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  1. Ingestion of ethanol just prior to sleep onset impairs memory for procedural but not declarative tasks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carlyle; Smith, Danielle

    2003-03-15

    The aim of Experiment 1 was to determine if moderate ethanol consumption at bedtime would result in memory loss for recently learned cognitive procedural and declarative tasks. The aim of Experiment 2 was to establish that the memory loss due to alcohol consumption at bedtime was due to the effect of alcohol on sleep states. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to learn a cognitive procedural task and a declarative task in the evening. Then, either the same evening or 2 nights later, they were asked to drink ethanol (0.7g/kg). Sleep was monitored for 3 days and re-testing of the tasks was done on the eighth day after training at the same time of day. In Experiment 2, subjects were asked to learn a cognitive procedural task (Tower of Hanoi) and a motor procedural task (Pursuit Rotor) in the late afternoon. Then one group was asked to drink ethanol (0.9 g/kg) right after task acquisition (5 hours before bed), while the other was asked to drink the same dose of ethanol just prior to bedtime. Re-testing was done 8 days later at the same time of day. Subjects in Experiment 1 were 15 college students between the ages of 19 and 24 that appeared to be in good health and were relatively naive in terms of drinking alcohol. Subjects in Experiment 2 were 13 college students in the same age range. These subjects were considered to be more experienced drinkers than subjects in Experiment 1 but were not judged to be heavy drinkers. In Experiment 1, the alcohol ingestion resulted in memory loss for the cognitive procedural task but not the declarative task. Further, the effect was seen when alcohol ingestion occurred the same day or 2 days after the end of acquisition. In Experiment 2, alcohol ingestion at bedtime impaired memory for the cognitive procedural and motor procedural tasks. By contrast, alcohol ingestion in the afternoon, immediately after the acquisition of these two tasks, did not impair memory. There were clear changes in the nature of rapid eye movement (REM

  2. Impairment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 increases accumulation of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Shinya; Amanuma, Yusuke; Nakai, Yukie; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are the definite carcinogens for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and reduced catalytic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which detoxifies acetaldehyde, increases the risk for ESCC. However, it remains unknown whether the ALDH2 genotype influences the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion. In the present study, we administered ethanol orally or intraperitoneally to Aldh2-knockout and control mice, and we quantified the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage, especially N2-ethylidene-2’-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), in the esophagus. In the model of oral ethanol administration, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was significantly higher in Aldh2-knockout mice compared with control mice. Similarly, in the model of intraperitoneal ethanol administration, in which the esophagus is not exposed directly to the alcohol solution, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was also elevated in Aldh2-knockout mice. This result indicates that circulating ethanol-derived acetaldehyde causes esophageal DNA damage, and that the extent of damage is influenced by knockout of Aldh2. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest the importance of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage which is induced in the esophagus of individuals with ALDH2 gene impairment. This provides a physiological basis for understanding alcohol-related esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:24959382

  3. Acute ethanol ingestion impairs appetitive olfactory learning and odor discrimination in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Julie A; Wright, Geraldine A; Edgar, Elaina A; Mazade, Reece E.; Wu, Chen; Lillvis, Joshua L

    2008-01-01

    Invertebrates are valuable models for increasing our understanding of the effects of ethanol on the nervous system, but most studies on invertebrates and ethanol have focused on the effects of ethanol on locomotor behavior. In this work we investigate the influence of an acute dose of ethanol on appetitive olfactory learning in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), a model system for learning and memory. Adult worker honey bees were fed a range of doses (2.5, 5, 10 or 25%) of ethanol and then conditioned to associate an odor with a sucrose reward using either a simple or differential conditioning paradigm. Consumption of ethanol before conditioning significantly reduced both the rate of acquisition and the asymptotic strength of the association. Honey bees also exhibited a dose dependent reduction in arousal/attention during conditioning. Consumption of ethanol after conditioning did not affect recall 24 h later. The observed deficits in acquisition were not due to the affect of ethanol on gustatory sensitivity or motor function. However, honey bees given higher doses of ethanol had difficulty discriminating amongst different odors suggesting that ethanol consumption influences olfactory processing. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an acute dose of ethanol affects appetitive learning and olfactory perception in the honey bee. PMID:18723103

  4. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P < 0. 05) edematous injury (reflected by nonhydrostatic weight gain) after endotoxin (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and subsequent perfusion ex vivo with n-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M). Ethanol ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P < 0.05) oxidized glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P < 0.05), decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell surfactant synthesis and secretion, and decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell viability, in vitro. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  5. Moderate Ethanol Ingestion and Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Maike; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    While ethanol intake at high levels (3-4 or more drinks), either in acute (occasional binge drinking) or chronic (daily) settings, increases the risk for myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, an inverse relationship between regular consumption of alcoholic beverages at light to moderate levels (1-2 drinks per day) and cardiovascular risk has been consistently noted in a large number of epidemiologic studies. Although initially attributed to polyphenolic antioxidants in red wine, subsequent work has established that the ethanol component contributes to the beneficial effects associated with moderate intake of alcoholic beverages regardless of type (red versus white wine, beer, spirits). Concerns have been raised with regard to interpretation of epidemiologic evidence for this association including heterogeneity of the reference groups examined in many studies, different lifestyles of moderate drinkers versus abstainers, and favorable risk profiles in moderate drinkers. However, better controlled epidemiologic studies and especially work conducted in animal models and cell culture systems have substantiated this association and clearly established a cause and effect relationship between alcohol consumption and reductions in tissue injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), respectively. The aims of this review are to summarize the epidemiologic evidence supporting the effectiveness of ethanol ingestion in reducing the likelihood of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, even in patients with co-existing risk factors, to discuss the ideal quantities, drinking patterns, and types of alcoholic beverages that confer protective effects in the cardiovascular system, and to review the findings of recent experimental studies directed at uncovering the mechanisms that underlie the cardiovascular protective effects of antecedent ethanol ingestion. Mechanistic interrogation of the signaling pathways invoked by antecedent ethanol

  6. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    SciTech Connect

    Witek-Janusek, L.

    1986-08-01

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat.

  7. Elevated cytosolic calcium in cerebrocortical nerve terminals of rats during prolonged ethanol ingestion

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.A.; Raikoff, K. )

    1990-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic free calcium concentrations ((Ca{sup ++})i) may underlie acute neuronal degeneration during ischemic or anoxic episodes, seizures and excitotoxin treatment. With quin-2 and fura-2 fluorescent probes, we have obtained evidence for elevated (Ca{sup ++})i in cerebrocortical terminals of adult rats following chronic consumption of ethanol-containing liquid diets for neurotoxic durations. Compared to isocaloric carbohydrate-fed controls, ethanol-fed rats had significantly higher (Ca{sup ++})i in P2 synaptosomal fractions after 4 months of diet intake, and in purified cerebrocortical synaptosomes after diet ingestion for 10 months. In addition, (Ca{sup ++})i in the synaptosomal fractions of ethanol-fed rats from either exposure time were markedly resistant to K{sup +}-dependent potentiation. Persistently increased synaptic (Ca{sup ++})i and a blunted response to K{sup +} depolarization following chronic ethanol ingestion lead us to associate impaired Ca{sup ++} homeostasis in the neurodegenerative processes of alcoholism.

  8. Ethanol-induced male infertility: impairment of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R A; Willis, B R; Oswald, C; Zaneveld, L J

    1983-05-01

    Ethanol is generally regarded as a reproductive toxin. However, the mechanism(s) of ethanol-induced infertility remain poorly understood. As male fertility depends upon the ability of spermatozoa to fertilize ova, it was the purpose of the present study to examine the effects of chronic ethanol treatment on several parameters related to sperm fertility. Male C57Bl/6J mice of proven fertility were administered liquid diets as follows: 5% (v/v) ethanol for either 1) 5 weeks; 2) 10 weeks; 3) 20 weeks; or 4) 6% (v/v) ethanol for 5 weeks. After each treatment, epididymal spermatozoa were evaluated with respect to quantity, motility, morphology and the ability to fertilize. A biphasic effect on sperm content was noted: 5- and 10-week treatments with 5% ethanol increased content by 80 and 65%, respectively, whereas 20-week treatment with 5% ethanol and 5-week treatment with 6% ethanol decreased content by 52 and 71%, respectively. Although the proportion of motile spermatozoa was unaffected by ethanol, average forward progression velocity was reduced, the effect being dependent on ethanol dose and duration of exposure. Similarly, the frequency of abnormal spermatozoa was increased; 20-week treatment with 5% ethanol and 5-week treatment with 6% ethanol increased the frequency of sperm morphological anomalies by 50 and 40%, respectively. Fertility of spermatozoa was reduced as a function of ethanol dose and duration of exposure. The ability of sperm to fertilize mouse ova in vitro was reduced by 34% (P less than .02) and 62% (P less than .001) subsequent to 20-week treatment with 5% ethanol and 5-week treatment with 6% ethanol, respectively. An animal model has been developed which describes ethanol-induced male infertility. The degree of reproductive impairment varies with the amount of ethanol ingested, and the duration of ethanol exposure. The continuum of effects should make possible the evaluation of putative mechanisms of male sterility resulting from chronic ethanol

  9. Adverse reaction to mefloquine associated with ethanol ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, R C; Saginur, R

    1995-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with no history of neuropsychiatric illness was taking one 250-mg tablet of mefloquine (MFQ) weekly for malaria prophylaxis while in Tanzania. He experienced no adverse reaction in association with his first two doses. Concurrently with both his third and his fourth dose he consumed about half a litre of whisky. On both occasions he experienced hallucinations, paranoid delusions and suicidal ideation. Thereafter he continued taking the MFQ, abstained completely from ethanol ingestion and had no recurrence of psychiatric symptoms. It is hypothesized that the combination of MFQ and ethanol caused the two episodes of severe psychiatric disturbance. PMID:7859199

  10. Effect of acute ethanol ingestion on fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Boquillon, M

    1976-12-01

    A test meal (300 mg casein, 600 mg sucrose, 100 mg corn oil, tracer dose of 9.10(3)H oleic acid) was given to fasting adult rats with intestinal lymph fistulas. One group received an acute oral dose of ethanol (3.2 g/kg body weight) simultaneously with the test meal. Controls received 2.5 ml of water instead of ethanol. Ingestion of ethanol temporarily delayed the removal of lipid radioactivity from the stomachs. More than 25% of radioactivity fed remained 8 hr after feeding whereas with control rats less than 10% of lipid radioactivity fed remained 6 hr after feeding. In controls and ethanol-treated rats, the amounts of exogenous lipids in the intestinal lumen and mucosa were low and similar enough. Quantities of endogenous and exogenous lipids found in the lymph collected during 24 hr after feeding were similar in the two groups, but the fat absorption peak was found after 6 hr in alcoholic rats and before 6 hr in controls. This delay was probably due to the retention of lipids in the stomach. More of the exogenous lipid was always transported by small particles moving in the region of alpha1 globulins in cellulose acetate electrophoresis than by larger particles remaining at the origin. This proportion was enhanced in the ethanol-treated animals. The larger fat particles were richer in endogenous fatty acids in alcohol-treated rats than in controls.

  11. Effects of ethanol ingestion on maternal and fetal glucose homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Singh, S.K.

    1984-08-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been studied in the offspring of rats fed liqiud diet containing ethanol during gestation (EF group). Weight-matched control dams were given liquid diet either by the pair-fed technique (PF group) or ad libitum (AF group). EF and PF dams showed reduced food consumption and attenuated gain in body weight during the gestation period compared with the AF group. Blood glucose, liver glycogen, and plasma insulin levels were significantly reduced in EF and PF dams. Ethanol ingestion resulted in a significant decrease in litter survival and fetal body weight. At term, EF pups on average showed a 30% decrease in blood glucose levels and 40% decrease in plasma insulin levels compared with AF pups. One hour after birth, EF pups exhibited a marked increase in blood sugar level compared with either control group. Fetal hyperinsulinemia disappeared shortly after delivery in control pups, as expected; however, in EF pups, the fall in plasma insulin level was gradual. Fetal and neonatal plasma glucagon levels were not altered by ethanol exposure in utero. Blood glucose levels remained significantly low at 2 days of age in EF pups, but reached near control values at 4 days of age. Plasma insulin and glucagon were nearly equal in EF and control pups at 2 and 4 days of age. These results show aberrations in blood glucose, plasma insulin, and liver glycogen levels in offspring exposed to ethanol in utero.

  12. Ethanol elimination kinetics following massive ingestion in an ethanol naive child.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Sage W; Olmedo, R; Howland, Ma; Nelson, Ls; Hoffman, Rs

    2013-07-01

    At low-to-moderate concentrations, ethanol elimination follows zero-order kinetics. It is unknown whether renal, pulmonary or other first-order processes become significant in patients with very high serum ethanol concentrations. Additionally, it is unclear whether ethanol naive subjects induce their metabolism during acute intoxication. We present the toxicokinetic analysis in a child with a massive ingestion of ethanol. A 15-year-old girl without significant medical history presented to the Emergency Department after drinking 24 ounces of tequila. She was found unresponsive at home with a Glasgow Coma Score of 3. Her presenting vitals were as follows: 118/69 mmHg blood pressure; pulse rate was 88 beats per minute; respiratory rate of 20 breaths per minute; pulse-oximetry is 96% on room air. Other than obtundation, her physical examination was normal. She was intubated for airway protection and admitted to the ICU. Her initial serum ethanol concentration was 543 mg/dL. A repeat level 3 h later was 722 mg/dL. Post-absorptive ethanol concentrations decreased from 693 mg/dL to 291 mg/dL over the following 15.5 h. The patient had spontaneous eye opening 24 h after presentation. Her projected serum ethanol concentration at that time was 215 mg/dL. She was extubated 2 h later and had an uneventful recovery. The elimination of ethanol in the post-absorptive phase remained zero-order at a rate of 26.3 mg/dL/h (5.7 mmol/L/h) with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (R (2)) of 0.9968 (p < 0.01). There was no evidence of acute induction in metabolism although pharmacodynamic tolerance likely occurred. Even at very high ethanol concentrations in ethanol naive subjects, elimination of ethanol follows a zero-order toxicokinetic model.

  13. Ethanol Administration Impairs Pancreatic Repair Following Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Scheer, Marc; Suhr, Mallory; Clemens, Dahn L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol abuse is one of the most common factors associated with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Although it is evident that alcohol abuse can have an important role in the development of pancreatitis, it does not appear that alcohol abuse alone is responsible for this disease. We investigated the involvement of ethanol in impairment of pancreatic repair after induction of pancreatitis. Methods A biologically relevant mouse model of alcoholic pancreatitis, combining chronic ethanol consumption and coxsackievirus infection, was used to investigate the effects of ethanol on pancreatic regeneration. Tissues were harvested and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunoblot. Results These studies demonstrate that chronic ethanol consumption impairs the structural repair of the exocrine pancreas. This is accompanied by a delay in the restitution of lipase expression. Additionally, impaired expression of the critical pancreatic transcription factors, PDX1 and PTF1, and the mediator of Notch signaling, HES1, were observed. Conclusions Chronic ethanol consumption impairs the structural repair and functional restitution of the pancreas after severe injury. These impairments may, in part, be explained by impaired expression of factors important in the development and maintenance of the exocrine pancreas. Impaired pancreatic regeneration may have a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:22617711

  14. Influence of ingested ethanol on Photofrin clearance in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montague, Donna; Fink, Louis; Stone, Angie; Flock, Stephen T.

    1993-06-01

    A series of experiments have been undertaken to ascertain the influence of dietary additives on the clearance of Photofrin. Post-treatment cutaneous photosensitivity continues to be a significant side effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in humans. Cutaneous photosensitivity in humans is evidenced by erythema and edema in exposed areas. Murine models were chosen to investigate the differences in cutaneous photosensitivity as measured by footpad thickness in the presence or absence of dietary additives. Additionally, radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells were implanted into the subcutaneous space on the dorsal aspect of the foot. In this case, the effect of PDT on tumor growth kinetics was assumed to be proportional to Photofrin concentration. Photofrin concentrations in tumors were measured by HPLC. Serum levels for dietary additives were obtained where analytical methods were available. Ingested ethanol increased the clearance rate of Photofrin as demonstrated by measurements of Photofrin tumor concentration and by failure of RIF tumor to respond to PDT in groups treated with ethanol compared to controls.

  15. Ethanol impairs post-prandial hepatic protein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, P; Volpi, E; Lucidi, P; Cruciani, G; Monacchia, F; Reboldi, G; Santeusanio, F; Bolli, G B; Brunetti, P

    1995-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol ingestion on whole body and hepatic protein metabolism in humans are not known. To simulate social drinking, we compared the effects of the association of a mixed meal (632 kcal, 17% amino acids, 50% glucose, 33% lipids) with a bottle of either table wine (ethanol content 71 g) or water on the estimates ([1-14C]-leucine infusion) of whole body protein breakdown, oxidation, and synthesis, and on the intravascular fractional secretory rates (FSR) of hepatically (albumin, fibrinogen) and extrahepatically (IgG) synthesized plasma proteins in two randomized groups (ethanol n = 7, water n = 7) of healthy nonalcoholic volunteers. Each study was carried out for 8 h. Protein kinetics were measured in the overnight post-absorptive state, over the first 4 h, and during a meal infusion (via a nasogastric feeding tube at constant rate) combined with the oral ingestion of wine or water, over the last 4 h. When compared with water, wine ingestion during the meal reduced (P < 0.03) by 24% the rate of leucine oxidation, did not modify the estimates of whole body protein breakdown and synthesis, reduced (P < 0.01) by approximately 30% the FSR of albumin and fibrinogen, but did not affect IgG FSR. In conclusion, 70 g of ethanol, an amount usual among social drinkers, impairs hepatic protein metabolism. The habitual consumption of such amounts by reducing the synthesis and/or secretion of hepatic proteins might lead to the progressive development of liver injury and to hypoalbuminemia also in the absence of protein malnutrition. PMID:7706451

  16. Ethyl alcohol (ethanol)-containing cologne, perfume, and after-shave ingestions in children.

    PubMed

    Scherger, D L; Wruk, K M; Kulig, K W; Rumack, B H

    1988-06-01

    Colognes, perfumes, and after-shaves containing ethyl alcohol (ethanol) are frequently ingested by children. These products may contain from 50% to 99% ethanol. To determine if ingestion of colognes, perfumes, or after-shaves by children results in serious ethanol toxic reactions, this retrospective study was performed. One hundred twenty-three cases of children younger than 6 years old who ingested these products were reviewed. The cases were arbitrarily divided into three groups based on the amount ingested by history. Group 1 included children in whom less than 30 mL was ingested; group 2, 30 to 60 mL was ingested; and group 3, more than 60 to 105 mL was ingested. Of the 102 patients in group 1, no children experienced symptoms or signs. One of 17 children in group 2 was described by parents as sleepy but was asymptomatic one hour later. Two of four children in group 3 behaved as if intoxicated, yet blood ethanol levels were undetectable within 2 1/2 hours after ingestion. Based on our study, asymptomatic children who ingested by history less than 105 mL of a cologne, perfume, or after-shave and remain asymptomatic can be safely watched at home. All children with symptoms of intoxication need health care facility referral.

  17. Effects of chronic ethanol ingestion and folate deficiency on the activity of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyesun; Im, Eun-Sun; Seo, Jung-Sook; Mun, Ju Ae; Burri, Betty J

    2005-12-01

    We recently observed that ethanol feeding impairs 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-FTHF) dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.6.) and 10-FTHF hydrolase activity in rats. In the present study, we explored the effects of folate deficiency or sufficiency combined with alcoholic intake on 10-FTHF and possible mechanisms by which chronic ethanol ingestion produces folate deficiency. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either folate-sufficient (FS) or folate-deficient (FD) diets; with or without ethanol (E) for four weeks. Hepatic 10-FTHF dehydrogenase and hydrolase activity, plasma folate and homocysteine were measured at baseline and after feeding experimental diets. Liver weight increased slightly with either folate deficiency or ethanol consumption. In rats fed the folate-sufficient diet with ethanol (FSE), plasma folate was decreased slightly (p<0.05) and plasma homocysteine elevated compared to rats fed the FS diet without ethanol. Ethanol did not affect plasma folate and plasma homocysteine in FD rats. Red-blood cell (RBC) folate was increased similarly in rats by ethanol feeding (FSE and FDE>FS and FD). Feeding folate deficient or ethanol (FSE, FD and FDE) diets depressed hepatic activities of 10-FTHF dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the oxidative deformylation of 10-FTHF to tetrahydrofolate (THF) and carbon dioxide. Rats consuming the FDE diet had the lowest enzyme activities of the experimental groups, implying that folate deficiency and ethanol consumption each affect enzyme activity. We confirm that ethanol decreases hepatic 10-FTHF dehydrogenase activity and show that this decrease occurs irrespective of folate status. This shows that modulation of 10-FTHF is one possible mechanism by which ethanol intake decreases folate status and affects one-carbon metabolism.

  18. Moderate ethanol ingestion, redox status, and cardiovascular system in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carmen Gonzalez; Agapito, Victoria Vega; Obeso, Ana; Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Bustamante, Rosa; Castañeda, Javier; Agapito, Teresa; Gonzalez, Constancio

    2011-06-01

    Moderate intake of alcoholic beverages decreases the incidence of cardiovascular pathologies, but it is in dispute if cardioprotective effects are due to ethanol, to polyphenolic compounds present in beverages or to a combination of both. In humans, effects of high, moderate, and low doses of alcoholic beverages are widely studied, but effects of pure alcohol remain unclear. On the other hand, experiments with laboratory animals are centered on high toxicological doses of ethanol but not on low doses. In the present study, we have aimed to mimic in the rat the pattern of alcohol intake in Mediterranean population. Alcohol ingestion is spread along the day and not always related to solid food consumption. We tried to define the beneficial and harmful effects of pure ethanol ingestion without polyphenol's influence. Experimental rats were given 1% ethanol in their drinking water for 30 days, resulting in a daily ingestion of 0.27 mL of ethanol/rat/d. Ethanol ingestion did not cause deleterious effects on the general status of the animals, but it decreased cholesterol, triglycerides, and catecholamine stores' rate of utilization in peripheral sympathetic system. Moreover, ethanol lowered pulmonary arterial pressure and did not alter systemic arterial pressure. In the liver, the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio was augmented and lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were decreased. However, catalase activity was unaltered. Liver cytochrome P4502E1 distribution and protein level and activity were unchanged by ethanol ingestion. Data indicate a lack of harmful effects and underscore a set of potentially beneficial effects of this dose of ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tools to tipple: ethanol ingestion by wild chimpanzees using leaf-sponges

    PubMed Central

    Hockings, Kimberley J.; Bryson-Morrison, Nicola; Carvalho, Susana; Fujisawa, Michiko; Humle, Tatyana; McGrew, William C.; Nakamura, Miho; Ohashi, Gaku; Yamanashi, Yumi; Yamakoshi, Gen; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    African apes and humans share a genetic mutation that enables them to effectively metabolize ethanol. However, voluntary ethanol consumption in this evolutionary radiation is documented only in modern humans. Here, we report evidence of the long-term and recurrent ingestion of ethanol from the raffia palm (Raphia hookeri, Arecaceae) by wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at Bossou in Guinea, West Africa, from 1995 to 2012. Chimpanzees at Bossou ingest this alcoholic beverage, often in large quantities, despite an average presence of ethanol of 3.1% alcohol by volume (ABV) and up to 6.9% ABV. Local people tap raffia palms and the sap collects in plastic containers, and chimpanzees use elementary technology—a leafy tool—to obtain this fermenting sap. These data show that ethanol does not act as a deterrent to feeding in this community of wild apes, supporting the idea that the last common ancestor of living African apes and modern humans was not averse to ingesting foods containing ethanol. PMID:26543588

  20. Influence of maternal ethanol ingestion on copper utilization during gestation and lactation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.H.; Cerklewski, F.L.

    1986-03-05

    A factorial experiment was conducted to determine the influence of ethanol intake (30% of Kcal) on the utilization of copper (Cu) at two dietary levels of Cu during gestation and lactation in the rat. Cu levels in the liquid diet were adjusted to provide either 60% of the minimum requirement or a more than adequate intake. Both ethanol and low Cu depressed dam liver Cu, but the lowest concentration was produced when ethanol and low Cu were combined. Although only ethanol depressed pup liver Cu concentration, the effects observed in dams were reflected in pup Cu content of the metallothionein fraction eluted from a Sephadex G-75 column. Otherwise, neither the metallothionein content of maternal intestinal cells nor that of pup liver affected the outcome of ethanol-antagonized Cu utilization. Effects of ethanol on Cu status of dams and pups cannot be defined as a simple C deficiency even though liver iron was elevated because the ferroxidase activity of dam ceruloplasmin was enhanced rather than inhibited by ethanol which is in agreement with observations made in alcoholics. The authors results are more consistent with a possible enhancing effect of ethanol on biliary excretion of Cu. Exactly why ethanol would have this effect in dams is not defined by available data. In pups, however, maternal ethanol ingestion caused a 30% increase in pup plasma corticosterone, a steroid known to enhance loss of neonatal liver Cu by way of biliary excretion.

  1. Death caused by ingestion of an ethanol-based hand sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Schneir, Aaron B; Clark, Richard F

    2013-09-01

    The use of hand sanitizer is effective in preventing the transmission of disease. Many hand sanitizers are alcohol-based, and significant intoxications have occurred, often in health care facilities, including the emergency department (ED). We present this case to highlight potential toxicity after the ingestion of an ethanol-based hand sanitizer. A 36-year-old man presented to the ED with ethanol intoxication. Ethanol breath analysis was measured at 278 mg/dL. After 4 h, the patient was less intoxicated and left the ED. Thirty minutes later, he was found apneic and pulseless in the ED waiting room bathroom after having ingested an ethanol-based hand sanitizer. Soon after a brief resuscitation, his serum ethanol was 526 mg/dL. He never regained consciousness and died 7 days later. No other cause of death was found. The case highlights the potential for significant toxicity after the ingestion of a product found throughout health care facilities. Balancing the benefit of hand sanitizers for preventing disease transmission and their potential misuse remains a challenge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Rising Incidence of Intentional Ingestion of Ethanol-Containing Hand Sanitizers

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Nicole J.; Bronstein, Alvin C.; Rasimas, Joseph J.; Pao, Maryland; T.Wratney, Angela; Sun, Junfeng; Austin, Howard A.; Suffredini, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a case of intentional ingestion of hand sanitizer in our hospital and to review published cases and those reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS). Design A case report, a literature review of published cases, and a query of the National Poison Data System (NPDS). Measurements Incidence and outcome of reported cases of unintentional and intentional ethanol containing-hand sanitizer ingestion in the United States from 2005 through 2009. Main Results A literature search found 14 detailed case-reports of intentional alcohol-based hand sanitizer ingestions with one death. From 2005 to 2009, NPDS received reports of 68,712 exposures to 96 ethanol-based hand sanitizers. The number of new cases increased by an average of 1894 (95% CI: 1266, 2521) cases per year (p = 0.002). In 2005, the rate of exposures, per year, per million U.S residents was 33.7 (95% CI: 28.4, 39.1); from 2005 to 2009, this rate increased on average by 5.87 per year (95%CI: 3.70, 8.04; p=0.003). In 2005, the rate of intentional exposures, per year, per million U.S residents, was 0.68 (95%CI: 0.17-1.20); from 2005 to 2009, this rate increased on average by 0.32 per year (95%CI: 0.11,0.53; p=0.02). Conclusions The number of new cases per year of intentional hand sanitizer ingestion significantly increased during this five - year period. While the majority of cases of hand sanitizer ingestion have a favorable outcome, 288 moderate and 12 major medical complications were reported in this NPDS cohort. Increased awareness of the risks associated with intentional ingestion is warranted, particularly among healthcare providers caring for persons with a history of substance abuse, risk-taking behavior or suicidal ideation. PMID:21926580

  3. The rising incidence of intentional ingestion of ethanol-containing hand sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Nicole J; Bronstein, Alvin C; Rasimas, Joseph J; Pao, Maryland; Wratney, Angela T; Sun, Junfeng; Austin, Howard A; Suffredini, Anthony F

    2012-01-01

    To describe a case of intentional ingestion of hand sanitizer in our hospital and to review published cases and those reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poison Data System. A case report, a literature review of published cases, and a query of the National Poison Data System. Medical intensive care unit. Seventeen-yr-old male 37-kg with an intentional ingestion of a hand sanitizer product into his gastrostomy tube. Intubation, ventilation, and hemodialysis. Incidence and outcome of reported cases of unintentional and intentional ethanol containing-hand sanitizer ingestion in the United States from 2005 through 2009. A literature search found 14 detailed case reports of intentional alcohol-based hand sanitizer ingestions with one death. From 2005 to 2009, the National Poison Data System received reports of 68,712 exposures to 96 ethanol-based hand sanitizers. The number of new cases increased by an average of 1,894 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1266-2521) cases per year (p =.002). In 2005, the rate of exposures, per year, per million U.S. residents was 33.7 (95% CI 28.4-39.1); from 2005 to 2009, this rate increased on average by 5.87 per year (95% CI 3.70-8.04; p = .003). In 2005, the rate of intentional exposures, per year, per million U.S. residents, was 0.68 (95% CI 0.17-1.20); from 2005 to 2009, this rate increased on average by 0.32 per year (95% CI 0.11-0.53; p = .02). The number of new cases per year of intentional hand sanitizer ingestion significantly increased during this 5-yr period. Although the majority of cases of hand sanitizer ingestion have a favorable outcome, 288 moderate and 12 major medical outcomes were reported in this National Poison Data System cohort. Increased awareness of the risks associated with intentional ingestion is warranted, particularly among healthcare providers caring for persons with a history of substance abuse, risk-taking behavior, or suicidal ideation.

  4. The effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on growth hormone secretion and hepatic sexual dimorphism in male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the activities of several sexually dimorphic hepatic proteins was investigated in male rats by feeding a nutritionally adequate liquid diet supplemented with either ethanol or dextrimaltose. Two androgen-responsive proteins served as markers of masculine hepatic function. A high capacity, moderate affinity male estrogen-binding protein (MEB) is found only in male rat liver cytosol and this activity was significantly reduced in all animals consuming ethanol at a dose of 5% by volume. The estrogen metabolizing enzyme estrogen 2-hydroxylase was also significantly reduced in male rats fed ethanol. Two proteins having higher activity in female compared to male liver were chosen as indicators of feminization: ceruloplasmin and 5[alpha]-reductase. Ceruloplasmin activity was increased after long term feeding of ethanol, but not after shorter durations of alcohol consumption. The 5a-reductase activity was not significantly affected by any of the alcohol feeding studies. Serum testosterone levels were not significantly decreased after ethanol consumption. After 30 or 60 days of ethanol ingestion, serum estradiol was elevated 34% and 40%. The reversibility of ethanol effects was determined by a gradual withdrawal of alcohol from the diet. The effect of ethanol consumption on sex-specific patterns of growth hormone secretion was examined. The secretory pattern of alcohol-fed rats was not feminized; after ethanol ingestion, the frequency of growth hormone pulses was unchanged. An increase in pulse height and mean growth hormone concentration was observed after 60 days of ethanol consumption. This results constitutes a change away from rather than toward the characteristics of a female secretory pattern. The feminization of activities of the male estrogen binding protein and of estrogen 2-hydroxylase in male rat liver after chronic ethanol consumption are not apparently related to a feminization of growth hormone secretion pattern.

  5. Pathophysiology of esophageal impairment due to button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Völker, Johannes; Völker, Christine; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Schraven, Sebastian P; Radeloff, Andreas; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf; Rak, Kristen

    2017-09-01

    The increased use of button batteries with high energy densities in devices of daily life presents a high risk of injury, especially for toddlers and young children. If an accidental ingestion of a button battery occurs, this foreign body can become caught in the constrictions of the esophagus and cause serious damage to the adjacent tissue layers. The consequences can be ulcerations, perforations with fistula formation and damage to the surrounding anatomical structures. In order to gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology after ingestion, we carried out systematic studies on fresh preparations of porcine esophagi. The lithium button battery type CR2032, used most frequently in daily life, was exposed in preparations of porcine esophagi and incubated under the addition of artificial saliva at 37 °C. A total of eight esophagi were analysed by different methods. Measurements of the pH value around the battery electrodes and histological studies of the tissue damage were carried out after 0.5-24 h exposure time. In addition, macroscopic time-lapse images were recorded. Measurements of the battery voltage and the course of the electric current supplemented the experiments. The investigations showed that the batteries caused an electrolysis reaction in the moist environment. The positive electrode formed an acidic and the negative electrode a basic medium. Consequently, a coagulation necrosis at the positive pole, and a deep colliquation necrosis at the minus pole occurred. After an exposure time of 12 h, tissue damage caused by the lye corrosion was observed on the side of the negative electrode up to the lamina muscularis. The corrosion progressed up to the final exposure time of 24 h, but the batteries still had sufficient residual voltage, such that further advancing damage would be expected. Button battery ingestion in humans poses an acute life-threatening danger and immediate endoscopic removal of the foreign body is essential. After only 2

  6. The Involvement of Acetaldehyde in Ethanol-Induced Cell Cycle Impairment.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Marc A; Schneider, Katrina J; Finnigan, Rochelle L; Maloney, Eamon P; Wells, Mark A; Clemens, Dahn L

    2016-03-31

    Hepatocytes metabolize the vast majority of ingested ethanol. This metabolic activity results in hepatic toxicity and impairs the ability of hepatocytes to replicate. Previous work by our group has shown that ethanol metabolism results in a G2/M cell cycle arrest. The intent of these studies was to discern the roles of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen, two of the major by-products of ethanol metabolism, in the G2/M cell cycle arrest. To investigate the role of ethanol metabolites in the cell cycle arrest, VA-13 and VL-17A cells were used. These are recombinant Hep G2 cells that express alcohol dehydrogenase or alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome P450 2E1, respectively. Cells were cultured with or without ethanol, lacking or containing the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or trolox, for three days. Cellular accumulation was monitored by the DNA content of the cultures. The accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2 in the inactive phosphorylated form (p-Cdc2) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 were determined by immunoblot analysis. Cultures maintained in the presence of ethanol demonstrated a G2/M cell cycle arrest that was associated with a reduction in DNA content and increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21, compared with cells cultured in its absence. Inclusion of antioxidants in the ethanol containing media was unable to rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest or these ethanol metabolism-mediated effects. Additionally, culturing the cells in the presence of acetaldehyde alone resulted in increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21. Acetaldehyde produced during ethanol oxidation has a major role in the ethanol metabolism-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest, and the concurrent accumulation of p21 and p-Cdc2. Although reactive oxygen species are thought to have a significant role in ethanol-induced hepatocellular damage, they may have a less important role in the inability of hepatocytes to replace dead or damaged cells.

  7. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in glycogen muscle reserves because of ingestion of ethanol: a study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Limoni, Ederson Luís; de Arruda, Eder João

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effects of alcoholic ingestion and neurostimulation on the muscle glycogen reserve, body weight, blood sugar, and weight of the soleus muscle. Methods: Twenty male rats were distributed into four experimental groups (n=5), namely, Control, Ethanol, Electrostimulated, and Ethanol+Electrostimulated. The study lasted for 22 days. The groups submitted to the use of ethanol received the substance diluted in water, which was consumed during the entire experimental period. The groups that received electrostimulation, undersedationfor the procedure, had their left hind leg shaved, and the current was applied daily for 7 days, in 20-minute sessions. Next, after induced alcoholism and electrical stimulation in the corresponding groups, the animals were euthanized so that their muscles could be sent for glycogen analysis. Results: The Ethanol group displayed a lower body weight when compared to the Control and Electrostimulated groups; the Ethanol+Electrostimulated groups had a lower body weight compared to the Control and Electrostimulated groups, but were in a better situation when compared to the Ethanol group. As to glycogen capture, it was noted that the Ethanol group demonstrated resistance to blood glucose capture, whereas the Ethanol Electrostimulated group showed better capture than the other groups. As to muscle weight, it was observed that the Ethanol group had a lower weight than did the Controls, and that the Electrostimulated group weight greater when compared to the Control and Ethanol groups, respectively. On the other hand, the Ethanol+Electrostimulated groups showed no significant difference relative to the Controls, but had better results when compared to the Ethanol group. Conclusion: Chronic exposure to alcohol showed a direct relationship with reduced muscle and body weight, and in glycogen capture and muscle reserves, besides favoring innumerous organic disorders, thus interfering in rehabilitation processes. PMID

  8. Tolerance to ethanol-induced impairment of water escape in rats bred for ethanol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bass, M B; Lester, D

    1980-01-01

    Rats selectively bred for ethanol (EtOH)- induced reductions in locomotor activity ("least affected" = MA) showed a reversed order of senstivity (i.e., LA more sensitive) to EtOH-induced (1.75 g/kg, IP) impairment of swimming. Thirty days of daily EtOH intubation began the next day, starting at 3.5 g/kg for 4 days, and increasing by 0.5 g/kg after 4 days at each dose, until 6.0 and 6.5 g/kg were given for 5 days each. Subjects were retested on the swim task (1.75 g/kg, IP) following 10, 20, and 30 days of chronic EtOH, and at 10, 20, and 30 days after cessation of EtOH treatment. Rats of each line and sex showed progressively decreasing peak impairment during the chronic treatment period; impairment increased toward initial levels during the post-treatment period. LA rats were more impaired than MA rats prior to, throughout, and subsequent to the chronic treatment period; a significant positive correlation between initial impairment and impairment after 30 days of chronic EtOH was found. No line differences in rates of tolerance acquisition or loss, or in final levels of tolerance as indicated by post-treatment impairment relative to initial impairment were observed. The similarity of the dynamics of EtOH tolerance in rats selectively bred for sensitivity to its acute effects suggests independent genetic influences upon initial ethanol sensitivity as opposed to acquired ethanal tolerance.

  9. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  10. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion and exercise training on skeletal muscle in rat.

    PubMed

    Vila, L; Ferrando, A; Voces, J; Cabral de Oliveira, C; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interactive effects of exercise training and chronic ethanol consumption on metabolism, capillarity, and myofibrillar composition in rat limb muscles. Male Wistar rats were treated in separate groups as follows: non exercised-control; ethanol (15%) in animals' drinking water for 12 weeks; exercise training in treadmill and ethanol administration plus exercise for 12 weeks. Ethanol administration decreased capillarity and increased piruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in white gastrocnemius; in plantaris muscle, ethanol increased citrate synthase activity and decreased cross-sectional area of type I, IIa, and IIb fibres. Exercise increased capillarity in all four limb muscles and decreased type I fibre area in plantaris. The decreased capillarity effect induced by ethanol in some muscles, was ameliorated when alcohol was combined with exercise. While alcoholic myopathy affects predominantly type IIb fibres, ethanol administration and aerobic exercise in some cases can affect type I and type IIa fibre areas. The exercise can decrease some harmful effects produced by ethanol in the muscle, including the decrease in the fibre area and capillary density.

  11. Acute ethanol poisoning in a 4-year-old as a result of ethanol-based hand-sanitizer ingestion.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jeffrey S; Spiller, Henry A

    2010-07-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers have become widely available because of widespread usage in schools, hospitals, and workplaces and by consumers. We report what we believe is the first unintentional ingestion in a small child producing significant intoxication. A 4-year-old 14-kg girl was brought to the emergency department with altered mental status after a history of ingesting an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Physical examination revealed an obtunded child with periods of hypoventilation and a hematoma in the central portion of her forehead from a fall at home that occurred after the ingestion. Abnormal vital signs included a heart rate of 139 beats/min and temperature of 96.3 degrees F, decreasing to 93.6 degrees F. Abnormal laboratory values consisted of potassium of 2.6 mEq/L and a serum alcohol of 243 mg/dL. A computed tomography scan of her brain without contrast showed no acute intracranial abnormality. A urine drug screen for common drugs of abuse was reported as negative. The child was intubated, placed on mechanical ventilation, and admitted for medical care. She recovered over the next day without sequelae. As with other potentially toxic products, we would recommend caution and direct supervision of use when this product is available to young children.

  12. The sap of Acer okamotoanum decreases serum alcohol levels after acute ethanol ingestion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Ha-Young; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, we examined whether Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) sap decreased the serum alcohol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol treatment in a rat model. Male rats were orally administered 25, 50 or 100% A. okamotoanum sap 30 min prior to oral challenge with 3 ml of ethanol (15 ml/kg of a 20% ethanol solution in water), and the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde were analyzed up to 7 h after the treatment. Pre-treatment with the sap significantly decreased the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations after 5 h when compared with ethanol treatment alone (a negative control). The expression levels of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mRNA were increased significantly in animals pre-treated with A. okamotoanum sap when compared with negative and positive controls. The data suggest that sap pre-treatment enhanced the alcohol metabolism rate in the rat liver. To investigate the involvement of mitochondrial regulation in the ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we carried out an immunohistochemical analysis of Bax and Bcl-2. Pre-treatment with sap significantly decreased Bax expression and increased Bcl-2 expression 7 h after ethanol administration when compared with the negative control. The data suggest that A. okamotoanum sap pre-treatment may reduce the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat liver.

  13. Caffeine ingestion impairs insulin sensitivity in a dose-dependent manner in both men and women.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Allen, Brian; Mazzetti, Gillian; Sullivan, Peter J; Graham, Terry E

    2013-02-01

    The effects of alkaloid caffeine on insulin sensitivity have been investigated primarily in men, and with a single caffeine dose most commonly of 5-6 mg·kg(-1) of body weight (BW). It is unknown if the effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis are sex-specific and (or) dose-dependent. This study examined whether caffeine ingestion would disrupt glucose homeostasis in a dose-dependent or threshold manner. It also examined whether sex-specific responses to caffeine exist. It was hypothesized that women would have an exaggerated response to caffeine, and that caffeine would only impair glucose metabolism once a threshold was reached. Twenty-four healthy volunteers (12 males, 12 females) participated in 4 trials, in a crossover, randomized, and double-blind fashion. They ingested caffeine (1, 3, or 5 mg·kg(-1) of BW) or placebo followed, 1 h later, by a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide area under the curve (AUC), and insulin sensitivity index data were fitted to a segmented linear model to determine dose-responses. There were no differences between sexes for any endpoints. Regression slopes were significantly different from zero (p < 0.05) for glucose, insulin, and C-peptide AUCs, with thresholds being no different from zero. Increasing caffeine consumption by 1 mg·kg(-1) of BW increased insulin and C-peptide AUCs by 5.8% and 8.7%, respectively. Despite this exaggerated insulin response, glucose AUC increased by 11.2 mmol per 120 min·L(-1) for each mg·kg(-1) BW consumed. These results showed that caffeine ingestion disrupted insulin sensitivity in a dose-dependent fashion beginning at very low doses (0-1 mg·kg(-1) BW) in both healthy men and women.

  14. Rats with mild bile duct ligation show hepatic encephalopathy with cognitive and motor impairment in the absence of cirrhosis: effects of alcohol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Salhi, Dounia; Urios, Amparo; Ruíz-Sauri, Amparo; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Studies in animal models allow identifying mechanisms and treatments for cognitive and motor alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Liver diseases leading to HE in humans have different aetiologies (alcoholic, viral, etc.). The International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy points out that satisfactory model for HE resulting from alcoholic cirrhosis are lacking. This work aimed to develop and characterize an animal model for HE in alcoholic liver cirrhosis. To potentiate the effects of alcohol on liver we administered it (5, 8 or 10% in drinking water) to rats showing mild liver damage induced by "mild" bile duct ligation (MBDL), obtained by sectioning 3 out of 5 bile ducts. MBDL rats show increased markers of cholestasis and liver damage, hyperammonemia and inflammation. MBDL rats also show motor in-coordination, hypokinesia, impaired learning ability in a Y maze and reduced spatial memory in the Morris water maze. Ingesting 10% ethanol does not induce relevant liver damage in control rats but potentiates liver damage in MBDL rats. In contrast, ethanol did not enhance the biochemical or neurological alterations in MBDL rats. This supports that the combination of certain levels of hyperammonemia and inflammation is enough to induce mild cognitive impairment, even in the absence of liver cirrhosis. Rats with MBDL and MBDL-OH survived more than 3 months, allowing performing long-term studies on cognitive and motor alterations and on underlying mechanisms. MBDL-OH rats are a good model to study the mechanisms of ethanol-induced liver cirrhosis and the factors making the liver susceptible to ethanol damage.

  15. A low concentration of ethanol impairs learning but not motor and sensory behavior in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brooks G; Khurana, Sukant; Pohl, Jascha B; Li, Wen-ke; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Cady, Amanda M; Najjar, Kristina; Hatch, Michael M; Shah, Ruchita R; Bhat, Amar; Hariri, Omar; Haroun, Kareem B; Young, Melvin C; Fife, Kathryn; Hooten, Jeff; Tran, Tuan; Goan, Daniel; Desai, Foram; Husain, Farhan; Godinez, Ryan M; Sun, Jeffrey C; Corpuz, Jonathan; Moran, Jacxelyn; Zhong, Allen C; Chen, William Y; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be a useful model system for the genetic analysis of ethanol-associated behaviors. However, past studies have focused on the response of the adult fly to large, and often sedating, doses of ethanol. The pharmacological effects of low and moderate quantities of ethanol have remained understudied. In this study, we tested the acute effects of low doses of ethanol (∼7 mM internal concentration) on Drosophila larvae. While ethanol did not affect locomotion or the response to an odorant, we observed that ethanol impaired associative olfactory learning when the heat shock unconditioned stimulus (US) intensity was low but not when the heat shock US intensity was high. We determined that the reduction in learning at low US intensity was not a result of ethanol anesthesia since ethanol-treated larvae responded to the heat shock in the same manner as untreated animals. Instead, low doses of ethanol likely impair the neuronal plasticity that underlies olfactory associative learning. This impairment in learning was reversible indicating that exposure to low doses of ethanol does not leave any long lasting behavioral or physiological effects.

  16. Ethanol impedes embryo transport and impairs oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tonghui; Yang, Qiuhong; Liu, Ruoxi; Wang, Wenfu; Wang, Shuanglian; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2016-05-16

    Most studies have demonstrated that alcohol consumption is associated with decreased fertility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of alcohol on pre-implantation embryo transport and/or early embryo development in the oviduct. We reported here that ethanol concentration-dependently suppressed the spontaneous motility of isolated human oviduct strips (EC50 50±6mM), which was largely attenuated in the present of L-NAME, a classical nitric oxide synthase(NOS) competitive inhibitor. Notably, either acute or chronic alcohol intake delayed egg transport and retarded early development of the embryo in the mouse oviduct, which was largely rescued by co-administration of L-NAME in a acute alcohol intake group but not in chronic alcohol intake group. It is worth mentioning that the oviductal epithelium destruction was verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations in chronic alcohol intake group. In conclusion, alcohol intake delayed egg transport and retarded early development of the embryo in the oviduct by suppressing the spontaneous motility of oviduct and/or impairing oviductal epithelium. These findings suggested that alcohol abuse increases the incident of ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Moderate ingestion of alcohol is associated with acute ethanol-induced suppression of circulating CTX in a PTH-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sripanyakorn, Supannee; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Mander, Adrian; Davidson, Sarah L; Thompson, Richard Ph; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-08-01

    The "J shape" curve linking the risk of poor bone health to alcohol intake is now well recognized from epidemiological studies. Ethanol and nonethanol components of alcoholic beverages could influence bone remodeling. However, in the absence of a solid underlying mechanism, the positive association between moderate alcoholic intake and BMD remains questionable because of confounding associated social factors. The objective of this work was to characterize the short-term effects of moderate alcohol consumption on circulating bone markers, especially those involved in bone resorption. Two sequential blood-sampling studies were undertaken in fasted healthy volunteers (age, 20-47 yr) over a 6-h period using beer of different alcohol levels (<0.05-4.6%), solutions of ethanol or orthosilicic acid (two major components of beer), and water +/- calcium chloride (positive and negative controls, respectively). Study 1 (24 subjects) assessed the effects of the different solutions, whereas study 2 (26 subjects) focused on ethanol/beer dose. Using all data in a "mixed effect model," we identified the contributions of the individual components of beer, namely ethanol, energy, low-dose calcium, and high-dose orthosilicic acid, on acute bone resorption. Markers of bone formation were unchanged throughout the study for all solutions investigated. In contrast, the bone resorption marker, serum carboxy terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), was significantly reduced after ingestion of a 0.6 liters of ethanol solution (>2% ethanol; p ethanol; p < 0.02), or a solution of calcium (180 mg calcium; p < 0.001), but only after calcium ingestion was the reduction in CTX preceded by a significant fall in serum PTH (p < 0.001). Orthosilicic acid had no acute effect. Similar reductions in CTX, from baseline, were measured in urine after ingestion of the test solutions; however, the biological variability in urine CTX was greater

  18. Ethanol stress impairs protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and activates Ire1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Ken-Ichi; Ishiwata-Kimata, Yuki; Kohno, Kenji; Kimata, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Impaired protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) evokes the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is triggered in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by the ER-located transmembrane protein Ire1. Here, we report that ethanol stress damages protein folding in the ER, causing activation of Ire1 in yeast cells. The UPR likely contributes to the ethanol tolerance of yeast cells.

  19. Concentrations of alprazolam in blood from impaired drivers and forensic autopsies were not much different but showed a high prevalence of co-ingested illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2013-03-01

    Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine anxiolytic widely prescribed for treatment of panic-disorder and social phobias, although this medication is also subject to abuse. In this paper, the concentrations of alprazolam in venous blood samples from impaired drivers were compared with femoral blood samples from forensic autopsies classified as intoxication or other causes of death (e.g. natural, trauma). After liquid-liquid extraction (n-butyl acetate) alprazolam was determined in blood by capillary gas chromatography with a nitrogen-phosphorous detector. The mean (median) and range of alprazolam concentrations in blood from impaired drivers (n = 773) were 0.08 mg/L (0.05 mg/L) and 0.02-3.9 mg/L, respectively. Many traffic offenders had co-ingested ethanol (13%), amphetamine (46%), cannabis (32%), or heroin (14%), as well as other drugs. In deaths attributed to drug intoxication, the mean (median) and range of alprazolam concentrations in blood (n = 438) were 0.10 mg/L (0.06 mg/L) and 0.02-1.6 mg/L, respectively, which were not much different from other causes of death (n = 278); 0.08 mg/L (0.05 mg/L) and 0.02-0.9 mg/L. Median concentrations of alprazolam in blood from living and deceased persons did not seem to depend on the number of co-ingested substances. The result of this pharmacoepidemiological study suggests that alprazolam is a fairly innocent drug when used as monotherapy, but toxicity problems arise when co-ingested with illicit drugs and/or psychoactive medication.

  20. Effect of chronic (4 weeks) ingestion of ethanol on transport of proline into intestinal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Beesley, R.C.; Jones, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    Hamsters were separated into two groups and fed liquid diets ad lib. Controls were given a diet similar to that described by DeCarli and Lieber while alcoholics received the same diet containing 5% ethanol isocalorically substituted for sucrose. The volume of diet consumed daily and the gain in body weights of alcoholics were not significantly different from those of controls. After four weeks the animals were sacrificed and the upper third of the small intestine was used to prepare brush border membrane vesicles. In the presence of a Na/sup +/ gradient, uptake of proline into vesicles prepared from both groups was rapid, reaching a maximum accumulation in 1 to 2 min and then decreasing to the equilibrium level. To normalize the results, the amount of proline take up at each time point was divided by the amount present at equilibrium. From the normalized data it was concluded that both the rate of uptake and the maximum accumulation of proline into brush border membrane vesicles isolated from alcoholics were significantly less than those obtained with vesicles from controls. These results suggest that chronic ingestion of ethanol results in a reduction in Na/sup +/-dependent transport of proline across the brush border membrane and, thus, may contribute to the malnutrition which is frequently associated with chronic alcoholism.

  1. The Interaction of Ethanol Ingestion and Social Interaction with an Intoxicated Peer on the Odor-Mediated Response to the Drug in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Amber M.; Youngentob, Lisa M.; Youngentob, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Using a social transmission of food preference paradigm in rats, we previously demonstrated that ethanol exposure during adolescence, as either an observer (interaction with an intoxicated conspecific) or demonstrator (intragastric infusion with ethanol), altered the reflexive odor-mediated responses to the drug. The two modes of exposure were equivalent in the magnitude of their effects. Human adolescents, however, are likely to experience the drug in a social setting as both an ethanol observer and demonstrator. That is, both interacting with an intoxicated peer and experiencing ethanol’s post-ingestive consequences in conjunction with hematogenic olfaction. Therefore, we tested whether combined adolescent exposure as both an observer and demonstrator differed from either form of individual experience. Methods Beginning on postnatal day (P) 29, naïve rats received ethanol or water exposures in a social interaction paradigm as either an observer, a demonstrator or combined experience (where each animal in the interaction was, itself, an observer and demonstrator). Exposures occurred four times, once every 48 hours. On P37, the reflexive behavioral response to ethanol odor was tested, using whole-body plethysmography. Results The odor-mediated responses of adolescent ethanol observers, demonstrators and combined exposure animals all significantly differed from controls. Compared to controls, however, the magnitude of the behavioral effect was greatest in the combined exposure animals. Moreover, combined exposure as both an ethanol observer and demonstrator significantly differed from either form of individual ethanol experience. Conclusions Ethanol’s component chemosensory qualities are known to be central contributors to its acceptance and increases in the acceptability of ethanol’s odor, resulting from a social transmission experience, are predictive of enhanced ethanol avidity in adolescence. Our findings demonstrate that combined exposure as

  2. Exercise capacity is not impaired after acute alcohol ingestion: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Damjanovic, Svetozar S; Plecas-Solarovic, Bosiljka; Pešić, Vesna; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Banovic, Marko; Ristic, Arsen; Mantegazza, Valentina; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The usage of alcohol is widespread, but the effects of acute alcohol ingestion on exercise performance and the stress hormone axis are not fully elucidated.We studied 10 healthy white men, nonhabitual drinkers, by Doppler echocardiography at rest, spirometry, and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in two visits (2-4 days in between), one after administration of 1.5 g/kg ethanol (whisky) diluted at 15% in water, and the other after administration of an equivalent volume of water. Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were also measured 10 min before the test, at maximal effort and at the third minute of recovery. Ethanol concentration was measured from resting blood samples by gas chromatography and it increased from 0.00 ± 0.00 to 1.25 ± 0.54‰ (P < 0.001). Basal echocardiographic and spirometric parameters were normal and remained so after acute alcohol intake, whereas ACTH, cortisol, and NT-pro-BNP nonsignificantly increased in all phases of the test. CPET data suggested a trend toward a slight reduction of exercise performance (peak VO2 = 3008 ± 638 vs. 2900 ± 543 ml/min, ns; peak workload = 269 ± 53 vs. 249 ± 40 W, ns; test duration 13.7 ± 2.2 vs. 13.3 ± 1.7 min, ns; VE/VCO2 22.1 ± 1.4 vs. 23.3 ± 2.9, ns). Ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide at rest was higher after alcohol intake (28 ± 2.5 vs. 30.4 ± 3.2, P = 0.039) and maximal respiratory exchange ratio was lower after alcohol intake (1.17 ± 0.02 vs. 1.14 ± 0.04, P = 0.04). In conclusion, we showed that acute alcohol intake in healthy white men is associated with a nonsignificant exercise performance reduction and stress hormone stimulation, with an unchanged exercise metabolism.

  3. Effects of different exercise protocols on ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Nosrat Abadi, T; Vaghef, L; Babri, S; Mahmood-Alilo, M; Beirami, M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is often accompanied by numerous cognitive deficits and may lead to long-lasting impairments in spatial learning and memory. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of regular treadmill exercise on hippocampal-dependent memory in ethanol-treated rats. Spatial memory was tested in a Morris Water Maze task. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to ethanol (4 g/kg, 20% v/v for 4 weeks) and effects of three exercise protocols (pre-ethanol, post-ethanol and pre-to-post-ethanol treatment) were examined. Results showed that ethanol exposure resulted in longer escape latencies during the acquisition phase of the Morris Water Maze task. Moreover, all three exercise protocols significantly decreased the latency to locate the hidden platform. During the probe trial, ethanol led to decreased time spent in the target quadrant. In contrast, performance on the probe trial was significantly better in the rats that had done the post- and pre-to-post-ethanol, but not pre-ethanol, exercises. These findings suggest that treadmill running can attenuate the adverse effects of chronic ethanol exposure on spatial memory, and may serve as a non-pharmacological alcohol abuse treatment.

  4. Caffeine ingestion before an oral glucose tolerance test impairs blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lindsay E; Savani, Sonali; Battram, Danielle S; McLaren, Drew H; Sathasivam, Premila; Graham, Terry E

    2004-10-01

    Caffeine ingestion negatively affects insulin sensitivity during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in lean and obese men, but this has not been studied in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We examined the effects of caffeine ingestion on insulin and glucose homeostasis in obese men with type 2 diabetes. Men (n = 12) with type 2 diabetes (age = 49 +/- 2 y, BMI = 32 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) underwent 2 trials, 1 wk apart, in a randomized, double-blind design. Each trial was conducted after withdrawal from caffeine, alcohol, exercise, and oral hypoglycemic agents for 48 h and an overnight fast. Subjects randomly ingested caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or placebo capsules and 1 h later began a 3 h 75 g OGTT. Caffeine increased (P < 0.05) serum insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide concentrations during the OGTT relative to placebo. Insulin area under the curve was 25% greater (P < 0.05) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Despite this, blood glucose concentration was also increased (P < 0.01) in the caffeine trial. After caffeine ingestion, blood glucose remained elevated (P < 0.01) at 3 h postglucose load (8.9 +/- 0.7 mmol/L) compared with baseline (6.7 +/- 0.4 mmol/L). The insulin sensitivity index was lower (14%, P = 0.02) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Overall, despite elevated and prolonged proinsulin, C-peptide, and insulin responses after caffeine ingestion, blood glucose was also increased, suggesting an acute caffeine-induced impairment in blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Standardized treatment of severe methanol poisoning with ethanol and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekins, B.R.; Rollins, D.E.; Duffy, D.P.; Gregory, M.C.

    1985-03-01

    Seven patients with methanol poisoning were treated with ethanol, hemodialysis and supportive measures. The interval between ingestion and initiation of ethanol therapy varied from 3 to 67 hours and from ingestion to dialysis from 9 to 93 hours. All patients survived, but one had permanent visual impairment. A 10% ethanol solution administered intravenously is a safe and effective antidote for severe methanol poisoning. Ethanol therapy is recommended when plasma methanol concentrations are higher than 20 mg per dl, when ingested doses are greater than 30 ml and when there is evidence of acidosis or visual abnormalities in cases of suspected methanol poisoning. 13 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

  6. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  7. Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Impaired Fat Efflux in Polarized Hepatic Cells: Consequences of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McVicker, Benita L.; Rasineni, Karuna; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Steatosis, an early manifestation in alcoholic liver disease, is associated with the accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). However, the role ethanol metabolism has in LD formation and turnover remains undefined. Here, we assessed LD dynamics following ethanol and oleic acid treatment to ethanol-metabolizing WIF-B cells (a hybrid of human fibroblasts (WI 38) and Fao rat hepatoma cells). An OA dose-dependent increase in triglyceride and stained lipids was identified which doubled (P < 0.05) in the presence of ethanol. This effect was blunted with the inclusion of an alcohol metabolism inhibitor. The ethanol/ OA combination also induced adipophilin, LD coat protein involved in the attenuation of lipolysis. Additionally, ethanol treatment resulted in a significant reduction in lipid efflux. These data demonstrate that the metabolism of ethanol in hepatic cells is related to LD accumulation, impaired fat efflux, and enhancements in LD-associated proteins. These alterations in LD dynamics may contribute to ethanol-mediated defects in hepatocellular LD regulation and the formation of steatosis. PMID:22506128

  8. Acute Ethanol Withdrawal Impairs Contextual Learning and Enhances Cued Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tipps, Megan E.; Raybuck, Jonathan D.; Buck, Kari J.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. Methods We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 h post-injection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on two forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post-training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; non-associative effects) is also investigated. Results Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Conclusions Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. PMID:25684050

  9. Acute ethanol withdrawal impairs contextual learning and enhances cued learning.

    PubMed

    Tipps, Megan E; Raybuck, Jonathan D; Buck, Kari J; Lattal, K Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol affects many of the brain regions and neural processes that support learning and memory, and these effects are thought to underlie, at least in part, the development of addiction. Although much work has been done regarding the effects of alcohol intoxication on learning and memory, little is known about the effects of acute withdrawal from a single alcohol exposure. We assess the effects of acute ethanol withdrawal (6 hours postinjection with 4 g/kg ethanol) on 2 forms of fear conditioning (delay and trace fear conditioning) in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. The influence of a number of experimental parameters (pre- and post training withdrawal exposure; foreground/background processing; training strength; and nonassociative effects) is also investigated. Acute ethanol withdrawal during training had a bidirectional effect on fear-conditioned responses, decreasing contextual responses and increasing cued responses. These effects were apparent for both trace and delay conditioning in DBA/2J mice and for trace conditioning in C57BL/6J mice; however, C57BL/6J mice were selectively resistant to the effects of acute withdrawal on delay cued responses. Our results show that acute withdrawal from a single, initial ethanol exposure is sufficient to alter long-term learning in mice. In addition, the differences between the strains and conditioning paradigms used suggest that specific learning processes can be differentially affected by acute withdrawal in a manner that is distinct from the reported effects of both alcohol intoxication and withdrawal following chronic alcohol exposure. Thus, our results suggest a unique effect of acute alcohol withdrawal on learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  10. Ethanol and fatty acids impair lipid homeostasis in an in vitro model of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Giulia; Grasselli, Elena; Compalati, Andrea D; Ragazzoni, Milena; Cortese, Katia; Gallo, Gabriella; Voci, Adriana; Vergani, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Excess ethanol consumption and fatty acid intake lead to a cumulative effect on liver steatosis through still unclear mechanisms. This study aimed to characterize the lipid homoeostasis alterations under the exposure of hepatocytes to ethanol alone or combined with fatty acids. FaO hepatoma cells were incubated in the absence (C) or in the presence of 100 mM ethanol (EtOH) or 0.35 mM oleate/palmitate (FFA) alone or in the combination (FFA/EtOH). Content of intra- and extra-cellular triglycerides (TAGs) and of lipid droplets (LDs), expression of lipogenic and lipolytic genes, and oxidative stress-related parameters were evaluated. Exposure to either FFAs or EtOH given separately led to steatosis which was augmented when they were combined. Our results show that FFA/EtOH: (i) increased the LD number, but reduced their size compared to separate treatments; (ii) up-regulated PPARγ and SREBP-1c and down-regulated sirtuin-1 (SIRT1); (iii) impaired FFA oxidation; (iv) did not change lipid secretion and oxidative stress. Our findings indicate that one of the major mechanisms of the metabolic interference between ethanol and fat excess is the impairment of FFA oxidation, in addition to lipogenic pathway stimulation. Interestingly, ethanol combined with FFAs led to a shift from macrovesicular to microvesicular steatosis that represents a more dangerous condition.

  11. Brain impairment in well-nourished chronic alcoholics is related to ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, J M; Estruch, R; Salamero, M; Orteu, N; Fernandez-Solà, J; Sacanella, E; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1997-05-01

    To determine the influence of chronic ethanol intake on the central nervous system, we studied 40 asymptomatic, well-nourished, chronic alcoholics (mean age, 42.6 +/- 9.1 years) and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects. Studies included neuropsychological testing, visual and short-latency auditory evoked potentials, and morphometric analysis of computed tomography scans. The mean daily ethanol consumption of the alcoholics was 204 gm over an average of 26.4 years. Compared to control subjects, chronic alcoholics exhibited a significant prolongation of the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials, and a prolongation and reduction in the amplitude of the latency of the V wave of short-latency auditory evoked potentials. These abnormalities were related to the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed. Brain morphometric analysis showed that alcoholics had a significantly greater degree of brain shrinkage with age, compared to control subjects. The cortical atrophy index correlated significantly with the lifetime ethanol consumption. Neuropsychological testing in alcoholics compared to controls revealed a significant impairment of frontal skills that was related to age, degree of scholarship, and the presence of frontal atrophy. In conclusion, well-nourished chronic alcoholics exhibited significant brain impairment, as demonstrated by neuropsychological testing, evoked potentials, and brain morphometric analysis, which was correlated with the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed.

  12. Ethanol-induced impairment in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Welti, Michael; Hülsmeier, Andreas J

    2014-04-01

    Deficiency in N-linked protein glycosylation is a long-known characteristic of alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Previous investigations of ethanol-induced glycosylation deficiency demonstrated perturbations in the early steps of substrate synthesis and in the final steps of capping N-linked glycans in the Golgi. The significance of the biosynthesis of N-glycan precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, however, has not yet been addressed in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol-metabolizing hepatoma cells were treated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. Transcript analysis of genes involved in the biosynthesis of N-glycans, activity assays of related enzymes, dolichol-phosphate quantification, and analysis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides were performed. Upon treatment of cells with ethanol, we found a decrease in the final N-glycan precursor Dol-PP-GlcNAc(2) Man(9) Glc(3) and in C95- and C100-dolichol-phosphate levels. Transcript analysis of genes involved in N-glycosylation showed a 17% decrease in expression levels of DPM1, a subunit of the dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase, and an 8% increase in RPN2, a subunit of the oligosaccharyl transferase. Ethanol treatment decreases the biosynthesis of dolichol-phosphate. Consequently, the formation of N-glycan precursors is affected, resulting in an aberrant precursor assembly. Messenger RNA levels of genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis are slightly affected by ethanol treatment, indicating that the assembly of N-glycan precursors is not regulated at the transcriptional level. This study confirms that ethanol impairs N-linked glycosylation by affecting dolichol biosynthesis leading to impaired dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly. Together our data help to explain the underglycosylation phenotype observed in alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  13. Ethanol impairs memory of a simple discrimination in adolescent rats at doses that leave adult memory unaffected.

    PubMed

    Land, Cantey; Spear, Norman E

    2004-01-01

    Adolescent rats are less sensitive than adults to the hypothermic, anxiolytic, motor impairing, hypnotic, and lethal effects of ethanol. In vitro experiments nevertheless suggest that hippocampal neural activity is more affected by ethanol in preweanling or adolescent rats than in adults. These data are complemented by in vivo results showing that pretraining ethanol impairs learning in adolescent rats at doses that do not affect adult learning. In order to determine if posttraining ethanol affects memory differently in adolescents than in adults, Sprague-Dawley albino rats of both ages were trained in an appetitively motivated odor discrimination in which they were required to dig in scented sand for sweetened cereal reward. Immediately after training subjects received intraperitoneal injections of 0, 0.5, or 1g/kg ethanol (12.6%). At test, 48h later, subjects were presented with unbaited discriminanda and the time (s) spent digging in the S+ and S- was measured. Adolescents, but not adults, showed impaired discrimination performance if training was followed by ethanol. A subsequent experiment discounted the possibility that impaired adolescent performance was due to ethanol-induced conditioned taste or odor aversions. It thus appears that relative to adults, memory in adolescent rats is more strongly affected by ethanol in a test of appetitive conditioning that excludes ethanol's effects on sensory and motivational influences during the learning experience.

  14. Long-term behavioral impairment following acute embryonic ethanol exposure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M; Oliveri, A N; Zhang, C; Frazier, J M; Mackinnon, S; Cole, G J; Levin, E D

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol has long been known to cause persisting neurobehavioral impairment. However, the neural and behavioral mechanisms underlying these deficits and the importance of exposure timing are not well-characterized. Given the importance of timing and sequence in neurodevelopment it would be expected that alcohol intoxication at different developmental periods would result in distinct neurobehavioral consequences. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to ethanol (0%, 1%, 3%) at either 8-10 or 24-27 h post-fertilization (hpf) then reared to adolescence and evaluated on several behavioral endpoints. Habituation to a repeated environmental stimulus and overall sensorimotor function were assessed using a tap startle test; measurements of anxiety and exploration behavior were made following introduction to a novel tank; and spatial discrimination learning was assessed using aversive control in a three-chambered apparatus. Overt signs of dysmorphogenesis were also scored (i.e. craniofacial malformations, including eye diameter and midbrain-hindbrain boundary morphology). Ethanol treated fish were more active both at baseline and following a tap stimulus compared to the control fish and were hyperactive when placed in a novel tank. These effects were more prominent following exposure at 24-27 hpf than with the earlier exposure window, for both dose groups. Increases in physical malformation were only present in the 3% ethanol group; all malformed fish were excluded from behavioral testing. These results suggest specific domains of behavior are affected following ethanol exposure, with some but not all of the tests revealing significant impairment. The behavioral phenotypes following distinct exposure windows described here can be used to help link cellular and molecular mechanisms of developmental ethanol exposure to functional neurobehavioral effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impaired oxygen utilization. A new mechanism for the hepatotoxicity of ethanol in sub-human primates.

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, C S; Baraona, E; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Kubota, S; Sato, N; Kawano, S; Matsumura, T; Inatomi, N

    1989-01-01

    The role of oxygenation in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury was investigated in six baboons fed alcohol chronically and in six pair-fed controls. All animals fed alcohol developed fatty liver with, in addition, fibrosis in three. No evidence for hypoxia was found, both in the basal state and after ethanol at moderate (30 mM) or high (55 mM) levels, as shown by unchanged or even increased hepatic venous partial pressure of O2 and O2 saturation of hemoglobin in the tissue. In controls, ethanol administration resulted in enhanced O2 consumption (offset by a commitant increase in splanchnic blood flow), whereas in alcohol fed animals, there was no increase. At the moderate ethanol dose, the flow-independent O2 extraction, measured by reflectance spectroscopy on the liver surface, tended to increase in control animals only, whereas a significant decrease was observed after the high ethanol dose in the alcohol-treated baboons. This was associated with a marked shift in the mitochondrial redox level in the alcohol-fed (but not in control) baboons, with striking rises in splanchnic output of glutamic dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde, reflecting mitochondrial injury. Increased acetaldehyde, in turn, may aggravate the mitochondrial damage and exacerbate defective O2 utilization. Thus impaired O2 consumption rather than lack of O2 supply characterizes liver injury produced by high ethanol levels in baboons fed alcohol chronically. Images PMID:2708529

  16. Early embryonic ethanol exposure impairs shoaling and the dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Buske, Christine; Gerlai, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a devastating disorder accompanied by numerous morphological and behavioral abnormalities. Human FAS has been modeled in laboratory animals including the zebrafish. Recently, embryonic exposure to low doses of ethanol has been shown to impair behavior without any gross morphological alterations in zebrafish. The exposed zebrafish showed reduced responses to animated conspecific images. The effect of embryonic ethanol exposure, however, has not been investigated in a real shoal and the potential mechanisms underlying the behavioral impairment are also unknown. Here we show that a 2h long immersion in 0.25% and 0.50% (vol/vol) alcohol at 24h post fertilization significantly increases the distance among members of freely swimming groups of zebrafish when measured at 70 days post fertilization. We also show that this impaired behavior is accompanied by reduced levels of dopamine, DOPAC, serotonin and 5HIAA as quantified by HPLC from whole brain extracts. Our results demonstrate that even very low concentrations of alcohol applied for a short period of time during the development of zebrafish can impair behavior and brain function. We argue that the observed behavioral impairment is not likely to be due to altered performance capabilities, e.g. motor function or perception, but possibly to social behavior itself. We also argue that our neurochemical data represent the first step towards understanding the mechanisms of this abnormality in zebrafish, which may lead to better modeling of, and ultimately perhaps better therapies for human FAS.

  17. Low concentrations of ethanol but not of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) impair reciprocal retinal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Siapich, Siarhei A; Akhtar, Isha; Hescheler, Jürgen; Schneider, Toni; Lüke, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The model of the isolated and superfused retina provides the opportunity to test drugs and toxins. Some chemicals have to be applied using low concentrations of organic solvents as carriers. Recently, E-/R-type (Cav2.3) and T-type (Cav3.2) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels were identified as participating in reciprocal inhibitory retinal signaling. Their participation is apparent, when low concentrations of NiCl2 (15 μM) are applied during superfusion leading to an increase of the ERG b-wave amplitude, which is explained by a reduction of amacrine GABA-release onto bipolar neurons. During these investigations, differences were observed for the solvent carrier used. Recording of the transretinal receptor potentials from the isolated bovine retina. The pretreatment of bovine retina with 0.01 % (v/v) dimethylsulfoxide did not impair the NiCl2-mediated increase of the b-wave amplitude, which was 1.31-fold ± 0.03 of initial value (n = 4). However, pretreatment of the retina with the same concentration of ethanol impaired reciprocal signaling (0.96-fold ± 0.05, n = 4). Further, the implicit time of the b-wave was increased, suggesting that ethanol itself but not DMSO may antagonize GABA-receptors. Ethanol itself but not DMSO may block GABA receptors and cause an amplitude increase by itself, so that reciprocal signaling is impaired.

  18. Spatial cognition and sexually dimorphic synaptic plasticity balance impairment in rats with chronic prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    An, Lei; Zhang, Tao

    2013-11-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure can lead to long-lasting impairments in the ability of rats to process spatial information, as well as produce long-lasting deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP), a biological model of learning and memory processing. The present study aimed to examine the sexually dimorphic effects of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) on behavior cognition and synaptic plasticity balance (SPB), and tried to understand a possible mechanism by evaluating the alternation of SPB. The animal model was produced by ethanol exposure throughout gestational period with 4 g/kg bodyweight. Offspring of both male and female were selected and studied on postnatal days 36. Subsequently, the data showed that chronic ethanol exposure resulted in birth weight reduction, losing bodyweight gain, microcephaly and hippocampus weight retardation. In Morris water maze (MWM) test, escape latencies were significantly higher in CPEE-treated rats than that in control ones. They also spent much less time in the target quadrant compared to that of control animals in the probe phase. In addition, it was found that there was a more severe impairment in females than that in males after CPEE treatment. Electrophysiological studies showed that CPEE considerably inhibited hippocampal LTP and facilitated depotentiation in males, while significantly enhanced LTP and suppressed depotentiation in females. A novel index, developed by us, showed that the action of CPEE on SPB was more sensitive in females than that in males, suggesting that it might be an effective index to distinguish the difference of SPB impairment between males and females. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alcohol Ingestion Impairs Maximal Post-Exercise Rates of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following a Single Bout of Concurrent Training

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Evelyn B.; Camera, Donny M.; Areta, José L.; Burke, Louise M.; Phillips, Stuart M.; Hawley, John A.; Coffey, Vernon G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The culture in many team sports involves consumption of large amounts of alcohol after training/competition. The effect of such a practice on recovery processes underlying protein turnover in human skeletal muscle are unknown. We determined the effect of alcohol intake on rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following strenuous exercise with carbohydrate (CHO) or protein ingestion. Methods In a randomized cross-over design, 8 physically active males completed three experimental trials comprising resistance exercise (8×5 reps leg extension, 80% 1 repetition maximum) followed by continuous (30 min, 63% peak power output (PPO)) and high intensity interval (10×30 s, 110% PPO) cycling. Immediately, and 4 h post-exercise, subjects consumed either 500 mL of whey protein (25 g; PRO), alcohol (1.5 g·kg body mass−1, 12±2 standard drinks) co-ingested with protein (ALC-PRO), or an energy-matched quantity of carbohydrate also with alcohol (25 g maltodextrin; ALC-CHO). Subjects also consumed a CHO meal (1.5 g CHO·kg body mass−1) 2 h post-exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 2 and 8 h post-exercise. Results Blood alcohol concentration was elevated above baseline with ALC-CHO and ALC-PRO throughout recovery (P<0.05). Phosphorylation of mTORSer2448 2 h after exercise was higher with PRO compared to ALC-PRO and ALC-CHO (P<0.05), while p70S6K phosphorylation was higher 2 h post-exercise with ALC-PRO and PRO compared to ALC-CHO (P<0.05). Rates of MPS increased above rest for all conditions (∼29–109%, P<0.05). However, compared to PRO, there was a hierarchical reduction in MPS with ALC-PRO (24%, P<0.05) and with ALC-CHO (37%, P<0.05). Conclusion We provide novel data demonstrating that alcohol consumption reduces rates of MPS following a bout of concurrent exercise, even when co-ingested with protein. We conclude that alcohol ingestion suppresses the anabolic response in skeletal muscle and may therefore impair recovery and adaptation to

  20. Acute ethanol poisoning in a 6-year-old girl following ingestion of alcohol-based hand sanitizer at school.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Madeline Matar; Zeretzke, Cristina; Reader, Sara; Sollee, Dawn R

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers (ABHSs) have been widely used in homes, workplaces and schools to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. We report a young child unintentionally ingested ABHS at a school, resulting in intoxication. The child was a 6-year-old girl who had been brought to the emergency department (ED) for hypothermia, altered mental status (AMS), periods of hypoventilation, hypothermia and vomiting. Computed tomography of her head revealed nothing abnormal in intracranial pathology. Urine drug screening was negative. Alcohol level was 205 mg/dL on admission. Other abnormal values included potassium of 2.8 mEq/L, osmolality of 340 mOsm/kg and no hypoglycemia. Further investigation revealed that the patient had gone frequently to the class restroom for ingestion of unknown quantities of ABHSs during the day. The patient was admitted for one day for intravenous fluid hydration and close observation of her mental status. The patient was discharged from the hospital the next day without any complications. Despite the large safety margin of ABHSs, emergency physicians need to be aware of the potential risk of ingestion of a large amount of such products in children and consider it in the assessment and management of school-age children with acute AMS.

  1. Acute ethanol poisoning in a 6-year-old girl following ingestion of alcohol-based hand sanitizer at school

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Madeline Matar; Zeretzke, Cristina; Reader, Sara; Sollee, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol-based hand sanitizers (ABHSs) have been widely used in homes, workplaces and schools to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. We report a young child unintentionally ingested ABHS at a school, resulting in intoxication. METHODS: The child was a 6-year-old girl who had been brought to the emergency department (ED) for hypothermia, altered mental status (AMS), periods of hypoventilation, hypothermia and vomiting. Computed tomography of her head revealed nothing abnormal in intracranial pathology. Urine drug screening was negative. Alcohol level was 205 mg/dL on admission. Other abnormal values included potassium of 2.8 mEq/L, osmolality of 340 mOsm/kg and no hypoglycemia. Further investigation revealed that the patient had gone frequently to the class restroom for ingestion of unknown quantities of ABHSs during the day. The patient was admitted for one day for intravenous fluid hydration and close observation of her mental status. RESULTS: The patient was discharged from the hospital the next day without any complications. CONCLUSION: Despite the large safety margin of ABHSs, emergency physicians need to be aware of the potential risk of ingestion of a large amount of such products in children and consider it in the assessment and management of school-age children with acute AMS. PMID:25215016

  2. Ethanol-Induced Motor Impairment Mediated by Inhibition of α7 Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, John; Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L.; Gallagher, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine and ethanol (EtOH) are among the most widely co-abused substances, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contribute to the behavioral effects of both drugs. Along with their role in addiction, nAChRs also contribute to motor control circuitry. The α7 nAChR subtype is highly expressed in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg), a brainstem cholinergic center that contributes to motor performance through its projections to thalamic motor relay centers, including the mediodorsal thalamus. We demonstrate that EtOH concentrations just above the legal limits for intoxication in humans can inhibit α7 nAChRs in LDTg neurons from rats. This EtOH-induced inhibition is mediated by a decrease in cAMP/PKA signaling. The α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator PNU120596 [N-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N′-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)-urea], which interferes with receptor desensitization, completely eliminated EtOH modulation of these receptors. These data suggest that EtOH inhibits α7 responses through a PKA-dependent enhancement of receptor desensitization. EtOH also inhibited the effects of nicotine at presynaptic α7 nAChRs on glutamate terminals in the mediodorsal thalamus. In vivo administration of PNU120596 either into the cerebral ventricles or directly into the mediodorsal thalamus attenuated EtOH-induced motor impairment. Thus, α7 nAChRs are likely important mediators of the motor impairing effects of moderate EtOH consumption. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor-impairing effects of ethanol contribute to intoxication-related injury and death. Here we explore the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced motor impairment. Physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol inhibit activity of a nicotinic receptor subtype that is expressed in brain areas associated with motor control. That receptor inhibition is mediated by decreased receptor phosphorylation, suggesting an indirect modulation of cell signaling pathways to achieve

  3. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carvacrol on Ethanol-Induced Hippocampal Neurons Impairment via the Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Luo, Qian; Qiao, Hui; Ding, Hui; Cao, Yonggang; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Zhang, Qianlong; Zhu, Hui; Qu, Lihui

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes hippocampal neuronal impairment, which is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carvacrol is a major monoterpenic phenol found in essential oils from the family Labiatae and has antioxidative stress and antiapoptosis actions. However, the protective effects of carvacrol in ethanol-induced hippocampal neuronal impairment have not been fully understood. We explored the neuroprotective effects of carvacrol in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 35% ethanol for 4 weeks to establish ethanol model in vivo, and hippocampal neuron injury was simulated by 200 mM ethanol in vitro. Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive dysfunction. The oxidative stress injury of hippocampal neurons was evaluated by measuring the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Histopathological examinations and western blot were performed to evaluate the apoptosis of neurons. The results showed that carvacrol attenuates the cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the mice treated with ethanol and decreases hippocampal neurons apoptosis induced by ethanol in vitro. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that carvacrol modulates the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and p-ERK, without influence of p-JNK and p-p38. Our results suggest that carvacrol alleviates ethanol-mediated hippocampal neuronal impairment by antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects.

  4. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carvacrol on Ethanol-Induced Hippocampal Neurons Impairment via the Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes hippocampal neuronal impairment, which is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carvacrol is a major monoterpenic phenol found in essential oils from the family Labiatae and has antioxidative stress and antiapoptosis actions. However, the protective effects of carvacrol in ethanol-induced hippocampal neuronal impairment have not been fully understood. We explored the neuroprotective effects of carvacrol in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 35% ethanol for 4 weeks to establish ethanol model in vivo, and hippocampal neuron injury was simulated by 200 mM ethanol in vitro. Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive dysfunction. The oxidative stress injury of hippocampal neurons was evaluated by measuring the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Histopathological examinations and western blot were performed to evaluate the apoptosis of neurons. The results showed that carvacrol attenuates the cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the mice treated with ethanol and decreases hippocampal neurons apoptosis induced by ethanol in vitro. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that carvacrol modulates the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and p-ERK, without influence of p-JNK and p-p38. Our results suggest that carvacrol alleviates ethanol-mediated hippocampal neuronal impairment by antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. PMID:28191274

  5. Proanthocyanidins prevent ethanol-induced cognitive impairment by suppressing oxidative and inflammatory stress in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Hu, Pingping

    2017-10-18

    Excessive chronic alcohol consumption enhances brain oxidative and inflammatory stress, resulting in cognitive deficit. This study investigated the potential alleviating effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs) on ethanol-induced cognitive impairment and stress in brain regions including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala. Adult male rats were administered saline, PACs, ethanol, or combinations of ethanol with different doses of PACs for 8 weeks. Then, the Morris water-maze test was performed. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide dismutase activity, total antioxidant capacity, and nitric oxide were chosen as parameters of oxidative stress, whereas tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β chosen as parameters of inflammatory stress. The results indicated that ethanol led to cognitive impairment along with enhanced oxidative and inflammatory stress in brain regions, whereas PACs per se had no significant effects. Moreover, coadministration with PACs in ethanol-treated rats dose dependently rescued cognitive impairment accompanied by suppressed oxidative and inflammatory stress in brain regions. Thus, the protective effects of PACs on ethanol-induced cognitive impairments may be because of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

  6. Inhibitory effect of ethanol extract of Nannochloropsis oceanica on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, amyloidogenesis and memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Chul Ju; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Hee Sik; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we investigated the suppressive possibility of ethanol extract of Nannochloropsis oceanica (N. oceanica) on memory deficiency along with the fundamental mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice model. Among several extracts of 32 marine microalgae, ethanol extract of N. oceanica showed the most significant inhibitory effect on nitric oxide (NO) generation, NF-κB activity and β-secretase activity in cultured BV-2 cells, neuronal cells and Raw 264.7 cells. Ethanol extract of N. oceanica (50, 100 mg/kg) also ameliorated LPS (250 μg/kg)-induced memory impairment. We also found that ethanol extract of N. oceanica inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) level as well as glutathione (GSH) level was also decreased by treatment of ethanol extract of N.oceanica. The ethanol extract of N. oceanica also suppresses IκB degradation as well as p50 and p65 translocation into the nucleus in LPS-treated mice brain. Associated with the inhibitory effect on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, ethanol extract of N. oceanica suppressed Aβ1-42 generation through down-regulation of APP and BACE1 expression in in vivo. These results suggest that ethanol extract of N. oceanica ameliorated memory impairment via anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-amyloidogenic mechanisms. PMID:28489589

  7. Ethanol affects NMDA receptor signaling at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in mice and impairs cerebellar LTD.

    PubMed

    He, Qionger; Titley, Heather; Grasselli, Giorgio; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol profoundly influences cerebellar circuit function and motor control. It has recently been demonstrated that functional N-methyl-(D)-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in the adult cerebellum. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse cerebellar slices, we examined whether ethanol can affect NMDA receptor signaling in mature Purkinje cells. NMDA receptor-mediated currents were isolated by bath application of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzol[f]quinoxaline (NBQX). The remaining (D)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid ((D)-APV)-sensitive current was reduced by ethanol at concentrations as low as 10 mM. At a concentration of 50 mM ethanol, the blockade of (D)-APV-sensitive CF-excitatory postsynaptic currents was significantly stronger. Ethanol also altered the waveform of CF-evoked complex spikes by reducing the afterdepolarization. This effect was not seen when NMDA receptors were blocked by (D)-APV before ethanol wash-in. In contrast to CF synaptic transmission, parallel fiber (PF) synaptic inputs were not affected by ethanol. Finally, ethanol (10 mM) impaired long-term depression (LTD) at PF to Purkinje cell synapses as induced under control conditions by paired PF and CF activity. However, LTD induced by pairing PF stimulation with depolarizing voltage steps (substituting for CF activation) was not blocked by ethanol. These observations suggest that the sensitivity of cerebellar circuit function and plasticity to low concentrations of ethanol may be caused by an ethanol-mediated impairment of NMDA receptor signaling at CF synapses onto cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  8. A controlled study of the time-course of breath alcohol concentration after moderate ingestion of ethanol following a social drinking session.

    PubMed

    Barquín, Jesús; Luna, Juan de Dios; Hernández, Antonio F

    2008-05-20

    This paper evaluates the breath alcohol concentration (BrAC), nausea (feeling of being slightly intoxicated) and subjective driving performance after ingesting a moderate dose of alcohol in the presence of a light meal, which intends to approach a social drinking setting. 119 healthy individuals (69 males and 50 females, aged 21.7+/-3.0) ingested three glasses of wine (95mL each) and their BrAC was determined by an Alcotest 7410 at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120min post-drinking. 46% of females and no male subjects exceeded a BrAC of 0.25mg/L, the legal limit for driving fixed by some Western countries. 53% of the study population felt nausea during the experimental session and 20% self-reported impairment of their driving skills. In both cases these subjective effects were more pronounced in females. The major determinants of mean BrAC were time post-drinking, gender (male) and body mass index (BMI), all these variables being inversely associated. Females and individuals with a BMI lower than 22.5kg/m(2) were at an increased risk of exceeding the legal limit of BrAC. The feeling of nausea was significantly associated with gender (females), the ingestion of up to 2 drinks on weekdays, and having exceeded a BrAC of 0.25mg/L during the experimental study. The main predictor of self-perception of impaired driving skills was the feeling of nausea, followed by a BrAC in excess of 0.25mg/L. In conclusion, both females and subjects with lower BMI are at an increased risk of exceeding the legal limit of BrAC after moderate alcohol consumption resembling a social drinking setting.

  9. Developmental ethanol exposure-induced sleep fragmentation predicts adult cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D A; Masiello, K; Lewin, M P; Hui, M; Smiley, J F; Saito, M

    2016-05-13

    Developmental ethanol (EtOH) exposure can lead to long-lasting cognitive impairment, hyperactivity, and emotional dysregulation among other problems. In healthy adults, sleep plays an important role in each of these behavioral manifestations. Here we explored circadian rhythms (activity, temperature) and slow-wave sleep (SWS) in adult mice that had received a single day of EtOH exposure on postnatal day 7 and saline littermate controls. We tested for correlations between slow-wave activity and both contextual fear conditioning and hyperactivity. Developmental EtOH resulted in adult hyperactivity within the home cage compared to controls but did not significantly modify circadian cycles in activity or temperature. It also resulted in reduced and fragmented SWS, including reduced slow-wave bout duration and increased slow-wave/fast-wave transitions over 24-h periods. In the same animals, developmental EtOH exposure also resulted in impaired contextual fear conditioning memory. The impairment in memory was significantly correlated with SWS fragmentation. Furthermore, EtOH-treated animals did not display a post-training modification in SWS which occurred in controls. In contrast to the memory impairment, sleep fragmentation was not correlated with the developmental EtOH-induced hyperactivity. Together these results suggest that disruption of SWS and its plasticity are a secondary contributor to a subset of developmental EtOH exposure's long-lasting consequences.

  10. Individual psychomotor impairment in relation to zopiclone and ethanol concentrations in blood--a randomized controlled double-blinded trial.

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Hjelmeland, Knut; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Mørland, Jørg

    2012-05-01

    To investigate individual traffic-relevant impairment related to measured blood zopiclone and ethanol concentrations. Also, we aimed to study possible development of acute tolerance. A randomized controlled four-way cross-over double-blind trial. Study drugs were zopiclone 5 or 10 mg, 50 g ethanol or placebo. Laboratory study with computerized tests: Connor's Continuous Performance test, Choice Reaction Time and Stockings of Cambridge. Altogether, the tests consisted of 15 test components, representing three levels of behaviour (automotive, control, executive planning), relevant to traffic safety. Sixteen healthy male volunteers. Each study day, 10 blood samples were collected from each volunteer. Fifteen psychomotor test components were registered at baseline and a further three times after intake. Impairment was defined as any individual deterioration in performance compared to individual baseline performance. Blood drug concentrations up to 74 µg/l zopiclone and 0.100% ethanol were measured. We found a clear positive concentration-effect relationship for zopiclone and ethanol for both automotive and control behaviours, and a modest relationship for executive planning behaviour. Significant impairment started to be observed at concentrations above 16 µg/l zopiclone (automotive and control behaviour) and above 0.026% ethanol (automotive behaviour). Acute tolerance was found for both drugs. The hypnotic, zopiclone, can impair psychomotor performance at blood concentrations as low as 16 µg/l. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Reduced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses following trehalose and isomaltulose ingestion: implications for postprandial substrate use in impaired glucose-tolerant subjects.

    PubMed

    van Can, Judith G P; van Loon, Luc J C; Brouns, Fred; Blaak, Ellen E

    2012-10-01

    The impact of slowly digestible sugars in reducing the risk of developing obesity and related metabolic disorders remains unclear. We hypothesised that such carbohydrates (CHO), resulting in a lower glycaemic and insulinaemic response, may lead to greater postprandial fat oxidation rates in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The present study intends to compare the postprandial metabolic responses to the ingestion of glucose (GLUC) v. trehalose (TRE) and sucrose (SUC) v. isomaltulose (IMU). In a randomised, single-blind, cross-over design, ten overweight IGT subjects were studied four times, following ingestion of different CHO drinks either at breakfast or in combination with a mixed meal at lunch. Before and 3 h after CHO ingestion, energy expenditure, substrate utilisation and circulating metabolite concentrations were determined. Ingestion of CHO drinks with a meal resulted in an attenuated rise in GLUC (-33 %) and insulin (-14 %) concentrations following TRE when compared with GLUC and following IMU, an attenuation of 43 and 34 % when compared with SUC ingestion, respectively. Additionally, there was less inhibition of the rise in NEFA concentrations and less decline in postprandial fat oxidation (22 %) after IMU when compared with SUC, whereas TRE did not differ from GLUC. The attenuated rise in GLUC and insulin concentrations following IMU ingestion attenuated the postprandial inhibition of fat oxidation compared with SUC when co-ingested with a meal. This suggests that exchange of SUC in the diet for IMU may result in a more favourable metabolic response and may help to reduce the risks associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Ethanol impairs Rho GTPase signaling and differentiation of cerebellar granule neurons in a rodent model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; Guleria, R S; Pan, J; Bayless, K J; Davis, G E; Dipette, D; Singh, U S

    2006-12-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol impairs fetal brain development and causes fetal alcohol syndrome. Although the cerebellum is one of the most alcohol-sensitive brain areas, signaling mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of ethanol on developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are largely unknown. Here we describe the effects of in vivo ethanol exposure on neurite formation in CGNs and on the activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA and Rac1), regulators of neurite formation. Exposure of 7-day-old rat pups to ethanol for 3 h moderately increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ( approximately 40 mM) and inhibited neurite formation and Rac1 activation in CGNs. Longer exposure to ethanol for 5 h resulted in higher BAC ( approximately 80 mM), induced apoptosis, inhibited Rac1, and activated RhoA. Studies demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPases in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and indicated that ethanol-associated impairment of Rho GTPase signaling might contribute to brain defects observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  13. Prenatal ethanol exposure impairs temporal ordering behaviours in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Patten, Anna R; Sawchuk, Scott; Wortman, Ryan C; Brocardo, Patricia S; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Christie, Brian R

    2016-02-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PNEE) causes significant deficits in functional (i.e., synaptic) plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA) hippocampal sub-regions of young adult male rats. Previous research has shown that in the DG, these deficits are not apparent in age-matched PNEE females. This study aimed to expand these findings and determine if PNEE induces deficits in hippocampal-dependent behaviours in both male and female young adult rats (PND 60). The metric change behavioural test examines DG-dependent deficits by determining whether an animal can detect a metric change between two identical objects. The temporal order behavioural test is thought to rely in part on the CA sub-region of the hippocampus and determines whether an animal will spend more time exploring an object that it has not seen for a larger temporal window as compared to an object that it has seen more recently. Using the liquid diet model of FASD (where 6.6% (v/v) ethanol is provided through a liquid diet consumed ad libitum throughout the entire gestation), we found that PNEE causes a significant impairment in the temporal order task, while no deficits in the DG-dependent metric change task were observed. There were no significant differences between males and females for either task. These results indicate that behaviours relying partially on the CA-region may be more affected by PNEE than those that rely on the DG.

  14. Minocycline mitigates motor impairments and cortical neuronal loss induced by focal ischemia in rats chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gedeão Batista; Fontes, Enéas de Andrade; de Carvalho, Sabrina; da Silva, Josiane Batista; Fernandes, Luanna Melo Pereira; Oliveira, Maria Cristina Souza Pereira; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Gomes-Leal, Walace; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz

    2014-05-02

    Ethanol is an important risk factor for the occurrence of cerebral ischemia contributing to poor prognosis and inefficacy of drug treatments for stroke-related symptoms. Females have a higher lifetime risk for stroke than males. Moreover, female gender has been associated with increased ethanol consumption during adolescence. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence may potentiate the motor impairments and cortical damage induced by focal ischemia in female rats. We also addressed whether these effects can be mitigated by minocycline, which has been shown to be neuroprotective against different insults in the CNS. Female rats were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) for 55 days by gavage. Focal ischemia was induced by microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1) into the motor cortex. Animals of both groups were treated daily with minocycline (25-50 mg/kg, i.p.) or sterile saline (i.p.) for 5 days, and motor function was assessed using open field, inclined plane and rotarod tests. Chronic ethanol exposure exacerbated locomotor activity and motor coordination impairments induced by focal ischemia in rats. Moreover, histological analysis revealed that microinjections of ET-1 induced pyramidal neuron loss and microglial activation in the motor cortex. Minocycline reversed the observed motor impairments, microglial activation and pyramidal neuron loss in the motor cortex of ischemic rats even in those exposed to ethanol. These results suggest that minocycline induces neuroprotection and functional recovery in ischemic female rats intoxicated with ethanol during adolescence. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this protective effect may be related to the modulation of neuroinflammation.

  15. Nicotine improves ethanol-induced impairment of memory: possible involvement of nitric oxide in the dorsal hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, N; Piri, M; Moshfegh, A; Shahin, M-S

    2012-09-06

    In the present study, the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) systems in the dorsal hippocampus in nicotine's effect on ethanol-induced amnesia and ethanol state-dependent memory was investigated. Adult male mice were cannulated in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and trained on a passive avoidance learning task for memory assessment. We found that pre-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (1 g/kg) decreased inhibitory avoidance memory when tested 24 h later. The response induced by pre-training ethanol was significantly reversed by pre-test administration of the drug. Similar to ethanol, pre-test administration of nicotine (0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) alone and nicotine (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse) plus an ineffective dose of ethanol also significantly reversed the amnesia induced by ethanol. Ethanol amnesia was also prevented by pre-test administration of L-arginine (1.2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1), a NO precursor. Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.2 μg/mouse) in combination with a low dose of L-arginine (0.8 μg/mouse) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by ethanol given before training. In contrast, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (0.4 and 0.8 μg/mouse), which reduced memory retrieval in inhibitory avoidance task by itself, in combination with an effective dose of nicotine (0.4 μg/mouse) prevented the improving effect of nicotine on memory impaired by pre-training ethanol. Moreover, intra-CA1 microinjection of L-NAME reversed the L-arginine-induced potentiation of the nicotine response. The results suggest the importance of NO system(s) in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus for improving the effect of nicotine on the ethanol-induced amnesia.

  16. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence in rats induces motor impairments and cerebral cortex damage associated with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Santana, Luana Nazaré da Silva; Bezerra, Fernando Romualdo; De Carvalho, Sabrina; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas Andrade; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking is common among adolescents, and this type of ethanol exposure may lead to long-term nervous system damage. In the current study, we evaluated motor performance and tissue alterations in the cerebral cortex of rats subjected to intermittent intoxication with ethanol from adolescence to adulthood. Adolescent male Wistar rats (35 days old) were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) during 55 days by gavage to complete 90 days of age. The open field, inclined plane and the rotarod tests were used to assess the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination performance in adult animals. Following completion of behavioral tests, half of animals were submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of NeuN (marker of neuronal bodies), GFAP (a marker of astrocytes) and Iba1 (microglia marker) in the cerebral cortex while the other half of the animals were subjected to analysis of oxidative stress markers by biochemical assays. Chronic ethanol intoxication in rats from adolescence to adulthood induced significant motor deficits including impaired spontaneous locomotion, coordination and muscle strength. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by marked changes in all cellular populations evaluated as well as increased levels of nitrite and lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate that continuous ethanol intoxication from adolescence to adulthood is able to provide neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative damage to cerebral cortex.

  17. Ethanol increases HSP70 concentrations in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hranitz, John M; Abramson, Charles I; Carter, Richard P

    2010-05-01

    Previous research on the honeybee ethanol model established how acute ethanol exposure altered function at different levels of organization: behavior and learning, ecology, and physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ethanol doses that affect honeybee behavior also induce a significant stress response, measured by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) concentrations, in honeybee brain tissues. Experiment 1 examined how pretreatment handling influenced brain HSP70 concentrations in three pretreatment groups of bees; immediately after being collected, after being harnessed and fed, and after 22-24h in a harness. HSP70 concentrations did not differ among pretreatment groups within replicates, although we observed significantly different HSP70 concentrations between the two replicates. Experiment 2 investigated the relationship between ethanol dose and brain HSP70 concentrations. Bees were placed in seven experimental groups, the three pretreatment groups as in Experiment 1 and four ethanol-fed groups. Bees in ethanol treatments were fed 1.5M sucrose (control) and 1.5M sucrose-ethanol solutions containing 2.5, 5, and 10% ethanol, allowed to sit for 4h, and dissected brains were assayed for HSP70. We observed ethanol-induced increases in honeybee brain HSP70 concentrations from the control group through the 5% ethanol group. Only bees in the 5% ethanol group had HSP70 concentrations significantly higher than the control group. The inverted U-shaped ethanol dose-HSP70 concentration response curve indicated that ingestion of 2.5% ethanol and 5% ethanol stimulated the stress response, whereas ingestion of 10% ethanol inhibited the stress response. Doses that show maximum HSP70 concentration (5% ethanol) or HSP70 inhibition (10% ethanol) correspond to those (> or =5% ethanol) that also impaired honeybees in previous studies. We conclude that acute ethanol intoxication by solutions containing > or =5% ethanol causes significant ethanol-induced stress in brain

  18. Ethanol exposure during the early first trimester equivalent impairs reflexive motor activity and heightens fearfulness in an avian model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Flentke, George R; Kragtorp, Katherine A; Tessmer, Laura

    2011-02-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is a leading cause of childhood neurodevelopmental disability. The adverse behavioral effects of alcohol exposure during the second and third trimester are well documented; less clear is whether early first trimester-equivalent exposures also alter behavior. We investigated this question using an established chick model of alcohol exposure. In ovo embryos experienced a single, acute ethanol exposure that spanned gastrulation through neuroectoderm induction and early brain patterning (19-22h incubation). At 7 days posthatch, the chicks were evaluated for reflexive motor function (wingflap extension, righting reflex), fearfulness (tonic immobility [TI]), and fear/social reinstatement (open-field behavior). Chicks exposed to a peak ethanol level of 0.23-0.28% were compared against untreated and saline-treated controls. Birds receiving early ethanol exposure had a normal righting reflex and a significantly reduced wingflap extension in response to a sudden descent. The ethanol-treated chicks also displayed heightened fearfulness, reflected in increased frequency of TI, and they required significantly fewer trials for its induction. In an open-field test, ethanol treatment did not affect latency to move, steps taken, vocalizations, defecations, or escape attempts. The current findings demonstrate that early ethanol exposure can increase fearfulness and impair aspects of motor function. Importantly, the observed dysfunctions resulted from an acute ethanol exposure during the period when the major brain components are induced and patterned. The equivalent period in human development is 3-4 weeks postconception. The current findings emphasize that ethanol exposure during the early first trimester equivalent can produce neurodevelopmental disability in the offspring.

  19. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  20. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  1. Effects of electroacupuncture on ethanol-induced impairments of spatial learning and memory and Fos expression in the hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Ma, Zhao; Cheng, Fei; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Huijuan; Shen, Xueyong; Liu, Sheng

    2014-07-25

    It is well established that alcohol impairs spatial learning and memory. Here, we investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST36 or nonacupoint on ethanol-induced learning and memory impairment and the expression of Fos in the hippocampus. Ethanol (5g/kg) was administered intragastrically once a day for 5 consecutive days; 2Hz EA was administered immediately after ethanol exposure. After a 2-day ethanol abstinence, for 6 consecutive days, the rats were submitted to Morris water maze training. Probe trials were performed on 1 day after the final training session. We also applied immunohistochemistry to detect Fos-positive nuclei in the hippocampus. We found that 5-day ethanol exposure markedly decreased spatial learning and memory abilities in the Morris water maze task as indicated by escape latency and time in the target quadrant. EA treatment shortened the time of reaching platform and increased times traveled in the target quadrant (P<0.05). Animals administered with ethanol emitted significantly fewer Fos expression in the hippocampal CA1 area. EA increased Fos expression in the hippocampal CA1 area. Significant correlations were obtained between Fos protein expression in CA1 and time in the target quadrant. Altogether, these results suggest that EA protects against ethanol-induced impairments of spatial learning and memory, which may be involved in the hippocampal CA1 area. EA treatment may provide a novel nonpharmacological strategy for ethanol-induced learning and memory impairment.

  2. Exposure to ethanol during capacitation impairs the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salonen, I

    1986-08-01

    To validate earlier findings, mainly in laboratory animals, the effect of ethanol on the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa has been investigated. Ethanol added to the capacitation medium reduced the penetration of zona-free hamster eggs by human spermatozoa in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 50 to 500 mg % (0.05-0.5%). Fertilizing capacity was at least partially restored by washing in ethanol-free medium. Ethanol exposure before capacitation had a slight stimulatory effect on the penetration of spermatozoa into zona-free hamster ova. The motility of spermatozoa was not altered significantly, either quantitatively or qualitatively, by the presence of ethanol in the capacitation medium. These results suggest that the decrease in fertilizing ability of spermatozoa induced by ethanol during capacitation is due to a specific action on the capacitation process.

  3. Chronic ethanol-induced impairment of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is attenuated by PPAR-δ agonist

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chelsea Q.; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Tong, Ming; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Kim, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Background The Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates liver growth, repair, and regeneration. Chronic ethanol exposure blunts normal liver regenerative responses, in part by inhibiting insulin/IGF signaling, and correspondingly, previous studies showed that ethanol-impaired liver regeneration could be restored by insulin sensitizer (PPAR-δ agonist) treatment. Since Wnt/β-catenin functions overlap and crosstalk with insulin/IGF pathways, we investigated the effects of ethanol exposure and PPAR-δ agonist treatment on Wnt pathway gene expression in relation to liver regeneration. Methods Adult male Long Evans rats were fed with isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol for 8 weeks, and also treated with vehicle or a PPAR-δ agonist during the last 3 weeks of the feeding regimen. The rats were then subjected to 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) and livers harvested at various post-PH time points were used to quantify expression of 19 Wnt pathway genes using Quantigene 2.0 Multiplex Assay. Results Ethanol broadly inhibited expression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling-related genes, including down-regulation of Wnt1, Fzd3, Lef1, and Bcl9 throughout the post-PH time course (0-72 h), and suppression of Wnt7a, Ccnd1, Fgf4, Wif1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 at 18, 24 hours post-PH time points. PPAR-δ agonist treatments rescued the ethanol-induced suppression of Wnt1, Wnt7a, Fzd3, Lef1, Bcl9, Ccnd1, and Sfrp2 gene expression in liver, corresponding with the improvements in DNA synthesis and restoration of hepatic architecture. Conclusions Chronic high-dose ethanol exposures inhibit Wnt signaling, which likely contributes to the impairments in liver regeneration. Therapeutic effects of PPAR-δ agonists extend beyond restoration of insulin/IGF signaling mechanisms and are mediated in part by enhancement of Wnt pathway signaling. Future studies will determine the degree to which targeted restoration of Wnt signaling is sufficient to improve liver regeneration and remodeling in the context of

  4. The Interaction of Ethanol Ingestion and Social Interaction with an Intoxicated Peer on the Odor-Mediated Response to the Drug in Adolescent Rats.

    PubMed

    Eade, Amber M; Youngentob, Lisa M; Youngentob, Steven L

    2016-04-01

    Using a social transmission of food preference paradigm in rats, we previously demonstrated that ethanol (EtOH) exposure during adolescence, as either an observer (interaction with an intoxicated conspecific) or demonstrator (intragastric infusion with EtOH), altered the reflexive odor-mediated responses to the drug. The 2 modes of exposure were equivalent in the magnitude of their effects. Human adolescents, however, are likely to experience the drug in a social setting as both an EtOH observer and demonstrator. That is, both interacting with an intoxicated peer and experiencing EtOH's postingestive consequences in conjunction with hematogenic olfaction. Therefore, we tested whether combined adolescent exposure as both an observer and demonstrator differed from either form of individual experience. Beginning on postnatal day (P) 29, naïve rats received EtOH or water exposures in a social interaction paradigm as either an observer, a demonstrator, or combined experience (where each animal in the interaction was, itself, an observer and demonstrator). Exposures occurred 4 times, once every 48 hours. On P37, the reflexive behavioral response to EtOH odor was tested, using whole-body plethysmography. The odor-mediated responses of adolescent EtOH observers, demonstrators, and combined exposure animals all significantly differed from controls. Compared to controls, however, the magnitude of the behavioral effect was greatest in the combined exposure animals. Moreover, combined exposure as both an EtOH observer and demonstrator significantly differed from either form of individual EtOH experience. EtOH's component chemosensory qualities are known to be central contributors to its acceptance and increases in the acceptability of EtOH's odor, resulting from a social transmission experience, are predictive of enhanced EtOH avidity in adolescence. Our findings demonstrate that combined exposure as an observer and demonstrator, within a socially relevant framework, may

  5. EFFECT OF THE SELECTIVE NMDA NR2B ANTAGONIST, IFENPRODIL, ON ACUTE TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL-INDUCED MOTOR IMPAIRMENT IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R. Liane; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent rats have been observed to be less sensitive than adults to a number of acute ethanol effects, including ethanol-induced motor impairment. These adolescent insensitivities may be related in part to the more rapid emergence of within session (acute) tolerance in adolescents than adults. Adolescent-related alterations in neural systems that serve as ethanol target sites, including changes in NMDA receptor subunit expression, may influence the responsiveness of adolescents to acute ethanol effects. The present study explored the role of NMDA NR2B receptors in the development of acute tolerance to ethanol-induced motor impairment in male adolescent (postnatal day [P]28–30), and adult (P68-70) Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Motor impairing effects of ethanol on the stationary inclined plane and blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) were examined following challenge at each age with a functionally equivalent ethanol dose (adolescents: 2.25 g/kg; adults: 1.5 g/kg). Data were collected at two post-injection intervals (10 or 60 min) to compare rate of recovery from ethanol intoxication with BEC declines using the Radlow approach (Radlow, 1994) and changes in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time for assessing acute tolerance. Results Both vehicle-treated adolescent and adult animals showed similar acute tolerance development to the motor-impairing effects of ethanol at these functionally equivalent doses on the stationary inclined plane, as indexed by an increasing time-dependent dissociation between BECs and ethanol-induced motor impairment, with motor impairment declining faster than BECs, as well as by significant declines in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time. Acute tolerance development was reliably blocked by administration of the NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, (5.0 mg/kg), in adult rats, whereas adolescents were affected by a higher dose (10.0 mg/kg). Conclusions These data support the suggestion that alterations in NMDA receptor systems

  6. Different genes influence toluene- and ethanol-induced locomotor impairment in C. elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Andrew G.; Friedberg, Ryan I.; Gupta, Hersh; Chan, Chung-Lung; Shelton, Keith L.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The abused volatile solvent toluene shares many behavioral effects with classic central nervous system depressants such as ethanol. Similarities between toluene and ethanol have also been demonstrated using in vitro electrophysiology. Together, these studies suggest that toluene and ethanol may be acting, at least in part, via common mechanisms. Methods We used the genetic model, C. elegans, to examine the behavioral effects of toluene in a simple system, and used mutant strains known to have altered responses to other CNS depressants to examine the involvement of those genes in the motor effects induced by toluene. Results Toluene vapor brings about an altered pattern of locomotion in wild-type worms that is visibly distinct from that generated by ethanol. Mutants of the slo-1, rab-3 and unc-64 genes that are resistant to ethanol or the volatile anesthetic halothane show no resistance to toluene. A mutation in the unc-79 gene results in hypersensitivity to ethanol, halothane and toluene indicating a possible convergence of mechanisms of the three compounds. We screened for, and isolated, two mutations that generate resistance to the locomotor depressing effects of toluene and do not alter sensitivity to ethanol. Conclusions In C. elegans, ethanol and toluene have distinct behavioral effects and minimal overlap in terms of the genes responsible for these effects. These findings demonstrate that the C. elegans model system provides a unique and sensitive means of delineating both the commonalities as well as the differences in the neurochemical effects of classical CNS depressants and abused volatile inhalants. PMID:21945072

  7. CB1-Receptor Knockout Neonatal Mice are Protected Against Ethanol-induced Impairments of DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Shivakumar, Madhu; Psychoyos, Delphine; Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2015-01-01

    The significant consequences of ethanol use during pregnancy are neurobehavioral abnormalities involving hippocampal and neocortex malfunctions that cause learning and memory deficits collectively named fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are still poorly understood and therefore warrant systematic research. Here, we document novel epigenetic abnormalities in the mouse model of FASD. Ethanol treatment of P7 mice, which induces activation of caspase-3, impaired DNA methylation through reduced DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A) levels. Inhibition of caspase-3 activity, before ethanol treatment, rescued DNMT1, DNMT3A proteins as well as DNA methylation levels. Blockade of histone methyltransferase (G9a) activity or cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1R), prior to ethanol treatment, which respectively inhibits or prevents activation of caspase-3, rescued the DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation. No reduction of DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation was found in P7 CB1R null mice, which exhibit no ethanol-induced activation of caspase-3. Together, these data demonstrate that ethanol-induced activation of caspase-3 impairs DNA methylation through DNMT1 and DNMT3A in the neonatal mouse brain, and such impairments are absent in CB1R null mice. Epigenetic events mediated by DNA methylation may be one of the essential mechanisms of ethanol teratogenesis. PMID:25487288

  8. Long term ethanol consumption promotes hepatic tumorigenesis but impairs normal hepatocyte proliferation in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption has been related to an increased risk of several cancers, including that of the liver; however, studies in animal models have yet to conclusively determine whether ethanol acts as a tumor promoter in hepatic tumorigenesis. We examined whether prolonged alcoh...

  9. Ethanol metabolism by alcohol dehydrogenase or cytochrome P450 2E1 differentially impairs hepatic protein trafficking and growth hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Doody, Erin E; Groebner, Jennifer L; Walker, Jetta R; Frizol, Brittnee M; Tuma, Dean J; Fernandez, David J; Tuma, Pamela L

    2017-09-01

    The liver metabolizes alcohol using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). Both enzymes metabolize ethanol into acetaldehyde, but CYP2E1 activity also results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that promote oxidative stress. We have previously shown that microtubules are hyperacetylated in ethanol-treated polarized, hepatic WIF-B cells and livers from ethanol fed rats. We have also shown that enhanced protein acetylation correlates with impaired clathrin-mediated endocytosis, constitutive secretion and nuclear translocation and that the defects are likely mediated by acetaldehyde. However, the roles of CYP2E1-generated metabolites and ROS in microtubule acetylation and these alcohol-induced impairments have not been examined. To determine if CYP2E1-mediated alcohol metabolism is required for enhanced acetylation and the trafficking defects, we co-incubated cells with ethanol and diallyl sulfide (a CYP2E1 inhibitor) or N-acetyl cysteine (an anti-oxidant). Both agents failed to prevent microtubule hyperacetylation in ethanol-treated cells and also failed to prevent impaired secretion or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Somewhat surprisingly, both NAS and DAC prevented impaired STAT5B nuclear translocation. Further examination of microtubule-independent steps of the pathway revealed that Jak2/STAT5B activation by growth hormone (GH) was prevented by DAS and NAC. These results were confirmed in ethanol-exposed HepG2 cells expressing only ADH or CYP2E1. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we further determined that ethanol exposure led to blunted GH-mediated gene expression. In conclusion, we determined that alcohol-induced microtubule acetylation and associated defects in microtubule-dependent trafficking are mediated by ADH metabolism whereas impaired microtubule-independent Jak2/STAT5B activation is mediated by CYP2E1 activity. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

  10. Anaphylactoid reaction to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J M; Keating, M U; Squillace, D L; O'Connell, E J; Yunginger, J W; Sachs, M I

    1990-05-01

    We studied a 14-year-old boy who developed a pruritic rash and facial swelling after ingestion of beer or wine. A blinded challenge with purified ethanol was positive demonstrating ethanol itself to be the offending agent. An IgE-mediated reaction to ethanol or one of its metabolites as a hapten is possible, or the reaction may involve unusual metabolism of ethanol with accumulation of acetaldehyde and/or direct mast cell degranulation.

  11. CB1-receptor knockout neonatal mice are protected against ethanol-induced impairments of DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja N; Subbanna, Shivakumar; Shivakumar, Madhu; Psychoyos, Delphine; Basavarajappa, Balapal S

    2015-02-01

    The significant consequences of ethanol use during pregnancy are neurobehavioral abnormalities involving hippocampal and neocortex malfunctions that cause learning and memory deficits collectively named fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are still poorly understood and therefore warrant systematic research. Here, we document novel epigenetic abnormalities in the mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Ethanol treatment of P7 mice, which induces activation of caspase 3, impaired DNA methylation through reduced DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A) levels. Inhibition of caspase 3 activity, before ethanol treatment, rescued DNMT1, DNMT3A proteins as well as DNA methylation levels. Blockade of histone methyltransferase (G9a) activity or cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1R), prior to ethanol treatment, which, respectively, inhibits or prevents activation of caspase 3, rescued the DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation. No reduction of DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation was found in P7 CB1R null mice, which exhibit no ethanol-induced activation of caspase 3. Together, these data demonstrate that ethanol-induced activation of caspase 3 impairs DNA methylation through DNMT1 and DNMT3A in the neonatal mouse brain, and such impairments are absent in CB1R null mice. Epigenetic events mediated by DNA methylation may be one of the essential mechanisms of ethanol teratogenesis. Schematic mechanism of action by which ethanol impairs DNA methylation. Studies have demonstrated that ethanol has the capacity to bring epigenetic changes to contribute to the development of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). However, the mechanisms are not well studied. P7 ethanol induces the activation of caspase 3 and impairs DNA methylation through reduced DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A) proteins (→). The inhibition or genetic ablation of cannabinoid receptor type-1 or inhibition of histone

  12. Corticosterone protects against memory impairments and reduced hippocampal BDNF levels induced by a chronic low dose of ethanol in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Latif, Liaque M; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie Christine

    2014-01-01

    Acute low doses of ethanol can produce reversible memory deficits, but it is unknown whether they persist upon chronic use. We investigated whether the chronic intake of a low dose of ethanol induces memory impairments in the ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mouse strain. Because stress precipitates alcohol abuse and the stress hormone corticosterone contributes to memory processes, ethanol consumption and toxic effects, we also determined the impact of co-treatment with corticosterone on these effects. BDNF contributes to memory function and toxic effects of ethanol, therefore its levels were quantified in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Ethanol (1% in drinking water) and corticosterone (250 μg/mL) were administered using the two-bottle choice test to monitor their appetitive properties. Spatial and non-spatial memory performance was assessed using the spontaneous alternation, object recognition and object location tests. The chronic exposure to a low dose of ethanol caused spatial and non-spatial memory deficits after withdrawal associated with a reduction in hippocampal BDNF levels, which were prevented by co-treatment with corticosterone (~21 mg/kg/day). The protective effect of corticosterone on memory was no longer observed at higher doses (~41 mg/kg/day), but persisted for hippocampal BDNF levels. C57BL/6J mice did not develop an appetence for 1% ethanol, but the addition of corticosterone increased voluntary consumption of and preference for the ethanol+corticosterone solutions. Although acute low doses of corticosterone (1 mg/kg) were found to rescue established memory impairments, this is the first report of a protective effect of chronic doses of corticosterone in the range of 20-32 mg/kg, and particularly against memory deficits induced by alcohol.

  13. Diet-induced obesity and ethanol impair progression of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse mesenteric vein injection model.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kyle J; Swan, Ryan Z; Iannitti, David A; McKillop, Iain H; Sindram, David

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rapidly increasing cancer whose known risk factors are chronic ethanol abuse, viral hepatitis infection, and aflatoxin exposure. Obesity, an emerging HCC risk factor, is reaching epidemic proportions in developed nations. This study investigated the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and chronic ethanol consumption on HCC progression in mice in vivo. In this study, C57BL/6 DIO mice and lean litter mates were maintained on a 60% (high-fat diet [HFD]) diet or a 10% (control diet [CD]) kcal% fat diet for 7 weeks before they were weaned to 10/20% ([v/v], alternating days) ethanol in drinking water (EtOH) or maintenance on drinking water (H(2)O) alone. Hepatic tumor formation was initiated by intrahepatic Hepa1-6 cell (6 × 10(6) cells) inoculation 6 weeks later via the mesenteric vein. The animals receiving the HFD showed decreased tumor incidence and area of hepatic foci versus the CD animals maintained on H(2)O alone. The action of EtOH suppressed tumor incidence further in both the CD and the HFD mice. Serologic analysis showed no significant differences in liver enzymes among the groups. Protein analysis demonstrated increased P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) in the groups maintained on EtOH, an effect exacerbated by HFD. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression in HFD HCC mice (H(2)O and EtOH) concomitant with decreased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) expression. Although obesity and EtOH consumption are known risk factors for HCC initiation and development, the data in this study suggest that these factors impair progression of established tumors within the liver.

  14. The protective effect of platelet released growth factors and bone augmentation (Bio-Oss(®)) on ethanol impaired osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Bayer, Andreas; Cremer, Tillman; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Lethaus, Bernd; Kweider, Nisreen; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Drescher, Wolf; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2017-07-31

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a known limiting factor for bone healing. One promising strategy to improve bone augmentation techniques with Bio-Oss(®) in oral and maxillofacial surgery might be the supportive application of platelet-concentrated biomaterials as platelet-released growth factor (PRGF). To address this matter, we performed an in vitro study investigating the protective effects of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in ethanol (EtOH) treated osteoblasts. The SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line, with and without EtOH pretreatment was used. The cell viability, proliferation and alkali phosphatase activity (ALP) after application of 0%, 5% and 10% PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) were assessed. The application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in EtOH impaired osteoblasts showed a significant beneficial influence increasing the viability of the osteoblasts in cell culture. The synergistic effect of Bio-Oss(®) and 5% PRGF on the proliferation of osteoblasts was also demonstrated. Bio-Oss(®) only in combination with PRGF increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in EtOH pretreated cells. These results indicate that the simultaneous application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) inhibits EtOH induced bone healing impairment. Furthermore, in the cells, PRGF induced a protective mechanism which might promote bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Impaired Ethanol-Induced Sensitization and Decreased Cannabinoid Receptor-1 in a Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matchynski-Franks, Jessica J.; Susick, Laura L.; Schneider, Brandy L.; Perrine, Shane A.; Conti, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired striatal neuroplasticity may underlie increased alcoholism documented in those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) is sensitive to the effects of ethanol (EtOH) and traumatic stress, and is a critical regulator of striatal plasticity. To investigate CB1 involvement in the PTSD-alcohol interaction, this study measured the effects of traumatic stress using a model of PTSD, mouse single-prolonged stress (mSPS), on EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization and striatal CB1 levels. Methods Mice were exposed to mSPS, which includes: 2-h restraint, 10-min group forced swim, 15-min exposure to rat bedding odor, and diethyl ether exposure until unconsciousness or control conditions. Seven days following mSPS exposure, the locomotor sensitizing effects of EtOH were assessed. CB1, post-synaptic density-95 (PSD95), and dopamine-2 receptor (D2) protein levels were then quantified in the dorsal striatum using standard immunoblotting techniques. Results Mice exposed to mSPS-EtOH demonstrated impaired EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization compared to Control-EtOH mice, which was accompanied by reduced striatal CB1 levels. EtOH increased striatal PSD95 in control and mSPS-exposed mice. Additionally, mSPS-Saline exposure increased striatal PSD95 and decreased D2 protein expression, with mSPS-EtOH exposure alleviating these changes. Conclusions These data indicate that the mSPS model of PTSD blunts the behavioral sensitizing effects of EtOH, a response that suggests impaired striatal neuroplasticity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that mice exposed to mSPS and repeated EtOH exposure decreases CB1 in the striatum, providing a mechanism of interest for understanding the effects of EtOH following severe, multimodal stress exposure. PMID:27186643

  16. Frontline Science: ATF3 is responsible for the inhibition of TNF-α release and the impaired migration of acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaojie; Meng, Xiaoming; Huang, Cheng; Shen, Chenlin; Li, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Binge drinking represses host innate immunity and leads to a high risk of infection. Acute EtOH-pretreated macrophages exhibit a decreased production of proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS. ATF3 is induced and counter-regulates the LPS/TLR4 inflammatory cascade. Here, we investigated the potential role of ATF3 in LPS tolerance in acute ethanol-pretreated macrophages. We found that there was an inverse correlation between ATF3 and LPS-induced TNF-α production in acute ethanol-pretreated murine monocytes and macrophages. The knockdown of ATF3 attenuated the inhibitory effects of acute ethanol treatment on LPS-induced TNF-α production. Furthermore, ChIP assays and co-IP demonstrated that ATF3, together with HDAC1, negatively modulated the transcription of TNF-α. In binge-drinking mice challenged with LPS, an up-regulation of ATF3 and HDAC1 and a concomitant decrease in TNF-α were observed. Given that HDAC1 was concomitantly induced in acute ethanol-exposed monocytes and macrophages, we used the HDACi TSA or silenced HDAC1 to explore the role of HDAC1 in acute ethanol-treated macrophages. Our results revealed that TSA treatment and HDAC1 knockdown prevented acute ethanol-induced ATF3 expression and the inhibition of TNF-α transcription. These data indicated a dual role for HDAC1 in acute ethanol-induced LPS tolerance. Furthermore, we showed that the induction of ATF3 led to the impaired migration of BM monocytes and macrophages. Overall, we present a novel role for ATF3 in the inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and in the impairment of monocyte and macrophage migration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Impairments in hippocampal synaptic plasticity following prenatal ethanol exposure are dependent on glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Patten, Anna R; Brocardo, Patricia S; Sakiyama, Claire; Wortman, Ryan C; Noonan, Athena; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Christie, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that prenatal ethanol exposure (PNEE) causes a significant deficit in synaptic plasticity, namely long-term potentiation (LTP), in the dentate gyrus (DG) region of the hippocampus of male rats. PNEE has also been shown to induce an increase in oxidative stress and a reduction in antioxidant capacity in the brains of both male and female animals. In this study the interaction between LTP and the major antioxidant in the brain, glutathione (GSH), is examined. We show that depletion of the intracellular reserves of GSH with diethyl maleate (DEM) reduces LTP in control male, but not female animals, mirroring the effects of PNEE. Furthermore, treatment of PNEE animals with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a cysteine donor for the synthesis of GSH, increases GSH levels in the hippocampus and completely restores the deficits in LTP in PNEE males. These results indicate that in males GSH plays a major role in regulating LTP, and that PNEE may cause reductions in LTP by reducing the intracellular pool of this endogenous antioxidant.

  18. Low and moderate doses of acute ethanol do not impair spatial cognition but facilitate accelerating rotarod performance in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Chin, Vivien S; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2012-03-14

    Adolescents and adult rodents have differing sensitivities to the acute effects of ethanol on a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Often, these differences are revealed using high ethanol doses and consequently little is known about these age-related effects using lower ethanol doses. We sought to determine if low-dose ethanol produces differential effects on cognition and motor behavior in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (postnatal day PD 30-32) and adult (PD 70-72) male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the standard version of the Morris Water Maze (MWM) for 5 days or received 5 training trials on an accelerating rotarod (ARR). Adolescents learned the location of the submerged platform in the MWM significantly slower than adults during training and, acute ethanol administration (0.5 g/kg, 0.75 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg) 30 min before testing did not impair spatial memory in either age group. On the ARR test, adolescent rats spent significantly more time on the rotarod compared to adults and, alcohol exposure (1.0 g/kg) significantly increased ARR performance 30 min following administration. Our findings address the utility of investigating low and moderate doses of ethanol during different developmental stages in rats.

  19. Life-Stage PBPK Models for Multiple Routes of Ethanol Exposure in the Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly blended with gasoline (10% ethanol) in the US, and higher ethanol concentrations are being considered. While the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of orally-ingested ethanol are widely reported, comparable work is limited for inhalation exposure (IE), particularly...

  20. Life-Stage PBPK Models for Multiple Routes of Ethanol Exposure in the Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly blended with gasoline (10% ethanol) in the US, and higher ethanol concentrations are being considered. While the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of orally-ingested ethanol are widely reported, comparable work is limited for inhalation exposure (IE), particularly...

  1. The ethanolic extract of the Eclipta prostrata L. ameliorates the cognitive impairment in mice induced by scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Yong; Kim, Haneul; Park, Ho Jae; Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Hye Jin; Choi, Hyuck Jai; Kim, Nam Jae; Jang, Dae Sik; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-08-22

    Eclipta prostrata L. (Asteraceae) has been prescribed for whole body nourishment and nervine tonic in Asia. However, the effects of E. prostrata in learning and memory have not been fully explored. To scientifically elucidate the effects of E. prostrata on cognitive functions, we examined whether E. prostrata could ameliorate a cholinergic blockade-induced memory impairment, and we also investigated the effects of E. prostrata on the synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine, a cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonist. The anti-amnesic effects of the ethanolic extract of Eclipta prostrata L. (EEEP) were measured in mice by the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks. To test the effects of EEEP on synaptic plasticity, we measured long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. We also studied several signaling molecules related to learning and memory, such as phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) or phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). In the passive avoidance task, EEEP (50 or 100mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated the shortened step-through latency induced by scopolamine. EEEP (100mg/kg, p.o.) also showed significant increase in alternation behavior during the Y-maze task. In the Morris water maze task, scopolamine-induced a decrease in both the swimming time within the target zone and the number of crossings where the platform had been placed were significantly reversed by EEEP (50 or 100mg/kg, p.o.). Moreover, EEEP (100μg/ml) significantly enhanced hippocampal LTP without affecting basal synaptic transmission. The administration of EEEP (100mg/kg) increased the phosphorylation levels of Akt and GSK-3β in the hippocampal region. These results suggest that EEEP has memory-ameliorating activity against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment and facilitates LTP in the hippocampus. This could be, at least in part, mediated by the activation of the Akt-GSK-3β signaling pathway

  2. Ethanol impairs estrogen receptor signaling resulting in accelerated activation of senescence pathways while estradiol attenuates the effects of ethanol in osteoblasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that chronic alcohol consumption increases the risk of osteoporosis. However, the mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced bone loss are largely unknown. Using bone from chronic ethanol (EtOH) infused cycling female rats and osteoblastic cells in vitro, we hav...

  3. Poppy seed ingestion: the Oregon perspective.

    PubMed

    Meneely, K D

    1992-07-01

    Numerous articles have been published regarding the positive morphine and codeine urinalysis results from the ingestion of poppy seeds. Oregon's perspective towards ingestion of controlled substances focuses around driving under impaired conditions. To determine the influence of the residual opium on poppy seeds to impairment, seven volunteers each ingested 25 grams of poppy seeds baked into bundt cakes. Urine samples were screened by EMIT using 300 ng/ml cutoff levels. All of the urine specimens were found to be opiate positive shortly after consuming the cake; however, after administering a series of standardized drug recognition evaluation tests, no subjects were found to exhibit symptoms of opiate impairment.

  4. Cardiovascular alterations at different stages of hypertension development during ethanol consumption: Time-course of vascular and autonomic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Crestani, Carlos C.; Lopes da Silva, Andréia; Scopinho, América A.; Ruginsk, Silvia G.; Uchoa, Ernane T.; Correa, Fernando M.A.; Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Resstel, Leonardo B.M.

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to establish a time-course correlation between vascular and autonomic changes that contribute to the development of hypertension during ethanol ingestion in rats. For this, male Wistar rats were subjected to the intake of increasing ethanol concentrations in their drinking water during four weeks. Ethanol effects were investigated at the end of each week. Mild hypertension was already observed at the first week of treatment, and a progressive blood pressure increase was observed along the evaluation period. Increased pressor response to phenylephrine was observed from first to fourth week. α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor protein in the mesenteric bed was enhanced at the first week, whereas β{sub 2}-adrenoceptor protein in the aorta was reduced after the second week. In the third week, ethanol intake facilitated the depressor response to sodium nitroprusside, whereas in the fourth week it reduced nitrate content in aorta and increased it plasma. The bradycardic component of the baroreflex was impaired, whereas baroreflex tachycardia was enhanced at the third and fourth weeks. AT{sub 1A} receptor and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNAs in the nucleus tractus solitarius were increased at the fourth week. These findings suggest that increased vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agents is possibly a link factor in the development and maintenance of the progressive hypertension induced by ethanol consumption. Additionally, baroreflex changes are possibly mediated by alterations in angiotensinergic mechanisms and CNP content within the brainstem, which contribute to maintaining the hypertensive state in later phases of ethanol ingestion. Facilitated vascular responsiveness to nitric oxide seems to counteract ethanol-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Mild hypertension was observed during the entire period of ethanol ingestion. • Ethanol facilitated vascular reactivity to vasoactive agents. • Changes in baroreflex activity

  5. On some physiological aspects of ethanol repercussion on neural and cardiorenal functions.

    PubMed

    Araujo Guedes, Rubem Carlos; de Alburquerque Paiva, Ana Maria; Amâncio-dos-Santos, Angela; Vieira-Filho, Leucio Duarte; Oliveira da Paixão, Ana Durce

    2009-12-01

    Chronic ethanol ingestion, mostly in young adults, constitutes a frequent drug-abuse situation, which is associated to a wide variety of pathological disturbance affecting a number of organs, including liver, kidney, heart, pancreas and brain. The ethanol effects are more prominent when occurring at the perinatal period of life, generating, among other disabilities, brain developmental and functional impairments, as well as the so-called "fetal alcoholic syndrome". However, low doses of ethanol, although not producing conspicuous signs of physiological impairment, may affect the developing organism, impairing the renal and cardiovascular system, among others. As a consequence of increased oxidative stress produced by ethanol intake and its subsequent oxidation, lipid peroxidation increases, enhancing reactive oxygen species formation, which is potentially injurious to the brain tissue. When occurring during gestation, lipid peroxidation may occur in the placenta, an event that would partially be responsible for fetal nutrition disturbance and consequently late physiological impairment. In this short review, data on ethanol effects on the nervous and cardiorenal structure and function are analyzed at the light of the most relevant hypotheses concerning ethanol mechanisms of action. Additionally, experimental data from the authors' laboratories are presented and discussed, focusing particular attention to the possibility of differential neural and cardiorenal ethanol effects as a function of the dose used in distinct experimental models.

  6. Supplemental choline during the periweaning period protects against trace conditioning impairments attributable to post-training ethanol exposure in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S

    2012-08-01

    Supplemental choline during early stages of development can result in long-lasting improvements to memory function. In addition, pre- or postnatal choline has been shown to be protective against some of the adverse effects of early alcohol exposure. The present experiment examined whether supplemental choline given to rats would protect against the effects of posttraining alcohol administration on trace fear conditioning. Posttraining alcohol exposure in adolescent rats results in poor performance in this hippocampus-dependent task, although delay conditioning is unaffected. Here, rats were given an s.c. injection of either saline or choline chloride daily on postnatal days (PD) 15-26. On PD 30 subjects were trained in a trace fear conditioning procedure. For the next 3 days animals were administered 2.5 g/kg ethanol or water control, and conditional stimulus (CS)-elicited freezing was measured on PD 34. Results indicated that posttraining alcohol disrupted the expression of trace conditioning and that supplemental choline on PD 15-26 was protective against this effect. That is, choline-treated animals subsequently given posttraining ethanol performed as well as animals not given ethanol. These results indicate that supplemental choline given during the periweaning period protects against ethanol-induced impairments in a hippocampus-dependent learning task. Findings contribute to the growing literature showing improvements in learning and memory in subjects given extra dietary choline during critical periods of brain development.

  7. Ingesting Isomaltulose Versus Fructose-Maltodextrin During Prolonged Moderate-Heavy Exercise Increases Fat Oxidation but Impairs Gastrointestinal Comfort and Cycling Performance.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Carstens, Matthew; Millen, Aletta M

    2015-10-01

    Certain commercial carbohydrate replacement products include slowly absorbed carbohydrates such as isomaltulose. Few studies have investigated the metabolic effects of ingesting isomaltulose during exercise and none have evaluated exercise performance and gastrointestinal comfort. Nine male cyclists participated postprandially during three trials of 2-h steady-state (S-S) exercise (60%Wmax) followed by a 16 km time trial (TT) while ingesting 63 g·h-1 of either, 0.8:1 fructose: maltodextrin (F:M) or isomaltulose (ISO) or placebo- flavored water (PL). Data were analyzed by magnitude-based inferences. During S-S exercise, ISO and PL similarly increased plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration (mean change ISO versus F:M: 0.18, 90%CI ±0.21 mmol·L-1, 88% likelihood) and fat oxidation (10, 90%CI ±9 g, 89% likelihood) while decreasing carbohydrate oxidation (-36, 90%CI ±30.2 g, 91% likelihood) compared with F:M, despite equal elevations in blood glucose concentration with ISO and F:M. Rating of stomach cramps and bloating increased progressively with ISO (rating: 0-90 min S-S, weak; 120 min S-S, moderate; TT, strong) compared with F:M and PL (0-120 min S-S and TT, very weak). TT performance was substantially slower with ISO (mean change: 1.5, 90%CI ±1.4 min, 94% likely harmful) compared with F:M. The metabolic response of ISO ingestion during moderate exercise to increase NEFA availability and fat oxidation despite elevating blood glucose concentration is anomalous for a carbohydrate supplement. However, ingesting isomaltulose at a continuous high frequency to meet the recommended carbohydrate replacement dose, results in severe gastrointestinal symptoms during prolonged or high intensity exercise and negatively affects exercise performance compared with fructose-maltodextrin supplementation.

  8. The combination of ethanol with mephedrone increases the signs of neurotoxicity and impairs neurogenesis and learning in adolescent CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Duart-Castells, Leticia; Camarasa, Jorge; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-02-15

    A new family of psychostimulants, under the name of cathinones, has broken into the market in the last decade. In light of the fact that around 95% of cathinone consumers have been reported to combine them with alcoholic drinks, we sought to study the consequences of the concomitant administration of ethanol on mephedrone -induced neurotoxicity. Adolescent male Swiss-CD1 mice were administered four times in one day, every 2h, with saline, mephedrone (25mg/kg), ethanol (2; 1.5; 1.5; 1g/kg) and their combination at a room temperature of 26±2°C. The combination with ethanol impaired mephedrone-induced decreases in dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in the frontal cortex; and in serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase in the hippocampus by approximately 2-fold, 7days post-treatment. Furthermore, these decreases correlated with a 2-fold increase in lipid peroxidation, measured as concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 24h post-treatment, and were accompanied by changes in oxidative stress-related enzymes. Ethanol also notably potentiated mephedrone-induced negative effects on learning and memory, as well as hippocampal neurogenesis, measured through the Morris water maze (MWM) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine staining, respectively. These results are of special significance, since alcohol is widely co-abused with amphetamine derivatives such as mephedrone, especially during adolescence, a crucial stage in brain maturation. Given that the hippocampus is greatly involved in learning and memory processes, normal brain development in young adults could be affected with permanent behavioral consequences after this type of drug co-abuse.

  9. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  10. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Binali, Ali M.; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A.; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication. PMID:21509239

  11. An unexpected clinical course in a 29-day-old infant with ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Fong, Hiu-Fai; Muller, Allison A

    2014-02-01

    Ethanol exposure can affect all pediatric age groups but occurs most commonly in ambulatory children and adolescents. Infants are less likely to ingest ethanol because they have limited ability to explore their environments. However, ethanol exposures in infants can occur. We report the case of a 29-day-old (3.5 kg) baby girl who presented with a blood alcohol level of 301 mg/dL after ingesting formula that had been prepared with gin. To our knowledge, she is the youngest reported child with such an elevated ethanol level in the medical literature. Despite her markedly elevated blood alcohol level, she had an unexpectedly mild clinical course, exhibiting subtle neurologic symptoms but no hypothermia, hypoglycemia, or cardiorespiratory impairment. This case demonstrates that the ethanol-exposed infant may lack typical or clear symptoms of acute intoxication. Therefore, the clinician must have a low threshold for pursuing blood alcohol testing in infants and young children with altered mental status. A prompt diagnosis of ethanol exposure is important for ensuring the health and safety of the child.

  12. Influence of ethanol on the pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate's metabolites ritalinic acid and ethylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Koehm, Michaela; Kauert, Gerold F; Toennes, Stefan W

    2010-01-01

    In view of the widespread application of methylphenidate for attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) therapy its interaction with alcohol was investigated in an in-vitro assay and in a study involving 9 male volunteers. The study conditions were: methylphenidate (20 mg) only, methylphenidate followed by ethanol (0.8 g/kg body weight) and ethanol followed by methylphenidate. Methylphenidate (CAS 113-45-1), ritalinic acid (CAS 19395-41-6) and ethylphenidate (CAS 57413-43-1) were assayed in blood samples collected up to 7 h after ingestion using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). It was found that methylphenidate is hydrolyzed to ritalinic acid by the same esterase that degrades cocaine. In the presence of ethanol this is inhibited and the active metabolite ethylphenidate is formed. The pharmacokinetic evaluation showed that methylphenidate concentrations were not markedly affected by ethanol, but ritalinic acid concentrations were lower, especially if ethanol was ingested first. Ethylphenidate concentrations were low with only about 10% of methylphenidate concentrations suggesting that concurrent ethanol use does not impair methylphenidate's therapeutic efficacy. Unexpectedly one subject exhibited a methylphenidate hydrolysis defect yielding very high methylphenidate and low ritalinic acid concentrations in all study conditions.

  13. Ethanol impairs muscarinic receptor-induced neuritogenesis in rat hippocampal slices: role of astrocytes and extracellular matrix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Gennaro; Guizzetti, Marina; Dao, Khoi; Mattison, Hayley A.; Costa, Lucio G.

    2011-01-01

    In an in vitro co-culture system of astrocytes and neurons, stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in astrocytes had been shown to cause neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons, and this effect was inhibited by ethanol. The present study sought to confirm these earlier findings in a more complex system, in vitro rat hippocampal slices in culture. Exposure of hippocampal slices to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (1 mM for 24 h) induced neurite outgrowth in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which was mediated by activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. Specifically, carbachol induced a >4-fold increase in the length of the longest neurite, and a 4-fold increase in the length of minor neurites and in the number of branches. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol (50 mM) resulted in significant inhibition of the effects induced by carbachol on all parameters measured. Neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons is dependent on various permissive factors that are produced and released by glial cells. In hippocampal slices carbachol increased the levels of two extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin and laminin-1, by 1.6-fold, as measured by Western blot. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol significantly inhibited these increases. Carbachol-induced increases in levels of extracellular matrix proteins were antagonized by a M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, function-blocking fibronectin or laminin-1 antibodies antagonized the effect of carbachol on neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that in hippocampal slices stimulation of muscarinic M3 receptors induces neurite outgrowth, which is mediated by fibronectin and laminin-1, two extracellular matrix proteins released by astrocytes. By decreasing fibronectin and laminin levels ethanol prevents carbachol-induced neuritogenesis. These findings highlight the importance of glial-neuronal interactions as important targets in the developmental neurotoxicity of alcohol. PMID:21884684

  14. Ethanol immunosuppression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol in concentrations equivalent to levels achieved by the ingestion of moderate to large amounts of alcoholic beverages has been shown to inhibit mitogen and anti-CD3 stimulated human T lymphocyte proliferation. This inhibition was monophasic suggesting that ethanol affected a single limiting component of T cell proliferation. In experiments designed to test the effect of ethanol on various aspects of proliferation, it was demonstrated that ethanol inhibited the capacity of exogenously supplied interleukin 2 to stimulate proliferation of T cells that had previously acquired interleukin 2 receptors in a monophasic, dose-dependent manner. Moreover, there was no suppression of interleukin 2 production or interleukin 2 receptor acquisition. Thus, ethanol was shown to mediate immunosuppression by a mechanism specific to one component of proliferation. Additive inhibition of T cell proliferation was seen with ethanol plus cyclosporin A which inhibits interleukin 2 production. The level of inhibition with 250 ng/ml cyclosporin A alone was equivalent to the level seen with 62 ng/ml cyclosporin A plus 20 mM (94 mg%) ethanol. Ethanol also suppressed an immune effector mechanism. NK cytotoxicity was depressed in a monophasic, dose-dependent manner. Thus, ethanol might be considered as a possible adjunct in immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure leads to alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor within the frontal cortex and impaired behavioral flexibility in both adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Gina M; Lew, Brandon J; Vedder, Lindsey C; Savage, Lisa M

    2017-04-21

    Chronic intermittent exposure to ethanol (EtOH; CIE) that produces binge-like levels of intoxication has been associated with age-dependent deficits in cognitive functioning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIE (5g/kg, 25% EtOH, 13 intragastric gavages) beginning at three ages: early adolescence (postnatal day [PD] 28), mid-adolescence (PD35) and adulthood (PD72). In experiment 1, rats were behaviorally tested following CIE. Spatial memory was not affected by CIE, but adult CIE rats were impaired at acquiring a non-spatial discrimination task and subsequent reversal tasks. Rats exposed to CIE during early or mid-adolescence were impaired on the first reversal, demonstrating transient impairment in behavioral flexibility. Blood EtOH concentrations negatively correlated with performance on reversal tasks. Experiment 2 examined changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels within the frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus (HPC) at four time points: during intoxication, 24 h after the final EtOH exposure (acute abstinence), 3 weeks following abstinence (recovery) and after behavioral testing. HPC BDNF levels were not affected by CIE at any time point. During intoxication, BDNF was suppressed in the FC, regardless of the age of exposure. However, during acute abstinence, reduced FC BDNF levels persisted in early adolescent CIE rats, whereas adult CIE rats displayed an increase in BDNF levels. Following recovery, neurotrophin levels in all CIE rats recovered. Our results indicate that intermittent binge-like EtOH exposure leads to acute disruptions in FC BDNF levels and long-lasting behavioral deficits. However, the type of cognitive impairment and its duration differ depending on the age of exposure.

  16. Kinetic and dynamic interaction of brotizolam and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Scavone, J M; Greenblatt, D J; Harmatz, J S; Shader, R I

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen healthy male volunteers ingested a single 0.25 mg dose of the thienodiazepine hypnotic, brotizolam, on two occasions: once with a typical social cocktail (containing 60 ml of vodka), and in a second trial with an 'ethanol-placebo' cocktail. Brotizolam kinetics were determined from multiple plasma concentrations measured during the 24 h after dosage. Coadministration of brotizolam with ethanol, as opposed to the placebo cocktail, slightly imparied brotizolam clearance (1.85 vs 2.19 ml min-1 kg-1 P less than 0.005), increased peak plasma concentrations (5.3 vs 4.3 ng ml-1, P less than 0.05), and prolonged elimination half-life (5.2 vs 4.4 h, P less than 0.05). There was evidence of impairment of performance, although not statistically significant, for the first 4-6 h after brotizolam dosage in the reaction time test, the digit-symbol substitution test, and a tracking task. None of these was enhanced by ethanol. In both trials, brotizolam produced significant increases in self-rated perceptions of sedation, fatigue, feeling 'spaced-out', and thinking slowed down. These effects were more intense during the brotizolam-ethanol as compared to brotizolam-placebo. In both trials, recovery was essentially complete by 6-8 h after dosage. Coadministration of brotizolam with ethanol produces a small but significant impairment of brotizolam clearance. Brotizolam produced self-rated perceptions of sedation and fatigue during 4-6 h after dosage, but objective impairment of psychomotor performance was minimal. Subjective perceptions of sedation were enhanced by ethanol coadministration, but the effects on psychomotor performance were not. PMID:3954936

  17. Binge ethanol exposure during adolescence leads to a persistent loss of neurogenesis in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus that is associated with impaired adult cognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period that coincides with the maturation of adult cognitive faculties. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can impact brain maturation. Using a rodent model of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, i.g., 20% EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day [P]25 to P55), we discovered that AIE treatment reduced neurogenesis (i.e., doublecortin-immunoreactive [DCX + IR] cells) in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus of late adolescent (P56) male Wistar rats that persisted during abstinence into adulthood (P220). This reduction in neurogenesis was accompanied by a concomitant reduction in proliferating cells (Ki-67) and an increase in cell death (cleaved caspase-3). In the hippocampus, AIE treatment induced a long-term upregulation of neuroimmune genes, including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its endogenous agonist high-mobility group box 1 as well as several proinflammatory signaling molecules. Administration of lipopolysaccharide, a gram-negative endotoxin agonist at TLR4, to young adult rats (P70) produced a similar reduction of DCX + IR cells that was observed in AIE-treated animals. Behaviorally, AIE treatment impaired object recognition on the novel object recognition task when assessed from P163 to P165. Interestingly, object recognition memory was positively correlated with DCX + IR in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus while latency to enter the center of the apparatus was negatively correlated with DCX + IR in the ventral dentate gyrus. Together, these data reveal that adolescent binge ethanol exposure persistently inhibits neurogenesis throughout the hippocampus, possibly through neuroimmune mechanisms, which might contribute to altered adult cognitive and emotive function. PMID:25729346

  18. Prenatal and postnatal ethanol experiences modulate consumption of the drug in rat pups, without impairment in the granular cell layer of the main olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Pueta, Mariana; Rovasio, Roberto A.; Abate, Paula; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of moderate exposure to ethanol during late gestation was studied in terms of its interaction with moderate exposure during nursing from an intoxicated dam. A further issue was whether behavioral effects of ethanol, especially the enhanced ethanol intake known to occur after moderate ethanol prenatally or during nursing, depend upon teratological effects that may include death of neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). During gestational days 17–20 rats were given 0, 1 or 2 g/kg ethanol doses intragastrically (i.g.). After parturition these dams were given a dose of 2.5 g/kg ethanol i.g. each day and allowed to perform regular nursing activities. During postnatal days (PDs) 15 and 16, ethanol intake of pups was assessed along with aspects of their general activity. In a second experiment pups given the same prenatal treatment as above were tested for blood ethanol concentration (BEC) in response to an ethanol challenge on PD6. A third experiment (Exp. 2b) assessed stereologically the number of cells in the granular cell layer of the MOB on PD7, as a function of analogous pre- and postnatal ethanol exposures. Results revealed that ethanol intake during the third postnatal week was increased by prenatal as well as postnatal ethanol exposure, with a few interesting qualifications. For instance, pups given 1 g/kg prenatally did not have increased ethanol intake unless they also had experienced ethanol during nursing. There were no effects of ethanol on either BECs or conventional teratology (cell number). This increases the viability of an explanation of the effects of prenatal and early postnatal ethanol on later ethanol intake in terms of learning and memory. PMID:20951715

  19. Ingestions considered nontoxic.

    PubMed

    Mofenson, H C; Greensher, J; Caraccio, T R

    1984-02-01

    We have compiled a list of common household products and drugs that are frequently ingested by children and may be considered nontoxic unless taken deliberately or in large amounts. An understanding of the nontoxic ingestion should prevent overtreatment, decrease emergency room visits, and allow physicians and poison control centers the opportunity to practice poison prevention. The reporting of all ingestions is encouraged to obtain information on the human experiment that occurs when a non-edible material is ingested. Only as we accumulate this knowledge will we be able to advise with a degree of certainty what treatment is needed.

  20. Ethanol up-regulates phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) and hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) in rat liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Smarajit; Chen, Guangping

    2015-05-01

    Ethanol-consumption impairs physiological-efficiency/endurance, expedites senescence. Impaired-regulations of steroids/biomolecules link these processes. Steroids are catabolized by cytosolic-sulfotransferases (SULTs). Ethanol-induction of eukaryotic-SULTs-expression is scanty. Plant (Brassica-napus) steroid-sulfotransferase; BNST3/BNST4 (gene/BNST) is highly ethanol-inducible (protein/mRNA). Resembling mammalian-SULTs catalytic-mechanism BNSTs show broad substrate-specificities (mammalian-steroids; estradiol/dehydroepiandrosterone/pregnanolone). Recently, ethanol-regulation of SULTs-expression is verified in rat liver/intestine/cultured human-hepatocarcinoma (Hep-G2) cells at enzyme-activity/protein-expression (Western-blot) level. Here, two week's ethanol ingestion by male rat significantly increased SULT2A1 in their liver/intestine (p < 0.05-p < 0.001) and phenol-sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) in intestine (p < 0.001) at enzyme-activity/protein levels. In human cells, ethanol significantly (2-fold) increased hSULT1A1/hSULT1E (2-3 fold) protein expressions paralleling their enzymatic-activities (p < 0.05-p < 0.01). The earlier finding of alcohol-association to the physiological impairment may be corroborated by our present findings. Inductions of SULT-expressions by ethanol have significant physiological/pharmacological consequences.

  1. The relation of age to the acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition.

    PubMed

    Wynne, H A; Mutch, E; Williams, F M; James, O F; Rawlins, M D; Woodhouse, K W

    1989-03-01

    The activity of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes, the mono-oxygenases, can be inhibited by an acute dose of ethanol. We set out to determine whether age has any relation to the degree of inhibition produced by ethanol, using acetanilide as a model substrate. Eight healthy young subjects (mean age 26 years) and eight healthy elderly subjects (mean age 72 years) were studied on two occasions, once receiving acetanilide alone and once acetanilide with 75 ml vodka (30 g ethanol). The clearance of acetanilide was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the elderly subjects at 27 +/- 3 l/h compared to 38 +/- 2 l/h in young subjects. No age-related differences in peak blood ethanol concentrations or ethanol elimination rates were noted. After ethanol, acetanilide clearance fell 18% to 31 +/- 3 l/h in young subjects (p = 0.05) and by 15% to 23 +/- 2 l/h in elderly subjects (p = 0.08). This suggests that the elderly do not suffer greater impairment of drug oxidation after acute ethanol ingestion than do the young.

  2. Severe systemic intoxication following triclopyr-TEA ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kyong, Yeon Y; Lee, Kyoung U; Choi, Kyoung H

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of triclopyr ingestion, a herbicide that acts via the auxin system in plants. It is classified as low-toxicity herbicide. The patient ingested this product and developed metabolic acidosis and coma with cardiovascular impairment. Echocardiography and elevated Troponin T and CK MB with prolongation of QTc suggested direct myocardial toxicity. The patient was extubated 57 h after ingestion, and he recovered completely. This case illustrates the potential acute toxicity of this agent in humans.

  3. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    on bowel habit. Gut. 1991;32(8):941–4. 23. Pfeiffer A, Hogl B, Kaess H. Effect of ethanol and commonly ingested alcoholic beverages on gastric...the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers (six men and two women...use of caffeine , alcohol, and medication Address for correspondence: Robert W. Kenefick, Ph.D., Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army

  4. Tiliacora triandra, an Anti-Intoxication Plant, Improves Memory Impairment, Neurodegeneration, Cholinergic Function, and Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus of Ethanol Dependence Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phunchago, Nattaporn; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain dysfunctions induced by alcohol. Since less therapeutic agent against cognitive deficit and brain damage induced by chronic alcohol consumption is less available, we aimed to assess the effect of Tiliacora triandra extract, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, on memory impairment, neuron density, cholinergic function, and oxidative stress in hippocampus of alcoholic rats. Male Wistar rats were induced ethanol dependence condition by semivoluntary intake of alcohol for 15 weeks. Alcoholic rats were orally given T. triandra at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg·kg−1BW for 14 days. Memory assessment was performed every 7 days while neuron density, activities of AChE, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px and, MDA level in hippocampus were assessed at the end of study. Interestingly, the extract mitigated the increased escape latency, AChE and MDA level. The extract also mitigated the decreased retention time, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and neurons density in hippocampus induced by alcohol. These data suggested that the extract improved memory deficit in alcoholic rats partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AChE. Therefore, T. triandra is the potential reagent for treating brain dysfunction induced by alcohol. However, further researches are necessary to understand the detail mechanism and possible active ingredient. PMID:26180599

  5. Ethanol-mediated operant learning in the infant rat leads to increased ethanol intake during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Luciano Federico; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the infant rat has high affinity for ethanol ingestion and marked sensitivity to the drug’s reinforcing effects (Spear & Molina, 2005). A novel operant technique was developed to analyze reinforcing effects of ethanol delivery during the third postnatal week. The impact of this ethanol-reinforcement experience upon subsequent ethanol consumption during adolescence (postnatal weeks 5–6 was also examined. In Experiment 1, pups (postnatal days 14–17 were given an explicit contingency between nose-poking behavior and intraoral delivery of either water or 3.75% v/v ethanol (paired groups). Yoked controls (pups receiving either reinforcer independently of their behavior) were also included. Paired subjects reinforced with ethanol exhibited rapid and robust operant conditioning leading to blood ethanol concentrations in the 25–48 mg% range. In Experiment 2, a higher ethanol concentration (7.5% v/v) provided significant reinforcement. During adolescence, animals originally reinforced with 3.75% v/v ethanol exhibited greater ingestion of ethanol than control animals without prior ethanol reinforcement. These results indicate that, without extensive initiation to ethanol, infant rats rapidly learn to gain access to ethanol and that this experience has a significant impact upon later ethanol intake patterns. PMID:18571224

  6. Effects of combining ethanol (EtOH) with gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) on the discriminative stimulus, locomotor, and motor-impairing functions of GHB in mice.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles D; Biddlestone, Laura; Coop, Andrew; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2006-03-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a drug of abuse that is often coabused with ethanol (EtOH) and has been implicated as a date rape agent in conjunction with EtOH. Much information is lacking regarding the manner in which GHB interacts with EtOH. This study was designed to further characterize the behavioral effects of GHB alone and in combination with EtOH in male Swiss-Webster mice. The effects of GHB (0.1-1.0 g/kg) and EtOH (2.0-5.0 g/kg) alone, as well as the effects of GHB in combination with EtOH, were examined using an automated locomotor activity procedure, a functional observational battery (FOB) and a GHB drug discrimination procedure. GHB decreased, whereas EtOH had little effect on locomotor activity. In the FOB, EtOH dose-dependently decreased activity in combination with 0.3 g/kg GHB. Alone, each drug had little effect on the righting reflex, but combining ineffective doses of GHB and EtOH significantly impaired righting. GHB and EtOH decreased forelimb grip strength. Combinations of ineffective doses of GHB and EtOH decreased forelimb grip strength when given together. GHB and EtOH impaired inverted screen performance, and EtOH increased the impairing effects of low, but not high, doses of GHB. GHB and EtOH increased hind limb splay, and EtOH increased the effects of 0.1 and 0.3 g/kg GHB on splay. GHB and EtOH decreased body temperature, and EtOH augmented the temperature-decreasing effects of GHB. EtOH produced less than 50% GHB-like discriminative stimulus effects, and GHB failed to alter the GHB-like discriminative stimulus effects of EtOH. Overall, EtOH increased the effects of GHB on several gross measures of behavior and only partially occasioned the discriminative stimulus properties of GHB.

  7. Early exposure to ethanol differentially affects ethanol preference at adult age in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Bouaziz, Elodie; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2012-08-01

    Although the acute effects of ethanol exposure on brain development have been extensively studied, the long term consequences of juvenile ethanol intake on behavior at adult age, regarding especially ethanol consumption, are still poorly known. The aim of this study was to analyze the consequences of ethanol ingestion in juvenile C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on ethanol intake and neurobiological regulations at adulthood. Mice were given intragastric ethanol at 4 weeks of age under different protocols and their spontaneous ethanol consumption was assessed in a free choice paradigm at adulthood. Both serotonin 5-HT(1A) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors were investigated using [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding assay for the juvenile ethanol regimens which modified adult ethanol consumption. In DBA/2J mice, juvenile ethanol ingestion dose-dependently promoted adult spontaneous ethanol consumption. This early ethanol exposure enhanced 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor-mediated [(35)S]GTP-γ-S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus and reduced CB1 receptor-mediated G protein coupling in both the striatum and the globus pallidus at adult age. In contrast, early ethanol ingestion by C57BL/6J mice transiently lowered spontaneous ethanol consumption and increased G protein coupling of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in the hippocampus but had no effect on CB1 receptors at adulthood. These results show that a brief and early exposure to ethanol can induce strain-dependent long-lasting changes in both behavior toward ethanol and key receptors of central 5-HT and CB systems in mice.

  8. The quantities of nutrients recommended by the NRC support increased ethanol metabolism in rats in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, R.F.; Draves, K. )

    1991-03-11

    The quantities of nutrients recommended by the NRC abate the effects of a toxic ethanol dose administered to rats. The objective of this study was to determine whether recommended amounts of nutrients ingested by rats with the 26% liquid ethanol diet increase the rate of ethanol metabolism over that when ethanol is ingested with the nutritionally inadequate 36% liquid ethanol diet. Rats were fed either the 26% or the 36% liquid ethanol diet for ten days. The rats were continued on their respective diets and their diet intake measured hourly for the next 42 hours. The hourly ethanol intake was used as the input into a physiologic pharmacokinetic model of ethanol metabolism in the rat. The simulation studies show that rats fed the nutritionally inadequate 36% liquid ethanol diet were unable to metabolize ethanol as fast as those fed the nutritionally adequate 26% liquid ethanol diet due to a decreased ability to support high K{sub m} ethanol metabolism.

  9. Microplastic ingestion by zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Lindeque, Pennie; Fileman, Elaine; Halsband, Claudia; Goodhead, Rhys; Moger, Julian; Galloway, Tamara S

    2013-06-18

    Small plastic detritus, termed "microplastics", are a widespread and ubiquitous contaminant of marine ecosystems across the globe. Ingestion of microplastics by marine biota, including mussels, worms, fish, and seabirds, has been widely reported, but despite their vital ecological role in marine food-webs, the impact of microplastics on zooplankton remains under-researched. Here, we show that microplastics are ingested by, and may impact upon, zooplankton. We used bioimaging techniques to document ingestion, egestion, and adherence of microplastics in a range of zooplankton common to the northeast Atlantic, and employed feeding rate studies to determine the impact of plastic detritus on algal ingestion rates in copepods. Using fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy we identified that thirteen zooplankton taxa had the capacity to ingest 1.7-30.6 μm polystyrene beads, with uptake varying by taxa, life-stage and bead-size. Post-ingestion, copepods egested faecal pellets laden with microplastics. We further observed microplastics adhered to the external carapace and appendages of exposed zooplankton. Exposure of the copepod Centropages typicus to natural assemblages of algae with and without microplastics showed that 7.3 μm microplastics (>4000 mL(-1)) significantly decreased algal feeding. Our findings imply that marine microplastic debris can negatively impact upon zooplankton function and health.

  10. Nicotine acts in the anterior cingulate, but not dorsal or ventral hippocampus, to reverse ethanol-induced learning impairments in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Danielle; Gould, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines the role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and anterior cingulate in the interactive effects of ethanol and nicotine on learning, anxiety and locomotion in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task, which allows dissociation of drug effects on each behaviour. At training, time spent in each of the arms of the elevated plus-maze was recorded for 5 minutes. Each time that the mouse entered the aversive enclosed arm, a light and white noise were turned on. At testing, no cues were turned on and time spent in each arm was recorded for 3 minutes. The effects of systemic ethanol (1.0 or 1.4 g/kg) and nicotine (0.35 µg/0.50 µl/side) infused into the anterior cingulate, dorsal and ventral hippocampus were examined, as were the interactive effects of systemic ethanol (1.0 g/kg) and nicotine (0.09 mg/kg) with the high-affinity nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHβE) (18.0 µg/0.50 µl/side) infused into the anterior cingulate. Ethanol dose dependently decreased anxiety, increased locomotion, and decreased learning. Anterior cingulate-infused nicotine decreased anxiety and reversed ethanol-associated learning deficits. Anterior cingulate-infused DHβE blocked reversal of ethanol-induced learning deficits by systemic nicotine. Dorsal hippocampus-infused nicotine reversed ethanol-induced anxiolysis and hyper-locomotion (1.4 g/kg) but produced no behavioural changes in ethanol-naïve mice. Ventral hippocampus-infused nicotine enhanced anxiolysis associated with 1.4 g/kg ethanol, but had no other effects. The anterior cingulate is necessary and sufficient for nicotine reversal of ethanol-induced learning deficits. In addition, the anterior cingulate, dorsal hippocampus and ventral hippocampus may mediate drug-induced changes in anxiety.

  11. Severe toxicity following synthetic cannabinoid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Lapoint, J; James, L P; Moran, C L; Nelson, L S; Hoffman, R S; Moran, J H

    2011-10-01

    To report a case of seizures and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) following confirmed synthetic cannabinoid ingestion. Despite widespread use of legal synthetic cannabinoids, reports of serious toxicity following confirmed use of synthetic cannabinoids are rare. We report severe toxicity including seizures following intentional ingestion of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and detail confirmation by laboratory analysis. A healthy 48 year old man had a generalized seizure within thirty minutes of ingesting an ethanol mixture containing a white powder he purchased from the Internet in an attempt to get high. Seizures recurred and abated with lorazepam. Initial vital signs were: pulse, 106/min; BP, 140/88 mmHg; respirations, 22/min; temperature, 37.7 °C. A noncontrast computed tomography of the brain and EEG were negative, and serum chemistry values were normal. The blood ethanol concentration was 3.8 mg/dL and the CPK 2,649 U/L. Urine drug screening by EMIT was negative for common drugs of abuse, including tetrahydrocannabinol. On hospital day 1, he developed medically refractory SVT. The patient had no further complications and was discharged in his normal state of health 10 days after admission. The original powder was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to be JWH-018, and a primary JWH-018 metabolite was detected in the patient's urine (200 nM) using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Synthetic cannabinoids are legal in many parts of the world and easily obtained over the Internet. Data on human toxicity are limited and real-time confirmatory testing is unavailable to clinicians. The potential for toxicity exists for users mistakenly associating the dose and side effect profiles of synthetic cannabinoids to those of marijuana. Ingestion of JWH-018 can produce seizures and tachyarrhythmias. Clinicians, lawmakers, and the general public need to be aware of the potential for toxicity associated with synthetic cannabinoid use.

  12. Ethanol Impairs Intestinal Barrier Function in Humans through Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signaling: A Combined In Vivo and In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Aleksa, Katarina; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol-induced gut barrier disruption is associated with several gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Aim Since human data on effects of moderate ethanol consumption on intestinal barrier integrity and involved mechanisms are limited, the objectives of this study were to investigate effects of a single moderate ethanol dose on small and large intestinal permeability and to explore the role of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a primary signaling mechanism. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 12 healthy volunteers after intraduodenal administration of either placebo or 20 g ethanol in a randomised cross-over trial. Localization of the tight junction (TJ) and gene expression, phosphorylation of the MAPK isoforms p38, ERK and JNK as indicative of activation were analyzed in duodenal biopsies. The role of MAPK was further examined in vitro using Caco-2 monolayers. Results Ethanol increased small and large intestinal permeability, paralleled by redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin, down-regulation of ZO-1 and up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, and increased MAPK isoforms phosphorylation. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol increased permeability, induced redistribution of the junctional proteins and F-actin, and MAPK and MLCK activation, as indicated by phosphorylation of MAPK isoforms and myosin light chain (MLC), respectively, which could be reversed by pretreatment with either MAPK inhibitors or the anti-oxidant L-cysteine. Conclusions Administration of moderate ethanol dosage can increase both small and colon permeability. Furthermore, the data indicate a pivotal role for MAPK and its crosstalk with MLCK in ethanol-induced intestinal barrier disruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928733 PMID:25226407

  13. Striatal modulation of BDNF expression using microRNA124a-expressing lentiviral vectors impairs ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference and voluntary alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major health, economic and social concern in modern societies, but the exact molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol addiction remain elusive. Recent findings show that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) signaling contributes to complex behavioral disorders including drug addiction. However, the role of miRNAs in ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference (CPP) and voluntary alcohol consumption has not yet been directly addressed. Here, we assessed the expression profile of miR124a in the dorsal striatum of rats upon ethanol intake. The results show that miR124a was downregulated in the dorso-lateral striatum (DLS) following alcohol drinking. Then, we identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a direct target of miR124a. In fact, BDNF mRNA was upregulated following ethanol drinking. We used lentiviral vector (LV) gene transfer technology to further address the role of miR124a and its direct target BDNF in ethanol-induced CPP and alcohol consumption. Results reveal that stereotaxic injection of LV-miR124a in the DLS enhances ethanol-induced CPP as well as voluntary alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm. Moreover, miR124a-silencer (LV-siR124a) as well as LV-BDNF infusion in the DLS attenuates ethanol-induced CPP as well as voluntary alcohol consumption. Importantly, LV-miR124a, LV-siR124a and LV-BDNF have no effect on saccharin and quinine intake. Our findings indicate that striatal miR124a and BDNF signaling have crucial roles in alcohol consumption and ethanol conditioned reward.

  14. Neonatal ethanol exposure results in dose-dependent impairments in the acquisition and timing of the conditioned eyeblink response and altered cerebellar interpositus nucleus and hippocampal CA1 unit activity in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Derick H.; Sokoloff, Greta; Milner, Eric; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ethanol in neonatal rats results in reduced neuronal numbers in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei of juvenile and adult animals. This reduction in cell numbers is correlated with impaired delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a simple motor learning task in which a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a co-terminating unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital shock). Across training, cell populations in the interpositus (IP) nucleus model the temporal form of the eyeblink conditioned response (CR). The hippocampus, though not required for delay EBC, also shows learning-dependent increases in CA1 and CA3 unit activity. In the present study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 3, 4, or 5 mg/kg/day of ethanol during postnatal days (PD) 4–9. As adults, CR acquisition and timing were assessed during 6 training sessions of delay EBC with a short (280 msec) interstimulus interval (ISI; time from CS onset to US onset) followed by another 6 sessions with a long (880 msec) ISI. Neuronal activity was recorded in the IP and area CA1 during all 12 sessions. The high-dose rats learned the most slowly and, with the moderate-dose rats, produced the longest CR peak latencies over training to the short ISI. The low dose of alcohol impaired CR performance to the long ISI only. The 3E (3 mg/kg/day of ethanol) and 5E (5 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats also showed slower-than-normal increases in learning-dependent excitatory unit activity in the IP and CA1. The 4E (4 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats showed a higher rate of CR production to the long ISI and enhanced IP and CA1 activation when compared to the 3E and 5E rats. The results indicate that binge-like ethanol exposure in neonatal rats induces long-lasting, dose-dependent deficits in CR acquisition and timing and diminishes conditioning-related neuronal excitation in both the cerebellum and hippocampus. PMID:23871534

  15. Neonatal ethanol exposure results in dose-dependent impairments in the acquisition and timing of the conditioned eyeblink response and altered cerebellar interpositus nucleus and hippocampal CA1 unit activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Sokoloff, Greta; Milner, Eric; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to ethanol in neonatal rats results in reduced neuronal numbers in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei of juvenile and adult animals. This reduction in cell numbers is correlated with impaired delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a simple motor learning task in which a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a co-terminating unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital shock). Across training, cell populations in the interpositus (IP) nucleus model the temporal form of the eyeblink-conditioned response (CR). The hippocampus, though not required for delay EBC, also shows learning-dependent increases in CA1 and CA3 unit activity. In the present study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 3, 4, or 5 mg/kg/day of ethanol during postnatal days (PD) 4-9. As adults, CR acquisition and timing were assessed during 6 training sessions of delay EBC with a short (280 ms) interstimulus interval (ISI; time from CS onset to US onset) followed by another 6 sessions with a long (880 ms) ISI. Neuronal activity was recorded in the IP and area CA1 during all 12 sessions. The high-dose rats learned the most slowly and, with the moderate-dose rats, produced the longest CR peak latencies over training to the short ISI. The low dose of alcohol impaired CR performance to the long ISI only. The 3E (3 mg/kg/day of ethanol) and 5E (5 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats also showed slower-than-normal increases in learning-dependent excitatory unit activity in the IP and CA1. The 4E (4 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats showed a higher rate of CR production to the long ISI and enhanced IP and CA1 activation when compared to the 3E and 5E rats. The results indicate that binge-like ethanol exposure in neonatal rats induces long-lasting, dose-dependent deficits in CR acquisition and timing and diminishes conditioning-related neuronal excitation in both the cerebellum and hippocampus.

  16. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ethanol, whiskey, and ethanol with n-propyl, n-butyl, and iso-amyl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Auty, R M; Branch, R A

    1977-08-01

    Plasma ethanol concentration, reaction time, and electroencephalogram (EEG) were recorded in 6 normal men after ingestion of ethanol along (Group 1), whiskey (Group 2), or a mixture of ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and iso-amyl alcohol (Group 3). The peak plasma ethanol concentration and the total area under the plasma concentration:time curve of ethanol did not depend upon the type of drink given, but the half-life of the terminal exponential phase of ethanol elimination was longer in Group 3. In each study period reaction time increased, there was a relative increase in delta activity (2 to 3 Hz) and a fall in mean dominant frequency in EEG activity. The extent of increase in reaction time depended on the rate of increase in plasma ethanol concentration and correlated with the concentration of ethanol while the plasma concentration of ethanol was falling. Differences in the effects of ethanol between study periods were minimal.

  18. RAB GTPASES ASSOCIATE WITH ISOLATED LIPID DROPLETS (LDS) AND SHOW ALTERED CONTENT AFTER ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION: POTENTIAL ROLE IN ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED LD METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Rasineni, Karuna; McVicker, Benita L.; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease is manifested by the presence of fatty liver, primarily due to accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). The presence of membrane-trafficking proteins (e.g. Rab GTPases) with LDs indicates that LDs may be involved in trafficking pathways known to be altered in ethanol damaged hepatocytes. Since these Rab GTPases are crucial regulators of protein trafficking, we examined the effect ethanol administration has on hepatic Rab protein content and association with LDs. Methods Male Wistar rats were pair-fed Lieber-DeCarli diets for 5 to 8 weeks. Whole liver and isolated LD fractions were analyzed. Identification of LDs and associated Rab proteins was performed in frozen liver or paraffin-embedded sections followed by immunohistochemical analysis. Results Lipid accumulation was characterized by larger LD vacuoles and increased total triglyceride content in ethanol-fed rats. Rabs 1, 2, 3d, 5, 7 and 18 were analyzed in post-nuclear supernatant (PNS) as well as LDs. All of the Rabs were found in the PNS, and Rabs 1, 2, 5 and 7 did not show alcohol-altered content, while Rab 3d content was reduced by over 80%, and Rab 18 also showed ethanol-induced reduction in content. Rab 3d was not found to associate with LDs, while all other Rabs were found in the LD fractions, and several showed an ethanol-related decrease (Rabs 2, 5, 7, 18). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the enhanced content of a LD-associated protein, perilipin 2 (PLIN2) that was paralleled with an associated decrease of Rab 18 in ethanol-fed rat sections. Conclusion Chronic ethanol feeding was associated with increased PLIN2 and altered Rab GTPase content in enriched LD fractions. Although mechanisms driving these changes are not established, further studies on intracellular protein trafficking and LD biology after alcohol administration will likely contribute to our understanding of fatty liver disease. PMID:24117505

  19. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  20. Ethanol-induced myocardial ischemia: close relation between blood acetaldehyde level and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Abe, H; Hisanou, R

    1993-05-01

    A patient with vasospastic angina who developed myocardial ischemia following ethanol ingestion but not after exercise was described. Myocardial ischemia was evidenced by electrocardiograms (ECGs) and thallium-201 scintigrams. The blood acetaldehyde level after ethanol ingestion was abnormally high. The time course and severity of myocardial ischemia coincided with those of the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde level. Coronary arteriography showed ergonovine maleate-induced coronary vasospasm at the left anterior descending coronary artery. ECG changes similar to those induced by ethanol ingestion were observed at the same time. These findings suggest that the high blood acetaldehyde level might be responsible for the development of coronary vasospasm and myocardial ischemia in this patient.

  1. Adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol intake and impairs fear extinction in adulthood: Possible role of disrupted noradrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Skelly, M J; Chappell, A E; Carter, E; Weiner, J L

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly comorbid, and exposure to chronic stress during adolescence may increase the incidence of these conditions in adulthood. Efforts to identify the common stress-related mechanisms driving these disorders have been hampered, in part, by a lack of reliable preclinical models that replicate their comorbid symptomatology. Prior work by us, and others, has shown that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behaviors and voluntary ethanol consumption in adult male Long-Evans rats. Here we examined whether social isolation also produces deficiencies in extinction of conditioned fear, a hallmark symptom of PTSD. Additionally, as disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to alcoholism, we examined the effect of anxiolytic medications that target noradrenergic signaling on ethanol intake following adolescent social isolation. Our results confirm and extend previous findings that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and enhances ethanol intake and preference in adulthood. Additionally, social isolation is associated with a significant deficit in the extinction of conditioned fear and a marked increase in the ability of noradrenergic therapeutics to decrease ethanol intake. These results suggest that adolescent social isolation not only leads to persistent increases in anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption, but also disrupts fear extinction, and as such may be a useful preclinical model of stress-related psychopathology. Our data also suggest that disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to escalated ethanol drinking following social isolation, thus further highlighting the potential utility of noradrenergic therapeutics in treating the deleterious behavioral sequelae associated with early life stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intestinal fistula after magnets ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maurício; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Maschietto, Rafael Forti; Waksman, Renata Dejtiar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. The case of an 18-month girl who developed an intestinal fistula after ingestion of two magnets is reported. PMID:23843068

  3. Accidental mobile phone card ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Sudesh; Mekwan, Jayanand; Brayley, Nigel F

    2009-01-01

    Accidental overdose, poisoning and foreign-body ingestion are common presentations to the emergency department. Usually, the ingested material is a common drug or household product. We present an unusual case of accidental ingestion where the foreign body was a mobile phone simulation (SIM) card. PMID:21686554

  4. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion Delays T Cell Activation and Effector Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Margoles, Lindsay M.; Mittal, Rohit; Klingensmith, Nathan J.; Lyons, John D.; Liang, Zhe; Serbanescu, Mara A.; Wagener, Maylene E.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in intensive care units in the US, and it is known that chronic alcohol use is associated with higher incidence of sepsis, longer ICU stays, and higher mortality from sepsis. Both sepsis and chronic alcohol use are associated with immune deficits such as decreased lymphocyte numbers, impaired innate immunity, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, and susceptibility to infections; however, understanding of specific pathways of interaction or synergy between these two states of immune dysregulation is lacking. This study therefore sought to elucidate mechanisms underlying the immune dysregulation observed during sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol exposure. Using a murine model of chronic ethanol ingestion followed by sepsis induction via cecal ligation and puncture, we determined that while CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from alcohol fed mice eventually expressed the same cellular activation markers (CD44, CD69, and CD43) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, TNF) as their water fed counterparts, there was an overall delay in the acquisition of these phenotypes. This early lag in T cell activation was associated with significantly reduced IL-2 production at a later timepoint in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in alcohol sepsis, as well as with a reduced accumulation of CD8dim activated effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that delayed T cell activation may result in qualitative differences in the immune response to sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol ingestion. PMID:27861506

  5. Pediatric safety pin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Kaklikkaya, I; Ozcan, F

    1998-08-01

    Fifteen consecutive children with ingested safety pins were evaluated retrospectively. Eight patients were males and seven were girls. The mean age of the patients was 5.4 years ranging from 7 months to 16 years. Two of 15 patients were mentally retarded Seven safety pins ingestion were noted by parents, three older children applied with safety pin swallowing. Three infants referred with hypersalivation and swallowing difficulty. One of two mentally retarded patients had recurrent aspiration pneumonia, the other had neck abscess. These patients' lesions were detected incidentally by thoracic X-ray. Nine safety pins were at the level of the cricopharyngeus, one at the level of the aortic arch and five at the esophagogastric junction. A right esophagoscopy was used for extraction of safety pins under general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation were used. Before esophagoscopy control plain X-ray was obtained for location of safety pin. Nine safety pins were extracted by esophagoscopy. Three safety pins spontaneously and three during anesthesia induction passed through the esophagus falling down the stomach. Five of these six safety pins were spontaneously extracted without complication. However one open safety pin lodged at the duodenum and laparotomy was required. In this article, etiology and management of safety pin ingestion in children are discussed.

  6. The effect of ethanol on spermatogenesis and fertility in male Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dare, W N; Noronha, C C; Kusemiju, O T; Okanlawon, O A

    2002-12-01

    Prenatal alcohol is associated with a variety of developmental abnormalies, including neuroanatomical, physical and behavioural features. This study was designed to determine the effects of administration of alcohol, exemplified mostly by ethanol (15 ml/kg, 25%, v/v) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 15 mg/kg) as a representative of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, individually and their combination (ethanol 15 ml/kg, 25%, v/v ASA 15 mg/kg) on semen quality and fertility after paternal intraperitoneal administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the combination study, the rats received ASA about 1 hour before ethanol administration. The combination experiments were conducted to determine if the effects of ethanol can be prevented by pre-treatment with acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) which has been reported to antagonise the rate-depressant effects of ethanol. All animals received this treatment for ten weeks. Semen parameters were determined and compared with controls. The result showed that when given alone, ethanol significantly reduced the sperm density and percentage of motile spermatozoa relative to controls. Pre-treatment with ASA failed to stop the decrease in sperm density and percentage motility caused by ethanol. Moreover none of the experimental male rats was able to fertilize the females exposed to them despite successful mating demonstrated by the presence of sperm plug. The present study demonstrates that chronic consumption of ethanol or ingestion of ASA has toxic effect on spermatozoa and impairs fertility in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Moreover, pre-treatment with ASA has no effect on the deleterious effects caused by ethanol.

  7. Soil ingestion by dairy cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Darwin, R.

    1990-02-15

    Ingested soil may be a source of minerals to grazing cattle; it may also be a source of radionuclides, heavy metals, and organic toxins. The importance of soil ingestion in the milk pathway depends on the amount of soil ingested, the ratio of the mineral concentration in soil to that in herbage, and the ability of the cattle to solubilize and absorb the soil-derived minerals. The amount of soil ingested by cattle on pasture, in turn, depends upon the stocking level, the quantity of forage available, and the soil ingesting propensity of individual cows. The objective of this note is to summarize some of the information about soil ingestion by dairy cattle and to suggest methods for incorporating soil ingestion into the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Phase I milk model. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  9. Identification of famprofazone ingestion.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Kraemer, T

    1998-01-01

    After a traffic accident a 32-year-old man was suspected of having previously taken an illegal drug. An immunochemical screening procedure revealed positive results for amphetamines in both urine and blood samples. The preliminary test was confirmed by GC/MS and both amphetamine and methamphetamine were found in both body fluids. However, the man denied any use of drugs but claimed to have taken four tablets of Gewodin. One of the ingredients, famprofazone, undergoes metabolic conversion to amphetamine and methamphetamine. Using GC/ MS the ingestion of famprofazone was verified by identification of the unchanged parent compound in the urine sample.

  10. Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Tarango Md, Stacy M; Liu Md, Deborah R

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Although fatal pediatric ingestions are rare, the prescription medications most responsible for injury and fatality in children include opioids, sedative/hypnotics, and cardiovascular drugs. Evidence regarding the evaluation and management of common pediatric ingestions is comprised largely of case reports and retrospective studies. This issue provides a review of these studies as well as consensus guidelines addressing the initial resuscitation, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric ingestions. Also discussed are current recommendations for decontamination, administration of antidotes for specific toxins, and management of ingested foreign bodies.

  11. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication.

  12. Acute alcohol intoxication in a child following ingestion of an ethyl-alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Hertzog, James H; Radwick, Allison

    2015-07-01

    While uncommon, ingestion of ethanol-based hand sanitizers by children may be associated with significant intoxication. We report the case of a 7-year-old with acute alcohol intoxication following hand sanitizer ingestion. Alcohol elimination in this patient followed zero-order kinetics with a clearance rate of 22.5 mg/kg/h, consistent with the limited pharmacokinetic information available for children who experience alcohol intoxication from more traditional sources.

  13. Dose-response study of sajabalssuk ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini on blood glucose in subjects with impaired fasting glucose or mild type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Shin, Su-Kyung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Kyung Tae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Previously we reported that an ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini lowered blood glucose in db/db mice. Here we report a preliminary study in which the blood glucose-lowering effects of two different doses of sajabalssuk ethanol extract (SBE), containing eupatilin and jaseocidin, were examined in hyperglycemic subjects with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of 100-150 mg/dL. Subjects were randomized into four groups: negative control (2,000 mg of lactose /day), positive control (1,140 mg of pinitol/day), low-dose SBE (2,000 mg of SBE/day), and high-dose SBE (4,000 mg of SBE/day). After 8 weeks of supplementation, FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were significantly lowered in low-and high-dose SBE groups compared to the baseline values; high-dose SBE also resulted in significantly lower plasma free fatty acid levels and systolic blood pressure. This study demonstrated that supplementation of 2 g or 4 g of SBE daily can significantly reduce blood glucose in hyperglycemic subjects, although high-dose SBE seemed to be more effective than low-dose SBE for lowering plasma free fatty acid level and systolic blood pressure.

  14. Effects of ethanol exposure in a familiar or isolated context during infancy on ethanol intake during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Haymal, Beatriz; Pautassi, Ricardo M

    2016-12-01

    Early exposure to ethanol affects ethanol intake later in life. This early experience encompasses exposure to social stimuli and the pharmacological and orosensory properties of ethanol. The specific contribution of each type of stimulus to subsequent ethanol intake remains unknown. We assessed the intake of various concentrations of ethanol in a familiar or isolated context during infancy and the lingering effects of this experience on ethanol intake during adolescence. On postnatal day 3 (PD3), PD7, and PD11, rats were given 5% ethanol or water in a nursing or isolated context (Experiments 1 and 2). Intake tests (ethanol vs. water) were conducted during adolescence. Experiment 2 matched the amount of fluid ingested during infancy in both contexts and subsequently tested ethanol consumption during adolescence. The results revealed a facilitative effect of the nursing context on fluid intake during the tests in infancy. Pups stimulated with ethanol but not water in the isolated context exhibited an increase in ethanol consumption during adolescence. This effect disappeared when the isolated infants were matched to receive the same amount of ethanol ingested by their nursed counterparts. In Experiment 3, isolated infant rats were exposed to different ethanol concentrations (.0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10.0%), and drug consumption was tested during adolescence. This exposure increased adolescent ethanol intake, regardless of the alcohol concentration (Experiment 3). The common denominators that resulted in enhanced ethanol intake during adolescence were preexposure to ethanol via active consumption of the drug that induced a low-to-moderate level of intoxication in an isolated context.

  15. Arterial compliance may be reduced by ingestion of red wine.

    PubMed

    Fantin, F; Bulpitt, C J; Zamboni, M; Cheek, E; Rajkumar, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of alcohol on blood pressure and arterial compliance over 24 h in a group of volunteers, comparing the same group of subjects on two consecutive but separate days, one with alcohol intake (alcohol day) and one free of alcohol (control day). We studied 18 healthy subjects (mean age 34.2 years, range 25-53). The subjects received the two days in random order. On the alcohol day, the subjects were asked to drink two glasses of red wine (12% ethanol) between 1830 hours and 0430 hours. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure and QKD interval (Q wave to Korotkoff (K) sound, diastolic phase (D) using Diasys Integra (Novacor, France)) were recorded (usually 1500 hours to 1500 hours). Three 'ingestion' periods were defined, from 1500 hours to 1830 hours ('before'), 1900 hours to 0430 hours ('during') and from 0430 hours to the following afternoon ('after') on both the alcohol day and on the control day. Red wine increased heart rate during alcohol ingestion and reduced arterial compliance after ingestion. The significant effect of interaction between day and ingestion period on heart rate, diastolic blood pressure and QKD were found, suggesting that the differences in response among the ingestion periods depended on whether alcohol has been consumed that day. For the first time our study indicates the effect of alcohol on 24 h arterial stiffness in a healthy group of volunteers.

  16. Does oral experience terminate ingestion?

    PubMed

    Swithers, S E; Hall, W G

    1994-10-01

    Using data from studies of ingestive behavior in developing rat pups we demonstrate how oral experience can contribute to the termination of ingestion. In rat pups, repeated oral stimulation with sweet solutions causes a decline in oral responsiveness. The diminished responsiveness is specific to the flavor of the stimulus experienced orally and can persist for several hours. We suggest that this experience-based decrement in responsiveness is best considered "oral habituation" and that oral habituation largely accounts for the onset of satiety. Post-ingestive feedback signals may have their influence through the oral habituation process or act in the context of oral habituation. Oral habituation is also shown to depend on the pattern of stimulus presentation, a phenomenon that adds considerable complexity to assessing the contributions of oral experience to satiety. The concept of oral habituation may be useful in understanding the immediate control of ingestion and the moment-to-moment expression of ingestive behavior in adult animals.

  17. Ethanol exposure during late gestation and nursing in the rat: Effects upon maternal care, ethanol metabolism and infantile milk intake

    PubMed Central

    Pueta, Mariana; Abate, Paula; Haymal, Olga B.; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol experiences, during late gestation as well as during nursing, modify the behavioral dynamics of the dam/pup dyad, and leads to heightened ethanol intake in the offspring. This study focuses on: a) behavioral and metabolic changes in intoxicated dams with previous exposure to ethanol during pregnancy and b) infantile consumption of milk when the dam is either under the effects of ethanol or sober. Pregnant rats received water, 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol, and were administered with water or ethanol during the postpartum period. Intoxication during nursing disrupted the capability of the dam to retrieve the pups and to adopt a crouching posture. These disruptions were attenuated when dams had exposure to ethanol during pregnancy. Ethanol experiences during gestation did not affect pharmacokinetic processes during nursing, whereas progressive postpartum ethanol experience resulted in metabolic tolerance. Pups suckling from intoxicated dams, with previous ethanol experiences, ingested more milk than did infants suckling from ethanol-intoxicated dams without such experience. Ethanol gestational experience results in subsequent resistance to the drug’s disruptions in maternal care. Consequently, better maternal care by an intoxicated dam with ethanol experience during gestation facilitates access of pups to milk which could be contaminated with ethanol. PMID:18602418

  18. Variants of contextual fear conditioning are differentially impaired in the juvenile rat by binge ethanol exposure on postnatal days 4-9.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Nathen J; Stanton, Mark E

    2010-10-15

    Neonatal ethanol exposure in the rat is known to partially damage the hippocampus, but such exposure causes only modest or inconsistent deficits on hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks. This may reflect variable sensitivity of these tasks or residual function following partial hippocampal injury. The context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) is a variant of context conditioning in which context exposure and immediate shock occur on successive occasions. During testing, preexposed rats freeze more than non-preexposed controls. The CPFE is more sensitive to anterograde hippocampal injury than standard contextual fear conditioning (e.g., Rudy JW, O'Reilly RC. Conjunctive representations, the hippocampus, and contextual fear conditioning. Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 2001;1:66-82). We report that rats exposed to a high binge dose of ethanol (5.25g/kg/day) over postnatal days [PD] 4-9 failed to demonstrate the CPFE when preexposed to the conditioning context on PD31, relative to sham-intubated and undisturbed controls (Experiment 1). Neonatal alcohol disrupted conditioned freezing to a much lesser extent relative to controls when context preexposure was followed by a standard context conditioning trial rather than immediate shock (Experiment 2). Fear conditioning to a discrete auditory cue (tone) was unaffected by neonatal alcohol exposure ruling out possible performance effects (Experiment 3). These findings suggest that the CPFE is an especially sensitive task for detecting hippocampal injury produced by neonatal alcohol. Mixed results with other tasks may reflect residual hippocampal function and/or the use of alternate neurobehavioral systems or "strategies" following alcohol-induced brain damage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis--a potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid; Alhonen, Leena; Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J

    2014-03-28

    Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this stage is so vulnerable to the development of neural tube defect, and growth restriction, the findings previously observed in fetal alcohol syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resveratrol plus ethanol counteract the ethanol-induced impairment of energy metabolism: ³¹P NMR study of ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate on isolated and perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Gallis, Jean-Louis; Serhan, Nizar; Gin, Henri; Couzigou, Patrice; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine

    2012-03-01

    The effects of trans-resveratrol (RSV) combined with ethanol (EtOH) were evaluated by (31)P NMR on total ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (sn-G3P) contents measured in real time in isolated and perfused whole liver of the rat. Mitochondrial ATP turnover was assessed by using specific inhibitors of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP supply (iodacetate and KCN, respectively). In RSV alone, the slight decrease in ATP content (-14±5% of the initial content), sn-G3P content and ATP turnover were similar to those in the Krebs-Henseleit buffer control. Compared to control, EtOH alone (14 or 70 mmol/L) induced a decrease in ATP content (-24.95±2.95% of initial content, p<0.05) and an increase in sn-G3P (+158±22%), whereas ATP turnover tended to be increased. RSV (20 μmol/L) combined with EtOH, (i) maintained ATP content near 100%, (ii) induced a 1.6-fold increase in mitochondrial ATP turnover (p=0.049 and p=0.004 vs EtOH 14 and 70 mmol/L alone, respectively) and (iii) led to an increase in sn-G3P (+49±9% and +81±6% for 14 and 70 mmol/L EtOH, respectively). These improvements were obtained only when glycolysis was efficient at the time of addition of EtOH+RSV. Glycolysis inhibition by iodacetate (IAA) evidenced an almost 21% contribution of this pathway to ATP content. RSV alone or RSV+EtOH prevented the ATP decrease induced by IAA addition (p<0.05 vs control). This is the first demonstration of the combined effects of RSV and EtOH on liver energy metabolism. RSV increased (i) the flux of substrates through ATP producing pathways (glycolysis and phosphorylative oxidation) probably via the activation of AMPkinase, and (ii) maintained the glycolysis deviation to sn-G3P linked to NADH+H⁺ re-oxidation occurring during EtOH detoxication, thus reducing the energy cost due to the latter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of acute beer ingestion on the liver: studies in female mice.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Wagnerberger, Sabine; Landmann, Marianne; Prigl, Eva; Hellerbrand, Claus; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether the effects of acute consumption of stout or pilsner beer on the liver differ from those of plain ethanol in a mouse model. Seven-week-old female C57BL/6J mice received either ethanol, stout or pilsner beer (ethanol content: 6 g/kg body weight) or isocaloric maltodextrin solution. Plasma alanine transaminase, markers of steatosis, lipogenesis, activation of the toll-like receptor-4 signaling cascade as well as lipid peroxidation and fibrogenesis in the liver were measured 12 h after acute ethanol or beer intake. Acute alcohol ingestion caused a marked ~11-fold increase in hepatic triglyceride accumulation in comparison to controls, whereas in mice exposed to stout and pilsner beer, hepatic triglyceride levels were increased only by ~6.5- and ~4-fold, respectively. mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase in the liver did not differ between alcohol and beer groups. In contrast, expression of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, inducible nitric oxide synthases, but also the concentrations of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, nuclear factor κB and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were induced in livers of ethanol treated mice but not in those exposed to the two beers. Taken together, our results suggest that acute ingestion of beer and herein especially of pilsner beer is less harmful to the liver than the ingestion of plain ethanol.

  2. Watercress has no Importance for the elimination of ethanol by CYP2E1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Desager, Jean-Pierre; Golnez, Jean-Luc; De Buck, Charlotte; Horsmans, Yves

    2002-09-01

    Watercress, a cruciferous vegetable, is known to inhibit the metabolism of several CYP2E1 substrates such as paracetamol and chlorzoxazone. Since ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are CYP2E1 substrates, the influence of watercress on ethanol and acetaldehyde was investigated in healthy human volunteers. According to a randomized cross-over design, ethanol and acetaldehyde pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in 9 persons at 3 occasions: without watercress and after watercress ingestion preceding ethanol consumption from 1 or 10.5 hr, respectively. Ethanol tmax occurred significantly later when watercress was ingested 1 hr before ethanol ingestion. Likewise, acetaldehyde Cmax was significantly higher whereas acetaldehyde AUCs were increased by watercress but not significantly. All other ethanol and acetaldehyde pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the 3 treatments. In healthy volunteers, no major watercress effect was observed on ethanol clearance but a weak inhibiting effect on acetaldehyde metabolism is possible. Ethanol absorption is also delayed by single ingestion of watercress immediately preceding ethanol consumption.

  3. Comparative effect of repeated ingestion of difructose anhydride III and palatinose on the induction of gastrointestinal symptoms in humans.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Akiko; Shiomi, Takuya; Tamaki, Noriko; Shigematsu, Norihiro; Tomita, Fusao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the safety and change in fermentability from repeated ingestion of difructose anhydride III (DFAIII) in humans. A randomized controlled single-blind crossover study with thirteen subjects was conducted. Each subject ingested 5 g of DFAIII or palatinose daily for 12 days, before and after which the subject was loaded with 10 g of DFAIII and had breath hydrogen measured from 0 to 9 h (DL test) to evaluate the fermentability of DFAIII. The defecation frequency and abdominal symptom score were the same between each ingestion period. Moreover, DFAIII ingestion had no influence on blood test results. Only the breath hydrogen excretion in post-DFAIII ingestion was slightly higher at h 8 than the pre-ingestion. Consequently, repeated ingestion of DFAIII for 12 days was as safe as palatinose ingestion, especially with respect to abdominal symptoms and blood test results, and its high resistance to enterobacterial fermentation in humans was not impaired.

  4. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid; Alhonen, Leena; Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J.

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. • Alcohol administration perturbs polyamine levels in the tissues with various patterns. • Total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc is critical for development. • The deficiency is associated with reduction in endothelial cell sprouting in the head. • Retarded migration of neural crest cells may cause development of neural tube defect. - Abstract: Introduction: Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. Methods: CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. Results: No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Discussion: Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this

  5. An ingestible temperature-transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Pill-sized transmitter measures deep body temperature in studies of circadian rhythm and indicates general health. Ingestible device is a compromise between accuracy, circuit complexity, size and transmission range.

  6. Effect of ethanol on the central oscillator in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Molloy, Fiona M; Shoge, Richard O; Goldstein, Susanne R; Wesley, Robert; Hallett, Mark

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the effects of ethanol and diazepam on the central, mechanical, and mechanical reflex components of tremor in patients with essential tremor (ET). A double-blind crossover study (ethanol or diazepam) was conducted on 2 separate days. Dose of ethanol or diazepam was calculated in each individual according to height, weight, and age in 10 patients with ET. The postural tremor amplitude at the wrist was recorded using a three-dimensional accelerometer placed on the dorsum of the hand. Electromyogram (EMG) was recorded with surface electrodes placed on the forearm extensors and flexors. To separate central and mechanical (reflex) components, a 500-g weight was placed on the dorsum of the hand during a second tremor measurement. Tremor recordings were done at baseline and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after drug ingestion. Ethanol and diazepam blood levels were measured at baseline and after 20, 40, 80, and 120 minutes. Blood ethanol and diazepam levels were highest after 40 and 80 minutes. The amplitude of the central component 60 minutes after ingestion of ethanol was decreased significantly (P = 0.029) compared with diazepam. Our findings suggest that the improvement in tremor after ethanol ingestion was due, at least in part, to an effect on a central oscillator.

  7. Hampered long-term depression and thin spine loss in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Talani, Giuseppe; Mulas, Giovanna; Licheri, Valentina; Fois, Giulia R; Muggironi, Giulia; Masala, Nicola; Cannizzaro, Carla; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Diana, Marco

    2014-09-02

    Alcoholism involves long-term cognitive deficits, including memory impairment, resulting in substantial cost to society. Neuronal refinement and stabilization are hypothesized to confer resilience to poor decision making and addictive-like behaviors, such as excessive ethanol drinking and dependence. Accordingly, structural abnormalities are likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunctions that occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic ingestion. Here we show that ethanol-dependent rats display a loss of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell, accompanied by a reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and postsynaptic density 95-positive elements. Further analysis indicates that "long thin" but not "mushroom" spines are selectively affected. In addition, patch-clamp experiments from Nacc slices reveal that long-term depression (LTD) formation is hampered, with parallel changes in field potential recordings and reductions in NMDA-mediated synaptic currents. These changes are restricted to the withdrawal phase of ethanol dependence, suggesting their relevance in the genesis of signs and/or symptoms affecting ethanol withdrawal and thus the whole addictive cycle. Overall, these results highlight the key role of dynamic alterations in dendritic spines and their presynaptic afferents in the evolution of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, they suggest that the selective loss of long thin spines together with a reduced NMDA receptor function may affect learning. Disruption of this LTD could contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in alcohol dependence.

  8. Hampered long-term depression and thin spine loss in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Saturnino; Talani, Giuseppe; Mulas, Giovanna; Licheri, Valentina; Fois, Giulia R.; Muggironi, Giulia; Masala, Nicola; Cannizzaro, Carla; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism involves long-term cognitive deficits, including memory impairment, resulting in substantial cost to society. Neuronal refinement and stabilization are hypothesized to confer resilience to poor decision making and addictive-like behaviors, such as excessive ethanol drinking and dependence. Accordingly, structural abnormalities are likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunctions that occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic ingestion. Here we show that ethanol-dependent rats display a loss of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell, accompanied by a reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and postsynaptic density 95-positive elements. Further analysis indicates that “long thin” but not “mushroom” spines are selectively affected. In addition, patch-clamp experiments from Nacc slices reveal that long-term depression (LTD) formation is hampered, with parallel changes in field potential recordings and reductions in NMDA-mediated synaptic currents. These changes are restricted to the withdrawal phase of ethanol dependence, suggesting their relevance in the genesis of signs and/or symptoms affecting ethanol withdrawal and thus the whole addictive cycle. Overall, these results highlight the key role of dynamic alterations in dendritic spines and their presynaptic afferents in the evolution of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, they suggest that the selective loss of long thin spines together with a reduced NMDA receptor function may affect learning. Disruption of this LTD could contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in alcohol dependence. PMID:25122682

  9. Ethanol reinforced behavior assessed with a concurrent schedule.

    PubMed

    Roehrs, T A; Samson, H H

    1981-10-01

    Oral ethanol (5% v/v) reinforced responding was studied in three rats using a concurrent fixed ratio (FR) schedule with water available at a second lever. First, concurrent (FR8 FR8) responding on both levers for water presentation was established. Then a concurrent (FR8 FR8) water-ethanol presentation schedule was introduced and a food ration was placed in the chamber at the beginning of the session. Within 12 sessions, ethanol responding developed and within-session feeding was discontinued. When stable concurrent water-ethanol performance was achieved, average ethanol responding was 11 times greater than water responding, even when ethanol availability switched from one level to the other. During the one hour session, in some cases, sufficient ethanol was ingested to produce blood ethanol levels between 30 and 50 mg/100 ml. As the ethanol FR requirement was increased for four sessions each to FR10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 40 and 50, rats continued to respond for ethanol, and in some rats, ethanol preference was maintained even when the ethanol FR was 50 while the water FR remained at 8.

  10. Influence of hormonal replacement on the ventral lobe of the prostate of rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) submitted to chronic ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Sáttolo, S; Carvalho, C A F; Cagnon, V H A

    2004-12-01

    The harmful influence of the chronic alcohol ingestion on the male reproductive system leads to important alterations including hypogonadism and feminization, besides the morphological and functional disorganization of the different sexual glands. So, the aim of this study was to analyse the structural changes on the ventral lobe of the prostate of rats with hormonal replacement associated to chronic alcohol ingestion. A total of 30 rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) was divided into three groups: control-received water; alcoholic-received ethanol diluted to 20% and hormone-treated alcoholic-received ethanol diluted to 20% associated with the administering of testosterone (5mg/kg of weight) during the last 30 days of treatment. After 150 days of treatment, the animals were sacrificed, the prostate removed and submitted to transmission and scanning electron microscopies, histochemical analysis for acid phosphatase, testosterone level and stereologic analysis. In the alcoholic group the results demonstrated reduction of the total cellular volume and disorganization of the organelles involved in the secretory process. It was characterized a partial recovery of the cellular volume after treatment with testosterone. It was concluded that the ethanol impaired the cellular morphology and the hormonal replacement by itself did not bring about efficient remodeling of the organelles responsible for the secretory process.

  11. Foreign body ingestion in children

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Selim; Koca, Tuğba; Serdaroğlu, Filiz; Akçam, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Foreign bodies ingested by the oral route enter into the gastrointestinal tract and are considered a significant health problem in the childhood. In this study, we evaluated the pediatric patients who presented to our hospital with the complaint of ingestion of foreign body. Material and Methods: The hospital records of all children who presented to our clinic because of ingestion of foreign body between January 2008 and January 2015 were examined retrospectively. The complaints at admission, the types of foreign bodies ingested, the localization of the foreign body in the gastrointestinal tract and the approaches and treatment methods used were examined. Results: Thirty-six (56%) of 64 patients included in the study were male and 28 (44%) were female and the mean age was 5.7±4.6 years (10 months–17 years). Thirty eight (59%) of 64 children who were included in the assessment were below the age of five years. The most common complaint at presentation was parental recognition of the ingested object and dysphagia. The most commonly ingested foreign bodies included coins, sewing pins, safety pins and hairclips. Nail clipper detected in the stomach, sewing pin which penetrated through the duodenal wall and stuck to hepatic parenchyma were the first pediatric cases in the literature. Upper esophagus was the most common location for foreign bodies. Endoscopic examinations were performed in 55 of 64 children. Conclusions: Early detection and treatment of ingested foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal system is important in terms of preventing possible complications. In our study, the most frequent foreign bodies detected in the upper digestive tract were coins and they were most frequently detected in the upper esophagus. Most of our patients were below the age of five years. Flexible endoscopic method was used commonly for treatment. PMID:26884693

  12. Acute ingestion of alcohol and cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bau, Paulo F D; Moraes, Ruy S; Bau, Claiton H D; Ferlin, Elton L; Rosito, Guido A; Fuchs, Flávio D

    2011-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic effects of alcohol may be intermediated by its effects over heart rate variability (HRV). Most studies about the effects of alcohol over HRV were observational and did not explore the temporal influence of alcohol ingestion over autonomic modulation. The aim of this study was to verify if an acute ingestion of alcohol has a time-dependent influence over time-domain indices of HRV. The effect of the ingestion of 60 g of ethanol or placebo over autonomic modulation was compared in healthy men (35 per group), with 18-25 years of age, before and during 17 h after ingestion. Alcohol promoted a fall in the standard deviation of all normal R-R intervals, root mean square of successive differences, and percentage of pairs of adjacent R-R intervals differing by more than 50 ms and in two indices of the three-dimensional return map, by a period up to 10 h after the ingestion of alcohol, accompanied by an increase in heart rate. The indices returned to values similar of the control group 10 h after ingestion. The effects over HRV indices were attenuated by adjustment for heart rate. The ingestion of alcohol induces a broad cardiovascular adaptation secondary to vagal withdrawal and sympathetic activation that may be responsible for arrhythmogenic effects of alcohol ingestion.

  13. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  14. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  15. Effects of energy drink ingestion on alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sionaldo Eduardo; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Pompéia, Sabine; de Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Well-known reports suggest that the use of energy drinks might reduce the intensity of the depressant effects of alcohol. However, there is little scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. The present study aimed at evaluating the effects of the simultaneous ingestion of an alcohol (vodka(37.5%v/v)) and an energy drink (Red Bull-3.57 mL/kg), compared with those presented after the ingestion of an alcohol or an energy drink alone. Twenty-six young healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to 2 groups that received 0.6 or 1.0 g/kg alcohol, respectively. They all completed 3 experimental sessions in random order, 7 days apart: alcohol alone, energy drink alone, or alcohol plus energy drink. We evaluated the volunteers' breath alcohol concentration, subjective sensations of intoxication, objective effects on their motor coordination, and visual reaction time. When compared with the ingestion of alcohol alone, the ingestion of alcohol plus energy drink significantly reduced subjects' perception of headache, weakness, dry mouth, and impairment of motor coordination. However, the ingestion of the energy drink did not significantly reduce the deficits caused by alcohol on objective motor coordination and visual reaction time. The ingestion of the energy drink did not alter the breath alcohol concentration in either group. Even though the subjective perceptions of some symptoms of alcohol intoxication were less intense after the combined ingestion of the alcohol plus energy drink, these effects were not detected in objective measures of motor coordination and visual reaction time, as well as on the breath alcohol concentration.

  16. Zinc toxicity following massive coin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D R; Baird, C J; Chan, K M; Crookes, P F; Bremner, C G; Gottlieb, M M; Naritoku, W Y

    1997-06-01

    This is the first reported case of human fatality associated with zinc intoxication following a massive ingestion of coins. Four hundred and sixty-one coins were removed form the gastrointestinal tract of a schizophrenic patient during the course of hospitalization. Many of the post-1981 pennies, which consist primarily of zinc, showed severe corrosion due to their prolonged contact with acidic gastric juice. The patient presented with clinical manifestations consistent with the local corrosive as well as systemic effects of zinc intoxication and died 40 days after admission with multi-system organ failure. Tissue samples of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver obtained at autopsy revealed acute tubular necrosis, mild fibrosis, and acute massive necrosis, respectively, and contained high levels of zinc. The overall effects of zinc intoxication on the various organ systems, possible hematological derangement, and the impairment of copper absorption as well as the outcome with treatment are discussed.

  17. Severe lactic acidosis in a diabetic patient after ethanol abuse and floor cleaner intake.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Lagas, Jurjen S; Daling, Ratana; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Brandjes, Desiderius P M; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2014-11-01

    An intoxication with drugs, ethanol or cleaning solvents may cause a complex clinical scenario if multiple agents have been ingested simultaneously. The situation can become even more complex in patients with (multiple) co-morbidities. A 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without treatment two weeks before the intoxication) intentionally ingested a substantial amount of ethanol along with ~750 mL of laminate floor cleaner containing citric acid. The patient was admitted with severe metabolic acidosis (both ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, with serum lactate levels of 22 mM). He was treated with sodium bicarbonate, insulin and thiamine after which he recovered within two days. Diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis aggravated due to ethanol intoxication, thiamine deficiency and citrate. The high lactate levels were explained by excessive lactate formation caused by the combination of untreated diabetes mellitus, thiamine deficiency and ethanol abuse. Metabolic acidosis in diabetes is multi-factorial, and the clinical situation may be further complicated, when ingestion of ethanol and toxic agents are involved. Here, we reported a patient in whom diabetic ketoacidosis was accompanied by severe lactic acidosis as a result of citric acid and mainly ethanol ingestion and a possible thiamine deficiency. In the presence of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis, physicians need to consider thiamine deficiency and ingestion of ethanol or other toxins. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. Fetal Exposure to Moderate Ethanol Doses: Heightened Operant Responsiveness elicited by Ethanol-Related Reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, Paula; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to moderate ethanol doses during late gestation modifies postnatal ethanol palatability and ingestion. The use of Pavlovian associative procedures, has indicated that these prenatal experiences broaden the range of ethanol doses capable of supporting appetitive conditioning. Recently, a novel operant technique aimed at analyzing neonatal predisposition to gain access to ethanol has been developed. Experiment 1 tested the operant conditioning technique for developing rats described by Arias et al. (2007) and Bordner et al. (2008). In Experiment 2 we analyzed changes in the disposition to gain access to ethanol as a result of moderate prenatal exposure to the drug. Methods In Experiment 1 newborn pups were intraorally cannulated and placed in a supine position that allowed access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Paired pups received an intraoral administration of a given reinforcer (milk or quinine) contingent upon physical contact with the sensor. Yoked controls received similar reinforcers only when Paired pups activated the circuit. In Experiment 2, natural reinforcers (water or milk) as well as ethanol (3% or 6 % v/v) or an ethanol-related reinforcer (sucrose compounded with quinine) were tested. In this Experiment pups had been exposed to water or ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) during gestational days 17–20. Results Experiment 1 confirmed previous results showing that 1-day-old pups rapidly learn an operant task to gain access to milk, but not to gain access to a bitter tastant. Experiment 2 showed that water and milk were highly reinforcing across prenatal treatments. Furthermore, general activity during training was not affected by prenatal exposure to ethanol. Most importantly, prenatal ethanol exposure facilitated conditioning when the reinforcer was 3% v/v ethanol or a psychophysical equivalent of ethanol’s gustatory properties (sucrose-quinine). Conclusions The present results suggest that late prenatal experience with ethanol changes

  19. Recurrent lactic acidosis secondary to hand sanitizer ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Guru, P K; Park, J G

    2015-01-01

    Due to their ability to decrease the spread of infection, hand sanitizers are now ubiquitous in health care settings. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted with acute alcohol intoxication and had near complete recovery in 12 hrs. Subsequently, she was found unresponsive on the floor of her hospital room on two separate occasions. Evaluations revealed repeatedly elevated levels of ethanol, acetone, and lactate as well as increased anion gap and hypotension, requiring intensive care unit evaluation and intubation for airway protection. During the second episode, she was found next to an empty bottle of ethanol-based hospital hand sanitizer. She confirmed ingesting hand sanitizer in order to become intoxicated.

  20. Recurrent lactic acidosis secondary to hand sanitizer ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M. E.; Guru, P. K.; Park, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their ability to decrease the spread of infection, hand sanitizers are now ubiquitous in health care settings. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted with acute alcohol intoxication and had near complete recovery in 12 hrs. Subsequently, she was found unresponsive on the floor of her hospital room on two separate occasions. Evaluations revealed repeatedly elevated levels of ethanol, acetone, and lactate as well as increased anion gap and hypotension, requiring intensive care unit evaluation and intubation for airway protection. During the second episode, she was found next to an empty bottle of ethanol-based hospital hand sanitizer. She confirmed ingesting hand sanitizer in order to become intoxicated. PMID:25684875

  1. Rhabdomyolysis associated with kava ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bodkin, Ryan; Schneider, Sandra; Rekkerth, Donna; Spillane, Linda; Kamali, Michael

    2012-05-01

    We report a case of rhabdomyolysis temporally related to the ingestion of a large amount of kava. Kava is a naturally occurring plant used in the United States and elsewhere in the world for its sedative properties. A previous case report also related rhabdomyolysis to the ingestion of kava. It is not clear whether this is an action of the kava itself, perhaps, due to its action on voltage ion channels or, perhaps, due to an adulterant in the product. Our patient developed peak creatine phosphokinase levels in excess of 30 000 U/L but had no significant renal damage.

  2. Bowel perforations induced by multiple magnet ingestion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Kook; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Moon, Jeong Mi; Jeung, Kyung Woon

    2010-04-01

    We report two cases of bowel perforation that presented to the ED after ingesting multiple magnets as diagnosed with exploratory laparotomy. Foreign body ingestion is a common occurrence in the paediatric population. Diagnosis is often delayed because it is difficult to obtain a precise history of foreign body ingestion. Fortunately, in many cases, ingested foreign bodies pass spontaneously without complications. However, surgical intervention is required for about one percent of foreign body ingestions. Multiple magnet ingestion produces bowel injuries, including bowel obstruction, ischaemia, necrosis, perforation and fistula formation, finally requiring surgical intervention. The incidence, which is rare, of magnet ingestion with complications has increased as a result of the popularity of magnetic toys. This case report highlights the complications that might occur with multiple magnet ingestion. We aim to alert physicians that multiple magnet ingestion can be a serious matter.

  3. Role of ethanol-derived acetaldehyde in operant oral self-administration of ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Peana, Alessandra T; Porcheddu, Valeria; Bennardini, Federico; Carta, Antonio; Rosas, Michela; Acquas, Elio

    2015-12-01

    The role of ethanol-derived acetaldehyde has not been examined yet on performance in a model of operant oral self-administration. However, previous studies reported that an acetaldehyde-sequestering agent, D-penicillamine (DP) and an inhibitor of catalase-mediated acetaldehyde production, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) reduce voluntary ethanol consumption. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the effects of DP and 3-AT on acquisition and maintenance of oral operant ethanol self-administration. Using operant chambers, rats learned to nose poke in order to receive ethanol solution (5-10 % v/v) under an FR1 schedule of reinforcement in which discrete light and tone cues were presented during ethanol delivery. DP and 3-AT impair the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, whereas its maintenance is not affected neither by drug given alone for both 10 or 5 % ethanol nor by drugs association for 5 % ethanol. Moreover, when the concentration of ethanol was diminished from 10 to 5 %, rats increased the rate of self-administration behaviour. These findings suggest that brain acetaldehyde plays a critical role during acquisition of operant self-administration in ethanol-naïve rats. In contrast, during the maintenance phase, acetaldehyde could contribute to ethanol self-administration by a combined mechanism: On one hand, its lack (by DP or 3-AT) might result in further ethanol-seeking and taking and, on the other, inhibition of ethanol metabolism (by 3-AT) might release an action of the un-metabolised fraction of ethanol that does not overall result in compromising maintenance of ethanol self-administration.

  4. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  5. Foreign bodies ingestion: what responsibility?

    PubMed

    Ricci, Serafino; Massoni, Francesco; Schiffino, Luigi; Pelosi, Marcello; Salesi, Marialucia

    2014-03-01

    The ingestion of foreign bodies is one of the most important and difficult emergencies for a physician to diagnose. Accidental ingestion is more common in children, in patients with dental implants, in individuals with mental disability and in drug users. Voluntary ingestion is found in patients who are psychologically unstable, in prisoners or those who attempt suicide. Foreign bodies may be divided into food as fish bones, chicken bones, food bolus, meat, etc. or real foreign bodies such as orthodontic implants, needles, pins, glass, coins, etc. The authors present a case of management, from the medicolegal point of view, of a female patient age 80, who complained, for some weeks of modest pain in the left iliac fossa, and afterwards the endoscopy showed a toothpick into the wall of the sigmoid colon. Assessed of the clinical status of the patient presented severe cardiac comorbidities so that before processing the patient to a second resolutive endoscopy, it was necessary to obtain the hemodynamic stability. However the management of cases of accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is particularly difficult. Medical errors can arise from the very first contact with the patient resulting in delays in appropriate treatment. The doctor to avoid compromising its position on medical liability, must use all the knowledge and diligence known by the art and science of medicine.

  6. Physiological Responses to Cola Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Handel, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Data from testing suggest that the ingestion of caffeine in the amount typically found in a single bottle of commercially available cola drink does not increase factors associated with coronary risk nor will it have an enhancing effect upon athletic performance. (MB)

  7. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  8. Physiological Responses to Cola Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Handel, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Data from testing suggest that the ingestion of caffeine in the amount typically found in a single bottle of commercially available cola drink does not increase factors associated with coronary risk nor will it have an enhancing effect upon athletic performance. (MB)

  9. Ingestion of cylindrical batteries and its management.

    PubMed

    Tien, Tony; Tanwar, Sudeep

    2017-01-17

    In contrast to the ingestion of coin batteries, the ingestion of cylindrical batteries is an uncommon medical presentation. Owing to their larger size, cylindrical battery ingestion can lead to serious complications including intestinal haemorrhage, bowel obstruction, bowel perforation, peritonitis and even death. We discuss the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented after swallowing three cylindrical batteries. Her medical history included depression and previous battery ingestion that required surgical removal. During this presentation however, these ingested batteries were removed endoscopically at oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. The patient was subsequently discharged without complication. This paper discusses the complications and management of cylindrical battery ingestion. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Resveratrol alleviates ethanol-induced hormonal and metabolic disturbances in the rat.

    PubMed

    Szkudelska, K; Deniziak, M; Roś, P; Gwóźdź, K; Szkudelski, T

    2017-03-31

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in different plant species and having numerous health-promoting properties in animals and humans. However, its protective action against deleterious effects of ethanol is poorly elucidated. In the present study, the influence of resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day) on some hormones and metabolic parameters was determined in rats ingesting 10 % ethanol solution for two weeks. Blood levels of insulin, glucagon and adiponectin were affected by ethanol, however, resveratrol partially ameliorated these changes. Moreover, in ethanol drinking rats, liver lipid accumulation was increased, whereas resveratrol was capable of reducing liver lipid content, probably due to decrease in fatty acid synthesis. Resveratrol decreased also blood levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids and reduced gamma-glutamyl transferase activity in animals ingesting ethanol. These results show that resveratrol, already at low dose, alleviates hormonal and metabolic changes induced by ethanol in the rat and may be useful in preventing and treating some consequences of alcohol consumption.

  11. A case of methanol intoxication caused by methomyl pesticide ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gil, H W; Hong, J R; Song, H Y; Hong, S Y

    2012-12-01

    When clinicians treat patients with pesticide poisoning, they often pay attention only to the chief toxic agent and ignore the toxicity of the pesticide's additives or solvents. Occasionally, however, a solvent (e.g. methanol) may itself be the cause of poisoning. We report a case of acute methanol intoxication that occurred after ingestion of a methomyl pesticide that contained methanol as an additive. A 49-year-old man was brought to the emergency department in an unconscious state after ingestion of 20 ml of a carbamate pesticide (chief ingredient: methomyl; active ingredient: methanol). Upon arrival, he was semicomatose and did not breathe spontaneously; however, his cholinesterase level was within normal limits and cholinergic symptoms were not observed. High anion gap metabolic acidosis was present. His blood ethanol level was 74.8 mg/dL. The urine methanol level was 55.60 mg/dL, and urine ethanol level was 22.0 mg/dL. He was treated with hemodialysis; subsequently, his metabolic acidosis resolved and he returned to normal mental status. We guessed that methanol, as the solvent of the methomyl, had produced the symptoms. When treating pesticide-poisoned patients, clinicians should identify the solvent used in the pesticide, because solvents such as methanol may exacerbate the symptoms of poisoned patients.

  12. Participation of thiamin in hepatic microsomal ethanol oxidizing system.

    PubMed

    Takabe, M; Itokawa, Y

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the role of thiamin on ethanol metabolism, changes in the activity of hepatic microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) were measured in rats fed thiamin deficient diet for 4-6 weeks. In thiamin deficient rats, the activity of hepatic MEOS was significantly decreased as compared with control rats. In vitro addition of thiamin or thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) caused the restoration of the decreased MEOS activity, and this effect was dependent on the concentration of thiamin in rat liver microsomal fraction. Thus, thiamin partly involves in the oxidation of ethanol, and chronic thiamin deficiency predisposes to impair the ethanol oxidation, and consequently to increase the toxicity due to ethanol.

  13. Ethanol metabolism, cirrhosis and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1997-01-03

    Alcohol-induced tissue damage results from associated nutritional deficiencies as well as some direct toxic effects, which have now been linked to the metabolism of ethanol. The main pathway involves liver alcohol dehydrogenase which catalyzes the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde, with a shift to a more reduced state, and results in metabolic disturbances, such as hyperlactacidemia, acidosis, hyperglycemia, hyperuricemia and fatty liver. More severe toxic manifestations are produced by an accessory pathway, the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system involving an ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 (2E1). After chronic ethanol consumption, there is a 4- to 10-fold induction of 2E1, associated not only with increased acetaldehyde generation but also with production of oxygen radicals that promote lipid peroxidation. Most importantly, 2E1 activates many xenobiotics to toxic metabolites. These include solvents commonly used in industry, anaesthetic agents, medications such as isoniazid, over the counter analgesics (acetaminophen), illicit drugs (cocaine), chemical carcinogens, and even vitamin A and its precursor beta-carotene. Furthermore, enhanced microsomal degradation of retinoids (together with increased hepatic mobilization) promotes their depletion and associated pathology. Induction of 2E1 also yields increased acetaldehyde generation, with formation of protein adducts, resulting in antibody production, enzyme inactivation, decreased DNA repair, impaired utilization of oxygen, glutathione depletion, free radical-mediated toxicity, lipid peroxidation, and increased collagen synthesis. New therapies include adenosyl-L-methionine which, in baboons, replenishes glutathione, and attenuates mitochondrial lesions. In addition, polyenylphosphatidylcholine (PPC) fully prevents ethanol-induced septal fibrosis and cirrhosis, opposes ethanol-induced hepatic phospholipid depletion, decreased phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity and activation of hepatic

  14. Sleepiness and ethanol effects on simulated driving.

    PubMed

    Roehrs, T; Beare, D; Zorick, F; Roth, T

    1994-02-01

    Twelve healthy young men were assessed in each of four experimental conditions presented in a Latin Square design: 8-hr time in bed (TIB) and placebo, 4-hr TIB and placebo, 8-hr TIB and ethanol, and 4-hr TIB and ethanol. After consuming ethanol (0.6 g/kg) or placebo (0900-0930 hr) with 20% supplements at 1030 and 1100 hr, subjects were tested for sleepiness (Multiple Sleep Latency Test at 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 hr) and divided attention (1030 hr) performance on day 1, and for simulated driving and divided attention (1000-1200 and 1400-1600 hr) performance on day 2. In the morning testing, with breath ethanol concentrations (BECs) averaging 0.049%, sleepiness was increased, divided attention reaction times increased (on both days), and simulated driving performance was disturbed in the ethanol and 4-hr TIB relative to placebo. Similarly in the afternoon, with BECs averaging 0.013%, the ethanol and 4-hr TIB condition increased sleepiness and disrupted divided attention and simulated driving performance. The results show that sleepiness and low-dose ethanol combine to impair simulated automobile driving, an impairment that extends beyond the point at which BEC reaches zero. They provide a possible explanation for the incidence of alcohol-related automobile accidents at low BECs.

  15. Tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to muriatic acid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Pense, S C; Wood, W J; Stempel, T K; Zwemer, F L; Wachtel, T L

    1988-02-01

    Acid ingestion may result in a variety of early and late complications. A patient is presented with severe sequelae from muriatic acid ingestion, including a tracheoesophageal fistula which is a previously unreported complication of acid ingestion injury. Recommendations are made for diagnosis and prevention of this potentially lethal complication.

  16. Ammonium nitrate cold pack ingestion.

    PubMed

    Challoner, K R; McCarron, M M

    1988-01-01

    Disposable ammonium nitrate cold packs are widely used in emergency departments instead of ice bags. Five confused or suicidal patients who tore open a pack and ingested from 64 to 234 grams of ammonium nitrate in a single dose, and another patient who attempted to do so, are reported. It is known that chronic ingestion of 6 to 12 grams/day of ammonium nitrate may cause gastritis, acidosis, isosmotic diuresis, and nitrite toxicity manifesting as methemoglobinemia or vasodilatation. None of these patients developed severe toxicity, although three had symptoms of gastritis, three had slight methemoglobinemia, and two had mild hypotension. The product was removed from the stomach promptly in three of the five patients. None had pre-existing renal or intestinal dysfunction, which are known to enhance ammonium nitrate toxicity.

  17. Infant botulism following honey ingestion.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, C O; Ayubi, A; Zulfiquer, F; Santhanam, G; Ahmed, M A S; Deeb, J

    2012-09-07

    An apparently well baby girl born at term was presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of acute onset of generalised floppiness at the age of 3 months. Clinically, the baby had lower motor neuron type of muscle weakness; detailed investigation lead to the diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorder secondary to botulism toxicity. Further tests confirmed the botulism toxicity secondary to honey ingestion. The baby was treated with specific anticlostridium antibodies; she recovered remarkably, now growing and developing normally.

  18. Paraffin ingestion--the problem.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J B; Krug, A; Robertson, J; Hay, I T; MacIntyre, U

    1994-11-01

    Paraffin ingestion is the commonest cause of accidental childhood poisoning in South Africa. Children from the lower socio-economic group are affected most. They drink paraffin in the summer months from bottles or intermediate containers, mistaking it for water or cold-drink. The children are predominantly male with a mean age of 24 months. The clinical picture is one of respiratory distress with a hospital case fatality rate of 0.74%. The use of paraffin as a source of household energy in South Africa is on the increase. Based on a modernisation index it would seem that this trend will continue into the next century. It can therefore be expected that the number of cases of paraffin ingestion will steadily increase if no active steps are taken to address the problem. Prevention should entail a wide spectrum of measures, the basis of which should be a child-resistant container. An effective durable, low-cost child-resistant container which is easy to pour from should be made available by petroleum companies and/or entrepreneurs and distributed through their network. This should be combined with health education on the danger of paraffin. Health care workers and administrators should be made more aware of the problem and become involved in health education and prevention. Further research should be undertaken on the effect a change in the colour of paraffin and the use of child-resistant caps would have on the incidence of paraffin ingestion in South Africa.

  19. Button battery ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Michael J; Ricca, Robert L; Gallagher, Thomas Q

    2017-08-30

    As the demand for small electronics continues to grow so does the risk of oesophageal ingestion of button batteries. These small but powerful sources of energy are ubiquitous in every household and when swallowed, especially in small children, have been shown to create significant injury in a short amount of time leading to long-term morbidity and possible death. This review highlights the latest findings regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of ingested button batteries. Updated epidemiology from the National Capital Poison Center, new bench research looking at injury patterns and possible mitigation strategies, updated ideas on management algorithms including the use of a trauma protocol, close-look second endoscopy and management of button batteries in the lower gastrointestinal tract are reviewed in this paper. Despite advances in the understanding of injury mechanics and innovations leading to early diagnosis and improved management of button battery ingestion, parental and provider education remain the most important tools to keep children well tolerated from the sequelae of these potentially fatal events. Collaboration between healthcare experts, public health and industry is essential to find a safe answer to this ongoing threat.

  20. Altered water-maze search behavior in adult guinea pigs following chronic prenatal ethanol exposure: lack of mitigation by postnatal fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Teresa D; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2008-08-22

    Ingestion of ethanol during pregnancy can result in teratogenic effects in humans, including significant and long-lasting neurobehavioral deficits. Similar results are seen in guinea pigs with chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) via maternal ethanol administration, which produces deficits in Morris water-maze performance and impaired hippocampal functioning (e.g., decreased long-term potentiation, LTP). In this study, we tested whether postnatal treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, decreases some of the neurobehavioral impairments produced by CPEE. Timed, pregnant guinea pigs received oral administration of ethanol (4g/kg maternal body weight) or isocaloric sucrose pair feeding (control) for 5 days/week throughout gestation. Offspring of the CPEE and control groups were randomly assigned to receive either fluoxetine (10mg/kg body weight/day) or saline intraperitoneally from postnatal day 10 to 48. Subsequent behavioral tests in the Morris water-maze revealed a significant increase in thigmotaxic swimming in CPEE offspring without apparent signs of impairment in spatial mapping of the hidden escape platform. Measures of hippocampal short- and long-term plasticity (paired-pulse facilitation, frequency facilitation, and LTP) were unaffected by CPEE, consistent with the behavioral data indicating normal hippocampal functioning. Postnatal fluoxetine administration resulted in a significant loss of body weight, but did not affect the increased thigmotaxic swimming following CPEE. These results indicate that changes in search strategies in the water-maze might be a highly sensitive index of CPEE-induced neurobehavioral toxicity that can occur in the absence of significant hippocampal dysfunction. Further, these data demonstrate that fluoxetine, at the selected treatment regime, does not mitigate the thigmotaxic swimming response to CPEE in the guinea pig.

  1. Voluntary ethanol drinking during the first three postnatal weeks in lines of rats selectively bred for divergent ethanol preference.

    PubMed

    McKinzie, D L; Cox, R; Murphy, J M; Li, T K; Lumeng, L; McBride, W J

    1999-12-01

    Using a procedure first developed by Hall (1979), we examined ethanol self-administration in preweanling pups from Wistar rats and in lines of rats selectively bred for divergent ethanol preference (alcohol-preferring P, alcohol-nonpreferring NP, high-alcohol-drinking HAD-1 and -2, and low-alcohol-drinking LAD-2) to determine if factors contributing to high and low alcohol intakes are present early in development. From postnatal days 5 to 20, nondeprived male and female rat pups received 30 min daily access to either water or a 15% (v/v) ethanol solution. In each daily session, pups were placed in a heated chamber containing Kimwipes soaked with a water or ethanol solution. Pups were weighed before and after each session, and intake levels were calculated as a percentage of body weight change. Similar to previous reports, Wistar pups exhibited over a 2-fold higher level of ethanol ingestion than water on postnatal days 9 through 14, with ethanol intakes approaching 3 g/kg body weight. When the drinking patterns of the selected lines were examined, only the HAD replicate lines showed a comparable preference for ethanol versus water during the preweanling period. The ethanol consumption of P, NP, and LAD lines was not consistently distinguishable from water intake levels. To reveal whether early ethanol exposure would influence later ethanol drinking behavior, a subset of HAD and LAD rat pups received free-choice ethanol access upon weaning. Although the divergent ethanol preference between high- and low-alcohol-drinking lines was evident within the first 4 days of access (>4 g/kg/day for HAD; <2 g/kg/day for LAD), preweanling ethanol exposure did not alter the acquisition or maintenance of ethanol drinking in either line. Overall, these results suggest that (a) the enhanced ethanol ingestion observed during the middle portion of the preweanling period is a robust phenomenon and generalizes across nonselected strains of rats, (b) selective breeding for divergent

  2. A Stochastic Model for the Ethanol Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    GHADIRINEJAD, Mazyar; ATASOYLU, Emine; İZBIRAK, Gökhan; GHA-SEMI, Matina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to propose a new stochastic model to study the time course of ethanol elimination in human bodies. Methods: The times and amount of alcohol ingested are assumed to be random in controllable intervals. Constant elimination rate follows zero order kinetics and is replaced by first order kinetics when the effects of alcohol increase due to alcohol ingestion. Simulation studies of three different models were made to compare the statistical characteristics of the ethanol effects obtained using analytical expressions. For each model, three cases were considered depending on the drinking pattern and by classifying the drinker as heavy, normal or sparse. Results: From the model formulation, we noted that as the rate of drinking increases for a given elimination rate, the expected time between overflows goes towards zero. Furthermore, as the average amount of alcohol in each drink increases, the corresponding time between overflows decreases. Conclusion: Variations in times of alcohol intakes as well as the amount of alcohol consumption can be accounted through the final created formula. The model proves that overflows occur when alcohol is ingested before the adverse effects of alcohol from the previous drink are completely eliminated. Being the first stochastic model of such a kind, we do hope that it will throw more light on interpreting experimental data of alcohol abuse. PMID:27957462

  3. Ingested and Aspirated Foreign Bodies.

    PubMed

    Green, S Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal and aspirated foreign bodies have important clinical significance, and both should be considered carefully when the history or physical examination findings raise sufficient suspicion. The published evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of foreign body ingestion or aspiration is weighted disproportionately with observational studies, case controls, expert opinion, and systematic reviews. Most of the publications would receive a categorization of C (observational studies including case-control and cohort design) and D (expert opinion, case reports, and clinical reasoning). One of the few prospective studies examining the diagnostic evaluation of foreign body aspiration in children could be considered level B evidence (randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, or diagnostic studies with minor limitations). This study found that the medical history is the most important predictive part of the evaluation. There is evidence for considering bronchoscopy if there is significant history suggestive of foreign body aspiration, even in the setting of normal physical examination findings. (28). Most ingested foreign bodies spontaneously pass without incident. However, special attention should be paid to objects in the esophagus as well as to batteries and magnets. Based on a systematic review of the literature (level B evidence) and the potential for rapid and life-threatening damage, batteries in the esophagus should be removed immediately. (10) Other objects, such as coins, may be observed for passage in an asymptomatic patient. In addition, given the high risk of significant complications, ingestion of high-powered magnets should be quickly and carefully evaluated. Although single magnets are likely to pass without complication, multiple magnets or magnets ingested with other metal objects can cause significant damage and should be removed if there is any concern for mural entrapment, bowel perforation, or failure to progress. (10

  4. Familial Anaphylaxis after Silkworm Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gautreau, Marc; Restuccia, Marc; Senser, Kevin; Weisberg, Stacy N

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we present a case of anaphylaxis in multiple family members after ingesting silkworms, an Asian delicacy. While food allergies, including anaphylaxis are unfortunately common, there are no previous reports of multiple family members suffering an anaphylactic reaction after eating silkworms. In addition, both family members required multiple doses of epinephrine and eventually an epinephrine infusion to improve their blood pressures. All interventions, including the epinephrine infusions, were started by emergency medical services (EMS) with on-line medical direction. Both the reaction and the required treatment are not extensively documented in the medical literature.

  5. The effect of gestational ethanol exposure on voluntary ethanol intake in early postnatal and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, Steven L; Molina, Juan C; Spear, Norman E; Youngentob, Lisa M

    2007-12-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies provide strong data for a relationship between prenatal ethanol exposure and the risk for abuse in adolescent and young adult humans. However, drug-acceptance results in response to fetal exposure have differed by study, age at evaluation, and experimental animal. In the present study, the authors tested whether voluntary ethanol intake was enhanced in both the infantile and adult rat (15 and 90 days of age, respectively), as a consequence of chronic fetal drug experience. Experimental rats were exposed in utero by administering ethanol to a pregnant dam in a liquid diet during gestational Days 6-20. Compared with those for isocaloric pair-fed and ad lib chow control animals, the results for experimental animals demonstrated that fetal exposure significantly increased infantile affinity for ethanol ingestion without affecting intake patterns of an alternative fluid (water). Heightened affinity for ethanol was absent in adulthood. Moreover, the results argue against malnutrition as a principal factor underlying the infantile phenomenon. These data add to a growing literature indicative of heightened early postnatal acceptance patterns resulting from maternal use or abuse of ethanol during pregnancy.

  6. Ingested (oral) SST inhibits EAE.

    PubMed

    Brod, Staley A; Hood, Zachary M

    2011-08-01

    Ingested immunoactive proteins type I interferon, soluble immune response suppressor peptide 1-21 and melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibit clinical attacks and inflammation in acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We examined whether another immunoactive protein, somatostatin (SST), would have similar anti-inflammatory effects on EAE after oral administration. B6 mice were immunized with MOG peptide 35-55 and gavaged with control saline or SST during ongoing disease. Splenocytes from mock-fed or SST-fed mice were adoptively transferred into active MOG peptide 35-55-immunized recipient mice during ongoing disease. In actively fed mice, increased Th2-like cytokines in both the spleen and the central nervous system (CNS) inhibited active disease. In recipients of donor cells from SST-fed donors, reduction of Th1 and Th17 and induction of Th2-like IL-4 cytokines in both the spleen and CNS inhibited disease. T(reg) cells were increased threefold in actively fed spleen cells that are responsible for protection against disease after adoptive transfer. Ingested (orally administered) SST can inhibit clinical disease, inhibit CNS inflammation by decreasing Th17 and Th1-like cytokines and increasing Th2-like cytokines in the CNS via induction of T(reg) cells.

  7. Accidental cell phone ingestion with pharyngeal impaction.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammed M; Bahl, Kazal; Dross, Matthew; Farooqui, Shoheb; Dross, Peter

    2014-09-01

    35 year old intoxicated male ingested an unusual, large foreign object (cell phone). To report the ingestion of an unusual large foreign object with hypopharyngeal impaction, complications, and treatment. Foreign body ingestion in the adult population is more prevalent in those who engage in drug or alcohol abuse. Impaction and perforation of the upper aerodigestive tract can lead to significant and potentially fatal complications including parapharyngeal/retropharyngeal abscess, mediastinitis, and aortoesophageal fistula. The treatment of foreign object ingestion is dependent on the type of foreign object ingested, its location, and potential for perforation. Endoscopic removal under general anesthesia is the treatment method recommended for foreign bodies impacted at the cricopharyngeus or esophagus. We report the only case of the accidental ingestion of an entire cell phone with casing. A plain film x-ray of the neck can be used in the assessment of the location of radiopaque foreign objects and in diagnosing potential complication.

  8. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  9. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation.

  10. Ethanol cytotoxic effect on trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Clave, S; Joya, X; Salat-Batlle, J; Garcia-Algar, O; Vall, O

    2014-03-03

    Prenatal ethanol exposure may cause both, altered fetal neurodevelopment and impaired placental function. These disturbances can lead to growth retardation, which is one of the most prevalent features in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). It is not known whether there is a specific pattern of cytotoxicity caused by ethanol that can be extrapolated to other cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effects caused by sustained exposure of trophoblast cells to ethanol. The cytotoxic effect of sustained exposure to standard doses of ethanol on an in vitro human trophoblast cell line, JEG3, was examined. Viable cell count by exclusion method, total protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and activation of apoptotic markers (P-H2AX, caspase-3 and PARP-1) were determined. Sustained exposure to ethanol decreased viable cell count and total protein concentration. LDH activity did not increased in exposed cells but apoptotic markers were detected. In addition, there was a dose-dependent relationship between ethanol concentration and apoptotic pathways activation. Sustained ethanol exposure causes cellular cytotoxicity by apoptotic pathways induction as a result of DNA damage. This apoptotic induction may partially explain the altered function of placental cells and the damage previously detected in other tissues.

  11. Ethanol-associated selective fetal malnutrition: a contributing factor in the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S E; Atkinson, M; Burnap, J K; Jacobson, S; Sehgal, P K; Scott, W; Van Thiel, D H

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the FAS, particularly the characteristic IUGR, may be due in part to ethanol-related placental injury. Ethanol and/ or acetaldehyde may impair placental transfer of nutrients essential for growth, e.g., amino acids. Such restriction could occur regardless of maternal nutritional status: selective fetal malnutrition. Impairment of placental nutrient transport at critical phases of fetal organogenesis could compound any direct fetotoxic effects of ethanol or acetaldehyde. The effect of ethanol upon human placental hormone synthesis and transport of vitamins, minerals, glucose, and nucleic acid precursors awaits further investigation. Similarly, potential interactions between ethanol and other xenobiotics commonly abused by alcoholics require clarification.

  12. Two Year Old With Water Bead Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jami; Randell, Kimberly A; Knapp, Jane F

    2015-08-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common pediatric complaint. Two case reports describe intestinal obstruction in children from an ingestion of a single superabsorbent water ball, requiring surgical removal. We describe nonsurgical management of an asymptomatic child who ingested approximately 100 superabsorbent water beads.Because of the risk for subsequent intestinal obstruction, the patient was admitted for whole bowel irrigation. This case report is the first describing use of whole bowel irrigation in the management of an asymptomatic patient with multiple water beads ingestion.

  13. Management of ingested magnets in children.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sunny Z; Bousvaros, Athos; Gilger, Mark; Mamula, Petar; Gupta, Sandeep; Kramer, Robert; Noel, R Adam

    2012-09-01

    We describe a comprehensive algorithm for the management of ingested rare-earth magnets in children. These newer and smaller neodymium magnets sold as adult toys are much stronger than the traditional magnets, and can attract each other with formidable forces. If >1 magnet is swallowed at the same time, or a magnet is co-ingested with another metallic object, the loops of intestine can be squeezed between them resulting in bowel damage including perforations. An algorithm that uses the number of magnets ingested, location of magnets, and the timing of ingestion before intervention helps to delineate the roles of the pediatric gastroenterologists and surgeons in the management of these cases.

  14. Esophageal button battery ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Şencan, Arzu; Genişol, İncinur; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-07-01

    Button battery lodged in the esophagus carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to present cases of patients with esophageal button battery ingestion treated at our clinic and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Records of patients admitted to our hospital for foreign body ingestion between January 2010 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with button battery lodged in the esophagus were included in the study. Patient data regarding age, sex, length of time after ingestion until admission, presenting clinical symptoms, type and localization of the battery, management, and prognosis were analyzed. Among 1891 foreign body ingestions, 71 were localized in the esophagus, and 8 of those (11.2%) were cases of button battery ingestion. Mean age was 1.7 years. Admission was within 6 hours of ingestion in 5 cases, after 24 hours had elapsed in 2, and 1 month after ingestion in 1 case. All patients but 1 knew the history of ingestion. Prompt endoscopic removal was performed for all patients. Three patients developed esophageal stricture, which responded to dilatation. Early recognition and timely endoscopic removal is mandatory in esophageal button battery ingestion. It should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  15. Toxicity following laundry detergent pod ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schneir, Aaron B; Rentmeester, Landen; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2013-06-01

    Laundry detergent pods (LDPs) have only recently become available in the United States, and there has been increasing concern regarding pediatric ingestions of them. We describe a 15-month-old female infant who ingested an LDP and had a depressed level of consciousness, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary toxicity, and swallowing difficulties. It is currently unclear what the exact etiologic agent(s) is responsible for the toxicity associated with LDPs. The case demonstrates the potential for significant toxicity following the ingestion of an LDP. Clearly, measures should be taken to avoid ingestions of these products.

  16. Cluster of Acute Toxicity from Ingestion of Synthetic Cannabinoid-Laced Brownies.

    PubMed

    Obafemi, Adebisi I; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Goto, Collin; Fout, Drew

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists (SCRAs) are emerging designer drugs of abuse. Most reports on the health effects of these drugs are case reports. Unlike SCRAs, marijuana has classically been used via many routes of exposure including oral, such as in brownies. We report on 11 symptomatic patients who unknowingly ingested brownies laced with analytically confirmed SCRA and presented with mostly neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular symptoms. All 11 patients were taken to the ED within 1 h of exposure with the onset of various symptoms. There were five males and six females, age range 20-57 years. Neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular symptoms predominated: memory impairment (91 %, 10/11) and inappropriate giggling (36 %, 4/11). All the patients had light-headedness, perioral and facial numbness and tingling sensation, dry mouth, difficulty focusing/blurring of vision, and sluggishness. No patient had depressed consciousness. Two patients had heart rates >100, and 4 of 11 (36 %) had BP >140/80. One patient had chest pain. All the symptoms were completely resolved 4 h following their onset except two patients who had ongoing weakness and fatigue. All patients had negative urine drugs of abuse immunoassays and ethanol, acetaminophen, and salicylate concentrations, as well as normal electrocardiograms (ECGS) and metabolic panels. The SCRA was confirmed to be AM-2201. All the patients were discharged from the ED in stable condition within 10 h of the exposure. Oral exposure of 11 patients to brownies laced with analytically confirmed SCRA resulted in neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular symptoms. This series reflects that like marijuana, oral exposures to SCRAs can lead to symptoms.

  17. The ingestible thermal monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Hogrefe, Arthur F.; Lesho, Jeffery C.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal monitoring system for measuring body core temperatures was developed that contains an ingestible pill which is both commandable and rechargeable, and which uses magnetic induction for command and telemetry as well as for recharging. The pill electronics consist of a battery power source, a crystal-controlled oscillator that drives a small air coil, and a command detection circuit. The resulting 262-kHz magnetilc field can be easily detected from a distance of 1 m. The pill oscillator functions at voltages less than 1 V, supplied by a single Ni-Cd battery, which must be recharged after 72 h of continuous transmission. The pill can be recalibrated periodically to compensate for long-term drift.

  18. The ingestible thermal monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Hogrefe, Arthur F.; Lesho, Jeffery C.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal monitoring system for measuring body core temperatures was developed that contains an ingestible pill which is both commandable and rechargeable, and which uses magnetic induction for command and telemetry as well as for recharging. The pill electronics consist of a battery power source, a crystal-controlled oscillator that drives a small air coil, and a command detection circuit. The resulting 262-kHz magnetilc field can be easily detected from a distance of 1 m. The pill oscillator functions at voltages less than 1 V, supplied by a single Ni-Cd battery, which must be recharged after 72 h of continuous transmission. The pill can be recalibrated periodically to compensate for long-term drift.

  19. Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The review focuses on operant self-administration of ethanol in immature, infant rats. Several methods for the analysis of ethanol intake in infants are available, yet only oral self-administration models the typical pattern of ethanol consumption found in humans. The study of ethanol intake in infants is important for our understanding of how early alcohol experiences facilitate subsequent engagement with alcohol. It seems that sensitivity to ethanol-induced operant reinforcement is found very early in life, a few hours after birth, and throughout the first three weeks of life. Most of the studies reviewed complied with most, albeit not all, of the criteria for operant behavior (e.g., greater responding than yoked controls and persistence of this difference after withholding the reinforcer). Operant self-administration of ethanol in infant rats seems to be, at least partially, mediated by endogenous opioid transmission and can be enhanced by prior exposure to ethanol. Furthermore, acquisition of ethanol-mediated operant learning seems to facilitate drug self-administration during adolescence. Relative to older subjects, infants exhibit lower sensitivity to ethanol's sedative, hypnotic and motor impairing effects. On the other hand, they exhibit increased sensitivity to the motor stimulant and rewarding effects of ethanol. We suggest that this pattern of response to ethanol may favor the rapid acquisition of operant self-administration in infant rats.

  20. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  2. Kansas Ethanol Lyons Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This update August 9, 2016 letter from EPA approves, with modifications, the petition from Kansas Ethanol, LLC, Lyons facility, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel

  3. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  4. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Klein, Seth J; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-AKT(Thr308) in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448) by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKT(Ser473) and p-AKT(Thr308) were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL(-1) · min(-1); P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling.

  5. Gestational ethanol exposure alters the behavioral response to ethanol odor and the expression of neurotransmission genes in the olfactory bulb of adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Frank A; Carrierfenster, Kellyn; Mooney, Sandra M; Youngentob, Steven L

    2009-02-03

    Fetal exposure to ethanol is highly predictive of the propensity to ingest ethanol during adolescence and in utero chemosensory plasticity has been implicated as a contributing factor in this process. Recent rodent studies have shown that fetal ethanol exposure results in a tuned unconditioned sniffing and neurophysiological olfactory response to ethanol odor in infant animals. Importantly, a significant proportion of increased ethanol avidity at this age can be attributed to the tuned behavioral response to ethanol odor. These effects are absent in adults. Using behavioral methods and comprehensive gene expression profiling to screen for robust transcriptional differences induced in the olfactory bulb, we examined whether ethanol exposure via maternal diet results in an altered responsiveness to ethanol odor that persists into late adolescence and, if so, the molecular mechanisms that may be associated with such effects. Compared to controls, fetal exposure altered: the adolescent sniffing response to ethanol odor consistent with the previously observed changes in infant animals; and the expression of genes involved in synaptic transmission and plasticity as well as neuronal development (both cell fate and axon/neurite outgrowth). These data provide evidence for a persistence of olfactory-mediated responsiveness to ethanol into the period of adolescence. Further, they provide insight into an important relationship between fetal exposure to ethanol, adolescent odor responsiveness to the drug and potential underlying molecular mechanisms for the odor-guided behavioral response.

  6. The influence of ethanol on hepatic transmethylation.

    PubMed

    Barak, A J; Beckenhauer, H C

    1988-01-01

    One of the most important biochemical pathways in the organism is the biosynthesis of methionine from the methylation of homocysteine. Two different reactions are responsible for this methylation, one utilizing N5-methyltetra-hydrofolate as a methylating agent and the other using betaine as the methyl donor. This paper reviews some recent findings in this laboratory, which demonstrate that ethanol-feeding to rats impairs the folate-induced reaction. Our findings also show that this impairment is compensated for through the adaptive increase in the enzyme using betaine in the biosynthesis of methionine. Further studies indicate that the mechanism of action in the impairment may occur through the formation of individual adducts between the folate-induced enzyme (methionine synthetase), its essential cofactors and acetaldehyde, a metabolic product of ethanol. These findings suggest a basis for why rats are more resistant to alcoholic liver injury than humans and may offer a means of protecting against alcoholic liver injury in man.

  7. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bird ingestion. 33.76 Section 33.76... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.76 Bird ingestion. (a... takeoff thrust or power. (2) The engine inlet throat area as used in this section to determine the bird...

  8. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  9. Changes in gastrointestinal DNA synthesis produced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption in the rat: a biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K; Czygan, P; Kienapfel, H; Veith, S; Schmidt-Gayk, H; Kommerell, B

    1983-02-01

    The effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration on DNA synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat was investigated. Acute intragastric ethanol administration (3 g/kg; 50%) decreased significantly in vivo DNA synthesis when measured 1 hour after alcohol application in the stomach and in the upper small intestine, whereas acute intravenous ethanol administration had no significant effect. In contrast, chronic ethanol ingestion resulted in a significant increase of in vivo and in vitro DNA synthesis in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In addition, even a more enhanced stimulation of DNA synthesis after chronic ethanol consumption was found in isolated intestinal cells. These results indicate an inhibition of gastrointestinal cell regeneration directly after the oral application of ethanol. The enhanced cellular regenerativity observed after chronic ethanol consumption may be secondary to the ethanol induced damage of the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Orally administered ethanol: transepidermal pathways and effects on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ute; Bartoll, Jens; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with a variety of skin diseases. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify the pathways of release of orally administered ethanol through the skin, and (2) to investigate the effects of a single oral dose of ethanol on the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin. Ethanol evaporation via the skin was measured using the new technique of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface temperature were simultaneously measured before and after ethanol consumption. Measurements were performed on skin sites with different stratum corneum (SC) thickness, and density of follicles and sweat glands. These appendages were selectively sealed to investigate their participation in ethanol evaporation. The penetration of a topically applied UV filter substance was studied before and after ethanol consumption after removing the SC with adhesive tape. Ethanol evaporation was measured within 5 min of consumption, while the skin surface temperature remained nearly constant. The sealing of the appendages did not have a significant effect on ethanol evaporation. On the forehead, a higher TEWL value was measured than on the forearm. On both skin sites, an increase in TEWL was observed after ethanol ingestion. No influence of orally administered ethanol on the penetration of the topically applied UV filter substance was observed. The results indicate that ethanol evaporation occurs via the lipid layers without a significant effect on the penetration of the topically applied substance.

  11. Foreign body ingestions in a schizophrenic patient.

    PubMed

    Alao, A O; Abraham, B

    2006-01-01

    The topic of foreign body ingestion has received extensive coverage in the areas of surgery, emergency medicine and pediatrics. A subset of this topic, the intentional ingestion of foreign bodies, however, is much less common, and involves subtleties in evaluation and management not usually seen in accidental ingestions. Here, we report a case of ingestion of a rolled, metal tuna can lid in a male prison inmate previously diagnosed with depression and paranoid schizophrenia. Following evaluation by the surgical team, the foreign body was removed by laparotomy and the patient was discharged back to the prison without complication. In many cases, ingestions ofthis type involve a command hallucination ordering the patient to swallow the foreign body. Interestingly, the patient in the present case reported auditory hallucinations commanding him not to swallow the can lid.

  12. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2007

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2007-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests.

  13. Ethanol and blood pressure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, D.C.; Edgar, S.; McCarron, D.A. )

    1989-02-09

    Epidemiologists have identified alcohol as a risk factor in hypertension. Attempts to increase blood pressure in rats with chronic alcohol ingestion have met with mixed results. Some investigators have reported increases in blood pressure while others have reported decreases. Most investigators have given alcohol in the drinking water which produced differences in food intake across groups. To control for food intake, Wister rats were simultaneously pair fed a liquid diet with either ethanol as 35% of calories or a control diet using ARF/Israel pair-feeding devices. At 5 weeks of age, animals on ethanol diets had lower systolic blood pressure than control animals (145 (n-19) vs. 121 (n-19) mmHg). There was no difference in weight between ethanol and control animals. The same pattern of results was apparent at 7 weeks (143 (n-13) vs. 119 (n-13) mmHg) and 9 weeks (147 (n-7) vs. 124 (n-7)). The data indicate that ethanol produces hypotension in rats when food intake is controlled.

  14. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk.

  15. Problem solving following neonatal exposure to cocaine, ethanol, or cocaine/ethanol in combination in rats.

    PubMed

    Barron, S; Hansen-Trench, L; Kaiser, D H; Segar, T M

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effects of neonatal drug exposure on performance in a digging maze. Subjects were Sprague-Dawley rats, artificially reared (AR) and fed through a gastrostomy tube from postnatal days (PND) 4-10. The AR groups included a cocaine group (20 mg/kg/day cocaine hydrochloride), an ethanol group (4 g/kg/day ethanol), a cocaine/ethanol group (20 mg/kg/day cocaine and 4 g/kg/day ethanol), and an AR control group. A suckled control raised by its dam was also included. At approximately PND 55, subjects were tested in a digging maze paradigm. The digging maze required subjects to use a species typical behavior (digging) to solve a novel problem (gaining access to water). While neonatal treatment had no effect on acquisition of a simple runway task for water reward, neonatal exposure to cocaine and ethanol in combination resulted in impaired performance on the digging maze task. None of the other neonatal treatment groups showed impairments on this task. These findings suggest that exposure to these doses of cocaine and ethanol during neonatal development may have more serious effects on problem solving tasks in rats than exposure to either drug alone.

  16. Participation of the Endogenous Opioid System in the Acquisition of a Prenatal Ethanol-Related Memory: Effects on Neonatal and Preweanling Responsiveness to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Morales, R. Sebastián Miranda; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E.; Abate, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The present study tested the involvement of the opioid system in the acquisition and expression of prenatal ethanol-related memories. We evaluated how this prenatal experience modulates ethanol self-administration in newborn rats, and preweanling’s ingestion of the drug. During Gestational Days (GDs) 17-20, four groups of dams were treated with ethanol (2 g/Kg) or water, followed immediately by naloxone (10 mg/Kg) or saline administration. A fifth group received a similar dose of naloxone 20 min before ethanol administration. On PD 1, pups were tested on an operant learning procedure to obtain milk or 3% ethanol. One hour later, an extinction session was performed. At Postnatal Days (PDs) 14 and 15, preweanlings representing each prenatal treatment were evaluated in an intake test with infusions of 5% ethanol or water. Prior to the intake test on PD14, preweanlings were administered naloxone (1 mg/Kg), saline or remained untreated. In both tests, animals representative of both genders were utilized. One-day-old pups rapidly learned the operant behavior to gain access to milk. In contrast, only pups prenatally treated with ethanol (administered immediately before naloxone or saline injection) increased operant responding to gain access to ethanol. On an intake test at PDs 14 and 15, those animals prenatally exposed to naloxone 20 min before ethanol administration consumed significantly lower ethanol levels than the remaining prenatal ethanol groups. Postnatal treatment with naloxone diminished intake of all solutions at PD14. These results suggest that prenatal ethanol exposure facilitates neonatal operant learning reinforced by intraoral administration of ethanol and increases ethanol consumption during PDs 14-15. The endogenous opioid system apparently is involved in the acquisition of prenatal ethanol memories, which can modulate the reinforcing attributes of the drug in neonatal and preweanling rats. PMID:20451537

  17. Prevention of effects of ethanol on amino acid concentrations in plasma and tissues by hepatic lipotropic factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanko, R T; Morse, E L; Adibi, S A

    1979-01-01

    The authors' previous studies have shown that hepatic steatosis of chronic ethanol ingestion in rats can be prevented by adding pyruvate, dihydroxyacetone, and riboflavin to their diet. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of chronic ethanol ingestion, with or without addition of the above metabolites to the diet, on protein and amino acid concentrations in tissues. Rats (120 g) were divided into three groups and fed isocalorically one of the fellowing diets for 30 days: control diet (28% fat, 15% protein, and 57% carbohydrate), ethanol diet (28% fat, 15% protein, 23% carbohydrate, and 24% ethanol), and metabolite diet (ethanol diet plus pyruvate, dihydroxyacetone, and riboflavin). Chronic ethanol ingestion reduced growth of muscle and intestinal mucosa without affecting that of liver and kidney. Among the 15 amino acids measured, chronic ethanol ingestion had the most consistent effect on plasma and tissue concentrations of leucine, alanine and alpha-amino-n-butyrate. The concentration of leucine was increased in muscle, liver, and plasma; that of alpha-amino-n-butyrate was increased in muscle and plasma, whereas that of alanine was decreased in plasma and liver. Addition of pyruvate, dihydroxyacetone, and riboflavin to the ethanol diet either totally or partially prevented ethanol-induced changes in plasma and tissue concentrations of amino acids despite similarity in plasma ethanol levels. Although these metabolites prevented the inhibition of the growth of intestinal mucosa, they were ineffective in blunting the effect of ehtanol on the skeletal muscle. This latter observation suggests that the mechanism of ethanol-induced inhibition of tissue growth is not the same for these tissues.

  18. Interaction of biogenic amines with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Smith, A A

    1975-01-01

    Ethanol through its primary catabolite, acetaldehyde, competitively inhibits oxidation of aldehyde dehydrogenase substrates. As a consequence biogenic amines form increased quantities of alcohols rather than the corresponding acids. During this biotransformation, condensation reactions between deaminated and intact amines may occur which can yield tetrahydropapaverolines. These compounds are closely related to precursors of opioids which is cause to link ethanol abuse to morphine addiction. There is, however, no pharmacological or clinical evidence suggesting similarities between ethanol dependence or opiod addiction. Acetaldehyde plays an additional role in alkaloidal formation in vitro. Biogenic amines may react with acetaldehyde to form isoquinoline or carboline compounds. Some of these substances have significant pharmacological activity. Furthermore, they may enter neural stores and displace the natural neurotransmitter. Thus, they can act as false neurotransmitters. Some investigators believe that chronic ethanol ingestion leads to significant formation of such aberrant compounds which may then upset autonomic nervous system balance. This disturbance may explain the abnormal sympathetic activity seen in withdrawal. While these ideas about the etiology of alcohol abuse have a definite appeal, they are naturally based on in vitro preliminary work. Much study of the quantitative pharmacology of these compounds in animals is required before judgement can be made as to the merits of the proposed hypotheses. In the meantime, pharmacological studies on the ability of ethanol to depress respiration in the mouse has revealed that unlike opioids or barbituates, respiratory depression induced by ethanol requires the presence in brain of serotonin. This neurotransmitter also mediates the respiratory effects of several other alcohols but curiously, not chloral hydrate, yet this compound is purported to alter biogenic amine metabolism much like ethanol. Thus, the response

  19. Adolescent ethanol experience alters immediate and long-term behavioral responses to ethanol odor in observer and demonstrator rats.

    PubMed

    Eade, Amber M; Youngentob, Steven L

    2009-06-04

    The social transmission of food preference paradigm centers on the finding that observers obtain dietary information through olfactory cues on the breath of a demonstrator peer that has ingested a novel substance. This phenomenon plays a role in ethanol acceptability. Historically, studies using this technique have focused on observer animals in order to study the social transmission process. With respect to ethanol, studies of acute intoxication have shown that the pharmacologic properties of ethanol and hematogenic olfaction can influence the subsequent ethanol odor-mediated responses of the intoxicated animals. These acute studies, however, demonstrate odor aversion. The present study compared the effect of adolescent ethanol exposure, via the social transmission paradigm, on the behavioral response to ethanol odor in both observer and demonstrator animals in adolescence (postnatal day (P) 37) and the persistence of these effects into adulthood (P90). Beginning on P29, naïve rats received four ethanol or water exposures: one every 48 hours through either direct intragastric infusion or social interaction with an infused peer. The reflexive sniffing response of observers and demonstrators to ethanol odor was tested at P37 or P90 using whole-body plethysmography. The behavioral response of adolescent ethanol observers and demonstrators significantly differed between themselves and from their respective water controls. Ethanol and water observers both displayed a greater response to ethanol odor than their respective demonstrator counterparts. Compared to controls, both modes of ethanol exposure produced similar magnitudes of enhancement. At P90, both forms of exposure displayed similar responses to ethanol odor and similar magnitudes of enhancement. Only demonstrators displayed equivalent enhanced responses in both sexes. In contrast to previous studies showing odor aversion following acute ethanol intoxication, within the context of the social transmission

  20. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  1. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  2. Effects of ethanol on red blood cell rheological behavior.

    PubMed

    Rabai, M; Detterich, J A; Wenby, R B; Toth, K; Meiselman, H J

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of red wine is associated with a decreased risk of several cardiovascular diseases (e.g., coronary artery disease, stroke), but unfortunately literature reports regarding ethanol's effects on hemorheological parameters are not concordant. In the present study, red blood cell (RBC) deformability was tested via laser ektacytometry (LORCA, 0.3-30 Pa) using two approaches: 1) addition of ethanol to whole blood at 0.25%-2% followed by incubation and testing in ethanol-free LORCA medium; 2) addition of ethanol to the LORCA medium at 0.25%-6% then testing untreated native RBC in these media. The effects of ethanol on deformability for oxidatively stressed RBC were investigated as were changes of RBC aggregation (Myrenne Aggregometer) for cells in autologous plasma or 3% 70 kDa dextran. Significant dose-related increases of RBC deformability were observed at 0.25% (p < 0.05) and higher concentrations only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium; no changes occurred for cells previously incubated with ethanol then tested in ethanol-free medium. The impaired deformability of cells pre-exposed to oxidative stress was improved only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium. RBC aggregation decreased with concentration at 0.25% and higher for cells in both autologous plasma and dextran 70. Our results indicate that ethanol reversibly improves erythrocyte deformability and irreversibly decreases erythrocyte aggregation; the relevance of these results to the health benefits of moderate wine consumption require further investigation.

  3. Caffeine promotes ethanol drinking in rats. Examination using a limited-access free choice paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kunin, D; Gaskin, S; Rogan, F; Smith, B R; Amit, Z

    2000-07-01

    There is growing evidence that caffeine may alter the pattern of intake of a variety of drugs. The present study was designed to assess the effect of caffeine pretreatment on voluntary ethanol consumption. The first experiment examined the effect of caffeine on the acquisition of ethanol intake in a limited-access-choice procedure in which water and ethanol were presented concurrently. Male Wistar rats, exposed to food and water ad lib, were presented with a daily 1-h choice session between water and progressively increasing concentrations of ethanol (2-10%). Each ethanol concentration was made available for 4-6 days for a total of 20 days of access to ethanol. Intraperitoneal injections of caffeine (5 or 10 mg/kg) or saline were administered to the rats 30 min prior to each choice session. Caffeine produced a dose-related facilitation in ethanol drinking whereby the lower caffeine dose produced enhancement in ethanol drinking. The second experiment examined the effect of caffeine on the maintenance of established ethanol consumption. Male Wistar rats, initially acclimatized to increasing concentrations of ethanol (2%-10), were presented with an additional 18 ethanol (10%) presentations, comprised of a 6-day baseline period followed by 6 days of treatment where animals were given one of three doses of caffeine (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg) or saline prior to ethanol presentation. A final 6-day post-treatment period followed treatment. These results revealed an inverted-U effect of caffeine dose on ethanol ingestion where the low and high caffeine doses produced no effect but the moderate dose of 5 mg/kg enhanced ethanol drinking that persisted throughout the post-treatment period. A third experiment revealed that caffeine did not alter levels of blood ethanol within the time period used for the ethanol drinking session.

  4. Total body water and lean body mass estimated by ethanol dilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Myhre, L. G.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating total body water (TBW) using breath analyses of blood ethanol content is described. Regression analysis of ethanol concentration curves permits determination of a theoretical concentration that would have existed if complete equilibration had taken place immediately upon ingestion of the ethanol; the water fraction of normal blood may then be used to calculate TBW. The ethanol dilution method is applied to 35 subjects, and comparison with a tritium dilution method of determining TBW indicates that the correlation between the two procedures is highly significant. Lean body mass and fat fraction were determined by hydrostatic weighing, and these data also prove compatible with results obtained from the ethanol dilution method. In contrast to the radioactive tritium dilution method, the ethanol dilution method can be repeated daily with its applicability ranging from diseased individuals to individuals subjected to thermal stress, strenuous exercise, water immersion, or the weightless conditions of space flights.

  5. Total body water and lean body mass estimated by ethanol dilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Myhre, L. G.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating total body water (TBW) using breath analyses of blood ethanol content is described. Regression analysis of ethanol concentration curves permits determination of a theoretical concentration that would have existed if complete equilibration had taken place immediately upon ingestion of the ethanol; the water fraction of normal blood may then be used to calculate TBW. The ethanol dilution method is applied to 35 subjects, and comparison with a tritium dilution method of determining TBW indicates that the correlation between the two procedures is highly significant. Lean body mass and fat fraction were determined by hydrostatic weighing, and these data also prove compatible with results obtained from the ethanol dilution method. In contrast to the radioactive tritium dilution method, the ethanol dilution method can be repeated daily with its applicability ranging from diseased individuals to individuals subjected to thermal stress, strenuous exercise, water immersion, or the weightless conditions of space flights.

  6. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A.; Sivaraman, C.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for ingests maintained by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new ingests for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing ingests, (3) future ingests that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to an ingest, and (5) top requested ingests from the ARM Data Archive. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A.; Sivaraman, C.

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for ingests maintained by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new ingests for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing ingests, (3) future ingests that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to an ingest, and (5) top requested ingests from the ARM Data Archive. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  9. Concentrated liquid detergent pod ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Natasha; Jaeger, Matthew W

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated liquid detergent pods are an emerging public health hazard, especially in pediatric patients. Ingestion is a more common route of exposure for liquid detergent pods compared with non-pod detergents and it tends to be associated with more severe adverse effects. We present 3 cases that demonstrate the varied clinical symptoms resulting from detergent pod ingestion. These cases not only demonstrate findings such as gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms but also show more rare neurological symptoms. The cases highlight the dangers of concentrated liquid detergent pod ingestion. To help prevent further life-threatening injuries, there is a need for more consumer information and provider knowledge about the potential adverse complications.

  10. Beware of canine Gorilla Glue ingestions.

    PubMed

    Lubich, Carol; Mrvos, Rita; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2004-06-01

    Household adhesive ingestions are considered relatively non-toxic. Gorilla Glue is a household glue containing a urethane polymer and a polymeric isocyanate liquid compound available in container sizes of 2 to 36 oz, and when applied will expand to 3-4 times its original volume. We report the ingestion of Gorilla Glue by 2 dogs that caused obstructive masses requiring surgical intervention. Dogs with a history of Gorilla Glue ingestion should be monitored closely by their owners and a veterinary referral made if signs of gastrointestinal distress develop.

  11. Equation reliability of soil ingestion estimates in mass-balance soil ingestion studies.

    PubMed

    Stanek Iii, Edward J; Xu, Bo; Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    Exposure to chemicals from ingestion of contaminated soil may be an important pathway with potential health consequences for children. A key parameter used in assessing this exposure is the quantity of soil ingested, with estimates based on four short longitudinal mass-balance soil ingestion studies among children. The estimates use trace elements in the soil with low bioavailability that are minimally present in food. Soil ingestion corresponds to the excess trace element amounts excreted, after subtracting trace element amounts ingested from food and medications, expressed as an equivalent quantity of soil. The short duration of mass-balance studies, different concentrations of trace elements in food and soil, and potential for trace elements to be ingested from other nonsoil, nonfood sources contribute to variability and bias in the estimates. We develop a stochastic model for a soil ingestion estimator based on a trace element that accounts for critical features of the mass-balance equation. Using results from four mass-balance soil ingestion studies, we estimate the accuracy of soil ingestion estimators for different trace elements, and identify subjects where the difference between Al and Si estimates is larger (>3 RMSE) than expected. Such large differences occur in fewer than 12% of subjects in each of the four studies. We recommend the use of such criteria to flag and exclude subjects from soil ingestion analyses. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  13. Model of voluntary ethanol intake in zebrafish: effect on behavior and hypothalamic orexigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sterling, M E; Karatayev, O; Chang, G-Q; Algava, D B; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that exposure to ethanol in tank water affects various behaviors, including locomotion, anxiety and aggression, and produces changes in brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Building on these investigations, the present study had two goals: first, to develop a method for inducing voluntary ethanol intake in individual zebrafish, which can be used as a model in future studies to examine how this behavior is affected by various manipulations, and second, to characterize the effects of this ethanol intake on different behaviors and the expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), which are known in rodents to stimulate consumption of ethanol and alter behaviors associated with alcohol abuse. Thus, we first developed a new model of voluntary intake of ethanol in fish by presenting this ethanol mixed with gelatin, which they readily consume. Using this model, we found that individual zebrafish can be trained in a short period to consume stable levels of 10% or 20% ethanol (v/v) mixed with gelatin and that their intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture leads to pharmacologically relevant blood ethanol concentrations which are strongly, positively correlated with the amount ingested. Intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture increased locomotion, reduced anxiety, and stimulated aggressive behavior, while increasing expression of GAL and OX in specific hypothalamic areas. These findings, confirming results in rats, provide a method in zebrafish for investigating with forward genetics and pharmacological techniques the role of different brain mechanisms in controlling ethanol intake.

  14. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  15. Effect of ethanol on metabolism of purine bases (hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Moriwaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Sumio

    2005-06-01

    There are many factors that contribute to hyperuricemia, including obesity, insulin resistance, alcohol consumption, diuretic use, hypertension, renal insufficiency, genetic makeup, etc. Of these, alcohol (ethanol) is the most important. Ethanol enhances adenine nucleotide degradation and increases lactic acid level in blood, leading to hyperuricemia. In beer, purines also contribute to an increase in plasma uric acid. Although rare, dehydration and ketoacidosis (due to ethanol ingestion) are associated with the ethanol-induced increase in serum uric acid levels. Ethanol also increases the plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine via the acceleration of adenine nucleotide degradation and a possible weak inhibition of xanthine dehydrogenase activity. Since many factors such as the ALDH2*1 gene and ADH2*2 gene, daily drinking habits, exercise, and dehydration enhance the increase in plasma concentration of uric acid induced by ethanol, it is important to pay attention to these factors, as well as ingested ethanol volume, type of alcoholic beverage, and the administration of anti-hyperuricemic agents, to prevent and treat ethanol-induced hyperuricemia.

  16. Interaction between marihuana and ethanol: effects on psychomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Perez-Reyes, M; Hicks, R E; Bumberry, J; Jeffcoat, A R; Cook, C E

    1988-04-01

    This is a report of the results of a placebo-controlled study in which the effects of the interaction between ethanol and marihuana on drug plasma concentrations, subjective ratings of intoxication, heart rate acceleration, and psychomotor performance were investigated. Six healthy, male, paid volunteers, moderate users of ethanol and marihuana, participated in the study. Ethanol (0.42 g/kg, 0.85 g/kg, or placebo) was administered over a 30-min interval. Fifteen minutes later the subjects smoked, in their customary manner, NIDA cigarettes containing 2.4% or 0.0004% (placebo) delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Each subject was tested in a single-blind, latin-square crossover design with the following six conditions: placebo ethanol/placebo marihuana; low dose ethanol/placebo marihuana; high dose ethanol/placebo marihuana; placebo ethanol/marihuana; low dose ethanol/marihuana; and high dose ethanol/marihuana. The variables measured in the study were: (a) subjective rating of ethanol and/or marihuana intoxication; (b) heart rate; (c) accuracy and latency of response in the Simulator Evaluation of Drug Impairment (SEDI) task; (d) blood ethanol concentration by gas chromatography; and (e) plasma concentration of THC by radioimmunoassay. The results indicate that the decrements due to ethanol in performance of skills necessary to drive an automobile were significantly enhanced by marihuana in an additive and perhaps synergistic manner. The administration of ethanol prior to marihuana smoking did not produce significant effects on the subjective rating of "high," heart rate acceleration, or THC plasma concentration.

  17. Acute toxicity from baking soda ingestion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S H; Stone, C K

    1994-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is an extremely well-known agent that historically has been used for a variety of medical conditions. Despite the widespread use of oral bicarbonate, little documented toxicity has occurred, and the emergency medicine literature contains no reports of toxicity caused by the ingestion of baking soda. Risks of acute and chronic oral bicarbonate ingestion include metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypertension, gastric rupture, hyporeninemia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, intravascular volume depletion, and urinary alkalinization. Abrupt cessation of chronic excessive bicarbonate ingestion may result in hyperkalemia, hypoaldosteronism, volume contraction, and disruption of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. The case of a patient with three hospital admissions in 4 months, all the result of excessive oral intake of bicarbonate for symptomatic relief of dyspepsia is reported. Evaluation and treatment of patients with acute bicarbonate ingestion is discussed.

  18. Arsenic ingestion and internal cancers: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, M.N.; Smith, A.H.; Hopenhayn-Rich, C. )

    1992-03-01

    Inorganic arsenic is known to cause skin cancer by ingestion and lung cancer by inhalation. However, whether arsenic ingestion causes internal cancers is still a matter of debate. This paper has reviewed the epidemiologic literature that bears on this question. Published studies of populations who have ingested arsenic in medicines, wine substitutes, or water supplies, as well as workers exposed to arsenic by inhalation, were considered in terms of whether the observed associations might be explained by the presence of biases, the consistency of the evidence, and the biologic plausibility of the associations. Many studies were found to be uninformative because of low statistical power or potential biases. The most informative studies, which were from Taiwan and Japan, involved exposure to arsenic in drinking water. These studies strongly suggest that ingested inorganic arsenic does cause cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, and liver, and possibly other sites. However, confirmatory studies are needed.82 references.

  19. Assistance of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in the interpretation of postmortem ethanol findings.

    PubMed

    Krabseth, Hege; Mørland, Jørg; Høiseth, Gudrun

    2014-09-01

    Postmortem ethanol formation is a well-known problem in forensic toxicology. The aim of this study was to interpret findings of ethanol in blood, in a large collection of forensic autopsy cases, by use of the nonoxidative ethanol metabolites, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS). In this study, according to previously published literature, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in EtS-negative cases. Among 493 ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, collected during the study period, EtS was not detected in 60 (12 %) of the cases. Among cases with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of ≤ 0.54 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 38 % of the cases, while among cases with a BAC of ≥ 0.55 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 2.2 % of the cases. For all cases where ethanol was measured at a concentration >1.0 g/kg, EtS was detected. The highest blood ethanol concentration in which EtS was not detected was 1.0 g/kg. The median concentrations of EtG and EtS in blood were 9.5 μmol/L (range: not detected (n.d.) 618.1) and 9.2 μmol/L (range: n.d. 182.5), respectively. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between concentration levels of ethanol and of EtG (Spearman's rho=0.671, p<0.001) and EtS (Spearman's rho=0.670, p<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that in a large number of ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, ethanol was not ingested before the time of death, particularly among cases where ethanol was present in lower blood concentrations. Routine measurement of EtG and EtS should therefore be recommended, especially in cases with BAC below 1 g/kg.

  20. Chronic nicotine and ethanol exposure both disrupt central ventilatory responses to hypoxia in bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara E; Brundage, Cord M; McLane, Lisa H

    2013-07-01

    The central hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) comprises a reduction in ventilatory activity that follows a peripherally mediated ventilatory augmentation. Chronic early developmental exposure to nicotine or ethanol are both known to impair the peripherally mediated HVR, and nicotine impairs the central HVR, but the effect of ethanol on the central HVR has not been investigated. Additionally, chronic nicotine and ethanol exposure are known to impair ventilatory responses to hypercapnia in bullfrog tadpoles but HVRs have not been tested. Here early and late metamorphic tadpoles were exposed to either 30 μg/L nicotine or 0.15-0.05 g/dL ethanol for 10 wk. Tadpole brainstems were then isolated and the neurocorrelates of ventilation were monitored in vitro over 180 min of hypoxia (PO2=5.05±1.04 kPa). Both nicotine and ethanol exposure disrupted central HVRs. Nicotine impairments were dependent on development. Central HVRs were impaired only in early metamorphic nicotine-exposed tadpoles. Both early and late metamorphic ethanol-exposed tadpoles failed to exhibit central HVRs. Thus, central HVRs are impaired following both nicotine and ethanol exposure. Such failure to decrease ventilatory activity during hypoxia indicates that central hypoxic ventilatory depression is an active suppression of neural activity in response to hypoxia rather than a metabolic consequence of O2 limitation, and that exposure to ethanol (across development) or nicotine (during early development) disrupts mechanisms that normally induce active ventilatory depression.

  1. Pebble ingestion: an unusual form of geophagia.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W D; Crabtree, J B

    1977-07-01

    Reported is a case representing an unusual form of geophagia, in which ingestion of pebbles by a 27-year-old mentally retarded woman resulted in impaction and complete filling of the colon with pebbles. Conservative therapy was successful in clearing the stones by the sixth day of treatment; however, a follow-up visit approximately six weeks later revealed that the patient was again ingesting pebbles.

  2. Prolonged psychosis after Amanita muscaria ingestion.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Miran; Mozina, Martin; Bunc, Matjaz

    2006-05-01

    Amanita muscaria has a bright red or orange cap covered with small white plaques. It contains the isoxazole derivatives ibotenic acid, muscimol and muscazone and other toxins such as muscarine. The duration of clinical manifestations after A. muscaria ingestion does not usually exceed 24 hours; we report on a 5-day paranoid psychosis after A. muscaria ingestion. A 48-year-old man, with no previous medical history, gathered and ate mushrooms he presumed to be A. caesarea. Half an hour later he started to vomit and fell asleep. He was found comatose having a seizure-like episode. On admission four hours after ingestion he was comatose, but the remaining physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable. Creatine kinase was 8.33 microkat/l. Other laboratory results and brain CT scan were normal. Toxicology analysis did not find any drugs in his blood or urine. The mycologist identified A. muscaria among the remaining mushrooms. The patient was given activated charcoal. Ten hours after ingestion, he awoke and was completely orientated; 18 hours after ingestion his condition deteriorated again and he became confused and uncooperative. Afterwards paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations appeared and persisted for five days. On the sixth day all symptoms of psychosis gradually disappeared. One year later he is not undergoing any therapy and has no symptoms of psychiatric disease. We conclude that paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations can appear 18 hours after ingestion of A. muscaria and can last for up to five days.

  3. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  4. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Dalal, Rajen

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  5. Chronic ethanol feeding to rats decreases adiponectin secretion by subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaocong; Sebastian, Becky M; Nagy, Laura E

    2007-02-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding to mice and rats decreases serum adiponectin concentration and adiponectin treatment attenuates chronic ethanol-induced liver injury. Although it is clear that lowered adiponectin has pathophysiological importance, the mechanisms by which chronic ethanol decreases adiponectin are not known. Here, we have investigated the impact of chronic ethanol feeding on adiponectin expression and secretion by adipose tissue. Rats were fed a 36% Lieber-DeCarli ethanol-containing liquid diet or pair-fed control diet for 4 wk. Chronic ethanol feeding decreased adiponectin mRNA but had no effect on adiponectin protein in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Chronic ethanol feeding also reduced adiponectin secretion by isolated subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipocytes despite the maintenance of equivalent intracellular concentrations of adiponectin between subcutaneous adipocytes from ethanol- and pair-fed rats. Treatment with brefeldin A suppressed adiponectin secretion by subcutaneous adipocytes from pair-fed rats but had little effect after ethanol feeding. In subcutaneous adipocytes from pair-fed rats, adiponectin was enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi relative to plasma membrane; however, after chronic ethanol feeding, adiponectin was equally distributed between plasma membrane and ER/Golgi fractions. In conclusion, chronic ethanol feeding impaired adiponectin secretion by subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipocytes; impaired secretion likely contributes to decreased adiponectin concentrations after chronic ethanol feeding.

  6. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  7. [Plasma clearance of ethanol and its excretion in the milk of rural women who consume pulque].

    PubMed

    Argote-Espinosa, R M; Flores-Huerta, S; Hernández-Montes, H; Villalpando-Hernández, S

    1992-01-01

    Women from rural areas of the central plateau of Mexico drink during pregnancy and lactation a mild alcoholic beverage called pulque as a galactogogue. Ethanol present in milk could have a harmful effect on growth and development of breast-fed children. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ethanol consumed as pulque by eleven lactating rural women as well as its clearance rate in blood and milk. Mothers were separated in two groups depending upon the ethanol ingested in a single dose of pulque 0.21 +/- 0.08 g/kg of body weight (group A) and 0.44 +/- 0.11 g/kg (group B). Maximal concentration of ethanol was reached in milk at 60 minutes and almost equaled that in plasma. Both groups showed a similar clearance pattern regardless of the volume of pulque ingested. Clearance rates between groups were different: ethanol concentration in milk at 60 min were 8.4 +/- 3.0 mg/dL for group A and 26.2 +/- 7.0 mg/dL for group B. Two hours later ethanol levels were 3.6 +/- 3.4 mg/dL and 23.3 +/- 9.4 mg/dL respectively. Clearance rates were slower in mothers showing the highest concentration of ethanol in milk. The present data demonstrate that there is no differential elimination of ethanol in maternal blood and milk following ingestion of a moderate amount of pulque during lactation. The amount of ethanol received by infants through milk is relatively low and therefore it is unlikely to have harmful effects on them. Pulque consumption adds about 350 kcal/day to the customary dietary intake of these lactating women.

  8. Estimates of soil ingestion by wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Connor, E.E.; Gerould, S.

    1994-01-01

    Many wildlife species ingest soil while feeding, but ingestion rates are known for only a few species. Knowing ingestion rates may be important for studies of environmental contaminants. Wildlife may ingest soil deliberately, or incidentally, when they ingest soil-laden forage or animals that contain soil. We fed white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) diets containing 0-15% soil to relate the dietary soil content to the acid-insoluble ash content of scat collected from the mice. The relation was described by an equation that required estimates of the percent acid-insoluble ash content of the diet, digestibility of the diet, and mineral content of soil. We collected scat from 28 wildlife species by capturing animals, searching appropriate habitats for scat, or removing material from the intestines of animals collected for other purposes. We measured the acid-insoluble ash content of the scat and estimated the soil content of the diets by using the soil-ingestion equation. Soil ingestion estimates should be considered only approximate because they depend on estimated rather than measured digestibility values and because animals collected from local populations at one time of the year may not represent the species as a whole. Sandpipers (Calidris spp.), which probe or peck for invertebrates in mud or shallow water, consumed sediments at a rate of 7-30% of their diets. Nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus, soil = 17% of diet), American woodcock (Scolopax minor, 10%), and raccoon (Procyon lotor, 9%) had high rates of soil ingestion, presumably because they ate soil organisms. Bison (Bison bison, 7%), black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus, 8%), and Canada geese (Branta canadensis, 8%) consumed soil at the highest rates among the herbivores studied, and various browsers studied consumed little soil. Box turtle (Terrapene carolina, 4%), opossum (Didelphis virginiana, 5%), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, 3%), and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo, 9%) consumed soil

  9. The effect of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure on spatial memory in adolescent rats: the dissociation of metabolic and cognitive tolerances.

    PubMed

    Van Skike, Candice E; Novier, Adelle; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2012-05-09

    Using a rapid chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure paradigm, we demonstrate the dissociability of metabolic tolerance from cognitive tolerance in adolescent rats. Adolescent rats were trained to spatially navigate in the Morris Water Maze and then exposed to CIE vapor or air 16 h a day for 4 days. After a final 28 h withdrawal, all rats received a saline or ethanol challenge, followed by a test of spatial memory 30 min after administration. Results indicate that CIE vapor exposure did not significantly impair adolescent spatial memory. Although CIE-exposed rats developed metabolic tolerance to a subsequent ethanol administration, CIE exposure did not alter dose-dependent ethanol-induced spatial memory impairments. These data indicate that metabolic ethanol tolerance can be distinguished from cognitive ethanol tolerance during adolescence and suggest that blood alcohol levels alone do not fully explain ethanol-induced spatial memory impairments.

  10. Ethanol as a cause of hypersensitivity reactions to alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, I; Hipler, U-C; Zuberbier, T; Worm, M

    2002-08-01

    Adverse reactions after ingestion of alcoholic beverages are common. Metabolic differences in individuals and also the histamine content in alcoholic beverages have been implicated. By contrast pure ethanol has rarely been reported as a cause of hypersensitivity reactions and its mechanism has not been clarified yet. To determine whether ethanol itself accounts for alcohol hypersensitivity in patients with anaphylactic reactions after alcohol intake. In search of possible pathomechanisms all patients were analysed by skin prick testing and sulfidoleukotriene production of peripheral leucocytes using ethanol and its metabolites. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges with a cumulated amount of 30 mL ethanol were performed in 12 adult patients with a positive history of adverse reactions after consumption of different alcoholic beverages. Skin prick tests and measurement of sulfidoleukotriene production were performed using different concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde from 50 to 1000 mm. Oral challenges with pure ethanol were positive in six out of eleven patients. All challenge-positive patients, but also four out of five challenge-negative patients, showed an increased sulfidoleukotriene production in-vitro compared with healthy controls. Skin prick tests using alcoholic beverages, ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid were negative in all patients (12/12). Our study shows that ethanol itself is a common causative factor in hypersensitivity reactions to alcoholic beverages. These reactions occur dose-dependent and a non-IgE-mediated pathomechanism is likely, because skin prick tests were negative in all cases. Increased sulfidoleukotriene production was determined in some patients, but is no reliable predictor. Therefore oral provocation tests remain indispensable in making the diagnosis of ethanol hypersensitivity.

  11. Lipid metabolism of orchiectomised rats was affected by fructose ingestion and the amount of ingested fructose.

    PubMed

    Makino, Satoru; Kishida, Taro; Ebihara, Kiyoshi

    2012-03-01

    We examined whether lipid metabolism in orchiectomised (ORX) rats was affected by fructose ingestion and the amount of ingested fructose. Sucrose was used as a fructose source. Sham-operated and ORX rats were fed one of the following three diets for 28 d: a maize starch-based diet without sucrose (SU0), a diet by which half or all of maize starch was replaced by sucrose (SU50 or SU100). Body-weight gain and food intake were increased by sucrose ingestion, but decreased by ORX. Plasma total cholesterol concentration was increased by ORX and dose-dependently by sucrose ingestion. Plasma TAG concentration was decreased by ORX, but was increased dose-dependently by sucrose ingestion. Plasma insulin concentration was decreased by ORX, but was not affected by sucrose ingestion. Liver TAG was increased by sucrose ingestion and ORX; however, liver cholesterol concentration was not affected by sucrose ingestion and ORX. The hepatic activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase 1 was not affected by sucrose ingestion and ORX; however, faecal excretion of bile acids was decreased. The mRNA level of microsomal TAG transfer protein, which is the gene related to hepatic VLDL production, was increased by ORX and sucrose ingestion. The mRNA level of uncoupling protein-1 was decreased by ORX, but not by sucrose ingestion. Plasma insulin concentration tended to correlate with the level of sterol-regulatory element-binding protein-1c mRNA (r 0·747, P = 0·088). These results show that lipid metabolism in ORX rats would be affected by the consumption of fructose-rich sweeteners such as sucrose and high-fructose syrup.

  12. Autophagy and ethanol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Terrence M Donohue

    2009-01-01

    The majority of ethanol metabolism occurs in the liver. Consequently, this organ sustains the greatest damage from ethanol abuse. Ethanol consumption disturbs the delicate balance of protein homeostasis in the liver, causing intracellular protein accumulation due to a disruption of hepatic protein catabolism. Evidence indicates that ethanol or its metabolism impairs trafficking events in the liver, including the process of macroautophagy, which is the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic constituents by the lysosomal system. Autophagy is an essential, ongoing cellular process that is highly regulated by nutrients, endocrine factors and signaling pathways. A great number of the genes and gene products that govern the autophagic response have been characterized and the major metabolic and signaling pathways that activate or suppress autophagy have been identified. This review describes the process of autophagy, its regulation and the possible mechanisms by which ethanol disrupts the process of autophagic degradation. The implications of autophagic suppression are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:19291817

  13. 21 CFR 880.6305 - Ingestible event marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ingestible event marker. 880.6305 Section 880.6305... Devices § 880.6305 Ingestible event marker. (a) Identification. An ingestible event marker is a prescription device used to record time-stamped, patient-logged events. The ingestible component...

  14. Effect of intragastric infusions of ethanol and wine on serum gastrin concentration and gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W L; Barnett, C; Walsh, J H

    1986-12-01

    The effects of ethanol and wine on serum gastrin concentration and gastric acid secretion were evaluated in 13 normal volunteers. Solutions studied were pure ethanol (5%, 12%, and 36%), red wine, and white wine. Each solution contained 28 g of ethanol and each was administered as a slow, steady intragastric infusion to simulate normal ingestion of beverages. When compared to saline (control), none of the pure ethanol solutions increased serum gastrin concentration or gastric acid secretion significantly. In contrast, red and white wine (12% ethanol vol/vol) were potent stimulants of gastrin release and acid secretion when compared either to saline or pure 12% ethanol. Mean (+/- SEM) peak serum gastrin increases with 300 ml of red wine, white wine, saline, and pure 12% ethanol were 253 +/- 125, 182 +/- 91, 13 +/- 2, and 11 +/- 3 pg/ml, respectively (p less than 0.05 for red and white wine versus saline or 12% ethanol), and the mean peak acid outputs were 28.6 +/- 2.8, 27.9 +/- 1.9, 9.3 +/- 2.0, and 11.9 +/- 1.3 mmol/h, respectively (p less than 0.05 for red and white wine versus saline or 12% ethanol). We conclude that red and white wine stimulate gastric acid secretion, probably by enhanced release of gastrin, and that this effect is not due to the ethanol content of wine.

  15. Chronic ethanol feeding alters hepatocyte memory which is not altered by acute feeding.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, F; Oliva, Joan; Dedes, Jennifer; Li, Jun; French, Barbara A; French, Samuel W

    2009-04-01

    Gene expression changes in the liver after acute binge drinking may differ from the changes seen in chronic ethanol feeding in the rat. The changes in gene expression after chronic ethanol feeding may sensitize the liver to alcohol-induced liver damage, which is not seen after acute binge drinking. To test this hypothesis, gene microarray analysis was performed on the livers of rats (n = 3) fed an acute binge dose of ethanol (6 g/kg body wt) and killed at 3 and 12 hours after ethanol by gavage. The gene microarrays were compared with those made on the liver of rats from a previous study, in which the rats were fed ethanol by intragastric tube for 1 month (36% of calories derived from ethanol). Microarray analysis data varied between the acute and chronic models in several important respects. Growth factors increased mainly in the chronic alcohol fed rat. Changes in enzymes involved in oxidative stress were noted only with chronic ethanol feeding. Gene expression of fat metabolism was increased only with chronic ethanol feeding. Most importantly, epigenetic related enzymes and acetylation and methylation of histones changed only after chronic ethanol feeding. The results support the concept that chronic ethanol ingestion induces altered gene expression as a result of changes in epigenetic mechanisms, where acetylation and methylation of histones were altered.

  16. Effect of acute ethanol and acute allopregnanolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Vivien S; Van Skike, Candice E; Berry, Raymond B; Kirk, Roger E; Diaz-Granados, Jamie; Matthews, Douglas B

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ethanol differ in adolescent and adult rats on a number of measures. The evidence of the effects of ethanol on spatial memory in adolescents and adults is equivocal. Whether adolescents are more or less sensitive to ethanol-induced impairment of spatial memory acquisition remains unclear; with regard to the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory retrieval there is almost no research looking into any age difference. Thus, we examined the effects of acute ethanol on spatial memory in the Morris Watermaze in adolescents and adults. Allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a modulator of the GABA(A) receptor and has similar behavioral effects as ethanol. We sought to also determine the effects of allopreganolone on spatial memory in adolescent and adults. Male adolescent (post natal [PN]28-30) and adult (PN70-72) rats were trained in the Morris Watermaze for 6 days and acute doses of ethanol (saline, 1.5 and 2.0 g/kg) or ALLO (vehicle, 9 and 18 mg/kg) were administered on Day 7. A probe trial followed on Day 8. As expected, there were dose effects; higher doses of both ethanol and ALLO impaired spatial memory. However, in both the ethanol and ALLO conditions adolescents and adults had similar spatial memory impairments. The current results suggest that ethanol and ALLO both impair hippocampal-dependent spatial memory regardless of age in that once learning has occurred, ethanol or ALLO does not differentially impair the retrieval of spatial memory in adolescents and adults. Given the mixed results on the effect of ethanol on cognition in adolescent rats, additional research is needed to ascertain the factors critical for the reported differential results.

  17. Ethanol tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ingram, L O

    1990-01-01

    The adverse effects of ethanol on bacterial growth, viability, and metabolism are caused primarily by ethanol-induced leakage of the plasma membrane. This increase in membrane leakage is consistent with known biophysical properties of membranes and ethanolic solutions. The primary actions of ethanol result from colligative effects of the high molar concentrations rather than from specific interactions with receptors. The ethanol tolerance of growth in different microorganisms appears to result in large part from adaptive and evolutionary changes in cell membrane composition. Different cellular activities vary in their tolerance to ethanol. Therefore, it is essential that the aspect of cellular function under study be specifically defined and that comparisons of ethanol tolerance among systems share this common definition. Growth is typically one of the most sensitive cellular activities to inhibition by ethanol, followed by survival, or loss of reproductive ability. Glycolysis is the most resistant of these three activities. Since glycolysis is an exergonic process, a cell need not be able to grow or remain viable for glycolysis to occur.

  18. Cardiovascular effects of yellow oleander ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bose, T K; Basu, R K; Biswas, B; De, J N; Majumdar, B C; Datta, S

    1999-10-01

    Yellow oleander (Thevetia neriifolia) is a commonly grown tree found widely in Eastern India. The seeds of yellow oleander are highly poisonous and contain three glycosides--thevetin, thevetoxin and peruvoside. Yellow oleander seed ingestion is usually with suicidal intent in Eastern India. Manifestations range from mild to potentially fatal. It has significant cardiovascular effects with varying rhythm abnormalities. Effects of yellow oleander seed ingestion (YOI) were studied in 300 patients from 1986 to 1990 at BS Medical College, Bankura. Majority i.e., 246 (82%) were females and 226 (75.33%) were young in the age group 11-20 years. Most reported for treatment 6 to 8 hours after ingestion of seeds. The number of seeds swallowed varied from half to fifteen. Two hundred and ninety-two (97.33%) ingested seeds in the crushed form; 156 (52%) were asymptomatic, 92 (30.66%) had vomiting and 36 (12%) had palpitation. In electrocardiogram (ECG), 138 (46%) revealed varying types of arrhythmias including sinus bradycardia in 68 cases (49.27%). Ischaemic changes were present in 118 cases (39.33%). Number of seeds ingested did not bear any relationship with ECG changes in YOI. All 14 cases of death were autopsied. Subendocardial and perivascular haemorrhage with focal myocardial oedema was present in all. Median hospital stay was 5 days (range 2 to 24). During discharge, 256 (85.33%) had normal ECG, 14 (4.66%) had sinus bradycardia and 16 (5.33%) demonstrated ischaemic changes.

  19. SOIL INGESTION COLLOQUIUM (2005) | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On May 24-25, 2005, the U.S. EPA Colloquium on Soil/Dust Ingestion Rates and Mouthing Behavior for Children and Adults (Colloquium) was held at the Holiday Inn National Airport in Crystal City, Virginia. The purpose of the Colloquium was to convene an expert panel to assess the state of knowledge on soil/dust ingestion research for children and adults. Because mouthing behavior is closely related to childrens soil and dust ingestion, mouthing behavior research also was included as a major topic. The Colloquium was designed to assist EPA in answering the following questions:What is the state of knowledge on soil/dust ingestion and mouthing behavior?Where should the state of knowledge be in order for EPA to make better decisions for the protection of children and adults from these pathways?How can EPA and the scientific community advance the science (i.e., what research is needed)?This summary report captures the major content of the presentations, breakout groups, and discussions/recommendations that occurred at the Colloquium. Presentation slides, organized sequentially by the order of presentation, the Colloquium agenda, and contact information of all the participants are included in this report as Appendices A, B, and C, respectively. The purpose of the Colloquium was to convene an expert panel to assess the state of knowledge on soil/dust ingestion research for children and adults.

  20. Toxicological significance of soil ingestion by wild and domestic animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Fries, George F.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Most wild and domestic animals ingest some soil or sediment, and some species may routinely, or under special circumstances, ingest considerable amounts. Ingested soil supplies nutrients, exposes animals to parasites and pathogens, and may play a role in developing immune systems.1 Soil ingestion is also sometimes the principal route of exposure to various environmental contaminants.2-7 Ingestion of soil and earthy material is defined as geophagy and may be either intentional or unintentional, occurring as an animal eats or grooms.

  1. Repetitive foreign body ingestion: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Sarah; Stagno, Susan J; Daly, Barb

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of persons who frequently present to the healthcare system following repetitive foreign body ingestion has been addressed in the psychiatric literature. However, there has been little exploration of the ethical considerations regarding the treatment of these patients. The complexity of their medical and psychiatric presentation raises fundamental ethical questions regarding the duty to treat, patient autonomy, justice, and futility. Careful ethical analysis is particularly important in this context, since the frustration that medical professionals may feel in response may lead to false assumptions that can negatively impact patient care. A careful exploration of these questions can increase awareness and understanding, which in turn can lead to improved treatment of patients who repetitively ingest foreign bodies. Care for patients who inflict self-harm, particularly by repetitive foreign body ingestion, is not futile. The patients have a right to treatment and are entitled to resources. Efforts should be made to provide a more comprehensive treatment approach to these patients.

  2. Metabolism of ingested uranium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, M.D.; Durbin, P.W.; Howard, B.; Lipsztein, J.; Rundo, J.; Still, E.T.; Willis, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Metabolic models for U and Ra are described to estimate the risks to human health from ingesting these elements in drinking water. Chemical toxicity, which is relevant to U in its natural, depleted or slightly enriched state, is addressed, as are the radiotoxicity and the radiobiological effects of the important alpha-emitting isotopes of Ra, including /sup 224/Ra, /sup 226/Ra, and /sup 228/Ra. This paper estimates the kinetics of skeletal U deposition, so that risk coefficients for bone cancer induction can be applied. Skeletal cancer is regarded as the major potential radiobiological effect of ingested alpha-emitting radioisotopes of Ra and the presumed radiobiological effect of U, if any. Best estimates of normal U metabolism are used, because even in extreme cases the amounts of U or Ra ingested in potable water are not great enough to chemically or radiobiologically modify their metabolic behavior.

  3. Towards automated ingestion detection: swallow sounds.

    PubMed

    Walker, William P; Bhatia, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and is a cause of many major chronic diseases. In most cases, obesity is a result of an imbalance between food intake and calories burned. Steps toward automated ingestion detection are being made. In order to automate the process of capturing ingestion, a method for detecting, analyzing, and recording sounds related to ingestion is being developed. In this paper, preliminary swallow sound analysis is presented and compared with various other noises captured from a throat mounted microphone. Initial frequency analysis indicates a stronger presence at high frequency intervals for swallow sounds in relation to other captured sounds such as voice. Comparisons show that a single high-pass filter can offer similar results as wavelet decomposition. Two simple methods for event detection are given.

  4. (-)-Hydroxycitrate ingestion and endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kiwon; Ryu, Sungpil; Suh, Heajung; Ishihara, Kengo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2005-02-01

    We have been interested in the ergogenic aid effects of food components and supplements for enhancing endurance exercise performance. For this purpose, acute or chronic (-)-hydroxycitrate (HCA) ingestion might be effective because it promotes utilization of fatty acid as an energy source. HCA is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme ATP: citrate lyase, thereby increasing inhibition of lipogenesis in the body. Many researchers have reported that less body fat accumulation and sustained satiety cause less food intake. After focusing on exercise performance with HCA ingestion, we came up with different results that show positive effects or not. However, our previously reported data showed increased use of fatty acids during moderate intensity exercise. For future research, HCA and co-ingestion of other supplements, such as carnitine or caffeine, might have greater effect on glycogen-sparing than HCA alone.

  5. Motor neurons controlling fluid ingestion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Andrea; Silies, Marion; Gohl, Daryl M; Scott, Kristin

    2012-04-17

    Rhythmic motor behaviors such as feeding are driven by neural networks that can be modulated by external stimuli and internal states. In Drosophila, ingestion is accomplished by a pump that draws fluid into the esophagus. Here we examine how pumping is regulated and characterize motor neurons innervating the pump. Frequency of pumping is not affected by sucrose concentration or hunger but is altered by fluid viscosity. Inactivating motor neurons disrupts pumping and ingestion, whereas activating them elicits arrhythmic pumping. These motor neurons respond to taste stimuli and show prolonged activity to palatable substances. This work describes an important component of the neural circuit for feeding in Drosophila and is a step toward understanding the rhythmic activity producing ingestion.

  6. Caustic ingestion-a forensic overview.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    The ingestion of corrosive substances may produce severe burns to the upper aerodigestive tract and stomach, particularly if the pH is greater than 12 or less than two. There is a biphasic age grouping with adult cases most often involving self-harm and pediatric cases accidental ingestion. Three cases are reported to demonstrate characteristic features following the ingestion of potassium hydroxide, glacial acetic acid and Lysol(®) , respectively. All deaths were due to the effects of caustic burns to the upper aerodigestive tract, esophagus and stomach with perforation and/or hemorrhage. The extent of injuries in these cases depends on the nature, amount, and concentration of the agent and on the exposure time. A point to note at autopsy is that tissue damage may also occur from postmortem exposure. Typical injuries involve perioral, limb, and trunk burns, with extensive aerodigestive liquefactive/coagulative necrosis causing hemorrhage and perforation.

  7. An ingestible sensor for measuring medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Hooman; Robertson, Timothy L; Moon, Greg D; Au-Yeung, Kit-Yee; Zdeblick, Mark J; Savage, George M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and performance of the first integrated-circuit microsensor developed for daily ingestion by patients. The ingestible sensor is a device that allows patients, families, and physicians to measure medication ingestion and adherence patterns in real time, relate pharmaceutical compliance to important physiologic metrics, and take appropriate action in response to a patient's adherence pattern and specific health metrics. The design and theory of operation of the device are presented, along with key in-vitro and in-vivo performance results. The chemical, toxicological, mechanical, and electrical safety tests performed to establish the device's safety profile are described in detail. Finally, aggregate results from multiple clinical trials involving 412 patients and 5656 days of system usage are presented to demonstrate the device's reliability and performance as part of an overall digital health feedback system.

  8. Acute Rhabdomyolysis Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Adedinsewo, Demilade A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Todd, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Context: Novel psychoactive substances, including synthetic cannabinoids, are becoming increasingly popular, with more patients being seen in the emergency room following acute ingestion. These substances have been associated with a wide range of adverse effects. However, identification of complications, clinical toxicity, and management remain challenging. Case Report: We present the case of a young African-American male who developed severe agitation and bizarre behavior following acute K2 ingestion. Laboratory studies revealed markedly elevated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) with normal renal function. The patient was managed with aggressive intravenous (IV) fluid hydration and treatment of underlying psychiatric illness. Conclusion: We recommend the routine evaluation of renal function and CPK levels with early initiation of IV hydration among patients who present to the emergency department following acute ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids to identify potential complications early as well as institute early supportive therapy. PMID:27500131

  9. Stridor after ingestion of dettol and domestos.

    PubMed

    Graham, Colin A

    2004-02-01

    Dettol (4.8% chloroxylenol, 9% pine oil and 12% isopropyl alcohol) has previously been reported to cause delayed upper airway obstruction when ingested, despite the product being labelled as non-poisonous. Domestos (1-5% sodium hypochlorite) is used as a household and toilet cleaner. This paper reports a rare case in which both agents were consumed together in significant quantities, and caused stridor and impending airway obstruction requiring endotracheal intubation in the emergency department. Patients who have ingested this combination of cleaning agents are at high risk of acute airway compromise, and should have expert upper airway evaluation and control as soon as possible after admission.

  10. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  11. [Near fatal attraction of ingested magnets].

    PubMed

    Munchak, Itamar; Yardeni, Dan; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Soudack-Ben Nun, Michalle; Augarten, Arie

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of intestinal perforation in a 20 month old girl following the ingestion of 2 small magnets. Ingestion of multiple magnets constitutes a unique problem. Magnets in adjacent intestinal loops may forcefully attract each other and produce pressure necrosis of the bowel wall, leading to perforation, fistula formation or intestinal obstruction. Therefore, these children should be observed carefully. Early surgical intervention should be considered when clinical symptoms develop, especially when, on sequential abdominal radiographs, there is no change in the magnets' location. Since toys with small magnets are ubiquitous, efforts should be made to increase parents' awareness on the one hand, and to alert toy manufacturers on the other hand.

  12. Anaphylaxis after accidental ingestion of kiwi fruit

    PubMed Central

    Różalska, Anna; Ukleja-Sokołowska, Natalia; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cases of anaphylaxis after ingestion of kiwi fruit, after the skin tests and during oral immunotherapy were described. The article describes the case of severe anaphylactic reaction that occurred in a 55-year-old patient after accidental ingestion of kiwi. Allergy to kiwi fruit was confirmed by a native test with fresh kiwi fruit. After the test, the patient experienced generalized organ response in the form of headache, general weakness and rashes on the neck and breast, and dyspnea. The patient had significantly elevated levels of total IgE and IgE specific to kiwi fruit. PMID:24278073

  13. Propylene Glycol Poisoning From Excess Whiskey Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Kevin; Sue, Gloria R.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of high anion gap metabolic acidosis with a significant osmolal gap attributed to the ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol. Recently, several reports have characterized severe lactic acidosis occurring in the setting of iatrogenic unintentional overdosing of medications that use propylene glycol as a diluent, including lorazepam and diazepam. To date, no studies have explored potential effects of excess propylene glycol in the setting of alcohol intoxication. Our patient endorsed drinking large volumes of cinnamon flavored whiskey, which was likely Fireball Cinnamon Whisky. To our knowledge, this is the first case of propylene glycol toxicity from an intentional ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol. PMID:26904700

  14. Systemic contact dermatitis from propolis ingestion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eujin; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2011-02-01

    Propolis, also known as bee glue, is a substance collected by worker bees and it is used as a material for constructing and maintaining their beehives. It has been used topically and orally by humans for its anti-inflammatory properties. However, the growing use of propolis has been paralleled by reports of allergic contact dermatitis as a reaction to the substance. Contact dermatitis with generalized cutaneous manifestations elicited by propolis ingestion has not been previously reported. Here we report on the first case of systemic contact dermatitis from propolis ingestion in a 36-year-old woman.

  15. Anaphylaxis after accidental ingestion of kiwi fruit.

    PubMed

    Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Różalska, Anna; Ukleja-Sokołowska, Natalia; Zbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2013-06-01

    Numerous cases of anaphylaxis after ingestion of kiwi fruit, after the skin tests and during oral immunotherapy were described. The article describes the case of severe anaphylactic reaction that occurred in a 55-year-old patient after accidental ingestion of kiwi. Allergy to kiwi fruit was confirmed by a native test with fresh kiwi fruit. After the test, the patient experienced generalized organ response in the form of headache, general weakness and rashes on the neck and breast, and dyspnea. The patient had significantly elevated levels of total IgE and IgE specific to kiwi fruit.

  16. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  17. GHB and Ethanol Effects and Interactions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Dung; Dyer, Jo Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L.; Haller, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a common drug of abuse that can produce serious toxicity, particularly when used with other sedatives. We examined the individual and combined effects of GHB and ethanol in human volunteers. Methods Sixteen healthy adults (7 men) were given 50 mg/kg GHB (Xyrem), 0.6 g/kg ethanol in 2 doses, alone and combined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Plasma concentrations, heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and oxygen saturation (O2sat) were serially monitored for 24 hours. Results Adverse events included 2 instances of hypotension and 6 episodes of vomiting with GHB-plus-ethanol ingestion. Oxygen saturation was decreased by GHB and ethanol individually, and maximally decreased by the drugs combined (max −2.1% ± 0.3%, P < 0.0001 vs placebo). Compared with baseline, systolic and diastolic BP were significantly decreased, and HR was increased by ethanol but not affected by GHB alone (maximum systolic BP change −15.7 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P = 0.0006; maximum HR change 13.5 ± 2.3 beats per minute, P = 0.006). Ethanol coingestion resulted in 16% higher GHB maximal plasma concentration and 29% longer elimination half-life, indicating possible enhanced bioavailability or reduced clearance of GHB caused by ethanol, however, these effects were not statistically significant. Conclusions Modest doses of GHB do not affect hemodynamic function, but O2sat was decreased. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate-plus-ethanol resulted in more adverse effects, including gastrointestinal disturbances, hypotension, and decreased O2sat, but only minimal pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. PMID:16974199

  18. Comparison of urinary excretion characteristics of ethanol and ethyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Helen; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Helander, Anders

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the urinary excretion characteristics of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) with that of ethanol, with focus on the effect of water-induced diuresis. Six healthy volunteers ingested an ethanol dose of 0.5 g/kg (range 25.0-41.5 g) as 5% (v/v) beer in 30 min and the same volume of water after 3 h. Urine collections were made before starting the experiment and at timed intervals over 31.5 h. The concentration of EtG was determined by an LC-MS method (LOQ = 0.1 mg/L). The urine samples collected immediately before starting drinking were all negative for ethanol and EtG, thus confirming that the participants had not recently ingested alcohol. Intake of beer resulted in a marked increase in excreted urine volume and a concomitant drop in creatinine concentration. The concentration of ethanol peaked at a mean value of 17 mmol/L in the 1.5-h urine collection. Except for one subject, EtG was first detectable (range 0.9-5.5 mg/L) at 1 h. Intake of water at 3 h produced another increase in urine volume and a drop in creatinine. The ethanol concentration curve was not influenced by the water diuresis, whereas this caused a distinct drop in the EtG concentration. When EtG was expressed relative to the creatinine value, this ratio was seemingly not affected by the intake of water. The ethanol concentration returned to zero at 6.5 h, whereas EtG was still detectable for up to 22.5-31.5 h, albeit at low levels in the end (< 1 mg/l). Only about 0.02% of the administered dose of ethanol (on a molar basis) was recovered in the urine as EtG. The results demonstrated that EtG remains detectable in the urine for many hours after the ethanol itself has been eliminated. Moreover, it was possible to lower the concentration of EtG by drinking large amounts of water prior to voiding, whereas this strategy did not influence the EtG/creatinine ratio or the concentration of ethanol.

  19. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  20. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level.

  1. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  2. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body*

    PubMed Central

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F. S.; de Castro, Francisco Gomes; Miller, Wagner Peitl; de Lima, Raphael Rodrigues; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. PMID:27818542

  3. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.76 Bird ingestion. (a... engine shall be limited to aircraft installations in which it is shown that a bird cannot strike the...

  4. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.76 Bird ingestion. (a... engine shall be limited to aircraft installations in which it is shown that a bird cannot strike the...

  5. Measuring water ingestion from spray exposures.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Martha; Roddick, Felicity; Nguyen, Thang; O'Toole, Joanne; Leder, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Characterisation of exposure levels is an essential requirement of health risk assessment; however for water exposures other than drinking, few quantitative exposure data exist. Thus, regulatory agencies must use estimates to formulate policy on treatment requirements for non-potable recycled water. We adapted the use of the swimming pool chemical cyanuric acid as a tracer of recreational water ingestion to permit detection of small water volumes inadvertently ingested from spray exposures. By using solutions of 700-1000 mg/L cyanuric acid in an experimental spray exposure scenario, we were able to quantify inadvertent water ingestion in almost 70% of participants undertaking a 10 min car wash activity using a high pressure spray device. Skin absorption was demonstrated to be negligible under the experimental conditions, and the measured ingestion volumes ranged from 0.06 to 3.79 mL. This method could be applied to a range of non-potable water use activities to generate exposure data for risk assessment processes. The availability of such empirical measurements will provide greater assurance to regulatory agencies and industry that potential health risks from exposure to non-potable water supplies are well understood and adequately managed to protect public health.

  6. Atypical Presentation of Multiple Foreign Body Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Sultan; Ayan, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is very common in childhood especially under 3 year of age. Pica syndrome is characterized by an appetite for substances that are largely non-nutritive. We present a 3-year old girl who presented to ER with symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction. PMID:28164004

  7. Duodenocolic fistula due to safety pin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Cay, Ali; Imamoğlu, Mustafa; Sarihan, Haluk; Sayil, Ozgür

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 16-month-old boy with benign duodenocolic fistula due to safety pin ingestion who presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. Etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature is reviewed. Early diagnosis and surgical management are necessary to avoid serious morbidity.

  8. Intestinal obstruction due to ingested Vaseline.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, D W; Buick, R G

    1987-01-01

    A case of intestinal obstruction due to ingested Vaseline (white soft paraffin) is described. While intestinal obstruction due to bezoars and impacted foodstuffs is uncommon, though well recognised, we know of no previous reports of obstruction caused by semisolid mineral matter. Images Figure PMID:3688922

  9. Survival of Chlorophyceae Ingested by Saprozoic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Leake, P. A.; Jensen, H. J.

    1970-01-01

    The saprozoic nematode, Pristionchus lheritieri ingested cells of four species of unicellular Chlorophyceae (grass-green algae) including Chlamydomonas reinhardi and unidentified species of Ankistrodesmus, Chlamydornonas and Scenedesmus. Additional tests with Ankistrodesmus sp. and Chlamydomonas sp., indicated cells of Ankistrodesmus survived passage through the alimentary canal and were subsequently cultured, while viable cells of Chlarnydomonas were only occasionally recovered. PMID:19322324

  10. Odorous urine following asparagus ingestion in man.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S C; Waring, R H; Land, D; Thorpe, W V

    1987-04-15

    The production of odorous urine after the ingestion of asparagus has been shown to occur in 43% of 800 volunteers investigated. This characteristic is reproducible over a 12-month-period and has been shown to remain with individuals for virtually a lifetime. Family studies suggest that the ability to produce the odorous urine is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

  11. Sucrose ingestion induces rapid AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Tukey, David S; Ferreira, Jainne M; Antoine, Shannon O; D'amour, James A; Ninan, Ipe; Cabeza de Vaca, Soledad; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K; Hartner, Diana T; Guarini, Carlo B; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S; Mahajan, Shahana S; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C; Carr, Kenneth D; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-04-03

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPARs containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPARs. Electrophysiological, biochemical, and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 d) induced a stable (>24 h) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 h) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7 d protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a noncaloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multistep GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose.

  12. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... rotorcraft flight operations for engines to be installed on rotorcraft. (2) Power lever movement is not... following test schedule must be used: (i) Ingestion followed by 1 minute without power lever movement. (ii... shutdown. The durations specified are times at the defined conditions. Power lever movement between each...

  13. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rotorcraft flight operations for engines to be installed on rotorcraft. (2) Power lever movement is not... following test schedule must be used: (i) Ingestion followed by 1 minute without power lever movement. (ii... shutdown. The durations specified are times at the defined conditions. Power lever movement between each...

  14. "Drinking in the dark" (DID) procedures: a model of binge-like ethanol drinking in non-dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Todd E; Navarro, Montserrat

    2014-05-01

    This review provides an overview of an animal model of binge-like ethanol drinking that has come to be called "drinking in the dark" (DID), a procedure that promotes high levels of ethanol drinking and pharmacologically relevant blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) in ethanol-preferring strains of mice. Originally described by Rhodes, Best, Belknap, Finn, and Crabbe (2005), the most common variation of the DID procedure, using singly housed mice, involves replacing the water bottle with a bottle containing 20% ethanol for 2-4 h, beginning 3 h into the dark cycle. Using this procedure, high ethanol drinking strains of mice (e.g., C57BL/6J) typically consume enough ethanol to achieve BECs greater than 100 mg/dL and to exhibit behavioral evidence of intoxication. This limited access procedure takes advantage of the time in the animal's dark cycle in which the levels of ingestive behaviors are high, yet high ethanol intake does not appear to stem from caloric need. Mice have the choice of drinking or avoiding the ethanol solution, eliminating the stressful conditions that are inherent in other models of binge-like ethanol exposure in which ethanol is administered by the experimenter, and in some cases, potentially painful. The DID procedure is a high throughput approach that does not require extensive training or the inclusion of sweet compounds to motivate high levels of ethanol intake. The high throughput nature of the DID procedure makes it useful for rapid screening of pharmacological targets that are protective against binge-like drinking and for identifying strains of mice that exhibit binge-like drinking behavior. Additionally, the simplicity of DID procedures allows for easy integration into other paradigms, such as prenatal ethanol exposure and adolescent ethanol drinking. It is suggested that the DID model is a useful tool for studying the neurobiology and genetics underlying binge-like ethanol drinking, and may be useful for studying the transition to

  15. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (September 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD; Gaustad, KL

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  16. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into four sections: (1) news about ingests currently under development, (2) current production ingests, (3) future ingest development plans, and (4) information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  17. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; N N Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  18. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (November 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD: Gaustad, KL

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  19. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  20. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  1. Process for producing ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

    1993-07-27

    A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

  2. Biofuel Ethanol Transport Risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol production has increased rapidly over the last 10 years and many communities lack awareness of the increased and growing extent of biofuel transportation through their jurisdictions. These communities and their emergency responders may not have the information and resour...

  3. Biofuel Ethanol Transport Risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol production has increased rapidly over the last 10 years and many communities lack awareness of the increased and growing extent of biofuel transportation through their jurisdictions. These communities and their emergency responders may not have the information and resour...

  4. The influence of ethanol on feeding in the frugivorous yellow-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus xanthopygos).

    PubMed

    Mazeh, Shunit; Korine, Carmi; Pinshow, Berry; Dudley, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The sugars in fleshy fruits provide a rich source of energy to frugivorous animals. However, these carbohydrates also serve as a substrate for alcoholic fermentation by yeasts, ethanol being the main by-product of this process. Ethanol ingestion via frugivory thus occurs in a diverse assemblage of invertebrate and vertebrate taxa, including numerous species of birds. We tested the roles of ethanol as an odor cue for resource location by adult yellow-vented bulbuls (Pycnonotus xanthopygos) and as a possible appetite stimulant in feeding trials with artificial food. We hypothesized (1) that the odor of ethanol does not serve as a food-locating cue in diurnal frugivorous passerine birds, and predicted that the choice of food source and the mass of food eaten by such birds will not be influenced by the odor of ethanol. We further hypothesized (2) that food intake in passerine birds is affected by ingestion of ethanol according to its concentration [EtOH], and predicted that food intake will follow a bell-shaped curve in relation to [EtOH]. In accord with hypothesis (1) and its prediction, we found that the odor of ethanol did not affect food preferences, in either ethanol-naïve or ethanol-experienced yellow-vented bulbuls, when presented at concentrations found in naturally ripe fruit (0.0-1.0%); this suggests that the odor of ethanol is not a food-locating cue for the bulbuls. Hypothesis (2) was partially supported, namely at low [EtOH] (0-3%), food intake was constant and at high [EtOH] (3%) food intake decreased, following only the right half of the predicted bell-shaped response. Ethanol-naïve birds showed no preference towards any [EtOH] presented in two-way choice trials. However, daily food intake in ethanol-experienced bulbuls in single option trials decreased by an average of 36% when the artificial food contained the highest tested concentration of ethanol (3.0%). We suggest that decreasing food intake when food ethanol concentration is relatively high may

  5. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Wood, Brent E.

    2001-01-01

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  6. The Combined Effects of Ethanol and Amphetamine Sulfate on Performance of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lolita; Taylor, Jack D.; Nash, Charles W.; Cameron, Donald F.

    1966-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and amphetamine on the performance of selected tests were evaluated. No differences were shown between the effects of ethanol-amphetamine and ethanol-lactose on the performance of balance, skipping, Minnesota manipulation, Purdue peg board, Maudsley Personality Inventory, pursuit rotor or digit span tests; but ethanol plus amphetamine produced less impairment of performance of coding, mental addition, and trail making tests than did ethanol plus a placebo. Ethanol increased the errors in performance of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but the simultaneous administration of amphetamine did not reduce this effect. Conversely, amphetamine reduced the test-retest reliability of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but alcohol appeared to counteract this effect of amphetamine. These experiments indicate that, when ethanol and amphetamine are used together, each drug modifies some of the effects produced by the other in a manner that cannot be predicted on the assumption that a depressant versus stimulant competition is operative. PMID:5324976

  7. Adapting to alcohol: Dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) ethanol consumption, sensitivity, and hoard fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lupfer, Gwen; Murphy, Eric S; Merculieff, Zoe; Radcliffe, Kori; Duddleston, Khrystyne N

    2015-06-01

    Ethanol consumption and sensitivity in many species are influenced by the frequency with which ethanol is encountered in their niches. In Experiment 1, dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) with ad libitum access to food and water consumed high amounts of unsweetened alcohol solutions. Their consumption of 15%, but not 30%, ethanol was reduced when they were fed a high-fat diet; a high carbohydrate diet did not affect ethanol consumption. In Experiment 2, intraperitoneal injections of ethanol caused significant dose-related motor impairment. Much larger doses administered orally, however, had no effect. In Experiment 3, ryegrass seeds, a common food source for wild dwarf hamsters, supported ethanol fermentation. Results of these experiments suggest that dwarf hamsters may have adapted to consume foods in which ethanol production naturally occurs.

  8. Effects of caffeine and Bombesin on ethanol and food intake

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, M.A.; Kulkosky, P.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The methylxanthine caffeine and ethyl alcohol are widely used and powerful psychotropic drugs, but their interactions are not well understood. Bombesin is a brain-gut neuropeptide which is thought to function as a neurochemical factor in the inhibitory control of voluntary alcohol ingestion. We assessed the effects of combinations of intraperitoneal doses of caffeine and bombesin on 5% w/v ethanol solution and food intake in deprived rats. Deprived male and female Wistar rats received access to 5% ethanol or Purina chow for 30 minutes after i.p. injections. In single doses, CAF and BBS significantly decreased both ethanol and food consumption, at 50 mg/kg and 10 {mu}g/kg, respectively. CAF and BBS combinations produced infra-additive, or less-than-expected inhibitory effects on ethanol intake, but simple additive inhibitory effects on food intake. This experimental evidence suggests a reciprocal blocking of effects of CAF and BBS on ethanol intake but not food intake. Caffeine, when interacting and bombesin, increases alcohol consumption beyond expected values. Caffeine could affect the operation of endogenous satisfy signals for alcohol consumption.

  9. Delayed ethanol elimination and enhanced susceptibility to ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis after liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Hakucho, Ayako; Liu, Jinyao; Fujimiya, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis after liver resection and the mechanisms behind it. METHODS: First, the preliminary examination was performed on 6 sham-operated (Sham) and 30 partial hepatectomy (PH) male Wistar rats (8-wk-old) to evaluate the recovery of the liver weight and liver function after liver resection. PH rats were sacrificed at the indicated time points (4, 8, and 12 h; 1, 3, and 7 d) after PH. Second, the time point for the beginning of the chronic ethanol exposure (1 wk after sham- or PH-operation) was determined based on the results of the preliminary examination. Finally, pair-feeding was performed with a controlled diet or with a 5-g/dL ethanol liquid diet for 28 d in another 35 age-matched male Wistar rats with a one-week recovery after undergoing a sham- (n = 15) or PH-operation (n = 20) to evaluate the ethanol-induced liver injury after liver resection. Hepatic steatosis, liver function, fatty acid synthase (Fas) gene expression level, the expression of lipid metabolism-associated enzyme regulator genes [sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar)-α], the mediators that alter lipid metabolism [plasminogen activator (Pai)-1 gene expression level and tumor necrosis factor (Tnf)-α production], and hepatic class-1 alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1)-associated ethanol elimination were investigated in the 4 groups based on histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, Western blotting, reverse transcriptase chain reaction, and blood ethanol concentration analyses. The relevant gene expression levels, liver weight, and liver function were assessed before and 1 wk after surgery to determine the subject’s recovery from the liver resection using the rats that had been subjected to the preliminary examination. RESULTS: In the PH rats, ethanol induced marked hepatic steatosis with impaired liver functioning, as evidenced by the accumulation of fatty droplets within the

  10. Delayed ethanol elimination and enhanced susceptibility to ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis after liver resection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Hakucho, Ayako; Liu, Jinyao; Fujimiya, Tatsuya

    2014-12-28

    To investigate ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis after liver resection and the mechanisms behind it. First, the preliminary examination was performed on 6 sham-operated (Sham) and 30 partial hepatectomy (PH) male Wistar rats (8-wk-old) to evaluate the recovery of the liver weight and liver function after liver resection. PH rats were sacrificed at the indicated time points (4, 8, and 12 h; 1, 3, and 7 d) after PH. Second, the time point for the beginning of the chronic ethanol exposure (1 wk after sham- or PH-operation) was determined based on the results of the preliminary examination. Finally, pair-feeding was performed with a controlled diet or with a 5-g/dL ethanol liquid diet for 28 d in another 35 age-matched male Wistar rats with a one-week recovery after undergoing a sham- (n = 15) or PH-operation (n = 20) to evaluate the ethanol-induced liver injury after liver resection. Hepatic steatosis, liver function, fatty acid synthase (Fas) gene expression level, the expression of lipid metabolism-associated enzyme regulator genes [sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar)-α], the mediators that alter lipid metabolism [plasminogen activator (Pai)-1 gene expression level and tumor necrosis factor (Tnf)-α production], and hepatic class-1 alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1)-associated ethanol elimination were investigated in the 4 groups based on histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, Western blotting, reverse transcriptase chain reaction, and blood ethanol concentration analyses. The relevant gene expression levels, liver weight, and liver function were assessed before and 1 wk after surgery to determine the subject's recovery from the liver resection using the rats that had been subjected to the preliminary examination. In the PH rats, ethanol induced marked hepatic steatosis with impaired liver functioning, as evidenced by the accumulation of fatty droplets within the hepatocytes, the higher

  11. Comparative studies of oral administration of marine collagen peptides from Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Li, Qiong; Lin, Bing; Yu, Yongchao; Ding, Ye; Dai, Xiaoqian; Li, Yong

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral administration of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) pre- and post-acute ethanol intoxication in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. MCPs were orally administered to rats at doses of 0 g per kg bw, 2.25 g per kg bw, 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw, prior to or after the oral administration of ethanol. Thirty minutes after ethanol treatment, the effect of MCPs on motor incoordination and hypnosis induced by ethanol were investigated using a screen test, fixed speed rotarod test (5 g per kg bw ethanol) and loss of righting reflex (7 g per kg bw ethanol). In addition, the blood ethanol concentrations at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after ethanol administration (5 g per kg bw ethanol) were measured. The results of the screen test and fixed speed rotarod test suggested that treatment with MCPs at 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw prior to ethanol could attenuate ethanol-induced loss of motor coordination. Moreover, MCP administered both pre- and post-ethanol treatment had significant potency to alleviate the acute ethanol induced hypnotic states in the loss of righting reflex test. At 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ethanol ingestion at 5 g per kg bw, the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) of control rats significantly increased compared with that in the 4.5 g per kg bw and 9.0 g per kg bw MCP pre-treated groups. However, post-treatment with MCPs did not exert a significant inhibitory effect on the BEC of the post-treated groups until 120 minutes after ethanol administration. Therefore, the anti-inebriation effect of MCPs was verified in SD rats with the possible mechanisms related to inhibiting ethanol absorption and facilitating ethanol metabolism. Moreover, the efficiency was better when MCPs were administered prior to ethanol.

  12. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is there a need for protein ingestion during exercise?

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-05-01

    Dietary protein ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis rates, stimulates net muscle protein accretion, and facilitates the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Furthermore, recent studies show that protein ingestion before and during exercise also increases muscle protein synthesis rates during resistance- and endurance-type exercise. Therefore, protein ingestion before and during prolonged exercise may represent an effective dietary strategy to enhance the skeletal muscle adaptive response to each exercise session by extending the window of opportunity during which the muscle protein synthetic response is facilitated. Protein ingestion during exercise has also been suggested to improve performance capacity acutely. However, recent studies investigating the impact of protein ingestion during exercise on time trial performance, as opposed to time to exhaustion, do not report ergogenic benefits of protein ingestion. Therefore, it is concluded that protein ingestion with carbohydrate during exercise does not further improve exercise performance when compared with the ingestion of ample amounts of carbohydrate only.

  14. Foreign body ingestion in Turkish children.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, Sema; Arikan, Ciğdem; Cakir, Murat; Baran, Maşallah; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Saz, Ulaş Eylem; Arslan, Mehmet Tayyip

    2009-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion (FBI) is a common problem in the pediatric population. Even though morbidity and mortality due to foreign body ingestion are rare in childhood, they may cause serious anxiety in parents. We aimed to analyze the clinical presentation, etiology and management strategy of FBI in children in our country. Records of children admitting with a history of FBI over a three-year period were reviewed retrospectively. Data regarding gender, age, type of the ingested body, management strategy and outcome of the patients were recorded. Of 176 children, 98 (55.6%) were male. Mean age +/- SD of the patients was 3.75 +/- 4.25 years, and most of the patients were below four years of age (71.5%). Most of the children (64.7%) were seen within 48 hours, and most were asymptomatic. Blue beads attached to a safety pin (a cultural good luck charm) (38.6%), coins (27.8%) and turban pins (18.1%) were the most commonly observed foreign bodies. The blue beads/safety pin were found to be ingested primarily by infants, while ingestion of turban pins was mostly seen in adolescent girls who covered their heads. Localization of the foreign bodies was in the distal small intestine, stomach and esophagus in 61.4%, 23.8% and 14.7% of the cases, respectively. Sixty-nine endoscopic interventions were performed in 61 patients (34.6%), and these accounted for 7.3% of all endoscopic interventions during the three-year period. No major complication was observed during the procedure, and none of the patients underwent surgery. The frequently used accessory devices were retrieval net basket (57.9%), snare for pins (17.3%), tripod forceps and rat-tooth forceps. The blue beads/safety pin and turban pin were the commonly ingested foreign bodies in our center due to cultural factors. Education of the parents and of adolescent girls should greatly reduce the incidence of FBI. Endoscopic removal is safe without any major complications.

  15. Impaired placentation in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gundogan, F; Elwood, G; Longato, L; Tong, M; Feijoo, A; Carlson, R I; Wands, J R; de la Monte, S M

    2008-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is one of the key features of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), and IUGR can be mediated by impaired placentation. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) regulate placentation due to stimulatory effects on extravillous trophoblasts, which are highly motile and invasive. Previous studies demonstrated that extravillous trophoblasts express high levels of aspartyl-(asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase (AAH), a gene that is regulated by IGF and has a critical role in cell motility and invasion. The present study examines the hypothesis that ethanol impaired placentation is associated with inhibition of AAH expression in trophoblasts. Pregnant Long Evans rats were fed isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol by caloric content. Placentas harvested on gestation day 16 were used for histopathological, mRNA, and protein studies to examine AAH expression in relation to the integrity of placentation and ethanol exposure. Chronic ethanol feeding prevented or impaired the physiological conversion of uterine vessels required for expansion of maternal circulation into placenta, a crucial process for adequate placentation. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant reductions in IRS-1, IRS-2, and significant increases in IGF-II and IGF-II receptor mRNA levels in ethanol-exposed placentas. These abnormalities were associated with significantly reduced levels of AAH expression in trophoblastic cells, particularly within the mesometrial triangle (deep placental bed) as demonstrated by real time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemical staining. Ethanol-impaired placentation is associated with inhibition of AAH expression in trophoblasts. This effect of chronic gestational exposure to ethanol may contribute to IUGR in FAS.

  16. Effects of ethanol on food consumption and skin temperature in the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus).

    PubMed

    Korine, Carmi; Sánchez, Francisco; Pinshow, Berry

    2011-09-01

    Since mammalian frugivores generally choose to eat ripe fruit in which ethanol concentration ([EtOH]) increases as the fruit ripens, we asked whether ethanol acts as an appetitive stimulant in the Egyptian fruit bat, Rousettus aegyptiacus, and also studied the effects of ethanol on their skin temperature (T(s)). We hypothesized that the responses of fruit bats to dietary ethanol are concentration dependent and tested the predictions that the bats' response is positive, i.e., they eat more when [EtOH] in the food is in the range found in naturally ripe fruit, while it negatively affects them at higher concentrations. We also tested the prediction that in winter, even when availability of fruit is low and thermoregulatory costs are high, ingestion of ethanol by fruit bats is low because assimilated ethanol reduces shivering thermogenesis and peripheral vasodilation; these, alone or together, are detrimental to the maintenance of body temperature (T(b)). In summer, captive bats offered food containing 0.1% ethanol significantly increased consumption over food with no ethanol; they did not change consumption when food contained 0.01, 0.3, or 0.5% ethanol; but significantly decreased consumption at higher levels of ethanol [EtOH], i.e., 1 and 2%. In winter, captive bats ate significantly less when their food contained 0.1% ethanol than when it contained 0, 0.3, or 0.5%. During summer, freshly caught bats ate significantly more ethanol-containing food than freshly caught bats in winter. Skin temperature (T(s)) in Egyptian fruit bats decreased significantly at an ambient temperature (T(a)) of 12 °C (winter conditions) after gavage with liquid food containing 1% ethanol. The effect was clearly temperature-dependent, since ethanol did not have the same effect on bats gavaged with food containing 1% or no ethanol at a T(a) of 25 °C (summer conditions). In conclusion, ethanol may act as an appetitive stimulant for Egyptian fruit bats at low concentrations, but only in

  17. Orexin receptor 1 signaling contributes to ethanol binge-like drinking: Pharmacological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Francisca; Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Valor, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Leticia; Sanchez-Amate, Maria Del Carmen; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (OX) have been recently implicated in ethanol seeking and self-administration. A few recent studies have provided additional evidence that OX receptor antagonists effectively reduce voluntary ethanol consumption in subjects spontaneously showing high levels of ethanol intake. The present study further evaluates the contribution of OXR1 to excessive binge-like drinking of ethanol in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice from a pharmacological and molecular approach. The main findings in the study are: (1) Icv administration of SB-334867 (3 μg/μl) blunted ethanol (20% v/v), but not saccharin (0.15% w/v) binge-like drinking in a drinking in the dark procedure, without any alteration of chow consumption or total calories ingested; (2) Icv administration of SB-334867 (3 μg/μl) increased the latency to recover the righting reflex after a sedative dose of ethanol without any significant alteration in ethanol peripheral metabolism; (3) four repetitive, 2-h daily episodes of saccharin, but not ethanol binge-like drinking blunted OXR1 mRNA expression in the lateral hypothalamus. Present findings extend the current knowledge pointing to a role for OX signaling in ethanol sedation, which might partially explain the inhibitory effect of OXR1 antagonists on ethanol consumption. Combined pharmacological and molecular data suggesting the contribution of OXR1 in ethanol binge-drinking leading us to propose the idea that targeting OXR1 could represent a novel pharmacological approach to control binge-consumption episodes of ethanol in vulnerable organisms failing to spontaneously reduce OX activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge Blocks Ethanol-Induced Synaptic Dysfunction through Regulation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jin; Lee, Seungheon; Jung, Ji Wook; Lee, Young Choon; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of high doses of ethanol can lead to amnesia, which often manifests as a blackout. These blackouts experienced by ethanol consumers may be a major cause of the social problems associated with excess ethanol consumption. However, there is currently no established treatment for preventing these ethanol-induced blackouts. In this study, we tested the ethanol extract of the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) for its ability to mitigate ethanol-induced behavioral and synaptic deficits. To test behavioral deficits, an object recognition test was conducted in mouse. In this test, ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) impaired object recognition memory, but SM (200 mg/kg) prevented this impairment. To evaluate synaptic deficits, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the mouse hippocampal slices were tested, as they are known to be vulnerable to ethanol and are associated with ethanol-induced amnesia. SM (10 and 100 μg/ml) significantly ameliorated ethanol-induced long-term potentiation and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP deficits in the hippocampal slices. Therefore, these results suggest that SM prevents ethanol-induced amnesia by protecting the hippocampus from NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity deficits induced by ethanol. PMID:27257009

  19. Ethanol inhibits neuritogenesis induced by astrocyte muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, Marina; Moore, Nadia H; Giordano, Gennaro; VanDeMark, Kathryn L; Costa, Lucio G

    2010-09-01

    In utero alcohol exposure can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that ethanol alters neuronal development. We have recently shown that stimulation of M(3) muscarinic receptors in astrocytes increases the synthesis and release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, causing neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. As M(3) muscarinic receptor signaling in astroglial cells is strongly inhibited by ethanol, we hypothesized that ethanol may also inhibit neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons induced by carbachol-stimulated astrocytes. In the present study, we report that the effect of carbachol-stimulated astrocytes on hippocampal neuron neurite outgrowth was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner (25-100 mM) by ethanol. This effect was because of the inhibition of the release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Similar effects on neuritogenesis and on the release of astrocyte extracellular proteins were observed after the incubation of astrocytes with carbachol in the presence of 1-butanol, another short-chain alcohol, which like ethanol is a competitive substrate for phospholipase D, but not by tert-butanol, its analog that is not a substrate for this enzyme. This study identifies a potential novel mechanism involved in the developmental effects of ethanol mediated by the interaction of ethanol with cell signaling in astrocytes, leading to an impairment in neuron-astrocyte communication.

  20. Postnatal ethanol exposure disrupts signal detection in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Woolfrey, Kevin M; Hunt, Pamela S; Burk, Joshua A

    2005-01-01

    Human prenatal ethanol exposure that occurs during a period of increased synaptogenesis known as the "brain growth spurt" has been associated with significant impairments in attention, learning, and memory. The present experiment assessed whether administration of ethanol during the brain growth spurt in the rat, which occurs shortly after birth, disrupts attentional performance. Rats were administered 5.25 g/kg/day ethanol via intragastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, sham-intubation, or no intubation (naïve). Beginning at PD 90, animals were trained to asymptotic performance in a two-lever attention task that required discrimination of brief visual signals from trials with no signal presentation. Finally, manipulations of background noise and inter-trial interval duration were conducted. Early postnatal ethanol administration did not differentially affect acquisition of the attention task. However, after rats were trained to asymptotic performance levels, those previously exposed to ethanol demonstrated a deficit in detection of signals but not of non-signals compared to sham-intubated and naïve rats. The signal detection deficit persisted whenever these animals were re-trained in the standard task, but further task manipulations failed to interact with ethanol pretreatment. The present data support the hypothesis that early postnatal ethanol administration disrupts aspects of attentional processing in the rat.

  1. 14 CFR 33.77 - Foreign object ingestion-ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Foreign object ingestion-ice. 33.77 Section... object ingestion—ice. (a)-(b) (c) Ingestion of ice under the conditions of paragraph (e) of this section... by engine test under the following ingestion conditions: (1) Ice quantity will be the maximum...

  2. 14 CFR 33.77 - Foreign object ingestion-ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Foreign object ingestion-ice. 33.77 Section... object ingestion—ice. (a)-(b) (c) Ingestion of ice under the conditions of paragraph (e) of this section... by engine test under the following ingestion conditions: (1) Ice quantity will be the maximum...

  3. 14 CFR 33.77 - Foreign object ingestion-ice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign object ingestion-ice. 33.77 Section... object ingestion—ice. (a)-(b) (c) Ingestion of ice under the conditions of paragraph (e) of this section... by engine test under the following ingestion conditions: (1) Ice quantity will be the maximum...

  4. Button battery ingestion-case report and review.

    PubMed

    Kalyanshettar, Ss; Patil, Sv; Upadhye, Gaurav

    2014-09-01

    Over the last few years there is a rise in use of button batteries in various toys and other electronic gadgets. Easy availability and small size of these batteries pose a significant risk of ingestion in small children. Button battery ingestion can lead to serious health hazards very rapidly. A case of button battery ingestion is presented in this paper.

  5. Bird Ingestion into Large Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR 292 04/06/90 B767 CF6 80C2 SEMB FOR LID 268 05/ 23 /90 A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR TR 247 05/31/90 A300 JT9D 59A INVOLUNTARY POWER LOSS FOR...Documentation Pog 1, Report No." 2. Government Accession No. 3. Rec•p-ent’s Catolog No. DOT/FAA/CT-911/17 4. Taide and Subtitle 5 . Report Oat* May...i 2 ENGINES, AIRCRAFT, AND OPERATIONS 2 3 INGESTION EVENTS AND RATES 7 4 CHARACTERISTICS OF INGESTED BIRDS 22 5 EFFECTS ON ENGINES AND FLIGHTS 35 5.1

  6. An Unusual Neck Mass: Ingested Chicken Bone

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, Erhan; İber, Metin; Yağız, Özlem; Kandoğan, Tolga; Çukurova, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract are frequently seen in otolaryngological practice, but migration of an ingested foreign body to the neck is a very rare condition. Case Report We present a 66-year-old woman admitted to our outpatient department with a painful neck mass. She had a history of emergency department admission 4 months prior with odynophagia after eating chicken meal. A physical examination revealed a painful and hyperemic mass on the left neck. Antibiotherapy did not relieve the patient’s symptoms and signs. A 3-cm linear foreign body was observed in X-ray and computed tomography scans. The symptoms of the patient were relieved after excision of the foreign body. Conclusion Although it is a rare situation, migration of a foreign body ingested through the aerodigestive tract to the neck should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with neck masses. PMID:27994927

  7. Successful laparoscopic removal of an ingested toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Karim; Shaunak, Shalin; Kalsi, Sarandeep; Nehra, Dhiren

    2013-07-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies will pass through the gastrointestinal tract without any problems. On the other hand long, slender objects such as a toothbrush will rarely be able to negotiate the angulated and fixed retroperitoneal duodenal loop. Spontaneous toothbrush passage has never been described and therefore endoscopic or surgical removal is always required. Here we describe an asymptomatic young female presenting to out-patient clinic with a history of unintentional toothbrush ingestion 4 years prior. Endoscopic removal was unsuccessful because the toothbrush was partially embedded in to the gastric mucosa. We describe the second case to date of laparoscopic removal of a toothbrush via a gastrotomy with subsequent intra-corporeal repair of the defect.

  8. Magnet ingestion in dogs: two cases.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Kristina; Hottinger, Heidi; Kahn, Tony; Ngo, Mary; Ben-Amotz, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Two dogs that had ingested foreign bodies were presented with vomiting. The foreign bodies appeared as metal and dense on abdominal radiographs. Abdominal exploratory identified intestinal perforation in one case and gastrointestinal tissue trapped between the two foreign bodies adhered to each other in the second case. The foreign bodies were identified as magnets in one case and magnets and other metallic foreign bodies in the second case. Both dogs had excellent outcomes following surgical intervention. These cases demonstrate the danger of tissue entrapment between the foreign bodies as a result of the magnetic attraction between two objects. Dogs that are presented with a history of or are suspect for ingesting multiple magnets or a magnet and metal foreign bodies should be treated with surgical intervention because of the risk of gastrointestinal perforation as a result of magnetic attraction between the foreign bodies.

  9. Sediment ingestion of two sympatric shorebird species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hui, C.A.; Beyer, W.N.

    1998-01-01

    Black-bellied Plovers (Pluvialis squatarola) have short bills and primarily peck while foraging whereas Willets (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) have long bills and primarily probe with bills open in sediments. Intestinal digesta were collected from these species at sympatric overwintering sites in southern California near San Diego to relate sediment ingestion to bill length and feeding behavior. Plover digesta contained an estimated 29% sediment, and Willet digesta an estimated 3% sediment. Techniques based on acid insoluble ash and on the elemental markers of Al, Fe, and Ti in digesta provided similar results. High Ca concentrations in Willet digesta and our observations suggested that the willets in our sample fed primarily on molluscs and crustaceans. Sediment ingestion may be species specific, not necessarily linked to bill length or probing behaviors, and may greatly affect a bird?s exposure to environmental contaminants in sediment.

  10. Health hazards of bivalve-mollusk ingestion.

    PubMed

    Earampamoorthy, S; Koff, R S

    1975-07-01

    Bivalve mollusks (oysters, clans, and mussels) filter large quantities of water unselectively and thereby may concentrate a variety of aquatic contaminants pathogenic for man within edible shellfish viscera. The recognized bacterial disease associated with ingestion of contaminated bivalves include typhoid fever (not presently a public health problem), Vibrio parahemolyticus gastroenteritis, and Vibrio chloerae infection. The major known shellfish-associated viral diseases are viral hepatitis and possibly viral gastroenteritis. The ingestion of bivalves that have fed on the toxic species of dinoflagellates that produce red tides may be responsible for an uncommon and very rarely fatal illness, paralytic shellfish poisoning. Outbreaks of airborne respiratory irritation in populations exposed to red tides may be the most common public health problem associated with red tides. The health hazards resulting from industrial, agricultural, and oil pollution of bivalves in coastal waters and the hazard from improper handling of bacterially contaminated mollusks remain to be defined.

  11. Gastric Perforation by Ingested Rabbit Bone Fragment.

    PubMed

    Gambaracci, Giulio; Mecarini, Eleonora; Franceschini, Maria Silvia; Scialpi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The majority of accidentally ingested foreign bodies is excreted from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without any complications. Sometimes sharp foreign bodies - like chicken and fish bones - can lead to intestinal perforation and may present insidiously with a wide range of symptoms and, consequently, different diagnoses. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman presenting with fever and a 1-month history of vague abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of a hyperdense linear image close to the gastric antrum surrounded by a fluid collection and free peritoneal air. At laparotomy, a 4-cm rabbit bone fragment covered in inflamed tissue was detected next to a gastric wall perforation. Rabbit bone fragment ingestion, even if rarely reported, should not be underestimated as a possible cause of GI tract perforation.

  12. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  13. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  14. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  15. Appetite influences the responses to meal ingestion.

    PubMed

    Pribic, T; Nieto, A; Hernandez, L; Malagelada, C; Accarino, A; Azpiroz, F

    2017-08-01

    We have previously shown that the postprandial experience includes cognitive sensations, such as satiety and fullness, with a hedonic dimension involving digestive well-being and mood. Preload conditioning has been shown to modulate appetite and food consumption under certain conditions, but its effects on the responses to meal ingestion are not clear. We hypothesized that appetite modulation by preload conditioning has differential effects on the cognitive and the emotive responses to meal ingestion. The effects of preload conditioning (ingestion of a low- vs a high-calorie breakfast) on appetite and on the cognitive and emotive responses to a comfort probe meal ingested 2 hours later (ham and cheese sandwich with orange juice; 300 mL, 425 Kcal) was tested in healthy subjects (n=12) in a cross-over design. Sensations were measured at regular intervals 15 minutes before and 60 minutes after the probe meal. As compared to the low-calorie breakfast, the high-calorie breakfast reduced basal hunger sensation and influenced the responses to the subsequent probe meal: it increased satiety (4.3±0.2 score vs 2.7±0.2 score; P<.001) and fullness (5.4±0.5 score vs 3.1±0.5; P<.001), but reduced the expected postprandial experience of digestive well-being after a palatable meal (1.3±0.7 score vs 3.0±0.3; P=.045). Appetite modulation by preload conditioning has differential effects on the cognitive and emotive responses to a meal. Preload conditioning of the postprandial experience may be applicable to dietary planning and prevention of postprandial symptoms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-03-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface.

  17. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface. Images PMID:46842

  18. Predicting outcome in pediatric coin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Amin, M R; Buchinsky, F J; Gaughan, J P; Szeremeta, W

    2001-07-02

    To determine the relationship between coin size, coin location, patient age, and patient weight and likelihood of coin passage through the esophagus following pediatric coin ingestion. A secondary objective is to test the hypothesis that coin denomination can be determined based on radiographic appearance. A retrospective review was performed of all children seen and evaluated for coin ingestion at a single institution over a 25-month period. Outcome measures included the number of coins that were retained in the esophagus, and the number that passed. Various factors were assessed for their predictive value in judging outcome in coin ingestion cases. Nineteen percent of patients (15/79) in the study passed their ingested coins. Coin denomination could be accurately determined on every patient that had a standard AP or lateral X-ray film. These findings were marked when compared with the lack of reliability of history in determining coin denomination. Patients who passed coins were as a group older (4.6 vs. 3.2 year, P=0.04), but did not differ significantly by weight (19.5 vs. 15.4 kg, P=0.07) from those that retained the coins. Coins located at the gastroesophageal junction had a significantly higher passage rate than coins located elsewhere in the esophagus (89 vs. 8.2%, P<0.01). Coin size was not predictive of coin passage (P=0.7 by chi(2)). Radiographic assessment of coin denomination is reliable, but in this study could not be used to predict coin passage. Patient age and coin location at the gastroesophageal junction, however, do correlate with this event.

  19. Sucrose Ingestion Induces Rapid AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tukey, David S.; Ferreira, Jainne M.; Antoine, Shannon O.; D’amour, James A.; Ninan, Ipe; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K.; Hartner, Diana T.; Guarini, Carlo B.; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F.; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S.; Mahajan, Shahana S.; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPA receptors containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological, biochemical and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 days) induced a stable (>24 hr) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 hr) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7-day protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a non-caloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multi-step GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose. PMID:23554493

  20. Kounis syndrome following canned tuna fish ingestion.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, Luisa; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Locuratolo, Nicola; Ruggiero, Massimo; Resta, Manuela; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Rana, Michele; Caldarola, Pasquale

    2016-12-20

    Kounis syndrome (KS) is a complex of cardiovascular symptoms and signs following either allergy or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults. We report the case of 57-year-old man, with hypertension and history of allergy, referred for facial rash and palpitations appeared after consumption of canned tuna fish. Suddenly, the patient collapsed: electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation in inferior leads. The patient was transferred from the spoke emergency room for coronary angio, which did not show any sign of coronary atherosclerosis. A transient coronary spasm was therefore hypothesized and the final diagnosis was KS. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first cases of KS following the ingestion of tuna fish. KS secondary to food allergy has also been reported, and shellfish ingestion has been considered as one of the most active KS inducer foods. Canned tuna fish too is well known as an allergy inducer. Tuna fish allergy should be considered, however, within the context of scombroid food poisoning, also called histamine fish poisoning. Fish with high levels of free histidine, the enzyme substrate converted to histamine by bacterial histidine decarboxylase, are those most often implicated in scombroid poisoning. Inflammatory mediators such as histamine constitute the pathophysiologic basis of Kounis hypersensitivity-associated acute coronary syndrome. Patients with coronary risk factors, allergic reaction after food ingestion, and suspected scombroid poisoning should be therefore carefully monitored for a prompt diagnosis of possible coronary complications.

  1. STELLAR ROTATION AND PLANET INGESTION IN GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    2008-06-15

    We investigate the expected increase in the rotation rate of post-main-sequence stars as they expand and ingest orbiting planets. This phenomenon is expected to occur when the stellar radius becomes larger than the planet's periastron distance. We calculate the expected frequency of planet ingestion during the red giant, horizontal branch (HB), and early asymptotic giant branch phases for planets of mass m{sub p}{>=}1M{sub J}. We also calculate the probability of observing anomalous rotation rates in a population of solar metallicity giants as a function of stellar mass and evolutionary stage. Planet ingestion is most easily detectable in a solar mass HB star, with a probability of about 1% for solar-neighborhood metallicity. Our analysis is based on the observed distribution of mass, eccentricity, semimajor axis for extrasolar planets around solar-type main-sequence stars, on stellar evolution models, and on the typical observed rotation rates observed in a sample of solar-neighborhood giants.

  2. Freon: accidental ingestion and gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Gotelli, Mariano Javier; Monserrat, Alberto Juan; Lo Balbo, Alfredo; Valdes Quintana, Eduardo Fernando; Gotelli, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    Freons generally have a low order of toxicity, but exposure to relatively high concentrations (>100 ppm) may produce adverse effects on health. Currently, intoxication reports are unintentional inhalation of CFCs. We report an unintentional ingestion of a mixture of CFCs and the results of a rat study. A 43-year-old man was admitted to the Emergency Department with a chief complaint of acute abdominal pain that developed minutes after he ingested a clear liquid in a water glass, which contained a mixture of Freon and water. Subsequent surgical evaluation revealed perforation of the stomach and necrosis of the stomach wall. He developed a transient rise in his hepatic transaminases, which resolved spontaneously, and fully recovered from his surgery. A murine model of the injury was created to evaluate threshold concentration and effect of time on injury grade. Injury grade increased with delay to histologic analysis from 8 to 24 hours after exposure to Freon. Increasing amounts of Freon also increased the lesion grade score. Patients ingesting Freon need to be closely evaluated for risk of gastric damage and perforation.

  3. Mammals as prey: estimating ingestible size.

    PubMed

    Close, Matthew; Cundall, David

    2012-09-01

    Most mammals have deformable bodies, making it difficult to measure the size of living or freshly killed ones accurately. Because small rodents are common prey of many snakes, and because nearly all snakes swallow their prey whole, we explored four methods for determining the ingestible size (the smallest cross-sectional area that the largest part of the rodent can be made into without breaking bones or dislocating joints) of 100 intact rodents, including 50 Musmusculus and 50 Rattus norvegicus. Cross-sectional areas derived from maximal height and width of specimens at rest or the same specimens wrapped snout to pelvic girdle are roughly 1.5× higher than areas calculated either by the height and width of the same specimens rolled into cylinders or by volumetric displacement. Rolling rodents into cylinders reduces cross-sectional area by straightening the vertebral column, lengthening the abdominal cavity, elevating the sternum, compressing the thoracic cavity, and protracting the shoulder joint, that is, changes similar to those seen in rodents eaten by snakes. Reduced major axis regression of the smallest attainable cross-sectional area, y, on mass, x, shows that y (in log mm(2) ) approximates 1.53x (in log grams)(0.69) for rats and 1.63x(0.64) for mice. Our results suggest that visual cues provided by live rodents might lead most predators, like snakes, to overestimate ingestible size and hence rarely attack prey too large to ingest.

  4. Death from Ingestion of E-Liquid.

    PubMed

    Morley, Stephen; Slaughter, John; Smith, Paul R

    2017-10-04

    The use of e-liquids is becoming more prevalent. There is a risk that such liquids may be ingested by mouth rather than being vaped/ inhaled. Due to the high concentration of drugs such as nicotine in these liquids, there may be toxic, and possibly fatal consequences. We report the death of a 32-year-old male who ingested nicotine-containing e-liquid while under the influence of alcohol. A serum sample taken 24 h after collapse contained nicotine at a concentration of 1600 ng/mL of nicotine. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Death secondary to e-liquid ingestion is still very rare, but has the potential for causing deaths due to the easy access of such liquids to the general public. Such toxicity should be considered in individuals who present in the early phases with symptoms of stimulant toxicity, but also in the latter phase where there may be autonomic depressive effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sildenafil citrate ingestion in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, F Lee

    2004-05-01

    Sildenafil citrate is the first FDA-approved oral agent for male erectile dysfunction. Common adverse effects include flushing, headache, and dyspepsia, although more serious side effects have been reported. Because of its specific therapeutic indication, sildenafil toxicity has been limited almost exclusively to adults. We report a symptomatic case of pediatric sildenafil ingestion. A 2-year-old male ingested 75 mg of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) 2 hours prior to arrival at an emergency room. Ipecac syrup had been given at home with one episode of vomiting. Activated charcoal was considered but withheld due to the delayed presentation to the hospital. The patient was observed in the hospital for 17.5 hours. Observed clinical effects included facial flushing, transient penile engorgement, bilateral rhonchi, and diarrhea. No significant cardiovascular effects were seen. A bronchodilator was given with resolution of rhonchi. No other specific interventions were required. One day after discharge, the patient had one additional bout of diarrhea and complained of pain in the penile region for one day. Two weeks after the exposure, the patient's mother denied any unusual symptoms. Pediatric ingestion of sildenafil may result in mild symptoms including persistent flushing and penile engorgement with associated pain. Penile pain may persist even after resolution of the erection. It is questionable whether the respiratory symptoms and diarrhea were related since neither has been described following sildenafil exposure. Significant cardiovascular symptoms were not seen. Early administration of ipecac syrup did not prevent symptoms from developing.

  6. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  7. Ethanol Withdrawal-Associated Drinking and Drinking in the Dark: Common and Discrete Genetic Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Crabbe, John C.; Metten, Pamela; Huang, Lawrence C.; Schlumbohm, Jason P.; Spence, Stephanie E.; Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Finn, Deborah A.; Rhodes, Justin S.; Cameron, Andy J.

    2014-01-01

    Individual mice differ in the dose of ethanol they will ingest voluntarily when it is offered during limited access periods in the circadian dark, a phenotype called drinking in the dark (DID). Substantial genetic variation in DID has been reported across a few standard inbred mouse strains, and a line of High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) mice has been established through selective breeding on the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) they attain at the end of a drinking session. Here, we report ethanol DID data for 23 inbred mouse strains, including 11 not previously reported, corroborating the genetic contributions to this trait. We also report data on a different ethanol drinking trait, the increased intake seen after multiple cycles of chronic intermittent exposure to ethanol vapor (CIE). Drinking escalated significantly during ethanol withdrawal. However, HDID mice and their HS controls showed equivalent escalation during withdrawal, demonstrating that withdrawal-associated drinking escalation is not a clear genetic correlate of selection on DID. Across inbred strains, DID is substantially genetically correlated with previously-published two-bottle ethanol preference drinking data assessed under conditions of continuous ethanol access. Although inbred strain data for withdrawal-associated drinking are not available, the current pattern of results suggests that withdrawal-associated drinking is genetically distinct from DID, while genetic contributions to DID and two-bottle preference drinking are substantially similar. PMID:24533180

  8. Low concentrations of ethanol protect against synaptotoxicity induced by Aβ in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Urrutia, Juan C; Burgos, Carlos F; Silva, Viviana; Aguilar, Felipe; Sama, Michelle; Yeh, Hermes H; Opazo, Carlos; Aguayo, Luis G

    2015-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported a reduction in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in individuals that ingest low amounts of alcohol. Also, it has been found that moderate consumption of ethanol might protect against β-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity. However, the mechanism underlying its potential neuroprotection is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that ethanol improved the cognitive processes of learning and memory in 3xTgAD mice. In addition, we found that a low concentration of ethanol (equivalent to moderate ethanol consumption) decreased the binding of Aβ (1 and 5 μM) to neuronal membranes and, consequently, its synaptotoxic effect in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons under acute (30 minutes) and chronic (24 hours) incubation conditions. This effect appears to be exerted by a direct action of ethanol on Aβ because electron microscopy studies showed that ethanol altered the degree of Aβ aggregation. The action of ethanol on Aβ also prevented the peptide from perforating the neuronal membrane, as assayed with patch clamp experiments. Taken together, these results contribute to elucidating the mechanism by which low concentrations of ethanol protect against toxicity induced by Aβ oligomers in primary neuronal cultures. These results may also provide an explanation for the decrease in the risk of Alzheimer's disease in people who consume moderate doses of alcohol.

  9. Protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weifeng Huang, Huimin; Niu, Xiaofeng Fan, Ting; Mu, Qingli; Li, Huani

    2013-10-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to gastric ulcer and the present work was aimed to examine the protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine (THC) in the model of ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Fasted mice treated with ethanol 75% (0.5 ml/100 g) were pre-treated with THC (10 or 20 mg/kg, ip), cimetidine (100 mg/kg, ip) or saline in different experimental sets for a period of 3 days, and animals were euthanized 4 h after ethanol ingestion. Gross and microscopic lesions, immunological and biochemical parameters were taken into consideration. The results showed that ethanol induced gastric damage, improving nitric oxide (NO) level, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the ethanol group. Pretreatment of THC at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg bodyweight significantly attenuated the gastric lesions as compared to the ethanol group. These results suggest that the gastroprotective activity of THC is attributed to reducing NO production and adjusting the pro-inflammatory cytokine, inhibited neutrophil accumulation and NF-κB expression. - Highlights: • THC decreased ethanol-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release. • THC inhibited the production of NO in serum and gastric tissue. • THC reduced NF-κB expression and MPO accumulation in ethanol-induced gastric tissue.

  10. Brewing complications: the effect of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Radek, Katherine A.; Ranzer, Matthew J.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol consumption is linked to a higher incidence of traumatic wounds and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality following surgical or traumatic injury. One of the most profound effects of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing occurs during the inflammatory response, and altered cytokine production is a primary component. Acute ethanol exposure also impairs the proliferative response during healing, causing delays in epithelial coverage, collagen synthesis, and blood vessel regrowth. The accumulated data support the paradigm that acute ethanol intoxication prior to injury significantly diminishes a patient’s ability to heal efficiently. PMID:19675208

  11. Effect of sub-chronic intermittent ethanol exposure on spatial learning and ethanol sensitivity in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, H S; Hogan, A; Risher, M-Louise; Swartzwelder, Rita A; Wilson, Wilkie A; Acheson, Shawn K

    2014-06-01

    It has become clear that adolescence is a period of distinct responsiveness to the acute effects of ethanol on learning and other cognitive functions. However, the effects of repeated intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence on learning and cognition are less well studied, and other effects of repeated ethanol exposure such as withdrawal and chronic tolerance complicate such experiments. Moreover, few studies have compared the effects of repeated ethanol exposure during adolescence and adulthood, and they have yielded mixed outcomes that may be related to methodological differences and/or secondary effects of ethanol on behavioral performance. One emerging question is whether relatively brief intermittent ethanol exposure (i.e., sub-chronic exposure) during adolescence or adulthood might alter learning at a time after exposure when chronic tolerance would be expected, and whether tolerance to the cognitive effects of ethanol might influence the effect of ethanol on learning at that time. To address this, male adolescent and adult rats were pre-treated with sub-chronic daily ethanol (five doses [4.0 g/kg, i.p.] or saline at 24-h intervals, across 5 days). Two days after the last pre-exposure, spatial learning was assessed on 4 consecutive days using the Morris water maze. Half of the animals from each treatment cell received ethanol (2.0 g/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to each testing session and half of the animals received saline. Ethanol pre-exposure altered water maze performance in adult animals but not in adolescents, and acute ethanol exposure impaired learning in animals of both ages independent of pre-exposure condition. There was no evidence of cognitive tolerance in animals of either age group. These results indicate that a relatively short period of intermittent ethanol exposure during adulthood, but not adolescence, promotes thigmotaxis in the water maze shortly after pre-exposure but does not induce cognitive tolerance to the effects of ethanol in

  12. In the rat, chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence alters the ethanol sensitivity of tonic inhibition in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Rebekah L; Acheson, Shawn K; Moore, Scott D; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol drinking by adolescents is a major public health concern. Adolescents tend to drink in a chronic, intermittent, that is, "binge," pattern, and such patterns of ethanol exposure are associated with increased risk of neurotoxicity and the development of alcohol use disorders (Crews et al., 2000; Hunt, 1993). Both adolescent humans and rats are more sensitive to acute ethanol-induced memory impairment than adults (Acheson et al., 1998; Markwiese et al., 1998). Furthermore, in rats, chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure during adolescence produces a long-lasting, perhaps permanent, maintenance of the adolescent high sensitivity to ethanol's amnestic effects (White et al., 2000a). We have previously shown that acute ethanol increases tonic inhibitory current mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors more efficaciously in dentate granule cells (DGCs) from adolescent than adult rats (Fleming et al., 2007). In this study, we determined if CIE during adolescence produced long-lasting changes in this tonic current. Adolescent rats were subjected to a CIE exposure regimen and allowed to mature to full adulthood. Whole-cell voltage-clamp measurements of tonic inhibitory current and mean phasic current were made in vitro in hippocampal brain slices. CIE exposure during adolescence increased the ethanol sensitivity of tonic inhibitory current mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors and decreased the ethanol sensitivity of phasic, synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated current in adult DGCs. CIE exposure during adolescence produces long-lasting changes in the function and ethanol sensitivity of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in DGCs. These changes appear to "lock-in" and maintain the high adolescent sensitivity to ethanol in these cells. Furthermore, greater ethanol enhancement of tonic inhibition in the hippocampal formation after CIE is consistent with the greater sensitivity to ethanol-induced memory impairment after adolescent CIE. This finding represents the

  13. [Effects of catalase activators and inhibitors on ethanol pharmacokinetic characteristics and ethanol and aldehyde-metabolizing enzyme activities in the rat liver and brain].

    PubMed

    Bardina, L R; Pron'ko, P S; Satanovskaia, V I; Alieva, E V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of catalase regulators (aminotriazole, lead acetate, taurine, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate) on the preference for ethanol, its pharmacokinetics, and activities of rat liver and brain ethanol and acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzymes were studied. Lead acetate (100 mg/kg, i.p., 7 days), aminotriazole (1 g/kg, i.p., 7 days), and taurine (650 mg/kg, i.g., 14 days) decreased ethanol consumption under conditions of free choice (10% ethanol water), whereas di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (300 mg/kg, i.g., 7 days) did not exert any effect on this parameter. Taurine, lead acetate and di-2-ethylhexylphthalate significantly activated liver ADH, MEOS and catalase peroxidase activity. Aminotriazole also activated ADH and MEOS, but inhibited liver catalase. The activities of liver and brain A1DH as well as catalase were insignificantly changed by this treatment. The 7-day administration of lead acetate, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate and aminotriazole administrations significantly influenced the ethanol (2 g/kg., i.p.) pharmacokinetic parameters: the area under the pharmacokinetic curve and the elimination half-life time were significantly reduced, whereas the elimination constant and clearance were increased. This unequivocally indicates accelerated ethanol elimination. The 14-day ingestion of taurine insignificantly changed the parameters of ethanol pharmacokinetics in rats.

  14. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  15. Effects of calcium antagonists on central actions of ethanol: comparative studies with nifedipine, verapamil and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, E; Kubik-Bogucka, E

    1993-11-01

    The effects of nifedipine (17.5 and 50 mg/kg), verapamil (5 and 15 mg/kg) and cinnarizine (75 and 200 mg/kg) on acute toxicity and central actions of ethanol (i.e. ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia, disturbances of rota-rod performance and spontaneous activity) were investigated in mice. Additionally, effects of these drugs on the development of tolerance to hypothermic and sleep-inducing action of ethanol were studied in rats. Calcium antagonists were given acutely 30 min before ethanol administration, or chronically once daily (lower dose) for 10 days, and on the 11th day the animals received an ethanol injection. Single doses of nifedipine increased the acute toxicity of ethanol and potentiated its central effects. After long-term administration of nifedipine no significant alterations in the central actions of ethanol were observed. Verapamil and cinnarizine antagonized the ethanol-induced sleep and impairment of locomotor activity. Nifedipine did not affect the development of tolerance to hypnotic and hypothermic action of ethanol. Verapamil prevents the development of tolerance to hypnotic action of ethanol, whereas cinnarizine prevents the development of tolerance to the hypnotic and hypothermic action of ethanol.

  16. Intercontinental comparison of caustic ingestion in children

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Hazrati, Hakimeh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the caustic ingestion in children among different continents according to demographic characteristics (core purpose), main symptoms, common caustic agents, signs and symptoms, management, treatment and complications. Methods This systematic review was performed by searching the databases Science Direct, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and PubMed, electronically and manually. We included studies that were published from 1980 to 2013, at University of Medical Sciences of Tabriz, Iran. A strategic search was performed with keywords including caustic, corrosive, ingestion and children, and was limited to articles in English and Persian. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS ver. 18. Results Of 63 selected articles of caustic ingestion with 9,888 samples, the proportion of Africa was 3 articles (4.8%) and 95 samples (1%), America 9 articles (14.3%) and 305 sample (3%), Asia 29 articles (46%) and 2,780 samples (28.1%), Europe 17 articles (27%) and 3,002 samples (30.4%), and Oceania 5 articles (7.9%) and 3,706 samples (37.5%). The average age was in the Africa 3.07±2.02 years, America 3.17±1.83 years, Asia 3.34±1.58 years, Europe 3.58±2.09 years and Oceania 3.52±2.02 years. Sex distribution was in Africa 76 males (0.91%) and 19 females (0.23%), America 49 males (0.58%) and 41 females (0.49%), Asia 1,575 males (18.76%) and 1,087 females (12.95%), Europe 1,018 males (12.13%) and 823 females (9.8%), and Oceania 1,918 males (22.85%) and 1,788 females (21.3%). Statistical analysis of the data indicated higher consumption in Europe and Oceania in the boys with higher average age of years. Conclusion The comparison of caustic ingestion indicated that the cause substances of caustic ingestion in children are different among continents, therefore prevention strategy and different treatment guidelines among continents will be needed. PMID:26770225

  17. Intercontinental comparison of caustic ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Rafeey, Mandana; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Hazrati, Hakimeh; Vahedi, Leila

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the caustic ingestion in children among different continents according to demographic characteristics (core purpose), main symptoms, common caustic agents, signs and symptoms, management, treatment and complications. This systematic review was performed by searching the databases Science Direct, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and PubMed, electronically and manually. We included studies that were published from 1980 to 2013, at University of Medical Sciences of Tabriz, Iran. A strategic search was performed with keywords including caustic, corrosive, ingestion and children, and was limited to articles in English and Persian. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS ver. 18. Of 63 selected articles of caustic ingestion with 9,888 samples, the proportion of Africa was 3 articles (4.8%) and 95 samples (1%), America 9 articles (14.3%) and 305 sample (3%), Asia 29 articles (46%) and 2,780 samples (28.1%), Europe 17 articles (27%) and 3,002 samples (30.4%), and Oceania 5 articles (7.9%) and 3,706 samples (37.5%). The average age was in the Africa 3.07±2.02 years, America 3.17±1.83 years, Asia 3.34±1.58 years, Europe 3.58±2.09 years and Oceania 3.52±2.02 years. Sex distribution was in Africa 76 males (0.91%) and 19 females (0.23%), America 49 males (0.58%) and 41 females (0.49%), Asia 1,575 males (18.76%) and 1,087 females (12.95%), Europe 1,018 males (12.13%) and 823 females (9.8%), and Oceania 1,918 males (22.85%) and 1,788 females (21.3%). Statistical analysis of the data indicated higher consumption in Europe and Oceania in the boys with higher average age of years. The comparison of caustic ingestion indicated that the cause substances of caustic ingestion in children are different among continents, therefore prevention strategy and different treatment guidelines among continents will be needed.

  18. Prophylactic tributyrin treatment mitigates chronic-binge ethanol-induced intestinal barrier and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Cresci, Gail A; Glueck, Bryan; McMullen, Megan R; Xin, Wei; Allende, Daniella; Nagy, Laura E

    2017-09-01

    Impaired gut-liver axis is a potential factor contributing to alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol depletes intestinal integrity and causes gut dysbiosis. Butyrate, a fermentation byproduct of gut microbiota, is altered negatively following chronic ethanol exposure. This study aimed to determine whether prophylactic tributyrin could protect the intestinal barrier and liver in mice during combined chronic-binge ethanol exposure. C57BL/6J mice exposed to 5% v/v ethanol-containing diet for 10 days received a single ethanol gavage (5 g/kg) 9 h before euthanasia. Control mice were isocalorically pair-fed maltose dextrin for ethanol. Diets were supplemented (5 mM) with tributyrin or glycerol. Intestine and liver disease activity was assessed histologically. Protein and mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, toll-like receptors, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were assessed. Caco-2 monolayers with or without ethanol exposure and/or sodium butyrate were used to test butyrate's direct effects on intestinal integrity. Chronic-binge ethanol feeding impaired intestinal TJ protein co-localization staining; however, tributyrin co-treatment mitigated these effects. Ethanol depleted TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance in Caco-2 monolayers, but butyrate co-treatment reduced these effects. Hepatic toll-like receptor mRNA expression and tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein expression was induced by ethanol; however, the response was significantly dampened in mice co-treated with tributyrin. Tributyrin altered localization of both neutrophils and single hepatocyte death: Leukocytes and apoptotic hepatocytes localized predominantly around the portal tract in ethanol-only treated mice, whereas localization predominated around the central vein in ethanol-tributyrin mice. Prophylactic tributyrin supplementation mitigated effects of combined chronic-binge ethanol exposure on disruption of intestinal TJ localization and intestinal permeability and liver injury. © 2017

  19. Moderate alcohol consumption and increased bone mineral density: potential ethanol and non-ethanol mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, R; O'Connell, M A; Sripanyakorn, S; Powell, J J

    2006-08-01

    Mounting epidemiological evidence indicates an association between the moderate ingestion of alcoholic beverages and higher bone mineral density (v. abstainers). More limited findings provide some evidence for translation of this association into reduced fracture risk, but further studies are required. Here, these data are reviewed and caveats in their assimilation, comparison and interpretation as well as in the use and application of bone health indices are discussed. Whilst it is concluded that evidence is now strong for the moderate alcohol-bone health association, at least in relation to bone mineral density, mechanisms are less clear. Both ethanol and non-ethanol components have been implicated as factors that positively affect bone health in the light of moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages, and four particular areas are discussed. First, recent findings suggest that moderate ethanol consumption acutely inhibits bone resorption, in a non-parathyroid hormone- and non-calcitonin-dependent fashion, which can only partly be attributed to an energy effect. Second, critical review of the literature does not support a role for moderate ethanol consumption affecting oestrogen status and leading to a knock-on effect on bone. Third, Si is present at high levels in certain alcoholic beverages, especially beer, and may have a measurable role in promoting bone formation. Fourth, a large body of work indicates that phytochemicals (e.g. polyphenols) from alcoholic beverages could influence bone health, but human data are lacking. With further work it is hoped to be able to model epidemiological observations and provide a clear pathway between the magnitude of association and the relative contribution of these mechanisms for the major classes of alcoholic beverage.

  20. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  1. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  2. Oesophagus obstruction due to ingestion of multiple foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Cegin, Muhammet Bilal; Sayir, Fuat; Gonullu, Hayriye; Olmez, Sehmuz

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of a foreign body (FB) is a potentially serious condition. In children, the most common years for FB ingestion are from the age of 6 months to 6 years. FB ingestion also occurs in those with psychiatric disorders or mental retardation and among adult prisoners and alcoholics. Most ingested FBs spontaneously pass out of the body via the gastrointestinal system. An endoscopic or surgical approach is only needed if the object fails to progress through the gastrointestinal tract. All objects impacted in the oesophagus require urgent treatment. This study reports a case of multiple FB ingestion and provides a literature review.

  3. Magnetic toy ingestion leading to jejunocecal fistula in a child.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ali M; Hassab, Mohamed H; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman A; Al-Tokhais, Tariq I

    2010-04-01

    The accidental ingestion of a foreign body is a common problem in children, but ingestion of magnets is rare. When multiple magnets are ingested, they may attract each other and cause pressure necrosis through the bowel walls and eventually lead to serious complications like obstruction, perforation, and fistula formation. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl with jejunocecal fistula following ingestion of 2 magnet toys; it highlights the diagnostic challenge and the need for early surgical intervention in children especially when multiple magnets are ingested.

  4. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Casey, G P; Ingledew, W M

    1986-01-01

    It is now certain that the inherent ethanol tolerance of the Saccharomyces strain used is not the prime factor regulating the level of ethanol that can be produced in a high sugar brewing, wine, sake, or distillery fermentation. In fact, in terms of the maximum concentration that these yeasts can produce under batch (16 to 17% [v/v]) or fed-batch conditions, there is clearly no difference in ethanol tolerance. This is not to say, however, that under defined conditions there is no difference in ethanol tolerance among different Saccharomyces yeasts. This property, although a genetic determinant, is clearly influenced by many factors (carbohydrate level, wort nutrition, temperature, osmotic pressure/water activity, and substrate concentration), and each yeast strain reacts to each factor differently. This will indeed lead to differences in measured tolerance. Thus, it is extremely important that each of these be taken into consideration when determining "tolerance" for a particular set of fermentation conditions. The manner in which each alcohol-related industry has evolved is now known to have played a major role in determining traditional thinking on ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces yeasts. It is interesting to speculate on how different our thinking on ethanol tolerance would be today if sake fermentations had not evolved with successive mashing and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of rice carbohydrate, if distillers' worts were clarified prior to fermentation but brewers' wort were not, and if grape skins with their associated unsaturated lipids had not been an integral part of red wine musts. The time is now ripe for ethanol-related industries to take advantage of these findings to improve the economies of production. In the authors' opinion, breweries could produce higher alcohol beers if oxygenation (leading to unsaturated lipids) and "usable" nitrogen source levels were increased in high gravity worts. White wine fermentations could also, if

  5. The Effect of Ethanol on the Release of Opioids from Oral Prolonged-Release Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Walden, Malcolm; Nicholls, Fiona A.; Smith, Kevin J.; Tucker, Geoffrey T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent experience has prompted the US FDA to consider whether ethanol ingestion may modify the release characteristics of prolonged-release formulations, where dose dumping may be an issue for patient safety. The influence of ethanol on the in vitro release of opioid drugs from some prolonged-release formulations utilizing different release technologies was examined. Results indicated that the prolonged-release mechanisms remained intact under the testing conditions, although one product showed initial sensitivity to ethanol in its release characteristics. Nevertheless, in this case, extrapolation of the findings to likely outcome in vivo indicated no risk of dose-dumping. It is proposed that prolonged-release medicinal products should be tested during development to ensure robustness to the effects of ethanol on drug release. PMID:17882730

  6. Analysis of inedible substance ingestion at a Japanese psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Yayama, So; Tanimoto, Chie; Suto, Shunji; Matoba, Kei; Kajiwara, Tomomi; Inoue, Masue; Endo, Yoshimi; Yamakawa, Miyae; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2017-01-27

    Inedible substance ingestion increases the risk of ileus, poisoning, and suffocation. Prevention is especially important in a psychiatric setting. This study aimed to analyze the incidence of inedible substance ingestion in a Japanese psychiatric hospital. Inedible substance ingestion incidents were extracted from an incident report database spanning 2000-2012 at a 400-bed psychiatric hospital in Japan. We tabulated the frequencies of incidents in accordance with major diagnosis, ingested materials, incident levels, and time of occurrence. The incidence rate was 0.09/1000 patient days, and 149 cases in 105 patients were classified as having experienced inedible substance ingestion. The most common diagnosis was dementia (n = 58), followed by schizophrenia (n = 22). Materials ingested by dementia patients were nappies or gauze attached to the patient's body after medical procedures. Materials ingested by schizophrenic patients were liquid soap, detergent or shampoo, and cigarettes. Inedible substance ingestion among dementia patients occurred mostly before or during meals. Among schizophrenic patients, the peak period of incidents was in the evening. Dementia patients were overrepresented in the inedible substance ingestion incidents. Items they wore or applied to their bodies were often subject to ingestion, and such behaviours mostly occurred around meal time. Therefore, the nursing staff were able to discover them quickly and treat most of the cases free of serious consequences. In contrast, schizophrenic patients were underrepresented in the incidents, and most cases involved ingestion of detergent powder or cigarettes, resulting in more serious consequences and requiring treatment. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. Ethanol Impacts on BTEX Plumes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impacts of ethanol on benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) are beginning to become established through laboratory, modeling and field research. Usage of ethanol, which increased due to federal mandates, drives interest and potential impacts on BTEX. Through co...

  8. Ultrastructural changes on the epithelial cells of uterine tubes of Wistar rats after chronic ethanol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Martinez, M; Branco Júnior, A C; Cagnon, V H; Mello Júnior, W; Garcia, P J; Martinez, F E

    1999-04-01

    The present paper describes the morphological alterations of the epithelial layer of the uterine tubes of rats submitted to experimental chronic alcoholism using anatomical, histological, ultrastructural and morphometric methods. Sixty adult rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) at the same age (3 months) and with a mean body weight of 228 g were divided into two groups. The control group received solid diet (Purina rat chow) and tap water ad libitum. The alcoholic group received the same solid diet and was allowed to drink only sugar cane brandy dissolved in 30 degrees Gay Lussac (v/v). After periods of 90, 180 and 270 days of treatment animals at normal estrus were anaesthetised with ethyl ether, weighed and sacrificed. Subsequently, the uterine tubes were dissected, weighed and prepared for TEM and SEM methods. The final mean body weights were similar in the control and alcoholic groups. The morphometric analysis showed no difference between control and alcoholic epithelial height. The alcoholic animals showed ultrastructural alterations: intense lipid droplet and lysosomes accumulation, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and vacuolization in both periods of treatment. It was concluded that alcohol acts as a toxin on the epithelial layer of the uterine tubes of rats.

  9. The effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice: involvement of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-05

    Excessive ethanol ingestion causes gastric mucosal damage through the inflammatory and oxidative processes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were pretreated with vehicle or thalidomide (30 or 60 mg/kg, orally), and one hour later, the gastric mucosal injury was induced by oral administration of acidified ethanol. The animals were euthanized one hour after ethanol ingestion, and gastric tissues were collected to biochemical analyzes. The gastric mucosal lesions were assessed by macroscopic and histopathological examinations. The results showed that treatment of mice with thalidomide prior to the administration of ethanol dose-dependently reduced the gastric ulcer index. Thalidomide pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6], malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In addition, thalidomide significantly inhibited ethanol-induced nitric oxide (NO) overproduction in gastric tissue. Histological observations showed that ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage was attenuated by thalidomide pretreatment. It seems that thalidomide as an anti-inflammatory agent may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced mucosal damage by inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and reducing the production of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in gastric tissue.

  10. Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Modulates Behavioral Effects of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Laurie J.; Sullivan, Katherine A.; Vallender, Eric J.; Rowlett, James K.; Platt, Donna M.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few treatment options for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) exist and more are critically needed. Here, we assessed whether trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a modulator of brain monoamine systems, is involved in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and whether it could potentially serve as a therapeutic target. Methods Wild-type (WT) and TAAR1 knockout (KO) mice (75% C57J/BL6 and 25% 129S1/Sv background) were compared in tests of ethanol consumption (two-bottle choice [TBC]), motor impairment (loss of righting reflex, [LORR], locomotor activity) and ethanol clearance (blood ethanol level [BEL]). Results As compared with WT mice, KO mice displayed (1) significantly greater preference for and consumption of ethanol in a TBC paradigm (3%–11% vol/vol escalating over 10 weeks), with no significant difference observed in TBC with sucrose (1%–3%); (2) significantly greater sedative-like effects of acute ethanol (2.0 or 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) manifested as LORR observed at a lower dose and for longer time, with similar BELs and rates of ethanol clearance; and (3) lower cumulative locomotor activity over 60 minutes in response to an acute ethanol challenge (1.0–2.5 g/kg, i.p.). Conclusions The present findings are the first to implicate TAAR1 in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and raise the question of whether specific drugs that target TAAR1 could potentially reduce alcohol consumption in humans with AUDs. PMID:23861588

  11. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  12. Ethanol induces second-order aversive conditioning in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Myers, Mallory; Spear, Linda Patia; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence is considered a developmental disorder with etiological onset during late childhood and adolescence, and understanding age-related differences in ethanol sensitivity is important. Low to moderate ethanol doses (0.5 and 2.0 g/kg, i.g.) induce single-trial, appetitive second-order place conditioning (SOC) in adolescent, but not adult, rats. Recent studies have demonstrated that adolescents may be less sensitive than adults to the aversive properties of ethanol, reflected by conditioned taste aversion. The present study assessed the aversive motivational effects of high-dose ethanol (3.0 and 3.25 g/kg, i.g., for adolescent and adults, respectively) using SOC. These doses were derived from Experiment 1, which found similar blood and brain ethanol levels in adolescent and adult rats given 3.0 and 3.25 g/kg ethanol, respectively. In Experiment 2, animals received ethanol or vehicle paired with intraoral pulses of sucrose (conditioned stimulus 1 [CS1]). After one, two, or three conditioning trials, rats were presented with the CS1 while in a distinctive chamber (CS2). When tested for CS2 preference, ethanol-treated animals exhibited reduced preference for the CS2 compared with controls. This result, indicative of ethanol-mediated aversive place conditioning, was similar for adolescents and adults, for females and males, and after one, two, or three training trials. One finding, however, suggested that adolescents were less sensitive than adults to ethanol’s aversive effects at the intermediate level of training. In conjunction with previous results, the present study showed that in adolescent rats subjected to SOC, ethanol’s hedonic effects vary from appetitive to aversive as the ethanol dose increases. Adolescent and adult animals appear to perceive the post-ingestive effects of high-dose ethanol as similarly aversive when assessed by SOC. PMID:21187242

  13. Model of voluntary ethanol intake in zebrafish: Effect on behavior and hypothalamic orexigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, M.E.; Karatayev, O.; Chang, G.-Q.; Algava, D.B.; Leibowitz, S.F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in zebrafish have shown that exposure to ethanol in tank water affects various behaviors, including locomotion, anxiety and aggression, and produces changes in brain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine. Building on these investigations, the present study had two goals: first, to develop a method for inducing voluntary ethanol intake in individual zebrafish, which can be used as a model in future studies to examine how this behavior is affected by various manipulations, and second, to characterize the effects of this ethanol intake on different behaviors and the expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), which are known in rodents to stimulate consumption of ethanol and alter behaviors associated with alcohol abuse. Thus, we first developed a new model of voluntary intake of ethanol in fish by presenting this ethanol mixed with gelatin, which they readily consume. Using this model, we found that individual zebrafish can be trained in a short period of time to consume stable levels of 10% or 20% ethanol (v/v) mixed with gelatin and that their intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture leads to pharmacologically-relevant blood ethanol concentrations which are strongly, positively correlated with the amount ingested. Intake of this ethanol-gelatin mixture increased locomotion, reduced anxiety, and stimulated aggressive behavior, while increasing expression of GAL and OX in specific hypothalamic areas. These findings, confirming results in rats, provide a method in zebrafish for investigating with forward genetics and pharmacological techniques the role of different brain mechanisms in controlling ethanol intake. PMID:25257106

  14. Ethanol concentration in food and body condition affect foraging behavior in Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Francisco; Korine, Carmi; Kotler, Burt P.; Pinshow, Berry

    2008-06-01

    Ethanol occurs in fleshy fruit as a result of sugar fermentation by both microorganisms and the plant itself; its concentration [EtOH] increases as fruit ripens. At low concentrations, ethanol is a nutrient, whereas at high concentrations, it is toxic. We hypothesized that the effects of ethanol on the foraging behavior of frugivorous vertebrates depend on its concentration in food and the body condition of the forager. We predicted that ethanol stimulates food consumption when its concentration is similar to that found in ripe fruit, whereas [EtOH] below or above that of ripe fruit has either no effect, or else deters foragers, respectively. Moreover, we expected that the amount of food ingested on a particular day of feeding influences the toxic effects of ethanol on a forager, and consequently shapes its feeding decisions on the following day. We therefore predicted that for a food-restricted forager, ethanol-rich food is of lower value than ethanol-free food. We used Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus) as a model to test our hypotheses, and found that ethanol did not increase the value of food for the bats. High [EtOH] reduced the value of food for well-fed bats. However, for food-restricted bats, there was no difference between the value of ethanol-rich and ethanol-free food. Thus, microorganisms, via their production of ethanol, may affect the patterns of feeding of seed-dispersing frugivores. However, these patterns could be modified by the body condition of the animals because they might trade-off the costs of intoxication against the value of nutrients acquired.

  15. Comparison of the fates of ingested leucine and ingested 2-ketoisocaproate in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, K.; Walser, M. )

    1990-05-01

    We previously reported that the ratio, R, of 14C to 3H in the leucine of whole body protein, measured 6 h after ingestion of (3H)leucine and (1-14C)2-ketoisocaproate is equal to ratio of the dose of leucine to the dose of 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC) (on a leucine-free diet) required to achieve the same rate of growth. To determine whether R is dependent on the interval between injection and sampling, R was measured at intervals in purified whole body protein after oral injection of these isotopes in groups of rats; it was constant from 1 h onward for 1 wk, averaging 0.64 +/- 0.01 (means +/- SEM). Thus, the extent of incorporation into the leucine of whole body protein of ingested KIC remains close to 64% of the incorporation of ingested leucine administered as such simultaneously, from 1 h onward for at least 1 wk.

  16. Hormonal responses and tolerance to cold of female quail following parathion ingestion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-week-old female bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus), maintained at 26 + 1?C, were provided diets containing 0,25, or 100 ppm parathion ad libitum. After 10 days, birds were exposed to mild cold (6 + 1?C) for 4,8, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in birds receiving 25 and 100 ppm parathion. Body weight, egg production, and plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations were reduced in birds receiving 100 ppm parathion compared with other groups. Cold exposure did not alter plasma corticosterone levels in the 0- and 25-ppm parathion groups, but a two- to five fold elevation of plasma corticosterone was observed in birds fed 100 ppm parathion. These findings indicate that (i) short-term ingestion of parathion can impair reproduction possibly by altering gonadotropin or steroid secretion, and (ii) tolerance to cold may be reduced following ingestion of this organophosphate.

  17. Daidzin, an antioxidant isoflavonoid, decreases blood alcohol levels and shortens sleep time induced by ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Xie, C I; Lin, R C; Antony, V; Lumeng, L; Li, T K; Mai, K; Liu, C; Wang, Q D; Zhao, Z H; Wang, G F

    1994-12-01

    The extract from an edible vine, Pueraria lebata, has been reported to be efficacious in lessening alcohol intoxication. In this study, we have tested the efficacy of one of the major components, daidzin, from this plant extract. When ethanol (40% solution, 3 g/kg body weight) was given to fasted rats intragastrically, blood alcohol concentration (BAC) peaked at 30 min after alcohol ingestion and reached 1.77 +/- 0.14 mg/ml (mean values +/- SD, n = 6). If daidzin (30 mg/kg) was mixed with the ethanol solution and given to animals intragastrically, BAC was found to peak at 90 min after alcohol ingestion and reached only 1.20 +/- 0.30 mg/ml (n = 6) (p < 0.05 vs. controls). The ability of daidzin to delay and decrease peak BAC level after ethanol ingestion was also observed in fed animals. In both fasted and fed rats given alcohol without daidzin, BAC quickly declined after reaching its peak at 30 min. By contrast, BAC levels receded more slowly if daidzin was also fed to the animals. Daidzin showed a chronic effect. Rats fed daidzin for 7 days before ethanol challenge, but not on the day of challenge, also produced lower and later peak BAC levels. Interestingly, daidzin, whether fed to rats only once or chronically for 7 days, did not significantly alter activities of either alcohol dehydrogenase or mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Further experiments demonstrated that daidzin shortened sleep time for rats receiving ethanol intragastrically (7 g/kg) but not intraperitoneally (2 g/kg). To test whether daidzin delayed stomach-emptying, [14C]polyethylene glycol was mixed with ethanol and fed to rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  19. Cervical Esophagotomy for Removal of an Ingested Clam Shell: A Very Uncommon Foreign Body Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Edoardo; Giuliani, Diletta; Nigro, Alice; Gasparrini, Marcello; Balducci, Genoveffa

    2017-01-01

    To report the removal of an ingested clam shell that was firmly impacted in the esophagus. A 77-year-old man presented at our hospital with acute dysphagia after eating a seafood risotto. An urgent dedicated examination (noncontrast helical multislice computed tomography scan of the neck and flexible esophagoscopy) detected a clam shell lodged in the upper esophagus. After several unsuccessful endoscopic attempts, a lifesaving cervical esophagotomy was performed and the foreign body was retrieved. This patient who ingested clam shell recovered well following the retrieval of the foreign body by performing a lifesaving cervical esophagotomy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  1. Repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence enhances voluntary sweetened ethanol intake in young adulthood in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Alipour, Kent K; Michael, Laura A; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2010-10-01

    Binge alcohol consumption is a rising concern in the United States, especially among adolescents. During this developmental period alcohol use is usually initiated and has been shown to cause detrimental effects on brain structure and function as well as cognitive/behavioral impairments in rats. Binge models, where animals are repeatedly administered high doses of ethanol typically over a period of three or four days cause these effects. There has been little work conducted aimed at investigating the long-term behavioral consequences of repeated binge administration during adolescence on later ethanol-induced behavior in young adulthood and adulthood. The repeated four-day binge model may serve as a good approximate for patterns of human adolescent alcohol consumption as this is similar to a "bender" in human alcoholics. The present set of experiments examined the dose-response and sex-related differences induced by repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence on sweetened ethanol (Experiment 1) or saccharin (Experiment 2) intake in young adulthood. In both experiments, on postnatal days (PND) 28-31, PND 35-38 and PND 42-45, ethanol (1.5, 3.0 or 5.0 g/kg) or water was administered intragastrically to adolescent rats. Rats underwent abstinence from PND 46-59. Subsequently, in young adulthood, ethanol and saccharin intake were assessed. Exposure to any dose of ethanol during adolescence significantly enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood. However, while female rats had higher overall g/kg intake, males appear to be more vulnerable to the impact of adolescent ethanol exposure on subsequently increased ethanol intake in young adulthood. Exposure to ethanol during adolescence did not alter saccharin consumption in young adulthood in male or female rats. Considering that adolescence is the developmental period in which ethanol experimentation and consumption is usually initiated, the present set of experiments demonstrate the importance of elucidating the

  2. Repeated Binge Ethanol Administration During Adolescence Enhances Voluntary Sweetened Ethanol Intake in Young Adulthood in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M.; Alipour, Kent K.; Michael, Laura A.; Kirstein, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Binge alcohol consumption is a rising concern in the United States, especially among adolescents. During this developmental period alcohol use is usually initiated and has been shown to cause detrimental effects on brain structure and function as well as cognitive/behavioral impairments in rats. Binge models, where animals are repeatedly administered high doses of ethanol typically over a period of three or four days cause these effects. There has been little work conducted aimed at investigating the long-term behavioral consequences of repeated binge administration during adolescence on later ethanol-induced behavior in young adulthood and adulthood. The repeated four-day binge model may serve as a good approximate for patterns of human adolescent alcohol consumption as this is similar to a “bender” in human alcoholics. The present set of experiments examined the dose-response and sex-related differences induced by repeated binge ethanol administration during adolescence on sweetened ethanol (Experiment 1) or saccharin (Experiment 2) intake in young adulthood. In both experiments, on postnatal days (PND) 28–31, PND 35–38 and PND 42–45, ethanol (1.5, 3.0 or 5.0 g/kg) or water was administered intragastrically to adolescent rats. Rats underwent abstinence from PND 46–59. Subsequently, in young adulthood, ethanol and saccharin intake were assessed. Exposure to any dose of ethanol during adolescence significantly enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood. However, while female rats had higher overall g/kg intake, males appear to be more vulnerable to the impact of adolescent ethanol exposure on subsequently increased ethanol intake in young adulthood. Exposure to ethanol during adolescence did not alter saccharin consumption in young adulthood in male or female rats. Considering that adolescence is the developmental period in which ethanol experimentation and consumption is usually initiated, the present set of experiments demonstrate the importance of

  3. Hemodialysis clearance of glyphosate following a life-threatening ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant herbicide.

    PubMed

    Garlich, F M; Goldman, M; Pepe, J; Nelson, L S; Allan, M J; Goldstein, D A; Goldfarb, D S; Hoffman, R S

    2014-01-01

    Ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant herbicides (GlySH) can result in acute kidney injury, electrolyte abnormalities, acidosis, cardiovascular collapse, and death. In severe toxicity, the use of hemodialysis is reported, but largely unsupported by kinetic analysis. We report the dialysis clearance of glyphosate following a suicidal ingestion of a glyphosate-containing herbicide. A 62-year-old man was brought to the emergency department (ED) 8.5 h after drinking a bottle of commercial herbicide containing a 41% solution of glyphosate isopropylamine, in polyoxyethyleneamine (POEA) surfactant and water. He was bradycardic and obtunded with respiratory depression necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation. Initial laboratory results were significant for the following: pH, 7.11; PCO2, 64 mmHg; PO2, 48 mmHg; potassium, 7.8 mEq/L; Cr 3.3, mg/dL; bicarbonate, 22 mEq/L; anion gap, 18 mEq/L; and lactate, 7.5 mmol/L. Acidosis and hyperkalemia persisted despite ventilation and fluid resuscitation. The patient underwent hemodialysis 16 h post ingestion, after which he demonstrated resolution of acidosis and hyperkalemia, and improvement in clinical status. Serum glyphosate concentrations were drawn prior to, during, and after hemodialysis. The extraction ratio and hemodialysis clearance were calculated to be 91.8% and 97.5 mL/min, respectively. We demonstrate the successful clearance of glyphosate using hemodialysis, with corresponding clinical improvement in a patient with several poor prognostic factors (advanced age, large volume ingested, and impaired consciousness). The effects of hemodialysis on the surfactant compound are unknown. Hemodialysis can be considered when severe acidosis and acute kidney injury complicate ingestion of glyphosate-containing products.

  4. The Effect of Caffeine Ingestion during Evening Exercise on Subsequent Sleep Quality in Females.

    PubMed

    Ali, A; O'Donnell, J M; Starck, C; Rutherfurd-Markwick, K J

    2015-06-01

    In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 10 females taking monophasic oral contraceptives completed 90 min intermittent treadmill-running 45 min after ingestion of 6 mg∙kg(-1) body mass anhydrous caffeine or artificial sweetener (placebo). Water (3 mL∙kg(-1)) was provided every 15 min during exercise. Venous blood samples were taken before, during and after exercise, as well as after sleep (~15 h post-ingestion), and levels of caffeine, paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Sleep quality was assessed using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Plasma caffeine concentration peaked 100 min after ingestion. Caffeine clearance was 0.95±0.14 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) while the elimination half-life of caffeine was 17.63±8.06 h. Paraxanthine and theophylline levels were significantly elevated at 15 h with no significant change in theobromine. Sleep latency and subsequent quality of sleep was impaired following caffeine supplementation (P<0.05); there were no differences between trials for how participants were feeling upon awakening. This is the first controlled study to examine caffeine supplementation on sleep quality in female athletes taking a low-dose monophasic oral contraceptive steroid following an intermittent-exercise running protocol. The data shows that female athletes using monophasic oral contraceptive steroids will have impaired sleep quality following evening caffeine ingestion.

  5. Beer Is Less Harmful for the Liver than Plain Ethanol: Studies in Male Mice Using a Binge-Drinking Model.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Marianne; Wagnerberger, Sabine; Kanuri, Giridhar; Ziegenhardt, Doreen; Bergheim, Ina

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms involved in the less damaging effects of beer in comparison to hard spirits have not yet been fully understood. The aim of the study was to determine if the effect of beer intake on the liver differs from that of plain ethanol and if so to determine mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice received either ethanol, beer (ethanol content: 6 g/kg body weight) or iso-caloric maltodextrin solution. Markers of steatosis, lipogenesis, activation of the toll-like receptor-4 signaling cascade and lipid export in liver and tight junction proteins in duodenum were measured 6 and 12 h after acute ethanol or beer intake. Alcohol ingestion resulted in a significant increase of hepatic triglyceride accumulation 6 and 12 h after ingestion, respectively, being markedly lower in mice fed beer. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mRNA was significantly lower 12 h after alcohol or beer exposure, while fatty acid synthase mRNA expression was induced in livers of ethanol-fed mice and to a lesser extent in mice fed beer 6 h after acute alcohol ingestion. Protein levels of tight junction proteins in the small intestine were similar between groups while expression of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 in livers was significantly induced in ethanol- but not in beer-fed mice. Concentrations of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein were also only induced in livers of mice fed ethanol. Protein levels of apolipoprotein B were induced in livers of beer-fed mice only. Our data suggest that beer is less harmful on the development of acute alcohol-induced liver damage than plain ethanol in male mice. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastric and Duodenal Ethanol Concentrations after Intake of Alcoholic Beverages in Postprandial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rubbens, Jari; Riethorst, Danny; Brouwers, Joachim; Wolfs, Kris; Adams, Erwin; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-11

    This study determined intraluminal ethanol concentrations (stomach and duodenum) in fed healthy volunteers after the consumption of common alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, and whisky). The results of this study were compared with a previous study in fasted volunteers. Five healthy volunteers were recruited in a crossover study. The fed state was simulated by ingestion of 250 mL of Nutridrink Compact Neutral. Volunteers subsequently consumed two standard units of beer (Stella Artois, 500 mL, 5.2% ethanol), wine (Blanc du Blanc, 200 mL, 11% ethanol), or whisky (Gallantry Whisky, 80 mL, 40% ethanol). Gastric and duodenal fluids were aspirated through two catheters over time and analyzed for ethanol content by head space gas chromatography. The capability of ethanol to permeate gastric and duodenal rat mucosa was examined in an Ussing chambers setup. A similar average gastric Cmax was observed in the beer and the wine conditions: 3.3% and 3.7% ethanol, respectively. The gastric Cmax in the whisky condition amounted to 8.5% ethanol. Lower ethanol concentrations were observed in the duodenum compared to the stomach. The duodenal Cmax was similar in all three conditions: 1.3%, 1.2%, and 1.6% ethanol for beer, wine, and whisky, respectively. Compared to the fasted state (reported in a previous study), higher gastric ethanol concentrations were observed during a longer time period. In the beer and wine conditions, similar concentrations were observed in the intestine regardless of the prandial state. After intake of whisky, however, the ethanol concentration was lower in the fed intestine. Alcohol was observed to permeate both gastric and duodenal rat mucosa. Higher intragastric ethanol concentrations were maintained for a longer period of time in fed compared to fasted state conditions. However, the observed concentration profiles were not in line with current FDA guidelines for alcohol resistance testing of formulations, stating that in vitro tests should investigate the

  7. Rotifers ingest oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fayer, R.; Trout, J.M.; Walsh, E.; Cole, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Six genera of rotifers including Philodina, Monostyla, Epiphanes, Euchlanis, Brachionus, and Asplanchna were exposed to oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum cleaned of fecal debris. Unstained oocysts and those stained with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody were added to suspensions of viable rotifers and were examined by phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. Rotifers of all six genera were observed ingesting oocysts. A maximum of 25 oocysts was observed in the stomachs of Euchlanis and Brachionus. Euchlanis and Epiphanes were observed excreting boluses containing up to eight oocysts. It was not determined whether rotifers digested or otherwise rendered oocysts nonviable.

  8. Pneumopericardium due to ingestion of button battery.

    PubMed

    Soni, Jai Prakash; Choudhary, Sandeep; Sharma, Pramod; Makwana, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Mostly ingested button batteries passed through the gastrointestinal tract without any adverse effects. But button battery can lead to hazardous complications including tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), especially when the battery is impacted in the esophagus. Urgent esophagoscopic removal of the battery is essential in all cases. Once the TEF is identified, conservative management is the initial treatment of choice. Delayed primary repair can be tried if spontaneous closure does not occur. Here in we want to report a rare case of air leak syndrome, pneumo-pericardium secondary to the corrosive effect of a button battery and child recovered completely with conservative management.

  9. Reported Adverse Health Effects in Children from Ingestion of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizers - United States, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cynthia; Kieszak, Stephanie; Wang, Alice; Law, Royal; Schier, Joshua; Wolkin, Amy

    2017-03-03

    Hand sanitizers are effective and inexpensive products that can reduce microorganisms on the skin, but ingestion or improper use can be associated with health risks. Many hand sanitizers contain up to 60%-95% ethanol or isopropyl alcohol by volume, and are often combined with scents that might be appealing to young children. Recent reports have identified serious consequences, including apnea, acidosis, and coma in young children who swallowed alcohol-based (alcohol) hand sanitizer (1-3). Poison control centers collect data on intentional and unintentional exposures to hand sanitizer solutions resulting from various routes of exposure, including ingestion, inhalation, and dermal and ocular exposures. To characterize exposures of children aged ≤12 years to alcohol hand sanitizers, CDC analyzed data reported to the National Poison Data System (NPDS).* The major route of exposure to both alcohol and nonalcohol-based (nonalcohol) hand sanitizers was ingestion. The majority of intentional exposures to alcohol hand sanitizers occurred in children aged 6-12 years. Alcohol hand sanitizer exposures were associated with worse outcomes than were nonalcohol hand sanitizer exposures. Caregivers and health care providers should be aware of the potential dangers associated with hand sanitizer ingestion. Children using alcohol hand sanitizers should be supervised and these products should be kept out of reach from children when not in use.

  10. Comparative abuse liability of GHB and ethanol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB; sodium oxybate) is approved for narcolepsy symptom treatment, and it is also abused. This study compared the participant-rated, observer-rated effects, motor/cognitive, physiological, and reinforcing effects of GHB and ethanol in participants with histories of sedative (including alcohol) abuse. Fourteen participants lived on a residential unit for ~1 month. Sessions were conducted Monday through Friday. Measures were taken before, and repeatedly up to 24 hours after drug administration. Participants were administered GHB (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 g/70kg), ethanol (12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 g/70kg), or placebo in a double-blind, within-subjects design. For safety, GHB and ethanol were administered in an ascending dose sequence, with placebos and both drugs intermixed across sessions. The sequence for each drug was stopped if significant impairment or intolerable effects occurred. Only 9 and 10 participants received the full dose range for GHB and ethanol, respectively. The highest doses of GHB and ethanol showed onset within 30 minutes, with peak effects at 60 minutes. GHB effects dissipated between 4 and 6 hours, while ethanol effects dissipated between 6 and 8 hours. Dose-related effects were observed for both drugs on a variety of measures assessing sedative drug effects, abuse liability, performance impairment, and physiological effects. Within-session measures of abuse liability were similar between the two drugs. However, post-session measures of abuse liability, including a direct preference test between the highest tolerated doses of each drug, suggested somewhat greater abuse liability for GHB, due most likely to the delayed aversive ethanol effects (e.g., headache). PMID:23421353

  11. Comparative abuse liability of GHB and ethanol in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R

    2013-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB; sodium oxybate) is approved for narcolepsy symptom treatment, and it is also abused. This study compared the participant-rated, observer-rated effects, motor/cognitive, physiological, and reinforcing effects of GHB and ethanol in participants with histories of sedative (including alcohol) abuse. Fourteen participants lived on a residential unit for ∼1 month. Sessions were conducted Monday through Friday. Measures were taken before and repeatedly up to 24 hours after drug administration. Participants were administered GHB (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 g/70 kg), ethanol (12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 g/70 kg), or placebo in a double-blind, within-subjects design. For safety, GHB and ethanol were administered in an ascending dose sequence, with placebos and both drugs intermixed across sessions. The sequence for each drug was stopped if significant impairment or intolerable effects occurred. Only 9 and 10 participants received the full dose range for GHB and ethanol, respectively. The highest doses of GHB and ethanol showed onset within 30 minutes, with peak effects at 60 minutes. GHB effects dissipated between 4 and 6 hours, whereas ethanol effects dissipated between 6 and 8 hours. Dose-related effects were observed for both drugs on a variety of measures assessing sedative drug effects, abuse liability, performance impairment, and physiological effects. Within-session measures of abuse liability were similar between the two drugs. However, postsession measures of abuse liability, including a direct preference test between the highest tolerated doses of each drug, suggested somewhat greater abuse liability for GHB, most likely as a result of the delayed aversive ethanol effects (e.g., headache).

  12. Physiological basis for effect of physical conditioning on chronic ethanol-induced hypertension in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Husain, Kazim; Mejia, Jose; Lalla, Jainarine

    2006-09-01

    The study aim was to investigate the interaction of physical conditioning and chronic ethanol ingestion on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), nitric oxide (NO) and oxidants/antioxidants balance in the plasma of rats. Male Fisher rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each and treated as follows: (1) Control (5% sucrose, orally) daily for 12 weeks; (2) ethanol (4 g kg(-1), orally) daily for 12 weeks; (3) exercise training on treadmill plus sucrose daily for 12 weeks and (4) exercise training on treadmill followed by ethanol (4 g kg(-1), orally) daily for 12 weeks. The body weight, BP and HR were recorded every week. The animals were sacrificed under ether anesthesia after 12 weeks, blood collected in heparinzed vials, plasma isolated and analyzed. The results show that exercise training significantly lowered the weight gain 6-12 weeks in ethanol treated rats compared to ethanol alone or control rats. The mean arterial BP was significantly elevated 6-12 weeks after ethanol ingestion without significant alterations in HR. Exercise training lowered the BP close to the normal control values in ethanol fed rats. Ethanol significantly decreased the plasma NO levels, reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) and antioxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD, and Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities while plasma NADPH oxidase activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated compared to control. Exercise training significantly restored the depletion of plasma NO levels, GSH/GSSG ratio, and antioxidant enzyme activities and normalized the MDA levels and NADPH oxidase activity in the plasma of ethanol treated rats. The study concluded that physical conditioning attenuates the chronic ethanol-induced hypertension by augmenting the NO bioavailability and reducing the oxidative stress response in the plasma of rats.

  13. Betaine, ethanol, and the liver: a review.

    PubMed

    Barak, A J; Beckenhauer, H C; Tuma, D J

    1996-01-01

    Two of the most important biochemical hepatic pathways in the liver are those that synthesize methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through the methylation of homocysteine. This article reviews some recent findings in this laboratory, which demonstrate that ethanol feeding to rats impairs one of these pathways involving the enzyme methionine synthetase (MS), but by way of compensation increases the activity of the enzyme betaine:homocysteine methyl transferase (BHMT), which catalyzes the second pathway in methionine and SAM biosynthesis. It has been shown that despite the inhibition of MS, the enhanced BHMT pathway utilizes hepatic betaine pools to maintain levels of SAM. Subsequent to the above findings, it has been shown that minimal supplemental dietary betaine at the 0.5% level generates SAM twofold in control animals and fivefold in ethanol-fed rats. Concomitant with the betaine-generated SAM, ethanol-induced hepatic fatty infiltration was ameliorated. In view of the fact that SAM has already been used successfully in the treatment of human maladies, including liver dysfunction, betaine, shown to protect against the early stages of alcoholic liver injury as well as being a SAM generator, may become a promising therapeutic agent and a possible alternative to expensive SAM in the treatment of liver disease and other human maladies.

  14. Neuropeptide Y suppresses ethanol drinking in ethanol-abstinent, but not non-ethanol-abstinent, Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Stewart, Robert B; Badia-Elder, Nancy E

    2008-11-01

    In outbred rats, increases in brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) activity suppress ethanol consumption in a variety of access conditions, but only following a history of ethanol dependence. NPY reliably suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring rats, and this effect is augmented following a period of ethanol abstinence. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of NPY on two-bottle choice ethanol drinking and feeding in Wistar rats that had undergone chronic ethanol vapor exposure, cycles of ethanol abstinence, or both. Ethanol-drinking Wistar rats were given 6 weeks of access to 15% (vol/vol) ethanol and water followed by either: two cycles of 1 week ethanol vapor exposure and 2 weeks with no ethanol; two cycles of 1 week ethanol bottle availability and 2 weeks with no ethanol; or 2 weeks of ethanol vapor exposure. Rats were infused intracerebroventricularly with one of four NPY doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 microg) following the ethanol exposure patterns described above, and tested for ethanol drinking and feeding in a two-bottle choice situation. NPY dose dependently increased food intake regardless of ethanol exposure history, but suppressed ethanol drinking only in rats that underwent cycles of ethanol access and ethanol abstinence. These results support the notion that dysregulation of brain NPY systems during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure is important in the motivational drive for subsequent relapse to ethanol drinking.

  15. The Safety of Ingested Caffeine: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Jennifer L.; Bernard, Christophe; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Czachor, Jason D.; Westphal, Joslyn A.; Mestre, Miriam A.

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive drug in the world. Natural sources of caffeine include coffee, tea, and chocolate. Synthetic caffeine is also added to products to promote arousal, alertness, energy, and elevated mood. Over the past decade, the introduction of new caffeine-containing food products, as well as changes in consumption patterns of the more traditional sources of caffeine, has increased scrutiny by health authorities and regulatory bodies about the overall consumption of caffeine and its potential cumulative effects on behavior and physiology. Of particular concern is the rate of caffeine intake among populations potentially vulnerable to the negative effects of caffeine consumption: pregnant and lactating women, children and adolescents, young adults, and people with underlying heart or other health conditions, such as mental illness. Here, we review the research into the safety and safe doses of ingested caffeine in healthy and in vulnerable populations. We report that, for healthy adults, caffeine consumption is relatively safe, but that for some vulnerable populations, caffeine consumption could be harmful, including impairments in cardiovascular function, sleep, and substance use. We also identified several gaps in the literature on which we based recommendations for the future of caffeine research. PMID:28603504

  16. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, a common fungal pathogen, follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in eradication, latency, or extrapulmonary dissemination. Successful control of C. neoformans infection is dependent on host macrophages, but macrophages display little ability to kill C. neoformans in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of C. neoformans by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by C. neoformans toxicity. Infection of macrophages by C. neoformans was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways, such as hypoxia-inducing factor-1-α, receptor-interacting protein 1, and apoptosis-inducing factor. Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated, depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the nonspecific nature of C. neoformans virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that C. neoformans infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen.

  17. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn), a common fungal pathogen follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in either eradication, latency or extra-pulmonary dissemination. Successful control of Cn infection is dependent on host macrophages but macrophages display little ability to kill Cn in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of Cn by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by Cn toxicity. Infection of macrophages by Cn was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways such as Hypoxia Inducing Factor-1α (HIF-1α), Receptor-interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) and Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF). Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the non-specific nature of Cn virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that Cn infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen. PMID:25646306

  18. Automatic Ingestion Monitor: A Novel Wearable Device for Monitoring of Ingestive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Juan M.; Farooq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective monitoring of food intake and ingestive behavior in a free-living environment remains an open problem that has significant implications in study and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. In this paper, a novel wearable sensor system (automatic ingestion monitor, AIM) is presented for objective monitoring of ingestive behavior in free living. The proposed device integrates three sensor modalities that wirelessly interface to a smartphone: a jaw motion sensor, a hand gesture sensor, and an accelerometer. A novel sensor fusion and pattern recognition method was developed for subject-independent food intake recognition. The device and the methodology were validated with data collected from 12 subjects wearing AIM during the course of 24 h in which both the daily activities and the food intake of the subjects were not restricted in any way. Results showed that the system was able to detect food intake with an average accuracy of 89.8%, which suggests that AIM can potentially be used as an instrument to monitor ingestive behavior in free-living individuals. PMID:24845288

  19. Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1986-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique is described for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The techniques were developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden airstream and of the droplet velocities were made at the stimulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The LWC was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water enchanced the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous LWC of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31% of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10% of the known water ingestion rate.

  20. Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a novel non-intrusive optical technique for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The technique was developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden aircraft and of the droplet velocities were made at the simulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The liquid water content was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed YAG laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water greatly improved the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous liquid water content of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31 percent of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10 percent of the known water ingestion rate.

  1. Data ingestion into NeQuick 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Radicella, S. M.; Azpilicueta, F.

    2011-12-01

    NeQuick 2 is the latest version of the NeQuick ionosphere electron density model developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy with the collaboration of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. It is a quick-run model particularly designed for trans-ionospheric propagation applications that has been conceived to reproduce the median behavior of the ionosphere. To provide 3-D specification of the ionosphere electron density for current conditions, different ionosphere electron density retrieval techniques based on the NeQuick adaptation to GPS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ionosonde measured peak parameters values have been developed. In the present paper the technique based on the ingestion of global vertical TEC map into NeQuick 2 will be validated and an assessment of the capability of the model to reproduce the ionosphere day-to-day variability will also be performed. For this purpose hourly GPS-derived global vertical TEC maps and hourly foF2 values from about 20 ionosondes corresponding to one month in high solar activity and one month in low solar activity period will be used. Furthermore, the first results concerning the ingestion of space-based GPS-derived TEC data will be presented.

  2. Food Poisonings by Ingestion of Cyprinid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Manabu; Noguchi, Tamao

    2014-01-01

    Raw or dried gallbladders of cyprinid fish have long been ingested as a traditional medicine in the Asian countries, particularly in China, for ameliorating visual acuity, rheumatism, and general health; however, sporadic poisoning incidences have occurred after their ingestion. The poisoning causes complex symptoms in patients, including acute renal failure, liver dysfunction, paralysis, and convulsions of limbs. The causative substance for the poisoning was isolated, and its basic properties were examined. The purified toxin revealed a minimum lethal dose of 2.6 mg/20 g in mouse, when injected intraperitoneally. The main symptoms were paralysis and convulsions of the hind legs, along with other neurological signs. Liver biopsy of the euthanized mice clearly exhibited hepatocytes necrosis and infiltration of neutrophils and lymphocytes, suggesting the acute dysfunction of the liver. Blood tests disclosed the characteristics of acute renal failure and liver injury. Infrared (IR) spectrometry, fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated, a molecular formula of C27H48O8S, containing a sulfate ester group for the toxin. Thus, we concluded that the structure of carp toxin to be 5α-cyprinol sulfate (5α-cholestane-3α, 7α, 12α, 26, 27-pentol 26-sulfate). This indicated that carp toxin is a nephro- and hepato- toxin, which could be the responsible toxin for carp bile poisoning in humans. PMID:24476713

  3. Calibration of an ingestible temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A P; Stewart, I B

    2008-11-01

    An ingestible telemetric sensor for measuring core body temperature is increasingly being utilized in occupational and athletic studies of heat strain. There is a need for a uniform method of calibrating these sensors in the scientific community in order to effectively compare the results of different researchers. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine and present such a calibration procedure. Sensors were placed in a water bath heated to nine discrete temperatures, and the recorded values were compared to that of a traceable thermometer. It was observed that sensor 2 recorded temperatures higher than sensors 1 and 3, and that all sensors were higher than the traceable thermometer, highlighting the need for a calibration procedure. The findings of this study suggest a number of recommendations for a calibration procedure including: (1) four water bath temperatures in the range of 33-41 degrees C should be utilized; (2) sensors should be immersed for a minimum of 4 min prior to taking a measurement; (3) a linear regression relating sensor temperature to a traceable thermometer is an appropriate method to adjust raw data. Switching the sensor off after calibration and reactivating it prior to ingestion will not influence the accuracy of temperature measurement.

  4. Prolonged energy harvesting for ingestible devices

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Phillip; El-Damak, Dina; Glettig, Dean; Kong, Yong Lin; Mo, Stacy; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Roxhed, Niclas; Langer, Robert; Chandrakasan, Anantha P.; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Ingestible electronics have revolutionized the standard of care for a variety of health conditions. Extending the capacity and safety of these devices, and reducing the costs of powering them, could enable broad deployment of prolonged monitoring systems for patients. Although prior biocompatible power harvesting systems for in vivo use have demonstrated short minute-long bursts of power from the stomach, not much is known about the capacity to power electronics in the longer term and throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the design and operation of an energy-harvesting galvanic cell for continuous in vivo temperature sensing and wireless communication. The device delivered an average power of 0.23 μW per mm2 of electrode area for an average of 6.1 days of temperature measurements in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. This power-harvesting cell has the capacity to provide power for prolonged periods of time to the next generation of ingestible electronic devices located in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28458955

  5. Prolonged energy harvesting for ingestible devices.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Phillip; El-Damak, Dina; Glettig, Dean; Kong, Yong Lin; Mo, Stacy; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Roxhed, Niclas; Langer, Robert; Chandrakasan, Anantha P; Traverso, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Ingestible electronics have revolutionized the standard of care for a variety of health conditions. Extending the capacity and safety of these devices, and reducing the costs of powering them, could enable broad deployment of prolonged monitoring systems for patients. Although prior biocompatible power harvesting systems for in vivo use have demonstrated short minute-long bursts of power from the stomach, not much is known about the capacity to power electronics in the longer term and throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the design and operation of an energy-harvesting galvanic cell for continuous in vivo temperature sensing and wireless communication. The device delivered an average power of 0.23 μW per mm(2) of electrode area for an average of 6.1 days of temperature measurements in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. This power-harvesting cell has the capacity to provide power for prolonged periods of time to the next generation of ingestible electronic devices located in the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Practical use of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in postmortem cases as markers of antemortem alcohol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Karinen, Ritva; Christophersen, Asbjørg; Mørland, Jørg

    2010-03-01

    In postmortem toxicology, it could be difficult to determine whether a positive blood ethanol concentration reflects antemortem ingestion or postmortem synthesis of alcohol. Measurement of the nonoxidative ethanol metabolite ethyl glucuronide (EtG) has been suggested as a marker of antemortem ingestion of alcohol, but EtG might degrade postmortem which could make interpretation difficult. So far, the published articles concern EtG only. Another nonoxidative metabolite, ethyl sulfate (EtS), which is more stable, has therefore been included in this study. We present a material of 36 deaths where postmortem formation of ethanol was suspected and where both EtG and EtS were measured in blood and urine to assist the interpretation. In 19 cases, EtG and EtS were positive in the body fluids analyzed. The median concentration of EtG and EtS in blood was 0.4 (range 0.1-23.2) and 0.9 mg/L (range 0.04-7.9), respectively. The median concentration of EtG and EtS in urine was 35.9 (range 1.0-182) and 8.5 mg/L (range 0.3-99), respectively. In another 16 cases, there was no trace of EtG or EtS in the specimens analyzed. In one case, there was inconsistency between the results of EtG and EtS; they were both positive in urine, while only EtS was positive in blood. This study showed that, out of 36 cases, antemortem ingestion of alcohol was very likely in 19 and unlikely in 16, according to EtG and EtS results. In the last case, the interpretation was more difficult. One possible explanation would be postmortem degradation of EtG in blood.

  7. Effect of ethanol on the efficacy of nasal continuous positive airway pressure as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Berry, R B; Desa, M M; Light, R W

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ethanol ingestion on the efficacy of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nasal CPAP) as a treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome was studied in ten obese male subjects undergoing this therapy. On the first night of polysomnography, the lowest level of CPAP that maintained airway patency was determined (critical level). On the second (control) night (C), subjects slept the entire night on this level of CPAP. On the third night (E), subjects ingested either 1.5 ml/kg (part A, N = 6) or 2.0 ml/kg (part B, N = 4) of 50 percent ethanol (100 proof vodka) over one half-hour starting 1 h before bedtime. A serum ethanol level was obtained at bedtime (part A: 63.7 +/- 17.3 mg/dl; part B: 108.6 +/- 20.6 mg/dl), and subjects were monitored on the critical level of CPAP. Comparison of nights C and E for parts A + B showed no difference in total sleep time (TST) or the amount of different sleep stages as an absolute time or a percentage of TST except that there was more stage 2 (as a percent of TST) on E nights. The apnea + hypopnea index and C and E nights did not differ and was quite low (3.6 +/- 3.7/h vs 1.9 +/- 2.7/h). Similarly, ethanol ingestion did not increase the number of desaturations to at or below 90 and 85 percent, or lower the mean arterial oxygen saturation in NREM or REM sleep. Analysis of parts A and B separately also showed no differences with respect to the apnea + hypopnea index or the number of desaturations on control and ethanol nights. We conclude that acute moderate ethanol ingestion does not decrease the efficacy of an optimum level of nasal CPAP.

  8. Thiamine transport across the rat intestine. II. Effect of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Hoyumpa, A M; Breen, K J; Schenker, S; Wilson, F A

    1975-11-01

    exit from the cells but does not affect cellular uptake of thiamine. The similarity to ouabain action suggests that ethanol may impair active thiamine transport by inhibiting Na-K ATPase activity.

  9. Ethanol Sensitization during Adolescence or Adulthood Induces Different Patterns of Ethanol Consumption without Affecting Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Carrara-Nascimento, Priscila F.; Hoffmann, Lucas B.; Contó, Marcos B.; Marcourakis, Tania; Camarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    In previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol preexposure may increase ethanol consumption in both adolescent and adult mice, in a two-bottle choice model. We now questioned if ethanol exposure during adolescence results in changes of consumption pattern using a three-bottle choice procedure, considering drinking-in-the-dark and alcohol deprivation effect as strategies for ethanol consumption escalation. We also analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity as a measurement of ethanol metabolism. Adolescent and adult Swiss mice were treated with saline (SAL) or 2.0 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) during 15 days (groups: Adolescent-SAL, Adolescent-EtOH, Adult-SAL and Adult-EtOH). Five days after the last injection, mice were exposed to the three-bottle choice protocol using sucrose fading procedure (4% + sucrose vs. 8%–15% ethanol + sucrose vs. water + sucrose) for 2 h during the dark phase. Sucrose was faded out from 8% to 0%. The protocol was composed of a 6-week acquisition period, followed by four withdrawals and reexposures. Both adolescent and adult mice exhibited ethanol behavioral sensitization, although the magnitude of sensitization in adolescents was lower than in adults. Adolescent-EtOH displayed an escalation of 4% ethanol consumption during acquisition that was not observed in Adult-EtOH. Moreover, Adult-EtOH consumed less 4% ethanol throughout all the experiment and less 15% ethanol in the last reexposure period than Adolescent-EtOH. ALDH activity varied with age, in which older mice showed higher ALDH than younger ones. Ethanol pretreatment or the pattern of consumption did not have influence on ALDH activity. Our data suggest that ethanol pretreatment during adolescence but not adulthood may influence the pattern of ethanol consumption toward an escalation in ethanol consumption at low dose, without exerting an impact on ALDH activity. PMID:28386220

  10. Ethanol at low concentrations protects glomerular podocytes through alcohol dehydrogenase and 20-HETE.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ellen T; Zhou, Jianping; Eckert, Ryan; Genochio, David; Sharma, Rishi; Oni, Olurinde; De, Alok; Srivastava, Tarak; Sharma, Ram; Savin, Virginia J; Sharma, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest cardiovascular and renal benefits of ingesting small amounts of ethanol. Effects of ethanol, role of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in podocytes of the glomerular filtration barrier have not been reported. We found that mouse podocytes at baseline generate 20-HETE and express ADH but not CYP2e1. Ethanol at high concentrations altered the actin cytoskeleton, induced CYP2e1, increased superoxide production and inhibited ADH gene expression. Ethanol at low concentrations upregulated the expression of ADH and CYP4a12a. 20-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite generated by CYP4a12a, blocked the ethanol-induced cytoskeletal derangement and superoxide generation. Ethanol at high concentration or ADH inhibitor increased glomerular albumin permeability in vitro. 20-HETE and its metabolite produced by ADH activity, 20-carboxy-arachidonic acid, protected the glomerular permeability barrier against an ADH inhibitor, puromycin or FSGS permeability factor. We conclude that ADH activity is required for glomerular function, 20-HETE is a physiological substrate of ADH in podocytes and that podocytes are useful biosensors to understand glomeruloprotective effects of ethanol.

  11. Ethanol at Low Concentrations Protects Glomerular Podocytes through Alcohol Dehydrogenase and 20-HETE

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ellen T.; Zhou, Jianping; Eckert, Ryan; Genochio, David; Sharma, Rishi; Oni, Olurinde; De, Alok; Srivastava, Tarak; Sharma, Ram; Savin, Virginia J.; Sharma, Mukut

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest cardiovascular and renal benefits of ingesting small amounts of ethanol. Effects of ethanol, role of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in podocytes of the glomerular filtration barrier have not been reported. We found that mouse podocytes at baseline generate 20-HETE and express ADH but not CYP2e1. Ethanol at high concentrations altered the actin cytoskeleton, induced CYP2e1, increased superoxide production and inhibited ADH gene expression. Ethanol at low concentrations upregulated the expression of ADH and CYP4a12a. 20-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite generated by CYP4a12a, blocked the ethanol-induced cytoskeletal derangement and superoxide generation. Ethanol at high concentration or ADH inhibitor increased glomerular albumin permeability in vitro. 20-HETE and its metabolite produced by ADH activity, 20-carboxy-arachidonic acid, protected the glomerular permeability barrier against an ADH inhibitor, puromycin or FSGS permeability factor. We conclude that ADH activity is required for glomerular function, 20-HETE is a physiological substrate of ADH in podocytes and that podocytes are useful biosensors to understand glomeruloprotective effects of ethanol. PMID:25447342

  12. Inhibition of potassium currents is involved in antiarrhythmic effect of moderate ethanol on atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baode; Li, Chenxing; Sun, Junyi; Wang, Xinghui; Liu, Xinling; Yang, Chun; Chen, Lina; Zhou, Jun; Hu, Hao

    2017-03-08

    Excessive consumption of alcohol is a well-established risk factor of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the effects of moderate alcohol drinking remain to be elucidated. This study was designed to determine the effects of moderate ethanol ingestion on atrial fibrillation and the electrophysiological mechanisms. In acetylcholine-induced canine and mouse AF models, the moderate ethanol prevented the generation and persistence of AF through prolonging the latent period of AF and shortening the duration of AF. The action potential duration (APD) was remarkably prolonged under the concentration range of 12.5-50.0mM ethanol in guinea pig atrial myocytes. Ultra-rapid delayed rectified potassium currents (IKv1.5) were markedly inhibited by 12.5-50.0mM ethanol in a concentration-dependent manner. Ethanol with 50.0mM could inhibit rapid delayed rectifier potassium currents (IhERG). Ethanol under 6.25-50.0mM did not affect on inward rectifier potassium currents (IKir2.1). Collectively, the present study provided an evidence that moderate ethanol intake can prolong the APD of atrial myocytes by inhibition of IKv1.5 and IhERG, which contributed to preventing the development and duration of AF.

  13. Ginger extract protects rat's kidneys against oxidative damage after chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Aireza; Rezaei, Farzaneh; Fard, Amin Abdollahzade; Afshari, Ali Taghizadeh; Gharalari, Farzaneh Hosseini; Rasmi, Yousef

    2016-12-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion is associated with pronounced detrimental effects on the renal system. In the current study, the protective effect of ginger extract on ethanol-induced damage was evaluated through determining 8-OHdG, cystatin C, glomerular filtration rate, and pathological changes such as cell proliferation and fibrosis in rats' kidneys. Male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups and were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) ethanol and (3) ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After a six weeks period of treatment, the results revealed proliferation of glomerular and tubular cells, fibrosis in glomerular and peritubular and a significant rise in the level of 8-OHdG, cystatin C, plasma urea and creatinine. Moreover, compared to the control group, the ethanol group showed a significant decrease in the urine creatinine and creatinine clearance. In addition, significant amelioration of changes in the structure of kidneys, along with restoration of the biochemical alterations were found in the ginger extract treated ethanolic group, compared to the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces kidneys abnormality by oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated using ginger as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Between-subject and within-subject variations in the pharmacokinetics of ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A W; Jönsson, K A

    1994-01-01

    1. Twelve healthy men drank 0.80 g ethanol kg-1 body weight on four occasions spread over several weeks. Ethanol was given as 96% v/v solvent which was diluted with orange juice to make a cocktail (20-25% v/v). This drink was ingested in exactly 30 min at 08.00 h after an overnight (10 h) fast. 2. Samples of venous blood were obtained at exactly timed intervals of 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 300, and 360 min after the start of drinking. The concentrations of ethanol in whole blood were determined by headspace gas chromatography. 3. Summary measures were used to evaluate the concentration-time profiles of ethanol for each subject. The between-subject and within-subject components of variation for the pharmacokinetics of ethanol were derived by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). 4. The variation between different subjects dominated the total variance for all of the pharmacokinetic parameters studied except the rate of disappearance of ethanol from blood (ko). For this latter parameter, 42% and 58% of the total variation arose from variations between- and within-subjects respectively. These results might be important to consider when experiments on the clinical pharmacokinetics of ethanol are being planned. PMID:8054248

  15. The ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, D; Bandara, A; Fraser, S; Chambers, P J; Stanley, G A

    2010-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is traditionally used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production; however, its performance during fermentation is compromised by the impact of ethanol accumulation on cell vitality. This article reviews studies into the molecular basis of the ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae; such knowledge can facilitate the development of genetic engineering strategies for improving cell performance during ethanol stress. Previous studies have used a variety of strains and conditions, which is problematic, because the impact of ethanol stress on gene expression is influenced by the environment. There is however some commonality in Gene Ontology categories affected by ethanol assault that suggests that the ethanol stress response of S. cerevisiae is compromised by constraints on energy production, leading to increased expression of genes associated with glycolysis and mitochondrial function, and decreased gene expression in energy-demanding growth-related processes. Studies using genome-wide screens suggest that the maintenance of vacuole function is important for ethanol tolerance, possibly because of the roles of this organelle in protein turnover and maintaining ion homoeostasis. Accumulation of Asr1 and Rat8 in the nucleus specifically during ethanol stress suggests S. cerevisiae has a specific response to ethanol stress although this supposition remains controversial.

  16. Ethanol intake under social circumstances or alone in Sprague-Dawley rats: Impact of age, sex, social activity and social anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    Background In human adolescents, heavy drinking is often predicted by high sociability in males and high social anxiety in females. This study assessed the impact of baseline levels of social activity and social anxiety-like behavior in group-housed adolescent and adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats on ethanol intake when drinking alone or in a social group. Methods Social activity and anxiety-like behavior initially were assessed in a modified social interaction test, followed by six drinking sessions that occurred every other day in animals given ad libitum food and water. Sessions consisted of 30-min access to 10% ethanol in a “supersac” (3% sucrose + 0.1% saccharin) solution given alone as well as in groups of five same-sex littermates, with order of the alternating session types counterbalanced across animals. Results Adolescent males and adults of both sexes overall consumed more ethanol under social than alone circumstances, whereas adolescent females ingested more ethanol when alone. Highly socially active adolescent males demonstrated elevated levels of ethanol intake relative to their low and medium socially active counterparts when drinking in groups, but not when tested alone. Adolescent females with high levels of social anxiety-like behavior demonstrated the highest ethanol intake under social, but not alone circumstances. Among adults, baseline levels of social anxiety-like behavior did not contribute to individual differences in ethanol intake in either sex. Conclusions The results clearly demonstrate that in adolescent rats, but not their adult counterparts, responsiveness to a social peer predicts ethanol intake in a social setting – circumstances under which drinking typically occurs in human adolescents. High levels of social activity in males and high levels of social anxiety-like behavior in females were associated with elevated social drinking, suggesting that males ingest ethanol for its socially enhancing properties, whereas

  17. Effects of ingesting a sports bar versus glucose polymer on substrate utilisation and ultra-endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Rauch, H G; Hawley, J A; Woodey, M; Noakes, T D; Dennis, S C

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ingestion of a sports bar (BAR) containing a mixture of fat (7 g), protein (14 ) and carbohydrate (CHO; 19 ) improved ulta-endurance cycling performance compared to when an equicaloric amount of CHO was consumed. On two occasions separated by a minimum of 7 days, six highly trained (peak power output [PPO] 414 +/- 8 W) endurance cyclists rode for 330 min at approximately 50% of PPO (203 +/- 8 W) while ingesting either the BAR or just CHO, before performing a 400 k] time trial as fast as possible. Rates of fat oxidation were significantly greater at the end of the submaximal ride when subjects ingested the BAR compared to CHO (1.09 +/- 0.08 vs 0.73 +/- 0.08g x min(-1); P<0.05), and accordingly total fat oxidation was significantly higher (280 +/- 24 vs 203 +/- 25 g, P < 0.05). However, two subjects failed to complete the time trial after they consumed the BAR during the prolonged, submaximal ride, whereas all subjects managed to finish the time trial when ingesting CHO. In conclusion, ingestion of the sports bar enhanced fat metabolism during prolonged, submaximal exercise, but impaired subsequent high-intensity time-trial performance.

  18. Supplementation of Pueraria radix water extract on changes of antioxidant enzymes and lipid profile in ethanol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Sook

    2004-09-01

    Water extract of Pueraria radix (PRWE), traditional oriental medicinal plant, may have an effect on the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes and lipid profile in ethanol-treated rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, ethanol, PRWE and ethanol-PRWE supplemented groups. Twenty-five percent (v/v) ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) was orally administered once a day for 5 weeks. The PRWE was supplemented in a diet based on 1500 mg of raw PRWE/kg body weight/day. Ethanol feeding resulted in a higher alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and lower aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. After PRWE supplementation, both activities were increased. The PRWE supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the plasma and liver total cholesterol concentrations in the ethanol-treated rats. Ethanol administration significantly lowered the activities of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), whereas it increased the plasma and hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. However, PRWE supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the SOD and CAT activities and a significant decrease in the TBARS and the GSH-Px activities in the ethanol-treated rats. PRWE can contribute to alleviating the adverse effect of ethanol ingestion by enhancing the lipid metabolism as well as the hepatic antioxidant defense system.

  19. An unusual presentation of hydrochloric acid ingestion: a mystery unraveled.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Vinod Prabhu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Chinnakkannan, Selvakumar; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2015-03-01

    Unintentional acid ingestion is less commonly encountered than alkali ingestion. The injury develops for hours to days after ingestion and often results in progressively increasing difficulty in airway management. However, gastric perforation is rare. A 3-year-old boy presented to us with an orotonsillopharyngeal membrane and severe upper airway obstruction. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with a case of gastric perforation due to unintentional hydrochloric acid ingestion. He was treated with partial gastrectomy and feeding jejunostomy, and the recovery was good. Unintentional hydrochloric acid ingestion is rare in children. The manifestations masquerade many other clinical conditions, and the diagnosis is difficult in cases in which history of ingestion is not available. Treatment is symptomatic, and emergency surgery is indicated in case of gastrointestinal perforation.

  20. “Drinking in the Dark” (DID) Procedures: A Model of Binge-Like Ethanol Drinking in Non-Dependent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Todd E.; Navarro, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of an animal model of binge-like ethanol drinking that has come to be called “drinking in the dark” (DID), a procedure that promotes high levels of ethanol drinking and pharmacologically relevant blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) in ethanol-preferring strains of mice. Originally described by Rhodes et al. (2005), the most common variation of the DID procedure, using singly housed mice, involves replacing the water bottle with a bottle containing 20% ethanol for 2 to 4 hours, beginning 3 hours into the dark cycle. Using this procedure, high ethanol drinking strains of mice (e.g., C57BL/6J) typically consume enough ethanol to achieve BECs greater than 100 mg/dL and to exhibit behavioral evidence of intoxication. This limited access procedure takes advantage of the time in the animal’s dark cycle in which the levels of ingestive behaviors are high, yet high ethanol intake does not appear to stem from caloric need. Mice have the choice of drinking or avoiding the ethanol solution, eliminating the stressful conditions that are inherent in other models of binge-like ethanol exposure in which ethanol is administered by the experimenter, and in some cases, potentially painful. The DID procedure is a high throughput approach that does not require extensive training or the inclusion of sweet compounds to motivate high levels of ethanol intake. The high throughput nature of the DID procedure makes it useful for rapid screening of pharmacological targets that are protective against binge-like drinking and for identifying strains of mice that exhibit binge-like drinking behavior. Additionally, the simplicity of DID procedures allows for easy integration into other paradigms, such as prenatal ethanol exposure and adolescent ethanol drinking. It is suggested that the DID model is a useful tool for studying the neurobiology and genetics underlying binge-like ethanol drinking, and may be useful for studying the transition to ethanol

  1. Effect of gestational ethanol exposure on long-term memory formation in newborn chicks.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venugopal; Chaudhuri, Joydeep D

    2007-09-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a condition occurring in some children of mothers who have consumed alcohol during pregnancy, is characterized by craniofacial malformations, and physical and mental retardation. It is significant that even children with history of gestational ethanol exposure but relatively unaffected overall IQ performance, often exhibit learning difficulties and behavioral problems, suggestive of impaired memory formation. Hence, the specific aim of this study was to examine memory formation in chicks exposed to ethanol during early gestation toward the understanding of neurobehavioral disturbances in FAS. Chicks were exposed to alcohol on gestational days 1-3 by injection of ethanol into the airspace of freshly fertilized eggs. The effects of prenatal ethanol on physical growth and development, and memory formation were studied. The one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm in 1-day-old chicks was used to study memory formation in these chicks. It was observed that chick embryos exposed to 10% ethanol on gestational days 1-3 had significant reduction in all body parameters when compared with appropriate controls. Further, ethanol-exposed chick embryos had significantly impaired (P<.05) long-term memory (LTM) formation after training, though short-term or intermediate-term memory formation was unimpaired. Thus, the findings of the current study demonstrate the detrimental effects of ethanol exposure during early pregnancy on developing chick embryos in general and on memory formation in particular. Hence, it is suggested that impairment in LTM could be a fundamental mechanism for learning disorders and neurobehavioral abnormalities observed in FAS.

  2. Ethanol administration exacerbates the abnormalities in hepatic lipid oxidation in genetically obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Hannah; Hu, Ming; Ajmo, Joanne M.; Rogers, Christopher Q.; Liang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Ray; Yin, Huquan; Choi, Alison; Bennett, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption synergistically increases the risk and severity of liver damage in obese patients. To gain insight into cellular or molecular mechanisms underlying the development of fatty liver caused by ethanol-obesity synergism, we have carried out animal experiments that examine the effects of ethanol administration in genetically obese mice. Lean wild-type (WT) and obese (ob/ob) mice were subjected to ethanol feeding for 4 wk using a modified Lieber-DeCarli diet. After ethanol feeding, the ob/ob mice displayed much more pronounced changes in terms of liver steatosis and elevated plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicators of liver injury, compared with control mice. Mechanistic studies showed that ethanol feeding augmented the impairment of hepatic sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling in the ob/ob mice. Moreover, the impairment of SIRT1-AMPK signaling was closely associated with altered hepatic functional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-α and lipin-1, two vital downstream lipid regulators, which ultimately contributed to aggravated fatty liver observed in ethanol-fed ob/ob mice. Taken together, our novel findings suggest that ethanol administration to obese mice exacerbates fatty liver via impairment of the hepatic lipid metabolism pathways mediated largely by a central signaling system, the SIRT1-AMPK axis. PMID:23139221

  3. Ethanol administration exacerbates the abnormalities in hepatic lipid oxidation in genetically obese mice.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Hannah; Hu, Ming; Ajmo, Joanne M; Rogers, Christopher Q; Liang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Ray; Yin, Huquan; Choi, Alison; Bennett, Eric S; You, Min

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption synergistically increases the risk and severity of liver damage in obese patients. To gain insight into cellular or molecular mechanisms underlying the development of fatty liver caused by ethanol-obesity synergism, we have carried out animal experiments that examine the effects of ethanol administration in genetically obese mice. Lean wild-type (WT) and obese (ob/ob) mice were subjected to ethanol feeding for 4 wk using a modified Lieber-DeCarli diet. After ethanol feeding, the ob/ob mice displayed much more pronounced changes in terms of liver steatosis and elevated plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicators of liver injury, compared with control mice. Mechanistic studies showed that ethanol feeding augmented the impairment of hepatic sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling in the ob/ob mice. Moreover, the impairment of SIRT1-AMPK signaling was closely associated with altered hepatic functional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-α and lipin-1, two vital downstream lipid regulators, which ultimately contributed to aggravated fatty liver observed in ethanol-fed ob/ob mice. Taken together, our novel findings suggest that ethanol administration to obese mice exacerbates fatty liver via impairment of the hepatic lipid metabolism pathways mediated largely by a central signaling system, the SIRT1-AMPK axis.

  4. The role of social isolation in ethanol effects on the preweanling rat

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Andrey P.; Nizhnikov, Michael; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    The present experiments investigated the effects of acute ethanol exposure on voluntary intake of 0.1% saccharin or water as well as behavioral and nociceptive reactivity in twelve–day-old (P12) rats exposed to differing levels of isolation. The effects of ethanol emerged only during short-term social isolation (STSI) with different patterns observed in males and females and in pups exposed to saccharin or water. The 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose selectively increased saccharin intake in females, decreased rearing activity in males and attenuated isolation-induced analgesia (IIA) in all water-exposed pups. Ingestion of saccharin decreased IIA, and the 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose further reduced IIA. The 1.0 g/kg ethanol dose, administered either intragastrically or intraparentionally, also decreased IIA in P12 females, but not in P9 pups. A significant correlation between voluntary saccharin intake and baseline nociceptive reactivity was revealed in saline injected animals, saccharin intake was inversely correlated with behavioral activation and latency of reaction to noxious heat after 0.5 g/kg ethanol in females. The 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose did not affect plasma corticosterone (CORT) measured 5 hours after maternal separation or 20 minutes after ethanol injection. Female pups CORT level was inversely correlated with magnitude of IIA that accompanied the first episode of STSI (pretest isolation) 1.5–2 hours before CORT measurement. The present findings suggest that the anxiolytic properties of ethanol are responsible for enhancement of saccharin intake during STSI. Furthermore, differential reactivity of P12 males and females to STSI plays an important role in ethanol effects observed at this age. PMID:22051944

  5. The acute effects of MDMA and ethanol administration on electrophysiological correlates of performance monitoring in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spronk, D B; Dumont, G J H; Verkes, R J; De Bruijn, E R A

    2014-07-01

    Knowing how commonly used drugs affect performance monitoring is of great importance, because drug use is often associated with compromised behavioral control. Two of the most commonly used recreational drugs in the western world, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") and ethanol (alcohol), are also often used in combination. The error-related negativity (ERN), correct-related negativity (CRN), and N2 are electrophysiological indices of performance monitoring. The present study aimed to investigate how ethanol, MDMA, and their co-administration affect performance monitoring as indexed by the electrophysiological correlates. Behavioral and EEG data were obtained from 14 healthy volunteers during execution of a speeded choice-reaction-time task after administration of ethanol, MDMA, and combined ethanol and MDMA, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover design. Ethanol significantly reduced ERN amplitudes, while administration of MDMA did not affect the ERN. Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not further impair nor ameliorate the effect of ethanol alone. No drug effects on CRN nor N2 were observed. A decreased ERN following ethanol administration is in line with previous work and offers further support for the impairing effects of alcohol intoxication on performance monitoring. This impairment may underlie maladaptive behavior in people who are under influence. Moreover, these data demonstrate for the first time that MDMA does not affect performance monitoring nor does it interact with ethanol in this process. These findings corroborate the notion that MDMA leaves central executive functions relatively unaffected.

  6. Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Avifauna in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Qamar A.; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Townsend, Kathy A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian coastal and marine bird species. We investigated which Australian bird groups ingest marine debris, and whether debris-ingesting groups exhibit selectivity associated with their taxonomy, habitat or foraging methods. Here we present the largest multispecies study of anthropogenic debris ingestion in Australasian avifauna to date. We necropsied and investigated the gastrointestinal contents of 378 birds across 61 species, collected dead across eastern Australia. These species represented nine taxonomic orders, five habitat groups and six feeding strategies. Among investigated species, thirty percent had ingested debris, though ingestion did not occur uniformly within the orders of birds surveyed. Debris ingestion was found to occur in orders Procellariiformes, Suliformes, Charadriiformes and Pelecaniformes, across all surveyed habitats, and among birds that foraged by surface feeding, pursuit diving and search-by-sight. Procellariiformes, birds in pelagic habitats, and surface feeding marine birds ingested debris with the greatest frequency. Among birds which were found to ingest marine debris, we investigated debris selectivity and found that marine birds were selective with respect to both type and colour of debris. Selectivity for type and colour of debris significantly correlated with taxonomic order, habitat and foraging strategy. This study highlights the significant impact of feeding ecology on debris ingestion among Australia’s avifauna. PMID:27574986

  7. Development of an Ingestion Pathway Model for AXAIRQ

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1999-01-13

    AXAIRQ is a dose mode code used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and is primarily used to show regulatory compliance. For completeness of pathway analysis, an ingestion model, AXINGST, has been developed for use with, and incorporation in, AXAIRQ. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. AXINGST calculates a conservative ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site specific variables where applicable.

  8. Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Avifauna in Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Roman, Lauren; Schuyler, Qamar A; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Townsend, Kathy A

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic debris in the world's oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia's coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian coastal and marine bird species. We investigated which Australian bird groups ingest marine debris, and whether debris-ingesting groups exhibit selectivity associated with their taxonomy, habitat or foraging methods. Here we present the largest multispecies study of anthropogenic debris ingestion in Australasian avifauna to date. We necropsied and investigated the gastrointestinal contents of 378 birds across 61 species, collected dead across eastern Australia. These species represented nine taxonomic orders, five habitat groups and six feeding strategies. Among investigated species, thirty percent had ingested debris, though ingestion did not occur uniformly within the orders of birds surveyed. Debris ingestion was found to occur in orders Procellariiformes, Suliformes, Charadriiformes and Pelecaniformes, across all surveyed habitats, and among birds that foraged by surface feeding, pursuit diving and search-by-sight. Procellariiformes, birds in pelagic habitats, and surface feeding marine birds ingested debris with the greatest frequency. Among birds which were found to ingest marine debris, we investigated debris selectivity and found that marine birds were selective with respect to both type and colour of debris. Selectivity for type and colour of debris significantly correlated with taxonomic order, habitat and foraging strategy. This study highlights the significant impact of feeding ecology on debris ingestion among Australia's avifauna.

  9. Jejunoileal perforation and volvulus caused by multiple magnet ingestion.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Serkan; Basuguy, Erol; Zeytun, Hikmet; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin; Arslan, Mehmet Serif

    2015-03-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in children, but magnet ingestion is relatively rare. However, when it occurs, it tends to have a high rate of complications. This is a case report of a 3-year-old child who swallowed multiple magnetic toys, subsequently developing jejunoileal perforation and volvulus. This case report indicates that it is best to surgically remove multiple ingested magnets without delay to avoid intestinal perforation, fistula, and other complications such as volvulus.

  10. Modeled estimates of soil and dust ingestion rates for children.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Halûk; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Glen, Graham; Smith, Luther

    2011-04-01

    Daily soil/dust ingestion rates typically used in exposure and risk assessments are based on tracer element studies, which have a number of limitations and do not separate contributions from soil and dust. This article presents an alternate approach of modeling soil and dust ingestion via hand and object mouthing of children, using EPA's SHEDS model. Results for children 3 to <6 years old show that mean and 95th percentile total ingestion of soil and dust values are 68 and 224 mg/day, respectively; mean from soil ingestion, hand-to-mouth dust ingestion, and object-to-mouth dust ingestion are 41 mg/day, 20 mg/day, and 7 mg/day, respectively. In general, hand-to-mouth soil ingestion was the most important pathway, followed by hand-to-mouth dust ingestion, then object-to-mouth dust ingestion. The variability results are most sensitive to inputs on surface loadings, soil-skin adherence, hand mouthing frequency, and hand washing frequency. The predicted total soil and dust ingestion fits a lognormal distribution with geometric mean = 35.7 and geometric standard deviation = 3.3. There are two uncertainty distributions, one below the 20th percentile and the other above. Modeled uncertainties ranged within a factor of 3-30. Mean modeled estimates for soil and dust ingestion are consistent with past information but lower than the central values recommended in the 2008 EPA Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook. This new modeling approach, which predicts soil and dust ingestion by pathway, source type, population group, geographic location, and other factors, offers a better characterization of exposures relevant to health risk assessments as compared to using a single value. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. The influences of age and gender on blood ethanol concentrations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Lucey, M R; Hill, E M; Young, J P; Demo-Dananberg, L; Beresford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Previous cross-section studies suggested that blood ethanol concentrations (BAC) increase with age. To establish this, and to account for putative gender differences, we studied four cohorts of nonalcoholic subjects. Fifty-seven subjects were studied: 14 men and 14 women in the young (21-40 years) and 14 men and 15 women in the old (> or = 60 years) groups. All subjects received ethanol (0.3 g/kg) on three occasions: orally (PO) after an overnight fast; PO after a standard meal; and by intravenous (IV) infusion after a standard meal. In all four cohorts, PO ethanol in the fasted state produced the greatest average areas under the curve (AUC) for ethanol, followed by IV ethanol and PO ethanol, both in the fed state. Pooled by age, blood ethanol AUCs were significantly greater in old subjects given PO ethanol when fasted (p = .001) and IV ethanol when fed (p < .004) but not after PO ethanol in the fed state. Pooled by gender, blood ethanol AUCs did not separate men and women in any of the experiments. Corrected for relative volumes of distribution (Vdist) among the four cohorts, only elderly women evidenced AUC values that could not be explained by Vdist alone and only in the fasted state. Both elderly men and women in the fasted state showed higher average peak ethanol levels than gender-matched younger cohorts; this effect was most pronounced in elderly women (47% vs 12%). The data confirm the influence of age, but fail to confirm that of gender, on blood ethanol response after a moderate dose of ethanol. They also show that feeding state can negate differences due to Vdist alone. In the fasted state, Vdist alone explains AUC and peak increases in elderly men but not in elderly women. Neither gastric metabolism nor motility account for age/BAC differences since these were independent of route. These data suggest caution for elderly drinkers or for those prescribing alcoholic beverages to elderly persons as well as for studies of ethanol ingestion that do not

  12. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  13. CENTRAL REINFORCING EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ARE BLOCKED BY CATALASE INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Michael Edward; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have systematically indicated that newborn rats are highly sensitive to ethanol’s positive reinforcing effects. Central administrations of ethanol (25–200 mg %) associated with an olfactory conditioned stimulus (CS) promote subsequent conditioned approach to the CS as evaluated through the newborn’s response to a surrogate nipple scented with the CS. It has been shown that ethanol’s first metabolite, acetaldehyde, exerts significant reinforcing effects in the central nervous system. A significant amount of acetaldehyde is derived from ethanol metabolism via the catalase system. In newborn rats catalase levels are particularly high in several brain structures. The present study tested the effect of catalase inhibition on central ethanol reinforcement. In the first experiment, pups experienced lemon odor either paired or unpaired with intracisternal (i.c.) administrations of 100 mg% ethanol. Half of the animals corresponding to each learning condition were pretreated with i.c. administrations of either physiological saline or a catalase inhibitor (sodium-azide). Catalase inhibition completely suppressed ethanol reinforcement in paired groups without affecting responsiveness to the CS during conditioning or responding by unpaired control groups. A second experiment tested whether these effects were specific to ethanol reinforcement or due instead to general impairment in learning and expression capabilities. Central administration of an endogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist (dynorphin A-13) was employed as an alternative source of reinforcement. Inhibition of the catalase system had no effect on the reinforcing properties of dynorphin. The present results support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism regulated by the catalase system plays a critical role in determination of ethanol reinforcement in newborn rats. PMID:17980789

  14. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  15. Binge ethanol exposure in late gestation induces ethanol aversion in the dam but enhances ethanol intake in the offspring and affects their postnatal learning about ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Chotro, M. Gabriela; Arias, Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to 1 or 2 g/kg ethanol during the last days of gestation increases ethanol acceptance in infant rats. We tested whether prenatal exposure to 3 g/kg, a relatively high ethanol dose, generates an aversion to ethanol in both the dam and offspring, and whether this prenatal experience affects the expression of learning derived from ethanol exposure postnatally. The answer was uncertain, since postnatal administration of a 3 g/kg ethanol dose induces an aversion to ethanol after postnatal day 10 but increases ethanol acceptance when administered during the first postnatal week. In the present study pregnant rats received intragastric administrations of water or ethanol (3 g/kg) on gestation days 17-20. On postnatal days 7-8 or 10-11 the offspring were administered water or ethanol (3 g/kg). Intake of ethanol and water, locomotor activity in an open-field and ethanol odor preference were evaluated in the pups, while the mothers were evaluated in terms of ethanol intake. Results indicated an aversion to ethanol in dams that had been administered ethanol during gestation, despite a general increase in ethanol intake observed in their pups relative to controls. The prenatal ethanol exposure also potentiated the increase in ethanol intake observed after intoxication on postnatal days 7-8. Ethanol intoxication on postnatal days 10-11 reduced ethanol consumption; this ethanol aversion was still evident in infant rats exposed prenatally to ethanol despite their general increase in ethanol intake. No effects of prenatal ethanol exposure were observed in terms of motor activity or odor preference. It is concluded that prenatal exposure to ethanol, even in a dose that induces ethanol aversion in the gestating dam, increases ethanol intake in infant rats and that this experience modulates age-related differences in subsequent postnatal learning about ethanol. PMID:19801275

  16. Fishing for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Zebrafish as a Model for Ethanol Teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Charles Ben; Fernandes, Yohaan; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-10-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) describes a wide array of ethanol-induced developmental defects, including craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive impairments. It affects ∼1 in 100 children born in the United States each year. Due to the pleiotropic effects of ethanol, animal models have proven critical in characterizing the mechanisms of ethanol teratogenesis. In this review, we focus on the utility of zebrafish in characterizing ethanol-induced developmental defects. A growing number of laboratories have focused on using zebrafish to examine ethanol-induced defects in craniofacial, cardiac, ocular, and neural development, as well as cognitive and behavioral impairments. Growing evidence supports that genetic predisposition plays a role in these ethanol-induced defects, yet little is understood about these gene-ethanol interactions. With a high degree of genetic amenability, zebrafish is at the forefront of identifying and characterizing the gene-ethanol interactions that underlie FASD. Because of the conservation of gene function between zebrafish and humans, these studies will directly translate to studies of candidate genes in human populations and allow for better diagnosis and treatment of FASD.

  17. An evaluation of possible interactions between ethanol and trazodone or amitriptyline.

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, S J; Ankier, S I; Turner, P

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic effects of single doses of trazodone (100 mg), amitriptyline (50 mg) or placebo either alone or with ethanol (0.5 ml/kg) were investigated in six healthy volunteers in a double-blind crossover study. Plasma concentrations of the drugs and ethanol were also measured. Pharmacodynamic tests were critical flicker fusion frequency threshold (CFF), choice reaction time (CRT), manual dexterity, a digit span test and visual analogue scales. Blood ethanol concentrations were not influenced by the co-administration of either antidepressant. tmax for trazodone was prolonged by ethanol but the other pharmacokinetic parameters for trazodone and amitriptyline were not influenced by ethanol. Trazodone and amitriptyline caused the expected profound depressant effects on CFF, CRT, manual dexterity and on the rating scales for drowsiness, 'clear-headedness', aggression and disinhibition. Ethanol alone impaired manual dexterity, increased drowsiness, reduced 'clear headedness' and also tended to reduce feelings of aggression. In combination with either trazodone or amitriptyline, ethanol caused little additional effect except in the case of manual dexterity which was further impaired. This result may reflect the profound effects of the antidepressants alone and does not suggest that it is safe for patients receiving antidepressant medication to take ethanolic drinks. PMID:6487494

  18. Emergency Management of the Ingested Magnet: An Algorithmic Approach.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Brent; McEachron, Kendall; Goldman, Deborah; Louiselle, Amanda; Zheng, Eugene; Mills, David; Louie, Jeffrey; Segura, Bradley

    2017-05-01

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is an increasing problem in the pediatric population. Symptoms are often nonspecific and may lead to a missed diagnosis because the ingestion event often goes unwitnessed. We present a case of a missed diagnosis of a multiple magnet ingestion event in a pediatric patient leading to operative management. A 2-year-old boy with a 4-week history of nonspecific abdominal pain presented to the emergency department (ED) with vomiting and worsening abdominal pain. He was recently seen in the ED for nonspecific abdominal pain diagnosed as acute otitis media. In this second ED visit, the child was found to be febrile and tachycardic and had signs of peritonitis. Radiographs revealed a foreign body in the right lower quadrant. The child was taken to the operating room where multiple intestinal perforations were identified and repaired. The child had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 7 days later. There are increasing awareness and growing concern over complications from pediatric magnet ingestion. Complications from neodymium magnet ingestion may include bowel obstruction, perforation, and fistula formation. The risk of complications is especially high with multiple-magnet ingestion. Pediatric foreign-body magnet ingestion may be a diagnostic challenge because the associated symptoms are nonspecific, and the ingestion is often unwitnessed. Our case represents the missed diagnosis of 4 magnets ingested separately over time. Emergency department providers may benefit from a clinical algorithm guiding the management of these increasingly prevalent patient presentations to prevent delayed diagnoses and to decrease morbidity.

  19. Ingestion analgesia occurs when a bad taste turns good.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hayley; Mason, Peggy

    2011-12-01

    During ingestion of water, chocolate, sucrose, and saccharin, pain-related behaviors are suppressed. This ingestion analgesic effect is reversed when the hedonic valence of a food is switched from "good" to "bad" as occurs during conditioned taste aversion. Here, we tested the converse hedonic shift to determine if ingestion analgesia occurs when 0.3 M NaCl is made palatable by inducing a sodium appetite. In Experiment 1, sham- and sodium-depleted rats were tested for paw withdrawal and lick latencies to brief noxious heat during quiet wake and intraoral NaCl ingestion. Only sodium-depleted rats showed a suppression of heat-evoked reactions during NaCl ingestion. In Experiment 2, we tested whether this analgesic effect is mediated by the brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Inactivation of NRM with muscimol blocked ingestion analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium-depleted rats. This attenuation was not due to a hyperalgesic effect of NRM inactivation. Muscimol microinjections into a nearby region, the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO), were ineffective. The present findings demonstrate that the internal milieu of an animal can modify ingestion analgesia, and that the analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium hungry rats is mediated by NRM. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Vapor ingestion in Centaur liquid-hydrogen tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    Vapor ingestion phenomena were investigated using scale models of the Centaur liquid hydrogen tank to determine the height of the free surface of the liquid when vapor is intially ingested into the tank outlet. Data are compared with an analysin and, is general the agreement is very good. Predictions are presented for minimum liquid levels required in the Centaur liquid hydrogen tank in order to prevent vapor ingestion when restarting the engines in space and the quantities of liquid remaining in the tank at vapor ingestion during main engine firing.

  1. Operant ethanol self-administration in ethanol dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C

    2014-05-01

    While rats have been predominantly used to study operant