatic compounds degradation. Future studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of this strain for bioremediation proposes. PMID:27114904

  13. Evaluation of the organic matter sources using the δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes in sediments from Brazilian estuarine systems by GC/C/IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maioli, Otávio Luiz Gusso; de Oliveira, Cristiane Rossi; Dal Sasso, Marco Aurélio; Madureira, Luiz Augusto dos Santos; Azevedo, Débora de Almeida; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2012-12-01

    The δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes (from C16 to C34) was measured from surface sediments of five Brazilian estuarine systems affected by different organic matter sources, such as harbor area, industries, urban centers and sugar cane crops, in order to determine the origins of the organic matter. The aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The levels of n-alkanes in the studied areas ranged from 0.34 to 18.14 μg kg-1, being relatively low in comparison to high polluted environments. The Carbon Preference Index (CPI) calculated in the C23-C34 range indicates that n-alkanes are mainly inherited from cuticular waxes of higher plants. The δ13C composition of all n-alkanes detected in the sediment samples ranged from -39.6 to -18.3‰ showing different sources for the studied estuarine systems. Through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) it was possible to verify the petrogenic influence in the n-alkane sources, especially in the Paraíba do Sul sediment samples. Differences up to 15‰ of the δ13C values between n-alkanes of odd and even carbon number (C26 and C27) also indicated mixture of petrogenic and biogenic sources in Paraíba do Sul River. High (less negative) δ13C n-alkane values of odd carbon number were obtained from two sampling sites located close to an ethanol plant, indicating residues discharge of sugar cane (C4 plant). Influence of C3 plants that are the main components of dense ombrophile forest was observed in the Itajaí-Açu sediments by the decrease of δ13C (about 10‰ compared to the Paraíba do Sul River δ13C).

  14. Observation metadata handling system at the European Southern Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycki, Adam; Brandt, Daniel; Giot, David; Lockhart, John; Rodriguez, Jesus; Rossat, Nathalie; Vuong, My Hà

    2006-06-01

    We present the design of the system for handling observations metadata at the Science Archive Facility of the European Southern Observatory using Sybase ASE, Replication Server and Sybase IQ. The system has been reengineered to enhance the browsing capabilities of Archive contents using searches on any observation parameter, for on-line updates on all parameters and for the on-the-fly introduction of those updates in files retrieved from the Archive. The systems also reduces the replication of duplicate information and simplifies database maintenance.

  15. Relating watershed nutrient loads to satellite derived estuarine water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enhanced phytoplankton production is a cause of degraded estuarine water quality. Yet, relationships between watershed nutrient loads and the spatial and temporal scales of phytoplankton blooms and subsequent water quality impairments remain unquantified for most systems...

  16. Citizen participation and discontent in three Southern European health systems.

    PubMed

    Serapioni, Mauro; Matos, Ana Raquel

    2014-12-01

    Participation has featured in political agendas in recent decades and the domain of healthcare has not been indifferent to its appeal. Although emerging later than in other European regions, the involvement of civil society in healthcare decision-making procedures has proved one of the biggest challenges facing Southern European health systems. The health systems of the countries considered in this analysis - Italy, Portugal and Spain - underwent reforms that brought citizen participation to the forefront of the health system. Through national laws or health plans, each of these countries has recognised the need to promote participation in order to 'give a voice' to citizens in the health sector. Accordingly, a range of significant activities have been implemented in the region, although they have been developed unequally within national territories, at different paces and involving the mobilisation of different actors. This article focuses on the most relevant experiences of citizen participation designed and implemented in the three selected countries, describing their key features and potential, as well as the main critical issues and contradictions that have emerged over time. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of the current financial crisis on Southern European national health systems, especially in terms of participatory methods, the way in which citizen participation is progressing and civil society's reaction to these important changes.

  17. Immigration and early life stages recruitment of the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to an estuarine nursery: The influence of environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Eva; Ramos, Sandra; Elliott, Michael; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2016-01-01

    Connectivity between coastal spawning grounds and estuarine nurseries is a critical step in the life cycle of many fish species. Larval immigration and transport-associated physical-biological processes are determinants of recruitment success to nursery areas. The recruitment of the European flounder, Platichthys flesus, to estuarine nurseries located at the southern edge of the species distribution range, has been usually investigated during its juvenile stages, while estuarine recruitment during the earlier planktonic life stage remains largely unstudied. The present study investigated the patterns of flounder larval recruitment and the influence of environmental factors on the immigration of the early life stages to the Lima estuary (NW Portugal), integrating data on fish larvae and post-settlement individuals (< 50 mm length), collected over 7 years. Late-stage larvae arrived at the estuary between February and July and peak abundances were observed in April. Post-settlement individuals (< 50 mm) occurred later between April and October, whereas newly-settled ones (< 20 mm) were found only in May and June. Variables associated with the spawning, survival and growth of larvae in the ocean (sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a and inland hydrological variables) were the major drivers of flounder occurrence in the estuarine nursery. Although the adjacent coastal area is characterized by a current system with strong seasonality and mesoscale variability, we did not identify any influence of variables related with physical processes (currents and upwelling) on the occurrence of early life stages in the estuary. A wider knowledge on the influence of the coastal circulation variability and its associated effects upon ocean-estuarine connectivity is required to improve our understanding of the population dynamics of marine spawning fish that use estuarine nurseries.

  18. Estuarine fluvial floodplain formation in the Holocene Lower Tagus valley (Central Portugal) and implications for Quaternary fluvial system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schriek, Tim; Passmore, David G.; Rolão, Jose; Stevenson, Anthony C.

    2007-11-01

    We present a brief synthesis of the Quaternary fluvial record in the Lower Tagus Basin (central Portugal), concentrating on factors controlling infill and incision. The Holocene part of the record forms the focus of this paper and guides the questioning of the basic assumptions of the established Quaternary fluvial evolution model, in particular the link between sea-level change and fluvial incision-deposition. We suggest that several incision-aggradation phases may have occurred during glacial periods. Major aggradation events may overlap with cold episodes, while incision appears to concentrate on the warming limb of climate transitions. The complex stratigraphy of the Quaternary record in the Lower Tagus valley is influenced by repeated base-level and climate changes. This paper submits the first chronostratigraphic framework for valley fill deposits in the Lower Tagus area. Sea-level rise forced aggradation and controlled deposition of the fine-grained sedimentary wedge underlying the low-gradient Lower Tagus floodplain. Investigations have focused on the lower Muge tributary, where rapidly aggrading estuarine and fluvial environments were abruptly established (∼8150 cal BP) as sea level rose. Base level at the valley mouth controlled the upstream extent of the fine-grained backfill. Tidal environments disappeared abruptly (∼5800 cal BP) when the open estuary at the Muge confluence was infilled by the Tagus River. The decrease and final still stand of sea-level rise led to floodplain stabilisation with peat (∼6400-5200 cal BP) and soil formation (∼5200-2200 cal BP). Localised renewed sedimentation (∼2200-200 cal BP) is linked to human activity.

  19. Effect of hypersaline and low lake conditions on ecological functioning of St Lucia estuarine system, South Africa: An overview 2002-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, D. P.; Vivier, L.; Jerling, H. L.

    2010-03-01

    Lake St Lucia, the largest estuarine lake in Africa has been subjected to hypersaline conditions and low lake levels over the past eight years following the closure of its mouth due to drought in the region. This paper documents the physical changes through which the lake has passed and summarises the main findings of research undertaken on the three major biotic components that have been subjected to these conditions. A review of the anthropogenic impacts which have affected the system is provided. These indicate that in combination with drought conditions greater pressure is placed on the system that was the case in the historical past. Available data indicate that the current situation is not only impacting on the lake and its fauna but also on the adjacent nearshore marine environment, It is considered that the Meta area is potentially also under threat. Medium to long term relief possibilities that are under consideration are discussed in relation to the restructuring of something resembling the historically combined uMfolozi-St Lucia ecosystem that existed in the past. It is concluded that in the short term only two options are available to potentially provide relief for the system, the first is to breach the connection between the mouth and the sea. The second is to re-establish some form of more permanent connection, between uMfolozi and St Lucia.

  20. The ecology of Mugu Lagoon, California: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Onuf, C.P.

    1987-06-01

    Mugu Lagoon is significant as one of the least disturbed and best protected estuaries in southern California; thus this small estuarine system can serve as a baseline model for the region. This report summarizes and synthesizes scientific data on the ecological structure and functioning of the estuary, including discussions of climate, hydrology, geology, physiography, biotic assemblages, and ecological processes and interactions. The estuary exhibits extreme variability in freshwater inputs, being at times totally marine and at other times flushed by stormwater runoff from the watershed. Major storms in 1978 and 1980 resulted in sedimentation that drastically altered benthic communities and resulted in changes in the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation and benthos, and fish and shorebird use of these food resources. Mugu Lagoon is part of a naval base and therefore not subject to the development pressures facing many other southern California estuaries. Storm-produced sedimentation remains a management concern, as well as closure of the mouth of the lagoon due to littoral drift of sand along the barrier spit.

  1. Relative importance of estuarine flatfish nurseries along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Henrique N.; Vasconcelos, Rita; Vinagre, Catarina; França, Susana; Fonseca, Vanessa; Maia, Anabela; Reis-Santos, Patrick; Lopes, Marta; Ruano, Miguel; Campos, Joana; Freitas, Vânia; Santos, Paulo T.; Costa, Maria José

    2007-02-01

    The relative importance of nursery areas and their relationships with several environmental variables were evaluated in nine estuarine systems along the Portuguese coast based on trawl surveys. Historical data were used to outline changes and trends in the nursery function of some of these estuaries over the past decades. The dominant flatfish species in Portuguese estuaries were Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758), Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858 and Monochirus hispidus Rafinesque, 1814, but their occurrence differed among the estuaries. P. flesus only occurred in estuaries north of the Tejo estuary (39°N), S. solea was quite rare along the southern Portuguese coast (south of 37°30'N), S. senegalensis occurred in estuaries throughout the coast, but its abundance varied considerably, and the occurrence of M. hispidus was limited to the Sado estuary and Ria Formosa. A Correspondence Analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between flatfish species abundance and geomorphologic and hydrologic characteristics of estuaries (latitude, freshwater flow, estuarine area, intertidal area, mean depth and residence time). Abiotic characteristics (depth, temperature, salinity, sediment type) of nursery grounds of each flatfish species were also evaluated. Results showed that some estuaries along the Portuguese coast have nursery grounds used by several flatfish species (e.g. Ria de Aveiro, Sado estuary), while in other systems a segregation was noticed, with juveniles of different species occurring in distinct estuarine areas (e.g. Minho and Mondego estuaries). This emphasizes the relevance of niche overlap, but the potential for competition may be considerably minimized by differences in resource use patterns and by an extremely high abundance of resources. Peak densities of flatfishes recorded in nurseries areas along the Portuguese coast were within the range of values reported for other geographical areas. Inter-annual abundance

  2. Evaluation of anthropic influences in an estuarine system of Southeastern Brazilian Coast by applying enrichment factors in cores from Bertioga Channel, Sao Paulo state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, R. C.; Sartoretto, J. R.; Salaroli, A. B.; Gabriela, C.; Andreza, R. P.; Tessler, M. G.; Mahiques, M.; Goncalves, C.

    2011-12-01

    Santos estuary, located in Southeastern Brazilian Coast, is impacted by several anthropic activities. The largest commercial harbor in South America and the main petrochemical and metallurgical industrial centre in the country, with approximately 1100 industries, are also in this estuary. The estuarine system has an important channel, called Bertioga Channel, which connects the upper Santos estuary to the ocean. In this channel are located the main mangroves of the estuarine complex that have a great potential of heavy metals retention. This behavior is related to sedimentary dynamics of system, where contaminated sediments from upper estuary are filtrated by channel before reaching the ocean. In this context, the main goal of this work was to carry out a study on toxic elements in cores from Bertioga Channel. Enrichment Factor (EF) was determined and it was related to geochronological data, allowing the evaluation of anthropic activities impact in this region. Thus, in February 2010, were collected five cores along the channel using a vibrocorer. The cores (150 - 220 cm) were sliced at every 2 cm, the samples were frozen and freeze-drying. Elemental preparation and analysis (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sc and Zn) followed SW-846 methodologies applying ICP-OES technique. Geocronology was determined via gamma spectrometry, by 210Pbxs and 137Cs methods. In order to assess the degree of sediment contamination, enrichment factors (EF) were calculated using Sc as normalization element Background values correspondeded to the element concentration in the bottom sediment core as determined by 210Pb chronology. EFs obtained in all analyzed cores were lower than 2, indicating a minimal pollution for the region. However, in core Bertioga 5 (the closest one to Santos harbor), it can be seen As, Cr, Pb and Zn enrichment from the bottom to the top, mainly from 70's, when harbor activities expanded. Despite of the low levels found for the studied elements, Bertioga channel area has

  3. Evidence for enhanced mercury reactivity in response to estuarine mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R.; Lamborg, Carl H.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Balcom, Prentiss H.

    2003-11-01

    Bioaccumulation of methylmercury in coastal U.S. fisheries has led to the issuance of numerous fish consumption advisories, and yet little is known about the processes that make Hg species chemically labile in coastal and estuarine systems. This study examined the role of estuarine mixing in formation of labile Hg complexes (reactive Hg) from relatively refractory Hg-organic associations in river water and characterized the behavior and distribution of Hg species in the Connecticut River estuary during three distinct collection periods. Results indicate that while total Hg partitioning and concentrations remained fairly constant with increasing salinity, the fraction present as reactive Hg concentrations increased, primarily in the particulate phase. Mixing experiments using both natural and prepared waters indicate that riverine organic ligands rapidly scavenge reactive Hg from natural waters on timescales of minutes to hours, while samples free of riverine influence remained much more "reactive." Modeling of the estuarine system suggests that elevated concentrations of chloride and dilution of the dominant organic ligand associated with estuarine mixing enhance reactive Hg and predict a bulk log formation constant for the binding ligand of approximately 21. Analysis of Hg0 production from Hg(II)-spiked, incubated estuarine samples supports the speciation data as higher reactive Hg concentrations and Hg0 production rates were observed in the more saline samples. These results suggest that estuarine mixing may exacerbate Hg methylation, evasion, and bioaccumulation in some systems by promoting the formation of Hg species that are readily labile.

  4. Human effects on estuarine shoreline decadal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rilo, A.; Freire, P.; Ceia, R.; Mendes, R. N.; Catalão, J.; Taborda, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their sheltered conditions and natural resources, estuaries were always attractive to human activities (industrial, agriculture, residential and recreation). Consequently, the complex interactions between anthropogenic and natural drivers increase estuarine shoreline vulnerability to climate changes impacts. The environmental sustainability of these systems depends on a fragile balance between societal development and natural values that can be further disturbed by climate change effects. This challenging task for scientific community, managers and stakeholders can only be accomplished with interdisplinary approaches. In this context, it seems clear that estuarine management plans should incorporate the concept of change into the planning of policy decisions since these natural dynamic areas are often under human pressure and are recognized as sensitive to climate change effects. Therefore, the knowledge about historical evolution of estuarine shoreline is important to provide new insights on the spatial and temporal dimensions of estuarine change. This paper aims to present and discuss shoreline changes due to human intervention in Tagus estuary, located on the west coast of Portugal. Detailed margins cartography, in a 550m fringe (drawn inland from the highest astronomical tide line), was performed based on 2007 orthophotos (spatial resolution of 0.5 m) analysis. Several classification categories were considered, as urbanized areas, industrial, port and airport facilities, agriculture spaces, green areas and natural zones. The estuarine bed (area bellow the highest astronomical tide line) was also mapped (including human occupation, natural habitats, morpho-sedimentary units) based on the geographic information above and LANSAT 7 TM+ images using image processing techniques. Aerial photographs dated from 1944, 1946, 1948, 1955 and 1958 were analyzed for a set of pilot zones in order to fully understand the decadal shoreline change. Estuarine bed presents

  5. Molecular characterization of Pseudo-nitzschia community structure and species ecology in a hydrographically complex estuarine system (Puget Sound, Washington, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katherine A.; Olson, Claire H.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Species within the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia coexist in coastal and estuarine waters globally and are difficult to distinguish by microscopy. Here, we describe a sensitive, high throughput PCR-based Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) approach to determine the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species within natural communities over space and time. The method was quantitatively validated using simplified mixtures of DNA or ITS1 standards from isolates of P. pungens, P. multiseries, and P. delicatissima. Relative abundance calculations based on ARISA profiles from these mixtures reflected input ratios, with minor deviations resulting from intraspecific variability. ARISA was used to identify and quantify at least eight species within Puget Sound and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington, USA: P. americana, P. australis/P. seriata, P. cuspidata, P. delicatissima, P. fraudulenta, P. fryxelliana, P. multiseries, and P. pungens; genotypes corresponding to P. pungens var. pungens and P. pungens var. cingulata were identified by environmental sequencing. The different species were significantly correlated with physical (temperature, salinity), biological (chlorophyll a fluorescence, oxygen), and/or chemical (ammonium, nutrient ratios) factors. The ability to determine shifts in the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species over spatial and temporal scales relevant to dispersion and selection facilitates dissection of the varied mechanisms driving vertical and horizontal species distribution patterns in hydrographically complex systems. PMID:27239082

  6. Development and validation of an experimental life support system for assessing the effects of global climate change and environmental contamination on estuarine and coastal marine benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Francisco J R C; Rocha, Rui J M; Pires, Ana C C; Ladeiro, Bruno; Castanheira, José M; Costa, Rodrigo; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Lillebø, Ana Isabel; Ribeiro, Rui; Pereira, Ruth; Lopes, Isabel; Marques, Catarina; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Calado, Ricardo; Cleary, Daniel F R; Gomes, Newton C M

    2013-08-01

    An experimental life support system (ELSS) was constructed to study the interactive effects of multiple stressors on coastal and estuarine benthic communities, specifically perturbations driven by global climate change and anthropogenic environmental contamination. The ELSS allows researchers to control salinity, pH, temperature, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), tidal rhythms and exposure to selected contaminants. Unlike most microcosms previously described, our system enables true independent replication (including randomization). In addition to this, it can be assembled using commercially available materials and equipment, thereby facilitating the replication of identical experimental setups in different geographical locations. Here, we validate the reproducibility and environmental quality of the system by comparing chemical and biological parameters recorded in our ELSS with those prevalent in the natural environment. Water, sediment microbial community and ragworm (the polychaete Hediste diversicolor) samples were obtained from four microcosms after 57 days of operation. In general, average concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients (NO3 (-) ; NH4 (+) and PO4 (-3) ) in the water column of the ELSS experimental control units were within the range of concentrations recorded in the natural environment. While some shifts in bacterial community composition were observed between in situ and ELSS sediment samples, the relative abundance of most metabolically active bacterial taxa appeared to be stable. In addition, ELSS operation did not significantly affect survival, oxidative stress and neurological biomarkers of the model organism Hediste diversicolor. The validation data indicate that this system can be used to assess independent or interactive effects of climate change and environmental contamination on benthic communities. Researchers will be able to simulate the effects of these stressors on processes driven by microbial communities, sediment and seawater

  7. Southern Africa Validation of NASA's Earth Observing System (SAVE EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Privette, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Southern Africa Validation of EOS (SAVE) is 4-year, multidisciplinary effort to validate operational and experimental products from Terra-the flagship satellite of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). At test sites from Zambia to South Africa, we are measuring soil, vegetation and atmospheric parameters over a range of ecosystems for comparison with products from Terra, Landsat 7, AVHRR and SeaWiFS. The data are also employed to parameterize and improve vegetation process models. Fixed-point and mobile "transect" sampling are used to collect the ground data. These are extrapolated over larger areas with fine-resolution multispectral imagery. We describe the sites, infrastructure, and measurement strategies developed underSAVE, as well as initial results from our participation in the first Intensive Field Campaign of SAFARI 2000. We also describe SAVE's role in the Kalahari Transect Campaign (February/March 2000) in Zambia and Botswana.

  8. Hydrodynamic behavior of the Cape Fear River and estuarine system: A synthesis and observational investigation of discharge-salinity intrusion relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, May Ling; Luettich, Richard A., Jr.; Mallin, Michael A.

    2010-07-01

    Transport of constituents in partially mixed estuaries depends on the relative strengths of dominant forcing mechanisms which may include tides, river input, and wind. In this study, we investigated the major physical mechanisms that influence the salinity structure in the Cape Fear River Estuary (CFRE), a partially mixed estuary that is representative of river-dominated estuaries along the southeast Atlantic coast of the U.S. Based on analysis of observed hydrographic and hydrodynamic data, we first describe differences in velocity, salinity, and stratification at along-channel sections of the estuary for relatively low-flow conditions. We then investigate the influence of river inflow on the salinity intrusion (defined by the 1-salinity contour near the bottom), based on six methods of choosing discharge in order to identify an appropriate means of incorporating flow history into the discharge value. Our analyses indicate: 1) 92 percent of the variability in the length of the salinity intrusion over a five-year period can be explained based on the Hydrologic Flood Method identified in this work, 2) the salinity intrusion depends more weakly on discharge than predicted by classic analytical relationships for exchange-dominated systems in which the intrusion varies with discharge to the power of (-1/3), and 3) intra-tidal and tidal-range differences based on a 29-day modulation significantly influence the salinity structure. Our results suggest that the salinity intrusion location is dependent upon the hydrologic "flood," defined by a peak in the river-discharge hydrograph. The analysis indicates that the new method used to determine discharge in the CFRE can more accurately explain river inflow-salinity relationships than previously investigated methods. In river-estuary systems in which hydrologic flood peaks are large relative to base flow, we hypothesize the hydrologic flood model offers a useful tool for predicting the estuarine salinity response to river

  9. Properties of light absorption in a highly coloured estuarine system in south-east Australia which is prone to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementson, Lesley A.; Parslow, John S.; Turnbull, Alison R.; Bonham, Pru I.

    2004-05-01

    The Huon Estuary in south-east Tasmania is an important site in Australia's aquaculture and finfish industries. Atlantic salmon and shellfish are farmed in the Huon River Estuary, which drains a catchment that includes both areas of pristine wilderness and agriculture. The estuary experiences algal blooms, including blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum, which can cause considerable problems for the aquaculture industry. The freshwater input is highly coloured due to high levels of humic material and this combined with intrusions of clearer oceanic water and the occurrence of algal blooms makes this estuary optically complex. Between November 1996 and September 1998 samples for pigment and optical analyses were collected weekly from five sites within the mid to lower regions of the estuary. In addition, every three months (beginning July 1996), samples were collected from 30 sites within the full river/estuary system. Early in December 1997 a bloom of Gymnodinium catenatum occurred throughout the estuary and persisted until June 1998. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was found to dominate the total absorption of the water throughout the entire estuary and over the two-year duration of the study. The occurrence of algal blooms showed no correlation with the optical characteristics of the estuary, suggesting that optical parameters cannot be used to predict the occurrence of algal blooms in this estuary. Blooms of different algal species, such as diatoms and dinoflagellates, may be able to be distinguished by their absorption spectra in the UV region rather than the visible region. To date, this study is the most detailed spatial and temporal study of the characteristics of light absorption in an estuarine system within Australia.

  10. Habitat- and bay-scale connectivity of sympatric fishes in an estuarine nursery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Michael A.; Rooker, Jay R.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to examine habitat- and bay-scale connectivity for co-occurring juvenile fishes, southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), at two spatial scales in a model estuarine seascape. An acoustic positioning system was deployed to examine habitat-scale (ca. 1 m-1 km) movement, while a larger gridded array was deployed to examine bay-scale movement (ca. 1-20 km). Both species exhibited greater use of edge habitat and seagrass beds at the habitat scale; however, rates of movement within habitats varied between species. Southern flounder movement (mean = 4.0 m min-1) increased with decreasing habitat complexity (seagrass to bare sand) and increasing temperature, while red drum rate of movement (mean = 8.4 m min-1) was not significantly affected by environmental factors at the habitat scale, indicating the use of different foraging strategies (i.e. ambush vs. active). Bay-scale distribution was influenced by physicochemical conditions and seascape composition, with both species found most frequently in areas with high seagrass coverage and relative close proximity to tidal creeks and connective channels. Response to environmental variables often differed between species and the probability of bay-scale movement (>1 km) for southern flounder was greatest on days with narrow tidal ranges (<0.4 m) and higher temperatures (>17 °C), while the probability of bay-scale movement for red drum increased in response to decreasing salinity and lower temperatures (<16 °C). Species-specific variation in movement patterns within and across habitat types observed here at both the habitat and bay scale suggest sympatric species employ different strategies to partition resources within estuarine nursery areas and highlight the importance of multi-species assessments for improving our understanding of habitat value and ecosystem function.

  11. State of the Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayewski, P. A.; Meredith, M. P.; Summerhayes, C. P.; Turner, J.; Worby, A.; Barrett, P. J.; Casassa, G.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Bracegirdle, T.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Bromwich, D.; Campbell, H.; Hamilton, G. S.; Lyons, W. B.; Maasch, K. A.; Aoki, S.; Xiao, C.; van Ommen, Tas

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews developments in our understanding of the state of the Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate and its relation to the global climate system over the last few millennia. Climate over this and earlier periods has not been stable, as evidenced by the occurrence of abrupt changes in atmospheric circulation and temperature recorded in Antarctic ice core proxies for past climate. Two of the most prominent abrupt climate change events are characterized by intensification of the circumpolar westerlies (also known as the Southern Annular Mode) between ˜6000 and 5000 years ago and since 1200-1000 years ago. Following the last of these is a period of major trans-Antarctic reorganization of atmospheric circulation and temperature between A.D. 1700 and 1850. The two earlier Antarctic abrupt climate change events appear linked to but predate by several centuries even more abrupt climate change in the North Atlantic, and the end of the more recent event is coincident with reorganization of atmospheric circulation in the North Pacific. Improved understanding of such events and of the associations between abrupt climate change events recorded in both hemispheres is critical to predicting the impact and timing of future abrupt climate change events potentially forced by anthropogenic changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols. Special attention is given to the climate of the past 200 years, which was recorded by a network of recently available shallow firn cores, and to that of the past 50 years, which was monitored by the continuous instrumental record. Significant regional climate changes have taken place in the Antarctic during the past 50 years. Atmospheric temperatures have increased markedly over the Antarctic Peninsula, linked to nearby ocean warming and intensification of the circumpolar westerlies. Glaciers are retreating on the peninsula, in Patagonia, on the sub-Antarctic islands, and in West Antarctica adjacent to the peninsula. The penetration of marine

  12. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and coordinate the use of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System for research purposes. (b) NOAA will, in...) NOAA will consult with other Federal and state agencies to promote use of one or more research...

  13. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and coordinate the use of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System for research purposes. (b) NOAA will, in...) NOAA will consult with other Federal and state agencies to promote use of one or more research...

  14. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and coordinate the use of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System for research purposes. (b) NOAA will, in...) NOAA will consult with other Federal and state agencies to promote use of one or more research...

  15. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and coordinate the use of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System for research purposes. (b) NOAA will, in...) NOAA will consult with other Federal and state agencies to promote use of one or more research...

  16. Environmental availability of potentially toxic elements in estuarine sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape coastal system, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tramonte, Keila Modesto; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; de Lima Ferreira, Paulo Alves; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Batista, Miriam Fernanda; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch

    2016-02-15

    The Cananéia-Iguape system is located in a Southeastern Brazilian coastal region, acknowledged by UNESCO as Biosphere Reserve of the Atlantic Rainforest. This system underwent important environmental changes due to the opening of the artificial channel of Valo Grande and by past intensive Pb ore mining activities. In view of this scenario, this study evaluated Cu, Pb and Zn availability in sediments from Cananéia-Iguape system, based on the content associated with the main components of the sediments. Moreover, in order to assess local contamination, the metals' contents were compared to Canadian quality guidelines, the past levels of metals preceding the mining activities and background sediment values. Concerning Cu and Zn in a state of chemical remobilization, both elements would possibly present no harm to the local communities. However, Pb available content exceeded the comparison values in various sampling sites, suggesting the need of monitoring regarding its bioavailability. PMID:26707887

  17. 11. 'Southern Pacific Company Pacific System. 1 180'1/4' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 'Southern Pacific Company - Pacific System. 1 - 180'-1/4' c. to c. End Pins S. Tr. Thro. Span. 16th crossing Sacramento River, The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., Apr. 25th 1901.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 324.99, Milepost 324.99, Shasta Springs, Siskiyou County, CA

  18. Impact of biodiversity-climate futures on primary production and metabolism in a model benthic estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the effects of anthropogenically-driven changes in global temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide and biodiversity on the functionality of marine ecosystems is crucial for predicting and managing the associated impacts. Coastal ecosystems are important sources of carbon (primary production) to shelf waters and play a vital role in global nutrient cycling. These systems are especially vulnerable to the effects of human activities and will be the first areas impacted by rising sea levels. Within these coastal ecosystems, microalgal assemblages (microphytobenthos: MPB) are vital for autochthonous carbon fixation. The level of in situ production by MPB mediates the net carbon cycling of transitional ecosystems between net heterotrophic or autotrophic metabolism. In this study, we examine the interactive effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (370, 600, and 1000 ppmv), temperature (6°C, 12°C, and 18°C) and invertebrate biodiversity on MPB biomass in experimental systems. We assembled communities of three common grazing invertebrates (Hydrobia ulvae, Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor) in monoculture and in all possible multispecies combinations. This experimental design specifically addresses interactions between the selected climate change variables and any ecological consequences caused by changes in species composition or richness. Results The effects of elevated CO2 concentration, temperature and invertebrate diversity were not additive, rather they interacted to determine MPB biomass, and overall this effect was negative. Diversity effects were underpinned by strong species composition effects, illustrating the importance of individual species identity. Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that in natural systems, the complex interactions between changing environmental conditions and any associated changes in invertebrate assemblage structure are likely to reduce MPB biomass. Furthermore, these effects would be

  19. Minimal incorporation of Deepwater Horizon oil by estuarine filter feeders.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brian; Anderson, Laurie C

    2014-03-15

    Natural abundance carbon isotope analyses are sensitive tracers for fates and use of oil in aquatic environments. Use of oil carbon in estuarine food webs should lead to isotope values approaching those of oil itself, -27‰ for stable carbon isotopes reflecting oil origins and -1000‰ for carbon-14 reflecting oil age. To test for transfer of oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill into estuarine food webs, filter-feeding barnacles (Balanus sp.) and marsh mussels (Geukensia demissa) were collected from Louisiana estuaries near the site of the oil spill. Carbon-14 analyses of these animals from open waters and oiled marshes showed that oil use was <1% and near detection limits estimated at 0.3% oil incorporation. Respiration studies showed no evidence for enhanced microbial activity in bay waters. Results are consistent with low dietary impacts of oil for filter feeders and little overall impact on respiration in the productive Louisiana estuarine systems.

  20. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of aquatic and terrestrial plants of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Harris, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of seasonal variability in the C-N stable isotope ratios of plants collected across the habitat mosaic of San Francisco Bay, its marshes, and its tributary river system. Analyses of 868 plant samples were binned into 10 groups (e.g., terrestrial riparian, freshwater phytoplankton, salt marsh) to determine whether C-N isotopes can be used as biomarkers for tracing the origins of organic matter in this river-marsh-estuary complex. Variability of ??13C and ??15N was high (???5-10???) within each plant group, and we identified three modes of variability: (1) between species and their microhabitats, (2) over annual cycles of plant growth and senescence, and (3) between living and decomposing biomass. These modes of within-group variability obscure any source-specific isotopic signatures, confounding the application of C-N isotopes for identifying the origins of organic matter. A second confounding factor was large dissimilarity between the ??13C-??15N of primary producers and the organic-matter pools in the seston and sediments. Both confounding factors impede the application of C-N isotopes to reveal the food supply to primary consumers in ecosystems supporting diverse autotrophs and where the isotopic composition of organic matter has been transformed and become distinct from that of its parent plant sources. Our results support the advice of others: variability of C-N stable isotopes within all organic-matter pools is high and must be considered in applications of these isotopes to trace trophic linkages from primary producers to primary consumers. Isotope-based approaches are perhaps most powerful when used to complement other tools, such as molecular biomarkers, bioassays, direct measures of production, and compilations of organic-matter budgets.

  1. Effect of melatonin in the antioxidant defense system in the locomotor muscles of the estuarine crab Neohelice granulata (Decapoda, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Geihs, Márcio Alberto; Vargas, Marcelo Alves; Maciel, Fábio Everton; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Cruz, Bruno Pinto; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Monserrat, José Maria; Nery, Luiz Eduardo Maia

    2010-03-01

    In vertebrates, many studies verified different effects of melatonin in the antioxidant defense system (ADS). In crustaceans, few studies have been conducted to verify this possibility. We verified the melatonin effects in the crab Neohelice granulata using low (0.002 and 0.02 pmol/crab) and high (2.0 and 20.0 pmol/crab) melatonin dosages in short-term (0.5h) and long-term (9.5h) experiments. We analyzed the antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, levels of by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), the activity of glutamate cysteine ligase (gamma-GCL) and catalase (CAT) and glutathione content (GSH). Finally, the effects of exogenous melatonin were verified in terms of melatonin and N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) content in the muscles of N. granulata. In short-term experiment and low dosages, melatonin increased the VO(2), gamma-GCL activity and GSH content (p<0.05) and decreased melatonin content (p<0.05) without effects in ROS, ACAP and LPO (p>0.05). Possibly, melatonin is acting in the ADS increasing its efficiency and/or acting in mitochondrial activity and/or through signaling muscles to increase its consumption. AFMK was only detected in the eyestalk and cerebroid ganglia. In high dosages melatonin effects decreased, possibly by the desensitization of their receptors. In long-term experiment, melatonin decreased ACAP (p<0.05), and CAT activity (p<0.05) in low dosages. In high dosages melatonin reduced VO(2) (p<0.05) and increased ACAP (p<0.05), possibly stimulating others components of the ADS. In conclusion, melatonin in the locomotor muscles of N. granulata affects the antioxidant/pro-oxidant balance in a time and dosage dependent manner.

  2. Estuarine 'collaboratories:' regional and global perspectives (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, A. M.; Needoba, J. A.; Davis, M.; Leinen, M.

    2013-12-01

    There is an urgent need to anticipate and manage environmental changes in estuaries, as these critical ecosystems provide services that are essential for regional and global sustainability. Collaboratively designed and operated estuarine observation and prediction systems are progressively enabling long-term and high-resolution characterizations of estuarine variability and function, thus providing a powerful foundation for stewardship activities. The benefits of these 'collaboratories' have been demonstrated regionally in various estuaries, and their broader scale potential is being explored through an emerging national and international initiative. The first part of this presentation will address the lessons learned from SATURN (http://www.stccmop.org), a mature multi-institutional 'collaboratory' for the Columbia River estuary. SATURN innovatively integrates sensors, models, flows of information, and communities of practice. This integration has fueled advances in understanding and prediction of the estuary as a complex and highly variable bioreactor, subject to shifts from global climate change and from evolving regional uses. Our focus will be on describing the aspects of the design and practice that make SATURN transformative as a scientific and management-support tool at a regional scale. The second part of the presentation will address the translation of lessons learned from and beyond SATURN into requirements for a global network of estuarine observation and prediction systems. 'Our Global Estuary' is an initiative designed to create and use such a network, to maximize the aggregate potential of estuaries as sentinels and key players in global sustainability. We will report on the main recommendations of the first planning workshop for this initiative, which will take place on October 2013.

  3. Remote sensing of estuarine fronts and their effects on pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Polis, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Imagery from LANDSAT 1 and 2 proved valuable in determining the location, type, and extent of estuarine fronts under different tidal conditions. Neither ships nor aircraft alone could provide as complete, synoptic, and repetitive an overview as did the satellites. Since estuarine fronts influence the movement of oil slicks and dispersion of other pollutants, cleanup operations depending on real time use of oil slick movement prediction models will benefit not only from aircraft tracking the actual slicks but also from real time satellite observations of surface currents and the location of frontal systems.

  4. Challenging paradigms in estuarine ecology and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, M.; Whitfield, A. K.

    2011-10-01

    For many years, estuarine science has been the 'poor relation' in aquatic research - freshwater scientists ignored estuaries as they tended to get confused by salt and tides, and marine scientists were more preoccupied by large open systems. Estuaries were merely regarded by each group as either river mouths or sea inlets respectively. For the past four decades, however, estuaries (and other transitional waters) have been regarded as being ecosystems in their own right. Although often not termed as such, this has led to paradigms being generated to summarise estuarine structure and functioning and which relate to both the natural science and management of these systems. This paper defines, details and affirms these paradigms that can be grouped into those covering firstly the science (definitions, scales, linkages, productivity, tolerances and variability) and secondly the management (pressures, valuation, health and services) of estuaries. The more 'science' orientated paradigms incorporate the development and types of ecotones, the nature of stressed and variable systems (with specific reference to resilience and redundancy), the relationship between generalists and specialists produced by environmental tolerance, the relevance of scale in relation to functioning and connectivity, the sources of production and degree of productivity, the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning and the stress-subsidy debates. The more 'management' targeted paradigms include the development and effects of exogenic unmanaged pressures and endogenic managed pressures, the perception of health and the ability to manage estuaries (related to internal and external influences), and the influence of all of these on the production of ecosystem services and societal benefits.

  5. Microbial Community in the Hydrothermal System at Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Itahashi, S.; Kakegawa, T.; Utsumi, M.; Maruyama, A.; Ishibashi, J.; Marumo, K.; Urabe, T.; Yamagishi, A.

    2004-12-01

    There is unique ecosystem around deep-sea hydrothermal area. Living organisms are supported by chemical free energy provided by the hydrothermal water. The ecosystem is expected to be similar to those in early stage of life history on the earth, when photosynthetic organisms have not emerged. In this study, we have analyzed the microbial diversity in the hydrothermal area at southern Mariana trough. In the "Archaean Park Project" supported by special Coordination Fund, four holes were bored and cased by titanium pipes near hydrothermal vents in the southern Mariana trough in 2004. Hydrothermal fluids were collected from these cased holes and natural vents in this area. Microbial cells were collected by filtering the hydrothermal fluid in situ or in the mother sip. Filters were stored at -80C and used for DNA extraction. Chimneys at this area was also collected and stored at -80C. The filters and chimney samples were crushed and DNA was extracted. DNA samples were used for amplification of 16S rDNA fragments by PCR using archaea specific primers and universal primers. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced. These PCR clones of different samples will be compared. We will extend our knowledge about microbiological diversity at Southern Mariana trough to compare the results obtained at other area.

  6. Resolving drivers of variability in estuarine metabolism from sustained observations of water quality in the SE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine trends in water quality in long-term monitoring (10-15 y) data collected at 5 estuarine systems of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve System: Grand Bay, MS; Weeks Bay, AL; Apalachicola Bay, FL; Rookery Bay, FL, and Guana Tolomatos and Matanzas Rivers, FL. These...

  7. 17. 'Southern Pacific Company Pacific System, 3 180'61/2' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 'Southern Pacific Company - Pacific System, 3 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. end pins S. Tr. Thro. Spans, 10th, 11th and 13th Crossings of Sacramento River, also for 1 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. end pins S. Tr. Thro. Span, 8th Crossing Sacramento River, The Phoenixville Bridge Co., Phoenixville Pa., Apr. 9th, 1901.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  8. Estuarine versus transient flow regimes in Juan de Fuca Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; MiháLy, Steven F.; Kulikov, Evgueni A.

    2007-09-01

    Residual currents in Juan de Fuca Strait are observed to switch between two fundamental states: estuarine and transient. The estuarine regime, which prevails roughly 90% of the time in summer and 55% of the time in winter, has a fortnightly modulated, three-layer structure characterized by strong (˜50 cm s-1) outflow above 60 ± 15 m depth, moderate (˜25 cm s-1) inflow between 60 and 125 m depth, and weak (˜10 cm s-1) inflow below 125 ± 10 m depth. Rotation increases the upper layer depth by 40 m on the northern side of the channel and upwelling-favorable coastal winds augment inflow in the bottom layer by as much as 5 cm s-1. Rotation, combined with modulation of the estuarine currents by tidal mixing in the eastern strait, leads to fortnightly variability in the along-channel velocity and cross-channel positioning of the core flow regions. Transient flows, which occur roughly 10% of the time in summer and 45% of the time in winter, are rapidly evolving, horizontally and vertically sheared "reversals" in the estuarine circulation generated during poleward wind events along the outer coast. Major events can persist for several weeks, force a net inward transport, and give rise to an O(10) km wide, surface-intensified, O(100) cm s-1 inflow along the southern (Olympic Peninsula) boundary of the strait. This "Olympic Peninsula Countercurrent" is typically accompanied by an abrupt decrease in salinity, indicating that it is a buoyancy flow originating with low-density water on the northern Washington shelf.

  9. Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Steven P. Ferraro, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR Background/Questions/Methods The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification, and the Her...

  10. Dynamics of pelagic and benthic microalgae during drought conditions in a shallow estuarine lake (Lake St. Lucia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirok, Katrin; Scharler, Ursula M.

    2013-02-01

    Microalgae are an important component of highly productive estuarine food webs worldwide. Due to their short generation times, they are able to respond quickly to changing environmental conditions and grazing pressures. We studied the dynamics of microalgae in Lake St. Lucia, a shallow estuarine lake system, and one of the largest estuaries in Africa. Recently, dry years in addition to the closure of the inlet in 2002 have left Lake St. Lucia with greatly reduced water levels and increased salinities. We sampled planktonic and benthic microalgal biomass (chl a) and physico-chemical parameters biweekly at three different stations located at the inlet, the southern, and the northern reaches of the system from October 2010 until September 2011. Microalgal biomass differed significantly between sites but did not show clear seasonal patterns. Stochastic climate phenomena had a larger influence than the seasonal cycle. However, the different sites were subject to different driving factors. Erratic rainfall led to rapid and large changes in salinity with most rain falling in summer 2010/2011. During long periods without rain, evaporation led to increasing salinities. In False Bay, in the northern reaches of Lake St. Lucia, this alternation of rainfall and evaporation additionally influenced algal biomass by dilution and concentration. This was not observed in the southern reaches and the inlet of the lake system where trophic interactions most likely played an important role in influencing microalgal dynamics. Although it was not possible to identify general patterns of microalgae dynamics for the entire system, the drivers at individual sites could be identified. Lake St. Lucia corresponded to the in general stochastic nature of microalgae dynamics found in systems worldwide, and in addition showed strong spatial heterogeneity.

  11. Regional CO2 flux estimates from estuarine environments: a reactive-transport modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Nicolas; Laruelle, Goulven G.; Arndt, Sandra; Regnier, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Estuaries are key components of the land-ocean continuum and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large amounts of terrestrial carbon are channelled through estuaries before reaching the ocean. During estuarine transit, numerous biogeochemical processes transform the carbon flux, resulting in a significant CO2 evasion flux to the atmosphere. The global estuarine CO2 outgassing is evaluated at 0.25±0.25 PgC yr-1. Yet, these estimates rely on the extrapolation of local measurements and the scarcity of such measurements conducts to large uncertainties. Furthermore, the global quantification is biased towards anthropogenically impacted estuarine systems located in industrialized countries. Here we provide a first assessment of the estuarine carbon budget and, in particular, CO2 evasion fluxes using a generic and effective reactive-transport model (RTM) approach that is applicable at the regional scale. The new approach is based on the mutual dependency between estuarine geometry and hydrodynamics and uses idealized estuarine geometries. Global river databases (GLORICH) and watershed model outputs (GlobalNEWS) are used to quantify input fluxes for the generic estuarine model. The new modeling approach provides not only a quantification of the estuarine carbon budget, but also allows disentangling the relative contributions of biogeochemical and physical processes to estuarine CO2 emissions. Preliminary results are presented for the North Eastern coast of the US. Model results are consistent with observations and indicate that the net heterotrophy of these systems is the major contributor to estuarine CO2 fluxes (>50%), followed by outgassing of supersaturated riverine waters and nitrification. Results also highlight the strong seasonality in the biogeochemical dynamics. In addition, significant heterogeneity is observed across different estuaries due to spatial heterogeneities in climate forcing, estuarine geometry or riverine input fluxes. The proposed

  12. Foraging ecology of sanderlings Calidris alba wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine intertidal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Pedro M.; Alves, José A.; Catry, Teresa; Granadeiro, José P.

    2015-10-01

    Outside the breeding season, most shorebirds use either estuarine or non-estuarine intertidal areas as foraging grounds. The sanderling Calidris alba is mostly associated with coastal sandy beaches, a habitat which is currently at risk worldwide due to increasing coastal erosion, but may also use estuarine sites as alternative foraging areas. We aimed to compare the trophic conditions for sanderlings wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine sites within and around the Tejo estuary, Portugal, where these two alternative wintering options are available within a relatively small spatial scale. To achieve this, we analysed sanderling diet, prey availability, foraging behaviour, and time and energy budgets in the different substrates available in estuarine and non-estuarine sites. In terms of biomass, the most important sanderling prey in the estuarine sites were siphons of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana, polychaetes, staphylinids and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae. In non-estuarine sites the main prey were polychaetes, the bivalve Donax trunculus and chironomid larvae. Both food availability and energetic intake rates were higher on estuarine sites, and sanderlings spent a higher proportion of time foraging on non-estuarine sites. In the estuary, sanderlings foraged in muddy-sand substrate whenever it was available, achieving higher intake rates than in sandy substrates. In the non-estuarine sites they used both sandy and rocky substrates throughout the tidal cycle but had higher intakes rates in sandy substrate. Estuarine sites seem to offer better foraging conditions for wintering sanderlings than non-estuarine sites. However, sanderlings only use muddy-sand and sandy substrates, which represent a small proportion of the intertidal area of the estuary. The extent of these substrates and the current sanderling density in the estuary suggest it is unlikely that the estuary could provide alternative wintering habitat for sanderlings if they face habitat loss and

  13. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  14. Simulation modeling of estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed of Galveston Bay, Texas ecosystem. Secondary productivity measured by harvestable species (such as shrimp and fish) is evaluated in terms of man-related and controllable factors, such as quantity and quality of inlet fresh-water and pollutants. This simulation model used information from an existing physical parameters model as well as pertinent biological measurements obtained by conventional sampling techniques. Predicted results from the model compared favorably with those from comparable investigations. In addition, this paper will discuss remotely sensed and conventional measurements in the framework of prospective models that may be used to study estuarine processes and ecosystem productivity.

  15. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  16. Population in trans-border regions: the Southern California-Baja California urban system.

    PubMed

    Rubin-kurtzman, J R; Ham-chande, R; Van Arsdol, M D

    1996-01-01

    "This article is a case study of population growth and composition in the Southern California-Baja California trans-border urban system (TBS). The central question guiding the research is how the combination of geographic proximity and economic integration in two very different regions affects population characteristics in the Southern California-Baja California TBS. We begin by briefly defining trans-border urban systems. We then specify the attributes of the Southern California-Baja California TBS, contrasting them with attributes observed elsewhere in the United States and Mexico.... The data are drawn primarily from the U.S. and Mexican censuses. Secondary data from a variety of sources also are discussed." PMID:12347786

  17. Anatomy of La Jolla submarine canyon system; offshore southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Caress, D.W.; Lundsten, E.; Gwiazda, R.; Anderson, K.; McGann, M.; Conrad, J.; Edwards, B.; Sumner, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp profiler was used to map sections of the seafloor within the La Jolla Canyon, offshore southern California, at sub-meter scales. Close-up observations and sampling were conducted during remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives. Minisparker seismic-reflection profiles from a surface ship help to define the overall geometry of the La Jolla Canyon especially with respect to the pre-canyon host sediments. The floor of the axial channel is covered with unconsolidated sand similar to the sand on the shelf near the canyon head, lacks outcrops of the pre-canyon host strata, has an almost constant slope of 1.0° and is covered with trains of crescent shaped bedforms. The presence of modern plant material entombed within these sands confirms that the axial channel is presently active. The sand on the canyon floor liquefied during vibracore collection and flowed downslope, illustrating that the sediment filling the channel can easily fail even on this gentle slope. Data from the canyon walls help constrain the age of the canyon and extent of incision. Horizontal beds of moderately cohesive fine-grained sediments exposed on the steep canyon walls are consistently less than 1.232 million years old. The lateral continuity of seismic reflectors in minisparker profiles indicate that pre-canyon host strata extend uninterrupted from outside the canyon underneath some terraces within the canyon. Evidence of abandoned channels and point bar-like deposits are noticeably absent on the inside bend of channel meanders and in the subsurface of the terraces. While vibracores from the surface of terraces contain thin (< 10 cm) turbidites, they are inferred to be part of a veneer of recent sediment covering pre-canyon host sediments that underpin the terraces. The combined use of state of the art seafloor mapping and exploration tools provides a uniquely detailed view of the morphology within an active submarine canyon.

  18. Upper Basalt-Confined Aquifer System in the Southern Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, P.

    1999-01-04

    The 1990 DOE Tiger Team Finding GW/CF-202 found that the hydrogeologic regime at the Hanford Site was inadequately characterized. This finding also identified the need for completing a study of the confined aquifer in the central and southern portions of the Hanford Site. The southern portion of the site is of particular interest because hydraulic-head patterns in the upper basalt-confined aquifer system indicate that groundwater from the Hanford central plateau area, where contaminants have been found in the aquifer, flows southeast toward the southern site boundary. This results in a potential for offsite migration of contaminants through the upper basalt-confined aquifer system. Based on the review presented in this report, available hydrogeologic characterization information for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system in this area is considered adequate to close the action item. Recently drilled offsite wells have provided additional information on the structure of the aquifer system in and near the southern part of the Hanford Site. Information on hydraulic properties, hydrochemistry, hydraulic heads and flow directions for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system has been re-examined and compiled in recent reports including Spane and Raymond (1993), Spane and Vermeul ( 1994), and Spane and Webber (1995).

  19. Removal of hexavalent chromium from estuarine waters by model substrates and natural sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.M.; Schick, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    Chromate removal from waters with a range of salinities (0-32%) was studied by using both model substrates, alumina and kaolinite, and natural estuarine sediments in order to determine possible effects of sediment on dissolved chromate in estuarine systems. The dependence of chromate removal on sediment concentrations (<1 g L/sup -1/) will be ineffective in removing dissolved chromate from the water column, though the reaction will be important in deposited sediments. Chromate removal is more effective in low- than high-salinity regimes. Removal by model substrates decreases monotonically with increasing salinity but shows a peak in the 0.1-1.0% range with estuarine sediments. This latter behavior shows similarity with the salinity dependence of chromate reduction by gallic acid, suggesting reductive adsorption by the estuarine sediments. Naturally occurring levels of phosphate ansilicate show negligible effect on chromate removal.

  20. Upwelling relaxation and estuarine plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shivanesh; Pringle, James; Austin, Jay

    2011-09-01

    After coastal upwelling, the water properties in the nearshore coastal region close to estuaries is determined by the race between the new estuarine plume traveling along the coast and the upwelled front (a marker for the old upwelled plume and the coastal pycnocline) returning to the coast under downwelling winds. Away from an estuary, downwelling winds can return the upwelled front to the coast bringing less dense water nearshore. Near the estuary, the estuarine plume can arrive along the coast and return less dense water to the nearshore region before the upwelled front returns to the coast. Where the plume brings less dense water to the coast first, the plume keeps the upwelled front from returning to the coast. In this region, only the plume and the anthropogenic input and larvae associated with the plume waters influence the nearshore after upwelling. We quantify the extent of the region where the plume is responsible for bringing less dense water to the nearshore and keeping the upwelled front from returning to the coast after upwelling. We successfully tested our predictions against numerical experiments and field observations of the Chesapeake plume near Duck, North Carolina. We argue that this alongshore region exists for other estuaries where the time-integrated upwelling and downwelling wind stresses are comparable.

  1. Variations in Reading Achievement across 14 Southern African School Systems: Which Factors Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungi, Njora; Thuku, Florence W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the authors employed a multilevel analysis procedure in order to examine the pupil and school levels factors that contributed to variation in reading achievement among Grade 6 primary school pupils in 14 southern African school systems (Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa,…

  2. Strategic adaptation of nitrogen management for el nino southern oscillation-induced winter wheat system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rainfall anomaly (RA) associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has various unwanted impacts on agricultural system globally. The loss of inorganic nitrogen (N) depending on extreme wet or dry conditions is a major concern. The main objective of this study was to adapt site-specific N ...

  3. Determination of water ages and flushing rates using short-lived radium isotopes in large estuarine system, the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo-Chao; Dimova, Natasha T.; Zhao, Liang; Jiang, Xue-Yan; Yu, Zhi-Gang

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of naturally-occurring short-lived radium isotopes (224Ra, t1/2 = 3.6 d and 223Ra, t1/2 = 11 d) to examine coastal water mixing dynamics of the third world largest estuary, Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) during two field trips in April 2010 and May 2011. Distributions of the 224Ra/223Ra activity ratios within the YRE area were used to calculate apparent estuarine water ages. Field-derived results were then compared to hydrodynamic assessments obtained by a Lagrangian particle tracking simulation experiment performed using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). Water ages obtained via both geotracers and particle tracking agree very well. During both field trips an anomalously "younger" water mass (low salinity and higher radium activities) was observed at about 90-170 km offshore distance from the mouth of the river, suggesting an additional terrestrial water source influenced this area. The temporal distribution of the radium isotopes indicated a semi-diurnal tidal pattern in the YRE with relatively constant isotopic composition of less than a 20% variation during our observations. An integrated water flushing rate based on our observations (excluding the additional anomalous source area) was 8.4 km day-1.

  4. Regional tectonic deformation in Southern California, inferred from terrestrial geodesy and the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhengkang

    Tectonic deformation in two regions in Southern California, the Southern Coast Ranges and the Los Angeles Basin, was studied. Results show that in the Southern Coast Ranges, regional deformation is predominantly controlled by deep strike slip motion along the San Andreas Fault, at a rate of 32 plus or minus 2 mm/yr. The deep slip along the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault is about 1-3 mm/yr, assuming a locked fault depth of 20 km. Convergence normal to the San Andreas Fault in the Southern Coast ranges is not significantly different from zero. About 5 mm/yr convergence is detected from the Santa Maria Basin. In the Los Angeles Basin area, this study demonstrates about 10 mm/yr relative motion trending northwest from San Pedro Hill to the San Gabriel Mountains. The direction of motion closely parallels to the trend of the frontal fault system at the southern margin of the San Gabriel Mountains. The basin suffers from north-south convergence and east-west extension, at a rate of about 0.07 mu rad/yr for either components. The convergence rate normal to the San Andreas across the basin is 4 plus or minus 3 mm/yr, implying smaller compression than previous estimates (e.g., Cline et al. 1984).

  5. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  6. The impact of electric vehicles on the Southern California Edison System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the results of the first phase of an investigation of the impacts of electric vehicles (EVs) in southern California. The investigation focuses on the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) which provides electric service for approximately 60% of southern California. The project is supported by the Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency'' Program of the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE). The first phase of the research is organized around how EVs might be viewed by customers, vehicle manufacturers and electric utility companies. The vehicle manufacturers' view has been studied with special emphasis on the role of marketable permit systems. The utilities' view of EVs is the subject of this report. The review is particularly important as several case studies of EVs in southern California have been conducted in recent years. The dynamics of a growing population of EVs is explained. Chapter 5 explains a simple method of deriving the electricity demands which could result from the operation of EVs in southern California. The method is demonstrated for several simple examples and then used to find the demands associated with each of the eight EV scenarios. Chapter 6 reports the impacts on SCE operations from the new demands for electricity. Impacts are summarized in terms of system operating costs, reliability of service, and changes in the utility's average electric rate. Chapter 7 turns to the emissions of air pollutants released by the operation of EVs, conventional vehicles (CVs) and power plants. Chapter 8 takes the air pollution analysis one step further by examining the possible reduction in ambient ozone concentration in southern California.

  7. The impact of electric vehicles on the Southern California Edison System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the results of the first phase of an investigation of the impacts of electric vehicles (EVs) in southern California. The investigation focuses on the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) which provides electric service for approximately 60% of southern California. The project is supported by the ``Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency`` Program of the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE). The first phase of the research is organized around how EVs might be viewed by customers, vehicle manufacturers and electric utility companies. The vehicle manufacturers` view has been studied with special emphasis on the role of marketable permit systems. The utilities` view of EVs is the subject of this report. The review is particularly important as several case studies of EVs in southern California have been conducted in recent years. The dynamics of a growing population of EVs is explained. Chapter 5 explains a simple method of deriving the electricity demands which could result from the operation of EVs in southern California. The method is demonstrated for several simple examples and then used to find the demands associated with each of the eight EV scenarios. Chapter 6 reports the impacts on SCE operations from the new demands for electricity. Impacts are summarized in terms of system operating costs, reliability of service, and changes in the utility`s average electric rate. Chapter 7 turns to the emissions of air pollutants released by the operation of EVs, conventional vehicles (CVs) and power plants. Chapter 8 takes the air pollution analysis one step further by examining the possible reduction in ambient ozone concentration in southern California.

  8. Pathobiology of marine and estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, J.A.; Fournie, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    The book is an up-to-date compendium of scientific findings related to diseases of marine and estuarine organisms. The information was presented at the Gulf Breeze Symposium on Marine and Estuarine Disease Research sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) held in October 1990 on Pensacola Beach, Florida. Authors review the state-of-the-science and recommend research for future studies of the impact of xenobiotics and other anthropogenic stress factors on disease processes in marine and estuarine organisms.

  9. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  10. The European Southern Observatory-MIDAS table file system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peron, M.; Grosbol, P.

    1992-01-01

    The new and substantially upgraded version of the Table File System in MIDAS is presented as a scientific database system. MIDAS applications for performing database operations on tables are discussed, for instance, the exchange of the data to and from the TFS, the selection of objects, the uncertainty joins across tables, and the graphical representation of data. This upgraded version of the TFS is a full implementation of the binary table extension of the FITS format; in addition, it also supports arrays of strings. Different storage strategies for optimal access of very large data sets are implemented and are addressed in detail. As a simple relational database, the TFS may be used for the management of personal data files. This opens the way to intelligent pipeline processing of large amounts of data. One of the key features of the Table File System is to provide also an extensive set of tools for the analysis of the final results of a reduction process. Column operations using standard and special mathematical functions as well as statistical distributions can be carried out; commands for linear regression and model fitting using nonlinear least square methods and user-defined functions are available. Finally, statistical tests of hypothesis and multivariate methods can also operate on tables.

  11. Ecohydraulics and Estuarine Wetland Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saintilan, N.; Spencer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The hydraulics or water flow in wetlands is known to be a key factor influencing ecosystem development in estuarine wetland environments. The relationship is indirect, with the hydraulics of wetlands influencing a host of factors including soil salinity, waterlogging, sediment transport, sediment chemistry, vegetation dispersal and growth and nutrient availability and cycling. The relationship is also not one way, with the hydraulics of wetlands being influenced by plant and animal activity. Understanding these complex interactions is fundamental for the adequate management of estuarine wetlands. Listed as a Wetland of International Importance under the 1971 Ramsar Convention, the Hunter River estuary is regarded as the most significant site for migratory shorebirds in New South Wales, Australia. Over the past 20 years, the number of migratory shorebirds in the estuary has sharply declined from 8,000 to 4,000 approx. Alteration of bird habitat is believed to be one of the reasons for this alarming trend. In 2004 we started a three-year program to investigate the links between hydraulics, sediment, benthic invertebrates, vegetation and migratory shorebird habitat in the estuary. During the first year we have focused on a highly disturbed part of the Hunter estuary wetlands located on Ash Island. The area is one of the major roosting sites in the estuary and is characterized by a complex hydraulic regime due to a restricted tidal interchange with the Hunter River and the presence of infrastructure for the maintenance of power lines (i.e., roads, bridges, culverts). Salt marshes, mudflat and mangroves are the dominant vegetation types. The monitoring program includes measurements of water levels, salinity, discharge, velocity, turbulence, sediment transport and deposition, plant species and density, soil composition and benthic invertebrates coordinated with observations of bird habitat utilization on a number of locations throughout the wetland and for different flow

  12. Rapid climatic signal propagation from source to sink in a southern California sediment-routing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Covault, J.A.; Romans, B.W.; Fildani, A.; McGann, M.; Graham, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial source areas are linked to deep-sea basins by sediment-routing systems, which only recently have been studied with a holistic approach focused on terrestrial and submarine components and their interactions. Here we compare an extensive piston-core and radiocarbon-age data set from offshore southern California to contemporaneous Holocene climate proxies in order to test the hypothesis that climatic signals are rapidly propagated from source to sink in a spatially restricted sediment-routing system that includes the Santa Ana River drainage basin and the Newport deep-sea depositional system. Sediment cores demonstrate that variability in rates of Holocene deep-sea turbidite deposition is related to complex ocean-atmosphere interactions, including enhanced magnitude and frequency of the North American monsoon and El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation cycles, which increased precipitation and fluvial discharge in southern California. This relationship is evident because, unlike many sediment-routing systems, the Newport submarine canyon-and-channel system was consistently linked tothe Santa Ana River,which maintained sediment delivery even during Holocene marine transgression and highstand. Results of this study demonstrate the efficiency of sediment transport and delivery through a spatially restricted, consistently linked routing system and the potential utility of deep-sea turbidite depositional trends as paleoclimate proxies in such settings. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago.

  13. Surveying of morphological variations in estuarine Nyband River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi-Bistooni, S.; Ershadi, C.

    2009-04-01

    Rivers estuary in aspect of ecological and morphological is very sensitive in coastal zones. This area can affect from human activities and these activities have direct effective on natural state of these area. There for, overall aim of this work is steady on development of this coastal area and thus, it is investigated the morphological and sedimentation mechanism in estuarine area. For this case study, area is limited (27°11'NL ; 56°19'EL), begin from Genu mountains in southern parts of Iran and pass from mid of Bandar Abbas city and in final ends to north of Persian Gulf. There were some physical variations in this estuarine area of Nyband River due to human activities. These variations include: fixing the banks, Jetty break water in near of estuary and recently sealing the bed bottom of river and building of bridge. A numerical program was used for analysis this hydrodynamic and sediment condition. This result compares with field data for evaluation of the numerical analysis. Also, the aero photographical document in past decade was prepared for surveying morphological variations. For this purpose, the GIS (ARCVIEW) was used and finally, the effect of the human activities, such as building of new structure, on morphology of river was investigated.

  14. Floristic evolution in an agroforestry system cultivation in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís C R; Machado, Sebastião A; Galvão, Franklin; Figueiredo, Afonso

    2016-06-01

    Bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella Bentham) is an important pioneer tree species in Ombrophylous Mixed Forest of Brazil and is widely used as an energy source. In traditional agroforestry systems, regeneration is induced by fire, then pure and dense stands known as bracatinga stands (bracatingais) are formed. In the first year, annual crops are intercalated with the seedlings. At that time the seedlings are thinned, then the stands remain at a fallow period and cut at seven years old. The species is very important mainly for small landowners. We studied the understory species that occur naturally during the succession over several years in order to manage them rationally in the future and maintain the natural vegetation over time. Three to 20 year-old Bracatinga stands were sampled between 1998 and 2011. All tree species with diameter at breast height (DBH) ≥ 5 cm were measured.The floristic evolution was assessed with respect to Sociability Index, the Shannon Diversity Index and the Pielou Evenness Index. Graphs of rank/abundance over different age groups were evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We identified 153 species dispersed throughout the understory and tend to become aggregated over time.

  15. Floristic evolution in an agroforestry system cultivation in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís C R; Machado, Sebastião A; Galvão, Franklin; Figueiredo, Afonso

    2016-06-01

    Bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella Bentham) is an important pioneer tree species in Ombrophylous Mixed Forest of Brazil and is widely used as an energy source. In traditional agroforestry systems, regeneration is induced by fire, then pure and dense stands known as bracatinga stands (bracatingais) are formed. In the first year, annual crops are intercalated with the seedlings. At that time the seedlings are thinned, then the stands remain at a fallow period and cut at seven years old. The species is very important mainly for small landowners. We studied the understory species that occur naturally during the succession over several years in order to manage them rationally in the future and maintain the natural vegetation over time. Three to 20 year-old Bracatinga stands were sampled between 1998 and 2011. All tree species with diameter at breast height (DBH) ≥ 5 cm were measured.The floristic evolution was assessed with respect to Sociability Index, the Shannon Diversity Index and the Pielou Evenness Index. Graphs of rank/abundance over different age groups were evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We identified 153 species dispersed throughout the understory and tend to become aggregated over time. PMID:27276374

  16. Managing bay and estuarine ecosystems for multiple services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Needles, Lisa A.; Lester, Sarah E.; Ambrose, Richard; Andren, Anders; Beyeler, Marc; Connor, Michael S.; Eckman, James E.; Costa-Pierce, Barry A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Lenihan, Junter S.; Parrish, Julia; Peterson, Mark S.; Scaroni, Amy E.; Weis, Judith S.; Wendt, Dean E.

    2013-01-01

    Managers are moving from a model of managing individual sectors, human activities, or ecosystem services to an ecosystem-based management (EBM) approach which attempts to balance the range of services provided by ecosystems. Applying EBM is often difficult due to inherent tradeoffs in managing for different services. This challenge particularly holds for estuarine systems, which have been heavily altered in most regions and are often subject to intense management interventions. Estuarine managers can often choose among a range of management tactics to enhance a particular service; although some management actions will result in strong tradeoffs, others may enhance multiple services simultaneously. Management of estuarine ecosystems could be improved by distinguishing between optimal management actions for enhancing multiple services and those that have severe tradeoffs. This requires a framework that evaluates tradeoff scenarios and identifies management actions likely to benefit multiple services. We created a management action-services matrix as a first step towards assessing tradeoffs and providing managers with a decision support tool. We found that management actions that restored or enhanced natural vegetation (e.g., salt marsh and mangroves) and some shellfish (particularly oysters and oyster reef habitat) benefited multiple services. In contrast, management actions such as desalination, salt pond creation, sand mining, and large container shipping had large net negative effects on several of the other services considered in the matrix. Our framework provides resource managers a simple way to inform EBM decisions and can also be used as a first step in more sophisticated approaches that model service delivery.

  17. Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marta

    2013-04-01

    Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries Lima, Marta1; Menor, Eldemar2; Lima, Enjolras3; Neumann, Virginio4 1MFGTransportes, Brazil; 2Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil 3Servico Geologico do Brasil-CPRM, Brazil 4Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil Heavy metal (HM) concentrations in estuarine sediments of the Botafogo and Manguaba river, North-eastern Brazil were investigated on basis of samples from a bottom core drill performed 4km from the mouth of the rivers. Total sediments (TS) of the sliced profiles (62 cm, Botafogo river and 87 cm, Manguaba river ) were submitted to chemical analysis (51 elements), mineralogical analysis (XRD) and statistical study, followed by stoichiometric calculations. Geochronologic determinations of 210Pb allowed studying the evolution of the contamination level approximately 150 year-old interval in the Botafogo river. Mercury (Hg) and Arsenic (As) are emphasized because of a chlorine-soda industry that dumps its effluents about 15 km upstream of the estuary and extensive cultivation of sugarcane existent in this watershed. Hg background in pelitic total sediments (PTS) was certain established considering the Hg content (126 ppb) in sedimentary intervals previous to 1910. The production of chlorine-soda (since 1963) coincides with a drastic increase of the Hg concentrations and contemporary values around 6.000 ppb, without interruption in the pollutant process. The conclusions found that the Hg was the main indicator of anthropogenic contribution in the sediments of the Botafogo river. On the other hand, an increase in the Hg-As concentrations has been observed at the last decades due to an increase of the clay mineral fraction in TS of the Manguaga river. This scenario indicates that the accumulation of HM has been constant since the last decades, under a

  18. New GPS constraints on the kinematics of the southern Dead Sea Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, F.; Abu Rajab, J.; Jaafar, R.; Al-Tarazi, E.; Ferry, M.

    2008-12-01

    The southern Dead Sea Fault System (DSFS) traces ~400 km from the Gulf of Aqaba in the south to the southern end of Lebanese Restraining Bend along the DSFS. The general structure involves two main segments, the Wadia Araba fault and the Jordan Valley fault, that control the Dead Sea pull-apart basin. This study assesses the present-day kinematics along the southern DSFS as expressed by present-day deformation. This study combines survey-mode (SGPS) and continuous GPS (CGPS) measurements from Jordan with other available GPS data to assess possible kinematic variations along the southern DSFS. The GPS network in Jordan consists of 15 SGPS sites that have been measured four times over a span of more than three years (2005 - 2008), along with two CGPS stations that have operated for more than 2 years. Preliminary velocities for SGPS sites yield uncertainties of approximately 1 mm/yr, and the CGPS sites yield uncertainties less than 0.8 mm/yr. Velocity patterns are generally consistent with locked faults accumulating strain. 1-D and 2-D Elastic dislocation models suggest slip rates of 3.8 - 4.6 mm/yr and 4.0 - 4.9 mm/yr for the Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley segments, respectively. These geodetically-based slip rates compare well with late Quaternary estimates based on faulted landforms. In addition to elastic models, the spatial coverage of GPS sites permits calculating velocity gradients and assessing infinitesimal strains and rotations along the fault, and within the Dead Sea pull-apart basin. Comparing the strain patterns with more detailed structural maps of the Dead Sea basin provides a means of assessing the kinematics involved in transferring displacement across a large releasing fault step. Furthermore, the rates of strain accumulation provide valuable constraints for assessing the earthquake hazard along the southern Dead Sea fault.

  19. Transformation of benzothiazole in estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Catallo, W James; Junk, T

    2005-01-01

    Benzothiazole (BT) is a natural and synthetic compound occurring in aquatic sediments and wastewater. The purpose of this work was to investigate BT biogeochemistry in controlled Eh/pH microcosms (CEPMs) containing estuarine sediments of different particle sizes (coarse, intermediate, fine) under oxidized and reduced conditions vs. killed controls, and tide simulation mesocosms (TSMs) containing plants and meiofauna under well-drained (oxidized), consistently saturated/flooded (reduced), and tidal (alternating oxidized/reduced) conditions. Benzothiazole was transformed into complex product mixtures under all conditions. Benzothiazole transformation rates in CEPMs were slower under reduced conditions vs. oxidized conditions in the fine- and intermediate-grain sediments, but the same in the coarse sediment. Quiescent (unstirred) CEPMs showed greatly reduced BT transformation rates in all sediments, with half-lives on the order of 2200 to >4000 h (unstirred) vs. 640 to 1000 h in the continuously stirred systems. The TSM data showed that tidal and drained systems processed BT at identical rates, far exceeding those observed in statically flooded (reduced) TSMs. Mixing was found to be a more significant variable in BT transformation rate than either Eh or sediment particle size breakdown, with constant stirring increasing observed degradation appreciably. Otherwise, BT was transformed more readily on sediments of high surface area under oxidized conditions vs. coarser sediments and those under reducing electrochemical conditions. PMID:16151226

  20. Global positioning system reoccupation of early triangulation sites - Tectonic deformation of the Southern Coast Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zheng-Kang; Jackson, David D.

    1993-06-01

    We study tectonic deformation in the Southern Coast Range, California. We use triangulation and astronomic azimuth data collected since 1875, trilateration since 1970, and global positioning system data collected from 1986 to 1987. Two modeling techniques have been used. An elastic block-fault model is applied to study the tectonic motion of the San Andreas Fault and the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault. Station velocities are modeled to study regional deformations. Results show that the regional deformation is predominantly controlled by deep strike-slip motion along the San Andreas Fault, at a rate of 33 +/- 2 mm/yr. Deep slip along the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault is about 0-4 mm/yr, assuming a locked suit to a depth of 20 km. Convergence normal to the San Andreas Fault in the Southern Coast Ranges is not greater than 0.02 microrad/yr.

  1. Global positioning system reoccupation of early triangulation sites - Tectonic deformation of the Southern Coast Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Zheng-Kang; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We study tectonic deformation in the Southern Coast Range, California. We use triangulation and astronomic azimuth data collected since 1875, trilateration since 1970, and global positioning system data collected from 1986 to 1987. Two modeling techniques have been used. An elastic block-fault model is applied to study the tectonic motion of the San Andreas Fault and the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault. Station velocities are modeled to study regional deformations. Results show that the regional deformation is predominantly controlled by deep strike-slip motion along the San Andreas Fault, at a rate of 33 +/- 2 mm/yr. Deep slip along the San Gregorio-Hosgri Fault is about 0-4 mm/yr, assuming a locked suit to a depth of 20 km. Convergence normal to the San Andreas Fault in the Southern Coast Ranges is not greater than 0.02 microrad/yr.

  2. 15 CFR 921.51 - Estuarine research guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conducted in a manner consistent with Estuarine Research Guidelines developed by NOAA. (b) A summary of the... funds discussed in § 921.50(c). (c) The Estuarine Research Guidelines are reviewed annually by...

  3. 15 CFR 921.51 - Estuarine research guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conducted in a manner consistent with Estuarine Research Guidelines developed by NOAA. (b) A summary of the... funds discussed in § 921.50(c). (c) The Estuarine Research Guidelines are reviewed annually by...

  4. 15 CFR 921.51 - Estuarine research guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conducted in a manner consistent with Estuarine Research Guidelines developed by NOAA. (b) A summary of the... funds discussed in § 921.50(c). (c) The Estuarine Research Guidelines are reviewed annually by...

  5. Hydrogeology, ground-water movement, and subsurface storage in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system of southern Florida is composed chiefly of carbonate rocks that range in age from early Miocene to Paleocene. The top of the aquifer system in southern Florida generally is at depths ranging from 500 to 1,000 feet, and the average thickness is about 3,000 feet. It is divided into three general hydrogeologic units: (1) the Upper Floridan aquifer, (2) the middle confining unit, and (3) the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer contains brackish ground water, and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains salty ground water that compares chemically to modern seawater. Zones of high permeability are present in the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. A thick, cavernous dolostone in the Lower Floridan aquifer, called the Boulder Zone, is one of the most permeable carbonate units in the world (transmissivity of about 2.5 x 107 feet squared per day). Ground-water movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer is generally southward from the area of highest head in central Florida, eastward to the Straits of Florida, and westward to the Gulf of Mexico. Distributions of natural isotopes of carbon and uranium generally confirm hydraulic gradients in the Lower Floridan aquifer. Groundwater movement in the Lower Floridan aquifer is inland from the Straits of Florida. The concentration gradients of the carbon and uranium isotopes indicate that the source of cold saltwater in the Lower Floridan aquifer is seawater that has entered through the karat features on the submarine Miami Terrace near Fort Lauderdale. The relative ages of the saltwater suggest that the rate of inland movement is related in part to rising sea level during the Holocene transgression. Isotope, temperature, and salinity anomalies in waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer of southern Florida suggest upwelling of saltwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer. The results of the study support the hypothesis of circulating relatively modern seawater and cast doubt on the theory that the

  6. Measuring the acute toxicity of estuarine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, T.H.; Swartz, R.C.; Lanberson, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Estuarine sediments frequently are repositories and sources of anthropogenic contaminants. Toxicity is one method of assessing the environmental quality of sediments, yet because of the extreme range of salinities that characterize estuaries few infaunal organisms have both the physiological tolerance and sensitivity to chemical contaminants to serve in estuarine sediment toxicity tests. The study describes research on the estuarine burrowing amphipod, Eohaustorius estuarius Bosworth, 1973, whose survival was >95% in control sediments across a 2 to 28% salinity range over 10-d periods. E. estuarius also was acutely sensitive to low sediment concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, fluoranthene (LC50 approximately = 10.6 mg/kg), and its sensitivity to fluoranthene was not affected by salinity. E. estuarius was almost as sensitive as Rhepoxynius abronius to fluoranthene and to field-collected sediments from Puget Sound urban and industrial bays. E. estuarius was also more tolerant of very fine, uncontaminated sediments than R. abronius. Furthermore, E. estuarius was more sensitive to sediments spiked with fluoranthene than the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. E. estuarius, and possibly other estuarine haustoriid species, appears to be an excellent candidate for testing the acute toxicity if estuarine and marine sediments.

  7. Global climate impacts of fixing the Southern Ocean shortwave radiation bias in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, J. E.; Medeiros, B.; Yettella, V. K. R.; Hannay, C.; Caldwell, P.; Wall, C.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    A large, long-standing, and pervasive climate model bias is excessive absorbed shortwave radiation (ASR) over the mid-latitude oceans, especially the Southern Ocean. We investigate both the underlying mechanisms for and climate impacts of this bias within the Community Earth System Model with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CESM-CAM5). Excessive Southern Ocean ASR in CESM-CAM5 results in part because low-level clouds contain insufficient amounts of supercooled liquid. In a present-day atmosphere-only run, an observationally motivated modification to the shallow convection detrainment increases supercooled cloud liquid, brightens low-level clouds, and substantially reduces the Southern Ocean ASR bias. Tuning to maintain global energy balance enables reduction of a compensating tropical ASR bias. In the resulting pre-industrial fully coupled run with a brighter Southern Ocean and dimmer Tropics, the Southern Ocean cools and the Tropics warm. As a result of the enhanced meridional temperature gradient, poleward heat transport increases in both hemispheres (especially the Southern Hemisphere) and the Southern Hemisphere atmospheric jet strengthens. Cross-equatorial heat transport increases in the ocean, but not in the atmosphere. As a result, a proposed atmospheric teleconnection that links Southern Ocean ASR bias reduction and cooling with northward shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone is not found. All results discussed above are for the transient response. Ongoing work to assess the equilibrium response and the impact of the fix climate change experiments results will also be presented.

  8. Coastal versus estuarine nursery grounds: Effect of differential temperature and heat waves on juvenile seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Narciso, Luís; Cabral, Henrique N.; Costa, Maria J.; Rosa, Rui

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates the biological responses of juvenile fish (Dicentrarchus labrax), that live in both coastal and estuarine nurseries, to differential temperatures and summer heat wave events. More specifically, we compared mortality, growth, condition, metabolic response and thermal sensitivity of 0-group juveniles of D. labrax at temperatures that reflect the average summer temperature that they encounter in coastal and estuarine nurseries, and also the temperatures that they endure inside estuaries during heat wave events. The low mortality and peak growth and condition values registered at 24 °C suggest that estuarine average summer temperatures are more beneficial for the juveniles than coastal ones. The estuarine water temperature attained during heat waves resulted in higher mortality, arrested growth, lower condition and a steep increase in metabolism, indicating that this species is probably under thermal stress at 28 °C. Consequently, future predictions of frequent and prolonged heat waves in Southern Europe are expected to induce negative impacts in the biology and metabolic ecology of 0-group seabass juveniles in estuarine nurseries.

  9. Inconsistencies in coastal dune genesis and development in the western Mediterranean Cabopino Dune system, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Malvárez, Gonzalo; Jackson, Derek; Navas, Fatima

    2016-04-01

    It is generally agreed that a falling sea level regime is required in the long term to establish dunes as distinctive landform features along a coast. Sedimentary (supply) bodies from fluvial, glacial sources or marine platform processes also need to be in place. In most Atlantic-facing coastal dune systems the current morpho-sedimentary structures are usually associated with the period between 18K BP and present when both glacial and riverine sediments emplaced sediments within the active zone of present sea level to help form beaches and dunes. Mediterranean coastal dunes fronted by steep continental shelves, such as in the western Mediterranean coast of southern Spain are, however, not associated with glacial deposits and thus are only present in association with river mouths and/or coastal lagoons. Their development is attributed to very recent sediment supply, which, combined with other forcing factors such as wind and waves, several orders of magnitude below those of north Atlantic systems, explains their limited extent. Some coastal dune fields however, do not seem to respond to this general pattern because of their scale and, more importantly, their origin linked possibly to marine platform processes rather than riverine or lagoonal development. Here, we examine the Cabopino dune system in southern Spain offering a conceptual model of their genesis and development as an "Atlantic" dune system within a Mediterranean setting. This is demonstrated by their scale (the largest in the Spanish Mediterranean) and their morphodynamic link to nearshore and platform processes in the last 18,000 years.

  10. Fluvial systems response to rift margin tectonics: Makhtesh Ramon area, southern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Ram; Eyal, Yehuda; Zilberman, Ezra; Bowman, Dan

    2002-06-01

    The geomorphic evolution of Makhtesh Ramon, a feather-shaped erosional valley, and the Nahal Neqarot drainage system to the south occurred largely in response to tectonic activity along the Dead Sea Rift and its western shoulder. Remnants of Miocene clastic sediments (Hazeva Formation) deposited on an erosional peneplain that formed over this area during the Oligocene epoch provide a datum plane for reconstructing subsequent fluvial evolution. These clastic remnants are presently located on the shoulders of Makhtesh Ramon at various elevations. The peneplain truncating the Makhtesh Ramon block has been tilted 0.7% northeastward since the Pliocene epoch (post-Hazeva Formation), whereas that of the Neqarot syncline, south of the Ramon, has been tilted 1.2%. The elliptical exposure of friable Lower Cretaceous sandstone, exposed in the core of the truncated Ramon structure, governed the development of a new ENE directed (riftward) drainage system through capture of streams that previously drained toward the Mediterranean Sea to the northwest. Incised fluvial gaps in the southern rim of Makhtesh Ramon and alluvial fan relicts within Makhtesh Ramon attest to original drainage into the Makhtesh from the south. Remnants of the Plio-Pleistocene Arava Conglomerate on the eastern end of the Neqarot syncline contain clasts from rocks exposed within Makhtesh Ramon, also indicating that streams flowed into the Makhtesh from the southern Neqarot block through the western gaps, then turning eastward and exiting the Makhtesh via the next (Sha'ar-Ramon) gap to the east. Further down-faulting of the Neqarot block during Mid-Late Pleistocene time led to westward retreat of the Neqarot valley and capture of the last stream flowing northward into the Ramon, leaving the modern Makhtesh Ramon isolated from the southern drainage system.

  11. The 2014-2015 warming anomaly in the Southern California Current System observed by underwater gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaba, Katherine D.; Rudnick, Daniel L.

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale patterns of positive temperature anomalies persisted throughout the surface waters of the North Pacific Ocean during 2014-2015. In the Southern California Current System, measurements by our sustained network of underwater gliders reveal the coastal effects of the recent warming. Regional upper ocean temperature anomalies were greatest since the initiation of the glider network in 2006. Additional observed physical anomalies included a depressed thermocline, high stratification, and freshening; induced biological consequences included changes in the vertical distribution of chlorophyll fluorescence. Contemporaneous surface heat flux and wind strength perturbations suggest that local anomalous atmospheric forcing caused the unusual oceanic conditions.

  12. The Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar Orbital System (SAAMER-OS): An Initial Sporadic Meteoroid Orbital Survey in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Swarnalingam, N.; Murphy, A.; O'Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.

    2015-08-01

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMER’s location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  13. THE SOUTHERN ARGENTINA AGILE METEOR RADAR ORBITAL SYSTEM (SAAMER-OS): AN INITIAL SPORADIC METEOROID ORBITAL SURVEY IN THE SOUTHERN SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Murphy, A.; O’Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C. E-mail: nimalan.swarnalingam@nasa.gov E-mail: jlhormaechea@untdf.edu.ar E-mail: doconnor@gsoft.com.au E-mail: bfuller@gsoft.com.au E-mail: claudiobrunini@yahoo.com

    2015-08-10

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMER’s location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  14. Impact of silver nanoparticles on benthic prokaryotes in heavy metal-contaminated estuarine sediments in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, B; Bhattacharya, B D; Ray Chaudhuri, S; Sarkar, S K

    2015-10-15

    Little knowledge is available about the potential impact of commercial silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on estuarine microbial communities. The Hugli river estuary, India, is susceptible to heavy metals pollution through boat traffic, and there is the potential for Ag-NP exposure via effluent discharged from ongoing municipal and industrial activities located in close proximity. This study investigated the effects of commercial Ag-NPs on native microbial communities in estuarine sediments collected from five stations, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique. An increase in the number of bacteria in consortium in sediments was observed following exposure to Ag-NPs. In general microbial communities may be resistant in estuarine systems to the antimicrobial effects of commercial Ag-NPs, but key microorganisms, such as Pelobacter propionicus, disappeared following exposure to Ag-NPs. In conclusion, the T-RFLP analysis indicated that Ag-NPs have the potential to shape estuarine sediment bacterial community structure. PMID:26231062

  15. Impact of silver nanoparticles on benthic prokaryotes in heavy metal-contaminated estuarine sediments in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, B; Bhattacharya, B D; Ray Chaudhuri, S; Sarkar, S K

    2015-10-15

    Little knowledge is available about the potential impact of commercial silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on estuarine microbial communities. The Hugli river estuary, India, is susceptible to heavy metals pollution through boat traffic, and there is the potential for Ag-NP exposure via effluent discharged from ongoing municipal and industrial activities located in close proximity. This study investigated the effects of commercial Ag-NPs on native microbial communities in estuarine sediments collected from five stations, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique. An increase in the number of bacteria in consortium in sediments was observed following exposure to Ag-NPs. In general microbial communities may be resistant in estuarine systems to the antimicrobial effects of commercial Ag-NPs, but key microorganisms, such as Pelobacter propionicus, disappeared following exposure to Ag-NPs. In conclusion, the T-RFLP analysis indicated that Ag-NPs have the potential to shape estuarine sediment bacterial community structure.

  16. Toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to juvenile blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Juvenile Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus)

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, L.B.; Burton, D.T.

    1981-02-01

    Large quantitites of estuarine and marine water are treated with chlorine to prevent condenser system fouling at power plants. Chlorine and its residual by-products, however, are toxic to many forms of aquatic life. Ozone is one alternative oxidant which has proven to be an effective biocide and disinfectant in many fresh water applications. Ozonation of estuarine and marine waters, however, may produce residual compounds similar to those produced by chlorination. This study was initiated to provide baseline information on the toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to two representative estuarine species. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, and the Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus Latrobe, were selected because of their wide distribution and commercial importance. The toxicity of ozone has been compared with chlorine toxicity data from the literature in an effort to examine possible similarities in toxicity.

  17. Estuarine density fronts and their effect on oil slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Polis, D. F.; Davis, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Estuarine fronts represent regions of extremely high gradient or discontinuity in various parameters of physical interest, the most important being the water velocity and density fields. Aircraft and boats were combined to study the behavior of different types of fronts in Delaware Bay and their effect on pollutants in order to provide a basis for improving an oil drift and spreading model. Imagery from the LANDSAT satellites provided the most effective means of determining the location and extent of frontal systems over all portions of the tidal cycle. This data is being used to modify the oil drift and spreading model.

  18. Remobilization of southern African desert dune systems by twenty-first century global warming.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David S G; Knight, Melanie; Wiggs, Giles F S

    2005-06-30

    Although desert dunes cover 5 per cent of the global land surface and 30 per cent of Africa, the potential impacts of twenty-first century global warming on desert dune systems are not well understood. The inactive Sahel and southern African dune systems, which developed in multiple arid phases since the last interglacial period, are used today by pastoral and agricultural systems that could be disrupted if climate change alters twenty-first century dune dynamics. Empirical data and model simulations have established that the interplay between dune surface erodibility (determined by vegetation cover and moisture availability) and atmospheric erosivity (determined by wind energy) is critical for dunefield dynamics. This relationship between erodibility and erosivity is susceptible to climate-change impacts. Here we use simulations with three global climate models and a range of emission scenarios to assess the potential future activity of three Kalahari dunefields. We determine monthly values of dune activity by modifying and improving an established dune mobility index so that it can account for global climate model data outputs. We find that, regardless of the emission scenario used, significantly enhanced dune activity is simulated in the southern dunefield by 2039, and in the eastern and northern dunefields by 2069. By 2099 all dunefields are highly dynamic, from northern South Africa to Angola and Zambia. Our results suggest that dunefields are likely to be reactivated (the sand will become significantly exposed and move) as a consequence of twenty-first century climate warming.

  19. Variations in Reading Achievement Across 14 Southern African School Systems: Which Factors Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungi, Njora; Thuku, Florence W.

    2010-02-01

    In this study the authors employed a multilevel analysis procedure in order to examine the pupil and school levels factors that contributed to variation in reading achievement among Grade 6 primary school pupils in 14 southern African school systems (Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zanzibar). The data for this study were collected in 2002 as part of a major project known as the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) that sought to examine the quality of education offered in primary schools in these countries. The most important factors affecting variation in pupil achievement across most of these school systems were grade repetition, pupil socioeconomic background, speaking the language of instruction at home, and Pupil age. South Africa, Uganda and Namibia were among the school systems with the largest between-school variation while Seychelles and Mauritius had the largest within-school variation. Low social equity in reading achievement was evident in Mauritius, Seychelles and Tanzania. Policy implications of the findings are discussed.

  20. An 'extreme' future for estuaries? Effects of extreme climatic events on estuarine water quality and ecology.

    PubMed

    Wetz, Michael S; Yoskowitz, David W

    2013-04-15

    Recent climate observations suggest that extreme climatic events (ECE; droughts, floods, tropical cyclones, heat waves) have increased in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions, consistent with climate model projections that account for man's influence on the global climate system. A synthesis of existing literature is presented and shows that ECE affect estuarine water quality by altering: (1) the delivery and processing of nutrients and organic matter, (2) physical-chemical properties of estuaries, and (3) ecosystem structure and function. From the standpoint of estuarine scientists and resource managers, a major scientific challenge will be to project the estuarine response to ECE that will co-occur with other important environmental changes (i.e., natural climate variability, global warming, sea level rise, eutrophication), as this will affect the provisioning of important ecosystem services provided by estuaries.

  1. The diamondback terrapin: The biology, ecology, cultural history, and conservation status of an obligate estuarine turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; Lee, D.S.; ,

    2006-01-01

    Ranging from Cape Cod to nearly the Texas-Mexico border, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is the only species of North American turtle restricted to estuarine systems. Despite this extensive distribution, its zone of occurrence is very linear, and in places fragmented, resulting in a relatively small total area of occupancy. On a global scale, excluding marine species, few turtles even venture into brackish water on a regular basis, and only two Asian species approach the North American terrapin's dependency on estuarine habitats. Here we describe some of the biological and behavioral adaptations of terrapins that allow them to live in the rather harsh estuarine environment. In this chapter we review the natural and cultural history of this turtle, discuss conservation issues, and provide information on the types of research needed to make sound management decisions for terrapin populations in peril.

  2. Turing Patterns in Estuarine Sediments by Microbiological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The use of Turing mechanisms and lattice Lotka-Volterra model (LLV), also by means of the non-extensive statistical mechanics, can mathematically describe well the phenomena of clustering and their associated boundaries with fractal dimensionality, which occurs in various natural situations, among them, biogeochemical processes via microorganisms in estuarine and marine sediments on the planet Earth. The author did an experimental analysis in field work which took into account the spatial and temporal behavior of Turing patterns, in the form of microbial activity within estuarine subsurface sediments. We show we can find the characteristics of clustering and fractallity which are present in the dynamical LLV model and Turing patterns mechanisms, and the non-extensive statistical mechanics could be used to find the q-entropy (Sq), and other non-equilibrium statistical parameters of the studied estuarine (Caraís lagoon) subsurface biogeochemical system. In this paper, the author suggests that such kinds of subsurface ecological systems are of interest to Astrobiology because if we find Turing-type clustered geomorphological patterns, below meter scale, on the near subsurface and inside rocks at the surface of planet Mars, and also find non-equilibrium statistical parameters (temperature, [F], [C], [S], etc.), displaying Turing-type mechanism, in the aquatic environments of the internal seas of planets Jupiter's moon Europa and the internal global ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus, that could mean that possible hypothetical biogeochemical activities are present in such places. This could be a bio-indicator tool. And with further studies we could find the q-entropy Sq to establish better defined statistical mechanical parameters for such environments and to refine models for their evolution, as we do on planet Earth.

  3. Duplex development and abandonment during evolution of the Lewis thrust system, southern Glacier National Park, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, An; Kelty, Thomas K.; Davis, Gregory A.

    1989-09-01

    Geologic mapping in southern Glacier National Park, Montana, reveals the presence of two duplexes sharing the same floor thrust fault, the Lewis thrust. The westernmost duplex (Brave Dog Mountain) includes the low-angle Brave Dog roof fault and Elk Mountain imbricate system, and the easternmost (Rising Wolf Mountain) duplex includes the low-angle Rockwell roof fault and Mt. Henry imbricate system. The geometry of these duplexes suggests that they differ from previously described geometric-kinematic models for duplex development. Their low-angle roof faults were preexisting structures that were locally utilized as roof faults during the formation of the imbricate systems. Crosscutting of the Brave Dog fault by the Mt. Henry imbricate system indicates that the two duplexes formed at different times. The younger Rockwell-Mt. Henry duplex developed 20 km east of the older Brave Dog-Elk Mountain duplex; the roof fault of the former is at a higher structural level. Field relations confirm that the low-angle Rockwell fault existed across the southern Glacier Park area prior to localized formation of the Mt. Henry imbricate thrusts beneath it. These thrusts kinematically link the Rockwell and Lewis faults and may be analogous to P shears that form between two synchronously active faults bounding a simple shear system. The abandonment of one duplex and its replacement by another with a new and higher roof fault may have been caused by (1) warping of the older and lower Brave Dog roof fault during the formation of the imbricate system (Elk Mountain) beneath it, (2) an upward shifting of the highest level of a simple shear system in the Lewis plate to a new decollement level in subhorizontal belt strata (= the Rockwell fault) that lay above inclined strata within the first duplex, and (3) a reinitiation of P-shear development (= Mt. Henry imbricate faults) between the Lewis thrust and the subparallel, synkinematic Rockwell fault.

  4. Evolution of Paleogene submarine Canyon-Fan systems, southern Sacramento basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.J.; Cherven, V.B.; Almgren, A.A.

    1986-04-01

    The evolutionary development of the Paleogene Martinez and Meganos Submarine Canyon and Fan systems of the southern Sacramento basin was controlled by a complex interplay of eustatic sea level change and tectonism. In this brief synthesis, the authors postulated that eustatic sea level changes were the dominant or controlling factor, and tectonism, although significant, was of secondary importance. The development of the Paleogene canyon and fan systems is correlated with low sea level stands or regressions at 60 Ma and 56 Ma. Intermittent tectonism, beginning at least 5-10 m.y. earlier, particularly along the western and southwestern margins of the Sacramento basin, controlled the location of the canyon and fan systems. The controlling tectonic elements of the southern basin were north-trending, high-angle faults related to the Kirby Hills and Midland fault zones and the Diablo-Kirby Hills(.) uplift. Both canyons were probably active (that is, channeling coarse sediment to their fans) during most of the late Paleocene. The authors suggest that canyon activity was maintained by south-flowing longshore drift or feeder systems, down-canyon gravity flows (turbidites, etc) and up-down canyon current systems, all of which are typical of modern, active submarine canyon and fan systems. The canyons filled with fine-grained sediments when the canyons were beheaded or separated from the longshore drift system by rising sea level, or when tectonism(.) shifted the major river drainage that supplied the canyon with sediment. Truncation and erosion of the canyon-fill and fan facies of the late Paleocene-early Eocene Meganos Formation along the Diablo outcrop belt was primarily due to the major early middle Eocene lowstand (49.5 Ma).

  5. Estuarine Oceanography. CEGS Programs Publication Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, F. F.

    Estuarine Oceanography is one in a series of single-topic problem modules intended for use in undergraduate and earth science courses. Designed for those interested in coastal oceanography or limnology, the module is structured as a laboratory supplement for undergraduate college classes but should be useful at all levels. The module has two…

  6. The live bird market system and low-pathogenic avian influenza prevention in southern California.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen S; Carpenter, Tim E; Mize, Sarah; Cardona, Carol J

    2008-06-01

    Although live bird markets (LBMs) have been associated with outbreaks of avian influenza (AI), there are some LBM systems where AI outbreaks are extremely rare events. The California LBMs have not had any detected avian influenza viruses (AIVs) since December 2005. Responses to a detailed questionnaire on the practices and characteristics of the participants in the California low-pathogenic (LP) AI control program have been described to characterize possible reasons for the lack of AI outbreaks in LBMs. Compliance with an LPAI control program that contains active surveillance, prevention, and rapid response measures by those involved in the LBM system, rendering services to dispose of carcasses, no wholesalers, and few third-party bird deliveries was associated with the lack of LPAIV circulating in the Southern California LBM system. PMID:18646469

  7. EXPECTED EFFECTS OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE AND NITROGEN IN SEWAGE EFFLUENT ON THE ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEM OF GREENWICH COVE, RI: AN ENERGY SYSTEMS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical, toxicological, and energy systems modeling were combined to make estimates of likely ecosystem-level effects due to residual chlorine in sewage effluent. The energy systems model also allowed us to make estimates of the effects of nutrient loading on the estuary both se...

  8. Late Holocene estuarine-inner shelf interactions; is there evidence of an estuarine retreat path for Tampa Bay, Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donahue, B.T.; Hine, A.C.; Tebbens, S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if and how a large, modern estuarine system, situated in the middle of an ancient carbonate platform, has affected its adjacent inner shelf both in the past during the last, post-glacial sea-level rise and during the present. An additional purpose was to determine if and how this inner shelf seaward of a major estuary differed from the inner shelves located just to the north and south but seaward of barrier-island shorelines. Through side-scan sonar mosaicking, bathymetric studies, and ground-truthing using surface grab samples as well as diver observations, two large submarine sand plains were mapped - one being the modern ebb-tidal delta and the other interpreted to be a relict ebb-tidal delta formed earlier in the Holocene. The most seaward portion of the inner shelf studied consists of a field of lobate, bathymetrically elevated, fine-sand accumulations, which were interpreted to be sediment-starved 3D dunes surrounded by small 2D dunes composed of coarse molluscan shell gravel. Additionally, exposed limestone hardbottoms supporting living benthic communities were found as well. This modern shelf sedimentary environment is situated on a large, buried shelf valley, which extends eastward beneath the modern Tampa Bay estuary. These observations plus the absence of an incised shelf valley having surficial bathymetric expression, and the absence of sand bodies normally associated with back-tracking estuarine systems indicate that there was no cross-shelf estuarine retreat path formed during the last rise in sea level. Instead, the modern Tampa Bay formed within a mid-platform, low-relief depression, which was flooded by rising marine waters late in the Holocene. With continued sea-level rise in the late Holocene, this early embayment was translated eastward or landward to its present position, whereby a larger ebb-tidal delta prograded out onto the inner shelf. Extensive linear sand ridges, common to the inner shelves to

  9. Transport of persistent organic pollutants by microplastics in estuarine conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastics represent an increasing source of anthropogenic contamination in aquatic environments, where they may also act as scavengers and transporters of persistent organic pollutants. As estuaries are amongst the most productive aquatic systems, it is important to understand sorption behaviour and transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) by microplastics along estuarine gradients. The effects of salinity sorption equilibrium kinetics on the distribution coefficients (Kd) of phenanthrene (Phe) and 4,4‧-DDT, onto polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and onto polyethylene (PE) were therefore investigated. A salinity gradient representing freshwater, estuarine and marine conditions, with salinities corresponding to 0 (MilliQ water, 690 μS/cm), 8.8, 17.5, 26.3 and 35 was used. Salinity had no significant effect on the time required to reach equilibrium onto PVC or PE and neither did it affect desorption rates of contaminants from plastics. Although salinity had no effect on sorption capacity of Phe onto plastics, a slight decrease in sorption capacity was observed for DDT with salinity. Salinity had little effect on sorption behaviour and POP/plastic combination was shown to be a more important factor. Transport of Phe and DDT from riverine to brackish and marine waters by plastic is therefore likely to be much more dependent on the aqueous POP concentration than on salinity. The physical characteristics of the polymer and local environmental conditions (e.g. plastic density, particle residence time in estuaries) will affect the physical transport of contaminated plastics. A transport model of POPs by microplastics under estuarine conditions is proposed. Transport of Phe and DDT by PVC and PE from fresh and brackish water toward fully marine conditions was the most likely net direction for contaminant transport and followed the order: Phe-PE >> DDT-PVC = DDT-PE >> Phe-PVC.

  10. Using stable isotopes and models to explore estuarine linkages at multiple scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine managers need tools to respond to dynamic stressors that occur in three linked environments – coastal ocean, estuaries and watersheds. Models have been the tool of choice for examining these dynamic systems because they simplify processes and integrate over multiple sc...

  11. A Comparative Ecological Approach to Assess the Role of Watersheds in Estuarine Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the geophysical nature of the estuary, the ocean (and atmospheric) system, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to a mixture of natural and anthropogenic drivers and pressures each compartment...

  12. The Role of Watershed Characteristics in Estuarine Condition: An Empirical Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures, each compartment must be characterized. For example, eutrophication ef...

  13. Comparative Ecological Approach to Assess the Role of Watersheds in Estuarine Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures, each compartment must be characterized. For example, eutrophication ef...

  14. STRONG SELECTIVE SIGNAL AND HIGH GENETIC VARIABILITY AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS IN CONTAMINATED AND UNCONTAMINATED POPULATIONS OF AN ESTUARINE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect immune system function....

  15. Simulating effects of highway embankments on estuarine circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional depth-averaged, finite-difference, numerical model was used to simulate tidal circulation and mass transport in the Port Royal Sound. South Carolina, estuarine system. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the utility of the Surface-Water. Integrated. Flow and Transport model (SWIFT2D) for evaluating changes in circulation patterns and mass transport caused by highway-crossing embankments. A model of subregion of Port Royal Sound including the highway crossings and having a grid size of 61 m (200ft) was derived from a 183-m (600-ft) model of the entire Port Royal Sound estuarine system. The 183-m model was used to compute boundary-value data for the 61-m submodel, which was then used to simulate flow conditions with and without the highway embankments in place. The numerical simulations show that, with the highway embankment in place, mass transport between the Broad River and Battery Creek is reduced and mass transport between the Beaufort River and Battery Creek is increased. The net result is that mass transport into and out of upper Battery Creek is reduced. The presence of the embankments also alters circulation patterns within Battery Creek.

  16. Eddy surface properties and propagation at Southern Hemisphere western boundary current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, G. S.; Mata, M. M.; Azevedo, J. L. L.

    2015-08-01

    Oceanic eddies exist throughout the world oceans, but are more energetic when associated with western boundary currents (WBC) systems. In these regions, eddies play an important role in mixing and energy exchange. Therefore, it is important to quantify and qualify eddies associated with these systems. This is particularly true for the Southern Hemisphere WBC system where only few eddy censuses have been performed to date. In these systems, important aspects of the local eddy population are still unknown, like their spatial distribution and propagation patterns. Moreover, the understanding of these patterns helps to establish monitoring programs and to gain insight in how eddies would affect local mixing. Here, we use a global eddy data set to qualify eddies based on their surface characteristics in the Agulhas Current (AC), the Brazil Current (BC) and the East Australian Current (EAC) systems. The analyses reveal that eddy propagation within each system is highly forced by the local mean flow and bathymetry. Large values of eddy amplitude and temporal variability are associated with the BC and EAC retroflections, while small values occur in the centre of the Argentine Basin and in the Tasman Sea. In the AC system, eddy polarity dictates the propagation distance. BC system eddies do not propagate beyond the Argentine Basin, and are advected by the local ocean circulation. EAC system eddies from both polarities cross south of Tasmania but only the anticyclonic ones reach the Great Australian Bight. For all three WBC systems, both cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies present a geographical segregation according to radius size and amplitude. Regions of high eddy kinetic energy are associated with the eddies' mean amplitudes, and not with their densities.

  17. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  18. Assessment of the zinc diffusion rate in estuarine zones.

    PubMed

    Sámano, María Luisa; Pérez, María Luisa; Claramunt, Inigo; García, Andrés

    2016-03-15

    Industrial pressures suffered by estuarine zones leave a pollution record in their sediment. Thus, high concentrations of many heavy metals and some organic compounds are often found in estuarine sediment. This work aims to contribute to the enhancement of water quality management strategies in these zones by studying in detail the diffusive processes that take place between the water and sediment using a two-pronged approach: experimental practice and numerical simulation. To provide an example of the practical application of the methodologies proposed in this paper, the Suances Estuary (northern Spain) was selected as the study zone. This estuary exhibits significant historical pollution and its sediment acts as a continuous internal source of zinc, mainly due to diffusive processes derived from the concentration gradient between the interstitial water at the solid particles of the sediment and the bottom of the water column. The experimentally obtained results, based on 6 case studies, demonstrated the buffering capacity of the system and allowed the determination of the required time for the mass transfer processes to reach an equilibrium state. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of zinc was approximately modeled taking into consideration the high concentration variability observed in sediment along the entire estuary. The convergence between the modeled and the experimental results indicated the required contact time to reach an equilibrium state in a real field situation. PMID:26851870

  19. The role of nutrient loading and eutrophication in estuarine ecology.

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J L; Paerl, H W; Tester, P; Richardson, T L

    2001-01-01

    Eutrophication is a process that can be defined as an increase in the rate of supply of organic matter (OM) to an ecosystem. We provide a general overview of the major features driving estuarine eutrophication and outline some of the consequences of that process. The main chemical constituent of OM is carbon (C), and therefore rates of eutrophication are expressed in units of C per area per unit time. OM occurs in both particulate and dissolved forms. Allochthonous OM originates outside the estuary, whereas autochthonous OM is generated within the system, mostly by primary producers or by benthic regeneration of OM. The supply rates of limiting nutrients regulate phytoplankton productivity that contributes to inputs of autochthonous OM. The trophic status of an estuary is often based on eutrophication rates and can be categorized as oligotrophic (<100 g C m(-2) y(-1), mesotrophic (100-300 g C m(-2) y(-1), eutrophic (300-500 g C m(-2) y(-1), or hypertrophic (>500 g C m(-2) y(-1). Ecosystem responses to eutrophication depend on both export rates (flushing, microbially mediated losses through respiration, and denitrification) and recycling/regeneration rates within the estuary. The mitigation of the effects of eutrophication involves the regulation of inorganic nutrient (primarily N and P) inputs into receiving waters. Appropriately scaled and parameterized nutrient and hydrologic controls are the only realistic options for controlling phytoplankton blooms, algal toxicity, and other symptoms of eutrophication in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:11677178

  20. Movement of spilled oil as predicted by estuarine nontidal drift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomos, T.J.

    1975-01-01

    Information on water movement obtained from bimonthly releases of surface and seabed drifters in the San Francisco Bay and adjacent Pacific Ocean is used to understand major processes controlling dispersal of oil after a spill of 3,200 m3 of Bunker C in the bay in January 1971. River-induced nontidal estuarine circulation was the dominant factor controlling net movement of the oil spilled at the entrance of the bay system, reinforcing ebbing tidal currents and causing the seaward movement of floating oil, which followed paths taken by surface drifters released 3 weeks before the spill. In contrast, some oil formed globules which sank to the near-bottom waters, had the same relative buoyancy as seabed drifters, and moved similarly, beaching in eastern San Pablo Bay after being transported landward in the near-bottom waters. No oil or surface drifters floated into the south bay because surface waters were drifting seaward, away from the south bay. Notable seasonally modulated phenomena which must be considered in predicting surface and near-bottom oil drifts of future spills include a summer (low-river discharge period) diminution of the estuarine circulation mechanism in the north and central bayadjacent ocean region and a seasonal reversal in two-layer drift in the south bay.

  1. Effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system. Final technical report, 1 August 1986-31 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Ledwell, J.R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-11-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF/sub 6/, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF/sub 6/, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF/sub 6/ and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  2. Uranium content and dose assessment for sediment and soil samples from the estuarine system of Santos and Sao Vicente, SP, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, L P; Serafim, R A M; Corrêa, B A M; Yamazaki, I M; Primi, M C

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the uranium (U) content in sediment and soil samples collected near the Santos and São Vicente estuaries was determined using the fission track registration technique (SSNTD). The sediment and soil samples after oven-dried and pulverised were prepared in the solution form. About 10 microl of this solution was deposited on a plastic detector and irradiated at the IPEN-IEA-R1 (3.5 MW) nuclear reactor. After the irradiation and chemical etching of the plastic foils, the fission tracks were counted with a system consisting of an optical microscope together with a video camera and a PC. The U content in the analysed samples ranged from 3.12 +/- 0.55 to 18.3 +/- 1.2 ppm for sediments and from 3.21 +/- 0.63 to 11.5 +/- 1.1 ppm for soils or in terms of (238)U equivalent activity from 38.5 +/- 6.8 to 226 +/- 15 and 39.6 +/- 7.8 to 142 +/- 14 Bq kg(-1) for sediments and soils, respectively. These results were compared with other values reported in the literature for sediments and soils collected in environments similar to the ones studied in this work. Most of the values obtained in this work are higher than the world mean and are in reasonable agreement with results found by other authors for sediments and soils from regions considered as polluted or with a high level of radioactivity.

  3. Annual Variation of Seismicity due to Surface Loads in Normal Fault Systems in Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Luo, Y.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    It had been found that there are seasonal variations of seismicity related to surface hydrology at Main Himalaya Thrust (MHT) fault. In this work, we analyzed the historical micro-earthquakes recorded by China Digital Seismograph Network (CSDN) in normal faulting systems in southern Tibet, to test whether such a phenomenon exist here and to figure out the possible modulation mechanism. There are several N-S striking normal fault systems (e.g. Yadong-Gulu, Shenza-Dingjie rifts) across the southern Tibetan plateau, which are supposed to accommodate the crust extension induced by Indo-Eurasia collision. The quake catalog covers the time span of 2008-2014. All quake events are relocated using the double-differencing method. The catalog was then declustered using CLUSTER2000 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/software/). The declustered catalog was then averaged for one-month period. The monthly catalog shows that the number of earthquake is maximum during the winter months (from January to March), although the maximum values do not agree for individual years (Fig. 1). Such a variation is similar to that found at MHT. Contrary to the situation at MHT (thrust fault), we found it might be explained directly by surface mass redistributions. The contemporary continuous GPS observations confirm that Tibetan plateau crust moves up and down periodically and reaches its lowest position in summer under the surface hydrological load. According to the Coulomb failure criterion (S=τ-μ(σn-pf) , where S is Coulomb Stress, σn is normal stress, τ is shear stress), an increase of mass load in summer in Tibet will cause an increase in normal stress at the (gently dipping) fault plane and accordingly a decrease in Coulomb stress, which thus inhibits the occurrence of quakes on those normal fault planes.

  4. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  5. Vicariance and dispersal effects on phylogeographic structure and speciation in a widespread estuarine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David W; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Heath, Daniel D

    2006-02-01

    Vicariance and dispersal can strongly influence population genetic structure and allopatric speciation, but their importance in the origin of marine biodiversity is unresolved. In transitional estuarine environments, habitat discreteness and dispersal barriers could enhance divergence and provide insight to evolutionary mechanisms underlying marine and freshwater biodiversity. We examined this by assessing phylogeographic structure in the widespread amphipod Gammarus tigrinus across 13 estuaries spanning its northwest Atlantic range from Quebec to Florida. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 phylogenies supported deep genetic structure consistent with Pliocene separation and cryptic northern and southern species. This break occurred across the Virginian-Carolinian coastal biogeographic zone, where an oceanographic discontinuity may restrict gene flow. Ten estuarine populations of the northern species occurred in four distinct clades, supportive of Pleistocene separation. Glaciation effects on genetic structure of estuarine populations are largely unknown, but analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) supported a phylogeographic break among clades in formerly glaciated versus nonglaciated areas across Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This finding was concordant with patterns in other coastal species, though there was no significant relationship between latitude and genetic diversity. This supports Pleistocene vicariance events and divergence of clades in different northern glacial refugia. AMOVA results and private haplotypes in most populations support an allopatric distribution across estuaries. Clade mixture zones are consistent with historical colonization and human-mediated transfer. An isolation-by-distance model of divergence was detected after we excluded a suspected invasive haplotype in the St. Lawrence estuary. The occurrence of cryptic species and divergent population structure support limited dispersal, dispersed habitat

  6. Systemic implementation strategies to improve hypertension: the Kaiser Permanente Southern California experience.

    PubMed

    Sim, John J; Handler, Joel; Jacobsen, Steven J; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-05-01

    The past decade has seen hypertension improving in the United States where control is approximately 50%. Kaiser Permanente has mirrored and exceeded these national advances in control. Integrated models of care such as Kaiser Permanente and the Veterans Administration health systems have demonstrated the greatest hypertension outcomes. We detail the story of Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) to illustrate the success that can be achieved with an integrated health system model that uses implementation, dissemination, and performance feedback approaches to chronic disease care. KPSC, with a large ethnically diverse population of more than 3.6 million, has used a stepwise approach to achieve control rates greater than 85% in those recognized with hypertension. This was accomplished through systemic implementations of specific strategies: (1) capturing hypertensive members into a hypertension registry; (2) standardization of blood pressure measurements; (3) drafting and disseminating an internal treatment algorithm that is evidence-based and is advocating of combination therapy; and (4) a multidisciplinary approach using medical assistants, nurses, and pharmacists as key stakeholders. The infrastructure, support, and involvement across all levels of the health system with rapid and continuous performance feedback have been pivotal in ensuring the follow-through and maintenance of these strategies. The KPSC hypertension program is continually evolving in these areas. With these high control rates and established infrastructure, they are positioned to take on different innovations and study models. Such potential projects are drafting strategies on resistant hypertension or addressing the concerns about overtreatment of hypertension. PMID:24786445

  7. Systemic implementation strategies to improve hypertension: the Kaiser Permanente Southern California experience.

    PubMed

    Sim, John J; Handler, Joel; Jacobsen, Steven J; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-05-01

    The past decade has seen hypertension improving in the United States where control is approximately 50%. Kaiser Permanente has mirrored and exceeded these national advances in control. Integrated models of care such as Kaiser Permanente and the Veterans Administration health systems have demonstrated the greatest hypertension outcomes. We detail the story of Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) to illustrate the success that can be achieved with an integrated health system model that uses implementation, dissemination, and performance feedback approaches to chronic disease care. KPSC, with a large ethnically diverse population of more than 3.6 million, has used a stepwise approach to achieve control rates greater than 85% in those recognized with hypertension. This was accomplished through systemic implementations of specific strategies: (1) capturing hypertensive members into a hypertension registry; (2) standardization of blood pressure measurements; (3) drafting and disseminating an internal treatment algorithm that is evidence-based and is advocating of combination therapy; and (4) a multidisciplinary approach using medical assistants, nurses, and pharmacists as key stakeholders. The infrastructure, support, and involvement across all levels of the health system with rapid and continuous performance feedback have been pivotal in ensuring the follow-through and maintenance of these strategies. The KPSC hypertension program is continually evolving in these areas. With these high control rates and established infrastructure, they are positioned to take on different innovations and study models. Such potential projects are drafting strategies on resistant hypertension or addressing the concerns about overtreatment of hypertension.

  8. Long-term patterns in estuarine fish growth across two climatically divergent regions.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Izzo, Christopher; Haddy, James A; Lyle, Jeremy M; Ye, Qifeng; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2015-12-01

    Long-term ecological datasets are vital for investigating how species respond to changes in their environment, yet there is a critical lack of such datasets from aquatic systems. We developed otolith growth 'chronologies' to reconstruct the growth history of a temperate estuarine fish species, black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri). Chronologies represented two regions in south-east Australia: South Australia, characterised by a relatively warm, dry climate, and Tasmania, characterised by a relatively cool, wet climate. Using a mixed modelling approach, we related inter-annual growth variation to air temperature, rainfall, freshwater inflow (South Australia only), and El Niño-Southern Oscillation events. Otolith chronologies provided a continuous record of growth over a 13- and 21-year period for fish from South Australia and Tasmania, respectively. Even though fish from Tasmania were sourced across multiple estuaries, they showed higher levels of growth synchronicity across years, and greater year-to-year growth variation, than fish from South Australia, which were sourced from a single, large estuary. Growth in Tasmanian fish declined markedly over the time period studied and was negatively correlated to temperature. In contrast, growth in South Australian fish was positively correlated to both temperature and rainfall. The stark contrast between the two regions suggests that Tasmanian black bream populations are more responsive to regional scale environmental variation and may be more vulnerable to global warming. This study highlights the importance of examining species response to climate change at the intra-specific level and further validates the emerging use of growth chronologies for generating long-term ecological data in aquatic systems. PMID:26245148

  9. Long-term patterns in estuarine fish growth across two climatically divergent regions.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Izzo, Christopher; Haddy, James A; Lyle, Jeremy M; Ye, Qifeng; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2015-12-01

    Long-term ecological datasets are vital for investigating how species respond to changes in their environment, yet there is a critical lack of such datasets from aquatic systems. We developed otolith growth 'chronologies' to reconstruct the growth history of a temperate estuarine fish species, black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri). Chronologies represented two regions in south-east Australia: South Australia, characterised by a relatively warm, dry climate, and Tasmania, characterised by a relatively cool, wet climate. Using a mixed modelling approach, we related inter-annual growth variation to air temperature, rainfall, freshwater inflow (South Australia only), and El Niño-Southern Oscillation events. Otolith chronologies provided a continuous record of growth over a 13- and 21-year period for fish from South Australia and Tasmania, respectively. Even though fish from Tasmania were sourced across multiple estuaries, they showed higher levels of growth synchronicity across years, and greater year-to-year growth variation, than fish from South Australia, which were sourced from a single, large estuary. Growth in Tasmanian fish declined markedly over the time period studied and was negatively correlated to temperature. In contrast, growth in South Australian fish was positively correlated to both temperature and rainfall. The stark contrast between the two regions suggests that Tasmanian black bream populations are more responsive to regional scale environmental variation and may be more vulnerable to global warming. This study highlights the importance of examining species response to climate change at the intra-specific level and further validates the emerging use of growth chronologies for generating long-term ecological data in aquatic systems.

  10. Alternative nursery habitat for estuarine associated marine fish during prolonged closure of the St Lucia estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, Leon; Cyrus, Digby P.

    2009-10-01

    The Mfolozi estuary, located on the east coast of South Africa, was historically directly linked to the adjacent St Lucia estuarine system, the largest estuarine system in Africa and a World Heritage Site. The Mfolozi used to be the main feeder system to maintain lake levels in St Lucia, but increased siltation from sugar cane farming in the Mfolozi floodplain led to artificial separation of the two systems in 1950. Reduced freshwater inflow due to drought conditions caused the St Lucia mouth to remain closed from June 2002 to present, coinciding with low lake levels and hypersaline conditions, except for a brief period during 2007 after the St Lucia mouth breached. These conditions led to disruption of larval recruitment into the system and major changes in biotic communities. Due to the importance of the St Lucia - Mfolozi System link, a study was initiated in 2007 on the fish community of the Mfolozi system, which was sampled using seine and gill nets. The 48 species recorded were dominated by juveniles of marine spawners, particularly Leiognathus equula and Valamugil cunnesius and the estuarine spawners Ambassis dussumieri and Ambassis natalensis. Estuarine dependent marine spawning species formed 68% of both the species numbers and CPUE, an indication of the regional importance of the Mfolozi estuary as an alternate refuge for juvenile marine fish during periods when the St Lucia system remained closed. Post-larval recruits of marine spawning species were particularly abundant, but low zoobenthic densities caused a rapid decline in numbers of benthic feeders shortly after their recruitment into the system. The importance of the Mfolozi estuary in maintaining marine brood stocks of estuarine dependent marine fish is discussed with particular reference to estuarine degradation and the ecological integrity of the St Lucia system.

  11. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere/asthenosphere system beneath southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rumpker, G.; Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rindraharisaona, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Madagascar is considered as a key region with respect to the assembly and break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana. Following the collision between East- and West-Gondwana (~700-650 Ma), its position was central to the Pan-African orogeny and later to the break-up between East-Africa, India and Antarctica. Today, Madagascar consists of different tectonic units; the eastern two thirds of the island are composed mainly of Precambian rocks, whereas the western part is dominated by sedimentary deposits. Southern Madagascar is characterized by several NS to NW-SE trending shear zones. To increase our understanding of these structures and related tectonic processes, we installed a dense temporary seismic network in southern Madagascar. It consisted of 50 stations, which were in operation for up to 2 years between 2012 and 2014. We present results from shear-wave splitting analyses to infer the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in response to deformational processes. The polarization of the fast shear wave and the delay time between the fast and slow waves provide constraints on the anisotropic fabric. For our study, we use core phases from up to 22 events. We first apply a conventional single-event splitting analysis by minimizing the transverse component. For stations that do not show a significant azimuthal dependence of the splitting parameters, we also apply a joint inversion involving all recorded waveforms from several events. Our results exhibit delay times between 0.4 and 1.5 s. In the center of the E-W profile, fast axes are mainly oriented NNW-SSE, whereas east of the Ranotsara zone, fast axes are oriented NE-SW. We apply full-waveform FD modeling to examine the effects of various anisotropic models of the crust and mantle. Our results indicate that recently proposed mantle flow models are insufficient to explain the small scale variations of splitting parameters observed along our profile. Our observations are best characterized by

  12. Comparison of Geodetic and Late Pleistocene Slip Rates for the Southern Dead Sea Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. J.; Gomez, F.; Abu Rajab, J. S.; Al-Tarazi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of short-term (geodetic) and Late Quaternary slip rates have been used to assess time-variable fault kinematics along various active faults, globally. Differences between such types slip rates may have implications for crustal rheology and/or temporal variations in plate motion. This research aims to compare the geodetically-derived slip rates with slip rates based on Late Pleistocene landforms along the southern Dead Sea fault system (DSFS). The DSFS is an active, left-lateral transform that accommodates differential movement between the Arabian and Sinai plates. A number of slip rates have been previously reported ranging from 2 to 6mm/yr. However, comparison of various slip rates requires ensuring that associated uncertainties are assessed using a standard. New GPS velocities from Jordan are combined with other available GPS data, and are used to model slip rates using elastic block models. Resulting slip rates are 4.3 to 5.3 mm/yr with fault locking depths of 8 - 15 km. Late Pleistocene rates are assessed from published observations, as well as new data. New mapping of offset alluvial fans in the southern Wadi Araba was facilitated by multi-spectral imagery and high-resolution digital elevation model. These fans correlate with regional aggradation events, with the resulting Late Pleistocene slip rates ranging from 4.2 to 5.1 mm/yr. Statistically, the geodetic and neotectonic slip rates are identical. Additionally, a 3-dimensional slip vector for the last earthquake in the northern Wadi Araba is constructed using close-range photogrammetry of a faulted Byzantine aqueduct that indicates both horizontal and vertical displacements. Previous studies suggested characteristic earthquake slip, so slip rates and this slip vector provide a means of assessing mean EQ recurrence interval, as well as the role of earthquakes in constructing the long-term topography along this part of the transform.

  13. Patterns in floral traits and plant breeding systems on Southern Ocean Islands

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    The harsh climatic conditions and paucity of potential pollinators on Southern Ocean Islands (SOIs; latitude 46°S–55°S) lead to the expectation that anemophily or self-fertilization are the dominant modes of plant sexual reproduction. However, at least some species have showy inflorescences suggesting biotic pollination or dimorphic breeding systems necessitating cross-pollination. This study investigates whether anemophily and self-compatibility are common on SOIs, whether species or genera with these traits are more widespread or frequent at higher latitudes, and whether gender dimorphy is correlated with anemophily, as might occur if reliance on pollinators was a disadvantage. Of the 321 flowering plant species in the SOI region, 34.3 % possessed floral traits consistent with anemophily. Compatibility information was located for 94 potentially self-fertilizing species, of which 92.6 % were recorded as partially or fully self-compatible. Dioecy occurred in 7.1 % of species overall and up to 10.2 % of island floras, but has not clearly arisen in situ. Gynodioecy occurred in 3.4 % of species. The frequency of anemophily and gender dimorphy did not differ between the SOI flora and southern hemisphere temperate reference floras. At the species level, gender dimorphy was positively associated with fleshy fruit, but at the genus level it was associated with occurrence in New Zealand and a reduced regional distribution. Anemophily was more prevalent in genera occurring on subantarctic islands and the proportion of species with floral traits suggestive of biotic pollination was significantly higher on climatically milder, cool temperate islands. These results support the contention that reliance on biotic pollinators has constrained the distribution of species on SOIs; however, it is also clear that the reproductive biology of few SOI species has been studied in situ and many species likely employ a mixed mating strategy combining biotic pollination with self

  14. Duplex development and abandonment during evolution of the Lewis thrust system, southern Glacier National Park, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, An; Kelty, T.K.; Davis, G.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The westernmost duplex (Brave Dog Mountain) includes the low-angle Brave Dog roof fault and Elk Mountain imbricate system, and the easternmost (Rising Wolf Mountain) duplex includes the low-angle Rockwell roof fault and Mt. Henry imbricate system. The geometry of these duplexes suggests that they differ from previously described geometric-kinematic models for duplex development. Their low-angle roof faults were preexisting structures that were locally utilized as roof faults during the formation of the imbricate systems. Crosscutting of the Brave Dog fault by the Mt. Henry imbricate system indicates that the two duplexes formed at different times. The younger Rockwell-Mt. Henry duplex developed 20 km east of the older Brave Dog-Elk Mountain duplex; the roof fault of the former is at a higher structural level. Field relations confirm that the low-angle Rockwell fault existed across the southern Glacier Park area prior to localized formation of the Mt. Henry imbricate thrusts beneath it. These thrusts kinematically link the Rockwell and Lewis faults and may be analogous to P shears that form between two synchronously active faults bounding a simple shear system. The abandonment of one duplex and its replacement by another with a new and higher roof fault may have been caused by (1) warping of the older and lower Brave Dog roof fault during the formation of the imbricate system (Elk Mountain) beneath it, (2) an upward shifting of the highest level of a simple shear system in the Lewis plate to a new decollement level in subhorizontal belt strata (= the Rockwell fault) that lay above inclined strata within the first duplex, and (3) a reinitiation of P-shear development (= Mt. Henry imbricate faults) between the Lewis thrust and the subparallel, synkinematic Rockwell fault.

  15. Mapping cattle trade routes in southern Somalia: a method for mobile livestock keeping systems.

    PubMed

    Tempia, S; Braidotti, F; Aden, H H; Abdulle, M H; Costagli, R; Otieno, F T

    2010-12-01

    The Somali economy is the only one in the world in which more than half the population is dependent on nomadic pastoralism. Trade typically involves drovers trekking animals over long distances to markets. A pilot approach for mapping trade routes was undertaken, using the Afmadow to Garissa routes in southern Somalia. The methodology included conducting a workshop with traders to gather preliminary information about the most-used routes and general husbandry practices and training selected drovers to collect data about key features along the routes, using hand-held global positioning system (GPS) devices, radio collar GPS and pictorial data forms. Collected data were then integrated into geographic information systems for analysis. The resultant spatial maps describe the Afmadow to Garissa routes, the speed of livestock movement along these routes and relevant environmental and social features affecting this speed. These data are useful for identifying critical control points for health screening along the routes, which may enable the establishment of a livestock certification system in nomadic pastoral environments.

  16. Evidence for Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in a Fissured-porous Karst System in Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, F.; Mayer, B.

    2005-12-01

    Twenty five percent of the world's population uses karst water as drinking water resources. Since karst groundwater systems are highly vulnerable to contamination, groundwater protection and self purification is a major challenge. Up to now research in karst groundwater systems has predominantly concentrated on hydrodynamic processes. Little is known about anoxic processes in oxygen dominated, fracture-matrix diffusion controlled karst aquifers. Isotope measurements comprise a promising tool to identify biogeochemical processes such as bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction in karstic aquifers. The goal of this study was to determine the sources and the processes affecting sulfate in an oxygen-rich karst aquifer in southern Germany and their dependence on hydrogeological parameters. This was achieved by interpreting tritium data with a simple lumped parameter approach and assessing variations in concentrations and isotopic compositions of sulfate and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with respect to groundwater age. Young groundwater (<30 years) was characterized by comparatively high sulfate concentrations (0.36 mM) and δ34S values similar to those of recent atmospheric deposition (1.5‰). In contrast groundwater with mean residence times >60 years had significantly lower sulfate concentrations (0.08 mM) and markedly higher δ34S values (7.5‰). These results indicate that in karst systems with matrix porosity, bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction may occur. This process has the potential to contribute to long-term biodegradation of contaminants in the porous rock matrix representing the dominant water reservoir in fissured-porous karst aquifers.

  17. Biostability in distribution systems in one city in southern China: characteristics, modeling and control strategy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pinpin; Zhang, Xiaojian; Zhang, Chiqian; Niu, Zhangbin; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the bacterial regrowth in drinking water distribution systems receiving finished water from an advanced drinking water treatment plant in one city in southern China. Thirteen nodes in two water supply zones with different aged pipelines were selected to monitor water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), chloramine residual, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), and heterotrophic plate counts (HPC). Regression and principal component analyses indicated that HPC had a strong correlation with chloramine residual. Based on Chick-Watson's Law and the Monod equation, biostability curves under different conditions were developed to achieve the goal of HPC < or = 100 CFU/mL. The biostability curves could interpret the scenario under various AOC concentrations and predict the required chloramine residual concentration under the condition of high AOC level. The simulation was also carried out to predict the scenario with a stricter HPC goal (< or = 50 CFU/mL) and determine the required chloramine residual. The biological regrowth control strategy was assessed using biostability curve analysis. The results indicated that maintaining high chloramine residual concentration was the most practical way to achieve the goal of HPC < or = 100 CFU/mL. Biostability curves could be a very useful tool for biostability control in distribution systems. This work could provide some new insights towards biostability control in real distribution systems.

  18. Agricultural management systems affect the green lacewing community (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) in olive orchards in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Porcel, M; Ruano, F; Cotes, B; Peña, A; Campos, M

    2013-02-01

    Green lacewings are generalist predators whose conservation is important for pest control in olive orchards (Olea europaea L.) Sustainable farming practices, as opposed to conventional management techniques, are believed to foster the presence of natural enemies. This study therefore aims to analyze the effect of 1) herbicidal weed cover removal and insecticide applications, and 2) the general management systems used in the olive orchards of southern Spain on chrysopid assemblages and abundance. Green lacewing adults and larvae were collected from olive orchards under conventional, integrated, and organic management systems. In addition, chemical analyses of residues were carried out to determine the presence of insecticidal and herbicidal residues. Eight adult species and three genera of larvae were identified. No rare species were captured from the most intensively farmed orchard, which therefore recorded the most limited chrysopid diversity with a very marked dominance of Chrysoperla carnea s.l.. No effect of dimethoate treatments on Chrysoperla larvae or C. carnea s.l. adults was observed. However, the presence of insecticide residues was associated with the depletion of Dichochrysa larvae. The absence of herbicide treatments favored C. carnea s.l. adult presence on olive trees while larval abundance decreased. Dichochrysa larvae were more abundant when weed cover received no treatment. In relation to the management systems studied, no difference in Chrysoperla larval abundance was observed between conventional and organic orchards. However, Dichochrysa larvae were more abundant in orchards under organic management.

  19. 77 FR 68073 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH; and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... that White Sands Missile Range. OPM announced these changes in interim (65 FR 48641) and final (65 FR..., and Perry Counties, MO, from the Southern Missouri wage area to the St. Louis wage area and Mercer... Wage System (FWS) wage areas. The proposed rule would redefine Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, and...

  20. Review of SISA Student Dissertations on Library and Information Systems and Services in Eastern and Southern Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, G. G.; Tadesse, Taye T.

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes student dissertations at the School of Information Studies for Africa (SISA) at Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia) in order to present an overview of the library and information systems and services available in seven eastern and southern African countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. (Author/LRW)

  1. Serving data from the SCAR Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) using the SeaDataNet infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, T. F.

    2010-09-01

    The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) jointly intend to build a Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). This paper addresses the required data flow infrastructure. SOOS will use a system of systems approach, using existing observation programmes and projects. Data should be submitted to professional data centres. The problem arises how to link all these data centres and get a central overview of the SOOS data as well as direct access to the data. The Netherlands National Oceanographic Data Committee (NL-NODC) has successfully built a national distributed oceanographic data acccess infrastructure, adopting and implementing technology developed by the European SeaDataNet project. The Dutch system has been operational since early 2009. The conclusion is that the SeaDataNet technology can be used to build an operational, distributed data delivery infrastructure, featuring all elements required by the Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS).

  2. Determination of thrust compression systems with a multisource geoscientific data processing in the southern margin of Ordos basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Yongjie, T.; Genderen, J.L. van

    1996-08-01

    In this paper, the multisource geoscientific data, such as TM data, NOAA data, the data of Bouguer gravity anomaly and aeromagnetic anomaly, the multisource geophysical processing methods, such as upward continuations, vertical derivative and gradient image, and synthetic image processing method - remote sensing image processing and geophysical image processing under I{sup 2}S600, are used to study the reverse faults or thrusts in the southern margin of Ordos basin, China. On the basis of these results and with geological investigation in the field, the authors have determined three thrust compression systems, named EW thrust compression system, NE thrust compression system and NW thrust compression system. These three systems reveal the regularity of geological structural evolution in the southern margin of Ordos basis and in the north side of Qinling Orogenic Belt.

  3. Newport-Inglewood-Carlsbad-Coronado Bank Fault System Nearshore Southern California: Testing models for Quaternary deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J. T.; Sorlien, C. C.; Cormier, M.; Bauer, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The San Andreas fault system is distributed across hundreds of kilometers in southern California. This transform system includes offshore faults along the shelf, slope and basin- comprising part of the Inner California Continental Borderland. Previously, offshore faults have been interpreted as being discontinuous and striking parallel to the coast between Long Beach and San Diego. Our recent work, based on several thousand kilometers of deep-penetration industry multi-channel seismic reflection data (MCS) as well as high resolution U.S. Geological Survey MCS, indicates that many of the offshore faults are more geometrically continuous than previously reported. Stratigraphic interpretations of MCS profiles included the ca. 1.8 Ma Top Lower Pico, which was correlated from wells located offshore Long Beach (Sorlien et. al. 2010). Based on this age constraint, four younger (Late) Quaternary unconformities are interpreted through the slope and basin. The right-lateral Newport-Inglewood fault continues offshore near Newport Beach. We map a single fault for 25 kilometers that continues to the southeast along the base of the slope. There, the Newport-Inglewood fault splits into the San Mateo-Carlsbad fault, which is mapped for 55 kilometers along the base of the slope to a sharp bend. This bend is the northern end of a right step-over of 10 kilometers to the Descanso fault and about 17 km to the Coronado Bank fault. We map these faults for 50 kilometers as they continue over the Mexican border. Both the San Mateo - Carlsbad with the Newport-Inglewood fault and the Coronado Bank with the Descanso fault are paired faults that form flower structures (positive and negative, respectively) in cross section. Preliminary kinematic models indicate ~1km of right-lateral slip since ~1.8 Ma at the north end of the step-over. We are modeling the slip on the southern segment to test our hypothesis for a kinematically continuous right-lateral fault system. We are correlating four

  4. Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian depositional systems and gas production, southern Sacramento basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Nilsen, T.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian strata of the southern Sacramento basin include four west- and southwest-prograding submarine-fan/slope/delta systems. The Winters, Lathrop, Tracy, and Blewett formations consist of submarine-fan and related slope/basin-plain deposits that were fed by various deltaic complexes of the Starkey Formation. Four major basinwide transgressive shale units (Sacramento Shale, Sawtooth Shale, Ragged Valley Shale, and H and T Shale) help intrasystem correlations. The Winters, Tracy, and Blewett fans are small, radial, coalescing sand-rich systems that contain the following principal facies: (1) sandstone-filled inner fan channel deposits, (2) mudstone-dominated inner fan interchannel deposits, (3) middle-fan amalgamated suprafan-type sandstone-rich channel deposits, and (4) mudstone-dominated outer fan deposits. The Lathrop fans are larger, elongate, mixed-sediment systems that contain basin-plain, outer fan lobe, middle fan-channel, levee, interchannel, and inner fan channel facies. The Sierran-derived fluvio-deltaic Starkey Formation can be divided into six sand-rich deltaic cycles that can be subdivided on the basis of log signaturres and spatial distribution into prodelta, delta-front, lower delta-plain, and upper delta-plain/fluvial facies. More than 50 gas fields produce from these systems. Stratigraphic traps include updip pinchouts of submarine canyon/gullies and inner fan channels into slope shale, especially in the many overlapping and coalescing sand-rich systems. Lateral pinchouts of outer fan lobes and middle-fan suprafan-type bodies are also productive. Structural traps generally characterize production from deltaic deposits because of the more continuous nature of these bodies.

  5. Sources of organic matter for flatfish juveniles in coastal and estuarine nursery grounds: A meta-analysis for the common sole (Solea solea) in contrasted systems of Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, O.; Modéran, J.; Beaunée, G.; Riera, P.; Nicolas, D.; Savoye, N.; Harmelin-Vivien, M.; Darnaude, A. M.; Brind'Amour, A.; Le Bris, H.; Cabral, H.; Vinagre, C.; Pasquaud, S.; França, S.; Kostecki, C.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal and estuarine nursery grounds are essential habitats for sustaining flatfish stocks since only these shallow and productive areas provide the high food supply that allows maximizing juvenile growth and survival in most flatfish species. However, the main organic matter sources at the basis of benthic food webs might differ drastically between estuarine nursery grounds under strong freshwater influences, where food webs are mainly supported by continental organic matter, and coastal ecosystems under limited freshwater influence, where the local marine primary production is the main source of carbon for the benthos. To better understand the links between continental inputs to the coastal zone and stock maintenance in the highly prized common sole, Solea solea (L.), we investigated the variability in the organic matter sources supporting the growth of its young-of-the-year (YoY) in five contrasted estuarine and coastal nursery grounds under varying freshwater influence. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen allowed tracing the origin of the organic matter exploited by YoY soles in the very first months following their benthic settlement, i.e. when most of the juvenile mortality occurs in the species. A mixing model was run to unravel and quantify the contribution of all major potential sources of organic matter to sole food webs, with a sensitivity analysis allowing assessment of the impact of various trophic enrichment factors on model outputs. This meta-analysis demonstrated a relative robustness of the estimation of the respective contributions of the various organic matter sources. At the nursery scale, the upstream increase in freshwater organic matter exploitation by YoY soles and its positive correlation with inter-annual variations in the river flow confirmed previous conclusions about the importance of organic matter from continental origin for juvenile production. However, inter-site differences in the organic matter sources exploited for growth

  6. Hydrological and ecological impacts of dams on the Kafue Flats floodplain system, southern Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumba, M.; Thompson, J. R.

    Developmental changes in river basins in Africa have become a reality. Many wetland ecosystems have been impacted by dams and other hydrological interventions resulting in both foreseen and unexpected consequences. The Kafue Flats in southern Zambia is an extensive floodplain system that lies within the middle Kafue river basin. The floodplain is about 255 km long and 60 km wide, covering an area of approximately 6,500 km 2. It is currently sandwiched between two large dams which are approximately 270 km apart. These dams have completely altered the hydrological regime of the system. Backwater from the downstream dam and releases from upstream have created a permanently flooded area within the floodplain that was not present in the past. Elsewhere, flooding has been reduced. The ecological consequences of these changes for the floodplain, which hosts two national parks (both Ramsar sites), have been extensive. Hydrological and vegetation changes have impacted the habitat for important wildlife communities including the endemic antelope, Kobus leche kafuensis. The most dramatic change in vegetation is associated with the colonisation of parts of the floodplain by the invasive alien plant, Mimosa pigra. This paper discusses these changes and their potential consequences.

  7. Southern Very Low Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in Wide Binary and Multiple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, José Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The results of the Königstuhl survey in the Southern Hemisphere are presented. I have searched for common proper motion companions to 173 field very low mass stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types >M5.0 V and magnitudes J<~14.5 mag. I have measured for the first time the common proper motion of two new wide systems containing very low mass components, Königstuhl 2 AB and 3 A-BC. Together with Königstuhl 1 AB and 2M 0126-50 AB, they are among the widest systems in their respective classes (r=450-11,900 AU). I have determined the minimum frequency of field wide multiples (r>100 AU) with late-type components at 5.0%+/-1.8% and the frequency of field wide late-type binaries with mass ratios q>0.5 at 1.2%+/-0.9%. These values represent a key diagnostic of evolution history and low-mass star and brown dwarf formation scenarios. In addition, the proper motions of 62 field very low mass dwarfs are measured here for the first time.

  8. Hydrochemical zonation of the western part of Göksu Delta aquifer system, Southern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, U. E.; Çelik, M.; Arslan, Ş.; Engin, H.

    2012-04-01

    In general, coastal areas are preferred places for human settlement, especially at places where infrastructure routes benefit from rivers, streets, or harbours. As a result, these areas usually suffer from rising population and endure increasingly high demand on natural resources like water. Göksu Delta, located in southern Turkey, is one of the important wetland areas of Turkey at the Mediterranean coast. It is divided into two parts by Göksu River. The western part of the delta, which is the subject matter of this study, hosts fertile agricultural fields, touristic places and a Special Environmental Protection Area. These properties of the region lead to a water-dependent ecosystem where groundwater has widely been used for agricultural and domestic purposes. When the exploitation of groundwater peaked in the middle of 1990s, the groundwater levels dropped and seawater intruded. General Directorate of State Hydraulic Works tried to stop seawater intrusion by building irrigation channels connected to Göksu River and banned drilling of new wells for groundwater exploitation, although it is hard to control the drilling of wells without official permit. Geological studies show that the delta is composed of terrestrial sediments including clay to coarse sand deposited during Quaternary. The heterogeneous sediments of Göksu Delta cause hydrogeological features of the aquifer systems to be heterogeneous and anisotropic. Hydrogeological investigations, therefore, indicate mainly two different aquifers, shallow and deep, separated by an aquitard. The shallow aquifer is under unconfined to confined conditions from north to south while the deep aquifer is under confined conditions. This study focuses on hydrogeochemical zonation in terms of hydrochemical processes that affect the Göksu Delta aquifer systems. For this purpose, hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies are conducted to understand the salinisation and softening processes of groundwater. The physicochemical

  9. Modelling the effect of hydrological change on estuarine health: An Australian Perspective. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. C.; Adiyanti, S.; Ruibal, A. L.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries provide an important role in the filtering and transformation of carbon and nutrients from coastal catchments into the marine environment. Global trends including climate change, increased population, industrialization and agriculture have led to the rapid deterioration of estuarine ecosystems across the world. Within the Australian context, a particular concern is how changes to hydrological regimes, due to both water diversions and climate variability, are contributing to increased stress and consequent decline in estuarine health. In this study we report the modeling output of five Australian estuaries, each with different hydrological regimes and alternative management issues relating to altered hydrology: 1) The Yarra River estuary is a highly urbanized system, also receiving agriculturally derived nutrients, where the concern is the role of periodic hypoxia in reducing the assimilation capacity of nitrogen and thus increased risk of algal blooms forming in the coastal environment; 2) The upper Swan River estuary in Western Australia, which experiences persistent anoxia and hypoxia brought about by reduced flows has led to the commissioning of several oxygenation plants to alleviate stress on biodiversity and overall estuarine health; 3) The health of the Caboolture estuary in Queensland has deteriorated in the past decade with the aim of model development to quantify the various sources of surface and groundwater derived nutrients; 4) The construction of an additional channel to increase flushing in the Peel Harvey estuary in Western Australia was designed to control persistent harmful algal blooms; and 5) The Lower River Murray estuary experienced a prolonged drought that led to the development of acid sulfate soils and acid drainage deteriorating water quality. For these applications we applied 3-D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical models to determine underlying relationships between altered flow regimes, increased temperatures and the response of

  10. Elevated naturally occurring arsenic in a semiarid oxidizing system, Southern High Plains aquifer, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, B.R.; Nicot, J.-P.; Reedy, R.C.; Kurtzman, D.; Mukherjee, A.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    High groundwater As concentrations in oxidizing systems are generally associated with As adsorption onto hydrous metal (Al, Fe or Mn) oxides and mobilization with increased pH. The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, sources and mobilization mechanisms of As in the Southern High Plains (SHP) aquifer, Texas, relative to those in other semiarid, oxidizing systems. Elevated groundwater As levels are widespread in the southern part of the SHP (SHP-S) aquifer, with 47% of wells exceeding the current EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ??g/L (range 0.3-164 ??g/L), whereas As levels are much lower in the north (SHP-N: 9% ??? As MCL of 10 ??g/L; range 0.2-43 ??g/L). The sharp contrast in As levels between the north and south coincides with a change in total dissolved solids (TDS) from 395 mg/L (median north) to 885 mg/L (median south). Arsenic is present as arsenate (As V) in this oxidizing system and is correlated with groundwater TDS (Spearman's ?? = 0.57). The most likely current source of As is sorbed As onto hydrous metal oxides based on correlations between As and other oxyanion-forming elements (V, ?? = 0.88; Se, ?? = 0.54; B, ?? = 0.51 and Mo, ?? = 0.46). This source is similar to that in other oxidizing systems and constitutes a secondary source; the most likely primary source being volcanic ashes in the SHP aquifer or original source rocks in the Rockies, based on co-occurrence of As and F (?? = 0.56), oxyanion-forming elements and SiO2 (?? = 0.41), which are found in volcanic ashes. High groundwater As concentrations in some semiarid oxidizing systems are related to high evaporation. Although correlation of As with TDS in the SHP aquifer may suggest evaporative concentration, unenriched stable isotopes (??2H: -65 to -27; ??18O: -9.1 to -4.2) in the SHP aquifer do not support evaporation. High TDS in the SHP aquifer is most likely related to upward movement of saline water from the underlying Triassic Dockum aquifer. Mobilization of As

  11. Ecoengineering with Ecohydrology: Successes and failures in estuarine restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Michael; Mander, Lucas; Mazik, Krysia; Simenstad, Charles; Valesini, Fiona; Whitfield, Alan; Wolanski, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Ecological Engineering (or Ecoengineering) is increasingly used in estuaries to re-create and restore ecosystems degraded by human activities, including reduced water flow or land poldered for agricultural use. Here we focus on ecosystem recolonization by the biota and their functioning and we separate Type A Ecoengineering where the physico-chemical structure is modified on the basis that ecological structure and functioning will then follow, and Type B Ecoengineering where the biota are engineered directly such as through restocking or replanting. Modifying the physical system to create and restore natural processes and habitats relies on successfully applying Ecohydrology, where suitable physical conditions, especially hydrography and sedimentology, are created to recover estuarine ecology by natural or human-mediated colonisation of primary producers and consumers, or habitat creation. This successional process then allows wading birds and fish to reoccupy the rehabilitated areas, thus restoring the natural food web and recreating nursery areas for aquatic biota. We describe Ecohydrology principles applied during Ecoengineering restoration projects in Europe, Australia, Asia, South Africa and North America. These show some successful and sustainable approaches but also others that were less than successful and not sustainable despite the best of intentions (and which may even have harmed the ecology). Some schemes may be 'good for the ecologists', as conservationists consider it successful that at least some habitat was created, albeit in the short-term, but arguably did little for the overall ecology of the area in space or time. We indicate the trade-offs between the short- and long-term value of restored and created ecosystems, the success at developing natural structure and functioning in disturbed estuaries, the role of this in estuarine and wetland management, and the costs and benefits of Ecoengineering to the socio-ecological system. These global case

  12. Estuarine consumers utilize marine, estuarine and terrestrial organic matter and provide connectivity among these food webs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flux of organic matter (OM) across ecosystem boundaries can influence estuarine food web dynamics and productivity. However, this process is seldom investigated taking into account all the adjacent ecosystems (e.g. ocean, river, land) and different hydrological settings (i.e....

  13. Coastal and Estuarine Waters: Light Behavior. Coastal and Estuarine Waters: Optical Sensors and Remote Sensing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the use of remote sensing techniques and technology to monitor coastal and estuarine waters. These waters are rich in mineral particles stirred up from the seabed by tides and waves and dissolved organic matter transported by rivers. The majority of the li...

  14. An operational real-time flood forecasting system in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Enrique; Coccia, Gabriele; Todini, Ezio

    2015-04-01

    A real-time flood forecasting system has been operating since year 2012 as a non-structural measure for mitigating the flood risk in Campania Region (Southern Italy), within the Sele river basin (3.240 km2). The Sele Flood Forecasting System (SFFS) has been built within the FEWS (Flood Early Warning System) platform developed by Deltares and it assimilates the numerical weather predictions of the COSMO LAM family: the deterministic COSMO-LAMI I2, the deterministic COSMO-LAMI I7 and the ensemble numerical weather predictions COSMO-LEPS (16 members). Sele FFS is composed by a cascade of three main models. The first model is a fully continuous physically based distributed hydrological model, named TOPKAPI-eXtended (Idrologia&Ambiente s.r.l., Naples, Italy), simulating the dominant processes controlling the soil water dynamics, runoff generation and discharge with a spatial resolution of 250 m. The second module is a set of Neural-Networks (ANN) built for forecasting the river stages at a set of monitored cross-sections. The third component is a Model Conditional Processor (MCP), which provides the predictive uncertainty (i.e., the probability of occurrence of a future flood event) within the framework of a multi-temporal forecast, according to the most recent advancements on this topic (Coccia and Todini, HESS, 2011). The MCP provides information about the probability of exceedance of a maximum river stage within the forecast lead time, by means of a discrete time function representing the variation of cumulative probability of exceeding a river stage during the forecast lead time and the distribution of the time occurrence of the flood peak, starting from one or more model forecasts. This work shows the Sele FFS performance after two years of operation, evidencing the added-values that can provide to a flood early warning and emergency management system.

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions from wetland rice-duck cultivation systems in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfang; Cao, Cougui; Wang, Jingping; Zhan, Ming; Yuan, Weiling; Ahmad, Shahrear

    2009-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a rice-duck cultivation system in the subtropical region of China and its regulating factors were investigated by using a static chambers technique during rice growth seasons in 2006 and 2007. The experimental field was equally divided into six plots for two different treatments: One was a conventional rice field (CK) and the other was a rice-duck ecosystem (RD). With the same amount of urea applied as basal fertilization, N2O emission fluxes from RD and CK followed a similar seasonal variation trend. During the flooding seasons, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, but it was significantly related to soil inorganic nitrogen (SIN) (p < 0.01) and soil pH (p < 0.01). After drainage, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, SIN, and soil pH. Our experimental data showed that peaks of N2O emission flux occurred both in 2 weeks after urea application and after drainage. Compared to CK, RD could significantly increase N2O emission. We evaluated the integrated global warming potentials (GWPs) of a rice-duck cultivation system based on methane (CH4) and N2O emission, which showed that RD could suppress the total amount of CH4 and N2O emissions from rice paddies. Moreover, because the decrease of CH4 emissions from RD compared to CK was far more than the increase of N2O emissions from RD compared to CK, RD greatly reduced integrated GWPs (CH4 + N2O) compared to CK. So, the rice-duck cultivation system is an effective strategy for reducing integrated GWPs of the rice-duck cultivation systems based on CH4 and N2O in southern China and will contribute to alleviating global warming. PMID:18427710

  16. Shock, stress or signal? Implications of freshwater flows for a top-level estuarine predator.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew D; van der Meulen, Dylan E; Ives, Matthew C; Walsh, Chris T; Reinfelds, Ivars V; Gray, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River). Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47-89 cm total length) were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time) in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4) tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8). High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed.

  17. An assessment of landscape characteristics affecting estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojun

    2012-02-01

    Exploring the quantitative association between landscape characteristics and the ecological conditions of receiving waters has recently become an emerging area for eco-environmental research. While the landscape-water relationship research has largely targeted on inland aquatic systems, there has been an increasing need to develop methods and techniques that can better work with coastal and estuarine ecosystems. In this paper, we present a geospatial approach to examine the quantitative relationship between landscape characteristics and estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed. The case study site is in the Pensacola estuarine drainage area, home of the city of Pensacola, Florida, USA, where vigorous urban sprawling has prompted growing concerns on the estuarine ecological health. Central to this research is a remote sensor image that has been used to extract land use/cover information and derive landscape metrics. Several significant landscape metrics are selected and spatially linked with the nitrogen loading data for the Pensacola bay area. Landscape metrics and nitrogen loading are summarized by equal overland flow-length rings, and their association is examined by using multivariate statistical analysis. And a stepwise model-building protocol is used for regression designs to help identify significant variables that can explain much of the variance in the nitrogen loading dataset. It is found that using landscape composition or spatial configuration alone can explain most of the nitrogen loading variability. Of all the regression models using metrics derived from a single land use/cover class as the independent variables, the one from the low density urban gives the highest adjusted R-square score, suggesting the impact of the watershed-wide urban sprawl upon this sensitive estuarine ecosystem. Measures towards the reduction of non-point source pollution from urban development are necessary in the area to protect the Pensacola bay ecosystem and its

  18. Benthic and pelagic pathways of methylmercury bioaccumulation in estuarine food webs of the northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Celia Y; Borsuk, Mark E; Bugge, Deenie M; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H; Ward, Darren M; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column.

  19. Shock, Stress or Signal? Implications of Freshwater Flows for a Top-Level Estuarine Predator

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew D.; van der Meulen, Dylan E.; Ives, Matthew C.; Walsh, Chris T.; Reinfelds, Ivars V.; Gray, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River). Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47–89 cm total length) were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time) in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4) tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8). High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed. PMID:24752585

  20. An assessment of landscape characteristics affecting estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojun

    2012-02-01

    Exploring the quantitative association between landscape characteristics and the ecological conditions of receiving waters has recently become an emerging area for eco-environmental research. While the landscape-water relationship research has largely targeted on inland aquatic systems, there has been an increasing need to develop methods and techniques that can better work with coastal and estuarine ecosystems. In this paper, we present a geospatial approach to examine the quantitative relationship between landscape characteristics and estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed. The case study site is in the Pensacola estuarine drainage area, home of the city of Pensacola, Florida, USA, where vigorous urban sprawling has prompted growing concerns on the estuarine ecological health. Central to this research is a remote sensor image that has been used to extract land use/cover information and derive landscape metrics. Several significant landscape metrics are selected and spatially linked with the nitrogen loading data for the Pensacola bay area. Landscape metrics and nitrogen loading are summarized by equal overland flow-length rings, and their association is examined by using multivariate statistical analysis. And a stepwise model-building protocol is used for regression designs to help identify significant variables that can explain much of the variance in the nitrogen loading dataset. It is found that using landscape composition or spatial configuration alone can explain most of the nitrogen loading variability. Of all the regression models using metrics derived from a single land use/cover class as the independent variables, the one from the low density urban gives the highest adjusted R-square score, suggesting the impact of the watershed-wide urban sprawl upon this sensitive estuarine ecosystem. Measures towards the reduction of non-point source pollution from urban development are necessary in the area to protect the Pensacola bay ecosystem and its

  1. Benthic and Pelagic Pathways of Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Estuarine Food Webs of the Northeast United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia Y.; Borsuk, Mark E.; Bugge, Deenie M.; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Ward, Darren M.; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column. PMID:24558491

  2. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems. PMID:24933166

  3. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems.

  4. Conceptual PHES-system models of the Aysén watershed and fjord (Southern Chile): testing a brainstorming strategy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Víctor H; Delgado, Luisa E; Bachmann, Pamela

    2008-09-01

    The use of brainstorming techniques for the generation of conceptual models, as the basis for the integrated management of physical-ecological-social systems (PHES-systems) is tested and discussed. The methodology is applied in the analysis of the Aysén fjord and watershed (Southern Chilean Coast). Results show that the proposed methods can be adequately used in management scenarios characterized by highly hierarchical, experts/non-experts membership.

  5. Modeling centuries of estuarine morphodynamics in the Western Scheldt estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, G.; Wegen, M.; Labeur, R. J.; Roelvink, D.

    2016-04-01

    We hindcast a 110 year period (1860-1970) of morphodynamic behavior of the Western Scheldt estuary by means of a 2-D, high-resolution, process-based model and compare results to a historically unique bathymetric data set. Initially, the model skill decreases for a few decades. Against common perception, the model skill increases after that to become excellent after 110 years. We attribute this to the self-organization of the morphological system which is reproduced correctly by the numerical model. On time scales exceeding decades, the interaction between the major tidal forcing and the confinement of the estuary overrules other uncertainties. Both measured and modeled bathymetries reflect a trend of decreasing energy dissipation, less morphodynamic activity, and thus a more stable morphology over time, albeit that the estuarine adaptation time is long (approximately centuries). Process-based models applied in confined environments and under constant forcing conditions may perform well especially on long (greater than decades) time scales.

  6. Applications of remote sensing to estuarine management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Gordon, H. H.; Hennigar, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Remote sensing was used in the resolution of estuarine problems facing federal and Virginia governmental agencies. A prototype Elizabeth River Surface Circulation Atlas was produced from photogrammetry to aid in oil spill cleanup and source identification. Aerial photo analysis twice led to selection of alternative plans for dredging and spoil disposal which minimized marsh damage. Marsh loss due to a mud wave from a highway dyke was measured on sequential aerial photographs. An historical aerial photographic sequence gave basis to a potential Commonwealth of Virginia legal claim to accreting and migrating coastal islands.

  7. Contamination by Arsenate in Oxidizing Groundwater, Southern Gulf Coast Aquifer System, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, J. B.; Nicot, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater arsenic concentrations exceed the U.S. EPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water (10 μg/L) in about one-third of wells in the southern Gulf Coast Aquifer System (GCAS) in Texas, representing a potential public health hazard and an environmental compliance challenge to numerous small public water supply systems. The aim of this study is to better understand the hydrogeochemical mechanisms underpinning the widespread distribution of elevated groundwater arsenic concentrations in the region. Here we focus upon arsenic contamination in unconfined portions of the aquifer system. The investigation is based upon chemical analyses of a field transect of 27 groundwater samples collected from across three units of the GCAS; stratified water quality sampling from one additional well; and relevant water chemistry data from the Texas Water Development Board groundwater database (more than 500 samples). Chemical results from the field study showed that carbonate weathering and active recharge in the unconfined zone result in circum-neutral pH and oxidizing redox conditions, which are typically amenable to arsenic immobilization by adsorption of As(V) onto mineral oxides and clays. However, arsenic concentrations were found up to 129 μg/L (median 12 μg/L), and As(V) represented nearly 100% of total arsenic. Concentrations generally decreased with increasing distance from the Catahoula Formation (which contains abundant volcanic ash presumed to be the original arsenic source), through the overlying Jasper, Evangeline and Chicot Aquifers. Statistically significant pairwise correlations with arsenic were found for vanadium, silica and potassium, all of which were released during weathering of volcanic sediments and their degradation products. Silica that was co-released with arsenic may compete for sorption sites and reduce the capacity for arsenic adsorption. An important role for variable arsenic source availability was suggested by regional spatial

  8. Geographical Information Systems and canine faecal contamination: the experience in the city of Naples (southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Veneziano, V; Rinaldi, L; Carbone, S; Biggeri, A; Cringoli, G

    2006-06-01

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can be used to make transect sampling when non-moving objects are to be counted, involving choosing a line or series of lines along which the counts are to take place. This approach has been used by us in order to study canine faecal contamination in the city of Naples (southern Italy), and to evaluate the consequent presence of canine parasitic elements. A GIS was constructed utilizing the geo-referenced digital photographs and the cadastral maps of Naples. In order to uniformly evaluate the canine faecal contamination throughout the city, a grid representing sub-areas of 1 km x 700 m was overlaid on the city map within the GIS. The territory of Naples was divided in 218 equal, rectangular sub-areas. In each sub-area a 1 km transect was drawn, and digitalized on-screen in the GIS. Canine faeces (copros in Greek) were counted along the transects in 143 sub-areas. In these sub-areas, 415 copros were collected and examined. Out of the 143 sub-areas, 141 contained canine copros. The results of the negative binomial regression model showed a positive association between the number of copros and the human population density. Out of the total of 415 copros, 70 (16.9%) were positive for parasitic elements; eggs of Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Ancylostoma caninum and Trichuris vulpis were found, as well as oocysts of Isospora canis. PMID:16881413

  9. The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

  10. SICS: the Southern Inland and Coastal System interdisciplinary project of the USGS South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    State and Federal agencies are working jointly on structural modifications and improved water-delivery strategies to reestablish more natural surface-water flows through the Everglades wetlands and into Florida Bay. Changes in the magnitude, duration, timing, and distribution of inflows from the headwaters of the Taylor Slough and canal C-111 drainage basins have shifted the seasonal distribution and extent of wetland inundation, and also contributed to the development of hypersaline conditions in nearshore embayments of Florida Bay. Such changes are altering biological and vegetative communities in the wetlands and creating stresses on aquatic habitat. Affected biotic resources include federally listed species such as the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, American crocodile, wood stork, and roseate spoonbill. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is synthesizing scientific findings from hydrologic process studies, collecting data to characterize the ecosystem properties and functions, and integrating the results of these efforts into a research tool and management model for this Southern Inland and Coastal System(SICS). Scientists from all four disciplinary divisions of the USGS, Biological Resources, Geology, National Mapping, and Water Resources are contributing to this interdisciplinary project.

  11. Sources and processes affecting sulfate in a karstic groundwater system of the Franconian Alb, southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Einsiedl, Florian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2005-09-15

    Chemical and isotope analyses on groundwater sulfate and 3H measurements on groundwaterwere used to determine the sulfate sources and sulfur transformation processes in a heterogeneous karst aquifer of the Franconian Alb, southern Germany. Sulfate was found to be derived from atmospheric deposition. Young groundwater was characterized by high sulfate concentrations and delta34S values similar to those of recent atmospheric sulfate deposition. However, the delta18O values of groundwater SO4(2-) were depleted by several per mil with respect to those of atmospheric deposition. This isotopic shift is indicative of mineralization of carbon-bonded S in the vadose zone of the karst system. In groundwater with mean residence times of more than 60 years, a trend of increasing delta34S values and delta18O values with decreasing sulfate concentrations was observed. This trend could not be solely explained by preindustrial atmospheric sulfate deposition with higher delta34S values, and hence, we conclude that bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction in the porous matrix of the karst aquifer must have occurred. This process has the potential to contribute to long-term biodegradation of contaminants in the porous rock matrix representing the dominantwater reservoir of the fissured porous karst aquifer.

  12. Integrated near surface geophysics across the active Mount Marzano Fault System (southern Italy): seismogenic hints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. C.; Giocoli, A.; Peronace, E.; Piscitelli, S.; Quadrio, B.; Bellanova, J.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe an original geophysical multi-method approach applied to the Mount Marzano Fault System. This is one of the most hazardous seismogenic faults of the Apennines (Irpinia, southern Italy), and it was responsible for the 1980, Mw 6.9, earthquake, along with many others before. We carried out electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements, and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) microtremor analysis along several common transects designed across the potential and/or certain fault traces. The data obtained from these non-invasive, inexpensive, expeditious methods mutually integrate with and complement each other, providing a valuable subsurface image of the near surface fault architecture. ERT depicts the general shallow image of the fault zone and of the fault-controlled sedimentary basin, with the depth of the buried bedrock cross-correlated through ambient-noise HVSR results. GPR delineates the very shallow geometry of the fault and of the associated deformation. Coupled with previous paleoseismological studies, these data allow the evaluation of some fault parameters and the precise locating of the fault trace, to aid future paleoseismological investigations aimed at seismic risk reduction programs.

  13. Sheep production and marketing system in southern Ethiopia: the case of Awassazuria district.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Estefanos; Negesse, Tegene; Abebe, Girma

    2015-10-01

    A survey was conducted in Awassazuria district of southern Ethiopia to characterize sheep production system. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Using purposive sampling, a total of 120 households from the district were included in the survey. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Result indicated that Kajima neighbourhood has more (p<0.05) grazing land than the others. Communal grazing, roadside grazing, enset (false banana, Ensete ventricosum), banana leaf and private grazing land were major feed resources for sheep. Lake Awassa and tap water were permanent water sources. Watering frequency of sheep varies from once a day to once in 4 days. Sheep are primarily kept to generate income and equilibrate benefit and risk and for home consumption. The criteria used by the households for purchase and sale of sheep are physical characteristics (coat colour, horn and tail) (46.7 %), body conformation (35 %), age (10.8 %) and known local ecotype (7.5 %). The reasons of slaughter of sheep include festival (55 %), childbirth (18.3 %), wedding (12.5 %), mutton for home (9 %), circumcision (5 %) and for guest (1.7 %). Farmers fatten sheep for New Year (60 %), Easter (30.8 %), Christmas and Arefa (Eid al-Adha celebration (Feast of the Sacrifice); <10 %). The reasons for expansion of sheep flock in the future were market price, high market demand, immediate return, ease of management, equilibrium between benefits and risks and suitability for home consumption, ranked in decreasing order of importance. The sheep production in southern Ethiopia is constrained by shortage of grazing land (23.3 %), recurrent drought (17.5 %), disease and parasite (15 %), marketing (10.8 %), water shortage (9 %) and other constraints including predators and lack of input, capital and lack of extension service. The presence of diversified and environmentally adaptable sheep breeds, high demand of mutton in the Awassa town and presence of nutritious and unutilized

  14. A mega-splay fault system and tsunami hazard in the southern Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Kun; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Doo, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Ching-Hui

    2013-01-01

    In April 1771, a subduction earthquake generated a great tsunami that struck the south Ryukyu islands and killed ˜12,000 people, whereas its mechanism is still enigmatic (Nakata and Kawana, 1995; Nakamura, 2006; Matsumoto et al., 2009). In this paper, we show its probable source on a mega-splay fault system existing along the southern Ryukyu forearc. Analyses of deep multi-channel seismic reflection profiles indicate that the mega-splay fault system is rising from the summit of a ˜1 km high ridge situated at a ˜5° landward dipping plate interface. An outer ridge marks the seafloor outcrop of the splay fault system and separates the landward inner wedge and the oceanward outer wedge. The inner wedge is uplifting and exhibits widespread normal faulting while the outer wedge shows folded structures. The mega-splay fault system is parallel to the Ryukyu Trench east of 125.5°E and is estimated to be ˜450 km long. The origin of this south Ryukyu mega-splay fault system is ascribed to a resistant subduction of the elevated transverse ridges associated with the subducting portion of the trench-parallel Luzon-Okinawa Fracture Zone. In contrast, no similar splay fault is found west of 125.5°E where the oblique subduction has produced large shear zones along the south Ryukyu forearc. We infer that a thrust earthquake linked to the mega-splay fault system is responsible for the south Ryukyu tsunami. However, another possible scenario of generating a large tsunami affecting the south Ryukyu islands is that the subducted ridge in the western end of the mega-splay fault system nucleated a large earthquake and simultaneously triggered the ˜100 km long E-W trending strike-slip fault west of 125.5°E and induced a southward-dipping tsunami-genic subsidence. In any case, after a quiescence of ˜241 yr, a large earthquake and tsunami is anticipated in the south Ryukyu forearc in the near future.

  15. Towards Sustainable Water Quality In Estuarine Impoundments: The Current State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Worrall, F.

    Several estuarine impoundment schemes have been built or are proposed in the UK and worldwide. The impounding of estuaries is currently a popular approach to urban regeneration in the UK. By creation of an aesthetically pleasing amenity impound- ment, including the drowning of "unsightly" tidal mud flats, it is hoped that prestige development will be encouraged in the estuarine area. Impounding fundamentally alters the dynamics of estuaries, with consequences in terms of sedimentation patterns and rates, and water quality. The SIMBA Project at- tempts to understand the controls on water quality in impoundments, with a view to- wards long term and sustainable high water quality through good barrage design and management practice. Detailed water quality surveys have been carried out on a total of 79 dates on the Tees, Tawe, Wansbeck and Blyth estuaries. Water quality parameters which have been determined are pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), conductivity, transparency, suspended solids, alkalinity, temperature, nutri- ents (nitrate+nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate), and a large range of dissolved metals. Statistical analyses are used to demonstrate the major controls on water qual- ity in impoundments. A distinction is made between total tidal exclusion (freshwater) systems, in which water quality is primarily influenced by external/catchment factors, and partial tidal exclusion systems, in which water quality is processed internally. This internal processing is due to density stratification creating compartments of saline wa- ter in contact with oxygen demanding sediments and isolated from the atmosphere, which leads to conditions of low DO and changes in redox conditions which may lead to release of metals and phosphate from the sediment.

  16. Relating watershed nutrient loads to satellite derived estuarine water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrter, J. C.; Le, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient enhanced phytoplankton production is a cause of degraded estuarine water quality. Yet, relationships between watershed nutrient loads and the spatial and temporal scales of phytoplankton blooms and subsequent water quality impairments remain unquantified for most systems. This is partially due to a lack of observations. In many systems, satellite remote sensing of water quality variables may be used to supplement limited field observations and improve understanding of linkages to nutrients. Here, we present the results from a field and satellite ocean color study that quantitatively links nutrients to variations in estuarine water quality endpoints. The study was conducted in Pensacola Bay, Florida, an estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico that is impacted by watershed nutrients. We developed new empirical band ratio algorithms to retrieve phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll a (chla), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). MERIS had suitable spatial resolution (300-m) for the scale of Pensacola Bay (area = 370 km2, mean depth = 3.4 m) and a spectral band centered at wavelength 709 nm that was used to minimize the effect of organic matter on chla retrieval. The algorithms were applied to daily MERIS remote sensing reflectance (level 2) data acquired from 2003 to 2011 to calculate nine-year time-series of mean monthly chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations. The MERIS derived time-series were then analyzed for statistical relations with time-series of mean monthly river discharge and river loads of nitrogen, phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, and SPM. Regression analyses revealed significant relationships between river loads and MERIS water quality variables. The simple regression models provide quantitative predictions about how much chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations in Pensacola Bay will increase with increased river loading, which is necessary information

  17. Serving data from the SCAR Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) using the SeaDataNet infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, T.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of the Southern Ocean to the global climate system and the uniqueness of its ecosystems are well known. The region is remote and logistically difficult to access and thus is one of the least sampled regions on the planet. Design and implementation of an observing system that encompasses physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes is therefore a formidable challenge. The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) has, jointly with the SCAR/SCOR Expert Group on the Southern Ocean, started the process to develop such a Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). The goals are to address major scientific questions and to coordinate measurement campaigns to do so. The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management (SC-ADM) is responsible for the design of the SOOS data flow system or Virtual Observatory, which will be used to archive and exchange data. SC-ADM is working in close cooperation with National Oceanographic Data Centres (NODCs), the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange Committee of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC-IODE) and the IOC-WMO Joint Committee on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM). This presentation will focus on the European SeaDataNet project (www.seadatanet.org), which provides a real-world, operational model for access to and exchange of data from big observing systems such as the proposed SOOS and the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet).

  18. Interpretation of the Hydrothermal System in Kirishima Hot Spring Village, Southern Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Yusaku; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Nishijima, Jun

    2014-05-01

    It is very important to understand hydrothermal systems for sustainable utilizing of hot springs. However, in Japan, most of the large hot springs are located in national parks. Therefore, explorations such as geochemical, geophysical or boring surveys to interpret the hydrothermal systems had not been conducted enough. For this reason, hydrothermal systems of some hot springs in Japan have not been made clear even now. We constructed a conceptual model to interpret the hydrothermal system of Kirishima Hot Spring Village in Kirishima national park, southern part of Kyushu, Japan. There are many hot springs in Kirishima Hot Spring Village, such as Maruo, Hayashida, and Myoban hot spring areas. Kirishima Hot Spring Village is located in southwestern part of Kirishima volcanoes, like Onami-ike volcano, and the altitude of Maruo area is about 600 m and that of Hayashida and Myoban areas is about 800 m. In order to interpret the hydrothermal system in Kirishima Hot Spring Village, we need to understand three important factors which are heat source, hot spring water, and subsurface structure. In January 2011, Shinmoe-dake volcano of Kirishima volcanoes made a large scale eruption. Then, the pressure source of Kirishima volcanoes is expected to be located in about 2 km west of Onami-ike volcano and its estimated altitude is about -7 km (Kobayashi et al., 2011). We used this pressure source for our conceptual model as a heat source. Secondary, we tried to clarify the fluid of Kirishima Hot Spring Village by considering the chemical compositions of hot spring water. In addition, we made a Na-K-Mg diagram to estimate the reservoir temperature and find that spring water has reached equilibrium or not. As a result, we supposed that hot spring water of Maruo area is magmatic, and that of Hayashida and Myoban area is consisted of sulfate and meteoric water. Thirdly, we used gravity data, which is the result from previous study and our field survey, to make a residual Bouguer

  19. Turkish Straits System and Southern Black Sea: Exchange. Mixing and Shelf / Canyon Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsoy, Emin; Gürses, Özgür; Tutsak, Ersin

    2015-04-01

    Based largely on an experiment employing high-resolution measurements carried out in June-July 2013 and re-interpretation of past experiments, the oceanographic variability of the exchange through the Turkish Straits System (TSS) and the interactions with the southern Black Sea are revealed through CTD, ADCP, oxygen and light transmission measurements. The exchange flow is primarily governed by the complex topography spanning two narrow straits, wide continental shelf regions, steep slopes and numerous canyons connecting deep basins. Water properties and currents in the high energy environment depends on the mosaic of fine-scale processes and pathways. The TSS, often approximated as a two-layer system has a hydraulically controlled, upper ocean and straits intensified regime, leading to surface jets and bottom plumes participating in mixing and renewal processes. The exit of the 'Mediterranean effluent' onto the Black Sea past a sill overflow from the Bosphorus passes through two subsequent hydraulic jumps and proceeds along a narrow canyon that veers to the west clear of the greater Bosphorus Canyon finally cascading down the few small canyons. A diffusive spread from the bottom vein of salty water reforms to the east and spills down the Bosphorus Canyon. The suspended particulate signature of the cascade, as well as its influence in hydrography is traced over the shelf and slope waters and through the numerous canyons into deep water where the reformed flow is found to sustain signatures of the past evolution of intrusive waters. An evaluation of the processes is given with reference to model development carried out in parallel to the analyses of the measurements.

  20. Role of native and exotic woody vegetation in soil restoration in active gully systems (southern Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja Ramon, Pablo; Alvarado Moncayo, Dario; Vanacker, Veerle; Cisneros, Pedro; Molina, Armando; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Revegetation projects in degraded lands have the potential to recover essential soil functions. If vegetation restoration is combined with bioengineering techniques, such as the construction of retention dams in active gully systems, soil restoration could be enhanced. One important aspect of this process is the role of vegetation on restoration of soil chemical and physical properties. There is currently a lack of knowledge on the potential of soil restoration in active badland systems, as most studies have concentrated on the direct and visible effect of revegetation on erosion control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of revegetation and bioengineering works on the restoration of soil physical and chemical properties. The analyses are realized in a highly degraded area of 3 km2, located in the lower part of the Loreto catchment (Southern Ecuadorian Andes). First, the soil physical and/or chemical parameters that are most sensitive to track environmental change were evaluated. Second, the role of vegetation on soil restoration was quantified. . Soil samples were taken in sites with different vegetation cover, land use and physiographic position. The following physical and chemical parameters were measured: volumetric water content (θsat, θact), bulk density, pH, texture, organic matter, C and N content. Our first results do not show a clear relationship between volumetric water content at saturation (θsat), bulk density, or C content. The saturation water content does not vary significantly between different sites, or land use types. However, significant differences are found between sites at different stages of restoration; and this for most chemical and physical soil properties. Vegetation cover (%) appears to exert a strong control on the C content in the mineral soils. The highest C values are found in soils of forest plantations with Eucalyptus and Pinus species. These plantations are located in areas that were previously affected by active

  1. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  2. Impact of estuarine pollution on birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Kerwin, J.A.; Stendell, R.C.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Stickel, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Pollution of estuaries affects bird populations indirectly through changes in habitat and food supply. The multi-factor pollution of Chesapeake Bay has resulted in diminution of submerged aquatic plants and consequent change in food habits of the canvasback duck. Although dredge-spoil operations can improve wildlife habitat, they often result in its demise. Pollution of estuaries also affects birds directly, through chemical toxication, which may result in outright mortality or in reproductive impairment. Lead from industrial sources and roadways enters the estuaries and is accumulated in tissues of birds. Lead pellets deposited in estuaries as a result of hunting are consumed by ducks with sufficient frequency .to result m large annual die-offs from lead poisoning. Fish in certain areas, usually near industrial sources, may contain levels of mercury high enough to be hazardous to birds that consume them. Other heavy metals are present in estuarine birds, but their significance is poorly known. Oil exerts lethal or sublethal effects on birds by oiling their feathers, oiling eggs and young by contaminated parents, and by ingestion of oil-contaminated food. Organochlorine chemicals, of both agricultural and industrial origin, travel through the food chains and reach harmful levels in susceptible species of birds in certain estuarine ecosystems. Both outright mortality and reproductive impairment have occurred.

  3. Estimating flood exceedance probabilities in estuarine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westra, Seth; Leonard, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Flood events in estuarine regions can arise from the interaction of extreme rainfall and storm surge. Determining flood level exceedance probabilities in these regions is complicated by the dependence of these processes for extreme events. A comprehensive study of tide and rainfall gauges along the Australian coastline was conducted to determine the dependence of these extremes using a bivariate logistic threshold-excess model. The dependence strength is shown to vary as a function of distance over many hundreds of kilometres indicating that the dependence arises due to synoptic scale meteorological forcings. It is also shown to vary as a function of storm burst duration, time lag between the extreme rainfall and the storm surge event. The dependence estimates are then used with a bivariate design variable method to determine flood risk in estuarine regions for a number of case studies. Aspects of the method demonstrated in the case studies include, the resolution and range of the hydraulic response table, fitting of probability distributions, computational efficiency, uncertainty, potential variation in marginal distributions due to climate change, and application to two dimensional output from hydraulic models. Case studies are located on the Swan River (Western Australia), Nambucca River and Hawkesbury Nepean River (New South Wales).

  4. Connectivities of estuarine fishes to the coastal realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, G. Carleton

    2005-07-01

    Connectivity is an important concept in landscape ecology, but has several meanings. Here, I treat this term generically, including interactions among land- and seascape elements, transfers of nutrients among them, and interactions among closely related species comprising guilds. Complex relationships between the natural histories of estuary-dependent fishes are best understood in the context of the "coastal realm", the heterogeneous and diverse portion of Earth where land, sea, and atmosphere interact with great intensity through exchanges of energy and materials. Especially for anadromous fishes, estuaries form especially important conduits between terrestrial watersheds and the coastal ocean. For this reason, these species may be termed "estuary-dependent". However, for many species that use estuaries, dependency may be difficult to define. I illustrate coastal-realm connectivities for two groups of closely related estuarine species from different latitudes: (1) clupeids of the US east coast, and (2) salmonids of the Bering Sea. These groups inhabit coastal-ocean waters as adults and use estuaries and/or freshwaters for reproduction or as nursery areas. Both groups have evolved metapopulation structures, perhaps also contingent patterns of behavior, that indicate hierarchical interactions within metaestuarine or metafluvial systems. Their natural histories suggest an estuary-dependent adaptive complex involving opportunistic life histories and redundancies within species guilds, which offer resiliency for these guilds under conditions of ecological and/or environmental change. I conclude that: (1) estuarine connectivities are best illustrated for fishes that can be shown to be estuary dependent at some life-history stage; (2) resiliency for functionally important guilds may also offer resiliency to their ecosystems; and (3) further understanding connectivities among coastal fishes and their changing environments depends on the fusion of natural history with land

  5. Microalgal productivity in an estuarine lake during a drought cycle: The St. Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan S.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-03-01

    The St. Lucia estuarine lake on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the largest estuarine systems in Africa and of unique importance for the adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The area regularly experiences periods of drought, resulting in hypersaline conditions in its shallow lakes and the closure of the estuarine mouth. This study aimed to assess the primary production rates of phytoplankton and microphytobenthos throughout an annual cycle of this drought phase. Primary production rates were assessed at representative sites, namely the Mouth, Narrows, South and North Lakes from June 2006 to May 2007. Because of the drought, the salinity gradient from the mouth to the head of the estuary was reversed by comparison to estuarine systems with a steady freshwater inflow and regular marine exchange. In March 2007, during the study, the mouth opened as a result of rough seas, and the marine influence broke the existing reversed gradient, producing a marine salinity throughout the system. Microphytobenthic primary productivity varied between 0 and 34 mg C m -2 h -1 and showed strong correlations with salinity, DIN:DIP ratios and irradiance. Benthic productivity was high across the system after breaching of the mouth. Pelagic primary productivity (between 0 and 180 mg C m -2 h -1), showed a correlation with temperature and irradiance and was highest across the system in February 2007 when the mouth was still closed. There was no significant correlation between production rates and biomass (chl-a) in either the benthic or pelagic habitats. The negative correlation between DIN:DIP ratio and benthic primary productivity indicated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. This study shows that salinity, along with seasonally dependent parameters such as temperature and irradiance, correlates with the rate of microalgal production. Hence, in these shallow lakes, the largest primary productivity can occur in either the pelagic or benthic

  6. Beroe gracilis (Ctenophora) from the Humboldt Current System: first occurrence of this species in the southern hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Otto M P; Feliú, Guillermo; Palma, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Beroe gracilis Künne, 1939 is a small neritic ctenophore, previously recorded only from cold waters of the northern hemisphere. The present study provides the first record of the species in the southern hemisphere, found in the surface layer of the Humboldt Current System off the central Chilean coast (32°-36.5° S). A complete description of this material is provided. PMID:25081170

  7. Paleozoic structural controls on shortening transfer in the Subandean foreland thrust system, Ene and southern Ucayali basins, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espurt, Nicolas; Brusset, StéPhane; Baby, Patrice; Hermoza, Wilber; BolañOs, Rolando; Uyen, Dennys; DéRamond, Joachim

    2008-06-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Ene and southern Ucayali basins of the Subandes has been controlled by two stacked thrust wedges that differ in terms of tectonic styles. The lower thrust wedge is formed by deep-seated décollements within the basement related to thick-skinned foreland structures inherited from an Early Carboniferous thrust system. Seismic reflection data show that this Paleozoic compressional system has been eroded and unconformably covered by Late Carboniferous clastic sediments. It generated an irregular Paleozoic sedimentary architecture controlling the Neogene thrust propagation. The upper thin-skinned thrust wedge developed within this Paleozoic sedimentary series and constitutes the Subandean zone. Cross-section balancing shows an along-strike homogenous horizontal shortening of ˜56 km (˜30%) across the Ene-southern Ucayali thrust system. This amount of shortening was vertically partitioned onto the two stacked thrust wedges. The N-S thickness variations of the Paleozoic sedimentary prism controlled the eastward propagation of the upper thrust wedge. The southern thickening of the Paleozoic series generated major décollements and the shortening excess is of 7 km (16%) in comparison to the north. Consequently, the northern lack of shortening onto the upper thrust wedge was transferred to the Early Carboniferous compressional structures of the lower thrust wedge. We suggest that this vertical partitioning of the shortening was accommodated by a regional oblique ramp: the Tambo transfer zone. This geometrical analysis of the Ene-southern Ucayali thrust system provides new perspectives for future hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  8. Beroe gracilis (Ctenophora) from the Humboldt Current System: first occurrence of this species in the southern hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Otto M P; Feliú, Guillermo; Palma, Sergio

    2014-07-04

    Beroe gracilis Künne, 1939 is a small neritic ctenophore, previously recorded only from cold waters of the northern hemisphere. The present study provides the first record of the species in the southern hemisphere, found in the surface layer of the Humboldt Current System off the central Chilean coast (32°-36.5° S). A complete description of this material is provided.

  9. Structural Control of the Ubinas-Huaynaputina-Ticsani System: A Large, Young Silicic Magmatic System in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Y.; de Silva, S. L.; Salas, G.; Byrnes, J.

    2003-12-01

    The location of magma reservoirs and volcanic centers are commonly controlled by tectonic structures (e.g., Hutton, 1989; Gibbons and Moreno, 2002). In the Central Volcanic Zone, southern Peru, volcanism is mainly associated with the major NNW-SSE sinistral strike slip fault systems underlying the main volcanic arc. However, a group of related silicic volcanoes was recently discovered which crop out beyond the arc; the Ubinas-Huaynaputina-Ticsani system (UHTS). Characterizing its dimension and tectonic influences are crucial in order to evaluate corresponding volcanic hazards. Potentially active fault systems as well as major tectonic features in and around the UHTS were mapped and the structural framework was elucidated. The UHTS is located within a north to south extensional domain housing three fault systems: (1) the arc related NNW-SSE fault system, intersected by (2) a unique N-S en echelon strike slip fault system, and (3) a minor W-E fault system. Identification of confined Cretaceous volcanics known as the Matalaque formation indicated the presence of a narrow graben that developed on the western side of the N-S fault system. Interestingly all volcanic centers are positioned at the intersection of the NNW-SSE faults with the N-S faults. Seismic records revealed the concentration of seismicity around depths ranging between 20 and 33 km. The position of the UHTS is dictated by the intersection of the NNW-SSE and N-S major en echelon strike slip fault systems. We propose the role of the NNW-SSE fault as a deep pathway for magma ascent whereas the N-S strike-slip motion allowed the release of stress and deviation of magma, which scattered and ponded between adjacent NNW-SSE faults at ~30 km depths. Based on the vent distribution, we estimated the size of the silicic magma reservoir as approximately 40 x 60 km; this is a reasonable estimate since the withdrawal of a volume larger than 10 km3 was not significant enough to produce an equivalent caldera collapse

  10. Data and Visualizations in the Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System (FIS) provides a single point of access to fault-related data and models from multiple databases and datasets. The FIS is built of computer code, metadata and Web interfaces based on Web services technology, which enables queries and data interchange irrespective of computer software or platform. Currently we have working prototypes of programmatic and browser-based access. The first generation FIS may be searched and downloaded live, by automated processes, as well as interactively, by humans using a browser. Users get ascii data in plain text or encoded in XML. Via the Earthquake Information Technology (EIT) Interns (Juve and others, this meeting), we are also testing the effectiveness of querying multiple databases using a fault database ontology. For more than a decade, the California Geological Survey (CGS), SCEC, and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) have put considerable, shared resources into compiling and assessing published fault data, then providing the data on the Web. Several databases now exist, with different formats, datasets, purposes, and users, in various stages of completion. When fault databases were first envisioned, the full power of today's internet was not yet recognized, and the databases became the Web equivalents of review papers, where one could read an overview summation of a fault, then copy and paste pertinent data. Today, numerous researchers also require rapid queries and downloads of data. Consequently, the first components of the FIS are MySQL databases that deliver numeric values from earlier, text-based databases. Another essential service provided by the FIS is visualizations of fault representations such as those in SCEC's Community Fault Model. The long term goal is to provide a standardized, open-source, platform-independent visualization technique. Currently, the FIS makes available fault model viewing software for users with access to Matlab or Java3D

  11. Geomorphic features off southern California as seen by GLORIA side-scan sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.D.; Field, M.E.; Carlson, P.R.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1985-02-01

    Approximately 165,000 km/sup 2/ of the sea floor off southern California was mapped during May 1984, as part of a USGS/IOS cooperative program to study the newly proclaimed Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the US Pacific margin. The area was insonified using the Geological Long-Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA), a long-range side-scan sonar system. Images were corrected for water-column velocity anomalies, for along-track distortions caused by acoustic ray travel paths. A photomosaic of the overlapping sonographs has been compiled at a scale of 1:375,000. The basins of the inner California continental borderland are characterized by both sinuous channel and fan complexes and by feathery acoustic patterns indicating active sediment transport. In contrast, outer borderland basins appear to be more sediment starved, exhibit large areas of sediment failure, and show significant structural influence. West of Patton Escarpment, the sonographs are dominated by acoustic patterns showing volcanic ridges and seamounts and by deposits of the Monterey and Arguello fans. Arguello fan, for example, exhibits multiple sinuous channels that have transported sediment 60 km south from the canyon mouth. These channels coalesce into a single 100-km long, westward-meandering channel that terminates in a 600-m deep box canyon. A zone of sediment failure is identifiable on the north levee of an upper fan channel. Tectonic trends associated with oceanic basement are highlighted by the terminus of the west-trending Murray Fracture Zone and by the prevailing northeast trend of volcanic ridge and seamount chains.

  12. Uneven distribution of Halobacillus trueperi species in arid natural saline systems of Southern Tunisian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Amel; Ettoumi, Besma; El Hidri, Darine; Essanaa, Jihene; Cherif, Hanene; Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur

    2013-11-01

    The genetic diversity of a collection of 336 spore-forming isolates recovered from five salt-saturated brines and soils (Chott and Sebkhas) mainly located in the hyper-arid regions of the southern Tunisian Sahara has been assessed. Requirements and abilities for growth at a wide range of salinities\\ showed that 44.3 % of the isolates were extremely halotolerant, 23 % were moderate halotolerant, and 32.7 % were strict halophiles, indicating that they are adapted to thrive in these saline ecosystems. A wide genetic diversity was documented based on 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer fingerprinting profiles (ITS) and 16S rRNA gene sequences that clustered the strains into seven genera: Bacillus, Gracilibacillus, Halobacillus, Oceanobacillus, Paenibacillus, Pontibacillus, and Virgibacillus. Halobacillus trueperi was the most encountered species in all the sites and presented a large intraspecific diversity with a multiplicity of ITS types. The most frequent ITS type included 42 isolates that were chosen for assessing of the intraspecific diversity by BOX-PCR fingerprinting. A high intraspecific microdiversity was documented by 14 BOX-PCR genotypes whose distribution correlated with the strain geographic origin. Interestingly, H. trueperi isolates presented an uneven geographic distribution among sites with the highest frequency of isolation from the coastal sites, suggesting a marine rather than terrestrial origin of the strains. The high frequency and diversity of H. trueperi suggest that it is a major ecosystem-adapted microbial component of the Tunisian Sahara harsh saline systems of marine origin. PMID:23949950

  13. Pronounced changes in carbonate system and temperature history of the Southern California margin from LGM to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana Krupinski, N. B.; Pak, D. K.; Hill, T. M.; Paytan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Millennial-scale records of the marine carbonate system and its natural variability provide long-term perspective on anthropogenically-induced ocean acidification, and provide a basis for determining whether there is a critical threshold at which organisms may be negatively affected by changing carbonate saturation and pH. The state, stability and natural variability of pre-anthropogenic marine carbonate systems can be reconstructed from carbonate system proxies in foraminiferal calcite. Using newly calibrated proxies, we quantify the long-term history and variability of the surface water carbonate system in the Southern California Borderland, a coastal region that experiences substantial pH fluctuations today. Our reconstruction of temperature also allows comparison with other nearby Southern California temperature reconstructions. We present trace metal (B/Ca, U/Ca and Mg/Ca), stable isotope (δ18O , δ13C ) and shell weight results from the planktonic foraminifera G. bulloides and N. incompta (N. pachyderma (d)) from Santa Monica Basin (SMB; ODP 1015) to reconstruct the past surface ocean carbonate system and temperature for the past ~32ka. We observe a gradual decrease in B/Ca in the thermocline-dwelling N. incompta from 20ka to ~12ka, likely reflecting the decrease in global ocean pH and [CO32-] during deglaciation. Changes in temperature and ocean carbonate chemistry can be observed during the Younger Dryas and Bolling-Allerod in trace metal, stable isotope and shell weight records. Compared with other nearby Southern California ODP sites, temperatures from Mg/Ca during deglaciation in SMB are cooler by ~1-3 degrees, and show a larger temperature difference between G. bulloides and N. incompta during glacial time than other regional sites. These results strengthen evidence that the southern California Borderland shows a strong atmospheric teleconnection to North Atlantic climate changes, and also provide the opportunity to assess what aspects of southern

  14. The evolution of the great river systems of southern Asia during the Cenozoic India-Asia collision: rivers draining southwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, M. E.

    1998-04-01

    During uplift of the Tibetan plateau and surrounding ranges, tectonic processes have interacted with climatic change and with local random effects (such as landslides) to determine the development of the major river systems of Asia. Rivers draining southward have three distinctive patterns that are controlled by different tectonic and climatic regimes. In central and southern Afghanistan, the rivers have moderate gradients and fan out from northeastern sources to disappear into arid depressions. Anti-clockwise rotation of southern Afghanistan, caused by differential compression and right-lateral shear, cut the rivers on the north, while increasingly arid conditions developed on the south as arc accretion in the Makran separated sources from the coastal rains. In Tibet and southeast Asia, the rivers are widely separated and have low gradients on the Tibetan plateau, higher gradients as they turn southwards into close and parallel gorges, before they fan out southeast to enter different seas. Differential shear and clockwise rotation between the compressing Tibetan plateau and Southeast Asia determined the great sigmoidal bends of this river system which was accompanied by increasing aridity, with truncation of river systems in the north and river capture in the south. In the Himalaya and southern Tibet, the main rivers have steep gradients where they cut across the Himalayan range and occasionally truncate former rivers with low gradients on the Tibetan plateau to the north. Southward thrusting and massive frontal erosion of the Himalaya caused progressive truncation of longitudinal rivers on the plateau, accompanied by river capture, and glacial and landslide diversions on the south. The drainage history of southern Asia can be reconstructed by restoring the gross movements of the plates and the tectonic displacement, uplift, and erosion of individual tectonic units. Most important changes in drainage took place in Pliocene to Quaternary times.

  15. Trophic functioning of the St. Lucia estuarine lake during a drought phase assessed using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Natasha; Smit, Albertus J.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-06-01

    The St. Lucia Estuary is Africa's largest estuarine system and is currently experiencing the stress of prolonged freshwater deprivation, manifested by extremely low water levels and hypersalinity. These unprecedented conditions have raised questions regarding the trophic functioning of the ecosystem. Despite the substantial amount of research previously undertaken within this system, no studies of food web structure and function have yet been documented. This study therefore aimed to examine the food web structure of the St. Lucia estuary system through the use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis. Analysis of carbon isotope ratios indicates that benthic carbon sources are most utilised at sites with low water levels and generally higher salinity (Catalina Bay, Charter's Creek). Conversely, the estuarine region of the mouth and Narrows, with its elevated water levels and lower salinity, still sustains a viable pelagic food web. Analysis of δ15N ratios indicates that the number of trophic transfers (food chain length) might be related to water levels. Overall, the study provides a greater understanding of the ecological processes of this complex estuarine lake, which may allow for future comparisons of trophic functioning under drought and normal/wet conditions to be made.

  16. Biotic resistance to invasion along an estuarine gradient

    PubMed Central

    Hovel, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Biotic resistance is the ability of native communities to repel the establishment of invasive species. Predation by native species may confer biotic resistance to communities, but the environmental context under which this form of biotic resistance occurs is not well understood. We evaluated several factors that influence the distribution of invasive Asian mussels (Musculista senhousia) in Mission Bay, a southern California estuary containing an extensive eelgrass (Zostera marina) habitat. Asian mussels exhibit a distinct spatial pattern of invasion, with extremely high densities towards the back of Mission Bay (up to 4,000 m−2) in contrast with near-complete absence at sites towards the front of the bay. We established that recruits arrived at sites where adult mussels were absent and found that dense eelgrass does not appear to preclude Asian mussel growth and survival. Mussel survival and growth were high in predator-exclusion plots throughout the bay, but mussel survival was low in the front of the bay when plots were open to predators. Additional experiments revealed that consumption by spiny lobsters (Panulirus interruptus) and a gastropod (Pteropurpura festiva) likely are the primary factors responsible for resistance to Asian mussel invasion. However, biotic resistance was dependent on location within the estuary (for both species) and also on the availability of a hard substratum (for P. festiva). Our findings indicate that biotic resistance in the form of predation may be conferred by higher order predators, but that the strength of resistance may strongly vary across estuarine gradients and depend on the nature of the locally available habitat. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-010-1700-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20602118

  17. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  18. Effect of rainfall as a component of climate change on estuarine fish production in Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynecke, Jan-Olaf; Lee, Shing Yip; Duke, Norman C.; Warnken, Jan

    2006-09-01

    The speculation that climate change may impact on sustainable fish production suggests a need to understand how these effects influence fish catch on a broad scale. With a gross annual value of A$ 2.2 billion, the fishing industry is a significant primary industry in Australia. Many commercially important fish species use estuarine habitats such as mangroves, tidal flats and seagrass beds as nurseries or breeding grounds and have lifecycles correlated to rainfall and temperature patterns. Correlation of catches of mullet (e.g. Mugil cephalus) and barramundi ( Lates calcarifer) with rainfall suggests that fisheries may be sensitive to effects of climate change. This work reviews key commercial fish and crustacean species and their link to estuaries and climate parameters. A conceptual model demonstrates ecological and biophysical links of estuarine habitats that influences capture fisheries production. The difficulty involved in explaining the effect of climate change on fisheries arising from the lack of ecological knowledge may be overcome by relating climate parameters with long-term fish catch data. Catch per unit effort (CPUE), rainfall, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and catch time series for specific combinations of climate seasons and regions have been explored and surplus production models applied to Queensland's commercial fish catch data with the program CLIMPROD. Results indicate that up to 30% of Queensland's total fish catch and up to 80% of the barramundi catch variation for specific regions can be explained by rainfall often with a lagged response to rainfall events. Our approach allows an evaluation of the economic consequences of climate parameters on estuarine fisheries, thus highlighting the need to develop forecast models and manage estuaries for future climate change impact by adjusting the quota for climate change sensitive species. Different modelling approaches are discussed with respect to their forecast ability.

  19. Community structure of epibenthic meiofauna in the St. Lucia Estuarine Lake (South Africa) during a drought phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, D.; Perissinotto, R.

    2009-01-01

    The St. Lucia Estuary is Africa's largest estuarine system. It is a major component of the iSimangaliso (formerly Greater St. Lucia) Wetland Park, which was declared a World Heritage Site in 1999. The system has been severely affected by drought conditions which have culminated in the mouth of the system being cut off from the Indian Ocean since June 2002, for a period of almost five years. This study aimed to document the dynamics of meiofauna of the system during a drought phase, since (1) the effects of droughts on estuaries are poorly documented and understood and (2) because studies of meiofauna have never been undertaken in this system before. Meiofauna samples as well as physico-chemical data were collected at representative sites in February, April, August and October 2005. The drought had a major effect on the estuary, resulting in the development of hypersaline conditions (maximum 126 at Hells Gate), and to the complete evaporation of pelagic habitats, especially in the northern regions. The meiofauna of the St. Lucia Estuary was statistically separated into two distinct spatial clusters under drought conditions. The first cluster comprised sites in the Narrows and the southern region of South Lake, while the second comprised sites in the northern regions of South Lake and False Bay. Meiofauna of cluster 1, which was least affected by the drought, comprised nematodes, polychaetes, copepods, amphipods and ostracods, all of which accounted for 97% of meiofauna in this cluster. Cluster 2 on the other hand, which was more severely affected by the drought, was dominated by nematodes and copepods, which cumulatively contributed 97% to meiofauna in this group. Taxonomic richness and diversity of meiofauna were positively correlated with water depth, while abundance was inversely correlated with water temperature. The major effects of low water levels on the meiofauna of the system occurred through a negative impact on diversity and taxonomic richness, resulting

  20. The interdisciplinary marine system of the Amundsen Sea, Southern Ocean: Recent advances and the need for sustained observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Schofield, Oscar; Wåhlin, Anna; Newman, Louise; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The Southern Ocean exerts a profound influence on the functioning of the Earth System, in part because its location and unique bathymetric configuration enable direct linkages to the other major ocean basins (Ganachaud and Wunsch, 2000; Lumpkin and Speer, 2007). It is the site of the world's largest current system, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which transfers waters and climatically/ecologically-important tracers between the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans (Rintoul et al., 2001). In addition to the strong horizontal connectivity, the ACC is also characterized by a vigorous overturning circulation, which upwells warm, nutrient-rich waters from intermediate depth to the surface, where they are modified by interactions with the atmosphere and cryosphere to form new water masses, some of which are lighter and others more dense (Marshall and Speer, 2012). This overturning circulation structures the Southern Ocean both horizontally and vertically, dictates the levels of its communication with the rest of the global ocean, and is a fundamental control on the sequestration of carbon from the atmosphere into the ocean interior (Sallée et al., 2012). In some locations, the upwelled waters can intrude onto the Antarctic shelves, supplying heat and nutrients to the shallower regions. This is believed to be especially effective in west Antarctica, where the southern edge of the ACC moves close to the shelf break (Martinson, 2011; Orsi et al., 1995; Thoma et al., 2008).

  1. Pastoral mobility and policy recommendations for livestock herding in the Borana pastoral system in southern Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livelihoods of pastoralists in the Borana Zone of southern Ethiopia have become increasingly vulnerable as a result of stressors like accelerating population growth, shrinking resource availability, sedentarization, and increased frequency and severity of drought. A research team from the USDA Agric...

  2. Evaluation of commercial cotton harvesting systems in the southern high plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton production practices have changed in the Southern High Plains of the US over the last decade resulting in increased yeilds and improved fiber quality. Moreover, the majority of US cotton now competes in a global fiber market that demands higher quality fiber for ring spun yarn than the former...

  3. Comparative evaluation of effects of ozonated and chlorinated thermal discharges on estuarine and freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, C.R.; Sugam, R.; Meldrim, J.W.; Holmstrom, E.R.; Balog, G.E.

    1980-08-01

    As a part of a program at PSE and G designed to examine the feasibility of ozonation as an alternative to chlorination for control of biofouling in once-through cooling systems, the biological effects of ozonated and chlorinated thermal discharges were evaluated with estuarine and freshwater organisms. Mortality at salinities between 0.5 to 2.5 ppt with mummichog and white perch indicated greater toxicity for chlorine while the alewife, spottail shiner, rainbow trout and white perch in freshwater were more sensitive to ozone. Behavioral and physograhic results were consistent with those observed in toxicity studies. Initial cough response and avoidance concentrations of mummicog and white perch in estuarine waters were lower when exposed to chlorine than to ozone. In freshwater, blueback herring, alewife, rainbow trout, spottail shiner, banded killifish, and white perch avoided lower concentrations of ozone than chlorine.

  4. Bioconcentration of endosulfan in different body tissues of estuarine organisms under sublethal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N. ); Venugopalan, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    The organochlorine pesticide endosulfan is applied in the agricultural fields as liquid in India. Investigations have revealed the occurrence and distribution of endosulfan in both biotic and abiotic components of Vellar estuary. The results from static bioassay studies revealed that fishes were more susceptible to the organochlorine pesticides than mollusks. Though the available information on the uptake of endosulfan by the estuarine organisms are limited to whole body tissues, no attempt has been made to find out the extent of uptake of pesticides by the different body tissues of the estuarine organisms. Hence the present study was planned to determine the bioconcentration of endosulfan in different tissues of fishes Mugil cephalus, Mystus gulio, oyster Crassostrea madrasensis and clam Katelysia opima based on the measured concentration of endosulfan in the experimental medium of the continuous flow through system for a period of 10 d.

  5. Nitrous oxide production by estuarine epiphyton

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.S.; Rees, A.P.; Owens, N.J.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Nitrous oxide was produced by denitrifying bacteria in epiphytic communities on the surface of the macroalgae Enteromorpha sp. and Fucus sp. during spring-summer in the Tamar estuary, SW England. Denitrification and N[sub 2]O production exhibited diel variability, in response to photosynthetic oxygen production. Temporal variability in the rate of N[sub 2]O production was observed in Enteromorpha incubations; the variability reflected the heterogeneity of the epiphytic microbial population density. N[sub 2]O production by epiphyton associated with Enteromorpha would enhance the sediment N[sub 2]O flux by 150-500% at maximal algal densities and so increase estuarine N[sub 2]O flux to the atmosphere. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  7. Sediment measurement in estuarine and coastal areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of uses of estuarine and coastal areas is given. Problems associated with these uses are discussed, and data needs for intelligent management of these valuable areas are outlined. Suspended sediment measurements are seen to be one of the greatest needs. To help understand the complexity of the problem, a brief discussion of sediment mechanics is given, including sediment sources, characteristics, and transport. The impact of sediment mechanics on its direct measurement (sampling and analysis) is indicated, along with recommendations for directly obtaining representative data. Indirect measurement of suspended sediment by remote sensors is discussed both theoretically and in the light of some recent experiences. The need for an integrated, multidisciplinary program to solve the problem of quantitatively measuring suspended sediment with remote sensors is stressed, and several important considerations of such a program and benefits to be derived therefrom are briefly addressed.

  8. REGIONAL AND STATE VIEWS OF ESTUARINE CONDITION IN NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATE BASED ON 2001 AND 2001 NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Assessment (NCA) is a probability-based survey that permits assessment of estuarine conditions at national, regional, or large-system scales. Additionally, states may use these data to comply with requirements of the Clean Water Act (CWA), which mandates re...

  9. Formation of albitite-hosted uranium within IOCG systems: the Southern Breccia, Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montreuil, Jean-François; Corriveau, Louise; Potter, Eric G.

    2015-03-01

    Uranium and polymetallic U mineralization hosted within brecciated albitites occurs one kilometer south of the magnetite-rich Au-Co-Bi-Cu NICO deposit in the southern Great Bear magmatic zone (GBMZ), Canada. Concentrations up to 1 wt% U are distributed throughout a 3 by 0.5 km albitization corridor defined as the Southern Breccia zone. Two distinct U mineralization events are observed. Primary uraninite precipitated with or without pyrite-chalcopyrite ± molybdenite within magnetite-ilmenite-biotite-K-feldspar-altered breccias during high-temperature potassic-iron alteration. Subsequently, pitchblende precipitated in earthy hematite-specular hematite-chlorite veins associated with a low-temperature iron-magnesium alteration. The uraninite-bearing mineralization postdates sodic (albite) and more localized high-temperature potassic-iron (biotite-magnetite ± K-feldspar) alteration yet predates potassic (K-feldspar), boron (tourmaline) and potassic-iron-magnesium (hematite ± K-feldspar ± chlorite) alteration. The Southern Breccia zone shares attributes of the Valhalla (Australia) and Lagoa Real (Brazil) albitite-hosted U deposits but contains greater iron oxide contents and lower contents of riebeckite and carbonates. Potassium, Ni, and Th are also enriched whereas Zr and Sr are depleted with respect to the aforementioned albitite-hosted U deposits. Field relationships, geochemical signatures and available U-Pb dates on pre-, syn- and post-mineralization intrusions place the development of the Southern Breccia and the NICO deposit as part of a single iron oxide alkali-altered (IOAA) system. In addition, this case example illustrates that albitite-hosted U deposits can form in albitization zones that predate base and precious metal ore zones in a single IOAA system and become traps for U and multiple metals once the tectonic regime favors fluid mixing and oxidation-reduction reactions.

  10. Site/Systems Operations, Maintenance and Facilities Management of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Susan

    2005-08-01

    This contract covered the site/systems operations, maintenance, and facilities management of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site.

  11. Norovirus Distribution within an Estuarine Environment▿

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Jennifer; Vinjé, Jan; Guadagnoli, Dominic; Lipp, Erin K.

    2009-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) has been studied extensively as an important cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. While oysters are a primary vehicle for infection, few studies have examined the wider distribution of NoV in the estuarine environment. Active shellfish-harvesting areas in Georgia were examined for the prevalence, genotype diversity, and concentrations of NoV in a variety of estuarine sample types over the course of 1 year. Of the 225 samples (9 oyster, 72 water, 72 63- to 200-μm plankton, and 72 >200-μm plankton) collected from 12 stations across two estuaries, 21 samples (9.3%) tested positive for NoV. By sample type, 55.0% (5/9) of oysters, 8.3% (6/72) of water samples, 11.1% (8/72) of 63- to 200-μm plankton samples, and 2.8% (2/72) of >200-μm plankton samples were positive for human NoV. The two NoV-positive >200-μm plankton samples, which contained mainly zooplankton, had the greatest quantity of NoV genomes (3.5 × 1013 and 1.7 × 1015 genomes g−1) of any sample tested. The majority, 90.5% (19/21), of the samples tested positive for genogroup I NoV, and only 9.5% (2/21) of the samples tested positive for genogroup II. The high concentrations of NoV in plankton samples compared to water and oyster samples were unexpected and provide new insights into the presence and distribution of human NoV in the water environment. PMID:19581478

  12. Cordon Caulle: an active volcanic-geothermal extensional system of Southern Andes of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, F.

    2013-05-01

    Cordon Caulle (CC; 40.5° S) is an active volcanic-geothermal system of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ; 37°-44°S). Morphologically, the CC system is a 6 km x 13 km volcanic plateau bordered by NW-trending structures, limited by Puyehue Volcano to the SE and by Caldera Nevada Caldera to the NW. While the SVZ is dominantly basaltic, CC is unique in that it has produced a wide compositional spectrum from basalt to rhyolite. The most recent volcanic activity of Puyehue-CC (last 70 ky) is dominantly silicic, including two historic fissure eruptions (1921-1922; 1960) and a recent central eruption from Puyehue Volcano (2011). Abnormally silicic volcanism was formerly attributed to a localized compression and long-term magma residence and differentiation, resulting from the NW orientation of underlying CC structures with respect to a NE-oriented σ1 (linked to regional strike-slip stress state). However, later studies, including examination of morpho-tectonic features; detailed structural analysis of the 1960 eruption (triggered by Mw 9.5 1960 Chilean Earthquake); InSAR deformation and gravity surveys, point to both historic and long-term extension at CC with σhmax oriented NNW to NW. The pre-2011 (i.e. Puyehue Volcano eruption) geothermal features of CC included boiling hot springs and geysers (Caldera Nevada) and fumaroles (CC and Puyehue Volcano). Both water and gas chemistry surveys were undertaken to assess the source fluid composition and equilibrium temperature. The combination of water and gas geothermometers led to a conceptual model of a stratified geothermal reservoir, with shallow, low-chloride, steam-heated aquifers equilibrated at temperatures between 150°-180°C, overlying a deeper, possibly dominated reservoir with temperatures in excess of 280°C. Gas chemistry also produced the highest He ratios of the SVZ, in agreement with a relatively pure, undiluted magmatic signature and heat source fueling the geothermal system. Other indicators such as N2/Ar

  13. Insights on the Optical Properties of Estuarine DOM – Hydrological and Biological Influences

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Luísa; Pinto, António; Filipe, Olga; Cunha, Ângela; Santos, Eduarda B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in estuaries derives from a diverse array of both allochthonous and autochthonous sources. In the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), the seasonality and the sources of the fraction of DOM that absorbs light (CDOM) were inferred using its optical and fluorescence properties. CDOM parameters known to be affected by aromaticity and molecular weight were correlated with physical, chemical and meteorological parameters. Two sites, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary, and with different hydrological characteristics, were regularly surveyed along two years, in order to determine the major influences on CDOM properties. Terrestrial-derived compounds are the predominant source of CDOM in the estuary during almost all the year and the two estuarine zones presented distinct amounts, as well as absorbance and fluorescence characteristics. Freshwater inputs have major influence on the dynamics of CDOM in the estuary, in particular at the brackish water zone, where accounted for approximately 60% of CDOM variability. With a lower magnitude, the biological productivity also impacted the optical properties of CDOM, explaining about 15% of its variability. Therefore, climate changes related to seasonal and inter-annual variations of the precipitation amounts might impact the dynamics of CDOM significantly, influencing its photochemistry and the microbiological activities in estuarine systems. PMID:27195702

  14. Insights on the Optical Properties of Estuarine DOM - Hydrological and Biological Influences.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luísa; Pinto, António; Filipe, Olga; Cunha, Ângela; Santos, Eduarda B H; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in estuaries derives from a diverse array of both allochthonous and autochthonous sources. In the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), the seasonality and the sources of the fraction of DOM that absorbs light (CDOM) were inferred using its optical and fluorescence properties. CDOM parameters known to be affected by aromaticity and molecular weight were correlated with physical, chemical and meteorological parameters. Two sites, representative of the marine and brackish water zones of the estuary, and with different hydrological characteristics, were regularly surveyed along two years, in order to determine the major influences on CDOM properties. Terrestrial-derived compounds are the predominant source of CDOM in the estuary during almost all the year and the two estuarine zones presented distinct amounts, as well as absorbance and fluorescence characteristics. Freshwater inputs have major influence on the dynamics of CDOM in the estuary, in particular at the brackish water zone, where accounted for approximately 60% of CDOM variability. With a lower magnitude, the biological productivity also impacted the optical properties of CDOM, explaining about 15% of its variability. Therefore, climate changes related to seasonal and inter-annual variations of the precipitation amounts might impact the dynamics of CDOM significantly, influencing its photochemistry and the microbiological activities in estuarine systems. PMID:27195702

  15. Joint NOAA/NWS/USGS prototype debris flow warning system for recently burned areas in Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Restrepo, P.; Jorgensen, D.P.; Cannon, S.H.; Costa, J.; Laber, J.; Major, J.; Martner, B.; Purpura, J.; Werner, K.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flows, also known as mudslides, are composed gravity-driven mixtures of sediment and water that travel through steep channels, over open hillslopes, and the like. Addressing this issue, US Geological Survey (USGS) and NOAA have established a debris-flow warning system that has the ability to monitor and forecast precipitation and issue timely weather hazard warning. In 2005, this joint NOAA-USGS prototype debris-flow warning system was issued in Southern California and as a result, it has provided valuable information to emergency managers in affected communities.

  16. Effects of climate change on suitable rice cropping areas, cropping systems and crop water requirements in southern China

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Qing; Yang, Xiaoguang; Dai, Shuwei; Chen, Guangsheng; Li, Yong; Zhang, Caixia

    2015-06-05

    Here, we discuss that rice is one of the main crops grown in southern China. Global climate change has significantly altered the local water availability and temperature regime for rice production. In this study, we explored the influence of climate change on suitable rice cropping areas, rice cropping systems and crop water requirements (CWRs) during the growing season for historical (from 1951 to 2010) and future (from 2011 to 2100) time periods. The results indicated that the land areas suitable for rice cropping systems shifted northward and westward from 1951 to 2100 but with different amplitudes.

  17. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  18. Connecting fishery sustainability to estuarine habitats and nutrient loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of several important fishery species depends on critical estuarine habitats, including seagrasses and salt marshes. Relatively simple models can be constructed to relate fishery productivity to the extent and distribution of these habitats by linking fishery-depend...

  19. SPECIES INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ESTUARINE DETRITIVORES: INHIBITION OR FACILITATION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Native Hawaiian estuarine detritivores; the prawn Macrobrachium grandimanus, and the neritid gastropod Neritina vespertina, were maintained in flow-through microcosms with conditioned leaves from two riparian tree species, Hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and guava (Psidium guajava). Th...

  20. The Earthquake Early Warning System In Southern Italy: Performance Tests And Next Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Elia, L.; Martino, C.; Colombelli, S.; Emolo, A.; Festa, G.; Iannaccone, G.

    2011-12-01

    PRESTo (PRobabilistic and Evolutionary early warning SysTem) is the software platform for Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) in Southern Italy, that integrates recent algorithms for real-time earthquake location, magnitude estimation and damage assessment, into a highly configurable and easily portable package. The system is under active experimentation based on the Irpinia Seismic Network (ISNet). PRESTo processes the live streams of 3C acceleration data for P-wave arrival detection and, while an event is occurring, promptly performs event detection and provides location, magnitude estimations and peak ground shaking predictions at target sites. The earthquake location is obtained by an evolutionary, real-time probabilistic approach based on an equal differential time formulation. At each time step, it uses information from both triggered and not-yet-triggered stations. Magnitude estimation exploits an empirical relationship that correlates it to the filtered Peak Displacement (Pd), measured over the first 2-4 s of P-signal. Peak ground-motion parameters at any distance can be finally estimated by ground motion prediction equations. Alarm messages containing the updated estimates of these parameters can thus reach target sites before the destructive waves, enabling automatic safety procedures. Using the real-time data streaming from the ISNet network, PRESTo has produced a bulletin for about a hundred low-magnitude events occurred during last two years. Meanwhile, the performances of the EEW system were assessed off-line playing-back the records for moderate and large events from Italy, Spain and Japan and synthetic waveforms for large historical events in Italy. These tests have shown that, when a dense seismic network is deployed in the fault area, PRESTo produces reliable estimates of earthquake location and size within 5-6 s from the event origin time (To). Estimates are provided as probability density functions whose uncertainty typically decreases with time

  1. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  2. Geochemical and isotopic characterization of groundwater origins in a Mediterranean karst system (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, J. L.; Ladouche, B.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.

    2013-12-01

    Geochemical and isotopic ratio (11B/10B and 87Sr/86Sr) results are reported for better determining the groundwater origins in the Lez Karst system (southern France). The Lez spring is the main perennial outlet of the system and supplies with drinking water the metropolitan area of Montpellier. According to the hydrodynamic conditions, five water-types discharge at the Lez spring with important mineralization fluctuations (Caetano Bicalho et al., 2012). This geochemical response suggests that hydrodynamics targets groundwater circulation, resulting from different water end-member solicitation and mixing. Previous studies using conventional natural tracers do not succeed to identify all the water compartments supporting the flow during the hydrologic cycle (Marjolet & Salado, 1977; Joseph et al., 1988) and to explain the mineralization variation of the Lez spring. The present study combines a basic geochemical survey data with boron and strontium isotope ratio data for a better characterization of the Lez spring geochemical functioning. Groundwater samples were collected at the Lez spring and surrounding springs and wells under different hydrologic conditions from 2009 to 2011. Major, trace and rare earth elements were determined at AETE analytical platform (OREME, Univ. Montpellier 2) by ionic chromatography and Q-ICP-MS respectively. d11B and 87Sr/86Sr were determined at BRGM/MMA Orleans by TIMS. The geochemical survey has been extended at a larger scale by sampling the main geochemical end- members already identified to replace the Lez spring waters in the regional geochemical context. From this geochemical study, valuable informations have been provided on the reservoir types and water origins flowing in high and low stage periods. For the highly mineralized waters occurring in the fall first rainy events or severe low stages, a deep contribution is highlighted but B and Sr isotopic data do not ascertain the two Triassic end-members (halite or gypsum) as possible

  3. VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE CDOM CAUSED BY PARTITIONING ONTO RIVER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The optical properties and geochemical cycling of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are altered by its sorption to freshwater and estuarine sediments. Measured partition coefficients (Kp) of Satilla River (Georgia) and Cape Fear River estuary (North Carolina) CDOM ran...

  4. Southern Ocean frontal system changes precede Antarctic ice sheet growth during the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Henning; Bickert, Torsten; Paulsen, Harald

    2009-07-01

    The middle Miocene climate approximately 14 Ma ago was characterized by the glaciation of Antarctica, deep-ocean cooling and variations in the global carbon cycle. Although the Southern Ocean underwent significant oceanographic changes, there is limited information on their spatial extent and timing. However, such knowledge is crucial for understanding the role of the Southern Ocean and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) for Antarctic glaciation and the coupling between the ocean and continental climate. We have reconstructed surface temperatures and seawater oxygen isotopes at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1092 in the Polar Frontal Zone of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean from foraminiferal oxygen isotopes ( δ18O) and magnesium to calcium ratios (Mg/Ca). Sea surface cooling by ~ 4 °C and freshening indicated by the ~ 1‰ reduction of seawater δ18O ( δ18O sw) at 14.2 Ma precede the major step in Antarctic ice sheet growth at 13.8-13.9 Ma. This pattern qualitatively mirrors previous findings from the Pacific sector, and we interpret the surface hydrographic changes to reflect the circum-Antarctic northward shift of the Southern Ocean fronts and specifically at Site 1092 the passage of the Subantarctic Front. The magnitude of change in reconstructed δ18O sw requires a δ18O sw: salinity gradient significantly higher than the modern value (~ 0.52‰) and it possibly exceeded 1.1‰. This implies the Polar Frontal Zone was influenced by freshwater derived from Antarctica, which in turn confirms higher than modern continental precipitation. The latter has previously been suggested to have contributed to Antarctic glaciation.

  5. Estuarine circulation versus tidal pumping: Sediment transport in a well-mixed tidal inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becherer, Johannes; Flöser, Götz; Umlauf, Lars; Burchard, Hans

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution water column observations have been carried out in the Wadden Sea to understand suspended particulate matter (SPM) transport in well-mixed tidal channels. These observations include more than 4000 consecutive CTD, microstructure shear and turbidity profiles from a free-falling microstructure probe, as well as velocity data from an ADCP and SPM samples for calibration. A horizontal density gradient was established by a landward temperature gradient built up during an extraordinarily warm and calm spring season. Tidal averaging along σ-layers (relative depth) provides the first direct observations of along-channel estuarine circulation in the Wadden Sea, with net inflow near the bottom and outflow near the surface. Increased westerly (up-estuary) winds during the second part of the campaign weakened and eventually even reversed estuarine circulation and yielded a net barotropic eastward transport. SPM concentrations showed a strong quarter-diurnal signal with maxima near full flood and full ebb and were generally lower during the calm period and increased during the windy period, mainly due to wave-related resuspension over nearby intertidal flats. The sediment flux analysis was based on a decomposition of the vertically integrated SPM flux into a barotropic advective component, an estuarine circulation component and a tidal pumping component. As a result, tidal pumping (due to ebb-dominance weakly seaward) dominated the SPM flux during calm conditions, whereas barotropic advection dominated the strong landward SPM flux during the windy period. Along-channel estuarine circulation is found to be of minor importance for the net SPM transport in such well-mixed systems.

  6. GPS measurements of near-field deformation along the southern Dead Sea Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Tarazi, Eid; Abu Rajab, Jafar; Gomez, Francisco; Cochran, William; Jaafar, Rani; Ferry, Matthieu

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of short-term deformation along the southern part of Dead Sea Fault (DSF) provides a systematic view of kinematics this part of the continental transform. The southern DSF consists of two principal segments: the Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley faults. In addition to other regional continuous GPS data, this study uses new data from 25 survey sites and 4 continuous GPS stations in Jordan for improved near-field observations. Resulting velocities are reported with 1-σ uncertainties ranging from 0.4-1.0 mm/yr. Application of elastic dislocation models yields estimates of slip rates for Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley faults are 4.9 ± 0.4 mm/yr and 4.7 ± 0.4 mm/yr, respectively. Modeling also suggests different depths of effective fault locking with 15 ± 5 km and 8 ± 5 km for the Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley faults, respectively. These slip rates are generally consistent with the upper end of the range of slip rates estimated from late Quaternary geology. Spatial variations in effective fault locking generally correspond with a heterogeneous mantle lithosphere. A similar observation can be observed along the southern San Andreas Fault, and this may reflect the influence of heterogeneity in the uppermost mantle on crustal faulting processes.

  7. Quantitative relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition for mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.F.; Hale, S.S.; Comeleo, R.L.; Copeland, J.; August, P.V.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot project has been conducted that developed quantitative relationships between watershed-scale (landscape) stressors and sediment contamination for sub-estuaries within Chesapeake Bay. The landscape stressors, land use patterns (derived from classified, contemporary satellite imagery) and point source pollution, were spatially analyzed for each individual watershed of 25 sub-estuaries using a geographic information system. Sediment contamination data for the sub-estuaries, available from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), were statistically reduced to one principal component for the metals and organics. Non-parametric statistical techniques were used to develop empirical relationships between sediment contamination and developed land (positive), herbaceous land (negative) and point source loadings (positive). These analyses have been extended to (1) include approximately 80 subestuaries across the mid-Atlantic region for which EMAP data were available, and (2) relate landscape stressors with estuarine condition. The measure of estuarine condition was an index of benthic quality developed by EMAP. The only available land use data set for the entire mid-Atlantic region was from US Geological Survey Land Use Data Analysis database, which is of 1970s vintage. Because of the dramatic differences in spatial area of the sub-estuaries in the mid-Atlantic region, adjustments for differing hydrologic regimes had to be factored into the analysis. Results indicate that it is possible to develop relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition across large geographic regions.

  8. Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-15

    A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

  9. Relative importance of estuarine nurseries for species of the genus Diplodus (Sparidae) along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance of estuarine nursery areas for species of the genus Diplodus and their relations with several environmental variables was evaluated along the Portuguese coast. Nine estuarine systems were sampled with beam trawl surveys. Species of the genus Diplodus were only present in estuaries south of the Ria de Aveiro (40°38'). A latitudinal gradient of increasing species richness and abundance towards the south was found. Estuarine nurseries of Diplodus vulgaris, Diplodus sargus and Diplodus puntazzo were characterized by mud substrate, lower salinity and lower dissolved oxygen, with the exception of Ria Formosa. Diplodus bellottii was associated with estuaries with large areas and high volumes, the Tejo and the Sado. Diplodus bellottii nursery grounds were characterized by low depth. Diplodus annularis was associated with seagrass and saltmarsh habitats, certainly because it is the only species of the genus Diplodus which recruits exclusively to seagrass meadows. Diplodus annularis nursery grounds were also characterized by sand substrate, higher salinity and higher dissolved oxygen. Niche breath varied widely amongst species and location. Diplodus vulgaris generally presented the highest values of niche breath, except when D. bellottii was present. Niche overlap was not high, the highest value being that between D. vulgaris and D. sargus in the Mira estuary, with 76% spatial niche overlap. Considerations were made on these species progress towards the north in a climate warming context, taking into account the habitat associations described here.

  10. A manipulative field experiment to evaluate an integrative methodology for assessing sediment pollution in estuarine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Marín, Arnaldo

    2009-05-15

    The assessment of sediment contamination is of crucial importance for the management of estuarine ecosystems. Environmental risk assessment of oil pollution must be specific to these ecosystems because of their unique toxicant bioavailability dynamics, which is not comparable with that of other ecosystems where the environmental parameters are less variable. The goal of this work was to test in two European estuarine areas (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal; La Manga, Spain) whether the common methodology used to evaluate sediment pollution in marine sediment (amphipod toxicity tests and community structure analysis) is suited to these physico-chemically unique systems. Manipulative field experiments were conducted at three oil concentration levels, to compare resulting changes in community structure with laboratory and in situ amphipod toxicity tests carried out with native amphipod species Corophium multisetosum (Atlantic area) and Microdeutopus gryllotalpa (Mediterranean area). The impact of the toxicant was reflected in the community structure and toxicity tests, both of which were correlated with oil concentration. These results point to this methodology being a reliable tool for assessing and monitoring pollution in estuarine areas.

  11. Controls on the Efficiency of Estuarine Particle Trapping: Ecosystem Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, D. A.; Orton, P. M.; Chisholm, T. A.

    2002-12-01

    Comparisons between the Columbia and Fraser river estuaries suggest several important controls on retention of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM). Observations were carried out in spring 1997 and 1999 in the Columbia under moderate to high-flow conditions. Because of flow regulation, flow levels were ~60% of their natural values, considerably increasing the salinity intrusion length and efficiency of particle trapping. Observations in the Fraser were made under extreme high-flow conditions (1999) and under normal spring conditions (2000). Concentrations of coarse material (sand and flocs landward of salinity intrusion, primarily large aggregates within the salt-water mass) were inferred from acoustic backscatter (ABS). Concentrations of silt and clay were estimated from optical backscatter (OBS). Both were calibrated through gravimetric analysis of pump samples and Owen tube results. The very high flows in the Fraser prevented efficient SPM retention for several reasons, and no permanent ETM was observed. First, the salinity intrusion was forced out of the estuary mouth on every greater ebb, exposing the bed to high bedstress levels. Moreover, the estuary was so short that individual silt particles could not settle to the bed before being exported by the river flow. Finally, aggregation appeared to be rate-limited, such that fluvial particles were unable to form into large aggregates during their rapid transit through the estuary. Aggregation occurred instead in the buoyant plume outside the estuary. Thus, the time scale for particle retention in the Fraser was <1 day. Conditions for ETM particle trapping were more favorable in the Columbia, because salt was never totally expelled from the system, and the fronts at the upstream limit of salinity intrusion were never forced back to the plume lift-off zone at the mouth. Also, near-surface waters required most of a tide to transit the length of salinity intrusion, allowing formation

  12. Morphology of the teleost ampullary organs in marine salmontail catfish Neoarius graeffei (Pisces: Ariidae) with comparative analysis to freshwater and estuarine conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Arnault R G; Whitehead, Darryl L; Bennett, Michael B; Tibbetts, Ian R

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that due to the relative conductivity of the environment, and to maintain sensory function, ampullary organs of marine Neoarius graeffei would differ morphologically from those described previously for estuarine and freshwater conspecifics. Unlike the ampullary systems of N. graeffei from freshwater and estuarine habitats, the ampullary pores of marine specimens occur in two distinct patterns; numerous pores seemingly randomly scattered on the head and ventro-lateral regions of the body, and pores arranged in distinctive vertical lines above the lateral line on the dorso-lateral body of the fish. Light and electron microscopy revealed that the ampullary organs also differed morphologically from estuarine and freshwater specimens in the presence of longer ampullary canals, a hitherto unreported canal wall composition, and in the collagen sheath surrounding both the canal and the ampulla proper within dermal connective tissues. Ampullary pores were wider in marine individuals and opened to the longest ampullary canals reported for this species. The canal wall was lined by cuboidal and squamous epithelial cells. Each ampullary canal opened into a single ampulla proper containing significantly more receptor cells than estuarine and freshwater conspecifics. The distribution of ampullary pores as well as the microstructure of the ampullary organs indicates that the electrosensory system of marine N. graeffei differs from those of estuarine and freshwater specimens in ways that would be expected to maintain the functionality of the system in a highly conductive, fully marine environment, and reveals the remarkable plasticity of this species' ampullary system in response to habitat conductivity.

  13. The architecture of the porphyry-metal system as a prospecting stratagem in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuerburg, George J.

    1978-01-01

    A model of the porphyry-metal system characteristic of the consanguineous Cretaceous and Tertiary igneous rocks and associated ores of the southern Rocky Mountains is constructed from the bits and pieces exposed in the Colorado mineral belt and the San Juan volcanic field. Hydrothermally altered rocks in a part of the areas of mineralized rock associated with the Platoro caldera are matched against the model, to locate and to characterize latent mineral deposits for optimal prospecting and exploration. The latent deposits are two stockwork molybdenite deposits (porphyry-molybdenum) and one or two copper-gold-silver chimney deposits.

  14. Discovery of Pulsating Components in the Southern Eclipsing Binary Systems AW Velorum, HM Puppis, and TT Horologii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. J. W.; Bohlsen, T.; Heathcote, B.; Richards, T.; Streamer, M.

    2013-09-01

    Eclipsing binary stars with pulsating components are especially valuable for studies of stellar evolution. We have discovered that three eclipsing binary stars in the southern sky have a pulsating component with oscillations similar to those of delta Scuti stars. The systems are: AW Velorum, HM Puppis, and TT Horologii. Their spectral types were determined as A7 for AW Vel and HM Pup and F0-F2 for TT Hor. The dominant pulsation frequencies are 15-38 cycles per day with amplitudes of 10-60 millimagnitudes.

  15. Moving sands along a headland-embayed beach system (Algarve, Southern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Sónia; Horta, João; Nascimento, Ana; Gomes, Ana; Veiga-Pires, Cristina; Moura, Delminda

    2015-04-01

    Resilience of embayed and pocket beaches located at the southernmost coast of Portugal is currently a major question to coastal management of this region. In fact, several among those beaches have been artificially fed aiming to increase the width of the beach allowing people to maintain a safe distance to the unstable rocky cliffs. The sand is dredged from the offshore (ca. 2 miles from the shoreline) representing high costs for the Portuguese government. For how long will the artificial feeding solve the problem? Which beaches are worth being nourished taking into account the morphosedimentary processes? The present work is the result of a field experiment aiming to study the efficiency of the alongshore sedimentary transport between successive embayed beaches. The experiment was performed in the very indented rocky coast of the Algarve region (Southern Portugal) and comprised two field campaigns, both in 2014, during spring tides in March and November. The Algarve coast experiences a semi-diurnal meso-tidal regime ranging from 1.3 m during neap tides to 3.5 m at spring tides and the waves approach from WSW (232°) during 72% of observations along the year, almost normal to the study area shoreline. The wave and current characteristics (significant height-Hs and Period-T for waves, velocity and direction for currents) were measured during three and six tidal cycles respectively for the first and second campaign, using two pressure transducers and one electromagnetic current meter. We used sand painted with orange fluorescent dye (100 kg in March and 200 kg in November) as tracer to track the movement of the sand along the coast. The marked sand was placed on the beach face of the westernmost beach of the study area during the first low tide of each campaign. Following, hundreds of sediment samples were collected during low tide, through the monitored period, in the nodes of a georeferenced square mesh of 10 x 20 m covering three embayed beaches. Later in the

  16. Modelling a strike-slip fault system affecting porous carbonates in Favignana Island (Sicily, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilona, A.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Johnson, G.; Shackleton, R.

    2012-12-01

    Investigating the deformation processes as well as the characteristics and distribution of their end-products is a crucial issue to improve geo-fluid exploitation in carbonate reservoirs (≈50% of natural geo-fluids). Indeed, besides the primary controls on the petrophysical properties of limestones, which are due to nature and organization/shape of the constituent elements (i.e. grains, pores, cement, clay minerals), both containment and migration of fluids in these rocks are influenced by fault zones and fractures. In this contribution we integrate quantitative structural analysis and numerical modelling approaches aiming at testing a new workflow useful to create a 3D discrete fracture network (DFN) model of a reservoir starting from outcrop data collected in Favignana Island (Sicily, southern Italy). The presence of several quarries in the Island provides 3D exposures of ≈25 m-thick Lower-Pleistocene high-porosity grainstones crosscut by two conjugate sets of strike-slip faults. This fault system, documented by Tondi et al. (2012), is comprised of three types of structure: single compactive shear bands (CSB); zones of bands (ZB); and, faults. CSBs are narrow tabular features with porosity less than the surrounding host rocks, and have thicknesses and displacements on the order of a few mm. The growth process for these structures involves localizing further deformation within zones of closely-spaced CSBs and, possibly, along continuous slip surfaces within fault rocks overprinting older ZBs. The transitions from one growth step to another are recorded by different values of the dimensional parameters (i.e. length, thickness and displacement) for the structures. These transitions are also reflected by the ratios and distributions of the dimensional parameters. The DFN model was built by means of the Fracture Modelling module of the commercial software package Move from Midland Valley©. The analysis of an aerial photo was performed firstly to delimit the

  17. Ecology of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina: an estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, B.J.; Hodson, R.G.; Riggs, S.R.; Easley, J.E. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Albemarle Sound, a large oligohaline estuary in northeastern North Carloina, constitutes a significant portion of North Carolina's coastal system. It is shallow, wind dominated, and strongly influenced by freshwater inflow. These conditions, combined with limited oceanic access and exchange, maintain fresh- to brackish water conditions throughout most of the estuary during the year. The nekton are the most well-known biological component of this extensive estuarine system. Albemarle Sound is an important nursery area for a number of anadromous and migratory fish as well as the blue crab and supports fisheries for many of these species. Other biological components (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and benthos) in the estuary are less well studied. Declining fisheries, algal blooms in freshwater tributaries, and changing patterns of land and water use are among the critical issues facing managers of Albemarle Sound. This report discusses current steps being taken toward holistic management and provides a state-of-the-art information base and ecological synthesis of the estuary and its watershed. 89 references, 50 figures, 19 tables.

  18. Inverse estimation of parameters for an estuarine eutrophication model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Kuo, A.Y.

    1996-11-01

    An inverse model of an estuarine eutrophication model with eight state variables is developed. It provides a framework to estimate parameter values of the eutrophication model by assimilation of concentration data of these state variables. The inverse model using the variational technique in conjunction with a vertical two-dimensional eutrophication model is general enough to be applicable to aid model calibration. The formulation is illustrated by conducting a series of numerical experiments for the tidal Rappahannock River, a western shore tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. The numerical experiments of short-period model simulations with different hypothetical data sets and long-period model simulations with limited hypothetical data sets demonstrated that the inverse model can be satisfactorily used to estimate parameter values of the eutrophication model. The experiments also showed that the inverse model is useful to address some important questions, such as uniqueness of the parameter estimation and data requirements for model calibration. Because of the complexity of the eutrophication system, degrading of speed of convergence may occur. Two major factors which cause degradation of speed of convergence are cross effects among parameters and the multiple scales involved in the parameter system.

  19. Response of deformation patterns to reorganizations of the southern San Andreas fault system since ca. 1.5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.; Fattaruso, L.; Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma, the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault and termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault. The southern San Andreas fault itself has also evolved since this time, with several shifts in activity among fault strands within San Gorgonio Pass. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate the impact of these changes to the fault network on deformation patterns. A series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault, initiation of the San Jacinto fault, and shifts in activity of the San Andreas fault. Interpreted changes to uplift patterns are well matched by model results. These results support the idea that growth of the San Jacinto fault led to increased uplift rates in the San Gabriel Mountains and decreased uplift rates in the San Bernardino Mountains. Comparison of model results for vertical axis rotation to data from paleomagnetic studies reveals a good match to local rotation patterns in the Mecca Hills and Borrego Badlands. We explore the mechanical efficiency at each step in the evolution, and find an overall trend toward increased efficiency through time. Strain energy density patterns are used to identify regions of off-fault deformation and potential incipient faulting. These patterns support the notion of north-to-south propagation of the San Jacinto fault during its initiation. The results of the present-day model are compared with microseismicity focal mechanisms to provide additional insight into the patterns of off-fault deformation within the southern San Andreas fault system.

  20. Is there a "blind" strike-slip fault at the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymofyeyeva, E.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the interseismic deformation at the southern end of the San Jacinto fault system using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. To complement the continuous GPS measurements from the PBO network, we have conducted campaign-style GPS surveys of 19 benchmarks along Highway 78 in the years 2012, 2013, and 2014. We processed the campaign GPS data using GAMIT to obtain horizontal velocities. The data show high velocity gradients East of the surface trace of the Coyote Creek Fault. We also processed InSAR data from the ascending and descending tracks of the ENVISAT mission between the years 2003 and 2010. The InSAR data were corrected for atmospheric artifacts using an iterative common point stacking method. We combined average velocities from different look angles to isolate the fault-parallel velocity field, and used fault-parallel velocities to compute strain rate. We filtered the data over a range of wavelengths prior to numerical differentiation, to reduce the effects of noise and to investigate both shallow and deep sources of deformation. At spatial wavelengths less than 2km the strain rate data show prominent anomalies along the San Andreas and Superstition Hills faults, where shallow creep has been documented by previous studies. Similar anomalies are also observed along parts of the Coyote Creek Fault, San Felipe Fault, and an unmapped southern continuation of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto Fault. At wavelengths on the order of 20km, we observe elevated strain rates concentrated east of the Coyote Creek Fault. The long-wavelength strain anomaly east of the Coyote Creek Fault, and the localized shallow creep observed in the short-wavelength strain rate data over the same area suggest that there may be a "blind" segment of the Clark Fault that accommodates a significant portion of the deformation on the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault.

  1. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria.

  2. Passive acoustic threat detection in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Brian; Sutin, Alexander; Roh, Heui-Seol; Bunin, Barry

    2008-04-01

    The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) at Stevens Institute of Technology supports research in a range of areas relevant to harbor security, including passive acoustic detection of underwater threats. The difficulties in using passive detection in an urban estuarine environment include intensive and highly irregular ambient noise and the complexity of sound propagation in shallow water. MSL conducted a set of tests in the Hudson River near Manhattan in order to measure the main parameters defining the detection distance of a threat: source level of a scuba diver, transmission loss of acoustic signals, and ambient noise. The source level of the diver was measured by comparing the diver's sound with a reference signal from a calibrated emitter placed on his path. Transmission loss was measured by comparing noise levels of passing ships at various points along their routes, where their distance from the hydrophone was calculated with the help of cameras and custom software. The ambient noise in the Hudson River was recorded under varying environmental conditions and amounts of water traffic. The passive sonar equation was then applied to estimate the range of detection. Estimations were done for a subset of the recorded noise levels, and we demonstrated how variations in the noise level, attenuation, and the diver's source level influence the effective range of detection. Finally, we provided analytic estimates of how an array improves upon the detection distance calculated by a single hydrophone.

  3. Methane emission from Yangtze estuarine wetland, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqi; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2009-06-01

    Yangtze estuary, lying in the subtropical monsoon region of China, is characterized by a unique environmental setting and endemic wetland plant species (Scirpus mariqueter). Methane (CH4) emission fluxes were measured at the Yangtze estuarine wetland, Chongming Dongtan (CD), by a static closed chamber technique from May 2004 to April 2005. The results showed that CD is the source of atmospheric CH4, and emission fluxes had significant diurnal and seasonal variation. The annual average CH4 emission flux was 2.06 mg m-2 h-1 at the CD marsh site and 0.04 mg m-2 h-1 at the CD bare tidal flat (nonvegetated). Wetland plant species (S. mariqueter) and temperature were the primary factors controlling the CH4 emission. The results of the light and dark chamber comparison and plant shoot clipping experiment suggest that molecular diffusion and convective gas flow methods were the two main mechanisms of CH4 transported via S. mariqueter plants in July. However, molecular diffusion was believed to be the primary transport mechanism from August to October, with leaf resistance as one of the factors regulating CH4 diffusion. There was significant correlation between CH4 fluxes and temperature, especially the 10 cm depth ground temperature (R2 = 0.7784). Although sediment organic carbon content did not determine CH4 fluxes, net ecosystem production was significantly correlated with CH4 fluxes, suggesting that the photosynthates of S. mariqueter effectively provided the substrate for methanogenic bacteria.

  4. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria. PMID:26247379

  5. Predation by estuarine zooplankton on tintinnid ciliates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Roy

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the feeding performances of Uca zoeae and the estuarine copepods Acartia tonsa and Tortanus setacaudatus when these zooplankton preyed upon the co-occurring tintinnids Favella panamensis (length 265 μm) and Tintinnopsis tubulosa (length 148 μm). Predation by Favella on Tintinnopsis was also studied. Over the range of experimental prey densities used, Acartia ingested Tintinopsis at rates linearly related to prey density. Favella was ingested by Aractia at higher rates than was Tintinnopsis. Tortamus ingested Favella more readily than did Acartia, but Tortanus did not ingest Tintinnopsis. Uca ingested both Tintinnopsis and Favella while Tintinnopsis was also ingested by the larger tintinnid Favella. Comparisons of Acartia predation on tintinnids with published data on ingestion of nauplii and phytoplankton showed that when the phytoplankton are dominated by small (diameters < 10 μm) species, tintinnids in concentrations exceeding 10 3 organisms 1 -1 can be important items in the diets of Acartia. At lower tintinnid concentrations or when algal species with diameters > 10 μm are present in significant concentrations, tintinnids merely supplement algae in the diet of Acartia. Generally, tintinnids are more important food items for Acartia than are comparably sized nauplii. Only at concentrations exceeding 10 4 cop. m -3 can Acartia depress tintinid population growth.

  6. Composition of estuarine colloidal material: organic components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigleo, A.C.; Hoering, T.C.; Helz, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    Colloidal material in the size range 1.2 nm to 0.4 ??m was isolated by ultrafiltration from Chesapeake Bay and Patuxent River waters (U.S.A.). Temperature controlled, stepwise pyrolysis of the freeze-dried material, followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses of the volatile products indicates that the primary organic components of this polymer are carbohydrates and peptides. The major pyrolysis products at the 450??C step are acetic acid, furaldehydes, furoic acid, furanmethanol, diones and lactones characteristic of carbohydrate thermal decomposition. Pyrroles, pyridines, amides and indole (protein derivatives) become more prevalent and dominate the product yield at the 600??C pyrolysis step. Olefins and saturated hydrocarbons, originating from fatty acids, are present only in minor amounts. These results are consistent with the composition of Chesapeake phytoplankton (approximately 50% protein, 30% carbohydrate, 10% lipid and 10% nucleotides by dry weight). The pyrolysis of a cultured phytoplankton and natural particulate samples produced similar oxygen and nitrogencontaining compounds, although the proportions of some components differ relative to the colloidal fraction. There were no lignin derivatives indicative of terrestrial plant detritus in any of these samples. The data suggest that aquatic microorganisms, rather than terrestrial plants, are the dominant source of colloidal organic material in these river and estuarine surface waters. ?? 1982.

  7. Infilling of the Hudson River Estuary During the Late Holocene (3000ka to Present): Implications for Estuarine Stratigraphic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Pekar, S. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Carbotte, S.; Bell, R.; Burckle, L.

    2002-12-01

    Estuaries are widely preserved in the geologic record and the estuarine fill, contained between non-marine sediment, provides an excellent temporal marker for continental margin studies. Estuarine stratigraphic models have provided a framework within which to interpret the estuarine fill. However, estuarine systems differ greatly in the shape of their valleys, the tectonic boundaries they cross, and in sediment supply so that their position in the geologic record may be out of sequence with that predicted by the models. New insights into estuarine systems and models are provided by the Hudson River Estuary (HRE; New York State) based on >150 cores and grab sediment samples and acoustic images documenting in great detail how the HRE filled its earlier excavated valley during the latest Holocene (3ka to present). Radiocarbon and 137-Cs radioisotope ages, borehole, and core data document the sedimentation patterns of the estuary. Diatom assemblages provide estimates of the shallowing-upwards of the estuary as its basin filled with sediments. The three areas of the stratigraphic model present in the HRE, include zones formed within inner fluvial and outer marine areas, (containing coarse-grained, sands and gravels), and a central area (containing fine-grained, silts and clays), that are nearly filled with little room for sediments to accumulate at or near sea-level. This has resulted in sedimentary bypass for almost the entire length the estuary. South of Kingston, fine-grained sediments have ceased accumulating when the bottom approaches wave base. Upstream from Kingston, final filling occurs as sediments fill in the remaining accommodation, forming islands. This should result in the export of sediment to the coastal zone. Instead, localized areas of sediment trapping still exist, which are related to the Hudson Valley Highlands and to the location of the estuarine turbidity maximum that hold large volumes of sediment. As a result minor volumes of Recent sediment are

  8. Determining Land System Sustainability through a Land Architecture Approach: Example of Southern Yucatán (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, B. L., II

    2009-12-01

    Sustainable land systems involve an array of tradeoffs, not only among ecosystem services, but between those services and human outcomes. These tradeoffs are affected by the architecture of the land system—the kind, size, pattern, and distribution of land uses and covers. Working towards a model capable of handling a full array of ecosystem services and human outcomes, the concept of land architecture is illustrated through a simplified land system in the seasonal tropical forests of the southern Yucatán where sustainability is sought through the competing goals of forest conservation-preservation and agricultural development, both cultivation and ranching. Land architecture and tradeoff impacts are compared between two communities emphasizing, respectfully, forest conservation-preservation and agriculture. The role of spatial scale is also illustrated. Vulnerability and resilience assessments of land systems should be enhanced through a land architecture approach.

  9. Microgobius meeki as a potential bio-indicator of habitat disturbance in shallow estuarine areas: a useful tool for the assessment of estuarine quality.

    PubMed

    Reis-Filho, J A; Giarrizzo, T

    2016-07-01

    The relationships between changes in habitat quality (disturbed and undisturbed sites) and the population parameters (density, size distribution, reproductive activity and diet) of a goby Microgobius meeki were investigated in a tropical estuary to assess its value as an indicator of anthropogenic changes, predominantly the effects of sedimentation and mangrove removal in shallow estuarine areas. Fish sampling surveys were conducted bimonthly between June 2009 and May 2010 over the entire estuarine gradient of the Paraguaçu River estuary, located on the central Brazilian coast. A predictive model was developed to assess the population changes of this species in 10 other tropical estuaries with different dimensions, basin features and distinct levels of anthropogenic disturbance. General linear models were used to relate the population structure of M. meeki to sediment type, habitat type resulting from mangrove conservation status, anthropogenic pressure and environmental characteristics such as salinity, dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperature. Sediment type and the presence of mangrove forests were the most effective predictors of local variability in the population structure of M. meeki. Individuals with mature gonads and high rates of feeding activity were associated predominantly with undisturbed habitats. Estuaries and estuarine sectors with high levels of sedimentation in shallow marginal areas, anthropogenic pressure from domestic and industrial effluents, and evidence of mangrove deforestation yielded the lowest capture rates of both juvenile and adult M. meeki. Based on these findings, M. meeki is identified as a potential indicator of the consequences of anthropogenic disturbance in transitional waters. A simple, but efficient collection protocol, in which overt signs of distress can be promptly observed is proposed. Testing the generality of this approach across different systems might prove useful in a broader conservation biology context. PMID

  10. Epidemiology Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes in a Hospital in Southern Taiwan by Use of the Updated emm Cluster Typing System.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    emm typing is the most widely used molecular typing method for the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]). emm typing is based on a small variable region of the emm gene; however, the emm cluster typing system defines GAS types according to the nearly complete sequence of the emm gene. Therefore, emm cluster typing is considered to provide more information regarding the functional and structural properties of M proteins in different emm types of GAS. In the present study, 677 isolates collected between 1994 and 2008 in a hospital in southern Taiwan were analyzed by the emm cluster typing system. emm clusters A-C4, E1, E6, and A-C3 were the most prevalent emm cluster types and accounted for 67.4% of total isolates. emm clusters A-C4 and E1 were associated with noninvasive diseases, whereas E6 was significantly associated with both invasive and noninvasive manifestations. In addition, emm clusters D4, E2, and E3 were significantly associated with invasive manifestations. Furthermore, we found that the functional properties of M protein, including low fibrinogen-binding and high IgG-binding activities, were correlated significantly with invasive manifestations. In summary, the present study provides updated epidemiological information on GAS emm cluster types in southern Taiwan.

  11. Implications of Nubian-Like Core Reduction Systems in Southern Africa for the Identification of Early Modern Human Dispersals.

    PubMed

    Will, Manuel; Mackay, Alex; Phillips, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Lithic technologies have been used to trace dispersals of early human populations within and beyond Africa. Convergence in lithic systems has the potential to confound such interpretations, implying connections between unrelated groups. Due to their reductive nature, stone artefacts are unusually prone to this chance appearance of similar forms in unrelated populations. Here we present data from the South African Middle Stone Age sites Uitpanskraal 7 and Mertenhof suggesting that Nubian core reduction systems associated with Late Pleistocene populations in North Africa and potentially with early human migrations out of Africa in MIS 5 also occur in southern Africa during early MIS 3 and with no clear connection to the North African occurrence. The timing and spatial distribution of their appearance in southern and northern Africa implies technological convergence, rather than diffusion or dispersal. While lithic technologies can be a critical guide to human population flux, their utility in tracing early human dispersals at large spatial and temporal scales with stone artefact types remains questionable. PMID:26125972

  12. Epidemiology Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes in a Hospital in Southern Taiwan by Use of the Updated emm Cluster Typing System

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    emm typing is the most widely used molecular typing method for the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]). emm typing is based on a small variable region of the emm gene; however, the emm cluster typing system defines GAS types according to the nearly complete sequence of the emm gene. Therefore, emm cluster typing is considered to provide more information regarding the functional and structural properties of M proteins in different emm types of GAS. In the present study, 677 isolates collected between 1994 and 2008 in a hospital in southern Taiwan were analyzed by the emm cluster typing system. emm clusters A-C4, E1, E6, and A-C3 were the most prevalent emm cluster types and accounted for 67.4% of total isolates. emm clusters A-C4 and E1 were associated with noninvasive diseases, whereas E6 was significantly associated with both invasive and noninvasive manifestations. In addition, emm clusters D4, E2, and E3 were significantly associated with invasive manifestations. Furthermore, we found that the functional properties of M protein, including low fibrinogen-binding and high IgG-binding activities, were correlated significantly with invasive manifestations. In summary, the present study provides updated epidemiological information on GAS emm cluster types in southern Taiwan. PMID:26560544

  13. Implications of Nubian-Like Core Reduction Systems in Southern Africa for the Identification of Early Modern Human Dispersals

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Lithic technologies have been used to trace dispersals of early human populations within and beyond Africa. Convergence in lithic systems has the potential to confound such interpretations, implying connections between unrelated groups. Due to their reductive nature, stone artefacts are unusually prone to this chance appearance of similar forms in unrelated populations. Here we present data from the South African Middle Stone Age sites Uitpanskraal 7 and Mertenhof suggesting that Nubian core reduction systems associated with Late Pleistocene populations in North Africa and potentially with early human migrations out of Africa in MIS 5 also occur in southern Africa during early MIS 3 and with no clear connection to the North African occurrence. The timing and spatial distribution of their appearance in southern and northern Africa implies technological convergence, rather than diffusion or dispersal. While lithic technologies can be a critical guide to human population flux, their utility in tracing early human dispersals at large spatial and temporal scales with stone artefact types remains questionable. PMID:26125972

  14. Cultivation-Dependant Assessment, Diversity, and Ecology of Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria in Arid Saline Systems of Southern Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Guesmi, Amel; Najjari, Afef; Cherif, Hanen; Ettoumi, Besma; Hamdi, Chadlia; Boudabous, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Haloalkaliphiles are polyextremophiles adapted to grow at high salt concentrations and alkaline pH values. In this work, we isolated 122 haloalkaliphilic bacteria upon enrichments of 23 samples from 5 distinct saline systems of southern Tunisia, growing optimally in media with 10% salt and at pH 10. The collection was classified into 44 groups based on the amplification of the 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes allowed the identification of 13 genera and 20 distinct species. Three gram-positive isolates showing between 95 and 96% of 16S rRNA sequence homology with Bacillus saliphilus could represent new species or genus. Beside the difference in bacterial diversity between the studied sites, several species ecological niches correlations were demonstrated such as Oceanobacillus in salt crust, Nesterenkonia in sand, and Salinicoccus in the rhizosphere of the desert plant Salicornia. The collection was further evaluated for the production of extracellular enzymes. Activity tests showed that gram-positive bacteria were mostly active, particularly for protease, lipase, DNase, and amylase production. Our overall results demonstrate the huge phenotypic and phylogenetic diversity of haloalkaliphiles in saline systems of southern Tunisia which represent a valuable source of new lineages and metabolites. PMID:24324969

  15. Using nitrate dual isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) as a tool for exploring sources and cycling of nitrate in an estuarine system: Elkhorn Slough, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, Carol; Paytan, Adina

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate (NO-3 concentrations and dual isotopic composition (??15N and ??18O) were measured during various seasons and tidal conditions in Elkhorn Slough to evaluate mixing of sources of NO-3 within this California estuary. We found the isotopic composition of NO-3 was influenced most heavily by mixing of two primary sources with unique isotopic signatures, a marine (Monterey Bay) and terrestrial agricultural runoff source (Old Salinas River). However, our attempt to use a simple two end-member mixing model to calculate the relative contribution of these two NO-3 sources to the Slough was complicated by periods of nonconservative behavior and/or the presence of additional sources, particularly during the dry season when NO-3 concentrations were low. Although multiple linear regression generally yielded good fits to the observed data, deviations from conservative mixing were still evident. After consideration of potential alternative sources, we concluded that deviations from two end-member mixing were most likely derived from interactions with marsh sediments in regions of the Slough where high rates of NO-3 uptake and nitrification result in NO-3 with low ?? 15N and high ??18O values. A simple steady state dual isotope model is used to illustrate the impact of cycling processes in an estuarine setting which may play a primary role in controlling NO -3 isotopic composition when and where cycling rates and water residence times are high. This work expands our understanding of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes as biogeochemical tools for investigating NO -3 sources and cycling in estuaries, emphasizing the role that cycling processes may play in altering isotopic composition. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Using nitrate dual isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) as a tool for exploring sources and cycling of nitrate in an estuarine system: Elkhorn Slough, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, Carol; Paytan, Adina

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations and dual isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) were measured during various seasons and tidal conditions in Elkhorn Slough to evaluate mixing of sources of NO3- within this California estuary. We found the isotopic composition of NO3- was influenced most heavily by mixing of two primary sources with unique isotopic signatures, a marine (Monterey Bay) and terrestrial agricultural runoff source (Old Salinas River). However, our attempt to use a simple two end-member mixing model to calculate the relative contribution of these two NO3- sources to the Slough was complicated by periods of nonconservative behavior and/or the presence of additional sources, particularly during the dry season when NO3- concentrations were low. Although multiple linear regression generally yielded good fits to the observed data, deviations from conservative mixing were still evident. After consideration of potential alternative sources, we concluded that deviations from two end-member mixing were most likely derived from interactions with marsh sediments in regions of the Slough where high rates of NO3- uptake and nitrification result in NO3- with low δ15N and high δ18O values. A simple steady state dual isotope model is used to illustrate the impact of cycling processes in an estuarine setting which may play a primary role in controlling NO3- isotopic composition when and where cycling rates and water residence times are high. This work expands our understanding of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes as biogeochemical tools for investigating NO3- sources and cycling in estuaries, emphasizing the role that cycling processes may play in altering isotopic composition.

  17. Southern blotting.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    2001-05-01

    the second alternate protocol is therefore more rapid than the basic protocol and can result in more complete transfer. Although the ease and reliability of capillary transfer methods makes this far and away the most popular system for Southern blotting with agarose gels, it unfortunately does not work with polyacrylamide gels, whose smaller pore size impedes the transverse movement of the DNA molecules. The third alternate protocol describes an electroblotting procedure that is currently the most reliable method for transfer of DNA from a polyacrylamide gel. Dot and slot blotting are also described. PMID:18429082

  18. Human mediated transport determines the non-native distribution of a dispersal limited estuarine invertebrate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sessile invertebrates are common invaders of estuarine ecosystems. To expand their non-native ranges, these invasive taxa must contend with the geographically and ecologically discontinuous nature of estuarine habitats, in many cases without the benefit of highly dispersed larval...

  19. Influence of organic carbon on estuarine benthic infauna of the US west coast - March 3, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) is often used as an indicator of eutrophication in estuarine environments. However, the determination of biologically relevant sediment TOC criteria to indicate estuarine condition is complicated by the relationship between TOC and grain size. Both va...

  20. Influence of organic carbon on estuarine benthic infauna of the US west coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) is often used as an indicator of eutrophication in estuarine environments. However, the determination of biologically relevant sediment TOC criteria to indicate estuarine condition is complicated by the relationship between TOC and grain size. Both va...

  1. Estimating tidal current amplitudes outside estuaries and characterizing the zone of estuarine tidal influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2008-02-01

    Tidal currents within many estuaries are stronger than on the adjacent continental shelf. Estuarine tidal influence extends onto the shelf elevating tidal amplitudes above ambient shelf levels over a region outside the estuary. In this paper, a kinematic theory that describes tidal flow in these estuary-shelf tidal interaction zones is derived and tested. Using these results, tidal current amplitudes outside estuaries are estimated and the range and intensity of estuarine tidal influence is characterized. The estimates for the tidal current amplitudes ( utide) of the dominant constituent are appropriate for linear or weakly nonlinear systems with predominantly barotropic tides; the ratio of tidal height to water depth is small ( η/ h≪1) in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes. Within tidal interaction zones, the tidal current amplitude is composed of an ambient shelf part ( ua) and an estuary-induced part ( ue). The characteristic shelf amplitude far from the estuary is used to set ua. Continuity arguments indicate that ue (averaged over a control volume arc centered on the mouth with radius r and a swath angle of γπ) approximately equals the ratio of the tidal volume flux through the mouth ( Vm) and the cross-sectional area of any control volume arc (u≈V/γπrh¯). This approximation holds where the squared product of the tidal wave number and radial distance is small: ( kr) 2≪1. For a shelf with constant slope α and small coastal wall depth, the arc-averaged depth is h¯≈sr (where s=2 α/ pi for γ=1). For this shelf bathymetry, ue decays with squared radial distance from the estuary mouth. Theoretical predictions are consistent with observed tidal current amplitudes outside the Delaware Bay and Block Island Sound. In both test cases, the estimated and observed amplitudes exhibit an r-2 dependence and decay over a similar distance. The relative importance of estuarine tidal influence is assessed with the tidal interaction index ( Ti= ue/ ua). The

  2. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  3. Sensitivity of carbon paleoproductivity in the Southern California Current System on different time scales for the last 2 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella-Gutiérrez, Jose; Herguera, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The San Lázaro Basin (SLB) sediment record is highly sensitive to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) due to its location vertically underlying the dynamic boundary between the northern, cooler and fresher waters of the California Current System (CCS) and the southern, warmer and saltier surface waters from the subtropics and tropics. Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and the ensuing stratified surface water column favor carbonate productivity, mostly dominated by the export of coccolithophorids as observed during El Niño events, while cool SSTs and a less stratified water column favor a relatively higher export of organic carbon. Here we show how during the last two millennia, the mechanisms that drive the organic carbon and carbonate export depend on the time scale considered. The organic carbon and carbonate records show opposite trends for the past 2000 years. On multicentennial periodicities, their variability is probably a result of precessional forcing and associated decreasing Northern Hemisphere insolation, which has been shown to affect the migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the polar jet stream. On shorter time scales, interannual to centennial, the SLB records exhibit an ENSO-like variability; similarly, decadal to multidecadal variability is correlated with instrumental and reconstructed PDO records. We further show how interannual variance seems to have increased during the Little Ice Age, most likely related to large ENSO events, in contrast with an apparent reduction in this type of variability between 400 and 1350 Common Era, suggesting a changing sensitivity of the ENSO teleconnection in the southern CCS for the past two millennia.

  4. The Effect of Ice Shelf Meltwater on Antarctic Sea Ice and the Southern Ocean in an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauling, A.; Bitz, C. M.; Smith, I.; Langhorne, P.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that recent Antarctic sea ice expansion resulted from an increase in fresh water reaching the Southern Ocean. This presentation investigates this conjecture in an Earth System Model. The freshwater flux from ice sheet and ice shelf mass imbalance is largely missing in models that participated in the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). However, CMIP5 models do account for the fresh water from precipitation minus evaporation (P-E). On average in CMIP5 models P- E reaching the Southern Ocean has increased to a present value of about 2600 Gt yr-1 greater than pre-industrial times and 3-8 times larger than estimates of the mass imbalance of Antarctic ice sheets and shelves. Two sets of model experiments were conducted from 1980-2013 in CESM1-CAM5 artificially distributing fresh water either at the ocean surface according to an estimate of iceberg melt, or at the ice shelf fronts at depth. An anomalous reduction in vertical advection of heat into the surface mixed layer resulted in sea surface cooling at high southern latitudes, and an associated increase in sea ice area. A freshwater enhancement of 1780 Gt yr-1 (approximately 1.3 times either present day basal melt or iceberg calving freshwater fluxes) raised the sea ice total area by 1×106 km2. Yet, even a freshwater enhancement up to 2670 Gt yr-1 was insufficient to offset the sea ice decline due to anthropogenic forcing for any period of 20 years or longer. Further, the sea ice response was found to be insensitive to the depth of fresh water injection.

  5. Climate change, reproductive performance and diet composition of marine birds in the southern California Current system, 1969 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydeman, William J.; Hester, Michelle M.; Thayer, Julie A.; Gress, Franklin; Martin, Paige; Buffa, Joelle

    We studied the effects of low-frequency climate change on the reproductive performance of 11 species of marine bird in the southern California Current system, 1969-1997. Reproductive performance of Brown Pelican ( Pelecanus occidentalis) and Double-crested Cormorant ( Phalacrocrax auritus) in southern California demonstrated an increase in the 1970s and early 1980s, attributable to recovery from organochlorine contamination (primarily DDE). Brandt's Cormorant ( Phalacrocorax penicillatus) in central California was the only species to demonstrate a secular increase in performance through time, a pattern that remains unexplained. Ashy Storm-petrel ( Oceanodroma homochroa) and Pelagic Cormorant ( Phalacrocorax pelagicus) demonstrated curvilinear patterns of change, with decreasing reproductive performance in the past decade. All other species including Western Gull ( Larus occidentalis), Pigeon Guillemot ( Cepphus columba), Xantus's Murrelet ( Synthiloboramphus hypoleucus), Common Murre ( Uria aalge), Cassin's Auklet ( Ptychoramphus aleuticus) and Rhinoceros Auklet ( Cerorhinca monocerata) showed diminishing reproductive performance through time. Patterns of change for the murre and auklets were not significant, presumably because of a lack of reproductive variation for these species, which display a conservative breeding effort (i.e. single-egg clutches). Changes in the birds' abilities to provision young and maintain chick survival during May-July each year appeared most closely related to overall changes in reproductive performance. Dietary change indicated a decline in use of juvenile rockfish ( Sebastes spp.) by marine birds in central California. There was also significant interannual variability in consumption of juvenile rockfish and the euphausiid Thysanoessa spinifera. Patterns of change in marine bird reproductive performance were generally concordant between southern and central California after considering the period of recovery for Brown Pelican and

  6. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" Strains in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the "Ca. Liberibacter" genera.

  7. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” Strains in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the “Ca. Liberibacter” genera. PMID:26741827

  8. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" Strains in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the "Ca. Liberibacter" genera. PMID:26741827

  9. Ground-water flow and saline water in the shallow aquifer system of the southern watersheds of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2003-01-01

    Population and tourism continues to grow in Virginia Beach, Virginia, but the supply of freshwater is limited. A pipeline from Lake Gaston supplies water for northern Virginia Beach, but ground water is widely used to water lawns in the north, and most southern areas of the city rely solely on ground water. Water from depths greater than 60 meters generally is too saline to drink. Concentrations of chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Virginia Beach, Department of Public Utilities, investigated the shallow aquifer system of the southern watersheds to determine the distribution of fresh ground water, its potential uses, and its susceptibility to contamination. Aquifers and confining units of the southern watersheds were delineated and chloride concentrations in the aquifers and confining units were contoured. A ground-water-flow and solute-transport model of the shallow aquifer system reached steady state with regard to measured chloride concentrations after 31,550 years of freshwater recharge. Model simulations indicate that if freshwater is found in permeable sediments of the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer, such a well field could supply freshwater, possibly for decades, but eventually the water would become more saline. The rate of saline-water intrusion toward the well field would depend on the rate of pumping, aquifer properties, and on the proximity of the well field to saline water sources. The steady-state, ground-water-flow model also was used to simulate drawdowns around two hypothetical well fields and drawdowns around two hypothetical open-pit mines. The chloride concentrations simulated in the model did not approximate the measured concentrations for some wells, indicating sites where local hydrogeologic units or unit properties do not conform to the simple hydrogeology of the model. The Columbia aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown

  10. Clear Sky Identification Using Data From Remote Sensing Systems at ARM's Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L.; Rodriguez, D.; Cederwall, R.

    2000-06-27

    Clouds profoundly affect our weather and climate due, in large part, to their interactions with radiation. Unfortunately, our understanding of these interactions is, at best, incomplete, making it difficult to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiation in climate models. The improved treatment of clouds and radiation, and a better understanding of their interaction, in climate models is one of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's major goals. To learn more about the distribution of water and ice, i.e., clouds, within an atmospheric column, ARM has chosen to use the remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols at its three climatologically-diverse sites as its primary observational method. ARM's most heavily instrumented site, which has operated continuously for more than a decade, is its Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility, located near Lamont, OK. Cloud-observing instruments at the Central Facility include the Whole Sky Imager, ceilometers, lidar, millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers and radiosondes.

  11. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  12. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:26261984

  13. The influence of Pacific Equatorial Water on fish diversity in the southern California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClatchie, Sam; Thompson, Andrew R.; Alin, Simone R.; Siedlecki, Samantha; Watson, William; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    The California Undercurrent transports Pacific Equatorial Water (PEW) into the Southern California Bight from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. PEW is characterized by higher temperatures and salinities, with lower pH, representing a source of potentially corrosive (aragonite,Ω<1) water to the region. We use ichthyoplankton assemblages near the cores of the California Current and the California Undercurrent to determine whether PEW influenced fish diversity. We use hydrographic data to characterize the interannual and seasonal variability of estimated pH and aragonite saturation with depth. Although there is substantial variability in PEW presence as measured by spice on the 26.25-26.75 isopycnal layer, as well as in pH and aragonite saturation, we found fish diversity to be stable over the decades 1985-1996 and 1999-2011. We detected significant difference in species structure during the 1998 La Niña period, due to reduced species evenness. Species richness due to rare species was higher during the 1997/1998 El Niño compared to the La Niña but the effect on species structure was undetectable. Lack of difference in the species abundance structure in the decade before and after the 1997/1999 ENSO event showed that the assemblage reverted to its former structure following the ENSO perturbation, indicating resilience. While the interdecadal species structure remained stable, the long tail of the distributions shows that species richness increased between the decades consistent with intrusion of warm water with more diverse assemblages into the southern California region.

  14. Carbonatites in a subduction system: The Pleistocene alvikites from Mt. Vulture (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Massimo; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Tonarini, Sonia; Doglioni, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    We report here, for the first time, on the new finding of extrusive calciocarbonatite (alvikite) rocks from the Pleistocene Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy). These volcanic rocks, which represent an outstanding occurrence in the wider scenario of the Italian potassic magmatism, form lavas, pyroclastic deposits, and feeder dikes exposed on the northern slope of the volcano. The petrography, mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry attest the genuine carbonatitic nature of these rocks, that are characterized by high to very high contents of Sr, Ba, U, LREE, Nb, P, F, Th, high Nb/Ta and LREE/HREE ratios, and low contents of Ti, Zr, K, Rb, Na and Cs. The O-C isotope compositions are close to the "primary igneous carbonatite" field and, thus, are compatible with an ultimate mantle origin for these rocks. The Sr-Nd-Pb-B isotope compositions, measured both in the alvikites and in the silicate volcanic rocks, indicate a close genetic relationship between the alvikites and the associated melilitite/nephelinite rocks. Furthermore, these latter products are geochemically distinct from the main foiditic-phonolitic association of Mt. Vulture. We propose a petrogenetic/geodynamic interpretation which has important implications for understanding the relationships between carbonatites and orogenic activity. In particular, we propose that the studied alvikites are generated through liquid unmixing at crustal levels, starting from nephelinitic or melilititic parent liquids. These latter were produced in a hybrid mantle resulting from the interaction through a vertical slab window, between a metasomatized mantle wedge, moving eastward from the Tyrrhenian/Campanian region, and the local Adriatic mantle. The occurrence of carbonatite rocks at Mt. Vulture, that lies on the leading edge of the Southern Apennines accretionary prism, is taken as an evidence for the carbonatation of the mantle sources of this volcano. We speculate that mantle carbonatation is related to the introduction of

  15. Southern Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Southern Africa     View larger JPEG image ... visibility of smoke plumes and haze. The southern tip of South Africa is at the bottom of the image, and Zambia is at the top. ... MISR Team. Aug 25, 2000 - South Africa to Zambia including the Okavango Delta. project:  ...

  16. Fluid geochemistry of natural manifestations from the Southern Poroto-Rungwe hydrothermal system (Tanzania): Preliminary conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delalande, Manuëlla; Bergonzini, Laurent; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Guidi, Massimo; Andre, Luc; Abdallah, Issah; Williamson, David

    2011-01-01

    The South Poroto-Rungwe geothermal field, in the northern part of the Malawi rift, Tanzania divides in two main areas. The relatively high altitude northern area around the main Ngozi, Rungwe, Tukuyu and Kyejo volcanoes, is characterised by cold and gas-rich springs. In contrast, hot springs occur in the southern and low-altitude area between the Kyela and Livingstone faults. The isotopic signature of the almost stagnant, cold springs of the Northern district is clearly influenced by H 2O-CO 2(g) exchange as evidenced from negative oxygen-shifts in the order of few deltas permil. In contrast, the isotopic signature of waters discharged from the hot springs of the Southern district is markedly less affected by the H 2O-CO 2(g) interaction. This evidence is interpreted as an effect of the large, permanent outflow of these springs, which supports the hypothesis of a regional-scale recharge of the major thermal springs. Measurements of carbon isotope variations of the dissolved inorganic carbon of waters and CO 2(g) from the Northern and Southern springs support a model of CO 2(g)-driven reactivity all over the investigated area. Our combined chemical and isotopic results show that the composition of hot springs is consistent with a mixing between (i) cold surface fresh (SFW) and (ii) Deep Hot Mineralised (DHMW) Water, indicating that the deep-originated fluids also supply most of the aqueous species dissolved in the surface waters used as local potable water. Based on geothermometric approaches, the temperature of the deep hydrothermal system has been estimated to be higher than 110 °C up to 185 °C, in agreement with the geological and thermal setting of the Malawi rift basin. Geochemical data point to (i) a major upflow zone of geothermal fluids mixed with shallow meteoric waters in the Southern part of the province, and (ii) gas absorption phenomena in the small, perched aquifers of the Northern volcanic highlands.

  17. Coastal and estuarine studies continue to grow at AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Malcolm

    Coastal and estuarine science is a rapidly growing area of research driven in part by an increasing awareness of man's impact on the coastal zone and the importance of understanding its fragile ecosystems. This area of study fits well into AGU's initiatives on enhancing interdisciplinary research.Coastal and Estuarine Studies is an open, numbered series of monographs that covers all branches of coastal and estuarine sciences, coastal meteorology, marine policy, coastal conservation, environmental toxicology, coastal ocean engineering, and transportation. However, all book topics must be firmly grounded in the geosciences. The series aims to promote the synthesis and speedy publication of significant contemporary research results in important and rapidly evolving fields. Forty-two volumes have been published since the series was founded in 1978.

  18. Contrasting tropical estuarine ecosystem functioning and stability: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Maria Ching

    2015-03-01

    A comparative study of the Sine-saloum (Senegal) and Gambia (The Gambia) estuaries was performed based on trophic model outputs that describe the system structure and functioning. These trophic models were constructed such as to differentiate main energetic flows in the systems and express how climate change may have impacted ecosystem resilience to change. Estuarine fish assemblages are highly resilient despite exposure to vast hydrodynamic variations and stress. Coupled with strong anthropogenic-driven stresses such as fisheries and climate change, ecosystems may undergo severe regime shifts that may weaken their resilience and stability. Taxonomically related and morphologically similar species do not necessarily play similar ecological roles in these two ecosystems. Biomass and production in the Sine-saloum are concentrated at trophic levels (TLs) 2 and 3, while for the Gambia, both are concentrated at TL3. Higher TL biomasses in Gambia compared to Sine-Saloum may be explained by the latter ecosystem being characterized by inverse hypersalinity. Higher TL of production in Sine-Saloum is due to higher exploitations compared to Gambia where fishing activities are still less developed. High production and consumption rates of some groups in both ecosystems indicate high system productivity. Elevated productivity may be due to higher abundance of juvenile fishes in most groups that utilize the latter as refuge and/or nursery zones. Both ecosystems are phytoplankton-driven. Differences in group trophic and ecological roles are mainly due to adaptive responses of these species to seasonal and long-term climate and anthropogenic stressors. System indicators suggest different levels of ecosystem resilience and stability as a function of biodiversity. Relevance of other observations on ecosystem functioning and indicators in relation to perturbation is discussed.

  19. Integrative assessment of organotin contamination in a southern European estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, NW Portugal): tracking temporal trends in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the EU ban.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Matsudaira, Chiho; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Barroso, Carlos

    2007-10-01

    Organotin (OT) compounds have been used as biocide agents in antifouling paints since the mid 1960s and are now ubiquitous in the marine environment. Due to their high toxicity to non-target species they were banned from antifouling paints in the European Union in 2003 (2002/62/EC directive). The aim of the present work is to assess any obvious decline of the OT environmental levels at Ria de Aveiro (NW Portugal) after the ban. The organotins - monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPT), diphenyltin (DPT), triphenyltin (TPT), monoctyltin (MOT), dioctyltin (DOT) and trioctyltin (TOT) - were quantified in the gastropod Nassarius reticulatus, in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and in sediments. Imposex (imposition of male characters on females of gonochorist gastropods) in N. reticulatus was additionally used as a biomarker of TBT pollution. Time comparisons show a slight decrease of imposex between 2003 and 2005 probably as a consequence of the EU ban, though in some cases this trend seems to have started earlier since 2000. The fraction of TBT relatively to its metabolites has been decreasing over the last years but still remains high suggesting that there are still recent inputs of this compound into the study area.

  20. Skills of yearly prediction of the early-season rainfall over southern China by the NCEP climate forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Siyu; Yang, Song; Deng, Yi; Li, Qiaoping

    2015-11-01

    The prominent rainfall over southern China from April to June, usually characterized by a rain belt aligned in a southwest-northeast direction, is referred to here as the early-season rainfall (ESR). The predictability of the ESR is studied by analyzing the 45-day hindcast made with the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) and several observational data sets. Skills of predicting the ESR and the associated atmospheric circulation and surface air temperature (SAT) patterns in each year are assessed with multiple methods. Results show that the ESR can be well predicted by the CFSv2 in advance by 20 days in some years including 2005 and 2006, while the lead time of skillful prediction is limited to around 1 week in some other years such as 2001 and 2010. More accurate predictions of the ESR seem to be related to the higher skills of CFSv2 in predicting the dominant modes of the rainfall variability. Moreover, atmospheric circulation patterns associated with the ESR and the SAT over the western Pacific warm pool in the preceding winter can be important signals for ESR prediction since in the years with good skills of ESR prediction, the CFSv2 also predicted these signals successfully. An overestimate (underestimate) of the SAT may lead to large biases in the predicted atmospheric circulation and subsequently result in an underestimate (overestimate) southern China ESR.

  1. Biogeochemical classification of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Henry O; Boyer, Joseph N; Castro, Joffre; Harlem, Peter

    2013-10-15

    South Florida's watersheds have endured a century of urban and agricultural development and disruption of their hydrology. Spatial characterization of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters is important to Everglades' restoration programs. We applied Factor Analysis and Hierarchical Clustering of water quality data in tandem to characterize and spatially subdivide South Florida's coastal and estuarine waters. Segmentation rendered forty-four biogeochemically distinct water bodies whose spatial distribution is closely linked to geomorphology, circulation, benthic community pattern, and to water management. This segmentation has been adopted with minor changes by federal and state environmental agencies to derive numeric nutrient criteria. PMID:23968989

  2. The solar neighborhood. XXXV. Distances to 1404 M dwarf systems within 25 PC in the southern sky

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, Jennifer G.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Dieterich, Sergio B. E-mail: jao@astro.gsu.edu; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present trigonometric, photometric, and photographic distances to 1748 southern (δ⩽0{sup ∘}) M dwarf systems with μ⩾0{sub ⋅}{sup ′′}18 yr{sup −1}, of which 1404 are believed to lie within 25 pc of the Sun. The stars have 6.67⩽V{sub J}⩽21.38 and 3.50⩽(V{sub J}−K{sub s})⩽9.27, covering the entire M dwarf spectral sequence from M0.0 V through M9.5 V. This sample therefore provides a comprehensive snapshot of our current knowledge of the southern sky for the nearest M dwarfs that dominate the stellar population of the Galaxy. Roughly one-third of the 1748 systems, each of which has an M dwarf primary, have published high quality parallaxes, including 179 from the REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars astrometry program. For the remaining systems, we offer photometric distance estimates that have well-calibrated errors. The bulk of these (∼700) are based on new V{sub J}R{sub KC}I{sub KC} photometry acquired at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9 m telescope, while the remaining 500 primaries have photographic plate distance estimates calculated using SuperCOSMOS B{sub J}R{sub 59F}I{sub IVN} photometry. Confirmed and candidate subdwarfs in the sample have been identified, and a census of companions is included.

  3. Towards a coastal ocean forecasting system in Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian seas based on unstructured-grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Ivan; Oddo, Paolo; Pinardi, Nadia; Coppini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian Forecasting System (SANIFS) operational chain is based on a nesting approach. The large scale model for the entire Mediterranean basin (MFS, Mediterranean Forecasting system, operated by INGV, e.g. Tonani et al. 2008, Oddo et al. 2009) provides lateral open boundary conditions to the regional model for Adriatic and Ionian seas (AIFS, Adriatic Ionian Forecasting System) which provides the open-sea fields (initial conditions and lateral open boundary conditions) to SANIFS. The latter, here presented, is a coastal ocean model based on SHYFEM (Shallow HYdrodynamics Finite Element Model) code, which is an unstructured grid, finite element three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (e.g. Umgiesser et al., 2004, Ferrarin et al., 2013). The SANIFS hydrodynamic model component has been designed to provide accurate information of hydrodynamics and active tracer fields in the coastal waters of Southern Eastern Italy (Apulia, Basilicata and Calabria regions), where the model is characterized by a resolution of about of 200-500 m. The horizontal resolution is also accurate in open-sea areas, where the elements size is approximately 3 km. During the development phase the model has been initialized and forced at the lateral open boundaries through a full nesting strategy directly with the MFS fields. The heat fluxes has been computed by bulk formulae using as input data the operational analyses of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Short range pre-operational forecast tests have been performed in different seasons to evaluate the robustness of the implemented model in different oceanographic conditions. Model results are validated by means of comparison with MFS operational results and observations. The model is able to reproduce the large-scale oceanographic structures of the area (keeping similar structures of MFS in open sea), while in the coastal area significant improvements in terms of reproduced structures and dynamics are

  4. The Asian-Australian monsoon and El Nino-Southern Oscillation in the NCAR Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Meehl, G.A.; Arblaster, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    Features associated with the Asian-Australian monsoon system and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are described in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global coupled Climate System Model (CSM). Simulation characteristics are compared with a version of the atmospheric component of the CSM, the NCAR CCM3, run with time-evolving SSTs from 1950 to 1994, and with observations. The CSM is shown to represent most major features of the monsoon system in terms of mean climatology, interannual variability, and connections to the tropical Pacific. This includes a representation of the Southern Oscillation links between strong Asian-Australian monsoons and associated negative SST anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The equatorial SST gradient across the Pacific in the CSM is shown to be similar to the observed with somewhat cooler mean SSTs across the entire Pacific by about 1--2 C. The seasonal cycle of SSTs in the eastern equatorial Pacific has the characteristic signature seen in the observations of relatively warmer SSTs propagating westward in the first half of the year followed by the reestablishment of the cold tongue with relatively colder SSTs propagating westward in the second half of the year. Like other global coupled models, the propagation is similar to the observed but with the establishment of the relatively warmer water in the first half of the year occurring about 1--2 months later than observed. The seasonal cycle of precipitation in the tropical eastern Pacific is also similar to other global coupled models in that there is a tendency for a stronger-than-observed double ITCZ year round, particularly in northern spring, but with a well-reproduced annual maximum of ITCZ strength north of the equator in the second half of the year.

  5. Controls on monthly estuarine residuals: Eulerian circulation and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jennifer M.; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Souza, Alejandro J.

    2014-04-01

    The Dee Estuary, at the NW English-Welsh border, is a major asset, supporting: one of the largest wildlife habitats in Europe, industrial importance along the Welsh coastline and residential and recreational usage along the English coast. Understanding of the residual elevation is important to determine the total water levels that inundate intertidal banks, especially during storms. Whereas, improved knowledge of the 3D residual circulation is important in determining particle transport pathways to manage water quality and morphological change. Using mooring data obtained in February-March 2008, a 3D modelling system has been previously validated against in situ salinity, velocity, elevation and wave observations, to investigate the barotropic-baroclinic wave interaction within this estuary under full realistic forcing. The system consists of a coupled circulation-wave-turbulence model (POLCOMS-WAM-GOTM). Using this modelling system the contribution of different processes and their interactions to the monthly residuals in both elevation and circulation is now assessed. By studying a tidally dominated estuary under wave influence, it is found that baroclinicity induced by a weak river flow has greater importance in generating a residual circulation than the waves, even at the estuary mouth. Although the monthly residual circulation is dominated by tidal and baroclinic processes, the residual estuarine surface elevation is primarily influenced by the seasonal external forcing to the region, with secondary influence from the local wind conditions. During storm conditions, 3D radiation stress becomes important for both elevation and circulation at the event scale but is found here to have little impact over monthly time scales.

  6. Aseismic Slip Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System Captured by Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P

    2001-10-01

    A seismic slip is observed along several faults in the Salton Sea and southernmost Landers rupture zone regions using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data spanning different time periods between 1992 and 1997. In the southernmost Landers rupture zone, projecting south from the Pinto Mountain Fault, sharp discontinuities in the interferometric phase are observed along the sub-parallel Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak Faults beginning three months after the Landers earthquake and is interpreted to be post-Landers after-slip. Abrupt phase offsets are also seen along the two southernmost contiguous 11 km Durmid Hill and North Shore segments of the San Andreas Fault with an abrupt termination of slip near the northern end of the North Shore Segment. A sharp phase offset is seen across 20 km of the 30 km-long Superstition Hills Fault before phase decorrelation in the Imperial Valley along the southern 10 km of the fault prevents coherent imaging by InSAR. A time series of deformation interferograms suggest most of this slip occurred between 1993 and 1995 and none of it occurred between 1992 and 1993. A phase offset is also seen along a 5 km central segment of the Coyote Creek fault that forms a wedge with an adjoining northeast-southwest trending conjugate fault. Most of the slip observed on the southern San Andreas and Superstition Hills Faults occurred between 1993 and 1995--no slip is observed in the 92-93 interferograms. These slip events, especially the Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak events, are inferred to be related to stress redistribution from the June, 1992 M{sub w} = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Best-fit elastic models of the San Andreas and Superstition Hills slip events suggest source mechanisms with seismic moments over three orders of magnitude larger than a maximum possible summation of seismic moments from all seismicity along each fault segment during the entire 4.8-year time interval spanned by the InSAR data. Aseismic moment releases of this

  7. Late Pleistocene drainage systems beneath Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Circe, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of an extensive grid of seismic-reflection profiles, along with previously published sedimentary data and geologic information from surrounding coastal areas, outline the ancestral drainage systems of the Delaware River beneath lower Delaware Bay. Major paleovalleys within these systems have southeast trends, relief of 10-35 m, widths of 1-8 km, and axial depths of 31-57 m below present sea level. The oldest drainage system was carved into Miocene sands, probably during the late Illinoian lowstand of sea level. It followed a course under the northern half of the bay, continued beneath the Cape May peninsula, and extended onto the present continental shelf. This system was buried by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and shallow-marine sediments during Sangamonian time. At the height of the Sangamonian sea-level transgression, littoral and nearshore processes built the Cape May peninsula southward over the northern drainage system and formed a contiguous submarine sedimentary ridge that extended partway across the present entrance to the bay. When sea level fell during late Wisconsinan time, a second drainage system was eroded beneath the southern half of the bay in response to the southerly shift of the bay mouth. This system, which continued across the shelf, was cut into Coastal Plain deposits of Miocene and younger age and included not only the trunk valley of the Delaware River but a large tributary valley formed by the convergence of secondary streams that drained the Delaware coastal area. During the Holocene rise of sea level, the southern drainage system was covered by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and paralic deposits that accumulated due to the passage of the estuarine circulation cell and to the landward and upward migration of coastal sedimentary environments. Some Holocene deposits have been scoured subsequently by strong tidal currents. The southward migration of the ancestral drainage systems beneath Delaware

  8. Southern Tibet Detachment System at Khula Kangri, Eastern Himalaya: A Large-Area, Shallow Detachment Stretching into Bhutan?

    PubMed

    Edwards; Pêcher; Kidd; Burchfiel; Royden

    1999-09-01

    A new map and cross sections of the Khula Kangri and Kankar Pünzum-Monlakarchung High Himalayan ranges in the Tibet-Bhutan frontier area are presented from integration of unpublished mapping from the summit section of Khula Kangri and new remote sensing together with previous mapping. The ranges define an orographic bifurcation of the High Himalaya that results in a north-south repetition of the main geological section and coincides with the morphological repetition. The Southern Tibet Detachment System that juxtaposes the Tethyan sedimentary rocks against the gneisses and granites of the High Himalayan Crystalline can be continuously traced around both ranges and is not imbricated. Postdetachment kilometer-scale flexure and faulting account for the features of the observed bifurcation. The true map extent of the Khula Kangri and Monlakarchung-Passalum granite batholiths is now apparent. We propose that the two plutons are part of the same originally continuous body.

  9. A continuous, real-time water quality monitoring system for the coral reef ecosystems of Nanwan Bay, Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tew, Kwee Siong; Leu, Ming-Yih; Wang, Jih-Terng; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Chung-Chi; Meng, Pei-Jie

    2014-08-30

    The coral reef ecosystems of Nanwan Bay, Southern Taiwan are undergoing degradation due to anthropogenic impacts, and as such have resulted in a decline in coral cover. As a first step in preventing the continual degradation of these coral reef environments, it is important to understand how changes in water quality affect these ecosystems on a fine-tuned timescale. To this end, a real-time water quality monitoring system was implemented in Nanwan Bay in 2010. We found that natural events, such as cold water intrusion due to upwelling, tended to elicit temporal shifts in coral spawning between 2010 and 2011. In addition, Degree Heating Weeks (DHWs), a commonly utilized predictor of coral bleaching, were 0.92 and 0.59 in summer 2010 and 2011, respectively. Though this quantity of DHW was below the presumed stress-inducing value for these reefs, a rise in DHWs in the future may stress the resident corals.

  10. Field studies in estuarine ecosystems: A review of approaches for assessing contaminant effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The types of data obtained in field studies must correspond to data used for risk assessment in order to verify approaches to predicting contaminant fate and effects in estuarine systems. Survival of caged test animals at field test sites provides field data for direct comparison with laboratory toxicity test results. Coupling survival and other effects data from caged-animal studies with assessments of stocks and dynamics of populations of the same or a related species at the field site allows extrapolation from simple laboratory and field test results to more complex and ecologically significant interpretations. The paper presents examples of various approaches to contaminant problems in estuaries.

  11. Occurrence of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, southern New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stackelberg, Paul E.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    1997-01-01

    Water samples were collected from a network of 72 shallow monitoring wells to assess the chemical quality of recently recharged ground water in the surficial Kirkwood- Cohansey aquifer system of southern New Jersey. The wells are randomly distributed among agricultural, urban, and undeveloped areas to provide data representative of chemical conditions of ground water underlying each of these land-use settings. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC?s). Concentrations of nitrate were highest in agricultural areas, where the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen was exceeded in 60 percent of the samples. Concentrations of nitrate were intermediate in urban areas, where the 10-mg/L concentration was exceeded in only 1 of 44 samples. All concentrations in samples from undeveloped areas were less than 1.0 mg/L. Pesticides and VOC?s were frequently detected; however, concentrations were low and rarely exceeded established or proposed USEPA or N.J. Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) drinking-water regulations. With the exception of the agricultural pesticide dinoseb, established regulations are at least 2.9 times the maximum concentration for pesticides and at least 5 times the maximum concentration for VOC?s reported in the samples from the 72- well network. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are ongoing in southern New Jersey to evaluate the (1) presence and concentration of pesticide-degradation byproducts in shallow ground water; (2) presence and movement of nitrate, pesticides, and VOC?s in the atmosphere, streams, unsaturated zone, and aquifers; (3) transport and fate of these compounds as they migrate deeper into the aquifer system; and (4) implications of these findings for the integrity of the regional water supply.

  12. Tungsten-molybdenum fractionation in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. Jade; Helz, George R.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) concentrations were measured in surface waters and sediment pore waters of Terrebonne Bay, a shallow estuary in the Mississippi River delta, to investigate the biogeochemical processes that fractionate these Group 6 elements relative to one another during transit from weathering to sedimentary environments. Although many of the chemical properties of W and Mo are similar, the two elements behave autonomously, and the fractionation mechanisms are only partly understood. In sulfidic pore waters, dissolved Mo is depleted relative to river water-seawater mixtures, whereas dissolved W is >10-fold enriched. Reductive dissolution of poorly crystalline phases like ferrihydrite, which is a preferential host of W relative to Mo in grain coatings on river-borne particles, can explain the dissolved W enrichment. Dissolved W becomes increasingly enriched as H2S(aq) rises above about 60 μM due to transformation of WO42- to thiotungstates as well as to additional reductive dissolution of phases that host W. In contrast, as rising sulfide transforms MoO42- to thiomolybdates in pore waters, dissolved Mo is suppressed, probably owing to equilibration with an Fe-Mo-S phase. This putative phase appears to control the aqueous ion product, Q = [Fe2+][MoS42-]0.6 [H2S0]0.4/[H+]0.8, at a value of 10-7.78. Concentrations of dissolved W and Mo in pore waters bear no relation to concentrations in surface waters of the same salinity. In surface waters, dissolved Mo is nearly conserved in the estuarine mixing zone. Dissolved W appears also to be conserved except for several cases where W may have been enhanced by exchange with underlying, W-rich pore waters. With increasing salinity, the molar Mo/W ratio rises from about 10 to about 1000 in surface waters whereas it is mostly <10 in underlying pore waters and in highly sulfidic pore waters is mostly near 1. Differences in two chemical properties may account for this fractionation of Mo with respect to

  13. Increased human occupation and agricultural development accelerates the population contraction of an estuarine delphinid

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wenzhi; Karczmarski, Leszek; Xia, Jia; Zhang, Xiyang; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few thousand years, human development and population expansion in southern China have led to local extirpation and population contraction of many terrestrial animals. At what extent this early human-induced environmental change has also affected coastal marine species remains poorly known. We investigated the demographic history of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD); an obligatory inshore species known for its susceptibility to anthropogenic impacts in one of China’s most developed coastal regions. Although the deltaic evolution of PRD has been influenced by climate since the Holocene, ~74% reduction of the dolphin’s effective population size occurred within the last 2000 years, consistent with ~61% habitat contraction during this period. This considerable and recent population contraction may have been due to land use practices and deforestation in the upper/middle Pearl River region, all leading to increasing sedimentation rate in the estuarine area. As anthropogenic impacts within the drainage of Pearl River affected a vast area, coastal dolphins and large terrestrial mammals in southern China may share a similar demographic history, whilst the demographic and biogeographic history of the PRD humpback dolphins may be symptomatic of similar processes that this species may have undergone elsewhere in the region. PMID:27759106

  14. Watershed Export and Estuarine Ecosystem Response to Pulsed Inputs of Nitrogen to South Texas Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. W.; Mooney, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    and estuarine ecosystem responses is increasingly important with respect to management of south Texas estuaries. These systems also provide a good model for thinking about the role of storm events in watershed-estuary systems more generally.

  15. The Role of Pulse Dynamics and Watershed-Scale Anthropogenic Impacts on Estuarine Cycling of Terrigenous Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchouarn, P.; Houel, S.; Lucotte, M.

    2004-05-01

    There still exists large uncertainties about the role that terrestrial organic matter (TOM) plays in riverine and estuarine bioproductivity and of the few studies that have addressed its dynamics in estuaries, most have failed to capture the range of hydrologic, seasonal, and land cover variability inherent in these systems. Temporal sampling of particulate fluxes in the water column of the St. Lawrence Estuary for example shows a huge contrast in both the quantity and quality of TOM that reaches this system over a year's time. Despite the limitations in fully understanding the role of pulse dynamics in carbon cycling, we now acknowledge however that bacterial respiration of terrestrial allochthonous carbon sustains the metabolic activity of many freshwater and estuarine systems. Indeed, it has been suggested that anthropogenic non-point source inputs of TOM (i.e. agricultural land use) may even drive large estuaries towards net heterotrophy. Additionally, large-scale impacts to watersheds such as impoundment of vast reservoirs can significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in river-estuarine systems. Among such impacts, we present a carbon budget from boreal reservoirs that suggest that at a maximum 95% and at a minimum 50% of carbon eroded from flooded soils are unaccounted for in reservoir basins several decades after impoundment. If a significant fraction of this eroded soil organic matter is exported from reservoirs by hydrodynamic forcing, and is redeposited in estuarine/coastal sedimentary basins, then we need to quantify the impact of man-made reservoir generation on translocation inputs to downstream systems. On the other hand, the spiraling of a fraction of that material into receiving streams and, most importantly, estuaries may also contribute to increased CO2 evasion rates and thus need to be taken into account as an indirect emission term of greenhouse gases attributable to reservoirs.

  16. Spatial dynamics of coccolithophore communities during an upwelling event in the Southern Benguela system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Jacques; Bailey, Geoffrey W.

    1995-12-01

    The spatial dynamics of coccolithophore communities were investigated in the top 100 m of a longitudinal transect off Hondeklip Bay, Southern Benguela region, during a period of active upwelling in late June 1993. This transect crossed five hydrological domains that were identified from the vertical sections of temperature and salinity, namely the upwelling zone, the upwelling front, the intermediate domain, the offshore divergence, and the oceanic region. Total coccolithophore standing crops ranged from less than 10 × 10 3 cells 1 -1 to a maximum of 278 × 103 cells 1-1. Highest values were recorded in the top 25 m in the upwelling zone and at the offshore edge of the upwelling front. Fifty different taxa were identified with Emiliania huxleyi and Syracosphaera epigrosa being the dominant forms in the standing stock. The offshore divergence and upwelling front effectively isolated assemblages with distinct species compositions and diversity trends. The most successful assemblage in terms of both species diversity and standing crop was found in the intermediate domain where oceanic and upwelled water mix. Equally important was the control of the water-masses motion on the vertical distribution of coccolithophore communities. Shallow-dwelling communities thrived in the inshore upwelling and offshore divergence areas, whereas deep-dwelling communities were found in the intermediate domain, where surface waters downwell. No clear relationship was found between the concentrations in major nutrients, and the species diversity and total standing crop values. S. epigrosa was the only recorded species whose absolute abundance showed a positive relationship with the nitrate and phosphate surface-water concentrations.

  17. Seismic properties of the Nazca oceanic crust in southern Peruvian subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The horizontal Nazca slab, extending over a distance of ~800 km along the trench is one of enigmatic features in Peruvian subduction zone. Increased buoyancy of the oceanic lithosphere alone due to the subduction of Nazca Ridge is insufficient to fully explain such a lengthy segment. We use data from the recent seismic experiment in southern Peru to find that the subduction-related hydration plays a major role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper part of the oceanic crust and overlying materials. We observe substantial velocity reductions of ~20-40% near the top plate interface along- and perpendicular-to the trench from ~40-120 km depths. In particular, significant shear wave velocity reductions and subsequently higher P-to-S velocity ratio (exceeding 2.0) at the flat slab region suggest that the seismically probed layer is fluid-rich and mechanically weak. The dominant source of fluid comes from metasediments and subducted crust (Nazca Ridge). Long-term supply of fluid from the southward migrating Nazca Ridge provides additional buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and also lowers the viscosity of the overlying mantle wedge to drive and sustain the flat plate segment of ~800 km along the trench. Also, by comparing calculated seismic velocities with experimentally derived mineral physics data, we additionally provide mechanical constraints on the possible changes in frictional behavior across the subduction zone plate interface. Observed low seismic velocities in the seismogenic zone suggest a presence of low strength materials that may be explained by overpressured pore fluids (i.e., accreted sediment included in the subduction channel).

  18. Seismic properties of the Nazca oceanic crust in southern Peruvian subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YoungHee; Clayton, Robert W.

    2015-11-01

    The horizontal Nazca slab, extending over a distance of ∼800 km along the trench is one of enigmatic features in Peruvian subduction zone. Increased buoyancy of the oceanic lithosphere alone due to the subduction of Nazca Ridge is insufficient to fully explain such a lengthy segment. We use data from the recent seismic experiment in southern Peru to find that the subduction-related hydration plays a major role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper part of the oceanic crust and overlying materials. We observe substantial velocity reductions of ∼20-40% near the top plate interface along- and perpendicular-to the trench from ∼40-120 km depths. In particular, significant shear wave velocity reductions and subsequently higher P-to-S velocity ratio (exceeding 2.0) at the flat slab region suggest that the seismically probed layer is fluid-rich and mechanically weak. The dominant source of fluid comes from metasediments and subducted crust (Nazca Ridge). Long-term supply of fluid from the southward migrating Nazca Ridge provides additional buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and also lowers the viscosity of the overlying mantle wedge to drive and sustain the flat plate segment of ∼800 km along the trench. Also, by comparing calculated seismic velocities with experimentally derived mineral physics data, we additionally provide mechanical constraints on the possible changes in frictional behavior across the subduction zone plate interface. Observed low seismic velocities in the seismogenic zone suggest a presence of low strength materials that may be explained by overpressured pore fluids (i.e., accreted sediment included in the subduction channel).

  19. Groundwater availability in the shallow aquifers of the southern voltaian system: a simulation and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yidana, Sandow; Ophori, Duke; Banoeng-Yakubo, Bruce

    2008-10-01

    A steady state groundwater flow simulation model was developed using available well data and general hydrogeological and geological information, for the Afram Plains area, Ghana. The hydrochemistry of groundwater from wells in the area was then evaluated to determine its suitability for irrigation and domestic uses. The assessment of the irrigation quality of groundwater from this area was based on salinity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratios (SAR), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), and permeability indices (PI). The simulation model reveals that groundwater in the Afram Plains area generally flows from the midsections in the neighborhood of Tease and surrounding areas, where significant recharge takes place, to the outer regions and discharges into the Volta Lake in the southern and eastern sections of the area. Flow magnitude and piezometric maps suggest that there is probably of less potential for groundwater extraction for sustainable irrigation in the central regions of the area, when compared to the other discharge areas. This study reveals that more than 70% of the samples analyzed fall within the C2 S1 category, referring to the medium level salinity and low sodium. Medium salinity waters may be used for irrigation on coarse textured soils with good permeability. About 15% of the data fall within the C3 S2 category, referring to water of high salinity and medium sodicity. High salinity, medium sodicity irrigation water cannot be used on fine-grained soils where drainage is restricted. This is because restricted flow is likely to result in the accumulation of salts in the root zones of crops, leading to salinity and soil clogging crisis. About 3% falls within the C3 S3 (high salinity, high sodicity) category. This category requires special soil management including improved drainage, heavy leaching and the use of chemical amendments on the water. Only one point plots within the extreme salinity sodicity range. Concentrations of fluoride, arsenic and other

  20. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Fox, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine "Limestone Marker" and estuarine "Brown Shale". The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming. At Red Bird field the primary exploration target was the Pennsylvanian "Leo sands" of the Minnelusa Formation, and

  1. Decoupling of nutrient and grazer impacts on a benthic estuarine diatom assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Anna R.; Gonzalez, Vanessa L.; Fong, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Strong interactions between top-down (consumptive) and bottom-up (resource supply) trophic factors occur in many aquatic communities, but these forces can act independently in some microphytobenthic communities. Within benthic estuarine diatom assemblages, the dynamics of these interactions and how they vary with abiotic environmental conditions are not well understood. We conducted a field experiment at two sites with varying habitat characteristics to investigate the interactive effects of grazers and nutrients on benthic estuarine diatoms. We crossed snail (Cerithidea californica) and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) addition treatments in enclosures on a restored tidal sandflat and a reference tidal mudflat in Mugu Lagoon, southern California. We repeated the study in summer 2000 and spring 2001 to assess temporal variation in the interactions. Snails caused a large decrease in diatom relative abundance and biomass (estimated as surface area); nutrients increased diatom abundance but did not alter diatom biomass. Snails and nutrients both reduced average diatom length, although the nutrient effect was weaker and temporally variable, occurring in the reference mudflat in the spring. There were few interactions between snail and nutrient addition treatments, suggesting that links between top-down and bottom-up forces on the diatom community were weak. There were no consistent differences in diatom assemblage characteristics between the two study sites, despite marked differences in sediment grain size and other abiotic characteristics between the sites. The strong diatom response to herbivores and weaker responses to enrichment differed from the previous studies where cyanobacteria increased in response to nutrient enrichment, further dissolving the “black box” perception of microphytobenthic communities. PMID:25568503

  2. Survey of three-dimensional numerical estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Smith, Peter E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper surveys the existing 3-D estuarine hydrodynamic and solute transport models by a review of the commonly used assumptions and approximations, and by an examination of the methods of solution. The model formulations, methods of solution, and known applications are surveyed and summarized in tables. In conclusion, the authors present their modeling philosophy and suggest future research needs.

  3. Marine and Estuarine Ecology. Man and the Gulf of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico (MGM)" is a marine science curriculum developed to meet the marine science needs of tenth through twelfth grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit, which focuses on marine and estuarine ecology, is divided into six sections. The first section contains unit objectives, discussions of the estuarine…

  4. Marine genetic swamping: hybrids replace an obligately estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David G; Gray, Charles A; West, Ronald J; Ayre, David J

    2010-02-01

    Populations of obligately estuarine taxa are potentially small and isolated and may lack genetic variation and display regional differentiation as a result of drift and inbreeding. Hybridization with a wide-ranging marine congener should introduce genetic variation and reduce the effects of inbreeding depression and genetic drift. However, high levels of hybridization can cause demographic and genetic swamping. In southeastern Australia hybridization occurs between obligately estuarine Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) and migratory marine Yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis). Here, we surveyed genetic variation at eight microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region of juvenile fish from five coastal lagoons (including temporal replication in two lagoons) (total n = 970) to determine the frequency and persistence of hybridization, and its likely consequence for the estuarine restricted A. butcheri. Of 688 juvenile fish genotyped 95% were either A. australis (347) or hybrids (309); only 5% (32) were A. butcheri. Most hybrids were later generation hybrids or A. butcheri backcrosses, which are likely multi-generational residents within lagoons. Far greater proportions of hybrid juveniles were found within two lagoons that are generally closed to the ocean (>90% hybrid fish within generally closed lagoons vs. 12-27% in permanently or intermittently open lagoons). In both lagoons, this was consistent across multiple cohorts of fish [79-97% hybrid fish (n = 282)]. Hybridization and introgression represent a major threat to the persistence of A. butcheri and have yet to be investigated for large numbers of estuarine taxa.

  5. Acute toxicity handbook of chemicals to estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.L.

    1987-04-01

    All acute toxicity data developed by the Gulf Breeze Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, since 1961 were evaluated for quality. A data base was established for 1175 tests with 197 chemicals and 52 species of estuarine organisms. The chemicals represent all major groups of pesticides, as well as numerous industrial and inorganic chemicals.

  6. DOES TERRESTRIAL CARBON SUBSIDIZE PRODUCTION OF ESTUARINE FISH LARVAE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented demonstrates the important role that terrestrial ecosystems can play in coastal food webs. We show that terrestrial carbon subsidizes the tidal freshwater and oligohaline portions of an estuarine food web, but that this exogenous carbon source is not impor...

  7. Monitoring nekton as a bioindicator in shallow estuarine habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raposa, K.B.; Roman, C.T.; Heltshe, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of estuarine nekton has many practical and ecological benefits but efforts are hampered by a lack of standardized sampling procedures. This study provides a rationale for monitoring nekton in shallow (< 1 m), temperate, estuarine habitats and addresses some important issues that arise when developing monitoring protocols. Sampling in seagrass and salt marsh habitats is emphasized due to the susceptibility of each habitat to anthropogenic stress and to the abundant and rich nekton assemblages that each habitat supports. Extensive sampling with quantitative enclosure traps that estimate nekton density is suggested. These gears have a high capture efficiency in most habitats and are small enough (e.g., 1 m(2)) to permit sampling in specific microhabitats. Other aspects of nekton monitoring are discussed, including spatial and temporal sampling considerations, station selection, sample size estimation, and data collection and analysis. Developing and initiating long-term nekton monitoring programs will help evaluate natural and human-induced changes in estuarine nekton over time and advance our understanding of the interactions between nekton and the dynamic estuarine environment.

  8. Ordination of the estuarine environment: What the organism experiences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators customarily schedule estuary sampling trips with regard to a variety of criteria, especially tide stage and the day-night cycle. However, estuarine organisms experience a wide suite of continuously changing tide and light conditions. Such organisms may undertake i...

  9. Does Terrestrial Carbon Subsidize Production of Estuarine Fish Larvae?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study shows important connections between terrestrial, riverine and marine energy sources in supporting larval fish production across an estuarine ecosystem in Chesapeake Bay, VA. It adds to a growing body of evidence that across ecosystem energy-exchanges play an important ...

  10. Field Study Manual to Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This field studies manual, developed by biology students in the 1971 Georgia Governor's Honors Program, was designed for collection of data pertinent to freshwater and estuarine habitats. In addition to the various methods of sampling the ecosystem and for quantification of the data, instructions for dividing the field study into three logical…

  11. Salt Marsh--Estuarine Ecosystem: A Liquid Asset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steever, E. Zell

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the salt marsh-estuarine ecosystem is provided. Topics discussed include: the general geologic history and formation of this ecosystem; physical and chemical parameters; variety; primary productivity; tidal zones; kind, sizes and abundance of vegetation; and the environmental factors influencing vegetation. (BT)

  12. Geogenic arsenic and other trace elements in the shallow hydrogeologic system of Southern Poopó Basin, Bolivian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Ormachea Muñoz, Mauricio; Wern, Hannes; Johnsson, Fredrick; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Sracek, Ondra; Thunvik, Roger; Quintanilla, Jorge; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    important process for the mobilisation of As in the shallow groundwaters of the region. Continuous monitoring and expansion of monitoring systems are necessary prerequisites for better understanding of the pattern of As mobilisation in the Southern Poopó Basin. PMID:24091126

  13. Geogenic arsenic and other trace elements in the shallow hydrogeologic system of Southern Poopó Basin, Bolivian Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Ormachea Muñoz, Mauricio; Wern, Hannes; Johnsson, Fredrick; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Sracek, Ondra; Thunvik, Roger; Quintanilla, Jorge; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    important process for the mobilisation of As in the shallow groundwaters of the region. Continuous monitoring and expansion of monitoring systems are necessary prerequisites for better understanding of the pattern of As mobilisation in the Southern Poopó Basin.

  14. The 2012-2014 eruptive cycle of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes. Magmatic-Hydrothermal system interaction and manifestations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Sergio; Alarcón, Alex; Basualto, Daniel; Bengoa, Cintia; Bertín, Daniel; Cardona, Carlos; Córdova, Maria; Franco, Luis; Gil, Fernando; Hernandez, Erasmo; Lara, Luis; Lazo, Jonathan; Mardones, Cristian; Medina, Roxana; Peña, Paola; Quijada, Jonathan; San Martín, Juan; Valderrama, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    Copahue Volcano (COPV), in Southern Andes of Chile, is an andesitic-basaltic stratovolcano, which is located on the western margin of Caviahue Caldera. The COPV have a NE-trending fissure with 9 aligned vents, being El Agrio the main currently active vent, with ca. 400 m in diameter. The COPV is placed into an extensive hydrothermal system which has modulated its recent 2012-2014 eruptive activity, with small phreatic to phreatomagmatic eruptions and isolated weak strombolian episodes and formation of crater lakes inside the main crater. Since 2012, the Southern Andes Volcano Observatory (OVDAS) carried out the real-time monitoring with seismic broadband stations, GPS, infrasound sensors and webcams. In this work, we report pre, sin, and post-eruptive seismic activity of the last two main eruptions (Dec, 2012 and Oct, 2014) both with different seismic precursors and superficial activity, showing the second one a particularly appearance of seismic quiescence episodes preceding explosive activity, as an indicator of interaction between magmatic-hydrothermal systems. The first episode, in late 2012, was characterized by a low frequency (0.3-0.4 Hz and 1.0-1.5 Hz) continuous tremor which increased gradually from background noise level amplitude to values of reduced displacement (DR), close to 50 cm2 at the peak of the eruption, reaching an eruptive column of ~1.5 km height. After few months of recording low energy seismicity, a sequence of low frequency, repetitive and low energy seismic events arose, with a frequency of occurrence up to 300 events/hour. Also, the VLP earthquakes were added to the record probably associated with magma intrusion into a deep magmatic chamber during all stages of eruptive process, joined to the record of VT seismicity during the same period, which is located throughout the Caviahue Caldera area. Both kind of seismic patterns were again recorded in October 2014, being the precursor of the new eruptive cycle at this time as well as the

  15. Links between carbonate productivity and ENSO variability in the southern California Current System for the past 2 Kyrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella-Gutiérrez, J. L.; Herguera, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    San Lázaro Basin (SLB) is a suboxic basin characteristic for its very high sedimentation rates (1mm/yr) and is located in the dynamic southern boundary of the California Current System (CCS). This southern boundary of the CCS generally extends further south during spring into early summer and retracts towards the north during fall and winter, and this pattern is further amplified or reduced on different time scales, (e.i. interannual timescales by El Niño and La Niña events, or multidecadal ones by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)). These oceanographic conditions are related with important differences in the base of the food chain; when the boundary migrates to northern latitudes, the presence of relatively warmer tropical and subtropical waters further stratify the water column, a period when coccolithophorids dominate the microplankton web structure. On the other side, diatoms flourish when the wind-driven circulation expand the subarctic water masses of the CCS to the south and upwelling cells are generated. We find in our cores XRF Ca counts (1 mm resolution) highly correlate with CaCO3 measurements (R=0.56), this last one showing a general decreasing trend over the past 2 Kyrs. The Ca spectrum analysis shows significant peaks for periods centered at 28, 40, 60, 120 yr. The centennial mode of variability of the Ca record shows correlations with Drought area Index from North America. When the variance of this mode is considered, similarities arises with intensity and number of ENSO events from Equatorial archives. Decadal variations of the record are highly correlated (R>0.8) with instrumental measurements of Kaplan sea surface temperature, and the PDO. We will discuss the implications of these periods in the carbonate record and the links between them and other paleoceanographic records in the Pacific.

  16. Variability and trends of ocean acidification in the Southern California Current System: A time series from Santa Monica Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinweber, A.; Gruber, N.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the temporal variability and trends of pH and of the aragonite saturation state, Ωarag, in the southern California Current System on the basis of a 6 year time series from Santa Monica Bay, using biweekly observations of dissolved inorganic carbon and combined calculated and measured alkalinity. Median values of pH and Ωarag in the upper 20 m are comparable to observations from the subtropical gyres, but the temporal variability is at least a factor of 5 larger, primarily driven by short-term upwelling events and mesoscale processes. Ωarag and pH decrease rapidly with depth, such that the saturation horizon is reached already at 130 m, on average, but it occasionally shoals to as low as 30 m. No statistically significant linear trends emerge in the upper 100 m, but Ωarag and pH decrease, on average, at rates of -0.009±0.006 yr-1 and -0.004±0.003 yr-1 in the 100-250 m depth range. These are somewhat larger, but not statistically different from the expected trends based on the recent increase in atmospheric CO2. About half of the variability in the deseasonalized data can be explained by the El Niño Southern Oscillation, with warm phases (El Niño) being associated with above normal pH and Ωarag. The observed variability and trend in Ωarag and pH is well captured by a multiple linear regression model on the basis of a small number of readily observable independent variables. This permits the estimation of these variables for related sites in the region.

  17. Efficiencies of freshwater and estuarine constructed wetlands for phenolic endocrine disruptor removal in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Ying; Yang, Lei; Kuo, Wen-Chien; Zen, Yi-Peng

    2013-10-01

    We examined the distribution and removal efficiencies of phenolic endocrine disruptors (EDs), namely nonylphenol diethoxylates (NP2EO), nonylphenol monoethoxylates (NP1EO), nonylphenol (NP), and octylphenol (OP), in wastewater treated by estuarine and freshwater constructed wetland systems in Dapeng Bay National Scenic Area (DBNSA) and along the Dahan River in Taiwan. Water samples were taken bimonthly at 30 sites in three estuarine constructed wetlands (Datan, Pengcun and Linbian right bank (A and B)) in DBNSA, for eight sampling campaigns. The average removal efficiencies were in the range of 3.13-97.3% for wetlands in DBNSA. The highest average removal occurred in the east inlet to the outlet of the Tatan wetland. The most frequently detected compound was OP (57.7%), whose concentration was up to 1458.7 ng/L in DBNSA. NP was seen in only 20.5% of the samples. The temporal variation of EDs showed a decrease across seasons, where summer>spring>winter>autumn in these constructed wetlands. The removal efficiencies of EDs by estuarine wetlands, in decreasing order, were Datan>Pengcun>Linbian right bank in DBNSA. Water samples collected at 18 sites in three freshwater constructed wetlands (Daniaopi, Hsin-Hai I, and Hsin-Hai II) along the riparian area of Dahan River. NP2EO was the most abundant compound, with a concentration of up to 11,200 ng/L. Removal efficiencies ranged from 55% to 91% for NP1EO, NP2EO, and NP in Hsin-Hai I. The average removal potential of EDs in freshwater constructed wetlands, in decreasing order, was Hsin-Hai II>Daniaopi>Hsin-Hai I constructed wetlands. The lowest concentrations of the selected compounds were observed in the winter. The highest removal efficiency of the selected phenolic endocrine disruptors was achieved by Hsin-Hai I wetland. The calculated risk quotients used to evaluate the ecological risk were up to 30 times higher in the freshwater wetlands along Dahan River than in the estuarine (DBNSA) constructed wetlands, indicating

  18. Juvenile fish condition in estuarine nurseries along the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Fonseca, V.; Ruano, M.; Tanner, S.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2009-03-01

    Connectivity between estuarine fish nurseries and coastal adult habitats can be affected by variations in juvenile growth and survival. Condition indices are renowned proxies of juvenile nutritional status and growth rates and are valuable tools to assess habitat quality. Biochemical (RNA:DNA ratio) and morphometric (Fulton's condition factor K) condition indices were determined in juveniles of Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax collected in putative nursery areas of nine estuaries along the Portuguese coast (Minho, Douro, Ria de Aveiro, Mondego, Tejo, Sado, Mira, Ria Formosa and Guadiana) in the Spring and Summer of two consecutive years (2005 and 2006) with distinct climatic characteristics. Individual condition showed significant variation amongst species. The combined use of both condition indices highlighted the low correlation between them and that RNA:DNA had a higher sensitivity. RNA:DNA varied between years but overall the site relative patterns in condition were maintained from one year to the other. Higher RNA:DNA values were found in Spring than in Summer in most species. Intra-estuarine variation also occurred in several cases. Species specific trends in the variability of condition amongst estuaries were highlighted. Some estuaries had higher juvenile condition for more than one species but results did not reveal an identical trend for all species and sites, hindering the hypotheses of one estuarine nursery promoting superior growth for all present species. Significant correlations were found between condition indices, juvenile densities and environmental variables (water temperature, salinity and depth) in the estuarine nurseries. These influenced juvenile nutritional condition and growth, contributing to the variability in estuarine nursery habitat quality. Management and conservation wise, interest in multi-species approaches is reinforced as assessments based on a single species may not

  19. Characterisation of the hydrology of an estuarine wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Binning, Philip; Willgoose, Garry R.

    1998-11-01

    The intertidal zone of estuarine wetlands is characterised by a transition from a saline marine environment to a freshwater environment with increasing distance from tidal streams. An experimental site has been established in an area of mangrove and salt marsh wetland in the Hunter River estuary, Australia, to characterise and provide data for a model of intertidal zone hydrology. The experimental site is designed to monitor water fluxes at a small scale (36 m). A weather station and groundwater monitoring wells have been installed and hydraulic head and tidal levels are monitored over a 10-week period along a short one-dimensional transect covering the transition between the tidal and freshwater systems. Soil properties have been determined in the laboratory and the field. A two-dimensional finite element model of the site was developed using SEEP/W to analyse saturated and unsaturated pore water movement. Modification of the water retention function to model crab hole macropores was found necessary to reproduce the observed aquifer response. Groundwater response to tidal fluctuations was observed to be almost uniform beyond the intertidal zone, due to the presence of highly permeable subsurface sediments below the less permeable surface sediments. Over the 36 m transect, tidal forcing was found to generate incoming fluxes in the order of 0.22 m 3/day per metre width of creek bank during dry periods, partially balanced by evaporative fluxes of about 0.13 m 3/day per metre width. During heavy rainfall periods, rainfall fluxes were about 0.61 m 3/day per metre width, dominating the water balance. Evapotranspiration rates were greater for the salt marsh dominated intertidal zone than the non-tidal zone. Hypersalinity and salt encrustation observed show that evapotranspiration fluxes are very important during non-rainfall periods and are believed to significantly influence salt concentration both in the surface soil matrix and the underlying aquifer.

  20. Turbine Sound May Influence the Metamorphosis Behaviour of Estuarine Crab Megalopae

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Matthew K.; Jeffs, Andrew G.; Radford, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21–31% compared to silent control treatments, 38–47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46–60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment. PMID:23240063

  1. A Linked Physical and Biological Framework to Assess Biogeochemical Dynamics in a Shallow Estuarine Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C. P.; Wetzel, R. L.; Meyers, M. B.

    1999-12-01

    The littoral zone of Chesapeake Bay contains a mosaic of shallow vegetated and nonvegetated habitats with biotic components that are sensitive to changes in biological and physical driving factors. Static and dynamic modelling frameworks provide an integrative way to study complex hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes in linked estuarine habitats. In this study we describe a spatial simulation model developed and calibrated relative to a specific littoral zone, estuarine ecosystem. The model consisted of four distinct habitats that contained phytoplankton, sediment microalgae, Zostera marina (eelgrass), and Spartina alterniflora. There was tidal exchange of phytoplankton, particulate and dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen between the littoral zone ecosystem and the offshore channel. Physical exchange and biogeochemical transformations within the habitats determined water column concentrations in each habitat. Predicted subtidal water column concentrations and Z. marina and S. alterniflora biomass were within the variability of validation data and the predicted annual rates of net primary production were similar to measured rates. Phytoplankton accounted for 17%, sediment microalgae 46%, the Z. marina community 24% and S. alterniflora 13% of the annual littoral zone primary production. The linked habitat model provided insights into producer, habitat and ecosystem carbon and nitrogen properties that might not have been evident with stand-alone models. Although it was an intra-ecosystem sink for particulate carbon, the seagrass habitat was a DOC source and responsible for over 30% of the littoral zone carbon and nitrogen primary production. The model predicted that the Goodwin Islands littoral zone was a sink of channel derived POC, but a source of DOC to the surrounding estuary. The framework created in this study of estuarine ecosystem dynamics is applicable to many different aquatic systems over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

  2. Turbine sound may influence the metamorphosis behaviour of estuarine crab megalopae.

    PubMed

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21-31% compared to silent control treatments, 38-47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46-60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment.

  3. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats - A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-12-01

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Lastly, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  4. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existingmore » baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.« less

  5. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  6. Turbine sound may influence the metamorphosis behaviour of estuarine crab megalopae.

    PubMed

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21-31% compared to silent control treatments, 38-47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46-60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment. PMID:23240063

  7. Modern estuarine siliceous spiculites, Tasmania, Australia: A non-polar link to Phanerozoic spiculitic cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, C. M.; James, N. P.; Kyser, T. K.; Barrett, N.; Hirst, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    Biosiliceous sedimentary rocks are well known from the geologicrecord and many are correctly interpreted to have formed indeep-water or cold-water environments. Shallow non-polar spiculitesare also known from the rock record, yet no modern analog hasbeen documented for such environments. Bathurst Harbour, anestuarine system in southwest Tasmania, provides this much-neededmodern analog. In this system a sharp halocline separates tannin-richlow-salinity surface waters from clear marine bottom waters.Tannins supply few nutrients and substantially reduce lightpenetration to bottom environments, resulting in a thinned photiczone and the mixing of deeper-water sub-photic biotas of softcorals, bryozoans, and sponges with other organisms more typicalof this temperate shallow-water environment. The well-definedhalocline allows a typically marine biota, including echinoderms,to live in bottom waters of this estuarine setting. The bioclasticfactory, producing both carbonate and siliceous particles, existsin marine subphotic bottom waters of incised channel and shallowrocky environments along the shoreline. Extensive organic-richsoft sediments in protected embayments generate few bioclasts,but contain allochthonous sponge spicules transported from theadjacent bioclastic factory. Trapping of organic material withinthe estuarine system lowers sediment pH and promotes dissolutionof carbonate biofragments, resulting in preferential preservationof siliceous sponge spicules. This situation implies that manybiosiliceous neritic deposits in the rock record may be theresult of similar preferential preservation.

  8. Predictive Relationships for pH and Carbonate Saturation in the Southern California Current System Using Oxygen and Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alin, S. R.; Feely, R. A.; Dickson, A. G.; Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Juranek, L. W.; Ohman, M. D.; Goericke, R.

    2010-12-01

    The California Current System is expected to experience the ecological impacts of ocean acidification earlier than most other ocean regions because marine waters in the North Pacific are among the oldest in the global oceans and natural upwelling processes in this eastern boundary current system bring CO2-rich water masses to the surface in coastal oceans during late spring-early fall months. We used a multiple linear regression (MLR) approach to generate predictive models using oxygen and temperature as proxy variables to reconstruct pH and carbonate saturation states in the Southern California Bight. The calibration data set included high-quality measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, oxygen, temperature, salinity, and nutrients and was collected during a cruise from British Columbia to Baja California in May-June 2007. The resulting relationships predicting pH and aragonite and calcite saturation states (Ω) from oxygen and temperature data were robust, with r2 values >0.98 and root mean square errors of 0.020 (pH), 0.048 (Ωarag), and 0.075 (Ωcalc). Predicted vs. measured ocean acidification conditions (i.e. pH, Ωarag, and Ωcalc) matched very well for seven verification data sets collected between 2008 and 2010 during quarterly CalCOFI cruises in the Southern California Bight and during several sampling dates on an Ensenada transect occupied several times between 2006 and 2010. Over sub-decadal time scales, these predictive models provide a valuable tool for reconstructing historical time-series of ocean acidification conditions in the California Current Ecosystem where historical inorganic carbon measurements are scarce. Reconstructed pH and saturation state values based on CalCOFI oxygen and temperature data for all cruises between 2005 and 2010 reveal a seasonal cycle in the upper water column, with higher pH and Ω values present during the winter cruises, and stronger gradients including much lower pH and Ω values during spring through

  9. Variations of convective systems in the different stages of the MJO in the southern tropical Indian Ocean during CINDY2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Masaki; Yoneyama, Kunio

    2013-04-01

    Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY 2011) was conducted to capture atmospheric and oceanic characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the central Indian Ocean. During CINDY, we deployed the research vessel MIRAI in the southern tropical Indian Ocean (STIO), at (8S, 80.5E), to occupy the southeastern corner of the CINDY/DYNAMO core sounding array for about two months. During the cruise, we captured two MJOs including convectively active event and period toward the active phase (pre-active phase). This study reports the convective systems and its activities, in addition to humidity profiles over Mirai, i.e. the southern tropical Indian Ocean. Basically the convections (and the moist layer) appeared alternatively between at 8S (Mirai) and at equator. In October, the former half was characterized as convectively active at 8S and inactive at equator ("ITCZ-stage"), while the latter was active in Equator and inactive at 8S ("MJO-stage"). The similar alternation also appeared in November. In the ITCZ-stage in both October and November events, the areal coverage of the radar echo appeared with 3- to 5-days cycle. The evolution of convective systems from shallow to deep convections is found in each cycle. The convective systems were just above Mirai in October, while shifted to north or south of Mirai in November. In October event, the vertical profiles of divergence from the radar data (by VAD analyses) (representing field around the convective systems in 100-km scale) resembles that from the radiosonde array representing the larger environmental field in 1000-km scale. On the other hand, the convections in MJO-stage in November was including relatively less shallow convections than in ITCZ-stage, and the radar-derived vertical profile of divergence differ from that by the budget analyses. This indicates that in the MJO-stage the convection in 8S did not dominate the divergent field in 1000-km scale. These

  10. Predicting stochastic systems by noise sampling, and application to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Chekroun, Mickaël David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Ghil, Michael

    2011-07-19

    Interannual and interdecadal prediction are major challenges of climate dynamics. In this article we develop a prediction method for climate processes that exhibit low-frequency variability (LFV). The method constructs a nonlinear stochastic model from past observations and estimates a path of the "weather" noise that drives this model over previous finite-time windows. The method has two steps: (i) select noise samples--or "snippets"--from the past noise, which have forced the system during short-time intervals that resemble the LFV phase just preceding the currently observed state; and (ii) use these snippets to drive the system from the current state into the future. The method is placed in the framework of pathwise linear-response theory and is then applied to an El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) model derived by the empirical model reduction (EMR) methodology; this nonlinear model has 40 coupled, slow, and fast variables. The domain of validity of this forecasting procedure depends on the nature of the system's pathwise response; it is shown numerically that the ENSO model's response is linear on interannual time scales. As a result, the method's skill at a 6- to 16-month lead is highly competitive when compared with currently used dynamic and statistic prediction methods for the Niño-3 index and the global sea surface temperature field. PMID:21730171

  11. Evaluation of the precision agricultural landscape modeling system (PALMS) in the semiarid Texas southern high plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate models to simulate the soil water balance in semiarid cropping systems are needed to evaluate management practices for soil and water conservation in both irrigated and dryland production systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of the Precision Agricultural Land...

  12. Emergy analysis of a silvo-pastoral system, a case study in southern Portugal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mediterranean silvo-pastoral system known as Montado, in Portugal, is a complex land use system composed of an open tree stratum in various densities and an herbaceous layer, used for livestock grazing. Livestock also profit from the acorns, and the grazing contributes to avo...

  13. 78 FR 21515 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH; and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... November 15, 2012, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued a proposed rule (77 FR 68073) to redefine Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, and Perry Counties, MO, from the Southern Missouri wage area to the St... Girardeau, and Perry Counties, MO, from the Southern Missouri wage area to the St. Louis wage area...

  14. Abandoned mine drainage in the Swatara Creek Basin, southern anthracite coalfield, Pennsylvania, USA: 2. performance of treatment systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of passive and semi-passive treatment systems were constructed by state and local agencies to neutralize acidic mine drainage (AMD) and reduce the transport of dissolved metals in the upper Swatara Creek Basin in the Southern Anthracite Coalfield in eastern Pennsylvania. To evaluate the effectiveness of selected treatment systems installed during 1995–2001, the US Geological Survey collected water-quality data at upstream and downstream locations relative to each system eight or more times annually for a minimum of 3 years at each site during 1996–2007. Performance was normalized among treatment types by dividing the acid load removed by the size of the treatment system. For the limestone sand, open limestone channel, oxic limestone drain, anoxic limestone drain (ALD), and limestone diversion well treatment systems, the size was indicated by the total mass of limestone; for the aerobic wetland systems, the size was indicated by the total surface area of ponds and wetlands. Additionally, the approximate cost per tonne of acid treated over an assumed service life of 20 years was computed. On the basis of these performance metrics, the limestone sand, ALD, oxic limestone drain, and limestone diversion wells had similar ranges of acid-removal efficiency and cost efficiency. However, the open limestone channel had lower removal efficiency and higher cost per ton of acid treated. The wetlands effectively attenuated metals transport but were relatively expensive considering metrics that evaluated acid removal and cost efficiency. Although the water-quality data indicated that all treatments reduced the acidity load from AMD, the ALD was most effective at producing near-neutral pH and attenuating acidity and dissolved metals. The diversion wells were effective at removing acidity and increasing pH of downstream water and exhibited unique potential to treat moderate to high flows associated with storm flow conditions.

  15. Extension of a qualitative model on nutrient cycling and transformation to include microtidal estuaries on wave-dominated coasts: Southern hemisphere perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taljaard, S.; van Niekerk, L.; Joubert, W.

    2009-11-01

    Estuaries are dynamic transition zones acting as filters and transformers of nutrients passing from catchments to the sea. We propose an extension to an existing southern hemisphere model on nutrient dynamics in estuaries to include the relatively constricted, microtidal estuaries located along wave-dominated coasts in the region, specifically focusing on the limiting macronutrients nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and on key processes, including physical (e.g. flushing, mixing and sedimentation), geochemical (e.g. flocculation), biochemical (e.g. remineralisation) and biological (e.g. primary production) processes. A simplified model of the physical states (primarily controlled by hydrological characteristics) is used as the basis for the qualitative model, where these are defined in terms of characteristic salinity-induced stratification of the water column, flushing time and the mouth condition. Four physical states are identified: a freshwater-dominated state, freshwater pulsed/recovery state, marine-dominated state and the closed mouth state. The states and their physical characteristics largely resemble that of the earlier model, except that the extended model reflects the dynamics of restricted inlets and introduces the closed mouth state. This model specifically explores the variation within southern African estuarine systems to better inform research and management programmes on the appropriate trophic, temporal and spatial scales at which uncertainties in ecosystem functioning need resolving. It can also be applied to other regions in the southern hemisphere, and even the northern hemisphere, with similar hydrological and estuarine geomorphological characteristics (e.g. the Mediterranean coast, the west coasts of North and South America, and the south-west and south-eastern coasts of Australia).

  16. Hydrogen Isotope Evidence for Giant Meteoric-Hydrothermal Systems Associated with Extension and Magmatism in the Southern Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holk, G. J.; McCarthy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Over 400 published mineral and fluid inclusion δD values from the southern Canadian Cordillera and our new data from the Eocene Penticton Group Volcanics and Coryell Intrusive Suite of the Southern Omineca Belt and the Western Metamorphic Belt of the Central Coast Orogen are compiled using GIS. δDH2O is estimated using published D/H fractionation factors at 400°C; the error is ±20‰, small enough to distinguish deep magmatic/metamorphic fluids from meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. Histogram plots of δDH2O values estimated from minerals reveal peaks at δD = -60‰ (deep fluid) and ­-110‰ (Early Cenozoic meteoric-hydrothermal fluid); this provides a clear distinction between the two kinds of fluid. Our analysis reveals that syn-extensional meteoric-hydrothermal systems (δDH2O < -80‰) affected the eastern margin of the Coast Ranges Batholith between latitude 49° and 55° and the Omineca Belt between latitude 49° and 52°45'; both regions were affected by detachment faulting during late stages of magmatism in the Early Cenozoic (e.g., Parrish et al., 1988; Crawford et al., 2009). Zones that escaped the effects of meteoric-hydrothermal systems, preserving the D/H signature of deep fluids (δD > -80‰), include the Western Metamorphic Belt, the Western and Central Coast Ranges Batholith, the belt of Jurassic metamorphism that extends from the Cariboo Mountains to the Purcell Mountains, and the deepest structural levels of the Shuswap Metamorphic Core Complex; most of these samples have quartz-feldspar 18O/16O fractionations indicative of magmatic temperatures. High δDH2O values (> -50‰) suggest seawater alteration of the plutons of Vancouver Island (Magaritz and Taylor, 1986). Histogram plots of vein quartz fluid inclusion δD values (Nesbitt and Muehlenbachs, 1995) reveal three peaks that include the two produced by the mineral δD values, but these data are dominated by a large peak at δD = -150, a value similar to modern meteoric waters in the region

  17. Choice chamber experiments to test the attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to water of estuarine and riverine origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Nicola C.; Cowley, Paul D.; Whitfield, Alan K.; Kaiser, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Although the recruitment of larvae and juveniles of marine fishes into estuaries has been well documented, little is known about the factors governing the immigration of estuary-associated marine fishes into estuaries. Fishes have a well-developed sense of smell and it has been suggested by several workers that olfactory cues of freshwater or estuarine origin serve as stimuli, attracting larvae and juveniles of estuary-associated species into estuaries. Attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to estuary and river water from the Kowie estuarine system, South Africa, was measured using a rectangular choice chamber. In experiments, conducted during peak recruitment periods, larvae selected estuary and river water with a significantly higher frequency than sea water. This study, the first to assess the possible role of olfaction in the recruitment process of an estuary-associated marine fish species, demonstrates that larvae are able to recognise water from different origins, probably based on odour.

  18. The Impact of Pleistocene Climate on Sediment Routing Systems: Reconstructing Sediment Dispersal from the Southern Alps to the Canterbury Continental Shelf, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, T. G.; Jaeger, J. M.; Marsaglia, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate and base level changes in the Pleistocene are expected to influence the relative storage and transfer of different size fractions in a sediment routing system. We study mechanisms of sediment routing and dispersal and their relative influence on marine strata formation during the Pleistocene using continental shelf strata drilled during IODP Expedition 317 to Canterbury Basin, South Island of New Zealand. We use semi-quantitative mineralogy from bulk, sand (2-0.063 mm), silt (63-15 μm), and clay (<2 μm) size fractions, to reconstruct sediment dispersal paths from the Southern Alps to the ocean. Silt is composed of lithic fragments and individual mineral grains, and the results are not informative on silt dispersal paths. Instead, it compares to bulk mineralogy, reflecting overall variations in terrigenous input to the shelf. Sand and clay mineralogy suggest the variable influence of two dispersal paths to Canterbury shelf: one reflecting direct input from the more proximal fluvial basin (Waitaki Basin), and another southern coastal source. A change in the sand quartz:plagioclase ratio from Middle to Late Pleistocene strata suggests a shift in the mode of sand dispersal from along margin (southern) to across margin (Waitaki). This likely resulted from relatively long sand residence time within the Waitaki Basin during the Middle Pleistocene, amplifying the influence of the southern source. This southern influence is supported by clay mineralogy that shows higher content of smectite versus illite+chlorite during this period. In contrast, Late Pleistocene sand and clay composition mostly reflect the dominant bedrock within the Waitaki basin indicating enhanced transfer of sediment from the Basin. We argue that this change in sediment dispersal is related to the expansion of alpine glaciers in the Southern Alps during the Middle Pleistocene that led to higher glacigenic sediment fluxes and shorter residence time within the sediment routing system.

  19. PCBs and DDE in Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) Eggs and Nestlings from an Estuarine PCB Superfund Site, New Bedford Harbor, MA, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    While breeding tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) have been used as biomonitors for freshwater sites, we report the first use of this species to assess the transfer of breeding ground contaminants from an estuarine system. Eggs and nestlings were collected from nest boxes locat...

  20. Six thousand years of coastline evolution in the Guadalfeo deltaic system (southern Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Lobo, Francisco José; Azor, Antonio; Martín-Rosales, Wenceslao; Pérez-Peña, José Vicente; Bárcenas, Patricia; Macías, Jorge; Fernández-Salas, Luis Miguel; Vázquez-Vílchez, Mercedes

    2014-02-01

    The 4000 BC to present-day coastal and shallow-marine changes of the Guadalfeo River deltaic system (southeast Spain) are studied using historic maps, aerial photographs, diverse submarine data, and hydrodynamic models. The deltaic system evolved with little anthropic influence until the 1940s, when the river mouth was diverted to the west. During the pre-diversion stage, the system evolved from an estuary to a delta due to the enormous sediment yield in the catchment, induced both by anomalously wet climate conditions and by deforestation practices. Accordingly, the coastline advanced significantly (up to 3.3 m year- 1) during this period, particularly during the 1500 to 1873 interval. The estimate for volumetric changes in the deltaic system shows very high specific sediment yield values (around 60-65 t ha- 1 year- 1) in the catchment. The deltaic system mainly evolved by cannibalization of the older, lobate outlet depocentre after the river diversion and the generation of a more elongated depocentre coincident with the current outlet due to enhanced lateral redistribution of sediments (from east to west). The construction of two major dams in the trunk river in the last 30 years has severely blocked sediment supply to the system, although expected coastline erosion has been partially mitigated by longshore sediment redistribution.

  1. The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS): Developing A Coastal Observation System To Enable Both Science Based Decision Making And Scientific Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrill, E.; John, O.

    2005-05-01

    The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS) is a consortium that extends from Northern Baja CA in Mexico to Morro Bay at the southern edge of central California, and aims to streamline, coordinate, and further develop individual institutional efforts by creating an integrated, multidisciplinary coastal observatory in the Bight of Southern California for the benefit of society. By leveraging existing infrastructure, partnerships, and private, local, state, and federal resources, SCCOOS is developing a fully operational coastal observation system to address issues related to coastal water quality, marine life resources, and coastal hazards for end user communities spanning local, state, and federal interests. However, to establish a sensible observational approach to address these societal drivers, sound scientific approaches are required in both the system design and the transformation of data to useful products. Since IOOS and coastal components of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) are not mutually exclusive within this framework, the SCCOOS consortium of observatory implementers have created an organizational structure that encourages dovetailing of OOI into the routine observations provided by the operational components of a regional IOOS. To begin the development, SCCOOS has grant funding from the California Coastal Conservancy as part of a $21M, statewide initiative to establish a Coastal Ocean Currents Monitoring Program, and funding from NOAA's Coastal Observing Technology System (COTS). In addition, SCCOOS is leveraging IT development that has been supported by the NSF Information Technology Research program Real-time observatories, Applications,and Data Manageemnt Network (ROADNET), and anticipates using developments which will result from the NSF Laboratory for Ocean Observatory Knowledge Integration Grid (LOOKING) program. The observational components now funded at SCCOOS include surface current mapping by HF radar; high

  2. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  3. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  4. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  5. Noise analysis of the seismic system employed in the northern and southern California seismic nets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The seismic networks have been designed and operated to support recording on Develocorders (less than 40db dynamic range) and analog magnetic tape (about 50 db dynamic range). The principal analysis of the records has been based on Develocorder films; and background earth noise levels have been adjusted to be about 1 to 2 mm p-p on the film readers. Since the traces are separated by only 10 to 12 mm on the reader screen, they become hopelessly tangled when signal amplitudes on several adjacent traces exceed 10 to 20 mm p-p. Thus, the background noise level is hardly more than 20 db below the level of largest readable signals. The situation is somewhat better on tape playbacks, but the high level of background noise set to accomodate processing from film records effectively limits the range of maximum-signal to background-earth-noise on high gain channels to a little more than 30 db. Introduction of the PDP 11/44 seismic data acquisition system has increased the potential dynamic range of recorded network signals to more than 60 db. To make use of this increased dynamic range we must evaluate the characteristics and performance of the seismic system. In particular, we must determine whether the electronic noise in the system is or can be made sufficiently low so that background earth noise levels can be lowered significantly to take advantage of the increased dynamic range of the digital recording system. To come to grips with the complex problem of system noise, we have carried out a number of measurements and experiments to evaluate critical components of the system as well as to determine the noise characteristics of the system as a whole.

  6. Effects of growth and dissolution on the fractionation of silicon isotopes by estuarine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaole; Olofsson, Martin; Andersson, Per S.; Fry, Brian; Legrand, Catherine; Humborg, Christoph; Mörth, Carl-Magnus

    2014-04-01

    Studies of silicon (Si) isotope fractionation during diatom growth in open ocean systems have documented lower Si isotopic values (δ30Si) in the biogenic silica of diatom frustules compared to dissolved silicon. Recent findings also indicate that Si isotope fractionation occurs during dissolution of diatom frustules, producing higher δ30Si values in the remaining biogenic silica. This study focuses on diatoms from high production areas in estuarine and coastal areas that represent approximately 30-50% of the global marine primary production. Two species of diatoms, Thalassiosira baltica and Skeletonema marinoi, were isolated from the brackish Baltic Sea, one of the largest estuarine systems in the world. These species were used for laboratory investigations of Si isotope fractionation during diatom growth and the subsequent dissolution of the diatom frustules. Both species of diatoms give an identical Si isotope fractionation factor during growth of -1.50 ± 0.36‰ (2σ) for 30Si, which falls in the range of -2.09‰ to -0.55‰ of published data. Our results also suggest a dissolution-induced Si isotope fractionation factor of -0.86‰ at early stage of dissolution, but this effect was observed only in DSi and no significant Si isotope change was observed for BSi. The growth and dissolution results are applied to a Baltic Sea sediment core to reconstruct DSi utilization by diatoms, and found to be in agreement with the observed DSi uptake rates in the overlying water column during diatom growth.

  7. Pimienta-Tamabra(!) - A giant supercharged petroleum system in the southern Gulf of Mexico, onshore and offshore Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoon, L.B.; Hudson, T.L.; Cook, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Pimienta-Tamabra(!) is a giant supercharged petroleum system in the southern Gulf of Mexico with cumulative production and total reserves of 66.3 billion barrels of oil and 103.7 tcf of natural gas, or 83.6 billion barrels of oil equivalent (BOE). The effectiveness of this system results largely from the widespread distribution of good to excellent thermally mature, Upper Jurassic source rock underlying numerous stratigraphic and structural traps that contain excellent carbonate reservoirs. Expulsion of oil and gas as a supercritical fluid from Upper Jurassic source rock occurred when the thickness of overburden rock exceeded 5 km. This burial event started in the Eocene, culminated in the Miocene, and continues to a lesser extent today. The expelled hydrocarbons started migrating laterally and then upward as a gas-saturated 35-40??API oil with less than 1 wt.% sulfur and a gas-to-oil ratio (GOR) of 500-1000 ft3/BO. The generation-accumulation efficiency is about 6%.

  8. Assessing indigenous knowledge systems and climate change adaptation strategies in agriculture: A case study of Chagaka Village, Chikhwawa, Southern Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkomwa, Emmanuel Charles; Joshua, Miriam Kalanda; Ngongondo, Cosmo; Monjerezi, Maurice; Chipungu, Felistus

    In Malawi, production from subsistence rain fed agriculture is highly vulnerable to climate change and variability. In response to the adverse effects of climate change and variability, a National Adaptation Programme of Action is used as framework for implementing adaptation programmes. However, this framework puts limited significance on indigenous knowledge systems (IKS). In many parts of the world, IKS have shown potential in the development of locally relevant and therefore sustainable adaptation strategies. This study was aimed at assessing the role of IKS in adaptation to climate change and variability in the agricultural sector in a rural district of Chikhwawa, southern Malawi. The study used both qualitative data from focus group and key informant interviews and quantitative data from household interviews and secondary data to address the research objectives. The study established that the local communities are able to recognise the changes in their climate and local environment. Commonly mentioned indicators of changing climatic patterns included delayed and unpredictable onset of rainfall, declining rainfall trends, warming temperatures and increased frequency of prolonged dry spells. An analysis of empirical data corroborates the people's perception. In addition, the community is able to use their IKS to adapt their agricultural systems to partially offset the effects of climate change. Like vulnerability to climate change, IKS varies over a short spatial scale, providing locally relevant adaptation to impacts of climate change. This paper therefore advocates for the integration of IKS in programmes addressing adaptation to climate change and vulnerability. This will serve to ensure sustainable and relevant adaptation strategies.

  9. Modelling the Emission And/or Absorption Features in the High Resolution Spectra of the Southern Binary System: HH Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseoglu, Dogan; Bakış, Hicran

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution spectra (R=48000) of the southern close binary system, HH Car, has been analyzed with modern analysis techniques. Precise absolute parameters were derived from the simultaneous solution of the radial velocity, produced in this study and the light curves, published. According to the results of these analyses, the primary component is an O9 type main sequence star while the secondary component is a giant/subgiant star with a spectral type of B0. Hα emissions can be seen explicitly in the spectra of HH Car. These features were modelled using the absolute parameters of the components. Since components of HH Car are massive early-type stars, mass loss through stellar winds can be expected. This study revealed that the components of HH Car have stellar winds and the secondary component loses mass to the primary. Stellar winds and the gas stream between the components were modelled as a hot shell around the system. It is determined that the interaction between the winds and the gas stream leads to formation of a high temperature impact region.

  10. Geochemistry of the Koshelev Volcano-Hydrothermal System, Southern Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kalacheva, E.

    2015-12-01

    Koshelev is the southernmost volcano of the Kamchatkan volcanic front where magmatic plumbing systems of the Kamchatkan subduction zone cross a thick layer of the oil-gas-bearing Neogene sedimentary strata of Western Kamchatka. The volcanic massive hosts a powerful hydrothermal system, which has been drilled in early 1980s. Deep wells tapped a hot (ca. 300ºC) saline solution (up to 40 g/L of Cl), whereas the upper part of the system is a typical steam cap with temperature close to 240ºC. Two hydrothermal fields of the volcano (Upper and Lower) discharge saturated or super-heated (up to 150ºC) steam and are characterized by numerous hot pools and low flow-rate springs of steam-heated waters enriched in boron and ammonia. There is also a small lateral group of warm Na-Ca-Cl-SO4 springs (40ºC). We report here our data and review the literature geochemical data on the chemical and isotopic composition of waters and hydrothermal vapours of the Koshelev system. Data on the gas composition include He and C isotopes, as well as the chemical and isotopic composition of light hydrocarbons. Water geochemistry includes literature data on water isotopes of the deep brine and trace elements and REE of steam-heated waters. A conceptual model of the system is presented and discussed.

  11. 7. VIEW OF SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE, LOWER CHORD, LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE, LOWER CHORD, LATERAL BRACING AND FLOOR SYSTEM, LOOKING WEST. - Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Rio Grande at Southern Pacific Railroad, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  12. The Environmental Belief Systems of Organic and Conventional Farmers: Evidence from Central-Southern England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kings, David; Ilbery, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Little comparative work has been conducted on the environmental belief systems and behaviours of conventional and organic farmers, especially in relation to farming culture, the environment and lowland farmland avifauna. Adopting a modified behavioural approach, this paper analyses the ways in which the environmental attitudes and understandings…

  13. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

    2003-01-08

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  14. Distribution of oxidizable organic c fractions in soils under cacao agroforestry systems in Southern Bahia, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforestry systems can play a major role in the sequestration of carbon (C) because of their higher input of organic materials to the soil. The importance of organic carbon to the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of soil quality is well recognized. However, total organic carbon measureme...

  15. Distribution of organic C oxidizable fractions in soils under cacao agroforestry systems in southern Bahia, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforestry systems can play a major role in the sequestration of carbon (C) because of their higher input of organic material to the soil. The importance of organic carbon to the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of soil quality is well recognized. However, total organic carbon measuremen...

  16. Contourite systems in the region of the southern São Paulo Plateau escarpment, South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. G.; Murdmaa, I. O.; Ivanova, E. V.; Levchenko, O. V.; Yutsis, V. V.; Frantseva, T. N.

    2013-07-01

    Seismoacoustic investigations with a high-resolution parametric echo-sounder "SES 2000 deep" carried out on cruises 33, 35, and 37 of the R/V Akademik Ioffe revealed several erosional-depositional contourite systems on the São Paulo Plateau escarpment and its toe in the South Atlantic. Two contourite terraces related to interfaces between different water masses are observable on the escarpment. These terraces presumably reflect the activity of internal waves and turbulent eddies. The São Paulo contourite channel and genetically related drift are traceable along the escarpment toe. Changes in planktonic foraminiferal assemblages in Core AI-2563 retrieved from the summit of the São Paulo contourite drift suggest a shallowing of the Weddell Sea Deep Water mass during glacial times. It is established that the contour current of the Weddell Sea Deep Water and Lower Circumpolar Water considerably affect the formation of contourite depositional systems on the escarpment and its toe.

  17. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  18. Dynamics of a large, restless, rhyolitic magma system at Laguna del Maule, southern Andes, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Brad S.; Andersen, Nathan L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; DeMets, Charles; Tikoff, Basil; Thurber, Clifford H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Cardonna, Carlos; Córdova, Loreto; Gil, Fernando; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Williams-Jones, Glyn; Miller, Craig W.; Fierstein, Judith; Hildreth, Edward; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01