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Sample records for ethyl radicals

  1. Reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John L.; Laguna, Glenn

    1985-01-01

    We have measured the rates of reaction of both methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the gas phase. The method we used was to photolyze samples of UF6 in the presence of either methane or ethane. The radicals produced by reaction of fluorine atoms with these species then react with either themselves or with UF6. We inferred the rate constants from ratios of the reaction products and the published rate constants for radical recombination. The diagnostic technique was gas chromatography. The resulting rate constants for reaction with UF6 were (1.6±0.8)×10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for methyl radicals and (4±2)×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for ethyl radicals.

  2. Determining the partial photoionization cross-sections of ethyl radicals.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, B L; Maienschein-Cline, M; Butler, L J; Lee, S-H; Lin, J J

    2007-12-13

    Using a crossed laser-molecular beam scattering apparatus, these experiments photodissociate ethyl chloride at 193 nm and detect the Cl and ethyl products, resolved by their center-of-mass recoil velocities, with vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. The data determine the relative partial cross-sections for the photoionization of ethyl radicals to form C2H5+, C2H4+, and C2H3+ at 12.1 and 13.8 eV. The data also determine the internal energy distribution of the ethyl radical prior to photoionization, so we can assess the internal energy dependence of the photoionization cross-sections. The results show that the C2H4++H and C2H3++H2 dissociative photoionization cross-sections strongly depend on the photoionization energy. Calibrating the ethyl radical partial photoionization cross-sections relative to the bandwidth-averaged photoionization cross-section of Cl atoms near 13.8 eV allows us to use these data in conjunction with literature estimates of the Cl atom photoionization cross-sections to put the present bandwidth-averaged cross-sections on an absolute scale. The resulting bandwidth-averaged cross-section for the photoionization of ethyl radicals to C2H5+ near 13.8 eV is 8+/-2 Mb. Comparison of our 12.1 eV data with high-resolution ethyl radical photoionization spectra allows us to roughly put the high-resolution spectrum on the same absolute scale. Thus, one obtains the photoionization cross-section of ethyl radicals to C2H5+ from threshold to 12.1 eV. The data show that the onset of the C2H4++H dissociative photoionization channel is above 12.1 eV; this result offers a simple way to determine whether the signal observed in photoionization experiments on complex mixtures is due to ethyl radicals. We discuss an application of the results for resolving the product branching in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction.

  3. Photodissociation dynamics of ethyl ethynyl ether: A ketenyl radical precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, Maria; Miller, Johanna; Butler, Laurie; Su, Hongmei; Bersohn, Richard; Shu, Jinian

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the photodissociation dynamics of ethyl ethynyl ether at 193.3 nm with crossed laser-molecular beam photofragment translational spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence. We establish ethyl ethynyl ether as the first clean precursor to the ketenyl radical, a key species in combustion reactions. One major bond fission channel was observed for the system, cleavage along the HCCO-C2H5 bond, leading to ground state C2H5 (ethyl) radicals and HCCO (ketenyl) radical products in two distinct electronic states. We observed neither cleavage of the other C-O bond nor molecular elimination to form C2H4 + CH2CO (ketene). Ketenyl radicals formed in the higher recoil kinetic energy channel could be either X(^2A") or Ã(^2A') state ketenyl radical. We assign the lower recoil kinetic energy channel to the spin forbidden ã(^4A") state of the ketenyl radical, reached through intersystem crossing. Laser-induced fluorescence from the ketenyl radical peaks after a 20 μs delay, indicating that it is formed with a significant amount of internal energy and subsequently relaxes to the lowest vibrational level of the ground electronic state, a result consistent with the product assignment.

  4. Dissociation of the Ethyl Radical: An Exercise in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassabeh, Nahal; Tran, Mark; Fleming, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A set of exercises for use in a typical physical chemistry laboratory course are described, modeling the unimolecular dissociation of the ethyl radical to form ethylene and atomic hydrogen. Students analyze the computational results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative structural changes are compared to approximate predicted values…

  5. Dissociation of the Ethyl Radical: An Exercise in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassabeh, Nahal; Tran, Mark; Fleming, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A set of exercises for use in a typical physical chemistry laboratory course are described, modeling the unimolecular dissociation of the ethyl radical to form ethylene and atomic hydrogen. Students analyze the computational results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative structural changes are compared to approximate predicted values…

  6. Theoretical Study of the Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Ethyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Daniel P.; Sibert, Edwin. L. Sibert, Iii

    2013-06-01

    The rich spectroscopy of the ethyl radical has attracted the attention of several experimental and theoretical investigations. The purpose of these studies was to elucidate the signatures of hyperconjugation, torsion, inversion, and Fermi coupling in the molecular spectra. Due to the number of degrees of freedom in the system, previous theoretical studies have implemented reduced-dimensional models. Our ultimate goal is a full-dimensional theoretical treatment of the vibrations using both Van Vleck and variational approaches. The methods will be combined with the potential that we have calculated using the CCSD(T) method on the cc-pVTZ basis set. In this talk we will discuss our initial work, which builds up from these reduced-dimensional models. Our calculations use coordinates that exploit the system's G_{12} PI symmetry in a simple fashion. By systematically adding more degrees of freedom to our model, we can determine the effects of specific couplings on the spectroscopy. T. Häber, A. C. Blair, D. J. Nesbitt and M. D. Schuder J. Chem. Phys. {124}, 054316, (2006). G .E. Douberly, unpublished. R. S. Bhatta, A. Gao and D. S. Perry J. Mol. Struct.: THEOCHEM {941}, 22, (2010).

  7. Photodissociation dynamics of ethyl ethynyl ether: A new ketenyl radical precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, M. J.; Miller, J. L.; Butler, L. J.; Su, H.; Bersohn, R.; Shu, J.

    2003-07-01

    The work presented here investigates the dynamics of the photodissociation of ethyl ethynyl ether at 193.3 nm with photofragment translational spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence. The data from two crossed laser-molecular beam apparatuses, one with vacuum ultraviolet photoionization detection and one with electron bombardment detection, showed that only cleavage of the C-O bond to form a C2HO radical and a C2H5 (ethyl) radical occurs. We observed neither cleavage of the other C-O bond nor molecular elimination to form C2H4+CH2CO (ketene). The C2HO radical is formed in two distinct product channels, with 37% of the radicals formed from a channel with recoil kinetic energies extending from about 10 to 70 kcal/mole and the other 63% formed from a channel with lower average recoil energies ranging from 0 to 40 kcal/mole. The measurements using photoionization detection reveal that the C2HO radical formed in the higher recoil kinetic-energy channel has a larger ionization cross section for photon energies between 10.3 and 11.3 eV than the radical formed in the lower recoil kinetic-energy channel, and that the transition to the ion is more vertical. The radicals formed in the higher recoil kinetic-energy channel could be either X˜(2A″) or Ã(2A') state ketenyl (HCCO) product and the shape of the recoil kinetic-energy distribution fitting this data does not vary with ionization energy between 10.3 and 11.3 eV. The C2HO formed in the channel with the lower kinetic-energy release is likely the spin forbidden ã(4A″) state of the ketenyl radical, reached through intersystem crossing. The B˜ state of ketenyl is energetically inaccessible. We also consider the possibility that the lower kinetic-energy channel forms two other C2HO isomers, the CCOH (hydroxyethynyl) radical or the cyclic oxiryl radical. Signal from laser-induced fluorescence of the HCCO photofragment was detected at the electronic origin and the 510 band. The fluorescence signal peaks after a 20

  8. High-resolution electron spin resonance spectroscopy of ethyl radicals in solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Takayuki; Kumagai, Jun; Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    2001-06-01

    High-resolution electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of ethyl radicals isolated in solid parahydrogen (>99.5 mol %) has been measured in the temperature range between 3.1 and 6.7 K. This study was carried out by UV photolysis of ethyl iodide doped in solid parahydrogen. Although ESR linewidth of the spectrum is broadened due to anisotropic terms of hyperfine interactions, the linewidth measured in parahydrogen remains comparable to that of the isotropic spectrum measured in liquid ethane [R. W. Fessenden, J. Chem. Phys. 37, 747 (1962)]. Small splittings were found in the resolved ESR signals and assigned as ethyl radicals with A(A',A″) and E(E',E″) symmetries, respectively. The ratio in the ESR intensities is not proportional to that of the degeneracy of each symmetry but varies as a function of temperature. We measured the signal intensities as a function of temperature and determined the rotational energy level splitting of methyl groups between the lowest with the A(A',A″) symmetry and the second-lowest with the E(E',E″) symmetry in solid parahydrogen to be 5.3±0.7 K. The level splitting is close to that measured by infrared-absorption study in gas phase and theoretical calculation, whereas the splitting measured in conventional matrices have been much smaller. Intermolecular interaction between guest radicals and surroundings in solid parahydrogen are found to be much smaller than those in other conventional matrices giving less shifted spectral parameters.

  9. Theoretical study for OH radical-initiated atmospheric oxidation of ethyl acrylate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanhui; Zhang, Qingzhu; Hu, Jingtian; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    OH radical-initiated atmospheric oxidation of ethyl acrylate (ethyl 2-propenoate, EA) has been investigated by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Optimizations of the reactants, intermediates, transition states and products were carried out at the MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. Single-point energy calculations were performed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The detailed oxidation mechanism was presented and discussed. The results show that the OH addition is more energetically favorable than the H abstraction. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory was used to predict the rate constants over the possible atmospheric temperature range of 180-370 K. The Arrhenius expression adequately describes the total rate constant: k(EA+OH)=(1.71×10(-12))exp(805.42/T)cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). At 298 K, the atmospheric lifetime of ethyl acrylate determined by OH radicals is about 16.2h. In order to find out the effect of alkyl substitution on the reaction activity, rate constants for the reactions of methyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and butyl acrylate with OH radicals were also discussed. Calculation results show that the reaction activity may increase with the increased electron-donating substitution for electrophilic addition reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The O_2 + Ethyl Reaction in Helium Nanodroplets: Infrared Spectroscopy of the Ethylperoxy Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Peter R.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2017-06-01

    Helium-solvated ethylperoxy radicals (CH_3CH_2OO) are formed via the in situ reaction between ethyl radicals and ˜{X}^{3}Σ_{g}^{-} O_2. The reactants are captured sequentially through the droplet pick-up technique. Helium droplets are doped with ethyl radical via pyrolysis of di-tert-amyl peroxide or n-propylnitrite in an effusive, low-pressure source. A mid-infrared spectrum of ethylperoxy is recorded with species-selective droplet beam depletion spectroscopy. Spectral assignments in the CH stretching region are made via comparisons to second-order vibrational perturbation theory with resonances (VPT2+K) based on coupled-cluster quartic force fields. Gauche and trans conformers are predicted to be nearly isoenergetic; however, the spectrum indicates that one dominant conformer is present. Indeed, in several previous studies in our group, where chemical reactions were conducted inside droplets, only a single conformer of the product was observed. Exploration of the ethylperoxy potential energy surface, particularly along the CCOO torsional and CO stretching coordinates, motivates an explanation that is based upon an adiabatic funneling mechanism that leads to the exclusive production of one conformer. The slower torsional degree of freedom is cooled more rapidly than the higher frequency stretching and bending coordinates owing to the stronger coupling between the torsional modes and the collective modes of the helium droplet. The reactants are cooled into the torsional well that stabilizes first during their approach on the PES.

  11. Angular dependence of the β-proton hyperfine coupling constant in β-substituted ethyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Maurizio

    The β-proton hyperfine coupling constants in β-substituted ethyl radicals Ḣ 2-CH 2-X (X = CH 3, NH 2, OH, F, SiH 3, PH 2, SH, Cl) were computed as a function of the rotational angle α about the C αC β bond by ab initio calculations at the UHF/DZ + d level. They follow the relation aH⨿(θ,α) = A + Bcos 2θ + C cosθcosα, where A and B are not significantly affected by the substituent, and C is closely related to the electronegativity of the heteroatom.

  12. Reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals and Cl atoms with ethyl propanoate, n-propyl propanoate, methyl 2-methylpropanoate, and ethyl n-butanoate.

    PubMed

    Cometto, Pablo M; Daële, Véronique; Idir, Mahmoud; Lane, Silvia I; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2009-10-08

    Kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with four saturated esters have been investigated. Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with ethyl propanoate (k(1)), n-propyl propanoate (k(2)), methyl 2-methylpropanoate (k(3)), and ethyl n-butanoate (k(4)) were measured using a conventional relative rate method and the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. At (296 +/- 2) K, the rate coefficients obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. Significant curvatures in the Arrhenius plots have been observed in the temperature range 243-372 K for k(1), k(3), and k(4). The rate coefficients for the reactions of the four esters with Cl atoms were determined using the relative rate method at (296 +/- 2) K and atmospheric pressure. The values obtained are presented, compared with the literature values when they exist, and discussed. Reactivity trends and atmospheric implications for these esters are also presented.

  13. Consecutive radical S-adenosylmethionine methylations form the ethyl side chain in thienamycin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Marous, Daniel R.; Lloyd, Evan P.; Buller, Andrew R.; Moshos, Kristos A.; Grove, Tyler L.; Blaszczyk, Anthony J.; Booker, Squire J.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their broad anti-infective utility, the biosynthesis of the paradigm carbapenem antibiotic, thienamycin, remains largely unknown. Apart from the first two steps shared with a simple carbapenem, the pathway sharply diverges to the more structurally complex members of this class of β-lactam antibiotics, such as thienamycin. Existing evidence points to three putative cobalamin-dependent radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) enzymes, ThnK, ThnL, and ThnP, as potentially being responsible for assembly of the ethyl side chain at C6, bridgehead epimerization at C5, installation of the C2-thioether side chain, and C2/3 desaturation. The C2 substituent has been demonstrated to be derived by stepwise truncation of CoA, but the timing of these events with respect to C2–S bond formation is not known. We show that ThnK of the three apparent cobalamin-dependent RS enzymes performs sequential methylations to build out the C6-ethyl side chain in a stereocontrolled manner. This enzymatic reaction was found to produce expected RS methylase coproducts S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5′-deoxyadenosine, and to require cobalamin. For double methylation to occur, the carbapenam substrate must bear a CoA-derived C2-thioether side chain, implying the activity of a previous sulfur insertion by an as-yet unidentified enzyme. These insights allow refinement of the central steps in complex carbapenem biosynthesis. PMID:26240322

  14. The photodissociation dynamics of the ethyl radical, C2H5, investigated by velocity map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbauer, Michael; Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Kathrin H.; Fischer, Ingo

    2012-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the ethyl radical C2H5 has been investigated by velocity map imaging. Ethyl was produced by flash pyrolysis from n-propyl nitrite and excited to the à 2A' (3s) Rydberg state around 250 nm. The energetically most favorable reaction channel in this wavelength region is dissociation to C2H4 (ethene) + H. The H-atom dissociation products were ionized in a [1+1'] process via the 1s-2p transition. The observed translational energy distribution is bimodal: A contribution of slow H-atoms with an isotropic angular distribution peaks at low translational energies. An expectation value for the fraction of excess energy released into translation of ⟨fT⟩ = 0.19 is derived from the data, typical for statistical dissociation reactions. In addition, a fast H-atom channel is observed, peaking around 1.8 eV. The latter shows an anisotropic distribution with β = 0.45. It originates from a direct dissociation process within less than a rotational period. Time-delay scans with varying extraction voltages indicate the presence of two rates for the formation of H-atoms. One rate with a sub-nanosecond time constant is associated with H-atoms with large translational energy; a second one with a time constant on the order of 100 ns is associated with H-atoms formed with low translational energy. The data confirm and extend those from previous experiments and remove some inconsistencies. Possible mechanisms for the dissociation are discussed in light of the new results as well as previous ones.

  15. The ethyl radical in superfluid helium nanodroplets: Rovibrational spectroscopy and ab initio computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Agarwal, Jay; Turney, Justin M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2013-05-01

    The ethyl radical has been isolated and spectroscopically characterized in 4He nanodroplets. The band origins of the five CH stretch fundamentals are shifted by < 2 cm-1 from those reported for the gas phase species [S. Davis, D. Uy, and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 1823 (2000), 10.1063/1.480746; T. Häber, A. C. Blair, D. J. Nesbitt, and M. D. Schuder, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054316 (2006), 10.1063/1.2140740]. The symmetric CH2 stretching band (v1) is rotationally resolved, revealing nuclear spin statistical weights predicted by G12 permutation-inversion group theory. A permanent electric dipole moment of 0.28 (2) D is obtained via the Stark spectrum of the v1 band. The four other CH stretch fundamental bands are significantly broadened in He droplets and lack rotational fine structure. This broadening is attributed to symmetry dependent vibration-to-vibration relaxation facilitated by the He droplet environment. In addition to the five fundamentals, three a1' overtone/combination bands are observed, and each of these have resolved rotational substructure. These are assigned to the 2v12, v4 + v6, and 2v6 bands through comparisons to anharmonic frequency computations at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory.

  16. The Ethyl Radical in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets: Rovibrational Spectroscopy and AB Initio Calcluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Moradi, Christopher P.; Agarwal, Jay; Turney, Justin. M.; Schaefer, Henry F. Schaefer, Iii; Douberly, Gary E.

    2013-06-01

    The ethyl radical has been isolated and spectroscopically characterized in ^4He nanodroplets. The five fundamental CH stretch bands are observed near 3 μm and have band origins shifted < 1 wn from those reported for the gas phase species. The symmetric CH_2 stretching band (ν_1) is rotationally resolved, revealing nuclear spin statistical weights predicted by G_{12} permutation-inversion group theory. A permanent electric dipole moment of 0.28 (2) D is obtained via the Stark spectrum of the ν_1 band. The four other CH stretch fundamental bands are broadened in helium droplets and lack rotational fine structure. The approximately 1-2 wn line widths for these bands are attributed to the homogeneous broadening associated with solvent-mediated rovibrational relaxation dynamics. In addition to these five fundamentals, three A_1' overtone/combination bands are observed and have resolved rotational substructure. These are assigned to the 2ν_{12}, ν_4+ν_6, and 2ν_6 bands through comparisons to anharmonic frequency computations at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. S. Davis, D. Uy, D. J. Nesbitt. J. Chem. Phys. 112, 1823-1834 (2000). T. Haber, A. C. Blair, D. J. Nesbitt, M. D. Schuder. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054316 (2006).

  17. Excited-state decay of hydrocarbon radicals, investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoionization: Ethyl, propargyl, and benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthias; Noller, Bastian; Schultz, Thomas; Fischer, Ingo

    2005-03-01

    The excited state decay of the hydrocarbon radicals ethyl, C2H5; propargyl, C3H3; and benzyl, C7H7 was investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoionization. Radicals were generated by flash pyrolysis of n-propyl nitrite, propargyl bromide, and toluene, respectively. It is shown that the 2A'2(3s) Rydberg state of ethyl excited at 250nm decays with a time constant of 20fs. No residual signal was observed at longer delay times. For the 3B12 state of propargyl excited at 255nm a slower decay with a time constant 50±10fs was determined. The 4B22 state of benzyl excited at 255nm decays within 150±30fs.

  18. Reaction Rate Coefficients of OH Radicals and Cl Atoms with Ethyl Propanoate, n-Propyl Propanoate, Methyl 2-Methylpropanoate, and Ethyl n-Butanoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cometto, Pablo M.; Daële, Véronique; Idir, Mahmoud; Lane, Silvia I.; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2009-09-01

    Kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with four saturated esters have been investigated. Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with ethyl propanoate (k1), n-propyl propanoate (k2), methyl 2-methylpropanoate (k3), and ethyl n-butanoate (k4) were measured using a conventional relative rate method and the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. At (296 ± 2) K, the rate coefficients obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. Significant curvatures in the Arrhenius plots have been observed in the temperature range 243-372 K for k1, k3, and k4. The rate coefficients for the reactions of the four esters with Cl atoms were determined using the relative rate method at (296 ± 2) K and atmospheric pressure. The values obtained are presented, compared with the literature values when they exist, and discussed. Reactivity trends and atmospheric implications for these esters are also presented.

  19. In vitro antiperoxidative, free radical scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibitory potentials of ethyl acetate fraction of Saraca ashoka flowers.

    PubMed

    Prathapan, A; Lijo Cherian, O; Nampoothiri, Suresh V; Mini, S; Raghu, K G

    2011-02-01

    Saraca ashoka is a widely used medicinal herb claimed to cure many diseases. This study investigated the antiperoxidative, free radical scavenging and xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory potential of the ethyl acetate fraction of S. ashoka flowers (SAF) and compared it with standard compounds like gallic acid, ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyl toluene and allopurinol. The ethyl acetate fraction of SAF exhibited free radical scavenging activity against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and superoxide radical, along with hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. Lipid peroxidation inhibitory potential of SAF was studied using a linoleic acid emulsion system, which shows significant antioxidant potential. SAF also demonstrated significant XO (key enzyme linked to inflammation) inhibitory activity, which revealed its therapeutic potential as an antioxidant and XO inhibitor. HPLC profiling of the ethyl acetate fraction of SAF revealed that it contains ellagic acid as a major compound and thus the beneficial effects of this fraction may be due to the presence of this compound.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with methyl ethyl ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimal, D.; Stevens, P. S.

    2007-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) or 2-butanone is a high-volume industrial solvent with a production rate greater than 70 million lbs yr-1. It is also a photo-oxidation product of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. MEK is removed from the atmosphere primarily by its reaction with hydroxyl (OH) radical. As a result, knowledge of the chemical mechanism and temperature dependence of this reaction is important as MEK may be transported to the upper troposphere and influence the chemistry of this region of the atmosphere. We present absolute measurements of the rate constant and the kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of MEK with OH radicals at low pressure and over the temperature range 263-388 K using a discharge-flow technique coupled with resonance fluorescence detection of OH radicals. Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface suggest that the reaction of MEK and OH proceeds by H-abstraction mediated by the formation of a 7- membered hydrogen-bonded complex. This mechanism is similar to that of several other atmospherically relevant oxygenated VOCs such as acetone, acetic acid and hydroxyacetone. The influence of the pre-reactive complex on the temperature dependence for this reaction will be discussed.

  1. The photodissociation dynamics of the ethyl radical, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, investigated by velocity map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbauer, Michael; Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Kathrin H.; Fischer, Ingo

    2012-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of the ethyl radical C{sub 2}H{sub 5} has been investigated by velocity map imaging. Ethyl was produced by flash pyrolysis from n-propyl nitrite and excited to the A {sup 2}A{sup Prime} (3s) Rydberg state around 250 nm. The energetically most favorable reaction channel in this wavelength region is dissociation to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (ethene) + H. The H-atom dissociation products were ionized in a [1+1{sup Prime }] process via the 1s-2p transition. The observed translational energy distribution is bimodal: A contribution of slow H-atoms with an isotropic angular distribution peaks at low translational energies. An expectation value for the fraction of excess energy released into translation of = 0.19 is derived from the data, typical for statistical dissociation reactions. In addition, a fast H-atom channel is observed, peaking around 1.8 eV. The latter shows an anisotropic distribution with {beta}= 0.45. It originates from a direct dissociation process within less than a rotational period. Time-delay scans with varying extraction voltages indicate the presence of two rates for the formation of H-atoms. One rate with a sub-nanosecond time constant is associated with H-atoms with large translational energy; a second one with a time constant on the order of 100 ns is associated with H-atoms formed with low translational energy. The data confirm and extend those from previous experiments and remove some inconsistencies. Possible mechanisms for the dissociation are discussed in light of the new results as well as previous ones.

  2. Atmospheric degradation of 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether, allyl ether and allyl ethyl ether: Kinetics with OH radicals and UV photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Antiñolo, M; Ocaña, A J; Aranguren, J P; Lane, S I; Albaladejo, J; Jiménez, E

    2017-08-01

    Unsaturated ethers are oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) emitted by anthropogenic sources. Potential removal processes in the troposphere are initiated by hydroxyl (OH) radicals and photochemistry. In this work, we report for the first time the rate coefficients of the gas-phase reaction with OH radicals (kOH) of 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (2ClEVE), allyl ether (AE), and allyl ethyl ether (AEE) as a function of temperature in the 263-358 K range, measured by the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. No pressure dependence of kOH was observed in the 50-500 Torr range in He as bath gas, while a slightly negative T-dependence was observed. The temperature dependent expressions for the rate coefficients determined in this work are: The estimated atmospheric lifetimes (τOH) assuming kOH at 288 K were 3, 2, and 4 h for 2ClEVE, AE and AEE, respectively. The kinetic results are discussed in terms of the chemical structure of the unsaturated ethers by comparison with similar compounds. We also report ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) absorption cross sections (σλ and σ(ν˜), respectively). We estimate the photolysis rate coefficients in the solar UV actinic region to be less than 10(-7) s(-1), implying that these compounds are not removed from the atmosphere by this process. In addition, from σ(ν˜) and τOH, the global warming potential of each unsaturated ether was calculated to be almost zero. A discussion on the atmospheric implications of the titled compounds is presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rate constant and reaction channels for the reaction of atomic nitrogen with the ethyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Stief, L.J.; Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A. ); Kuo, S.C.; Tao, W.; Klemm, R.B. )

    1995-04-01

    The absolute rate constant and primary reaction products have been determined at [ital T]=298 K for the atom--radical reaction N([sup 4][ital S])+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] in a discharge flow system with collision-free sampling to a mass spectrometer. The rate constant measurements employed low energy electron impact ionization while the product study used dispersed synchrotron radiation as the photoionization source. The rate constant was determined under pseudo-first-order conditions by monitoring the decay of C[sub 2]H[sub 5] or C[sub 2]D[sub 5] as a function of time in the presence of excess N atoms. The result is [ital k]=(1.1[plus minus]0.3)[times]10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1]. For the reaction product experiments using photoionization mass spectrometry, products observed at 114 nm (10.9 eV) were CD[sub 3], D[sub 2]CN and C[sub 2]D[sub 4] for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction. The product identification is based on the unambiguous combination of product [ital m]/[ital z] values, the shift of the [ital m]/[ital z] peaks observed for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction products with respect to the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction products and the photoionization threshold measured for the major products. The observed products are consistent with the occurrence of the reaction channels D[sub 2]CN+CD[sub 3](2a) and C[sub 2]D[sub 4]+ND(2c). Formation of C[sub 2]D[sub 4] product via channel (2c) accounts for approximately 65% of the C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reacted. Most, if not all, of the remaining 35% is probably accounted for by channel (2a). These rate constant and product results are compared with those for the N+CH[sub 3] reaction as well as other atom+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reactions. The role of the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction in the formation of HCN in the atmospheres of Titan and Neptune is briefly considered. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Induction heating vs conventional heating for the hydrothermal treatment of nitinol and its subsequent 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl 2-(trimethylammonio)ethyl phosphate coating by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Devillers, S; Barthélémy, B; Delhalle, J; Mekhalif, Z

    2011-10-01

    Nitinol is an alloy of great interest in general and especially in the biomedical field where many researches are aimed to improve both its corrosion resistance and its biocompatibility. In this work, we report on the advantage of an induction heating treatment in pure water compared to a conventional hydrothermal procedure. Both treatments lead to a hydroxylation of the surface, a decrease of the nickel amount in the outer part of the oxide layer, and a drastically decreased corrosion current density. However, the amount of surface hydroxyl groups is higher in the case of the induction heating treatment, which in turn leads to a denser grafting of atom transfer radical polymerization initiators and ultimately to a thicker 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl 2-(trimethylammonio)ethyl phosphate (MPC) polymer layer than in the case of conventional heating treatments. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static contact angle, and polarization curves measurements as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to characterize the obtained modified surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Kinetic study of the reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with methyl ethyl ketone (2-butanone) and its deuterated isotopomers at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, J. A.; Stevens, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (2-butanone) in the atmosphere comes from a variety of sources. It is produced commercially as an industrial ketone. It can be formed as a result of the OH or Cl-initiated oxidation of C4-C6 alkanes, primarily n-butane, or from the reaction of some alkenes with OH or O3. Biogenic sources include direct emissions from certain plants as well as emissions from decaying plant matter. Methyl ethyl ketone is removed from the atmosphere primarily by its reaction with OH. A product of this reaction includes acetaldehyde, which is a hazardous air pollutant, can further react to produce peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN), and can be a significant source of free radicals to the atmosphere. The absolute rate constant for the reaction of OH with methyl ethyl ketone has been measured as a function of temperature at low pressure using discharge-flow techniques coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of OH. In addition, measurements of the rate constants for the reactions of OH with two deuterated isotopomers of methyl ethyl ketone, including CD3C(O)CH2CH3 and CH3C(O)CD2CD3, will be presented to gain a better understanding of the mechanism for this reaction. Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface for this reaction suggest that the reaction proceeds through the formation of a hydrogen-bonded pre-reactive complex, similar to that of several other atmospherically relevant oxygenated VOCs such as acetone, acetic acid, and hydroxyacetone.

  6. Theoretical and spectroscopic study of ethyl 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and its 6-fluoro and 8-nitro derivatives in neutral and radical anion forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimarčík, Ján; Punyain, Kraiwan; Lukeš, Vladimír; Klein, Erik; Dvoranová, Dana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Milata, Viktor; Lietava, Jozef; Brezová, Vlasta

    2011-05-01

    A systematic comparative theoretical and spectroscopic study has been performed on a series of four recently prepared ethyl 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate derivatives possessing a variety of biological activities. The most probable oxo- and hydroxy-tautomeric neutral molecular forms were identified using density functional theory (DFT). Vertical optical transitions were calculated for global minima using time-dependent version of DFT. Calculated spectra were compared with the experimental electronic spectra of quinolones measured in various aprotic solvents (toluene, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide). Finally, the structures and spin density distributions of radical anions obtained upon photoinduced reduction of two nitro-substituted derivatives in titania suspension were deduced from the comparison of calculated isotropic hyperfine coupling constants with experimental data determined from EPR spectra.

  7. Living/controlled free radical copolymerization of chlorotrifluoroethene and butyl vinyl ether under 60Co γ-ray irradiation in the presence of S-benzyl O-ethyl dithiocarbonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Lu, Dan; Wang, Hu; Dong, Qibao; Wang, Pucheng; Bai, Ruke

    2011-07-21

    Living/controlled free radical copolymerization of chlorotrifluoroethene and butyl vinyl ether has been successfully achieved at room temperature under (60)Co γ-ray irradiation in the presence of S-benzyl O-ethyl dithiocarbonate. The alternating and block copolymers have been obtained with well-defined molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions.

  8. Theoretical studies on atmospheric chemistry of HFE-245mc and perfluoro-ethyl formate: Reaction with OH radicals, atmospheric fate of alkoxy radical and global warming potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lily, Makroni; Baidya, Bidisha; Chandra, Asit K.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical studies have been performed on the kinetics, mechanism and thermochemistry of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of CF3CF2OCH3 (HFE-245mc) and CF3CF2OCHO with OH radical using DFT based M06-2X method. IRC calculation shows that both hydrogen abstraction reactions proceed via weakly bound hydrogen-bonded complex preceding to the formation of transition state. The rate coefficients calculated by canonical transition state theory along with Eckart's tunnelling correction at 298 K: k1(CF3CF2OCH3 + OH) = 1.09 × 10-14 and k2(CF3CF2OCHO + OH) = 1.03 × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 are in very good agreement with the experimental values. The atmospheric implications of CF3CF2OCH3 and CF3CF2OCHO are also discussed.

  9. Defining the enzyme binding domain of a ribonuclease III processing signal. Ethylation interference and hydroxyl radical footprinting using catalytically inactive RNase III mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Nicholson, A W

    1996-01-01

    Ethylation interference and hydroxyl radical footprinting were used to identify substrate ribose-phosphate backbone sites that interact with the Escherichia coli RNA processing enzyme, ribonuclease III. Two RNase III mutants were employed, which bind substrate in vitro similarly as wild-type enzyme, but lack detectable phosphodiesterase activity. Specifically, altering glutamic acid at position 117 to lysine or alanine uncouples substrate binding from cleavage. The two substrates examined are based on the bacteriophage T7 R1.1 RNase III processing signal. One substrate, R1.1 RNA, undergoes accurate single cleavage at the canonical site, while a close variant, R1.1[WC-L] RNA, undergoes coordinate double cleavage. The interference and footprinting patterns for each substrate (i) overlap, (ii) exhibit symmetry and (iii) extend approximately one helical turn in each direction from the RNase III cleavage sites. Divalent metal ions (Mg2+, Ca2+) significantly enhance substrate binding, and confer stronger protection from hydroxyl radicals, but do not significantly affect the interference pattern. The footprinting and interference patterns indicate that (i) RNase III contacts the sugar-phosphate backbone; (ii) the RNase III-substrate interaction spans two turns of the A-form helix; and (iii) divalent metal ion does not play an essential role in binding specificity. These results rationalize the conserved two-turn helix motif seen in most RNase III processing signals, and which is necessary for optimal processing reactivity. In addition, the specific differences in the footprint and interference patterns of the two substrates suggest why RNase III catalyzes the coordinate double cleavage of R1.1[WC-L] RNA, and dsRNA in general, while catalyzing only single cleavage of R1.1 RNA and related substrates in which the scissle bond is within an asymmetric internal loop. Images PMID:8635475

  10. Gas-phase oxidation of methyl crotonate and ethyl crotonate. kinetic study of their reactions toward OH radicals and Cl atoms.

    PubMed

    Teruel, Mariano A; Benitez-Villalba, Julio; Caballero, Norma; Blanco, María B

    2012-06-21

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and chlorine atoms with methyl crotonate and ethyl crotonate have been determined at 298 K and atmospheric pressure. The decay of the organics was monitored using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID), and the rate constants were determined using the relative rate method with different reference compounds. Room temperature rate coeficcients were found to be (in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(1)(OH + CH(3)CH═CHC(O)OCH(3)) = (4.65 ± 0.65) × 10(-11), k(2)(Cl + CH(3)CH═CHC(O)OCH(3)) = (2.20 ± 0.55) × 10(-10), k(3)(OH + CH(3)CH═CHC(O)OCH(2)CH(3)) = (4.96 ± 0.61) × 10(-11), and k(4)(Cl + CH(3)CH═CHC(O)OCH(2)CH(3)) = (2.52 ± 0.62) × 10(-10) with uncertainties representing ±2σ. This is the first determination of k(1), k(3), and k(4) under atmospheric pressure. The rate coefficients are compared with previous determinations for other unsaturated and oxygenated VOCs and reactivity trends are presented. In addition, a comparison between the experimentally determined k(OH) with k(OH) predicted from k vs E(HOMO) relationships is presented. On the other hand, product identification under atmospheric conditions has been performed for the first time for these unsaturated esters by the GC-MS technique in NO(x)-free conditions. 2-Hydroxypropanal, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and formic acid were positively observed as degradation products in agreement with the addition of OH to C2 and C3 of the double bond, followed by decomposition of the 2,3- or 3,2-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed. Atmospheric lifetimes, based on of the homogeneous sinks of the unsaturated esters studied, are estimated from the kinetic data obtained in the present work.

  11. Structural and magnetic effects of meso-substitution in alkyl-substituted metalloporphyrinate pi-cation radicals: characterization of [Fe(TalkylP*)(Cl)]SbCl6 (alkyl = ethyl and n-propyl).

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Neal, Teresa J; Wyllie, Graeme R A; Schulz, Charles E; Scheidt, W Robert

    2010-09-06

    We report the preparation and characterization of two meso-alkyl substituted porphyrin pi-cation radical derivatives, [Fe(TalkylP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) (alkyl = ethyl or propyl). Both complexes have been characterized by UV/vis/near-IR, IR, and Mossbauer spectroscopy, temperature-dependent solid-state magnetic susceptibility measurements, and X-ray structure determinations. All data for both oxidized species are consistent with the formulation of the complexes as ring-oxidized iron(III) porphyrin species. The molecular structures of the two five-coordinate species have the typical square-pyramidal coordination group of high-spin iron(III) derivatives. The crystal structures also reveal that the species form cofacial pi-pi dimers with lateral shifts of 1.44 A and 3.22 A, respectively, for the propyl and ethyl radical derivatives. Both radicals exhibit porphyrin cores with alternating bond distance patterns in the inner 16-membered ring. In addition, [Fe(TEtP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) and [Fe(TPrP(*))(Cl)]SbCl(6) have been characterized by temperature-dependent (6-300 K) magnetic susceptibility studies, the best fitting of the temperature-dependent moments reveal strong coupling between iron spins and porphyrin radical, and a smaller magnitude of antiferromagnetic coupling between ring radicals, which are opposite to those found in the five-coordinate iron(III) OEP radicals. The differences in structure and properties of the cation radical meso-alkyl and beta-alkyl derivatives possibly reflect differences in properties of a(1u)- and a(2u)-forming radicals.

  12. Chemical Kinetic Studies Using Ultraviolet Cavity Ring-Down=20 Spectroscopic Detection: Self-Reaction of Ethyl and Ethylperoxy Radicals=20 and the Reaction, O2 + C_2H_5arrow C_2H_5O_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Dean B.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1997-04-01

    A laser-photolysis reactor that uses cavity ring-down spectroscopic (CRDS) detection was characterized and used to measure the rate coefficients of three benchmark reactions of known importance to ethane oxidation. At 295 K and approximately 700 Pa (5.5 torr) total pressure we obtained the self-reaction rate coefficients of k =3D 1.99(±0.44)×10-11=A0cm^3s-1 for C_2H5 + C_2H5 and k =3D 7.26(±2.4)×10-14=A0cm^3s-1 for C_2H_5O2 + C_2H_5O_2. We obtained k =3D 2.7(±0.3)×10-12=A0cm^3s-1 for the pseudo-first order association reaction, O2 + C_2H5 + Ar. We also measured the absorption cross-sections of the ethyl radical, σ _220 =3D 252(±42)×10-20 cm^2 and σ _222 =3D 206(±42)×10-20 cm^2. Stated uncertainties are ±2σ. The new rate coefficients agree with those obtained previously by other methods. The agreement confirms that ultraviolet CRDS detection is a viable tool for experimental determinations of gas-phase radical-radical and radical-molecule reaction rate coefficients.

  13. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  14. Ethyl carbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl carbamate ; CASRN 51 - 79 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  15. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  16. Ethyl ether

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl ether ; CASRN 60 - 29 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. Near-monodisperse poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine)-based macromonomers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization and thiol-ene click chemistry: novel reactive steric stabilizers for aqueous emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Muise, Carl; Stephens, Alex; Armes, Steven P; Lewis, Andrew L

    2012-02-07

    Poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) macromonomers have been prepared by the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) using a bifunctional disulfide-based initiator. To attach a terminal polymerizable methacrylate group, the central disulfide bond was cleaved and the resulting thiols were conjugated to 3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) in water. Here TCEP serves as both the disulfide cleavage agent and also the catalyst for the subsequent Michael addition, which is highly selective for the acrylate group. The resulting methacrylate-terminated macromonomers were used as a reactive steric stabilizer for the aqueous emulsion polymerization of styrene, yielding near-monodisperse PMPC-stabilized polystyrene (PS) latexes of around 100-200 nm in diameter. As a comparison, the disulfide-containing PMPC homopolymer precursor and the intermediate thiol-functional PMPC homopolymer (PMPC-SH) were also evaluated as potential steric stabilizers. Interestingly, near-monodisperse latexes were also obtained in each case. These three sterically-stabilized latexes, prepared using either PMPC macromonomer, disulfide-based PMPC homopolymer, or PMPC-SH homopolymer as a reactive steric stabilizer, remained colloidally stable after both freeze-thaw experiments and the addition of an electrolyte, indicating that a coronal layer of PMPC chains prevented flocculation in each case. In contrast, both a charge-stabilized PS latex prepared in the absence of any steric stabilizer and a PS latex prepared in the presence of a nonfunctional PMPC homopolymer exhibited very poor colloidal stability when subjected to a freeze-thaw cycle or the addition of an electrolyte, as expected.

  18. Ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol misuse is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although clinical history, examination, and the use of self-report questionnaires may identify subjects with harmful patterns of alcohol use, denial or under-reporting of alcohol intake is common. Existing biomarkers for detecting alcohol misuse include measurement of blood or urine ethanol for acute alcohol consumption, and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin and gamma-glutamyl transferase for chronic alcohol misuse. There is a need for a biomarker that can detect excessive alcohol consumption in the timeframe between 1 day and several weeks. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a direct metabolite of ethanol detectable in urine for up to 90 h and longer in hair. Because EtG has high specificity for excess alcohol intake, it has great potential for use in detecting "binge" drinking. Using urine or hair, this noninvasive marker has a role in a variety of clinical and forensic settings. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. FTIR gas-phase kinetic study on the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with unsaturated esters: Methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate, (E)-ethyl tiglate and methyl-3-butenoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, Juan P.; Blanco, María B.; Peñéñory, Alicia B.; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2013-11-01

    The relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rates coefficients for the reactions of the unsaturated esters methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate, (E)-ethyl tiglate and methyl-3-butenoate with OH radicals and chlorine atoms at (298 ± 2) K in synthetic air at a total pressure of (760 ± 10) Torr. The experiments were performed in an environmental chamber using in situ FTIR detection to monitor the decay of the esters relative to different reference compounds. The following room temperature rate coefficients (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were obtained: k1(OH + (CH3)2Cdbnd CHC(O)OCH3) = (4.46 ± 1.05) × 10-11, k2(Cl + (CH3)2Cdbnd CHC(O)OCH3) = (2.78 ± 0.46) × 10-10, k3(OH + CH3CHdbnd C(CH3)C(O)OCH2CH3) = (8.32 ± 1.93) × 10-11, k4(Cl + CH3CHdbnd C(CH3)C(O)OCH2CH3) = (2.53 ± 0.35) × 10-10, k5(OH + CH2dbnd CHCH2C(O)OCH3) = (3.16 ± 0.57) × 10-11, k4(Cl + CH2dbnd CHCH2C(O)OCH3) = (2.10 ± 0.35) × 10-10. With the exception of the reaction of Cl with methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate (k2), for which one determination exists in the literature, this study is the first kinetic study for these reactions under atmospheric pressure. Reactivity trends are discussed in terms of the effect of the alkyl and ester groups attached to the double bond on the overall rate coefficients towards OH radicals. The atmospheric implications of the reactions were assessed by the estimation of the tropospheric lifetimes of the title reactions.

  20. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. 584.200... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100...

  1. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. 584.200... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100...

  2. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. 584.200... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100...

  3. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. 584.200... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100...

  4. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. 584.200... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100...

  5. REACTIONS OF FREE RADICALS CONTAINING NITROGEN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    deduced. The reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with a variety of amino compounds were studied. The reactions of difluoroamino radicals in the...Hydrazines, Anilines and Cyanides were pyrolysed and the heats of formation of the resultant radicals and the strengths of the bonds formed by them

  6. Chlorimuron-ethyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) Chemical Assessment Summary U.S . Environmental Protection Agency National Center for Environmental Assessment This IRIS Summary has been removed from the IRIS database and is available for historical reference purposes . ( July 2016 ) Chlorimuron - ethyl

  7. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone ( MEK ) ( CASRN 78 - 93 - 3 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  8. Ethyl alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, V.; Hauck, D.

    1980-11-01

    Recent price increases and temporary shortages of petroleum products have caused farmers to search for alternate sources of fuel. The production of ethyl alcohol from grain is described and the processes involved include saccharification, fermentation and distillation. The resulting stillage has potential as a livestock feed.

  9. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanisms for Diethyl Ether and its Oxidation Products, Ethyl Formate and Ethyl Acetate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Carbon-containing compounds are present in the earth's atmosphere as the result of emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources. Their oxidation in the atmosphere, initiated by such oxidants as OH, ozone, and nitrate radicals, leads to potentially harmful secondary pollutants such as ozone, carbonyl species, organic acids and aerosols. Ethers and esters are two classes of compounds that contribute to the complex array of organic compounds found in anthropogenically-influenced air. Additional ester is present as a result of the oxidation of the ethers. In this paper, the oxidation of diethyl ether and its two main oxidation products, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate, are studied over ranges of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and NOx concentration, using an environmental chamber / FTIR absorption technique. Major end-products (the esters from diethyl ether; organic acids and anhydrides from the esters) are quantified, and these data are interpreted in terms of the chemistry of the various alkoxy and peroxy radicals generated. Emphasis is placed on the effects of chemical activation on the behavior of the alkoxy radicals, as well as on a novel peroxy radical rearrangement that may contribute to the observed products of ether oxidation under some conditions. Finally, the data are used, in conjunction with data on similar species, to provide a general representation of ether and ester oxidation in the atmosphere.

  10. A Study on Spectro-Analytical Aspects, DNA - Interaction, Photo-Cleavage, Radical Scavenging, Cytotoxic Activities, Antibacterial and Docking Properties of 3 - (1 - (6 - methoxybenzo [d] thiazol - 2 - ylimino) ethyl) - 6 - methyl - 3H - pyran - 2, 4 - dione and its Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Mudavath; Chennam, Kishan Prasad; Ushaiah, B; Eslavath, Ravi Kumar; Perugu, Shyam; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Devi, Ch Sarala

    2015-09-01

    The focus of the present work is on the design, synthesis, characterization, DNA-interaction, photo-cleavage, radical scavenging, in-vitro cytotoxicity, antimicrobial, docking and kinetic studies of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ce (IV) and Zr (IV) metal complexes of an imine derivative, 3 - (1 - (6 - methoxybenzo [d] thiazol - 2 - ylimino) ethyl) - 6 - methyl - 3H - pyran - 2, 4 - dione. The investigation of metal ligand interactions for the determination of composition of metal complexes, corresponding kinetic studies and antioxidant activity in solution was carried out by spectrophotometric methods. The synthesized metal complexes were characterized by EDX analysis, Mass, IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and UV-Visible spectra. DNA binding studies of metal complexes with Calf thymus (CT) DNA were carried out at room temperature by employing UV-Vis electron absorption, fluorescence emission and viscosity measurement techniques. The results revealed that these complexes interact with DNA through intercalation. The results of in vitro antibacterial studies showed the enhanced activity of chelating agent in metal chelated form and thus inferring scope for further development of new therapeutic drugs. Cell viability experiments indicated that all complexes showed significant dose dependent cytotoxicity in selected cell lines. The molecular modeling and docking studies were carried out with energy minimized structures of metal complexes to identify the receptor to metal interactions.

  11. Ethyl N-phenyloxamate.

    PubMed

    García-Báez E, Efrén V; Gómez-Castro, Carlos Z; Höpfl, Herbert; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco J; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I

    2003-10-01

    The oxamate group in the title compound, C(10)H(11)NO(3), is almost coplanar with the phenyl ring because of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions, and the structure can be described as an anilide single bonded to an ethyl carboxylate group. The supramolecular structure is achieved through intermolecular hard N-H...O and soft C-H...X (X = O and phenyl) hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1295 Ethyl formate. (a) Ethyl formate (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 109-94-4) is also referred to as ethyl methanoate. It is an ester of formic acid and is prepared by esterification of formic acid with ethyl alcohol or by distillation of ethyl acetate and formic acid in the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1295 Ethyl formate. (a) Ethyl formate (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 109-94-4) is also referred to as ethyl methanoate. It is an ester of formic acid and is prepared by esterification of formic acid with ethyl alcohol or by distillation of ethyl acetate and formic acid in the...

  14. Reactivity of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Iniesta García, María Paz; Moreno Sanroma, Alberto; Martín Porrero, María Pilar; Tapia Valle, Araceli; Cabañas Galán, Beatriz; Salgado Muñoz, María Sagrario

    2010-04-07

    Rate coefficients at room temperature for the reaction of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with OH and NO(3) radicals and with Cl atoms have been determined in a 150 L PTFE chamber using GC-FID/SPME and FTIR as detection systems. The rate coefficients k (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) obtained were: (1.13 +/- 0.31) 10(-11) for the OH reaction, (2.93 +/- 0.92) 10(-15) for the NO(3) reaction and (1.88 +/- 0.25) 10(-10) for the Cl reaction. Despite the high concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, especially in indoor air, this is the first kinetic study carried out to date for these reactions. The results are consistent with the expected reactivity given the chemical structure of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Calculated atmospheric lifetimes reveal that the dominant loss process for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is clearly the daytime reaction with the hydroxyl radical.

  15. A reexamination of the cytochrome P-450-catalyzed free radical production from a dihydropyridine. Evidence of trace transition metal catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C H; Mason, R P

    1990-07-15

    Radical production from 3,5-bis(ethoxycarbonyl)-4-ethyl-2,6-dimethyl-1,4- dihydropyridine (DDEP) in rat liver microsomes has been attributed to one-electron oxidation via cytochrome P-450 followed by extrusion of an ethyl radical. In the presence of the spin trap alpha-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN), this radical was detected as the 4-POBN/ethyl radical adduct by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The addition of catalase resulted in over a 50% decrease in radical production. The concentration of the 4-POBN/ethyl radical adduct increased about 9-fold in the presence of EDTA and approximately 2-fold in the presence of either diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) or deferoxamine mesylate. When DDEP was incubated with deferoxamine mesylate-washed microsomes and NADPH in Chelex-treated incubation buffer, much less 4-POBN/ethyl radical formation occurred. Addition of either DTPA, EDTA, or the ferric complexes of these chelators greatly stimulated production of the 4-POBN/ethyl radical adduct in this system. These results suggest that the ethyl radicals produced from DDEP in a microsomal system arise via trace transition metal-catalyzed reactions.

  16. Formation of stable radicals in the radiolysis of hexafluoropropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allayarov, S.R.; Barkalov, I.M.; Lebedeva, M.Yu.; Loginova, N.N.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1986-08-20

    The radiolysis of the dimer (perfluoro-4-methyl-2-pentene) and trimer (perfluoro-2,4-dimethyl-3-ethyl-2-pentene) of hexafluoropropylene (HFP) gives thermally stable perfluoroalkyl radicals. The stability of these radicals is apparently related to the steric isolation of the unpaired electron. The formation of a growing oligomer chain perfluoroalkyl radical which is stable in the liquid phase is observed upon the radiolysis of hexafluoropropylene. The radio-chemical yield of such a radical G approx. 0.05 x 10/sup -2/ eV. The low capacity of hexafluoropropylene to undergo homopolymerization is related to the formation of similar inactive radicals.

  17. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No. 141-78... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are...

  18. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No. 141-78... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are...

  19. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  20. Reactivity of 1,4-dihydropyridines toward alkyl, alkylperoxyl radicals, and ABTS radical cation.

    PubMed

    López-Alarcón, C; Navarrete, P; Camargo, C; Squella, J A; Núñez-Vergara, L J

    2003-02-01

    A series of C4-substituted 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHP) with either secondary or tertiary nitrogen in the dihydropyridine ring were synthesized. All of these compounds together with some commercial DHP derivatives were tested for potential scavenger effects toward alkyl, alkylperoxyl radicals, and ABTS radical cation in aqueous media at pH 7.4. Kinetic rate constants were assessed either by UV/vis spectroscopy or GC/MS techniques. Tested compounds reacted faster toward alkylperoxyl radicals and ABTS radical cation than alkyl ones. N-Ethyl-substituted DHPs showed the lowest reactivity. Kinetic results were compared with either trolox or nisoldipine. Using deuterium kinetic isotope effect studies, we have proved that the hydrogen of the 1-position of the DHP ring is involved in the proposed mechanism. This fact is mostly noticeable in the case of alkyl radicals. In all cases, the respective pyridine derivative was detected as the main product of the reaction.

  1. S-Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    S - Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate ( EPTC ) ; CASRN 759 - 94 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessme

  2. Detection of interstellar ethyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Litvak, M. M.; Thaddeus, P.; Guelin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-four millimeter-wave emission lines of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) have been detected in the Orion Nebula (OMC-1) and seven in Sgr B2. To derive precise radial velocities from the astronomical data, a laboratory measurement of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide has been made at frequencies above 41 GHz. In OMC-1, the rotational temperature of ethyl cyanide is 90 K (in good agreement with other molecules), the local-standard-of-rest radial velocity is 4.5 + or - 1.0 km/s (versus 8.5 km/s for most molecules), and the column density is 1.8 by 10 to the 14th power per sq cm (a surprisingly high figure for a complicated molecule). The high abundance of ethyl cyanide in the Orion Nebula suggests that ethane and perhaps larger saturated hydrocarbons may be common constituents of molecular clouds and have escaped detection only because they are nonpolar or only weakly polar.

  3. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  4. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  5. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  8. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH. (b) The ingredient meets...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  10. 21 CFR 184.1293 - Ethyl alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol. 184.1293 Section 184.1293 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1293 Ethyl alcohol. (a) Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is the chemical C2H5OH....

  11. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  12. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  13. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  14. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  15. Nitrosation of glycine ethyl ester and ethyl diazoacetate to give the alkylating agent and mutagen ethyl chloro(hydroximino)acetate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Haorah, James; Chen, Sheng C; Wang, Xiaojie; Kolar, Carol; Lawson, Terence A; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2004-03-01

    Whereas nitrosation of secondary amines produces nitrosamines, amino acids with primary amino groups and glycine ethyl ester were reported to react with nitrite to give unidentified agents that alkylated 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine to produce purple dyes and be direct mutagens in the Ames test. We report here that treatment of glycine ethyl ester at 37 degrees C with excess nitrite acidified with HCl, followed by ether extraction, gave 30-40% yields of a product identified as ethyl chloro(hydroximino)acetate [ClC(=NOH)COOEt, ECHA] and a 9% yield of ethyl chloroacetate. The ECHA was identical to that synthesized by a known method from ethyl acetoacetate, strongly alkylated nitrobenzylpyridine, and may have arisen by N-nitrosation of glycine ethyl ester to give ethyl diazoacetate, which was C-nitrosated and reacted with chloride to give ECHA. Nitrosation of ethyl diazoacetate also yielded ECHA. Ethyl nitroacetate was not an intermediate as its nitrosation did not produce ECHA. ECHA reacted with aniline to give ethyl (hydroxamino)(phenylimino)acetate [PhN=C(NHOH)CO2Et]. This product was different from ethyl [(phenylamino)carbonyl]carbamate [PhNHC(=O)NHCO2Et], which was synthesized by reacting ethyl isocyanatoformate (OCN.CO2Et) with aniline. ECHA reacted with guanosine to give a derivative, which may have been a guanine-C(=NOH)CO2Et derivative. ECHA showed moderate toxicity and weak but significant mutagenicity without activation in Salmonella typhimurium TA-100 (mean, 1.31 x control value for 12-18 microg/plats) and for V79 mammalian cells (1.5-1.7 x control value for 60-100 microM). In conclusion, gastric nitrosation of glycine derivatives such as peptides with a N-terminal glycine might produce ECHA analogues that alkylate bases of gastric mucosal DNA and thereby initiate gastric cancer.

  16. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Takahide; Kawamoto, Takuji; Kobayashi, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products. PMID:24062844

  17. EPR study of radiation-induced radicals in glutaric and amino acid derivatives in solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşim Dicle, Işık

    2015-05-01

    Gamma radiation-induced radicals of 2-methylglutaric acid (2MG), diethyl amino malonate hydrochloride (DEAMHCl), ethyl malonate monoamide have been investigated at room temperature by the electron paramagnetic resonance technique. The type of radicals formed and their room temperature stability were evaluated. Three different radicals have been detected. The free radicals formed in compounds were attributed to the HOOCCH3ĊCH2CH2 COOH, CH3ĊHCO2CHNH2COCH2CH3 HCl and NH2COCH2COOĊHCH3 radicals, respectively. The results were found to be in good agreement with the existing literature data and theoretical predictions conformation.

  18. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of Six Algerian Propolis Extracts: Ethyl Acetate Extracts Inhibit Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 μM. PMID:24514562

  19. Characterization and antioxidant properties of six Algerian propolis extracts: ethyl acetate extracts inhibit myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-02-07

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 µM.

  20. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing...

  1. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing...

  2. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing...

  3. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing...

  4. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT....108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor. (b) Specific gravity at 15.56 °/15.56 °C. Not...

  5. Product study of the photolysis of ketene and ethyl ethynyl ether at 193.3 nm.

    PubMed

    Fockenberg, Christopher

    2005-08-18

    The product distributions of the excimer laser photolysis of ketene (CH2CO) and ethyl ethynyl ether (C2H5OCCH) at lambda = 193.3 nm (ArF) were studied using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) as an analytical tool. Ketene was photolyzed in bath gases consisting of mixtures of He and H2/D2 at various mixing ratios at constant total pressures of 4 Torr and temperature of about 300 K. Singlet methylene (1CH2) produced in the photolysis of ketene was almost instantaneously converted either to triplet methylene (3CH2) or to methyl radicals in collisions with He and H2 or D2. By extrapolating the methyl and methylene signals to zero time after photolysis, initial concentrations of these radicals were obtained. Analyzing the initial 3CH2 and CH3 concentrations as functions of hydrogen-to-helium ratios as well as simulating the observed traces of reactant and product species resulted in 1CH2 + CO (66 +/- 8)%, as the main product channel of the ketene photolysis with smaller contributions from HCCO + H (17 +/- 7)% and 3CH2 + CO (6 +/- 9)%. Hydrogen atoms, acetylene, ethylene, ethyl, and ketenyl radicals, and small amounts of ketene were observed as primary products of the ethyl ethynyl ether photolysis. Quantification of C2H2, C2H4, C2H5, and CH2CO product leads to a HCCO yield of (91 +/- 14)%.

  6. Formation and inhibition of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-08-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) und ethyl sulfate (EtS) are widely accepted biomarkers in forensic and clinical settings. Even though, levels of EtG and EtS in blood and urine increase with increasing doses of alcohol, a high inter-individual variability in their production has been noticed. Therefore, we investigated the influence of dietary plant phenols on the formation of EtG and EtS and tentatively estimated the magnitude of in vivo inhibitory interactions from our in vitro results. To address these issues, formation of EtS and EtG was investigated using recombinant glucuronosyl- and sulfotransferases as well as human liver microsomes and liver cytosol. After respective kinetics had been established, inhibition experiments using quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol were performed. These polyphenols are subject to extensive glucuronidation and/or sulfonation. EtG and EtS were determined by LC-MS/MS following solid phase extraction for EtG due to severe matrix effects and by direct injection for EtS. All enzymes investigated were involved in the conjugation of ethanol. Maximal EtG and EtS formation rates were observed with HLM and SULT1A1, respectively. All kinetics could best be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Resveratrol was a competitive inhibitor of UGT1A1, UGT1A9 and HLM; quercetin and kaempferol were inhibitors of all transferases under investigation except UGT2B15. Findings for quercetin with regard to UGT2B7 and SULT2A1 and for kaempferol with regard to SULT1E1 and SULT2A1 suggested a mechanism based inhibition. Competitive inhibition of the glucuronidation and sulfonation of ethanol was estimated as weak to negligible and as moderate to weak, respectively. Beside the known polymorphisms of the transferases involved in EtG and EtS formation, prediction of the inhibitory potential indicates that polyphenols may contribute to the variable formation rate of EtG and EtS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening of Potential Free Radicals Scavenger and Antibacterial Activities of Purwoceng (Pimpinella alpina Molk)

    PubMed Central

    Wahyuningrum, Retno; Utami, Pri Iswati; Dhiani, Binar Asrining; Kumalasari, Malikhah; Kusumawardani, Rizka Sari

    2016-01-01

    Purwoceng (Pimpinella alpina Molk) is a traditional medicinal plant used for its aphrodisiac values. This plant was originated Dieng Plateu, Central Java, Indonesia. Purwoceng has been reported to contain steroid, flavonoids, glycoside, saponins, tannins, and phenolic. Based on secondary metabolite compounds of Purwoceng herbs, a research need to be done to determine the other potential free radicals scavenger and antibacterial activities of Purwoceng. The objectives of this research are to screen the potential free radicals scavenger activity of in vitro using DPPH (1,1 diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil) radicals and NO• (nitric oxide) radicals, and antibacterial activity of Purwoceng. The extraction is done by a maceration method with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and ethanol solvent, respectively. Free radicals scavenger test was performed using DPPH radicals and NO• radicals, while antibacterial activity screening was performed using agar diffusion test. The results showed that ethyl acetate extract of Purwoceng has free radical scavenger activity with IC50 53.07 ppm lower than butylated hydroxytoluene. Ethyl acetate extract and ethanol extract of Purwoceng have antibacterial activity against Staphyloccus aureus, Escherichia coli, and MG42 bacterial isolate. PMID:27965755

  8. Screening of Potential Free Radicals Scavenger and Antibacterial Activities of Purwoceng (Pimpinella alpina Molk).

    PubMed

    Wahyuningrum, Retno; Utami, Pri Iswati; Dhiani, Binar Asrining; Kumalasari, Malikhah; Kusumawardani, Rizka Sari

    2016-11-01

    Purwoceng (Pimpinella alpina Molk) is a traditional medicinal plant used for its aphrodisiac values. This plant was originated Dieng Plateu, Central Java, Indonesia. Purwoceng has been reported to contain steroid, flavonoids, glycoside, saponins, tannins, and phenolic. Based on secondary metabolite compounds of Purwoceng herbs, a research need to be done to determine the other potential free radicals scavenger and antibacterial activities of Purwoceng. The objectives of this research are to screen the potential free radicals scavenger activity of in vitro using DPPH (1,1 diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil) radicals and NO• (nitric oxide) radicals, and antibacterial activity of Purwoceng. The extraction is done by a maceration method with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and ethanol solvent, respectively. Free radicals scavenger test was performed using DPPH radicals and NO• radicals, while antibacterial activity screening was performed using agar diffusion test. The results showed that ethyl acetate extract of Purwoceng has free radical scavenger activity with IC50 53.07 ppm lower than butylated hydroxytoluene. Ethyl acetate extract and ethanol extract of Purwoceng have antibacterial activity against Staphyloccus aureus, Escherichia coli, and MG42 bacterial isolate.

  9. Radical addition-initiated domino reactions of conjugated oxime ethers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The application of conjugated oxime ethers to the synthesis of complex chemical scaffolds using domino radical reactions has been described in detail. The triethylborane-mediated hydroxysulfenylation reaction allows for the regioselective construction of a carbon-sulfur bond and a carbon-oxygen bond in a single operation for the formation of β-hydroxy sulfides. This reaction proceeds via a radical pathway involving regioselective thiyl addition and the subsequent trapping of the resulting α-imino radical with O₂, where the imino group enhances the stability of the intermediate radical. Hydroxyalkylation reactions that occur via a carbon radical addition reaction followed by the hydroxylation of the resulting N-borylenamine with O₂ have also been developed. We investigated sequential radical addition aldol-type reactions in detail to explore the novel domino reactions that occur via the generation of N-borylenamine. The radical reaction of a conjugated oxime ether with triethylborane in the presence of an aldehyde affords γ-butyrolactone via sequential processes including ethyl radical addition, the generation of N-borylenamine, an aldol-type reaction with an aldehyde, and a lactonization reaction. A novel domino reaction has also been developed involving the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of N-boryl-N-phenoxyenamine. The triethylborane-mediated domino reactions of O-phenyl-conjugated oxime ethers afforded the corresponding benzofuro[2,3-b]pyrrol-2-ones via a radical addition/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement/cyclization/lactamization cascade.

  10. Mutagenic Action of Ethyl Methanesulfonate in Maize.

    PubMed

    Neuffer, M G; Ficsor, G

    1963-03-29

    Pollen of corn plants carrying three closely linked genes (alpha beta Sh(2)) on chromosome 3 were treated by ethyl methanesulfonate in order to determine the nature of genetic changes produced. In this genetic material the loss of the beta gene alone represents a discrete genetic change, possibly a point mutation, while the loss of two or more markers represents chromosome aberrations. Ethyl methanesulfonate, x-rays, and ultraviolet light all induced numerous chromosome aberrations, but only ultraviolet light and probably ethyl methanesulfonate induced discrete genetic changes.

  11. A new acyl radical-based route to the 1,5-methanoazocino[4,3-b]indole framework of uleine and Strychnos alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Bennasar, M-Lluïsa; Roca, Tomàs; García-Díaz, Davinia

    2008-11-21

    C-4 or C-12 ethyl substituted 1,5-methanoazocino[4,3-b]indoles, which constitute the tetracyclic framework of uleine alkaloids as well as the ABDE substructure of the Strychnos alkaloid family, have been synthesized by novel 6-exo and 6-endo cyclizations of selenoester-derived 2-indolylacyl radicals upon 5-ethyl-1,2,3,6- and 3-ethyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridines, respectively.

  12. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  13. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  14. Methyl Ethyl Ketoxime; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing this final test rule under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO, CAS No. 96-29-7) to perform testing for health effects.

  15. [Toxicology of ethyl gasoline 78 and 94].

    PubMed

    Starzyński, Z; Szymańska, S; Jaraczewska, W; Myślak, Z

    1978-01-01

    The authors have described clinical pictures of acute and chronic intoxication, especially toxic effect of ethyl gasoline upon nervous sytem, parenchymatous organs, and irritating effect on skin and mucous membranes.

  16. 77 FR 23625 - Quizalofop Ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Quizalofop Ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001... are an agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. Potentially...

  17. Hemo-De as substitute for ethyl acetate in formalin-ethyl acetate concentration technique.

    PubMed Central

    Neimeister, R; Logan, A L; Gerber, B; Egleton, J H; Kleger, B

    1987-01-01

    In comparative studies, Hemo-De (PMP Medical Industries, Inc., Irving, Tex.) was found to be a suitable replacement for ethyl acetate in the Formalin-ethyl acetate concentration technique. With essentially equivalent recovery rates for both procedures, the Formalin-Hemo-De concentration technique is considered to be the preferred technique because Hemo-De is less toxic and less flammable and does not present disposal problems, and its cost is approximately one-fourth that of ethyl acetate. PMID:3818930

  18. Structure and reactions of cation-radicals of esters in freon matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Belevskii, V.N.; Belopushkin, S.I.; Fel'dman, V.I.

    1987-11-01

    In CFCl/sub 3/ matrices the cation-radicals of methyl and ethyl formates, formed in ..gamma..-irradiated solutions, at 77 K efficiently undergo intramolecular H atom transfer to form the secondary cation-radicals HC(OH)OCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/ and DC(OH)OCD/sub 2/CH/sub 2/. This process does not occur in the deuteroformate cation-radical DCOOCH/sub 2/CD/sub 3//sup +./, which is observed in the ESR spectra in different conformations, depending on the temperature. Ion-molecule reactions involving cation-radicals are indicated

  19. A comparison of two alcohol biomarkers in clinical practice: ethyl glucuronide versus ethyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory; Marin, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the characteristics of two direct alcohol biomarkers, ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate. Both biomarkers were analyzed from urine specimens submitted by 58 active duty service members at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center's Addiction Treatment Service. These 58 individuals, as a result of serial testing, submitted a total of 374 urine specimens for laboratory analysis. Of 374 specimens, the paired tests were most often negative (n = 295, 78.9%).The paired tests were both positive less frequently (n = 38, 10.2%). In an interesting development ethyl sulfate produced more positive results than ethyl glucuronide (n = 32, 8.6%).

  20. Ethyl Vanillin Activates TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Fowler, Daniel K; Shaffer, Forrest J; Lindberg, Jonathon E M; Peters, James H

    2017-09-01

    The nonselective cation channel transient receptor potential ankryn subtype family 1 (TRPA1) is expressed in neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia and also in vagal afferent neurons that innervate the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Many TRPA1 agonists are reactive electrophilic compounds that form covalent adducts with TRPA1. Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), the common agonist used to identify TRPA1, contains an electrophilic group that covalently binds with cysteine residues of TRPA1 and confers a structural change on the channel. There is scientific motivation to identify additional compounds that can activate TRPA1 with different mechanisms of channel gating. We provide evidence that ethyl vanillin (EVA) is a TRPA1 agonist. Using fluorescent calcium imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology on dissociated rat vagal afferent neurons and TRPA1-transfected COS-7 cells, we discovered that EVA activates cells also activated by AITC. Both agonists display similar current profiles and conductances. Pretreatment with A967079, a selective TRPA1 antagonist, blocks the EVA response as well as the AITC response. Furthermore, EVA does not activate vagal afferent neurons from TRPA1 knockout mice, showing selectivity for TRPA1 in this tissue. Interestingly, EVA appears to be pharmacologically different from AITC as a TRPA1 agonist. When AITC is applied before EVA, the EVA response is occluded. However, they both require intracellular oxidation to activate TRPA1. These findings suggest that EVA activates TRPA1 but via a distinct mechanism that may provide greater ease for study in native systems compared with AITC and may shed light on differential modes of TRPA1 gating by ligand types. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. A case of severe corrosive esophagitis, gastritis, and liver necrosis caused by ingestion of methyl ethyl ketone peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung Oh; Choi, Jeong Woo; Hwang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The plastic hardener methyl ethyl ketone peroxide is unstable peroxide that releases free oxygen radicals. Ingestion of this compound induces widespread liver necrosis, severe metabolic acidosis, corrosive esophagitis and gastritis, that is often fatal. A 49-year-old man unintentionally ingested approximately 100 mL (55%) of this compound in solution, which was purchased as plastic hardener. Despite resuscitation, he died about 11 hours after admission. We report a patient with poisoning due to methyl ethyl ketone peroxide who presented with corrosive esophagitis and gastritis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and developed ischemia of the bowel and necrosis of the liver and died of severe metabolic acidosis and multiorgan failure. PMID:28168233

  2. Interaction between alkyl radicals and single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Denis, Pablo A

    2012-06-30

    The addition of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied by means of dispersion corrected density functional theory. The PBE, B97-D, M06-L, and M06-2X functionals were used. Consideration of Van der Waals interactions is essential to obtain accurate addition energies. In effect, the enthalpy changes at 298 K, for the addition of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl radicals onto a (5,5) SWCNT are: -25.7, -25.1, -22.4, and -16.6 kcal/mol, at the M06-2X level, respectively, whereas at PBE/6-31G* level they are significantly lower: -25.0, -19.0, -16.7, and -5.0 kcal/mol respectively. Although the binding energies are small, the attached alkyl radicals are expected to be stable because of the large desorption barriers. The importance of nonbonded interactions was more noticeable as we moved from primary to tertiary alkyl radicals. Indeed, for the tert-butyl radical, physisorption onto the (11,0) SWCNT is preferred rather than chemisorption. The bond dissociation energies determined for alkyl radicals and SWCNT follow the trend suggested by the consideration of radical stabilization energies. However, they are in disagreement with some degrees of functionalization observed in recent experiments. This discrepancy would stem from the fact that for some HiPco nanotubes, nonbonded interactions with alkyl radicals are stronger than covalent bonds.

  3. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  4. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  5. Stabilization and isomerization of radical cations generated by fast electron irradiation of unsaturated organic molecules in a solid argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, V. I.; Sukhov, F. F.; Orlov, A. Yu.; Tyulpina, I. V.; Ivanchenko, V. K.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix isolation EPR spectroscopy was used to study the fate of "hot" unsaturated radical cations produced by fast electron irradiation in solid argon. It was found that the radical cations of cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene and ethyl vinyl ether resulting from highly exothermic hole transfer (excess energy>6 eV) underwent effective relaxation in an argon matrix. 1-Butene radical cation exhibits isomerization to cis-2-butene radical cation. The role of molecular structure of organic radical cations in excess energy relaxation is discussed.

  6. A tandem mass spectrometric investigation of N-(3-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters and N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dilip K; Mooney, Áine; Kenny, Peter T M

    2011-10-15

    N-(3-Ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters 1-4 and N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters 5-8 were prepared by coupling either 3-ferrocenylnaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid or 6-ferrocenylnaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid to the dipeptide ethyl esters GlyGly(OEt) (1, 5), AlaGly(OEt) (2, 6), GlyPhe(OEt) (3, 7) and GlyLeu(OEt) (4, 8), using the standard N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride, 1-hydroxybenzotriazole protocol. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) were employed in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry in the analysis of N-(3-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters 1-4 and N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide ethyl esters 5-8. Radical cations, [M](+•) and [M + H](+) species were both observed in the mass spectra. Intense sodium [M + Na](+) and potassium [M + K](+) adducts were also present. An important diagnostic ion at m/z [M-65](+) was observed in both the MS and MS/MS spectra of the N-(3-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide derivatives. Sequence-specific ions were generally not observed in the MS/MS spectra of the N-(3-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) series due to formation of the diagnostic [M-65](+) ion. Sequence-specific ions were observed in the MS/MS spectra of the N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl) dipeptide esters with charge retention on the derivatized N-terminal of the dipeptide. Both series of compounds could be successfully analyzed by MALDI without the use of a matrix (LDI).

  7. Modeling the free radical polymerization of acrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günaydin, Hakan; Salman, Seyhan; Tüzün, Nurcan Şenyurt; Avci, Duygu; Aviyente, Viktorya

    Acrylates have gained importance because of their ease of conversion to high-molecular-weight polymers and their broad industrial use. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) is a well-known monomer for free radical polymerization, but its α-methyl substituent restricts the chemical modification of the monomer and therefore the properties of the resulting polymer. The presence of a heteroatom in the methyl group is known to increase the polymerizability of MMA. Methyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (MHMA), methyl α-methoxymethylacrylate (MC1MA), methyl α-acetoxymethylacrylate (MAcMA) show even better conversions to high-molecular-weight polymers than MMA. In contrast, the polymerization rate is known to decrease as the methyl group is replaced by ethyl in ethyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (EHMA) and t-butyl in t-butyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (TBHMA). In this study, quantum mechanical tools (B3LYP/6-31G*) have been used in order to understand the mechanistic behavior of the free radical polymerization reactions of acrylates. The polymerization rates of MMA, MHMA, MC1MA, MAcMA, EHMA, TBHMA, MC1AN (α-methoxymethyl acrylonitrile), and MC1AA (α-methoxymethyl acrylic acid) have been evaluated and rationalized. Simple monomers such as allyl alcohol (AA) and allyl chloride (AC) have also been modeled for comparative purposes.

  8. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  9. Antioxidant and Protective Effect of Ethyl Acetate Extract of Podophyllum Hexandrum Rhizome on Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Rat Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Haq, Ehtishamul; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Abid; Zargar, Mohmmad Afzal

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of ethyl acetate extract was carefully investigated by the methods of DPPH radical scavenging activity, Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, Superoxide radical scavenging activity, Hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging activity and its Reducing power ability. All these in vitro antioxidant activities were concentration dependent which were compared with standard antioxidants such as BHT, α-tocopherol. The hepatoprotective potential of Podophyllum hexandrum extract was also evaluated in male Wistar rats against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage. Pre-treated rats were given ethyl acetate extract at 20, 30 and 50 mg/kg dose prior to CCl4 administration (1 ml/kg, 1:1 in olive oil). Rats pre-treated with Podophyllum hexandrum extract remarkably prevented the elevation of serum AST, ALT, LDH and liver lipid peroxides in CCl4-treated rats. Hepatic glutathione levels were significantly increased by the treatment with the extract in all the experimental groups. The extract at the tested doses also restored the levels of liver homogenate enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S- transferase) significantly. This study suggests that ethyl acetate extract of P. hexandrum has a liver protective effect against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity and possess in vitro antioxidant activities. PMID:21394192

  10. 40 CFR 721.10595 - Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy-, ethyl sulfate (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10595 Octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy... chemical substance identified as octadecen-1-aminium, N-ethyl-N,N-dimethy-, ethyl sulfate (1:1) (PMN P-11...

  11. The radical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The radical amplifier as a method for measuring radical concentrations in the atmosphere has received renewed attention lately. In principle, it can measure the total concentration of HO(x) and RO(x) radicals by reacting ambient air with high concentrations of CO (3-10 percent) and NO (2-6 ppmv), and measuring the NO2 produced.

  12. Growing up Radical: Investigation of Benzyl-Like Radicals with Increasing Chain Lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Joseph A.; Jawad, Khadija M.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Combustion processes involve complex chemistry including pathways leading to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from small molecule precursors. Resonance stabilized radicals (RSRs) likely play an important role in the pathways to PAHs due to their unusual stability. Benzyl radical is a prototypical RSR that is stabilized by conjugation with the phenyl ring. Earlier work on α-methyl benzyl radical showed perturbations to the spectroscopy due to a hindered methyl rotor. If the alkyl chain is lengthened then multiple conformations become possible. This talk will discuss the jet-cooled spectroscopy of α-ethyl benzyl radical and α-propyl benzyl radical produced from the discharge of 1-phenyl propanol and 1-phenyl butanol respectively. Electronic spectra were obtained via resonant two-photon ionization, and IR spectra were obtained by resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy. Kidwell, N. M.; Reilly, N. J.; Nebgen, B.; Mehta-Hurt, D. N.; Hoehn, R. D.; Kokkin, D. L.; McCarthy, M. C.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Zwier, T. S. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 2013, 117, 13465.

  13. Radical ring expansion reactions of methylenecyclopropane derivatives: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Diego; Sordo, Tomas L

    2006-06-23

    The evolution of the primary radicals from 1-(3-bromopropyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, 1-(3-bromopropyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane, 1-(3-bromobutyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, and 1-(3-bromobutyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane was theoretically studied at the ROMP2/6-311++G(d,p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d,p) theory level taking into account the effect of solvent through a PCM-UAHF model. For the propyl-substituted radicals, the attack of the radical center on the double bond takes place most favorably in an exo fashion. The subsequent ring expansions yield the product corresponding to the rupture of the endo C-C bond as the most favorable one in accordance with the experimental results. In the case of 1-(3-bromobutyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, the Gibbs energy barriers for the endo and exo attacks are the same, and the subsequent reversible evolution yields the product corresponding to the rupture of the exo C-C bond as the most favorable one through thermodynamic control in agreement with experiment. Finally, for 1-(3-bromobutyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane, our calculations predict that the endo attack is 0.8 kcal/mol more favorable than the exo one. In the subsequent reversible ring expansion, the product corresponding to the rupture of the endo C-C bond is kinetically the most favored one in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. [Ethyl glucuronide: a biomarker of alcohol consumption].

    PubMed

    Kharbouche, H; Sporkert, F; Staub, C; Mangin, P; Augsburger, M

    2009-11-04

    Excessive alcohol consumption represents a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality. It is therefore indispensable to be able to detect at-risk drinking. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a specific marker of alcohol consumption. The determination of ethyl glucuronide in urine or blood can be used to prove recent driving under the influence of alcohol, even if ethanol is no longer detectable. The commercialization of an EtG specific immunological assay now allows to obtain preliminary results rapidly and easily with satisfying sensitivity. Moreover, the detection of ethyl glucuronide in hair offers the opportunity to evaluate an alcohol consumption over a long period. The EtG concentration in hair is in correlation with the amount of ingested alcohol. Thus, the analysis of ethyl glucuronide can be used to monitor abstinence, to detect alcohol relapse and to identify at-risk drinkers. However, a cut off allowing to detect chronic alcohol abuser reliably still does not exist. Therefore, it is recommended to perform the analysis of ethyl glucuronide in complement to the existing blood markers. A study financed by the Swiss Foundation for Alcohol Research is actually conducted by the West Switzerland University Center of Legal Medicine in order to establish an objective cut-off.

  15. [Degradation of thiometon in ethyl acetate].

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Shimokawa, S; Kobata, M; Tanaka, T; Nakanishi, Y

    2001-04-01

    When performing multiresidue analysis of pesticides, the recovery of thiometon was less than 20% from carrots and eggplants, but about 100% from garlic chives and welsh onions. The recovery of thiometon was found to depend on the lot of ethyl acetate. A 2-year-old lot of ethyl acetate caused degradation of thiometon, but a fresh lot of ethyl acetate did not. Analysis showed that ethyl acetate stored for 2 years contained about 5 microL/mL of acetaldehyde. Thiometon was also degraded by acetone or acetonitrile, when acetaldehyde was added to them, in the same manner as by aged ethyl acetate. The fact that the recovery of thiometon from welsh onions was about 100% indicated that some of the mercaptans in allium vegetables may prevent thiometon degradation. Mercaptans such as L-cysteine and 3-mercaptoproionic acid were confirmed to prevent the degradation of thiometon and disulfoton. These findings show that mercaptans may be useful additives for analyzing thiometon and disulfoton.

  16. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS No...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS No...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10244 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, 2-[bis(2- chloroethoxy)phosphinyl]ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10244 Phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2... substance identified as phosphonic acid, P- ethyl]-, 2- ethyl 2-chloroethyl ester (PMN P-09-195; CAS No...

  20. A Signature of Roaming Dynamics in the Thermal Decomposition of Ethyl Nitrite: Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Prozument, Kirill; Suleimanov, Yury V; Buesser, Beat; Oldham, James M; Green, William H; Suits, Arthur G; Field, Robert W

    2014-11-06

    Chirped-pulse (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy is uniquely suited for near-universal quantitative detection and structural characterization of mixtures that contain multiple molecular and radical species. In this work, we employ CP spectroscopy to measure product branching and extract information about the reaction mechanism, guided by kinetic modeling. Pyrolysis of ethyl nitrite, CH3CH2ONO, is studied in a Chen type flash pyrolysis reactor at temperatures of 1000-1800 K. The branching between HNO, CH2O, and CH3CHO products is measured and compared to the kinetic models generated by the Reaction Mechanism Generator software. We find that roaming CH3CH2ONO → CH3CHO + HNO plays an important role in the thermal decomposition of ethyl nitrite, with its rate, at 1000 K, comparable to that of the radical elimination channel CH3CH2ONO → CH3CH2O + NO. HNO is a signature of roaming in this system.

  1. Forgotten Radicals in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Luc, Rochette; Vergely, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Redox reactions play key roles in intra- and inter-cellular signaling, and in adaptative processes of tissues towards stress. Among the major free radicals with essential functions in cells are reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (•OH) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (•NO). In this article, we review the forgotten and new radicals with potential relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Approximately 0.3% of O2•- present in cytosol exists in its protonated form: hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•). Water (H2O) can be split into two free radicals: •OH and hydrogen radical (H•). Several free radicals, including thiyl radicals (RS•) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) are known to isomerize double bonds. In the omega-6 series of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), cis-trans isomerization of γ-linolenate and arachidonate catalyzed by RS• has been investigated. Evidence is emerging that hydrogen disulphide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in vivo which can be a source of free radicals. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme can oxidize the ionized form of H2S to hydro-sulphide radical: HS•. Recent studies suggest that H2S plays an important function in cardiovascular functions. Carbonate radical, which can be formed when •OH reacts with carbonate or bicarbonate ions, is also involved in the activity of Cu-Zn-SOD. Recently, it has been reported that carbonate anion were potentially relevant oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. In conclusion, there is solid evidence supporting the formation of many free radicals by cells leading which may play an important role in their homeostasis. PMID:23675099

  2. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-28

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and t-butyl (C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (E{sub T}) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low E{sub T} part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high E{sub T} part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH{sub 3}-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  3. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 573.420 Section 573.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  4. Ethyl p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphorothioate (EPN)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl p - nitrophenyl phenylphosphorothioate ( EPN ) ; CASRN 2104 - 64 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Ha

  5. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1295 - Ethyl formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chapter; and 0.01 percent in all other food categories. (e) Prior sanctions for ethyl formate different... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... the animal kingdom. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed...

  7. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  8. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related...

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, M. Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Başkan, M Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Antifungal and antioxidant activity of Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh ethyl acetate extract and fractions (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Crassocephalum bauchiense is a flowering plant, found in the West Region of Cameroon. Previous studied has highlighted the antibacterial and the dermal toxicological safety as well as the immunomodulatory activities of the ethyl acetate extract of its dry leaves. As an extension of the previous researches, the current work has been undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antifungal and antioxidant activities of C. bauchiense dried leaves ethyl acetate extract and fractions. Methods The extract was obtained by maceration in ethyl acetate and further fractionated into six fractions labeled F1 to F6 by flash chromatography. The antifungal activity of the extract and fractions against yeasts and dermatophytes was evaluated using broth microdilution method. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and β-carotene - linoleic acid assays. Results The extract (MIC = 0.125 - 4 mg/ml) was found to be more active on dermatophytes and yeasts compared to the fractions. The ethyl acetate extract and fractions exhibited strong scavenging activity on DPPH (CI50 = 28.57 - 389.38 μg/ml). The fractions F3 and F6 expressed best antioxidant activity on DPPH radicals compared to the crude extract. Conclusion The results of these findings clearly showed that C. bauchiense ethyl acetate extract has a significant antifungal and antioxidant activity. It is therefore a source of active compounds that might be used as antifungal and antioxidant agents. PMID:24742210

  12. 4-Alkyl radical extrusion in the cytochrome P-450-catalyzed oxidation of 4-alkyl-1,4-dihydropyridines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Jacobsen, N.E.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. )

    1988-10-04

    Rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 oxidizes the 4-methyl, 4-ethyl (DDEP), and 4-isopropyl derivatives of 3,5-bis(carbethoxy)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4,-dihydropyridine to mixtures of the corresponding 4-alkyl and 4-dealkyl pyridines. A fraction of the total microsomal enzyme is destroyed in the process. The 4-dealkyl to 4-alkyl pyridine metabolite ratio, the extent of cytochrome P-450 destruction, and the rate of spin-trapped radical accumulation are correlated in a linear inverse manner with the homolytic or heterolytic bond energies of the 4-alkyl groups of the 4-alkyl-1,4-dihydropyridines. No isotope effects are observed on the pyridine matabolite ratio, the destruction of cytochrome P-450, or the formation of ethyl radicals when (4-{sup 2}H)DDEP is used instead of DDEP. N-Methyl- and N-ethyl-DDEP undergo N-dealkylation rather than aromatization but N-phenyl-DDEP is oxidized to a mixture of the 4-ethyl and 4-deethyl N-phenylpyridinium metabolites. In contrast to the absence of an isotope effect in the oxidation of DDEP, the 4-deethyl to 4-ethyl N-phenylpyridinium metabolite ratio increases 6-fold when N-phenyl(4-{sup 2}H)DDEP is used. The results support the hypothesis that cytochrome P-450 catalyzes the oxidation of dihydropyridines to radical cations and show that the radical cations decay to nonradical products by multiple, substituent-dependent, mechanisms.

  13. Separation of ethyl acetate and ethanol from methyl ethyl ketone and water, and ethyl acetate from ethanol and water by extractive distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Ratanapupech, P.

    1983-01-01

    A number of extractive distillation agents were investigated to separate ethyl acetate and ethanol from methyl ethyl ketone and water in an ethyl acetate-ethanol-methyl ethyl ketone-water mixture, and ethyl acetate from ethanol and water in an ethyl acetate-ethanol-water mixture by means of extractive distillation. A measure of separation is the relative volatility, which was calculated by the Fenske equation. The results showed that it is possible to separate the components from these two mixtures by extractive distillation with a distillation column containing relatively few theoretical plates. It was found that the proper extractive distillation agent completely eliminated azeotrope formation among the components in the mixtures investigated. Packed columns can be used in extractive distillation even though they are not quite as efficient as perforated plate columns. For the separation of ethyl acetate and ethanol from methyl ethyl ketone and water one of the more attractive extractive agents is comprised of 25.0 wt.% hydroquinone, 25.0 wt.% ortho-tertbutylphenol, 25.0 wt.% catechol and 25.0 wt.% dimethylformamide, and the relative volatilities of ethnaol to methyl ethyl ketone obtained was 1.51 and ethyl acetate to methyl ethyl ketone was 1.69. For the separation of ethyl acetate from ethanol and water a typical attractive extractive agent is comprised of 33.33 wt.% glycerol, 33.33 wt.% ethylene glycol and 33.33 wt.% triethylene glycol, and the relative volatility of ethyl acetate to ethanol obtained was 3.93.

  14. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... combined residues of the herbicide quizalofop (2- propanoic acid) and quizalofop ethyl (ethyl-2- propanoate...) Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the herbicide quizalofop (2- propanoic acid... herbicide quizalofop-p ethyl ester , and its acid metabolite quizalofop-p , and the S enantiomers of...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  18. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including...

  19. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including...

  20. 40 CFR 180.441 - Quizalofop ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the....05 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including its... with regional registration are established for residues of the herbicide quizalofop ethyl, including...

  1. 'Carbene radicals' in Co(II)(por)-catalyzed olefin cyclopropanation.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Wojciech I; Xu, Xue; Zhang, X Peter; Reek, Joost N H; de Bruin, Bas

    2010-08-11

    The mechanism of cobalt(II)-porphyrin-mediated cyclopropanation of olefins with diazoesters was studied. The first step--reaction of cobalt(II)-porphyrin with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA)--was examined using EPR and ESI-MS techniques. EDA reacts with cobalt(II)-porphyrin to form a 1:1 Co(por)(CHCOOEt) adduct that exists as two isomers: the 'bridging carbene' C' in which the 'carbene' is bound to the metal and the pyrrolic nitrogen of the porphyrin that has a d(7) configuration on the metal, and the 'terminal carbene' C in which the 'carbene' behaves as a redox noninnocent ligand having a d(6) cobalt center and the unpaired electron residing on the 'carbene' carbon atom. The subsequent reactivities of the thus formed 'cobalt carbene radical' with propene, styrene, and methyl acrylate were studied using DFT calculations. The calculations suggest that the formation of the carbene is the rate-limiting step for the unfunctionalized Co(II)(por) and that the cyclopropane ring formation proceeds via a stepwise radical process: Radical addition of the 'carbene radical' C to the C=C double bonds of the olefins results in formation of the gamma-alkyl radical intermediates D. Species D then easily collapse in almost barrierless ring-closure reactions (TS3) to form the cyclopropanes. This radical mechanism readily explains the high activity of Co(II)(por) species in the cyclopropanation of electron-deficient olefins such as methyl acrylate.

  2. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester...

  3. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester...

  4. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester...

  5. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester...

  6. Urine ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in a routine clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Allcock, Rebecca L

    2017-01-01

    Background Detection of alcohol consumption in clients undergoing treatment for alcohol dependence can be difficult. The ethanol metabolites ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate are detectable for longer in urine than either breath ethanol or urine ethanol. Our aim was to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for urine ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate for use in a routine clinical laboratory and define clinical cut-offs in a large population who had not consumed alcohol for at least two weeks. Methods Urine samples were diluted in 0.05% formic acid in HPLC grade water and then directly injected onto a Waters Acquity ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a Waters TQ Detector. Eighty participants were recruited who had not consumed alcohol for at least two weeks to define cut-offs for urine ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate. Samples and alcohol diaries were also collected from 12 alcohol-dependent clients attending a treatment programme. Results The assay was validated with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.20 mg/L for ethyl glucuronide and 0.04 mg/L for ethyl sulphate. Accuracy, precision, linearity and recovery were acceptable. Cut-offs were established for ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulphate and ethyl sulphate/creatinine ratio (≤0.26 mg/L, ≤0.22 mg/L and ≤0.033 mg/mmol, respectively) in a non-drinking population. The validated cut-offs correctly identified clients in alcohol treatment who were continuing to drink alcohol. Conclusions A simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for urine ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate has been validated and cut-offs defined using 80 participants who had not consumed alcohol for at least two weeks. This is the largest study to date to define cut-offs for ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulphate and ethyl sulphate/creatinine ratio.

  7. Generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxide tumor promoters in isolated mouse keratinocytes. Formation of alkyl and alkoxyl radicals from tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Taffe, B G; Takahashi, N; Kensler, T W; Mason, R P

    1987-09-05

    The organic hydroperoxides tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide are tumor promoters in the skin of SENCAR mice, and this activity is presumed to be mediated through the activation of the hydroperoxides to free radical species. In this study we have assessed the generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxides in the target cell (the murine basal keratinocyte) using electron spin resonance. Incubation of primary isolates of keratinocytes from SENCAR mice in the presence of spin traps (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide or 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane) and either tert-butyl hydroperoxide or cumene hydroperoxide resulted in the generation and detection of radical adducts of these spin traps. tert-Butyl alkoxyl and alkyl radical adducts of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide were detected shortly after addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide, whereas only alkyl radical adducts were observed with cumene hydroperoxide. Spin trapping of the alkyl radicals with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane led to the identification of methyl and ethyl radical adducts following both tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide exposures. Prior heating of the cells to 100 degrees C for 30 min prevented radical formation. The radical generating capacity of subcellular fractions of these epidermal cells was examined using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and this activity was confined to the 105,000 X g supernatant fraction.

  8. Production of ethyl alcohol from bananas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Towns, T.

    1983-12-01

    The production of ethyl alcohol from waste bananas presents many special problems. During cooking, matting of the latex fibers from the banana peel recongeal when cooled and left untreated. This problem has been addressed by Alfaro by the use of CaC1/sub 2/. Separation of solids prior to distillation of the mashes in an economical fashion and use of the by product are also of concern to banana processors.

  9. Synthesis of Ethyl Salicylate Using Household Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sally; Hur, Chinhyu; Lee, Alan; Smith, Kurt

    1996-02-01

    Ethyl salicylate is synthesized, isolated, and characterized in a three-step process using simple equipment and household chemicals. First, acetylsalicylic acid is extracted from aspirin tablets with isopropyl alcohol, then hydrolyzed to salicylic acid with muriatic acid, and finally, the salicylic acid is esterified using ethanol and a boric acid catalyst. The experiment can be directed towards high school or university level students who have sufficient background in organic chemistry to recognize the structures and reactions that are involved.

  10. Ethyl ether fraction of Gastrodia elata Blume protects amyloid beta peptide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Moon, Kwang-Deog; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Han

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Recently, it has been reported that Alzheimer's disease is associated with cell death in neuronal cells including the hippocampus. Amyloid beta-peptide stimulates neuronal cell death, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop anti-dementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the effect of the herbal compound Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB) on neuronal cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The fractionation of GEB was carried out in various solvents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of the ethyl ether fraction was more potent than any other fractions. In cells treated with amyloid beta-peptide, the neuroprotective effect of the ethyl ether, chloroform, and butanol fractions was 92, 44, and 39%, respectively, compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that the ethyl ether fraction of GEB contains one or more compounds that dramatically reduce amyloid beta-peptide induced neuronal cell death in vitro.

  11. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  12. Radical aminomethylation of imines.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Konishi, Takehito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Yamaoka, Yousuke; Takasu, Kiyosei; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-05

    Taking advantage of the high level of performance of N-alkoxycarbonyl-imines, we achieved the first example of addition of the aminomethyl radical to imine. The reaction efficiency depended on the structure of the radical precursor, whether it is an iodide or a xanthate, and an electron-withdrawing group on the nitrogen atom of the radical. This reaction allows direct introduction of an N-substituted aminomethyl group onto imine to provide 1,2-diamine as well as the short-step synthesis of ICI-199,441.

  13. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  16. Chemical and thermochemical aspects of the ozonolysis of ethyl oleate: decomposition enthalpy of ethyl oleate ozonide.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Neat ethyl oleate was ozonized in a bubble reactor and the progress of the ozonolysis was followed by infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The ozonolysis was conducted till a molar ratio O3/C=C≈1 when the exothermal reaction spontaneously went to completion. A specific thermochemical calculation on ethyl oleate ozonation has been made to determine the theoretical heat of the ozonization reaction using the group increment approach. A linear relationship was found both in the integrated absorptivity of the ozonide infrared band at 1110 cm(-1) and the ozonolysis time as well as the thermal decomposition enthalpy of the ozonides and peroxides formed as a result of the ozonation. The DSC decomposition temperature of ozonated ethyl oleate occurs with an exothermal peak at about 150-155 °C with a decomposition enthalpy of 243.0 kJ/mol at molar ratio O3/C=C≈1. It is shown that the decomposition enthalpy of ozonized ethyl oleate is a constant value (≈243 kJ/mol) at any stage of the O3/C=C once an adequate normalization of the decomposition enthalpy for the amount of the adsorbed ozone is taken into consideration. The decomposition enthalpy of ozonized ethyl oleate was also calculated using a simplified thermochemical model, obtaining a result in reasonable agreement with the experimental value.

  17. A calibration method for measurement of small alkyl organic peroxy radicals by chemical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bin; Takami, Akinori; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2006-08-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the calibration factor (CF) of methyl and ethyl peroxy radicals in a chemical amplifier. The radical source comes from the reactions of excess methane and ethane, respectively, with known concentrations of OH radicals generated by the photolysis of water vapor at 184.9 nm in air in a flow tube. This yields a mixed radical source with equal amounts of HO2 and RO2 (R = CH3, C2H5). The CF for RO2 can be derived from the CF for HO2 and an average CF for the mixed radicals. The reliability of the method was evaluated by comparing the CF ratios of RO2 to HO2 obtained from both the experiments and theoretical calculations.

  18. Flash pyrolysis of ethyl, n-propyl, and isopropyl iodides as monitored by supersonic expansion vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kevin H; Lemieux, Jessy M; Zhang, Jingsong

    2009-01-22

    The thermal decomposition of ethyl and propyl iodides, along with select isotopomers, up to 1300 K was performed by flash pyrolysis with a 20-100 mus time scale. The pyrolysis was followed by supersonic expansion to isolate the reactive intermediates and initial products, and detection was accomplished by vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). The products monitored, such as CH(3), CH(3)I, C(2)H(5), C(2)H(4), HI, I, C(3)H(7), C(3)H(6), and I(2), provide for the simultaneous and direct observation of molecular elimination and bond fission pathways in ethyl and propyl iodides. In the pyrolysis of ethyl iodide, both C-I bond fission and HI molecular elimination pathways are competitive at the elevated temperatures, with C-I bond fission being preferred; at temperatures >or=1000 K, the ethyl radical products further dissociate to ethene + H atoms. In the pyrolysis of isopropyl iodide, both HI molecular elimination and C-I bond fission are observed and the molecular elimination channel is more important at all the elevated temperatures; the isopropyl radicals produced in the C-I fission channel undergo further decomposition to propene + H at temperatures >or=850 K. In contrast, bond fission is found to dominate the n-propyl iodide pyrolysis; at temperatures >or=950 K the n-propyl radicals produced decompose into methyl radical + ethene and propene + H atom. Isotopomer experiments characterize the extent of surface reactions and verify that the HI molecular eliminations in ethyl and propyl iodides proceed by a C1, C2 elimination mechanism (the 1,2 intramolecular elimination).

  19. Radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Opuntia humifusa Raf.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Seung-Chun; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Kil-Soo; Song, Jae-Chan; Kim, Sang-Keun; Lee, Hui-Min; Sung, Hye-Jin; Park, Hwa-Jin; Song, Yong-Beom; Yoo, Eun-Sook; Lee, Choong-Hwan; Rhee, Man-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Opuntia humifusa Raf. (O. humifusa Raf.) is a member of the Cactaceae family. To determine the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of this herb, various solvent fractions (methanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water) prepared from the leaves of cacti were tested using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical) and xanthine oxidase assays, and nitric oxide (NO)-producing macrophage cells. We found that O. humifusa Raf. displayed potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, all solvent fractions, except for the water layer, showed potent scavenging effects. The scavenging effect of the ethyl acetate fraction was higher than that of the other fractions, with IC50 values of 3.6 and 48.2 microg mL(-1). According to activity-guided fractionation, one of the active radical scavenging principles in the ethyl acetate fraction was found to be quercetin. In contrast, only two fractions (chloroform and ethyl acetate) significantly suppressed nitric oxide production from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions significantly blocked the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the RAW264.7 cells stimulated by LPS. Moreover, ethyl acetate fractions significantly blocked the expression of IL-1beta from the RAW264.7 cells stimulated by LPS. Therefore, the results suggested that O. humifusa Raf. may modulate radical-induced toxicity via both direct scavenging activity and the inhibition of reactive species generation, and the modulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Finally, O. humifusa Raf. may be useful as a functional food or drug against reactive species-mediated disease.

  20. Online Radicalization: Bangladesh Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    will work on developing a sustainable social awareness against radicalization. It will be responsible for coordinating and integrating all government...PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including...coordination among the counter-terrorism agencies, and lack of positive initiatives to grow enduring social resilience against radicalization. Bangladesh

  1. Analysis of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate using aqueous normal-phase chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T; Dang, Andy

    2015-05-01

    The use of aqueous normal-phase chromatography is explored as a possible format for the analysis of the forensically significant compounds ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate. Standard solutions of the two compounds are used to verify the retention capabilities of two stationary phases (diamond hydride and undecanoic acid). These results are then compared to data obtained on hair extracts to determine if any matrix effects exist with respect to both retention and peak shape. The undecanoic stationary phase is used for the establishment of calibration curves for quantitative analysis. These curves are utilized to determine the concentration of ethyl glucuronide in several hair samples tested. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Theoretical study of the decomposition of ethyl and ethyl 3-phenyl glycidate.

    PubMed

    Josa, Daniela; Peña-Gallego, Angeles; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the decomposition of ethyl and ethyl 3-phenyl glycidate in gas phase was studied by density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 methods. A proposed mechanism for the reaction indicates that the ethyl side of the ester is eliminated as ethylene through a concerted six-membered cyclic transition state, and the unstable intermediate glycidic acid decarboxylates rapidly to give the corresponding aldehyde. Two possible pathways for glycidic acid decarboxylation were studied: one via a five-membered cyclic transition state, and the other via a four-membered cyclic transition state. The results of the calculations indicate that the decarboxylation reaction occurs via a mechanism with five-membered cyclic transition state.

  3. The ν1 CH stretching mode of the ketenyl (HCCO) radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; McNavage, William; Groller, Raymond; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2008-02-01

    The ν1 CH stretch, a previously uncharacterized mode of the ketenyl (HCCO) radical, has been identified at 3232cm-1 through time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy of rovibrationally excited ketenyl generated, along with ethyl (CH2CH3), with near-unit quantum efficiency via the 193nm photodissociation of ethyl ethynyl ether. IR emission from the vibrationally excited photoproducts was detected with both temporal and frequency resolutions. Spectral assignments were supported by comparison with theoretical calculations as well as two-dimensional correlation analysis.

  4. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  5. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  6. In vitro protection of biological macromolecules against oxidative stress and in vivo toxicity evaluation of Acacia nilotica (L.) and ethyl gallate in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, enormous research has been focused on natural bioactive compounds possessing potential antioxidant and anticancer properties using cell lines and animal models. Acacia nilotica (L.) is widely distributed in Asia, Africa, Australia and Kenya. The plant is traditionally used to treat mouth, ear and bone cancer. However, reports on Acacia nilotica (L.) Wild. Ex. Delile subsp. indica (Benth.) Brenan regarding its toxicity profile is limited. Hence in this study, we investigated the antioxidant capacity and acute toxicity of ethyl gallate, a phenolic antioxidant present in the A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract. Methods The antioxidant activity of ethyl gallate against Fenton’s system (Fe3+/H2O2/ascorbic acid) generated oxidative damage to pBR322 DNA and BSA was investigated. We also studied the interaction of ethyl gallate to CT-DNA by wave scan and FTIR analysis. The amount of ethyl gallate present in the A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract was calculated using HPLC and represented in gram equivalence of ethyl gallate. The acute toxicity profile of ethyl gallate in the A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract was analyzed in albino Wistar rats. Measurement of liver and kidney function markers, total proteins and glucose were determined in the serum. Statistical analysis was done using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) tool version 16.0. Results Ethyl gallate was found to be effective at 100 μg/mL concentration by inhibiting the free radical mediated damage to BSA and pBR322 DNA. We also found that the interaction of ethyl gallate and A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract to CT-DNA occurs through intercalation. One gram of A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract was found to be equivalent to 20 mg of ethyl gallate through HPLC analysis. Based on the acute toxicity results, A. nilotica (L.) leaf extract and ethyl gallate as well was found to be non-toxic and safe. Conclusions Results revealed no mortality or abnormal biochemical changes in vivo and the protective effect

  7. Comparison of Diffusion Coefficients of Aryl Carbonyls and Aryl Alcohols in Hydroxylic Solvents. Evidence that the Diffusion of Ketyl Radicals in Hydrogen-Bonding Solvents is Not Anomalous?

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, S Thomas ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Kandanarachchi, Pramod H.; Franz, James A. )

    2000-12-01

    The diffusion coefficients of a benzyl-, sec-phenethyl-, and diphenylmethyl alcohol and the corresponding aryl carbonyls (benzaldehyde, acetophenone and benzophenone) were measured by Taylor's dispersion method in both ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. The experimental values are compared to published transient grating measurements of the corresponding aryl ketyl radicals (benzyl-, sec-phenethyl-, and diphenylmethyl-ketyl radical). In general, the diffusion coefficient of the aryl alcohols and the corresponding aryl ketyl radicals are equivalent within experimental error. This work shows that the diffusion of ketyl radicals is not anomalously slow and that aryl alcohols are significantly better models than the corresponding aryl ketones for analyzing the diffusion of aryl ketyl radicals in both ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. Empirical estimates of the diffusion coefficients of aryl alcohols using the Spernol-Wirtz and Wilke-Chang modifications to the Stokes-Einstein diffusion equation do not adequately account for the interactions between the aryl ketyl radicals or aryl alcohols with the hydroxylic solvents ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. The excellent agreement between the experimental diffusion coefficients of the aryl alcohols and the corresponding ketyl radicals show that the transient grating method can provide accurate estimates for the diffusion coefficients of transient species. This is especially important when a stable model is not available, for example the pyranyl radical.

  8. HYDROCARBON RADICAL REACTIONS WITH O2: COMPARISON OF ALLYL, FORMYL AND VINYL TO ETHYL. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. 1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol from the biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (ethyl ferulate) and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Compton, David L; Laszlo, Joseph A

    2009-06-01

    1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol is found ubiquitously throughout the plant kingdom, possessing ultraviolet adsorbing and antioxidant properties. Diferuloyl glycerol was synthesized and isolated as a byproduct in up to 5% yield from a pilot plant scale packed-bed, biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl ferulate with soybean oil or mono- and diacylglycerols from soybean oil. The yield of the diferuloyl glycerol byproduct was directly proportional to the overall water concentration of the bioreactor. The isolated diferuloyl glycerol exhibited good ultraviolet adsorbing properties, 280-360 nm with a lambda(max) 322 nm, and compared well to the efficacy of commercial sunscreen active ingredients. The antioxidant capacity of diferuloyl glycerol (0.25-2.5 mM) was determined by its ability to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals and was comparable to that of ferulic acid. At current pilot plant scale production capacity, 120 kg diferuloyl glycerol byproduct could be isolated per year.

  10. Chemistry of ascorbic acid radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of ascorbic acid free radicals is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on identification and characterization of ascorbate radicals by spectrophotometric and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques, the kinetics of formation and disappearance of ascorbate free radicals in enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions, the effect of pH upon the spectral and kinetic properties of ascorbate anion radical, and chemical reactivity of ascorbate free radicals.

  11. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  12. Laparoscopic Radical Trachelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Gabriel J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. Case Description: We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Conclusion: Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries. PMID:23318085

  13. Intense, hyperthermal source of organic radicals for matrix-isolation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Friderichsen, Anders V.; Nandi, Sreela; Ellison, G. Barney; David, Donald E.; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Lindeman, Theodore G.; Dayton, David C.; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2003-06-01

    We have incorporated a pulsed, hyperthermal nozzle with a cryostat to study the matrix-isolated infrared spectroscopy of organic radicals. The radicals are produced by pyrolysis in a heated, narrow-bore (1-mm-diam) SiC tube and then expanded into the cryostat vacuum chamber. The combination of high nozzle temperature (up to 1800 K) and near-sonic flow velocities (on the order of 104cm s-1) through the length of the 2 cm tube allows for high yield of radicals (approximately 1013 radicals pulse-1) and low residence time (on the order of 10 μs) in the nozzle. We have used this hyperthermal nozzle/matrix isolation experiment to observe the IR spectra of complex radicals such as allyl radical (CH2CHCH2), phenyl radical (C6H5), and methylperoxyl radical (CH3OO). IR spectra of samples produced with a hyperthermal nozzle are remarkably clean and relatively free of interfering radical chemistry. By monitoring the unimolecular thermal decomposition of allyl ethyl ether in the nozzle using matrix IR spectroscopy, we have derived the residence time (τnozzle) of the gas pulse in the nozzle to be around 30 μs.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, COX-1 inhibitory, and free radical scavenging effects of Rumex nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Raju; Karkhile, Kailas V; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Jachak, Sanjay M

    2010-10-01

    Evaluation of the topical anti-inflammatory activity of chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of RUMEX NEPALENSIS roots in a TPA-induced acute inflammation mouse model demonstrated a significant reduction in ear edema. The extracts were further tested on purified enzymes for COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition to elucidate their mechanism of action, and a strong inhibition was observed. Six anthraquinones and two naphthalene derivatives were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract. Among the isolated compounds, emodin was found to be a potent inhibitor with slight selectivity towards COX-2, and nepodin exhibited selectivity towards COX-1. Emodin, endocrocin, and nepodin also exhibited significant topical anti-inflammatory activity in mice. Interestingly, nepodin showed better radical scavenging activity than trolox and ascorbic acid against DPPH and ABTS radicals. The strong radical scavenging activity of chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts could be explained by the presence of nepodin as well as by the high phenolic content of the ethyl acetate extract. Thus, the anti-inflammatory effect of R. NEPALENSIS roots was assumed to be mediated through COX inhibition by anthraquinones and naphthalene derivatives and through the radical scavenging activities of naphthalene derivatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Value of Ethyl Glucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate in Serum as Biomarkers of Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Sharma, Priyamvada; Ganesha, Suhas; Ghadigaonkar, Deepak; Thomas, Evan; Kandasamy, Arun; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urinary Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulfate (EtS) are established markers of alcohol conumption. Measurement of these markers in serum offers certain advantages. This outpatient department based study evaluated performance of serum Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulphate (EtS) as biomarkers of recent alcohol consumption in alcohol dependent subjects. It also evaluated effect of alcohol dose and time since consumption on serum EtG and EtS concentration. Methods: Information regarding alcohol intake was collected using Time line follow back calendar method from 152 subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine serum EtG and EtS concentration. Results: The results revealed that serum EtG (at a threshold of 45 ng/mL) could detect recent moderate to heavy alcohol consumption with 85 percent sensitivity and 89 percent specificity. The results also show that simultaneous measurement of EtS does not increase test accuracy. We found that dose of alcohol and time since alcohol consumption explain 68 and 62 percent variance in serum EtG and EtS levels. Conclusion: EtG testing in blood was found useful as a way to detect recent drinking. This sensitive and specific short-term biomarker provides valuable information about recent alcohol consumption. PMID:28852244

  16. Value of Ethyl Glucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate in Serum as Biomarkers of Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Sharma, Priyamvada; Ganesha, Suhas; Ghadigaonkar, Deepak; Thomas, Evan; Kandasamy, Arun; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Urinary Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulfate (EtS) are established markers of alcohol conumption. Measurement of these markers in serum offers certain advantages. This outpatient department based study evaluated performance of serum Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulphate (EtS) as biomarkers of recent alcohol consumption in alcohol dependent subjects. It also evaluated effect of alcohol dose and time since consumption on serum EtG and EtS concentration. Information regarding alcohol intake was collected using Time line follow back calendar method from 152 subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine serum EtG and EtS concentration. The results revealed that serum EtG (at a threshold of 45 ng/mL) could detect recent moderate to heavy alcohol consumption with 85 percent sensitivity and 89 percent specificity. The results also show that simultaneous measurement of EtS does not increase test accuracy. We found that dose of alcohol and time since alcohol consumption explain 68 and 62 percent variance in serum EtG and EtS levels. EtG testing in blood was found useful as a way to detect recent drinking. This sensitive and specific short-term biomarker provides valuable information about recent alcohol consumption.

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Etbe) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. The draft Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether.

  18. Going the distance with ethyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Hairston, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    If all had gone according to plan, ethyl alcohol would be in the driver`s seat now, cruising down the highway and getting ready to speed into high gear. Instead, this renewable fuel, chemical reagent and solvent is navigating a complex obstacle course, watching warily for sharp turns and mixed signals. Globally, the supply and demand for all grades of ethyl alcohol is awry. Production of industrial-grade material is running at full throttle and prices are going up. Much of the upheaval over ethanol can be traced to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) of the Clean Air Act. Under ROS, 15% of oxygenates used in gasoline sold this year was to be derived from a renewable source. Next month, that percentage was to have been doubled to 30%. Enticed by projections of upwards of 2 billion gal/yr of fermentation alcohol to comply with ROS, producers rushed to expand capacity. But to the producers` dismay, EPA was forced to backpedal on ROS. When representatives of the petroleum industry filed suit and won a stay, EPA rescinded its ROS regulation and ethanol producers were left in the lurch. High prices for corn is also putting the squeeze on inventories of industrial alcohol. Synthetic ethanol production, from ethylene for example, is booming, however. This paper discusses the ethanol market factors.

  19. A fluorine 1,2-migration via aryl cation/radical/radical anion/radical sequence.

    PubMed

    Pretali, Luca; Dondi, Daniele; D'Angelantonio, Mila; Manet, Ilse; Fasani, Elisa; Monti, Sandra; Bovio, Bruna; Albini, Angelo

    2013-08-02

    Irradiation of a 7-piperazino-8-fluoroquinolone causes formal 1,2-fluorine migration, piperazine loss and reduction, or nucleophile addition in 8. Product study, laser flash photolysis, and computational modeling support F(-) detachment to yield a triplet 8-quinolyl cation that either inserts intramolecularly or is trapped by Cl(-), Br(-). However, iodide and pyrrole reduce it to the radical that continues the 'redox tour' (aryl cation→ radical→ radical anion→ radical and then again radical or radical anion) leading to the rearranged products.

  20. Testing for ethanol markers in hair: discrepancies after simultaneous quantification of ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Kintz, P; Nicholson, D

    2014-10-01

    The hair of 97 cases were analysed for ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE, including ethyl myristate, ethyl palmitate, ethyl oleate and ethyl stearate) according to the Society of Hair Testing guidelines to examine the role of both tests in documenting chronic excessive alcohol drinking, particularly when the results are in contradiction. 27 (27.8%) results were EtG negative and FAEE positive, when applying the SoHT cut-offs, probably due to the use of alcohol-containing hair products. Four cases (4.1%) were EtG positive and FAEE negative that were attributed to the use of herbal lotions containing EtG.

  1. Radical dematerialization and degrowth.

    PubMed

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-06-13

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable 'degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money.This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  3. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  4. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  5. Against Radical Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jeff

    This essay presents two strands of arguments against radical or critical emancipatory multiculturalism. In strand 1, "'Culture' is...whatever..." the looseness of the core concept of "culture," which can refer to anything at all concerning a social group that itself may exist only theoretically, is shown. In strand 2, "From ideology to leveling,…

  6. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  7. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Cotí, Karla K.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John-Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmielli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication.

  8. Radical Socioeducational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This book describes an interactive-interdisciplinary way of looking at the social conditions which impinge upon schooling, and which impact upon the social facts of life. It examines current schooling problems from the perspective of radical social democratic thought. The book is organized into four major sections. Part 1 provides an overview and…

  9. The Oxonium Rydberg Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavín, C.; Martin, I.

    The Quantum Defect Orbital (QDO) method has been applied to the study of transition probabiUties in the oxonium Rydberg radical H3O. Absorption oscillator strengths and Einstein emission coefficients are reported and compared with the results of an earlier, simplified, molecular version of QDO method.

  10. Interrogating Hydrocarbon Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2010-06-01

    Motivated by astrophysical problems (and a sense of fun) for some years my research group has been obtaining new spectra of hitherto unobserved hydrocarbon radicals. We employ the complementary techniques of resonant ionization and laser induced fluorescence to rigorously identify radicals by matching their ground state vibrational frequencies to those obtained using density functional theory (DFT). While some radicals were made to order in our pulsed electrical discharge source, others of particular chemical importance have been found lurking in the congested forest of dicarbon and tricarbon fluorescence. Using a 2-dimensional fluorescence (2df) map, we have extracted pure spectra, unpolluted by C_2 and C_3, from a benzene discharge. One spectrum was first presented at this symposium in 2006, but at that stage was not identified. Subsequent measurement of a matching resonant ionization spectrum revealed a mass of 115, much higher than the benzene precursor. With the aid of DFT calculations, the species was positively identified, giving clues to hydrocarbon-building chemistry of relevance to combustion; planetary atmospheres; and the interstellar and circumstellar space. Further experiments revealed other surprising additions to the radical zoo, also identified with the help of 2df. Along the way we have also identified two new band systems of C_2, the first involving the hidden c^3Σ_u^+ state, and have ventured into the world of larger molecules, such as hexabenzocoronene, C42H18.

  11. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  12. Radicals in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Veronika

    2012-05-14

    Stable radicals and recombination of photogenerated lophyl radicals are investigated in ionic liquids. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yloxyl derivatives contain various substituents at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group, including hydrogen-bond-forming or ionic substituents that undergo additional interactions with the individual ions of the ionic liquids. Some of these spin probes contain similar ions to ionic liquids to avoid counter-ion exchange with the ionic liquid. Depending on the ionic liquid anion, the Stokes-Einstein theory or the Spernol-Gierer-Wirtz theory can be applied to describe the temperature dependence of the average rotational correlation time of the spin probe in the ionic liquids. Furthermore, the spin probes give information about the micropolarity of the ionic liquids. In this context the substituent at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group plays a significant role. Covalent bonding of a spin probe to the imidazolium ion results in bulky spin probes that are strongly immobilized in the ionic liquid. Furthermore, lophyl radical recombination in the dark, which is chosen to understand the dynamics of bimolecular reactions in ionic liquids, shows a slow process at longer timescale and a rise time at a shorter timescale. Although various reactions may contribute to the slower process during lophyl radical recombination, it follows a second-order kinetics that does not clearly show solvent viscosity dependence. However, the rise time, which may be attributed to radical pair formation, increases with increasing solvent viscosity. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Indole derivatives from a marine sponge-derived yeast as DPPH radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Ito, Yuki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Hirota, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Two new indole derivatives (3, 4) and three known compounds (1, 2, 5) were isolated as radical scavengers from the culture filtrate of a marine sponge-derived yeast. Their structures were determined to be tyrosol (1), tryptophol (2), 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate (3), 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl 5-hydroxypentanoate (4), and cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) (5) on the basis of their spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations of compounds 3 and 5 were determined by chiral HPLC analysis combined with synthesis and Marfey's method, respectively. Each obtained compound was evaluated for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity, and all compounds exhibited weak activities.

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database....

  15. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, "Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)". The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database....

  17. 77 FR 41346 - Trinexapac-ethyl; Proposed Pesticide Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...-ethyl in or on barley, bran; sugarcane, molasses; and wheat, bran under the Federal Food, Drug, and... trinexapac-ethyl in or on barley, bran at 2.5 ppm; sugarcane, molasses at 2.5 ppm; and wheat, bran at 6.0 ppm... commodities of barley, sugarcane and wheat; however, tolerances for certain processed commodities...

  18. The gelation of oil using ethyl cellulose.

    PubMed

    Davidovich-Pinhas, M; Barbut, S; Marangoni, A G

    2015-03-06

    The characterization of the thermo-gelation mechanism and properties of ethyl cellulose/canola oil oleogels was performed using rheology and thermal analysis. Thermal analysis detected no evidence for thermal transitions contributed to secondary conformational changes, suggesting a gelation mechanism that does not involve secondary ordered structure formation. Rheological analysis demonstrated a relationship between the polymer molecular weight and the final gel strength, the cross-over behavior as well as the gel point temperature. Increasing polymer molecular weight led to an increase in final gel strength, the modulus at cross-over, and the gel point temperature. Cooling/heating rates affect gel modulus only for the low molecular weight samples. A decrease in gel strength with increasing cooling rate was detected. The cross-over temperature was not affected by the cooling/heating rates. Cooling rate also affected the gelation setting time where slow cooling rates produced a stable gel faster.

  19. Weeding the Astrophysical Garden: Ethyl Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, F. C.; Fortman, S. M.; Medvedev, I. R.; Neese, C. F.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that many, if not most, of the unidentified features in astrophysical spectra arise from relatively low lying excited vibrational and torsional states of a relatively small number of molecular species— the astrophysical weeds. It is also well known that the traditional quantum mechanical assignment and fitting of these excited state spectra is a formidable task, one that is made harder by the expected perturbations and interactions among these states. We have previously proposed an alternative fitting and analysis approach based on experimental, intensity calibrated spectra taken at many temperatures. In this paper we discuss the implementation of this approach and provide details in the context of one of these weeds, ethyl cyanide.

  20. Cognitive effects of creatine ethyl ester supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jonathan; Kritikos, Minos; Tiplady, Brian

    2009-12-01

    Supplementation with creatine-based substances as a means of enhancing athletic performance has become widespread. Until recently, however, the effects of creatine supplementation on cognitive performance has been given little attention. This study used a new form of creatine--creatine ethyl ester--to investigate whether supplementation would improve performance in five cognitive tasks, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Creatine dosing led to an improvement over the placebo condition on several measures. Although creatine seems to facilitate cognition on some tasks, these results require replication using objective measures of compliance. The improvement is discussed in the context of research examining the influence of brain energy capacity on cognitive performance.

  1. Pulse radiolysis study of the formation and the reactivity of baicalin radical anion, and in comparison with rutin, quercetin and acyrlate ester radical anions in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Wang, Wenfeng; Wu, Jilan

    2007-06-01

    The reaction of solvated electrons with baicalin in N 2-saturated ethanol has been studied by pulse radiolysis. The results show that a solvated electron can add to baicalin and generate a baicalin radical anion with a maximum UV absorbance peak at 360 nm. Its molar extinction coefficient at this wavelength is 1.3×10 4 M -1 cm -1. The rate constant for the build-up of the baicalin radical anion is 1.3(±0.4)×10 10 M -1 s -1. Decay of the radical anion is induced by a proton transfer reaction and a recombination reaction, which involves a pseudo-first-order reaction with rate constant 2.6(±0.4)×10 3 s -1 and a second-order reaction with rate constant 1.3(±0.2)×10 9 M -1 s -1. The effect of acetaldehyde on the decay of the baicalin radical anion was also investigated. Electron transfer between the baicalin radical anion and acetaldehyde was not observed, probably due to the low rate of electron transfer between the baicalin radical anion and acetaldehyde. Reactivity of the rutin, quercetin, baicalin and ethyl acrylate radical anions are also compared.

  2. Ethyl glucuronide identified in commercial hair tonics.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Torsten; Schröfel, Stefanie; Stemmerich, Karsten

    2013-09-10

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in hair is considered as a specific marker of ethanol consumption. Prompted by a report of positive EtG hair testings due to hair treatment with an EtG containing hair lotion, commercially available herbal hair tonics from supermarkets, drug-stores, and health food stores were analyzed for the presence of EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS). LC-MS/MS (QTRAP 5500 mass spectrometer) was done in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), enhanced product ion (EPI) and MS(3) mode. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.05 mg/L for EtG and the cut-off for the detection of EtS 0.01 mg/L. Altogether 11 hair tonics from 8 manufacturers were tested, with 1 product in 3 different lots. EtG ranged between 0.07 and 1.06 mg/L (7 products from 4 manufacturers) and was almost identical in the 3 lots of 1 product (1.01-1.06 mg/L). EtS was found in 3 out of the 11 hair tonics. EtG is quite frequently present in commercially available herbal hair tonics. Using EtG in hair as a marker of alcohol (ab)use, one has to consider external sources of EtG and has to assess the use of hair care products, esp. if the patient denies any ethanol intake. Whether EtS is a more reliable alcohol (ab)use marker, as sometimes discussed, should be critically assessed against the background of its broad use in large amounts in industrial chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Photoisomerization of ethyl ferulate: A solution phase transient absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbury, Michael D.; Baker, Lewis A.; Rodrigues, Natércia D. N.; Quan, Wen-Dong; Stavros, Vasilios G.

    2017-04-01

    Ethyl ferulate (ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate) is currently used as a sunscreening agent in commercial sunscreen blends. Recent time-resolved gas-phase measurements have demonstrated that it possesses long-lived (>ns) electronic excited states, counterintuitive to what one might anticipate for an effective sunscreening agent. In the present work, the photodynamics of ethyl ferulate in cyclohexane, are explored using time-resolved transient electronic absorption spectroscopy, upon photoexcitation to the 11ππ∗ and 21ππ∗ states. We demonstrate that ethyl ferulate undergoes efficient non-radiative decay to repopulate the electronic ground state, mediated by trans-cis isomerization. These results strongly suggest that even mild perturbations induced by a non-polar solvent, as may be found in a closer-to-market sunscreen blend, may contribute to our understanding of ethyl ferulate's role as a sunscreening agent.

  4. [Effect of dimethicone on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ethyl biscoumacetate].

    PubMed

    Copie, X; Pinquier, J L; Letrait, M; Paltiat, M H; Pello, J Y; Rey, E; Chanteclair, G; de Lauture, D; Olive, G; Strauch, G

    1993-01-01

    The influence of dimeticone (Gel de Polysilane Midy) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral ethyl biscoumacetate was studied in 6 healthy volunteers in a randomised single dose, two-way cross-over study. Each volunteer received at one week interval a single dose (300 mg) of ethyl biscoumacetate, either alone or with dimeticone. Ethyl biscoumacetate levels were measured in plasma for 24 hours. Pharmacodynamic parameters were measured for 96 hours. Ethyl biscoumacetate peak concentration was significantly higher when administered with dimeticone (40.3 +/- 25.3 mg/l vs 31.0 +/- 25.7 mg/l; p = 0.031), without significant change in the area under curve. Other pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters did not differ significantly. The slight increase of the ethyl biscoumacetate bioavailability with dimeticone in repeated dosing might have pharmacodynamic consequence; a clinical trial should address this question.

  5. A morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Raut, Jayant S; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-11-01

    Regulation of morphogenesis through the production of chemical signalling molecules such as isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, 1-dodecanol, E-nerolidol and farnesol is reported in Candida albicans. The present study focuses on the effect of ethyl alcohol on C. albicans dimorphism and biofilm development. Ethyl alcohol inhibited germ tube formation induced by the four standard inducers in a concentration-dependent manner. The germ tube inhibitory concentration (4%) did not have any effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans cells. Ethyl alcohol also inhibited the elongation of germ tubes. Four percentage of ethyl alcohol significantly inhibited biofilm development on polystyrene and silicone surfaces. We suggest a potential morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol, which may influence dissemination, virulence and establishment of infection. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization for microencapsulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P; Stöver, Harald D H

    2010-12-07

    This Article describes a new microencapsulation method based on a Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization (PETI-ATRP). Cationic LUDOX CL nanoparticles were coated electrostatically with an anionic polymeric ATRP initiator, poly(sodium styrene sulfonate-co-2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PSB), prepared by radical copolymerization of sodium styrene sulfonate and 2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate (BIEM). The resulting PSB-modified CL particles were surface active and could be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. ATRP of water-soluble cross-linking monomers, confined to the oil-water interface by the surface-bound PSB, then led to nanoparticle/polymer composite shells. This method allowed encapsulation of core solvents (xylene, hexadecane, perfluoroheptane) with different solubility parameters. The microcapsule (MC) wall chemistry could accommodate different monomers, demonstrating the versatility of this method. Double-walled MCs were formed by sequentially carrying out PETI-ATRP and in situ polymerization of encapsulated monomers. The double-walled structure was verified by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

  7. A new stable perfluoroalkyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Allayarov, S.R.; Barkalov, I.M.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper uses ESR spectroscopy to study the radical formed upon the gamma-irradiation of liquid perfluoro-methyl-2-pentene (PMP). The ESR spectrum of this radical shows a well resolved doublet of triplets with splitting 6.2 and 1.5 mT with additional splitting of each component by 0.25 mT. This ESR corresponds to a radical formed upon the addition of a radical r, in particlular, CF/sub 3/ to PMP.

  8. Radical Ion Formation in Polymers as a Mechanism for Laser Eye Protection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-31

    Xmax 720 nm. Indirect evidence shows that in benzonitrile , T2 decay is primarily by electron transfer with a minor contribution due to energy transfer...T2 -> benzonitrile SO). The failure to detect the cation radical, even in the presence of an applied magnetic field, indicates that cage escape...two-laser flash photolysis study of anthracene in the presence of ethyl bromoacetate, benzonitrile , acrylonitrile and fumaronitrile, all of which are

  9. Determination of ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters in hair samples.

    PubMed

    Oppolzer, David; Barroso, Mário; Passarinha, Luís; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    Hair testing for alcohol biomarkers is an important tool for monitoring alcohol consumption. We propose two methods for assessing alcohol exposure through combined analysis of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) species (ethyl myristate, palmitate, stearate and oleate) in hair (30 mg). EtG was analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, while FAEEs were analysed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using electron impact ionization. Both methods were validated according to internationally accepted guidelines. Linearity was proven between 3 and 500 pg/mg for EtG and 30-5000 pg/mg for FAEEs, and the limits of quantification were 3 pg/mg for EtG and 30 pg/mg for each of the four FAEEs. Precision and accuracy were considered adequate, processed EtG samples were found to be stable for up to 96 h left in the injector and processed FAEEs samples for up to 24 h. Matrix effects were not significant. Both methods were applied to the analysis of 15 authentic samples, using the cut-off values proposed by the Society of Hair Testing for interpretation. The results agreed well with the self-reported alcohol consumption in most cases, and demonstrated the suitability of the methods to be applied in routine analysis of alcohol biomarkers, allowing monitoring consumption using low sample amounts.

  10. High yielding synthesis of N-ethyl dehydroamino acids.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Luís S; Suárez, Ana S

    2012-10-01

    Recently we reported the use of a sequence of alkylation and dehydration methodologies to obtain N-ethyl-α, β-dehydroamino acid derivatives. The application of this N-alkylation procedure to several methyl esters of β,β-dibromo and β-bromo, β-substituted dehydroamino acids protected with standard amine protecting groups was subsequently reported. The corresponding N-ethyl, β-bromo dehydroamino acid derivatives were obtained in fair to high yields and some were used as substrates in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions to give N-ethyl, β,β-disubstituted dehydroalanine derivatives. Herein, we further explore N-ethylation of β-halo dehydroamino acid derivatives using triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate as alkylating agent, but substituting N,N-diisopropylethylamine for potassium tert-butoxide as auxiliary base. In these conditions, for all β-halo dehydroamino acid derivatives, reactions were complete and the N-ethylated derivative could be isolated in high yield. This method was also applied for N-ethylation of non-halogenated dehydroamino acids. Again, with all compounds the reactions were complete and the N-ethyl dehydroamino acid derivatives could be isolated in high yields. Some of these N-ethyl dehydroamino acid methyl ester derivatives were converted in high yields to their corresponding acids and coupled to an amino acid methyl ester to give N-ethyl dehydrodipeptide derivatives in good yields. Thus, this method constitutes a general procedure for high yielding synthesis of N-ethylated dehydroamino acids, which can be further applied in peptide synthesis.

  11. Parameters Affecting Ethyl Ester Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Fermentation▿

    PubMed Central

    Saerens, S. M. G.; Delvaux, F.; Verstrepen, K. J.; Van Dijck, P.; Thevelein, J. M.; Delvaux, F. R.

    2008-01-01

    Volatile esters are responsible for the fruity character of fermented beverages and thus constitute a vital group of aromatic compounds in beer and wine. Many fermentation parameters are known to affect volatile ester production. In order to obtain insight into the production of ethyl esters during fermentation, we investigated the influence of several fermentation variables. A higher level of unsaturated fatty acids in the fermentation medium resulted in a general decrease in ethyl ester production. On the other hand, a higher fermentation temperature resulted in greater ethyl octanoate and decanoate production, while a higher carbon or nitrogen content of the fermentation medium resulted in only moderate changes in ethyl ester production. Analysis of the expression of the ethyl ester biosynthesis genes EEB1 and EHT1 after addition of medium-chain fatty acid precursors suggested that the expression level is not the limiting factor for ethyl ester production, as opposed to acetate ester production. Together with the previous demonstration that provision of medium-chain fatty acids, which are the substrates for ethyl ester formation, to the fermentation medium causes a strong increase in the formation of the corresponding ethyl esters, this result further supports the hypothesis that precursor availability has an important role in ethyl ester production. We concluded that, at least in our fermentation conditions and with our yeast strain, the fatty acid precursor level rather than the activity of the biosynthetic enzymes is the major limiting factor for ethyl ester production. The expression level and activity of the fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes therefore appear to be prime targets for flavor modification by alteration of process parameters or through strain selection. PMID:17993562

  12. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  13. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  14. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates...

  15. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  16. Probability and radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of probability appears to be very important in the radical behaviorism of Skinner. Yet, it seems that this probability has not been accurately defined and is still ambiguous. I give a strict, relative frequency interpretation of probability and its applicability to the data from the science of behavior as supplied by cumulative records. Two examples of stochastic processes are given that may model the data from cumulative records that result under conditions of continuous reinforcement and extinction, respectively. PMID:22478114

  17. Radicals in melanin biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Riley, P A

    1988-01-01

    Melanins are light-absorbant polymeric pigments found widely dispersed in nature. They possess many interesting physicochemical properties. One of these is the expression in the polymer of stable free radicals which appear to have a protective action in cells, probably by acting as a sink for diffusible free-radical species. Polymer formation is thought to occur by a free-radical process in which semiquinones are added to the chain. Semiquinones are formed by redox equilibration interactions between metabolic intermediates formed during the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation process. In the continued presence of substrate, steady-state concentrations of reactive species are predicted in the reaction system, and the melanogenic pathway may be considered as potentially hazardous for pigment-generating cells. This feature has been exploited by the use of analogue substrates to generate cytotoxic species as a possible rational approach to the treatment of malignant melanoma. One such substance is 4-hydroxyanisole, the oxidation of which gives rise to semiquinone radical species. The possibility that the anisyl semiquinone initiates a mechanism leading to cell damage has not been excluded. However, the current view is that the major cytotoxicity due to the oxidation products of this compound is the result of the action of the corresponding orthoquinone. A number of mechanisms exist for detoxifying quinones if they reach the cytosol such as O-methylation and the formation of thiol adducts with cysteine or glutathione, and these can be used as markers of melanogenesis. In general, however, only small amounts of reactive intermediates of melanogenesis escape from the confines of the melanosome, probably because of their limited lipid solubility. The selective toxic action of anisyl quinone in the treatment of melanoma may, in part, be due to membrane defects in the melanosomes of malignant melanocytes.

  18. A boron-boron coupling reaction between two ethyl cation analogues.

    PubMed

    Litters, Sebastian; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Enders, Markus; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-12-01

    The design of larger architectures from smaller molecular building blocks by element-element coupling reactions is one of the key concerns of synthetic chemistry, so a number of strategies were developed for this bottom-up approach. A general scheme is the coupling of two elements with opposing polarity or that of two radicals. Here, we show that a B-B coupling reaction is possible between two boron analogues of the ethyl cation, resulting in the formation of an unprecedented dicationic tetraborane. The bonding properties in the rhomboid B₄ core of the product can be described as two B-B units connected by three-centre, two-electron bonds, sharing the short diagonal. Our discovery might lead the way to the long sought-after boron chain polymers with a structure similar to the silicon chains in β-SiB₃. Moreover, the reaction is a prime textbook example of the influence of multiple-centre bonding on reactivity.

  19. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  20. Diaryldichalcogenide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Ole; Khanfar, Monther A; Malischewski, Moritz; Finke, Pamela; Hesse, Malte; Lork, Enno; Augenstein, Timo; Breher, Frank; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Zibarev, Andrey; Bogomyakov, Artem S; Seppelt, Konrad; Beckmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of two series of diaryldichalcogenides (C6F5E)2 (13a-c) and (2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2 (16a-c) was studied (E = S, Se, Te). The reaction of 13a and 13b with AsF5 and SbF5 gave rise to the formation of thermally unstable radical cations [(C6F5S)2]˙(+) (14a) and [(C6F5Se)2]˙(+) (14b) that were isolated as [Sb2F11](-) and [As2F11](-) salts, respectively. The reaction of 13c with AsF5 afforded only the product of a Te-C bond cleavage, namely the previously known dication [Te4](2+) that was isolated as [AsF6](-) salt. The reaction of (2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2 (16a-c) with [NO][SbF6] provided the corresponding radical cations [(2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2]˙(+) (17a-c; E = S, Se, Te) in the form of thermally stable [SbF6](-) salts in nearly quantitative yields. The electronic and structural properties of these radical cations were probed by X-ray diffraction analysis, EPR spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations and other methods.

  1. Types of radical hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Plesca, M; Bordea, CI; Moga, MA; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for cervical cancer is a complex, multidisciplinary issue, which applies according to the stage of the disease. The surgical elective treatment of cervical cancer is represented by the radical abdominal hysterectomy. In time, many surgeons perfected this surgical technique; the ones who stood up for this idea were Thoma Ionescu and Ernst Wertheim. There are many varieties of radical hysterectomies performed by using the abdominal method and some of them through vaginal and mixed way. Each method employed has advantages and disadvantages. At present, there are three classifications of radical hysterectomies which are used for the simplification of the surgical protocols: Piver-Rutledge-Smith classification which is the oldest, GCG-EORTC classification and Querlow and Morrow classification. The last is the most evolved and recent classification; its techniques can be adapted for conservative operations and for different types of surgical approaches: abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic or robotic. Abbreviations: GCG-EORTC = Gynecologic Cancer Group of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer; LEEP = loop electrosurgical excision procedure; I.O.B. = Institute of Oncology Bucharest; PRS = Piver-Rutledge-Smith PMID:25408722

  2. [Radical prostatectomy - pro robotic].

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical radical prostatectomy was introduced in the early 1980s by Walsh and Donker. Elucidation of key anatomical structures led to a significant reduction in the morbidity of this procedure. The strive to achieve similar oncological and functional results to this gold standard open procedure but with further reduction of morbidity through a minimally invasive access led to the establishment of laparoscopic prostatectomy. However, this procedure is complex and difficult and is associated with a long learning curve. The technical advantages of robotically assisted surgery coupled with the intuitive handling of the device led to increased precision and shortening of the learning curve. These main advantages, together with a massive internet presence and aggressive marketing, have resulted in a rapid dissemination of robotic radical prostatectomy and an increasing patient demand. However, superiority of robotic radical prostatectomy in comparison to the other surgical therapeutic options has not yet been proven on a scientific basis. Currently robotic-assisted surgery is an established technique and future technical improvements will certainly further define its role in urological surgery. In the end this technical innovation will have to be balanced against the very high purchase and running costs, which remain the main limitation of this technology.

  3. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  4. 2.10 Titanium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 1.35 Ruthenium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 2.33 Mercury-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.32 Gold-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 2.8 Potassium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 2.28 Tantalum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 1.42 Iodine-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 4.6.3 Vinyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 1.48 Gold-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 2.7 Phosphorus-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. 1.46 Iridium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  15. 2.16 Zinc-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  16. 1.38 Cadmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  17. 2.15 Copper-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  18. 2.4 Sodium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  19. 2.17 Gallium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  20. 2.31 Iridium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  1. 2.21 Niobium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  2. 1.36 Palladium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  3. 2.3 Boron-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  4. 1.37 Silver-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 2.24 Silver-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 2.18 Rubidium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.20 Zirconium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 1.40 Tin-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 1.41 Tellurium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 2.2 Lithium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 2.5 Aluminum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 2.22 Molybdenum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 2.12 Chromium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. 2.14 Cobalt-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  15. 2.9 Scandium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  16. 2.6 Silicon-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  17. 2.19 Yttrium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  18. 2.27 Lanthanum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  19. 2.23 Rhodium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  20. 2.13 Manganese-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  1. 4.6.2 Aryl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  2. 1.34 Molybdenum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  3. 1.43 Lanthanum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  4. 2.30 Osmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 2.29 Tungsten-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 1.47 Platinum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.26 Cesium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 1.45 Osmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 1.44 Tantalum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 2.11 Vanadium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 2.25 Cadmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 1.49 Mercury-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 1.39 Indium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. Recyclable antibacterial magnetic nanoparticles grafted with quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) brushes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongchen; Huang, Jinyu; Koepsel, Richard R; Ye, Penglin; Russell, Alan J; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2011-04-11

    Highly efficient recyclable antibacterial magnetite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core with an antibacterial poly(quaternary ammonium) (PQA) coating were prepared in an efficient four-step process. The synthetic pathway included: (1) preparation of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles via coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) in the presence of an alkaline solution; (2) attachment of an ATRP initiating functionality to the surface of the nanoparticles; (3) surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA); and (4) transformation of PDMAEMA brushes to PQA via quaternization with ethyl bromide. The success of the surface functionalization was confirmed by FT-IR, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The PQA-modified magnetite nanoparticles were dispersed in water and exhibited a response to an external magnetic field, making the nanoparticles easy to remove from water after antibacterial tests. The PQA-modified magnetite nanoparticles retained 100% biocidal efficiency against E. coli (10(5) to 10(6)E. coli/mg nanoparticles) during eight exposure/collect/recycle procedures without washing with any solvents or water.

  15. Degradation of chlorotriazine pesticides by sulfate radicals and the influence of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lutze, Holger V; Bircher, Stephanie; Rapp, Insa; Kerlin, Nils; Bakkour, Rani; Geisler, Melanie; von Sonntag, Clemens; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2015-02-03

    Atrazine, propazine, and terbuthylazine are chlorotriazine herbicides that have been frequently used in agriculture and thus are potential drinking water contaminants. Hydroxyl radicals produced by advanced oxidation processes can degrade these persistent compounds. These herbicides are also very reactive with sulfate radicals (2.2-3.5 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). However, the dealkylated products of chlorotriazine pesticides are less reactive toward sulfate radicals (e.g., desethyl-desisopropyl-atrazine (DEDIA; 1.5 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1))). The high reactivity of the herbicides is largely due to the ethyl or isopropyl group. For example, desisopropyl-atrazine (DIA) reacts quickly (k = 2 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)), whereas desethyl-atrazine (DEA) reacts more slowly (k = 9.6 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). The tert-butyl group does not have a strong effect on reaction rate, as shown by the similar second order reaction rates between desethyl-terbuthylazine (DET; k = 3.6 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and DEDIA. Sulfate radicals degrade a significant proportion of atrazine (63%) via dealkylation, in which deethylation significantly dominates over deisopropylation (10:1). Sulfate and hydroxyl radicals react at an equally fast rate with atrazine (k (hydroxyl radical + atrazine) = 3 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). However, sulfate and hydroxyl radicals differ considerably in their reaction rates with humic acids (k (sulfate radical + humic acids) = 6.8 × 10(3) L mgC(-1) s(-1) (mgC = mg carbon); k (hydroxyl radical + humic acids) = 1.4 × 10(4) L mgC(-1) s(-1)). Thus, in the presence of humic acids, atrazine is degraded more efficiently by sulfate radicals than by hydroxyl radicals.

  16. Microwave spectroscopy and curious molecular dynamics of ethyl trifluoroacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A.; Harvey Michels, H.; Acharte, Christian

    2017-05-01

    The first ethyl ester whose structure was determined by microwave spectroscopy is ethyl formate. It exists in two conformations. In the 1970s, that study was used as a model to determine the structures of other ethyl esters, ethyl cyanoformate, chloroformate, and trifluoroacetate. They display the same conformations as ethyl formate. But under the experimental conditions used, Stark modulation with a maximum electric field, static low pressure gas, rapid sweeping, and long detector time constants, each of those esters displays bands of an additional third species. A careful, high resolution study of ethyl cyanoformate only observed two conformers. A model has been proposed that the third species derives from a dense array of torsionally excited states with broadened transitions due to short lifetimes. The present study of ethyl trifluoroacetate in a pulsed jet Fourier Transform spectrometer is intended to clarify the earlier results. Two conformers are observed including all their monosubstituted 13C and 18O isotopologs. In a pulsed jet Fourier Transform spectrometer using argon as the carrier gas, only one conformer is observed. Switching to helium as the carrier gas, another, higher energy conformer is also observed.

  17. On the cause of low thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates

    PubMed Central

    Mortén, Magnus; Hennum, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rates for the thermal decomposition of ethyl halodiazoacetates (halo = Cl, Br, I) have been obtained, and reported herein are their half-lives. The experimental results are supported by DFT calculations, and we provide a possible explanation for the reduced thermal stability of ethyl halodiazoacetates compared to ethyl diazoacetate and for the relative decomposition rates between the chloro, bromo and iodo analogs. We have also briefly studied the thermal, non-catalytic cyclopropanation of styrenes and compared the results to the analogous Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions. PMID:27559411

  18. Ethyl Esterification for MALDI-MS Analysis of Protein Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Reiding, Karli R; Lonardi, Emanuela; Hipgrave Ederveen, Agnes L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl esterification is a technique for the chemical modification of sialylated glycans, leading to enhanced stability when performing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry (MS), as well as allowing the efficient detection of both sialylated and non-sialylated glycans in positive ion mode. In addition, the method shows specific reaction products for α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids, leading to an MS distinguishable mass difference. Here, we describe the ethyl esterification protocol for 96 glycan samples, including enzymatic N-glycan release, the aforementioned ethyl esterification, glycan enrichment, MALDI target preparation, and the MS(/MS) measurement.

  19. Ethyl pyruvate: a novel treatment for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2007-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester derived from pyruvic acid, improves survival and ameliorates organ system dysfunction in mice with peritonitis induced by caecal ligation and perforation, even when treatment is started as late as 12-24 hours after the onset of sepsis. In studies using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage like cells, EP inhibits activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappaB, and down regulates secretion of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF). In this reductionist in vitro system, EP also blocks secretion of the late-appearing pro inflammatory cytokine-like molecule, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In murine models of endotoxaemia or sepsis, treatment with EP decreases circulating levels of TNF and HMGB1. While the molecular events responsible for the salutary effects of EP remain to be elucidated, one mechanism may involve covalent modification of a critical thiol residue in the p65 component of NF-kappaB. EP warrants evaluation as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of sepsis in humans.

  20. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Amphiphilic graft copolymers with ethyl cellulose backbone: Synthesis, self-assembly and tunable temperature-CO2 response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weizhong; Zou, Hui; Shen, Jin

    2016-01-20

    Amphiphilic ethyl cellulose-graft-poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (EC-g-PDMAEMA) and ethyl cellulose-graft-poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate-co-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (EC-g-P(MEO2MA-co-DMAEMA)) graft copolymers were easily synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The micelles self-assembled from the copolymer presented switchable temperature-CO2 dually responsive properties. The value of lower critical solution temperature (LCST) for the copolymer micelle solutions could be adjusted by CO2/Ar. Moreover, due to the alteration of the ratio of DMAEMA to MEO2MA, the LCST values of the micelle solutions decreased with the increase of MEO2MA in copolymer. The temperature-CO2 dually responsive properties of the copolymer were reversible and could be accomplished through altering the temperature and bubbling CO2/Ar. The hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of the copolymer micelles was also influenced by the ratio of DMAEMA to MEO2MA and the stimuli of temperature and CO2/Ar. As a drug release system, the copolymer micelles could achieve the control release of doxorubicin (DOX) by changing the temperature and alternatively bubbling CO2/Ar.

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-42 - Ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shall be designed and tested to meet the rules of the American Bureau of Shipping for a head of water at... liquid. (g) Precautions shall be taken to prevent the contamination of ethyl ether by strong...

  3. 77 FR 12740 - Trinexapac-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Trinexapac-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bethany Benbow, Registration Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide... agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. Potentially affected entities may include...

  4. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) inhibition and anti-inflammation activity of the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Kwon; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Choi, Bong-Keun; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the anti-cancer properties of soil-borne actinobacteria, MJM 8637, the glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) assay, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α assay, the level of antioxidant potential by DPPH radical scavenging activity, NO scavenging activity, and ABTS radical scavenging activity in ethyl acetate extract were determined. The 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637, which was isolated from Hambak Mountain, Korea, has 99.5% similarity to Streptomyces atratus strain NBRC 3897. The physiological and the morphological characteristics of the strain MJM 8637 were also identified. The ethyl acetate extract of MJM 8637 inhibited TNF-α production approximately 61.8% at concentration 100 μg/ml. The IC50 value of the strain MJM 8637 extract on GST-pi was identified to be 120.2 ± 1.6 μg/ml. In DPPH, NO, and ABTS radical scavenging assays, the IC50 values of the strain MJM 8637 extract were found to be 977.2 μg/ml, 1143.7 μg/ml, and 454.4 μg/ml, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract of the strain MJM 8637 showed 97.2 ± 1.3% of cell viability at 100 μg/ml in RAW 264.7 cell viability assay. The results obtained from this study suggest that the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637 could be considered as a potential source of drug for the cancers that have multidrug resistance with its GST-pi inhibition and anti-inflammation activities, and low cytotoxicity.

  5. Residual behavior of quizalofop ethyl on onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Gurmail; Kumar, Rajinder; Chahil, G S; Battu, R S; Singh, Balwinder

    2013-02-01

    Quizalofop ethyl, a phenoxy propionate herbicide, is used for postemergence control of annual and perennial grass weeds in broad-leaved crops in India. The experiments were designed to study the dissipation kinetics of quizalofop ethyl on onion for two seasons. A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for estimation of quizalofop ethyl residues in onion and soil was developed and validated. The recoveries of quizalofop ethyl residues from onion and soil at different spiking level range from 84.81 to 92.68 %. The limit of quantification of this method was found to be 0.01 μg g(-1). The risk assessment through consumption of the onion in comparison to its acceptable daily intake which is an important parameter for the safety of the consumer was also evaluated. Standardized methodology supported by recovery studies was adopted to estimate residues of quizalofop ethyl on onion and soil. The average initial deposits of quizalofop ethyl on onion were observed to be 0.25 and 0.33 mg kg(-1), following single application of the herbicide at 50 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1) during 2009 and 2010, respectively. The half-life values (T (1/2)) of quizalofop ethyl on onion crop were worked out to be 0.85 and 0.79 days, respectively, during 2009 and 2010. At harvest time, the residues of quizalofop ethyl on onion and soil were found to be below the determination limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1) following single application of the herbicide at 50 and 100 g a.i. ha(-1) for both the periods.

  6. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  7. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers.

  8. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  9. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    PubMed

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone.

  10. Development of materials from copolyacrylates via atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Melody Mersadez

    Homopolymerization of 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl acrylate, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acrylate, methyl acrylate, and methyl methacrylate using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is reported. In addition, polymethyl acrylate and polymethyl methacrylate were used as macroinitiators for diblock copolymerizations (via ATRP) with various monomers to yield pMA-b-TMSEA, pMMA-b-TMSEA, and pMMA-b-GMA copolymers; these results are also reported. Controlled polymerizations were performed using the CuBr/hexamethyltriethylenetetramine catalyst system in combination with methyl bromopropionate as the initiator. The protected acid block copolymers pMA-b-TMSEA and pMMA-b-TMSEA were deprotected to afford acrylic and meth acrylic acid block copolymers pMA-b-AA and pMMA-b-AA. Methylene chloride was used to micellize the amphiphilic copolymers in order to obtain the critical micelle concentration of the polymers (CMCpMA-b-AA = 10 mg/mL, CMCpMMA-b-AA = 0.4 mg/mL). The majority of polymerization were done in bulk; however, since poly(trimethylsilyl)ethyl acrylate displayed polydispersity (Mn = 11459, PDI = 1.437) on the high end of the acceptable range, various solvents were utilized to decrease the polymerization rate and afford low polydispersity materials. This differs from the ATRP of polymethyl acrylate or polymethyl methacrylate using this catalytic system, which do not require the addition of a solvent to obtain well-defined polymers. Also, for this polymerization system three different temperatures (60°C, 90°C, and 120°C) were used, in order to reduce the concentration of radicals and the contribution of termination. The homopolymers and protected acid block copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography to determine the relative molecular weights. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain the glass transition temperature of all polymers. Characterization using NMR (1H and 13C) and FTIR confirmed homopolymerization of 3,3-dimethylbutyl acrylate, 2

  11. Phytochemical analysis, antimicrobial and radical-scavenging properties of Acalypha manniana leaves.

    PubMed

    Noumedem, Jaures Ak; Tamokou, Jean de Dieu; Teke, Gerald Ngo; Momo, Rosine Cd; Kuete, Victor; Kuiate, Jules Roger

    2013-01-01

    Acalypha manniana (Euphorbiaceae) is a plant popularly used in Cameroon and in several parts of Africa for the treatment of various microbial diseases like diarrhea and skin infections. The present study was designed to evaluate the phytochemical composition, antimicrobial and radical-scavenging activities of A. manniana methanol leaf extract and its fractions. The methanol extract was partitioned into hexane, ethyl acetate and residual fractions and phytochemical analysis was conducted using standard methods. The broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity against nine bacterial species and four dermatophyte species. The free radical scavenging activities of the methanol extract and its fractions were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The results obtained showed that A. manniana contains alkaloids, tannins, anthocyanins, flavonoids, phenols and steroids. The methanol extract as well as the hexane, ethyl acetate and residual fractions exhibited both antibacterial and antidermatophytic activities that varied between the microbial species (MIC = 0.12 - 2.04 mg/mL). These tested samples also showed high radical-scavenging activities (RaS50 = 3.34 - 4.80 μg/mL) when compared with vitamin C used as reference antioxidant (RaS50 = 1.74 μg/mL). These findings provide evidence that the studied plant possesses antimicrobial and antioxidant properties and may act as potential antioxidant for biological systems susceptible to free radical-mediated reactions.

  12. Evaluation of Ethyl Glucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate in Calliphora Vicina as Potential Biomarkers for Ethanol Intake.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, Simonetta; Groppi, Angelo; Gemmellaro, Denise; Morini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are specific and sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute or chronic alcohol abuse. Due to postmortem alcohol production in biological tissues, they have recently been evaluated as potential biomarkers of ethanol ingestion. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate all developmental stages of the fly Calliphora vicina L. (Calliphoridae). Different pig substrates were used during the in vitro experiments to rear C. vicina Experiments were performed to: (i) assess the presence of EtG and EtS in larvae, pupae and insects; (ii) study variability due to the substrates characteristics; (iii) evaluate the possibility of false positives due to external alcohol contamination; and (iv) estimate the potential metabolism of ethanol by the insects. EtS was found in all of the samples where the standard was added to the substrate. Muscle provided the most reliable results. EtS was found in larvae, pupae and puparia. EtG and EtS were found in larvae and pupae collected from the body of an alcoholic found dead in his home. This study showed that maggots, pupae and puparia could be a useful matrix for the evaluation of antemortem alcohol ingestion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)−1 day−1) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW−1 in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW−1 day−1) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes. PMID:28197411

  14. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Pang, Quanhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)(-1) day(-1)) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW(-1) in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW(-1) day(-1)) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes.

  15. Ethyl acetate production by the elusive alcohol acetyltransferase from yeast.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Aleksander J; Levisson, Mark; Mars, Astrid E; van der Ploeg, Max; Garcés Daza, Fernando; Ellena, Valeria; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2017-05-01

    Ethyl acetate is an industrially relevant ester that is currently produced exclusively through unsustainable processes. Many yeasts are able to produce ethyl acetate, but the main responsible enzyme has remained elusive, hampering the engineering of novel production strains. Here we describe the discovery of a new enzyme (Eat1) from the yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus that resulted in high ethyl acetate production when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. Purified Eat1 showed alcohol acetyltransferase activity with ethanol and acetyl-CoA. Homologs of eat1 are responsible for most ethyl acetate synthesis in known ethyl acetate-producing yeasts, including S. cerevisiae, and are only distantly related to known alcohol acetyltransferases. Eat1 is therefore proposed to compose a novel alcohol acetyltransferase family within the α/β hydrolase superfamily. The discovery of this novel enzyme family is a crucial step towards the development of biobased ethyl acetate production and will also help in selecting improved S. cerevisiae brewing strains. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Khaled, Fethi; Ning, Hongbo; Ma, Liuhao; Farooq, Aamir; Ren, Wei

    2017-08-24

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O((3)P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range 500-2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with the asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900-1321 K and 1.4-2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900-1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  17. 40 CFR 180.595 - Flufenpyr-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide, flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], in or on the following...) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide flufenpyr-ethyl; acetic acid, -phenoxy]-ethyl ester], and its metabolite, S-3153 acid-4-OH; -phenoxy]-acetic acid, free and conjugated, in or on the...

  18. 19 CFR 10.99 - Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage... Provisions Ethyl Alcohol § 10.99 Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes. (a) If claim is made... of ethyl alcohol of an alcoholic strength by volume of 80 percent volume or higher under subheading...

  19. 19 CFR 10.99 - Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage... Provisions Ethyl Alcohol § 10.99 Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes. (a) If claim is made... of ethyl alcohol of an alcoholic strength by volume of 80 percent volume or higher under subheading...

  20. 19 CFR 10.99 - Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage... Provisions Ethyl Alcohol § 10.99 Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes. (a) If claim is made... of ethyl alcohol of an alcoholic strength by volume of 80 percent volume or higher under...

  1. 19 CFR 10.99 - Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage... Provisions Ethyl Alcohol § 10.99 Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes. (a) If claim is made... of ethyl alcohol of an alcoholic strength by volume of 80 percent volume or higher under...

  2. 19 CFR 10.99 - Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage... Provisions Ethyl Alcohol § 10.99 Importation of ethyl alcohol for nonbeverage purposes. (a) If claim is made... of ethyl alcohol of an alcoholic strength by volume of 80 percent volume or higher under...

  3. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  4. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  5. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-04-03

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595-605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually.

  6. Examination of sex differences in fatty acid ethyl ester and ethyl glucuronide hair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gareri, Joey; Rao, Chitra; Koren, Gideon

    2014-06-01

    Clinical studies examining performance of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in identifying excessive alcohol consumption have been primarily conducted in male populations. An impact of hair cosmetics in producing both false-negative EtG results and false-positive FAEE results has been demonstrated, suggesting a possible bias in female populations. This study evaluates FAEE-positive hair samples (>0.50 ng/mg) from n = 199 female and n = 73 male subjects for EtG. Higher FAEE/EtG concordance was observed amongst male over female subjects. Performance of multiple proposed EtG cut-off levels were assessed; amongst female samples, FAEE/EtG concordance was 36.2% (30 pg/mg), 36.7% (27 pg/mg), and 43.7% (20 pg/mg). Non-coloured hair demonstrated a two-fold increase in concordance (41.8 v. 20.8%) over coloured hair in the female cohort. FAEE levels did not differ between male and female subjects; however they were lower in coloured samples (p = 0.046). EtG was lower in female subjects (p = 0.019) and coloured samples (p = 0.026). A total of n = 111 female samples were discordant. Amongst discordant samples (EtG-negative), 26% had evidence of recent alcohol use including consultation histories (n = 20) and detectable cocaethylene (n = 9); 29% of discordant samples were coloured. False-negative risk with ethyl glucuronide analysis in females was mediated by cosmetic colouring. These findings suggest that combined analysis of FAEE and EtG is optimal when assessing a female population and an EtG cut-off of 20 pg/mg is warranted when using combined analysis. While concordant FAEE/EtG-positive findings constitute clear evidence, discordant FAEE/EtG findings should still be considered suggestive evidence of chronic excessive alcohol consumption.

  7. Phytochemical analysis and free radical scavenging activity of medicinal plants Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sougata; Derle, Abhishek; Ahire, Mehul; More, Piyush; Jagtap, Soham; Phadatare, Suvarna D; Patil, Ajay B; Jabgunde, Amit M; Sharma, Geeta K; Shinde, Vaishali S; Pardesi, Karishma; Dhavale, Dilip D; Chopade, Balu A

    2013-01-01

    Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera are traditional medicinal plants that can be considered as sources of natural antioxidants. Herein we report the phytochemical analysis and free radical scavenging activity of their sequential extracts. Phenolic and flavonoid content were determined. Scavenging activity was checked against pulse radiolysis generated ABTS(•+) and OH radical, in addition to DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by biochemical methods followed by principal component analysis. G. glauca leaf extracts were rich in phenolic and flavonoid content. Ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulbs and methanol extract of G. glauca stem exhibited excellent scavenging of pulse radiolysis generated ABTS(•+) radical with a second order rate constant of 2.33 × 10(6) and 1.72 × 10(6), respectively. Similarly, methanol extract of G. glauca flower and ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulb with second order rate constants of 4.48 × 10(6) and 4.46 × 10(6) were found to be potent scavengers of pulse radiolysis generated OH radical. G. glauca leaf and stem showed excellent reducing activity and free radical scavenging activity. HPTLC fingerprinting, carried out in mobile phase, chloroform: toluene: ethanol (4: 4: 1, v/v) showed presence of florescent compound at 366 nm as well as UV active compound at 254 nm. GC-TOF-MS analysis revealed the predominance of diphenyl sulfone as major compound in G. glauca. Significant levels of n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid were also present. Diosgenin (C₂₇H₄₂O₃) and diosgenin (3á,25R) acetate were present as major phytoconstituents in the extracts of D. bulbifera. G. glauca and D. bulbifera contain significant amounts of phytochemicals with antioxidative properties that can be exploited as a potential source for herbal remedy for oxidative stress induced diseases. These results rationalize further investigation in the potential discovery of new natural bioactive principles from these two important

  8. Phytochemical Analysis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Medicinal Plants Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sougata; Derle, Abhishek; Ahire, Mehul; More, Piyush; Jagtap, Soham; Phadatare, Suvarna D.; Patil, Ajay B.; Jabgunde, Amit M.; Sharma, Geeta K.; Shinde, Vaishali S.; Pardesi, Karishma; Dhavale, Dilip D.; Chopade, Balu A.

    2013-01-01

    Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera are traditional medicinal plants that can be considered as sources of natural antioxidants. Herein we report the phytochemical analysis and free radical scavenging activity of their sequential extracts. Phenolic and flavonoid content were determined. Scavenging activity was checked against pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ and OH radical, in addition to DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by biochemical methods followed by principal component analysis. G. glauca leaf extracts were rich in phenolic and flavonoid content. Ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulbs and methanol extract of G. glauca stem exhibited excellent scavenging of pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ radical with a second order rate constant of 2.33×106 and 1.72×106, respectively. Similarly, methanol extract of G. glauca flower and ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulb with second order rate constants of 4.48×106 and 4.46×106 were found to be potent scavengers of pulse radiolysis generated OH radical. G. glauca leaf and stem showed excellent reducing activity and free radical scavenging activity. HPTLC fingerprinting, carried out in mobile phase, chloroform: toluene: ethanol (4: 4: 1, v/v) showed presence of florescent compound at 366 nm as well as UV active compound at 254 nm. GC-TOF-MS analysis revealed the predominance of diphenyl sulfone as major compound in G. glauca. Significant levels of n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid were also present. Diosgenin (C27H42O3) and diosgenin (3á,25R) acetate were present as major phytoconstituents in the extracts of D. bulbifera. G. glauca and D. bulbifera contain significant amounts of phytochemicals with antioxidative properties that can be exploited as a potential source for herbal remedy for oxidative stress induced diseases. These results rationalize further investigation in the potential discovery of new natural bioactive principles from these two important medicinal plants. PMID:24367520

  9. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    This article offers a conceptual framework to understand radical change. It opens with a typology that defines change in terms of its pace and scope...known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding and shaping the radical change process. The implications of this conceptual framework to

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of urinary ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott H; Koch, David G; Burgess, Douglas M; Willner, Ira R; Reuben, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    It is important to monitor alcohol use in the care of patients with liver disease, but patient self-report can be unreliable. We therefore evaluated the performance of urine ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) in detecting alcohol use in the days preceding a clinical encounter. Subjects (n = 120) were recruited at a university-based hepatology clinic or during hospitalization. Alcohol consumption was ascertained by validated self-report measures. Urine EtG (cutoff 100 ng/ml) and EtS (cutoff 25 ng/ml) concentrations were assayed by a contracted laboratory using tandem mass spectrometry. The sensitivity and specificity of each biomarker in the detection of drinking during the 3 and 7 days preceding the clinic visit were determined, as well as the influence of liver disease severity on these results. Urine EtG (sensitivity 76%, specificity 93%) and urine EtS (sensitivity 82%, specificity 86%) performed well in identifying recent drinking, and liver disease severity does not affect biomarker performance. After elimination of 1 false-negative self-report, urine EtG > 100 ng/ml was 100% specific for drinking within the past week, whereas 9% of the subjects without evidence of alcohol drinking for at least 1 week had EtS > 25 ng/ml. Urine EtG and EtS can objectively supplement the detection of recent alcohol use in patients with liver disease. Additional research may determine optimal methods for integrating these tests into clinical care. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF URINARY ETHYL GLUCURONIDE AND ETHYL SULFATE IN LIVER DISEASE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Scott H.; Koch, David G.; Burgess, Douglas M.; Willner, Ira R.; Reuben, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Background It is important to monitor alcohol use in the care of liver disease patients, but patient self-report can be unreliable. We therefore evaluated the performance of urine ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) in detecting alcohol use in the days preceding a clinical encounter. Methods Subjects (n=120) were recruited at a university-based Hepatology clinic or during hospitalization. Alcohol consumption was ascertained by validated self-report measures. Urine EtG (cutoff 100 ng/mL) and EtS (cutoff 25 ng/mL) concentrations were assayed by a contracted laboratory using tandem mass spectrometry. The sensitivity and specificity of each biomarker in the detection of drinking during the 3 and 7 days preceding the clinic visit were determined, as well as the influence of liver disease severity on these results. Results Urine EtG (sensitivity 76%, specificity 93%) and urine EtS (sensitivity 82%, specificity 86%) performed well in identifying recent drinking, and liver disease severity does not affect biomarker performance. After elimination of one false negative self-report, urine EtG > 100 ng/mL was 100% specific for drinking within the past week, whereas 9% of the subjects without evidence of alcohol drinking for at least one week had EtS > 25 ng/mL. Conclusions Urine EtG and EtS can objectively supplement the detection of recent alcohol use in patients with liver disease. Additional research may determine optimal methods for integrating these tests into clinical care. PMID:22725265

  12. Phosphatidylethanol: the potential role in further evaluating low positive urinary ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate results.

    PubMed

    Skipper, Gregory E; Thon, Natasha; Dupont, Robert L; Baxter, Louis; Wurst, Friedrich M

    2013-09-01

    Whereas urinary ethyl glucuronide (EtG) levels above 1,000 ng/ml reflect with a high probability ethanol (EtOH) consumption, levels below this cutoff are difficult to interpret as both extraneous (nonbeverage) EtOH exposure, recent drinking, and more distant high EtOH intake (several days ago) might yield similar results. This might be of particular relevance in medico-legal cases. To overcome this dilemma, phosphatidylethanol (PEth) might be a promising marker, because blood PEth is only positive following significant alcohol use. The aim of our study was therefore to employ PEth as a marker to differentiate between the different conditions. Subjects included were 252 participants in monitoring with the Alabama Physician Health Program. All subjects testing positive for EtG and/or ethyl sulfate (EtS) who denied drinking after routine supportive confrontation were subject to information about PEth testing. If they still denied drinking, PEth testing was performed and the result communicated. EtG, EtS, and PEth testing was performed in a commercial laboratory using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry methods. Of a total of 18 subjects who tested positive for EtG and/or EtS, 10 denied drinking. Of the 7 who denied drinking after PEth explanation, in 5 cases, their claim was supported by a negative PEth result. In 2 cases, a positive PEth result was in contrast to their claim. PEth results in combination with previous low positive EtG/EtS results allow differentiating between innocent/extraneous exposure and drinking. Negative PEth testing following low positive EtG/EtS results helps to further elucidate the findings and support the claim of the patient of recent alcohol abstinence. Positive PEth testing following positive EtG/EtS results confirms recent drinking. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  13. Determination of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Hernández Redondo, Ana; Schroeck, Alexandra; Kneubuehl, Beat; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are non-oxidative minor metabolites of ethanol. They are detectable in various body fluids shortly after initial consumption of ethanol and have a longer detection time frame than the parent compound. They are regarded highly sensitive and specific markers of recent alcohol uptake. This study evaluates the determination of EtG and EtS from dried blood spots (DBS), a simple and cost-effective sampling method that would shorten the time gap between offense and blood sampling and lead to a better reflectance of the actual impairment. For method validation, EtG and EtS standard and quality control samples were prepared in fresh human heparinized blood and spotted on DBS cards, then extracted and measured by an LC-ESI-MS/MS method. Additionally, 76 heparinized blood samples from traffic offense cases were analyzed for EtG and EtS as whole blood and as DBS specimens. The results from these measurements were then compared by calculating the respective mean values, by a matched-paired t test, by a Wilcoxon test, and by Bland-Altman and Mountain plots. Calibrations for EtG and EtS in DBS were linear over the studied calibration range. The precision and accuracy of the method met the requirements of the validation guidelines that were employed in the study. The stability of the biomarkers stored as DBS was demonstrated under different storage conditions. The t test showed no significant difference between whole blood and DBS in the determination of EtG and EtS. In addition, the Bland-Altman analysis and Mountain plot confirmed that the concentration differences that were measured in DBS specimens were not relevant.

  14. Ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, and ethanol in urine after intensive exposure to high ethanol content mouthwash.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Pesce, Amadeo J; Crews, Bridgit O; Wilson, George R; Teitelbaum, Scott A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    To determine the degree of ethanol absorption and the resultant formation and urinary excretion of its conjugated metabolites following intensive use of high ethanol content mouthwash, 10 subjects gargled with Listerine(®) antiseptic 4 times daily for 3¼ days. First morning void urine specimens were collected on each of the four study days and post-gargle specimens were collected at 2, 4, and 6 h after the final gargle of the study. Urine ethanol, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), ethyl sulfate (EtS), and creatinine were measured. Ethanol was below the positive threshold of 20 mg/dL in all of the urine specimens. EtG was undetectable in all pre-study urine specimens, but two pre-study specimens had detectable EtS (6 and 82 ng/mL; 16 and 83 μg/g creatinine). Only one specimen contained detectable EtG (173 ng/mL; 117 μg/g creatinine). EtS was detected in the urine of seven study subjects, but was not detected in the single specimen that had detectable EtG. The maximum EtS concentrations were 104 ng/mL and 112 μg/g creatinine (in different subjects). Three subjects produced a total of eight (non-baseline) urinary EtS concentrations above 50 ng/mL or 50 μg/g creatinine and three EtS concentrations exceeding 100 ng/mL or 100 μg/g creatinine. In patients being monitored for ethanol use by urinary EtG and EtS concentrations, currently accepted EtG and EtS cutoffs of 500 ng/mL are adequate to distinguish between ethanol consumption and four times daily use of high ethanol content mouthwash.

  15. Enhanced ethylene and ethane production with free-radical cracking catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kolts, J H; Delzer, G A

    1986-05-09

    A series of free-radical catalysts have been discovered that increase the yield of highly valuable olefins from the cracking of low molecular weight paraffins. For example, catalytic cracking of n-butane, isobutane, and propane over manganese or iron supported on magnesium oxide (MgO) gave product distributions different from those given by thermal (free-radical) cracking or cracking over traditional acid catalysts. With n-butane and propane feeds, the products from catalytic cracking included large amounts of ethylene and ethane; with isobutane feed, propylene was the major product. Physical characterization of the MgO-supported catalyst showed the manganese to be in a 2+ oxidation state in the reduced catalyst and a 4+ oxidation state in the fully oxidized catalyst. Manganese was also shown to be uniformly distributed in the support material with very little enrichment at the surface. Matrix isolation of the gasphase radicals from n-butane feed showed that ethyl and methyl radicals were produced over the active catalysts. In the thermal process, only methyl radicals were produced. The mechanism of the catalytic reaction appears to be selective formation of primary carbanions at the catalyst surface followed by electron transfer and release of primary hydrocarbon radicals to the gas phase.

  16. The thermal decomposition of the benzyl radical in a heated micro-reactor. I. Experimental findings

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, Grant T.; Ormond, Thomas K.; Porterfield, Jessica P.; Ellison, G. Barney; Hemberger, Patrick; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.

    2015-01-28

    The pyrolysis of the benzyl radical has been studied in a set of heated micro-reactors. A combination of photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and matrix isolation infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been used to identify the decomposition products. Both benzyl bromide and ethyl benzene have been used as precursors of the parent species, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}, as well as a set of isotopically labeled radicals: C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CD{sub 2}, C{sub 6}D{sub 5}CH{sub 2}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}. The combination of PIMS and IR spectroscopy has been used to identify the earliest pyrolysis products from benzyl radical as: C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=C=CH{sub 2}, H atom, C{sub 5}H{sub 4}—C ≡ CH, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, HCCCH{sub 2}, and HC ≡ CH. Pyrolysis of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CD{sub 2}, C{sub 6}D{sub 5}CH{sub 2}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup 13}CH{sub 2} benzyl radicals produces a set of methyl radicals, cyclopentadienyl radicals, and benzynes that are not predicted by a fulvenallene pathway. Explicit PIMS searches for the cycloheptatrienyl radical were unsuccessful, there is no evidence for the isomerization of benzyl and cycloheptatrienyl radicals: C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}⇋C{sub 7}H{sub 7}. These labeling studies suggest that there must be other thermal decomposition routes for the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2} radical that differ from the fulvenallene pathway.

  17. Anti-genotoxic and free-radical scavenging activities of extracts from (Tunisian) Myrtus communis.

    PubMed

    Hayder, N; Abdelwahed, A; Kilani, S; Ammar, R Ben; Mahmoud, A; Ghedira, K; Chekir-Ghedira, L

    2004-11-14

    The effect of extracts from leaves of Myrtus communis on the SOS reponse induced by Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and Nifuroxazide was investigated in a bacterial assay system, i.e. the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. Aqueous extract, the total flavonoids oligomer fraction (TOF), hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts and essential oil obtained from M. communis significantly decreased the SOS response induced by AFB1 (10 microg/assay) and Nifuroxazide (20 microg/assay). Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts showed the strongest inhibition of the induction of the SOS response by the indirectly genotoxic AFB1. The methanol and aqueous extracts exhibited the highest level of protection towards the SOS-induced response by the directly genotoxic Nifuroxazide. In addition to anti-genotoxic activity, the aqueous extract, the TOF, and the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts showed an important free-radical scavenging activity towards the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. These results suggest the future utilization of these extracts as additives in chemoprevention studies.

  18. A potential role for sinapyl p-coumarate as a radical transfer mechanism in grass lignin formation.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Ronald; Ralph, John; Grabber, John H

    2008-11-01

    Grass lignins are differentiated from other lignin types by containing relatively large amounts of p-coumaric acid (pCA) acylating the C-9 position of lignin subunits. In the case of a mature corn (Zea mays L.) stems, pCA constitutes 15-18% of a dioxane soluble enzyme lignin. The major portion of the pCA is specifically attached to syringyl residues. Studies with isolated corn wall peroxidases show that pCA readily undergoes radical coupling in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas sinapyl alcohol radical coupling proceeds more slowly. Analysis of corn wall peroxidases did not reveal specific enzymes that would lead to the preferred incorporation of sinapyl alcohol as seen in other plants. The addition of ethyl ferulate, methyl p-coumarate, or sinapyl p-coumarate conjugates to a reaction mixture containing peroxidase, sinapyl alcohol, and hydrogen peroxide stimulated the rate of sinapyl alcohol radical coupling by 10-20-fold. Based on spectral analysis it appears that pCA and ferulate radicals form rapidly, but the radical is readily transferred to sinapyl alcohol. The newly formed sinapyl alcohol radicals undergo coupling and cross-coupling reactions. However, sinapyl alcohol radicals do not cross-couple with pCA radicals. As long as hydrogen peroxide is limiting pCA remains uncoupled. Ferulates have similar reaction patterns in terms of radical transfer though they appear to cross-couple in the reaction mixture more readily then pCA. The role of pCA may be to internally provide a radical transfer mechanism for optimizing radical coupling of sinapyl alcohol into the growing lignin polymer. Attachment of some pCA to sinapyl alcohol ensures localization of the radical transfer mechanism in areas where sinapyl alcohol is being incorporated into lignin.

  19. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo(2.1.0)pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo(3.2.1)oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  20. Spectroscopy reveals that ethyl esters interact with proteins in wine.

    PubMed

    Di Gaspero, Mattia; Ruzza, Paolo; Hussain, Rohanah; Vincenzi, Simone; Biondi, Barbara; Gazzola, Diana; Siligardi, Giuliano; Curioni, Andrea

    2017-02-15

    Impairment of wine aroma after vinification is frequently associated to bentonite treatments and this can be the result of protein removal, as recently demonstrated for ethyl esters. To evaluate the existence of an interaction between wine proteins and ethyl esters, the effects induced by these fermentative aroma compounds on the secondary structure and stability of VVTL1, a Thaumatin-like protein purified from wine, was analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The secondary structure of wine VVTL1 was not strongly affected by the presence of selected ethyl esters. In contrast, VVTL1 stability was slightly increased by the addition of ethyl-octanoate, -decanoate and -dodecanoate, but decreased by ethyl-hexanoate. This indicates the existence of an interaction between VVTL1 and at least some aroma compounds produced during fermentation. The data suggest that proteins removal from wine by bentonite can result in indirect removal of at least some aroma compounds associated with them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Free radicals and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Allamaneni, Shyam S R

    2011-03-01

    Male factor accounts for almost 50% cases of infertility. The exact mechanism of sperm dysfunction is not known in many cases. Extensive research in the last decade has led to the identification of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) as mediators of sperm dysfunction in both specific diagnoses and idiopathic cases of male infertility. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are seen in up to 30-80% of men with male infertility. The role of free radicals has been studied extensively in the process of human reproduction. We know now that a certain level of free radicals is necessary for normal sperm function, whereas an excessive level of free radicals can cause detrimental effect on sperm function and subsequent fertilisation and offspring health. Oxidative stress develops when there is an imbalance between generation of free radicals and scavenging capacity of anti-oxidants in reproductive tract. Oxidative stress has been shown to affect both standard semen parameters and fertilising capacity. In addition, high levels of free radicals have been associated with lack of or poor fertility outcome after natural conception or assisted reproduction. Diagnostic techniques to quantify free radicals in infertile patients can assist physicians treating patients with infertility to plan for proper treatment strategies. In vivo anti-oxidants can be used against oxidative stress in male reproductive tract. Supplementation of in vitro anti-oxidants can help prevent the oxidative stress during sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction.

  2. Health and Environmental Effects Profile for ethyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for ethyl methacrylate was prepared to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency actions under Section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Both published literature and information obtained from Agency program office files were evaluated as they pertained to potential human health, aquatic life and environmental effects. Quantitative estimates are presented provided sufficient data are available. Ethyl methacrylate has been determined to be a systemic toxicant. An acceptable daily intake (ADI) for ethyl methacrylate is 0.086 mg/kg/day for oral exposure.

  3. NEW GROUND-STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ETHYL CYANIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan

    2009-09-01

    The spectrum of ethyl cyanide, or propionitrile (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN), has been repeatedly observed in the interstellar medium with large column densities and surprisingly high temperatures in hot core sources. The construction of new, more sensitive, observatories accessing higher frequencies such as Herschel, ALMA, and SOFIA have made it important to extend the laboratory data for ethyl cyanide to coincide with the capabilities of the new instruments. We report extensions of the laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide in its ground vibrational state to 1.6 THz. A global analysis of the ground state, which includes all of the previous data and 3356 newly assigned transitions, has been fitted to within experimental error to J = 132, K = 36, using both Watson A-reduced and Watson S-reduced Hamiltonians.

  4. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  5. Selective determination of ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol, and methyl ethyl ketone using quartz crystal nanobalance combined with principle component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mirmohseni, A; Razzaghi, M A; Pourata, R; Rastgouye-Hojagan, M; Zavareh, S

    2009-07-15

    Quartz crystal nanobalance (QCN) sensors are considered as powerful mass sensitive sensors to determine materials in the subnanogram level. In the current study a method based on QCN modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been developed to determine organic vapors (ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone). The frequency shift of QCN was found to be linear against analytes concentrations in the range between 4 to 35 mg/L for acetone vapor and 4-70 mg/L for 3 other vapors. The correlation coefficients for ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol, and methyl ethyl ketone were 0.9971, 0.9976, 0.9984 and 0.9927, respectively. The principal component analysis was also utilized to process the frequency response data of the organic vapors. Using principal component analysis, it was found that over 95% of the data variance could still be explained by use of two principal components (PC1 and PC2). Subsequently, the successful discrimination of ethyl acetate and other compounds was possible through the principal component analysis of the transient responses of the PEG-modified QCN sensor.

  6. Ethyl sulphate, a chemically reactive human metabolite of ethanol?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H; Wilson, Ian D

    2014-11-01

    1. Ethanol consumption is known to be linked in varying degrees to numerous ailments including damage to the nervous, endocrine and musculoskeletal systems and the gastrointestinal tract as well as extensive liver injury and several cancerous events. 2. Although acetaldehyde is the presently favoured candidate, both directly and indirectly, for such deleterious outcomes, over the years many other mechanisms and suggestions have been advanced. 3. The sparse literature concerning ethyl sulphate, a recently confirmed human metabolite of ethanol, has been examined, evaluated and interpreted to put forward the new proposition that ethyl sulphate itself may be able to alkylate various biological macromolecules thereby leading to toxicity.

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) was released for external peer review in April 2017. EPA’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee (CAAC) will conduct a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the ETBE assessment and release a final report of their review. Information regarding the peer review can be found on the SAB website. EPA is conducting an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE). The outcome of this project is a Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary for ETBE that will be entered into the IRIS database.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Etbe) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) was released for external peer review in June 2017. EPA’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee (CAAC) will conduct a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the ETBE assessment and release a final report of their review. Information regarding the peer review can be found on the SAB website. EPA is conducting an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE). The outcome of this project is a Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary for ETBE that will be entered into the IRIS database.

  9. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of alkyl benzyl radicals: Effects of a radical center on the CH stretch infrared spectrum of an alkyl chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Joseph A.; Tabor, Daniel P.; Sibert, Edwin L.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-09-01

    An important initial step in the combustion of gasoline and diesel fuels is the abstraction of hydrogen from alkylbenzenes to form resonance-stabilized alkyl benzyl radicals. This work uses, for the first time, double resonance spectroscopy methods to explore the conformation-specific vibronic and infrared spectroscopy of the α-ethylbenzyl (αEtBz) and α-propylbenzyl (αPrBz) radicals. Local mode Hamiltonian modeling enables assignment of the alkyl CH stretch IR spectra, accounting for Fermi resonance that complicates aliphatic alkyl CH stretch IR spectroscopy. The ground state conformational preferences of the ethyl and propyl chains are changed from those in the alkylbenzenes themselves, with global minima occurring for an in-plane orientation of the alkyl chain (trans) about its first dihedral angle (ϕf123, numbers are alkyl C atoms. C1 is CH radical site). This in-plane structure is the only observed conformer for the α-EtBz radical, while two conformers, tt and tg' share this orientation at the first dihedral, but differ in the second (ϕ1234) for the αPrBz radical. The in-plane orientation lowers the local site frequencies of the CH2 group stretches immediately adjacent to the benzylic radical site by about 50 cm-1 relative to those in pure alkyl chains or alkylbenzenes. This effect of the radical site is localized on the first CH2 group, with little effect on subsequent members of the alkyl chain. In the D1 excited electronic state, an out-of-plane orientation is preferred for the alkyl chains, leading to torsional mode Franck-Condon activity in the D0-D1 spectra that is both conformer-specific and diagnostic of the conformational change.

  10. Assistance of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in the interpretation of postmortem ethanol findings.

    PubMed

    Krabseth, Hege; Mørland, Jørg; Høiseth, Gudrun

    2014-09-01

    Postmortem ethanol formation is a well-known problem in forensic toxicology. The aim of this study was to interpret findings of ethanol in blood, in a large collection of forensic autopsy cases, by use of the nonoxidative ethanol metabolites, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS). In this study, according to previously published literature, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in EtS-negative cases. Among 493 ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, collected during the study period, EtS was not detected in 60 (12 %) of the cases. Among cases with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of ≤ 0.54 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 38 % of the cases, while among cases with a BAC of ≥ 0.55 g/kg, antemortem ethanol ingestion was excluded in 2.2 % of the cases. For all cases where ethanol was measured at a concentration >1.0 g/kg, EtS was detected. The highest blood ethanol concentration in which EtS was not detected was 1.0 g/kg. The median concentrations of EtG and EtS in blood were 9.5 μmol/L (range: not detected (n.d.) 618.1) and 9.2 μmol/L (range: n.d. 182.5), respectively. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between concentration levels of ethanol and of EtG (Spearman's rho=0.671, p<0.001) and EtS (Spearman's rho=0.670, p<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that in a large number of ethanol-positive forensic autopsy cases, ethanol was not ingested before the time of death, particularly among cases where ethanol was present in lower blood concentrations. Routine measurement of EtG and EtS should therefore be recommended, especially in cases with BAC below 1 g/kg.

  11. Detection times for urinary ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in heavy drinkers during alcohol detoxification.

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Böttcher, Michael; Fehr, Christoph; Dahmen, Norbert; Beck, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are conjugated ethanol metabolites formed in low amounts after alcohol consumption. Compared with ethanol, EtG and EtS are excreted in urine for a prolonged time, making them useful as sensitive alcohol biomarkers. This study determined the detection times for EtG and EtS in alcoholic patients undergoing alcohol detoxification. Alcohol-dependent patients (n = 32) with an initial alcohol concentration >or=1 g/L based on breath testing were followed during detoxification. Urine samples for determination of EtG, EtS, ethanol and creatinine were collected on admission to the hospital and thereafter once daily for several days. EtG and EtS measurements were performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and EtG also using an immunochemical assay (DRI-EtG EIA, ThermoFisher/Microgenics). The detection time for urinary EtG was weakly correlated (r = 0.434, P = 0.013) with the initial alcohol concentration (range 1.0-3.4 g/L). For EtG, the individual time range until return to below the applied cut-off limit (<0.5 mg/L) was approximately 40-130 h (median 78) with a similar time course observed for EtS. After correction for urine dilution, the time until an EtG/creatinine ratio <0.5 mg/g was approximately 40- 90 h (median 65). The detection times after an estimated zero ethanol concentration were approximately 30-110 h (median 66) for EtG and approximately 30- 70 h (median 56) for EtG/creatinine. The EtG results by LC-MS and the immunoassay were in good agreement. During alcohol detoxification, EtG and EtS remained detectable in urine for several days. The detection times showed wide inter-individual variations, also after adjusting values for urine dilution and to the estimated times for a completed ethanol elimination.

  12. Free radical scavenging and hepatoprotective potential of Ficus microcarpa L. fil. bark extracts.

    PubMed

    Kalaskar, Mohan G; Surana, Sanjay J

    2011-07-01

    Successive extracts of Ficus microcarpa L. fil. bark (FMB) were tested for antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride- and paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicities in rats. The ethyl acetate extract of FMB exhibited significant antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity by reducing carbon tetrachloride- and paracetamol-induced changes in biochemical parameters as evidenced by enzymatic and histological examination. Pretreatment with ethyl acetate extract of FMB significantly shortened the duration of pentobarbitone-induced necrosis in mice, indicating its hepatoprotective potential. Phytochemical studies confirmed the presence of the phenolic compound, catechin, in FMB, which may interfere with free-radical formation and may account for its significant hepatoprotective effects. The present study thus provides a scientific rationale for the traditional use of this plant in the management of liver disorders.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of New Optically Active Poly (ethyl L-lysinamide)s and Poly (ethyl L-lysinimide)s

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed; Vakili, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Ethyl L-lysine dihydrochloride was reacted with three different dianhydrides to yield the poly (ethyl L-lysinimide)s (PI1−3); it was also reacted with two different diacyl chlorides to yield the poly (ethyl L-lysinamide)s (PA4-5). The resulting polymers have inherent viscosities in the range of 0.15 to 0.42 dL g−1. These polymers are prepared from an inexpensive starting material and are optically active, potentially ion exchangeable, semicrystalline, thermally stable, and soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as DMF, DMSO, NMP, DMAc, and sulfuric acid. All of the above polymers were fully characterized by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, WAX diffraction, TGA, inherent viscosity measurement, and specific rotation. PMID:22331998

  14. Investigation of 60Co γ-irradiated L-(-) malic acid, N-methyl- DL-valine and L-glutamic acid γ-ethyl ester by electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, M. Halim; Aydın, Murat; Osmanoğlu, Şemsettin

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of γ-irradiated L-(-) malic acid, N-methyl- DL-valine and L-glutamic acid γ-ethyl ester powders have been investigation at room temperature. Radiation damage centres are attributed to HOOCCH 2ĊHCOOH, (CH 3) 2ĊCH(NHCH 3)COOH and C 2H 5OCOCH 2CH 2Ċ(NH 2)COOH radicals, respectively. The spectra have been computer simulated. The EPR parameters of the observed radicals have been determined and discussed.

  15. [Simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy, diverticulectomy].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Sokolov, A E; Guspanov, R I; Polegen'kiĭ, V V

    2014-01-01

    Presented clinical case demonstrates a combination of rare congenital abnormality - giant true diverticula of the bladder - and high-risk prostate cancer, as well as a successful result of simultaneous operation - a radical prostatectomy with diverticulectomy.

  16. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  17. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  18. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  19. Ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in meconium and hair-potential biomarkers of intrauterine exposure to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Morini, L; Marchei, E; Vagnarelli, F; Garcia Algar, O; Groppi, A; Mastrobattista, L; Pichini, S

    2010-03-20

    This study investigated ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) concentration in meconium and in maternal and neonatal hair (HEtG and HFAEEs, respectively) as potential markers of intrauterine exposure to ethanol together with meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in a cohort of 99 mother-infant dyads, 49 coming from the Arcispedale of Reggio Emilia (Italy) and 50 from the Hospital del Mar of Barcelona (Spain). FAEEs, EtG and EtS were measured in meconium samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A head space-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to test HEtG and HFAEEs in hair samples from mothers and their newborns. Eighty-two meconium samples (82.8%) tested positive for EtG, 19 (19.2%) for EtS while 22 (22.2%) showed FAEEs levels higher than 2 nmol/g, the cut-off used to differentiate daily maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy from occasional or no use. Although EtG and EtS in meconium did not correlate with total FAEEs concentration, a good correlation between EtG, EtS and ethyl stearate was observed. Moreover, EtG correlated well with ethyl palmitoleate, while EtS with ethyl laurate, myristate and linolenate. Neither maternal nor neonatal hair appears as good predictors of gestational ethanol consumption and subsequent fetal exposure in these mother-infant dyads. In conclusion, these data show that meconium is so far the best matrix in evaluating intrauterine exposure to ethanol, with EtG and EtS being potentially good alternative biomarkers to FAEEs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radical-scavenging activity and mechanism of resveratrol-oriented analogues: influence of the solvent, radical, and substitution.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ya-Jing; Qian, Yi-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Da; Dai, Fang; Shang, Xian-Ling; Jia, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Qiang; Fang, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Bo

    2009-07-17

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, 3,5,4'-THS) is a well-known natural antioxidant and cancer chemopreventive agent that has attracted much interest in the past decade. To find a more active antioxidant and investigate the antioxidative mechanism with resveratrol as the lead compound, we synthesized 3,5-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,5-DHS), 4-hydroxy-trans-stilbene (4-HS) 3,4-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,4-DHS), 4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (4,4'-DHS), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-trans-stilbene (3-MeO-4-HS), 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-trans-stilbene (4'-MeO-4-HS), 4-hydroxy-4'-methyl-trans-stilbene (4'-Me-4-HS), 4-hydroxy-4'-nitro-trans-stilbene (4'-NO(2)-4-HS), and 4-hydroxy-4'-trifluoromethyl-trans-stilbene (4'-CF(3)-4-HS). The radical-scavenging activity and detailed mechanism of resveratrol and its analogues (ArOHs) were investigated by the reaction kinetics with galvinoxyl (GO(*)) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(*)) radicals in ethanol and ethyl acetate at 25 degrees C, using UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the reaction rates increase with increasing the electron-rich environment in the molecules, and the compound bearing o-dihydroxyl groups (3,4-DHS) is the most reactive one among the examined resveratrol analogues. The effect of added acetic acid on the measured rate constant for GO(*)-scavenging reaction reveals that in ethanol that supports ionization solvent besides hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), the kinetics of the process is partially governed by sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET). In contrast to GO(*), DPPH(*) has a relatively high reduction potential and therefore enhances the proportion of SPLET in ethanol. The relatively low rate constants for the reactions of ArOHs with GO(*) or DPPH(*) in ethyl acetate compared with the rate constants in ethanol prove that in ethyl acetate these reactions occur primarily by the HAT mechanism. The contribution of SPLET and HAT mechanism depends on the ability of the solvent to ionize Ar

  1. Peroxy radical oxidation of thymidine.

    PubMed

    Martini, M; Termini, J

    1997-02-01

    The peroxy radical (ROO) is unique among reactive oxygen species implicated in the production of DNA damage in that it possesses an extremely long half-life (order of seconds) and is predicted to have a relatively greater chemical selectivity in its reactions relative to other radical intermediates. Yet no product studies of the reactions of ROO with bases, nucleosides, or DNA have appeared, and thus no meaningful predictions can be made regarding its potential involvement in the production of DNA base damage and the mutagenic process. We report here on the reaction products formed by peroxy radical with thymidine, major target of oxidative base damage. ROO reacts with thymine to yield predominantly 5-Me oxidation products. The highly mutagenic 5-(hydroperoxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine are produced by peroxy radical oxidation. In contrast, 5Me oxidation products are minor products of thymidine oxidation by OH, which yields predominantly saturated derivatives via addition to the 5,6 double bound. A plausible mechanistic scheme for the formation of the base oxidation products of thymidine by peroxy radicals is presented. Attach at the deoxyribose moiety resulting in oxidative depyrimidination is also found to occur, as indicated by free base release. Phosphodiester backbone cleavage resulting in single and double strand breaks is also catalyzed by peroxy radical, as demonstrated using a plasmid nicking assay.

  2. Synthesis of Ethyl Nalidixate: A Medicinal Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Ray; Leeb, Elaine; Smith, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments that complement a medicinal chemistry lecture course in drug design and development have been developed. The synthesis of ethyl nalidixate covers three separate experimental procedures, all of which can be completed in three, standard three-hour lab classes and incorporate aspects of green chemistry such as…

  3. Ethyl chloride as a cryoanalgesic in pediatrics for venipuncture.

    PubMed

    Soueid, Ali; Richard, Bruce

    2007-06-01

    Ethyl chloride can be used as a cryoanalgesic, but with the availability of alternative and relatively safer topical analgesics, its use has decreased. However, it still has the advantage of being quicker to apply compared with other topical analgesics, making it ideal for use in the outpatient departments. We wanted to compare the effectiveness of ethyl chloride as an analgesic during venipuncture in children. Venipuncture was carried out using either no analgesia (NO), ethyl chloride spray (EC), or application of the topical anesthetic Ametop (TA) on children attending the phlebotomy outpatient service by experienced pediatric phlebotomists. A pain score was recorded using either the Faces scoring system or the Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry Consolability scoring system. A total of 55 patients were included in the study, 18 from group EC, 18 from group TA, and 19 from group NO. Thirteen patients from both groups EC and TA and 17 from group NO scored 2 or less on the pain scores. The use of ethyl chloride was as effective as topical anesthetics in preventing distress to children in venipuncture. However, in the appropriate situations, the use of NO could also be comfortable to the child if venipuncture was done by specialist pediatric phlebotomists.

  4. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  5. 77 FR 60917 - Trinexapac-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 RIN 2070-ZA16 Trinexapac-ethyl; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental..., is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at the Office of Pesticide Programs Regulatory Public...), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC...

  6. Synthesis of Ethyl Nalidixate: A Medicinal Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Ray; Leeb, Elaine; Smith, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments that complement a medicinal chemistry lecture course in drug design and development have been developed. The synthesis of ethyl nalidixate covers three separate experimental procedures, all of which can be completed in three, standard three-hour lab classes and incorporate aspects of green chemistry such as…

  7. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  8. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blended with polyethylene or with one or more olefin copolymers complying with § 177.1520 or with a mixture of polyethylene and one or more olefin copolymers, in such proportions that the ethyl acrylate... prescribed in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, when tested by the methods prescribed for polyethylene...

  9. Steric Effects in the Reaction of Aryl Radicals on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Combellas, Catherine; Jiang, Deen; Kanoufi, Frederic; Pinson, Jean; Podvorica, Fetah

    2009-01-01

    Steric effects are investigated in the reaction of aryl radicals with surfaces. The electrochemical reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-methyl, 2-methoxy, 2-ethyl, 2,6-, 2,4-, and 3,5-dimethyl, 4-tert-butyl, 3,5-bis-tert-butyl benzenediazonium, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl), and pentafluoro benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborates is examined in acetonitrile solutions. It leads to the formation of grafted layers only if the steric hindrance at the 2- or 2,6-position(s) is small. When the 3,5-positions are crowded with tert-butyl groups, the growth of the organic layer is limited by steric effects and a monolayer is formed. The efficiency of the grafting process is assessed by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and ellipsometry. These experiments, together with density functional computations of bonding energies of substituted phenyl groups on a copper surface, are discussed in terms of the reactivity of aryl radicals in the electrografting reaction and in the growth of the polyaryl layer.

  10. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  11. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... combined residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl phenoxy]propanoate] and its metabolites (6-chloro-2... tolerances are established for combined residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, phenoxy]propanoic acid...

  12. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its...

  13. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its...

  14. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its...

  15. Protective effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Acacia ferruginea DC. against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Sowndhararajan, Kandhasamy; Kang, Sun Chul

    2013-06-21

    In traditional systems of medicine, stem bark of Acacia ferruginea DC. is used for the treatment of itching, leucoderma, ulcers, stomatitis and diseases of the blood. In the present study, we determined antioxidant and anti-ulcerogenic activities of Acacia ferruginea stem bark. Acetone extract and its sub-fractions of Acacia ferruginea stem bark were subjected to assess their antioxidant potential using various in vitro systems such as DPPH(•), ABTS(•+) scavenging, FRAP and phosphomolybdenum reduction activities. Based on the antioxidant potential, the ethyl acetate fraction was used to evaluate the protective effect of ethanol-induced gastric damage in rat model. Enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione, catalase and lipid peroxidation were also determined in the stomach tissues. Ethyl acetate fraction (AFE) of Acacia ferruginea stem bark registered higher antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities than the crude acetone extract and other fractions. In addition, AFE exhibited that the IC50 values of DPPH (2.5µg/ml) and ABTS (1.8µg/ml) were lower when compared to the standard quercetin (12.4µg/ml and 4.7µg/ml, respectively). In ethanol induced gastric ulcer, administration of AFE at doses of 10mg/kg, 50mg/kg and 100mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol ingestion significantly protected the stomach ulceration. Consequently significant changes were observed in enzyme activities such as SOD, CAT, GSH and LPO in the stomach tissues when compared with ethanol control group. It is concluded that the ethyl acetate fraction of Acacia ferruginea stem bark possessed higher antioxidant and anti-ulcerogenic activities. Based on the results, we suggest that Acacia ferruginea stem bark has potential to provide a therapeutic approach to ethanol mediated ulcer as an effective anti-ulcer agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Icosapent ethyl (eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester): Effects on remnant-like particle cholesterol from the MARINE and ANCHOR studies.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Christie M; Bays, Harold E; Philip, Sephy; Doyle, Ralph T; Braeckman, Rene A; Stirtan, William G; Soni, Paresh N; Juliano, Rebecca A

    2016-10-01

    Remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C) is atherogenic and may increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Icosapent ethyl is a high-purity prescription eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (approved as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride [TG] levels in adult patients with TGs ≥500 mg/dL [≥5.65 mmol/L] at 4 g/day). In the MARINE and ANCHOR studies, icosapent ethyl reduced TG and other atherogenic lipid parameter levels without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. This exploratory analysis evaluated the effects of icosapent ethyl on calculated and directly measured RLP-C. MARINE (TGs ≥500 and ≤2000 mg/dL [≥5.65 mmol/L and ≤22.6 mmol/L]) and ANCHOR (TGs ≥200 and <500 mg/dL [≥2.26 and <5.65 mmol/L] despite statin-controlled LDL-C) were phase 3, 12-week, double-blind studies that randomized adult patients to icosapent ethyl 4 g/day, 2 g/day, or placebo. This analysis assessed median percent change from baseline to study end in directly measured (immunoseparation assay) RLP-C levels (MARINE, n = 218; ANCHOR, n = 252) and calculated RLP-C levels in the full populations. Icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced directly measured RLP-C levels -29.8% (p = 0.004) in MARINE and -25.8% (p = 0.0001) in ANCHOR versus placebo, and also reduced directly measured RLP-C levels to a greater extent in subgroups with higher versus lower baseline TG levels, in patients receiving statins versus no statins (MARINE), and in patients receiving medium/higher-intensity versus lower-intensity statins (ANCHOR). Strong correlations were found between calculated and directly measured RLP-C for baseline, end-of-treatment, and percent change values in ANCHOR and MARINE (0.73-0.92; p < 0.0001 for all). Icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced calculated and directly measured RLP-C levels versus placebo in patients with elevated TG levels from the MARINE and ANCHOR studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors

  17. Radical or not radical: compared structures of metal (M = Ni, Au) bis-dithiolene complexes with a thiazole backbone.

    PubMed

    Filatre-Furcate, Agathe; Bellec, Nathalie; Jeannin, Olivier; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Fourmigué, Marc; Vacher, Antoine; Lorcy, Dominique

    2014-08-18

    A complete series of dianionic, monoanionic, and neutral dithiolene complexes formulated as [Ni(Et-thiazdt)2](n), with n = -2, -1, 0, and Et-thiazdt: N-ethyl-1,3-thiazoline-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate, is prepared using an optimized procedure described earlier for the N-Me derivatives. Electrochemical and spectroscopic properties confirm the electron-rich character of the Et-thiazdt dithiolate ligand. The three complexes are structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The paramagnetic anionic complex [Ni(Et-thiazdt)2](-1), as Ph4P(+) salt, exhibits side-by-side lateral interactions leading to a Heisenberg spin chain behavior. The solid-state structure of the neutral, diamagnetic [Ni(Et-thiazdt)2](0) complex shows a face-to-face organization with a large longitudinal shift, at variance with the structure of its radical and neutral gold dithiolene analogue described earlier and formulated as [Au(Et-thiazdt)2](•). Comparison of the two structures, and those of the other few structurally characterized pairs of Ni/Au dithiolene complexes, demonstrates the important role played by overlap interactions between gold dithiolene radical species. Despite its closed-shell character, the neutral nickel complex [Ni(Et-thiazdt)2](0) exhibits a semiconducting behavior with a room-temperature conductivity σRT ≈ 0.014 S cm(-1).

  18. 40 CFR 721.10064 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-[2-(ethenyloxy)ethoxy]ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.10064 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester (PMN P-04...

  19. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10064 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-[2-(ethenyloxy)ethoxy]ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.10064 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester (PMN P-04...

  2. 76 FR 82320 - Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... COMMISSION Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports AGENCY: United States.... domestic market for fuel ethyl alcohol during the 12-month period ending on the preceding September 30. This determination is to be used to establish the ``base quantity'' of imports of fuel ethyl...

  3. 78 FR 9938 - Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... COMMISSION Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports AGENCY: United States... is equal to 7 percent of the U.S. domestic market for fuel ethyl alcohol during the 12-month period...'' of imports of fuel ethyl alcohol, and the Commission transmitted it determinations to the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN P...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN P...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN P...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10300 - Benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester. 721.10300 Section 721.10300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....-phenyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10300 - Benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester. 721.10300 Section 721.10300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....-phenyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10064 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-[2-(ethenyloxy)ethoxy]ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.10064 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10300 - Benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester. 721.10300 Section 721.10300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....-phenyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzeneacetic acid, .alpha.-chloro-.alpha.-phenyl-, ethyl ester (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10064 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-[2-(ethenyloxy)ethoxy]ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.10064 2-Propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2- ethyl ester (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.7290 - Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)-, ethyl ester. 721.7290 Section 721.7290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7290 Propanoic acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 2-(trimethoxysilyl)-, ethyl ester (PMN P-01-22; CAS No. 137787-41-8) is subject to...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4090 - Ethanaminium, N-[bis(diethylamino)-methylene]-N-ethyl-, bromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide... Substances § 721.4090 Ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethanaminium, N- -N-ethyl-, bromide (PMN P...

  4. 40 CFR 180.430 - Fenoxaprop-ethyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the...-limited tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its... established for residues of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  5. Solvent-dependent cage dynamics of small nonpolar radicals: lessons from the photodissociation and geminate recombination of alkylcobalamins.

    PubMed

    Stickrath, Andrew B; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Dai, Xiaochuan; Harris, D Ahmasi; Rury, Aaron; Smith, Broc; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Wert, Jonathan; Sension, Roseanne J

    2009-07-30

    Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the primary geminate recombination and cage escape of alkyl radicals in solution over a temperature range from 0 to 80 degrees C. Radical pairs were produced by photoexcitation of methyl, ethyl, propyl, hexylnitrile, and adenosylcobalamin in water, ethylene glycol, mixtures of water and ethylene glycol, and sucrose solutions. In contrast to previous studies of cage escape and geminate recombination, these experiments demonstrate that cage escape for these radical pairs occurs on time scales ranging from a hundred picoseconds to over a nanosecond as a function of solvent fluidity and radical size. Ultrafast cage escape (<100 ps) is only observed for the methyl radical where the radical pair is produced through excitation to a directly dissociative electronic state. The data are interpreted using a unimolecular model with competition between geminate recombination and cage escape. The escape rate constant, k(e), is not a simple function of the solvent fluidity (T/eta) but depends on the nature of the solvent as well. The slope of k(e) as a function of T/eta for the adenosyl radical in water is in near quantitative agreement with the slope calculated using a hydrodynamic model and the Stokes-Einstein equation for the diffusion coefficients. The solvent dependence is reproduced when diffusion constants are calculated taking into account the relative volume and mass of both solvent and solute using the expression proposed by Akgerman (Akgerman, A.; Gainer, J. L. Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 1972, 11, 373-379). Rate constants for cage escape of the other radicals investigated are consistently smaller than the calculated values suggesting a systematic correction for radical size or coupled radical pair motion.

  6. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  7. Theoretical and kinetic study of the reaction of ethyl methyl ketone with HO2 for T = 600-1600 K. Part II: addition reaction channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Mendes, Jorge; Curran, Henry J

    2013-06-06

    The temperature and pressure dependence of the addition reaction of ethyl methyl ketone (EMK) with HO2 radical has been calculated using the master equation method employing conventional transition state theory estimates for the microcanonical rate coefficients in the temperature range of 600-1600 K. Geometries, frequencies, and hindrance potentials were obtained at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. A modified G3(MP2,CC) method has been used to calculate accurate electronic energies for all of the species involved in the reactions. The rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation has been used for all of the vibrations except for the torsional degrees of freedom which are being treated as 1D hindered rotors. Asymmetric Eckart barriers were used to model tunneling effect in a one-dimensional reaction coordinate through saddle points. Our calculated results show that the four reaction channels forming 1-buten-2-ol + HO2 radical (R5), 2-buten-2-ol + HO2 radical (R10), acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical (R13), and 2-methyl-2-oxetanol + OH radical (R15) are the dominant channels. When the temperature is below 1000 K, the reaction R15 forming the cyclic ether, 2-methyl-2-oxetanol, is dominant while the reaction R13 forming acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical becomes increasingly dominant at temperatures above 1000 K. The other two channels forming 1-buten-2-ol, 2-buten-2-ol, and HO2 radical are not dominant but are still important product channels over the whole temperature range investigated here. No pressure dependence has been found for the reaction channels forming 2-methyl-2-oxetanol + OH radical and acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical. A slightly negative pressure dependence has been found for the reaction channels producing the two butenols. Rate constants for the four important reaction channels at 1 atm (in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) are k(R5) = 2.67 × 10(15) × T(-1.32)exp(-16637/T), k(R10) = 1.62 × 10(8) × T(0.57)exp(-13142/T), k(R13) = 2.29 × 10(17) × T

  8. Dual responsive pickering emulsion stabilized by poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] grafted cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Lee, Micky Fu Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Boxin; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam C

    2014-08-11

    A weak polyelectrolyte, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA), was grafted onto the surface of cellulose nanocrystals via free radical polymerization. The resultant suspension of PDMAEMA-grafted-cellulose nanocrystals (PDMAEMA-g-CNC) possessed pH-responsive properties. The grafting was confirmed by FTIR, potentiometric titration, elementary analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); the surface and interfacial properties of the modified particles were characterized by surface tensiometer. Compared to pristine cellulose nanocrystals, modified CNC significantly reduced the surface and interfacial tensions. Stable heptane-in-water and toluene-in-water emulsions were prepared with PDMAEMA-g-CNC. Various factors, such as polarity of solvents, concentration of particles, electrolytes, and pH, on the properties of the emulsions were investigated. Using Nile Red as a florescence probe, the stability of the emulsions as a function of pH and temperature was elucidated. It was deduced that PDMAEMA chains promoted the stability of emulsion droplets and their chain conformation varied with pH and temperature to trigger the emulsification and demulsification of oil droplets. Interestingly, for heptane system, the macroscopic colors varied depending on the pH condition, while the color of the toluene system remained the same. Reversible emulsion systems that responded to pH were observed and a thermoresponsive Pickering emulsion system was demonstrated.

  9. Ethyl Pyruvate Ameliorates The Damage Induced by Cyclophosphamide on Adult Mice Testes

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiary, Zahra; Shahrooz, Rasoul; Ahmadi, Abbas; Soltanalinejad, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a chemotherapy drug which causes deleterious effects on testicular tissue and increases free radicals in the body. The aim of this study is to investigate the protective effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP) on testicular improvement in CP treated animals. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 15 male mice (6-8 weeks) were divided into 3 groups. The control group received normal saline (0.1 ml/day), intraperitoneal (IP), CP group received CP (15 mg/kg/week, IP), and the CP+EP group received EP (40 mg/kg/day, IP) plus CP. After 35 days, we assessed serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) along with histomorphometric and histochemical analyses of the testicles. Results The mean thickness of the germinal epithelium, diameter of seminiferous tubules, and the number of Leydig cells in the CP+EP group were higher than those of the CP group (P<0.05). The number of the mast cells in the CP+EP group significantly reduced compared with the CP group (P<0.05). Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), periodic acid-schiff (PAS) positive reactions and lipid granules in cytoplasm of the Leydig cells in the CP group increased compared with the other groups (P<0.05). TAC in the CP group significantly reduced compared with the other groups (P<0.05). Conclusion This study showed the ability of EP to reduce the destructive side effects of CP in the adult mice reproductive system. PMID:27123204

  10. [Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Núñez Mora, C; García Mediero, J Ma; Cáceres Jiménez, F; Cabrera Castillo, P M

    2007-09-01

    To review our initial experience with laparoscopic radical cystectomy. Between September 2004 and June 2006 we performed 16 laparoscopic radical cystectomies (14 males and 2 females) with a median age of 63.8 y.o. (51-85). 12 ileal neobladder (with laparoscopic ileal-urethra anastomosis), 3 cutaneous ureteroileostomies and 1 cutaneous ureterostomy were performed as derivation techniques. Median follow up was 12.4 months Mean operation time was 340 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 350 ml. and 3 cases required intra-op blood transfusion. Mean hospitalization discharged was at 7.6 days. Median linph node dissection was 22.9 finding node metastasis in 6 cases. Most frequent complication was ileo in two cases. No local recurrentes in trocar placement was achieved. Laparoscopic Radical cystectomy is a challenged long-lasting procedure but with the advantage of a less transfusion rate and short hospital stay. Oncologycal outcomes are similar as tose from open surgery.

  11. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  12. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  13. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  14. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of meconium fatty acid ethyl ester, ethyl glucuronide, and ethyl sulfate for detecting maternal drinking during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Himes, Sarah K; Dukes, Kimberly A; Tripp, Tara; Petersen, Julie M; Raffo, Cheri; Burd, Larry; Odendaal, Hein; Elliott, Amy J; Hereld, Dale; Signore, Caroline; Willinger, Marian; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-03-01

    We investigated agreement between self-reported prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and objective meconium alcohol markers to determine the optimal meconium marker and threshold for identifying PAE. Meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS) were quantified by LC-MS/MS in 0.1 g meconium from infants of Safe Passage Study participants. Detailed PAE information was collected from women with a validated timeline follow-back interview. Because meconium formation begins during weeks 12-20, maternal self-reported drinking at or beyond 19 weeks was our exposure variable. Of 107 women, 33 reported no alcohol consumption in pregnancy, 16 stopped drinking by week 19, and 58 drank beyond 19 weeks (including 45 third-trimester drinkers). There was moderate to substantial agreement between self-reported PAE at ≥19 weeks and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g (κ = 0.57, 95% CI 0.41-0.73). This biomarker and associated cutoff was superior to a 7 FAEE sum ≥2 nmol/g and all other individual and combination marker cutoffs. With meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g as the gold standard condition and maternal self-report at ≥19 weeks' gestation as the test condition, 82% clinical sensitivity (95% CI 71.6-92.0) and 75% specificity (95% CI 63.2-86.8) were observed. A significant dose-concentration relationship between self-reported drinks per drinking day and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g also was observed (all P < 0.01). Maternal alcohol consumption at ≥19 weeks was better represented by meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g than currently used FAEE cutoffs. © 2014 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. Clinical Sensitivity and Specificity of Meconium Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters, Ethyl Glucuronide, and Ethyl Sulfate for Detecting Maternal Drinking During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Sarah K.; Dukes, Kimberly A.; Tripp, Tara; Petersen, Julie M.; Raffo, Cheri; Burd, Larry; Odendaal, Hein; Elliott, Amy J.; Hereld, Dale; Signore, Caroline; Willinger, Marian; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated agreement between self-reported prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and objective meconium alcohol markers to determine the optimal meconium marker and threshold for identifying PAE. Methods Meconium fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and ethyl sulfate (EtS) were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 0.1 g meconium from infants of Safe Passage Study participants. Detailed PAE information was collected from women with a validated timeline follow-back interview. As meconium formation begins during weeks 12-20, maternal self-reported drinking at or beyond 19 weeks was our exposure variable. Results Of 107 women, 33 reported no alcohol consumption in pregnancy, 16 stopped drinking by week 19, and 58 drank beyond 19 weeks (including 45 3rd trimester drinkers). There was moderate-substantial agreement between self-reported PAE ≥19 weeks and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g (kappa: 0.57, 95% CI 0.41-0.73). This biomarker and associated cutoff was superior to a 7 FAEE sum ≥2 nmol/g and all other individual and combination marker cutoffs. With meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g as the gold-standard condition and maternal self-report ≥19 weeks gestation as the test condition, 82% sensitivity (95% CI: 71.6-92.0) and 75% specificity (95% CI: 63.2-86.8) were observed. A significant dose-concentration relationship between self-reported drinks per drinking day and meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g also was observed (P<0.01). Conclusions We assessed meconium EtG, EtS, and FAEE concentrations in the same meconium sample and compared concentrations to detailed self-reported PAE data. Maternal alcohol consumption ≥19 weeks was better represented by meconium EtG ≥30 ng/g compared to current FAEE cutoffs. PMID:25595440

  16. [A study on the mechanism of reductive alkylation for preparing 3-(beta-hydroxy-ethyl-sulfonyl) N-ethyl aniline with HPLC/MS].

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Wu, Z W; Lin, L S; Yang, H Y

    2000-11-01

    Hydrogenating 3-(beta-hydroxy-ethyl-sulfonyl)-aniline and acetaldehyde in the presence of Raney Nickel as a catalyst, 3-(beta-hydroxy-ethyl-sulfonyl)-N-ethyl-aniline was obtained with 98% conversion and 95% monoalkylation selectivity under optimum conditions. By using high performance liquid chromatography/mass selective detection technique to characterize the structures of the products, the mechanism of reductive alkylation is proposed. From the intermediates determined, it is shown that the reaction mechanism would go via an unstable N-alpha-hydroxyethylaniline derivative and Schiff base stage. After hydrogenation of Schiff base, finally the product 3-(beta-hydroxyethyl-sulfonyl)-N-ethyl aniline was formed.

  17. Ab initio studies of (1,2)-hydrogen migrations in open-shell hydrocarbons: vinyl radical, ethyl radical, and triplet methylcarbene

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1981-12-16

    Ab initio, POL-CI calculations on the barriers to hydrogen migration in the title compounds are reported. For C/sub 2/H/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, and CH/sub 3/CH the predicted barriers are 57, 46, and 53 kcal/mol, respectively. For the first two molecules barriers to C-H bond cleavage are also calculated and found to be lower than the migration barriers. A qualitative analysis of the wave functions indicates that the high migration barriers are due to a geometrical constraint placed on the electronic structure of the transition state. A comparison to hydrogen migration in a closed-shell molecule (vinylidene-acetylene) is also presented.

  18. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  19. Laparoscopic radical and partial cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, Ben J.; Rose, Kristen; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2005-01-01

    Radical cystectomy remains the standard treatment for muscle invasive organ confined bladder carcinoma. Laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy (LRC) is an advanced laparoscopic procedure that places significant demands on the patient and the surgeon alike. It is a prolonged procedure which includes several technical steps and requires highly developed laparoscopic skills including intra-corporeal suturing. Here we review the development of the technique, the indications, complications and outcomes. We also examine the potential benefits of robotic-assisted LRC and explore the indications and technique of laparoscopic partial cystectomy. PMID:21206662

  20. VUV Photoionisation of hydrocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, C.; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Gans, Bérenger; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Gauyacq, Dolorès; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo

    2008-09-01

    Hydrocarbon radicals CxHy are constituents of various planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as a result of the methane photochemistry induced by the solar radiation. They contribute to the neutral chemistry, but are also important for the ionosphere through their photoionisation leading to their cations CxHy +. These cations are also produced by ion-molecule reactions starting from the reaction of the primary ions CH4 + and CH3 + which are created in the non-dissociative and dissociative photoionisation of CH4. This work aims at caracterizing the VUV photoionisation of small hydrocarbon radicals as a function of photon energy. The objective is to provide laboratory data for modelers on the spectroscopy, the thermochemistry, and the reactivity of the radicals and their cations. The hydrocarbon radicals are much less caracterized than stable molecules since they have to be produced in situ in the laboratory experiment. We have adapted at Orsay [1-3] a pyrolysis source (Figure 1) well suited to produce cold beams of hydrocarbon radicals to our experimental setups. Available now at Orsay, we have two new sources of VUV radiation, complementary in terms of tunability and resolution, that can be used for these studies. The first one is the DESIRS beamline [4] at the new french synchrotron, SOLEIL. The second one is the VUV laser developped at the Centre Laser de l'Université Paris-Sud (CLUPS) [5]. At SOLEIL, a photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer is used to monitor the photoionisation on a large photon energy range. At the CLUPS, a pulsedfield ionisation (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer allows studies at higher resolution on selected photon energies. The first results obtained with these new setups will be presented. References [1] Fischer, I., Schussler, T., Deyerl, H.J., Elhanine, M. & Alcaraz, C., Photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the allyl radical, C3H5. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 261 (2-3), 227-233 (2007) [2] Schüßler, T., Roth, W., Gerber

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION AND DETECTION OF ETHYL MERCAPTAN IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Daly, A. M.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Gordon, B. P.; Shipman, S. T. E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: brittany.gordon@ncf.edu

    2014-03-20

    New laboratory data of ethyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH, in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave domains (up to 880 GHz) provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants that allowed the detection of gauche-CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH toward Orion KL. This identification is supported by 77 unblended or slightly blended lines plus no missing transitions in the range 80-280 GHz. A detection of methyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}SH, in the spectral survey of Orion KL is reported as well. Our column density results indicate that methyl mercaptan is ≅ 5 times more abundant than ethyl mercaptan in the hot core of Orion KL.

  2. Highly efficient palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Ian P; Kwon, Ohyun

    2008-12-08

    The palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of acetylenes is widely exploited in organic synthesis as a means of forming vinyl stannanes for use in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Application of this methodology to ethyl ethynyl ether results in an enol ether that is challenging to isolate from the crude reaction mixture because of incompatibility with typical silica gel chromatography. Reported here is a highly efficient procedure for the palladium-catalyzed hydrostannation of ethyl ethynyl ether using 0.1% palladium(0) catalyst and 1.0 equiv of tributyltin hydride. The product obtained is a mixture of regioisomers that can be carried forward with exclusive reaction of the beta-isomer. This method is highly reproducible; relative to previously reported procedures, it is more economical and involves a more facile purification procedure.

  3. Identification of an antioxidant, ethyl protocatechuate, in peanut seed testa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiow Chyn; Yen, Gow-Chin; Chang, Lee-Wen; Yen, Wen-Jye; Duh, Pin-Der

    2003-04-09

    The antioxidant activity and identification of the antioxidant component of peanut seed testa were investigated. The antioxidant activity of peanut seed testa was studied in the linoleic acid model system by using the ferric thiocyanate method. Among the five organic solvent extracts, the ethanolic extracts of peanut seed testa (EEPST) produced higher yields and stronger antioxidant activity than other organic solvent extracts. EEPST was separated into 17 fractions on silica gel column chromatography. Fraction 17, which showed the largest yield and significant antioxidant activity, was separated by thin-layer chromatography. Four major antioxidative subfractions were present. Subfraction 17-2 was found to be effective in preventing oxidation of linoleic acid. This subfraction was further fractionated and isolated and characterized by UV, MS, IR, and (1)H NMR techniques. The active compound was identified as ethyl protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid ethyl ester).

  4. Fragrance material review on 2-ethyl-1-hexanol.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2010-07-01

    A summary of the safety data available for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol is a member of the fragrance structural group branched chain saturated alcohols in which the common characteristic structural element is one hydroxyl group per molecule, and a C(4) to C(12) carbon chain with one or several methyl side chains. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire branched chain saturated alcohol group will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2010) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances.

  5. Elevated plasma creatinine due to creatine ethyl ester use.

    PubMed

    Velema, M S; de Ronde, W

    2011-02-01

    Creatine is a nutritional supplement widely used in sport, physical fitness training and bodybuilding. It is claimed to enhance performance. We describe a case in which serum creatinine is elevated due to the use of creatine ethyl esther. One week after withdrawal, the plasma creatinine had normalised. There are two types of creatine products available: creatine ethyl esther (CEE) and creatine monohydrate (CM). Plasma creatinine is not elevated in all creatine-using subjects. CEE , but not CM, is converted into creatinine in the gastrointestinal tract. As a result the use of CEE may be associated with elevated plasma creatinine levels. Since plasma creatinine is a widely used marker for renal function, the use of CEE may lead to a false assumption of renal failure.

  6. Fragrance material review on 2-ethyl-1-butanol.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2010-07-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-ethyl-1-butanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Ethyl-1-butanol is a member of the fragrance structural group branched chain saturated alcohols. The common characteristic structural elements of the alcohols with saturated branched chain are one hydroxyl group per molecule, and a C(4)-C(12) carbon chain with one or several methyl side chains. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire branched chain saturated alcohol group will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2010) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances.

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioequivalence Demonstration for Ω-3 Acid Ethyl Ester Formulations: Rationale for Modification of Current Guidance.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Johns, Colleen; Harris, William S; Puder, Mark; Freedman, Steven D; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Daak, Ahmed; Rabinowicz, Adrian L; Sancilio, Frederick D

    2017-02-08

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for establishing bioequivalence (BE) of ω-3 acid ethyl esters (containing both eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] as ethyl esters), used to treat severe hypertriglyceridemia, recommends the conduct of 2 studies: one with participants in the fasting state and one with participants in the fed state. For the fasting study, the primary measures of BE are baseline-adjusted EPA and DHA levels in total plasma lipids. For the fed study, the primary measures of BE are EPA and DHA ethyl esters in plasma. This guidance differs from that established for icosapent ethyl (EPA ethyl esters) in which the primary measure of BE is baseline-adjusted total EPA in plasma lipids for both the fasting and fed states. The FDA guidance for ω-3 acid ethyl esters is not supported by their physiologic characteristics and triglyceride-lowering mechanisms because EPA and DHA ethyl esters are best characterized as pro-drugs. This article presents an argument for amending the FDA draft guidance for ω-3 acid ethyl esters to use baseline-adjusted EPA and DHA in total plasma lipids as the primary measures of BE for both fasting and fed conditions. This change would harmonize the approaches for demonstration of BE for ω-3 acid ethyl esters and icosapent ethyl (EPA ethyl esters) products for future development programs and is the most physiologically rational approach to BE testing.

  9. Sensory reception of the primer pheromone ethyl oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenz, Thomas S.; Maisonnasse, Alban; Plettner, Erika; Le Conte, Yves; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Social work force distribution in honeybee colonies critically depends on subtle adjustments of an age-related polyethism. Pheromones play a crucial role in adjusting physiological and behavioral maturation of nurse bees to foragers. In addition to primer effects of brood pheromone and queen mandibular pheromone—both were shown to influence onset of foraging—direct worker-worker interactions influence adult behavioral maturation. These interactions were narrowed down to the primer pheromone ethyl oleate, which is present at high concentrations in foragers, almost absent in young bees and was shown to delay the onset of foraging. Based on chemical analyses, physiological recordings from the antenna (electroantennograms) and the antennal lobe (calcium imaging), and behavioral assays (associative conditioning of the proboscis extension response), we present evidence that ethyl oleate is most abundant on the cuticle, received by olfactory receptors on the antenna, processed in glomeruli of the antennal lobe, and learned in olfactory centers of the brain. The results are highly suggestive that the primer pheromone ethyl oleate is transmitted and perceived between individuals via olfaction at close range.

  10. Uptake of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor in Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, M.

    2002-12-01

    The uptake of ethyl alcohol vapor in liquid sulfuric acid has been investigated over the composition range of 40 - 80 wt % H2SO4 and between the temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies were performed using a flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and possible reaction products, ethyl hydrogen sulfate and diethyl sulfate. The uptake coefficients (gamma) have been measured and found to vary from 0.018 to 0.065, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. For example, at concentrated acids greater than 70 wt % and dilute solutions (<70 wt %) colder than 210 K, the gamma values are approaching ~ 0.06. Under other conditions, the gamma values are smaller. The adsorption and thermal desorption measurements have been used to distinguish the possible uptake mechanisms, either solubility or reactive uptake. The results suggest that reactive uptakes are greater than 50 % under all conditions. For dilute acids, we also determine the effective Henry's law constants (H*). We will compare the results with the uptake of gaseous methyl alcohol and acetone in H2SO4 determined previously in our laboratory. The potential implications to the budget of ethyl alcohol in the global troposphere will also be discussed.

  11. Separation optimization for the recovery of phenyl ethyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Priddy, S A; Hanley, T R; Effler, W T

    1999-01-01

    Phenyl ethyl alcohol is a compound that occurs naturally in flower petals and in many common beverages, such as beer. Desire for the floral, rose-like notes imparted by phenyl ethyl alcohol has created a unique niche for this chemical in flavor and fragrance industries. Phenyl ethyl alcohol can be produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via bioconversion. Often this method of production results in extremely low yields, thus placing a great deal of importance on recovery and purification of the valuable metabolite. To determine the best method for recovering the chemical, a primary recovery step and a secondary recovery step were developed. The primary recovery step consisted of comparing dead-end filtration with crossflow ultrafiltration. Crossflow ultrafiltration was ultimately selected to filter the fermentation broth because of its high flow rates and low affinity for the product. The secondary recovery step consisted of a comparison of liquid- liquid extraction and hydrophobic resin recovery. The hydrophobic resin was selected because of its higher rate of recovery and a higher purity than the liquid-liquid extraction, the current practice of Brown-Forman.

  12. Ethyl brings MMT to market with aggressive sales efforts

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Wasting no time in seizing a market opportunity that has been on hold for nearly two decades, Ethyl Corp. recently delivered MMT to refiners across the US immediately after the US EPA decided on Dec. 4, 1995, not to appeal court decisions giving Ethyl the right to market the gasoline additive in conventional gasoline. Among the refiners reportedly taking deliveries of MMT were Texaco and Marathon, though spokepersons from each company would not comment. With the last immediate roadblock to the sale of MMT in the US removed, Ethyl anticipates achieving a market penetration of 8 million-10 million lb annually. With MMT allowed in conventional gasoline at 1/32 gram per gallon, 10 million lb would represent blending the octane enhancer into 948,000 b/d of gasoline. Blending MMT into nearly a million b/d of gasoline would represent a market share of about 20% of the eligible gasoline-i.e., the 5.5 million b/d that is not RFG. That 20% figure also corresponds to the approximate share of the gasoline market controlled by independent refiners.

  13. Fragrance material review on ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties; acute toxicity; skin irritation; and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Etbe) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2016, EPA released the draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) for public comment and discussion. The draft assessment was reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. Consistent with the May 2009 IRIS assessment development process, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices are made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science consultation materials provided to other agencies, including interagency review drafts of the IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether are posted on this site. EPA is undertaking an new health assessment for ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) for the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The outcome of this project will be a Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary of ETBE that will be entered on the IRIS database. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment process, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used nationally and internationally in combination with specific situational exposure assessment infor

  15. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters.

  16. Contribution of citrulline to the formation of ethyl carbamate during Chinese rice wine production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peihong; Sun, Junyong; Li, Xiaomin; Wu, Dianhui; Li, Tong; Lu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Xie, Guangfa

    2014-04-01

    Ethyl carbamate is a well-known carcinogen and widely occurs in Chinese rice wine. To provide more clues to minimise ethyl carbamate accumulation, the levels of possible precursors of ethyl carbamate in Chinese rice wine were investigated by HPLC. Studies of the possible precursors of ethyl carbamate in Chinese raw rice wine with various additives and treatments indicated that significant amounts of urea can account for ethyl carbamate formation. It was also recognised that citrulline is another important precursor that significantly affects ethyl carbamate production during the boiling procedure used in the Chinese rice wine manufacturing process. Besides urea and citrulline, arginine was also found to be an indirect ethyl carbamate precursor due to its ability to form urea and citrulline by microorganism metabolism.

  17. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  18. The Other Women: Radicalizing Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puigvert, Lidia; Darder, Antonia; Merrill, Barbara; de los Reyes, Eileen; Stromquist, Nelly

    A recent international symposium on radicalizing feminism explored ways of developing a dialogic feminism that emphasizes working in different settings under the common goal of including women who have been invisible in the dominant feminist literature by furthering theories and practices based on the principles of dialogic feminism. The seminar…

  19. [Reprodcutive results of radical trachelectomy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Chapa, Arnulfo; Alonso-Reyes, Nelly; Luna-Macías, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Historically, cervical cancer in early stages has been treated with radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy with no option in keeping the uterine-ovarian function. Since two decades ago, evidence shows these cases are candidates for radical trachelectomy, a procedure capable of preserving the fertility without affecting the oncological outcome. To analyze reproductive results among patients treated with radical trachelectomy, in a reference center from the northeast of Mexico. Between March 1999 and December 2013, 27 cases with cervical cancer in early stages were treated with vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy in the ISSSTE Regional Hospital in Monterrey, NL (Mexico). We obtained the gynecological, medical and surgical clinical history. Plan of analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Age range was 27-39 years. Main complications were cervical stenosis (n=1) and erosion of cerclaje (n=2). Eighteen patients tried to get pregnant, 8 of them got a spontaneous pregnancy; 1 more patient required assisted reproduction technics and did not succeed. All pregnancies were delivered by cesarean section and were preterm births; 3 underwent premature rupture of membranes. Two pregnancies ended in abortion, one at 10 weeks with severe hemorrhage that needed hysterectomy; the second one, at 1 7 weeks, received a fine uterine curettage. Only 6 cases (33%) got a live birth. Only one third of the attempted pregnancies got a live birth. Assisted reproduction technics play an important role and should be offer to all cases. Cerclaje is an important factor to carry a pregnancy up to the third trimester.

  20. Mitigating Radicalism in Northern Nigeria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    radicalization in northern Nigeria. u Active engagement of youth and communities in peacebuilding programs that facilitate interactions among individuals...leaders, sustained development investments in marginalized communities , promotion of values of inclusivity to mitigate the spread of extremist ideology...claiming to have repelled Boko Haram, the militants return, regroup, and seek revenge. As a result, social and economic activities in the northern

  1. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  2. Analysis and interpretation of specific ethanol metabolites, ethyl sulfate, and ethyl glucuronide in sewage effluent for the quantitative measurement of regional alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Reid, Malcolm J; Langford, Katherine H; Mørland, Jørg; Thomas, Kevin V

    2011-09-01

    The quantitative measurement of urinary metabolites in sewage streams and the subsequent estimation of consumption rates of the parent compounds have previously been demonstrated for pharmaceuticals and narcotics. Ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide are excreted in urine following the ingestion of alcohol, and are useful biomarkers for the identification of acute alcohol consumption. This study reports a novel ion-exchange-mediated chromatographic method for the quantitative measurement of ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide in sewage effluent, and presents a novel calculation method for the purposes of relating the resulting sewage concentrations with rates of alcohol consumption in the region. A total of 100 sewage samples covering a 25-day period were collected from a treatment plant servicing approximately 500,000 people, and analyzed for levels of ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide. The resulting data were then used to estimate combined alcohol consumption rates for the region, and the results were compared with alcohol related sales statistics for the same region. Ethyl glucuronide was found to be unstable in sewage effluent. Ethyl sulfate was stable and measurable in all samples at concentrations ranging from 16 to 246 nM. The highest concentrations of the alcohol biomarker were observed during weekend periods. Sixty one percent of the total mass of ethyl sulfate in sewage effluent corresponds to alcohol consumption on Friday and Saturday. Sales statistics for alcohol show that consumption in the region is approximately 6,750 kg/d. The quantity of ethyl sulfate passing through the sewage system is consistent with consumption of 4,900 to 7,800 kg/d.   Sewage epidemiology assessments of ethyl sulfate can provide accurate estimates of community alcohol consumption, and detailed examination of the kinetics of this biomarker in sewage streams can also identify time-dependent trends in alcohol consumption patterns. 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  3. Production of ethyl (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoate via reduction of ethyl 2-oxo-4-phenylbutanoate in an interface bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Inada, Y; Kobayashi, A; Ohta, H

    1998-09-01

    Ethyl (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoate [(R)-EHPB], a useful intermediate for the synthesis of various anti-hypertension drugs, was produced via microbial reduction of ethyl 2-oxo-4-phenylbutanoate [EOPB] in an interface bioreactor. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 0920 and Candida holmii KPY 12402 were selected as the best type culture and isolated yeasts, respectively. The highest enantiomeric excess of (R)-EHPB produced by R. minuta and C. holmii were 95 and 94%, respectively. C. holmii was used for the reduction of EOPB in a pad-packed interface bioreactor (inner volume, 3 liter). After incubation for 4 days, 4.4 g of (R)-EHPB was obtained via extraction with methanol followed by column chromatography. The overall yield, chemical purity, and enantiomeric excess of (R)-EHPB were 58%, 99.1%, and 90%, respectively.

  4. Quantitation of Ethyl Glucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate in Urine Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Slawson, Matthew H; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate are minor conjugated metabolites of ethanol that can be detected in urine for several days after last ingestion of ethanol. The monitoring of ethanol use has both clinical and forensic applications and a longer detection window afforded by monitoring these metabolites is obvious. LC-MS/MS is used to analyze diluted urine with deuterated analogs of each analyte as internal standards to ensure accurate quantitation and control for any potential matrix effects. High aqueous HPLC is used to chromatograph the metabolites. Negative ion electrospray is used to introduce the metabolites into the mass spectrometer. Selected reaction monitoring of two product ions for each analyte allows for the calculation of ion ratios which ensures correct identification of each metabolite, while a matrix-matched calibration curve is used for quantitation.

  5. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging active compounds from greater cardamom (Amomum subulatum Roxb.).

    PubMed

    Kikuzaki, H; Kawai, Y; Nakatani, N

    2001-04-01

    Constituents of the fruits of greater cardamom (Amomum subulatum) were fractionated into three fractions, the dichloromethane extract, and the ethyl acetate-soluble and water-soluble fractions of the 70% aqueous acetone extract. The ethyl acetate-soluble fraction showed a high radical-scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Four compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction, and their structures were ascribed to protocatechualdehyde (1), protocatechuic acid (2), 1,7-bis(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)hepta-4E,6E-dien-3-one (3) and 2,3,7-trihydroxy-5-(3,4-dihydroxy-E-styryl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocycloheptene (4) on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. This is the first isolation of these compounds from greater cardamom. In particular, 4 was a new type of cyclic diarylheptanoid. DPPH radical-scavenging activity of these compounds was measured by colorimetric analysis. Compounds 1 and 3 showed stronger activity than such natural antioxidants as alpha-tocopherol and L-ascorbic acid. Compounds 2 and 4 were comparable to alpha-tocopherol and L-ascorbic acid.

  6. Reactivity of hydrohaloethers with OH radicals and chlorine atoms: Correlation with molecular properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasso, Pablo R.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Nieto, Jorge D.; Cometto, Pablo M.; Cobos, Carlos J.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2014-07-01

    The reactivity of halogenated ethers, especially hydrochloroethers, with hydroxyl radicals and chlorine atoms was studied by correlating the room-temperature rate coefficients with both the C-H bond dissociation energies and the vertical ionization potentials of the parent molecules. These molecular properties were estimated at the composite G3B3 level of theory. The results suggest that Cl-substituted ethyl-methyl-ethers and ethyl-ethyl-ethers at the β-position tend to raise the activating effect of the ether linkage -O- and to enhance the possibility of the abstraction of H atoms bonded to α-carbon. Derived relationships between the rate coefficients (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) and ionization potentials (in eV): log kOH = -(1.248 ± 0.065) IP + (1.06 ± 0.73) and log kCl = -(1.46 ± 0.12) IP + (4.5 ± 1.3) allows, in average, to estimate rate coefficients within a factor of 2-3. The atmospheric implications of halogenated and hydrogenated ethers are briefly discussed on the basis of their estimated global lifetimes.

  7. Protective Effect of the Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Sargassum muticum Against Ultraviolet B–Irradiated Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Mei Jing; Yoon, Weon Jong; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kim, Dong Sam; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective properties of the ethyl acetate fraction of Sargassum muticum (SME) against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). SME exhibited scavenging activity toward the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). SME also scavenged the hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO4 + H2O2), which was detected using electron spin resonance spectrometry. In addition, SME decreased the level of lipid peroxidation that was increased by UVB radiation, and restored the level of protein expression and the activities of antioxidant enzymes that were decreased by UVB radiation. Furthermore, SME reduced UVB-induced apoptosis as shown by decreased DNA fragmentation and numbers of apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that SME protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant activity in cells, thereby inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:22174656

  8. Supercritical extraction and desulphurization of Beypazari lignite by ethyl alcohol/NaOH treatment; Effect of ethyl alcohol/coal ratio and NaOH

    SciTech Connect

    Yurum, Y.; Tugluhan, A. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors report an investigation of the solubilization and desulphurization of Beypazari lignite with supercritical ethyl alcohol/NaOH. Supercritical experiments of 60 minutes were done in microreactors of 15 ml at 245{sup 0}C by changing the ethyl alcohol/coal ratio from 3 to 20 under a nitrogen atmosphere. As the ethyl alcohol/coal ratio was increased the yield of solubilization and desulphurization also increased. Higher yields of extraction in the case of ethyl alcohol/NaOH experiments may be due to the fact that alcohols can transfer hydrogen more easily in the presence of bases. The average molecular weights of liquid products obtained in experiments with ethyl alcohol/coal ratios of 3, 6 and 20 were 430, 450 and 465, respectively. In experiments with ethyl alcohol/NaOH system as the ethyl alcohol/coal ratio was increased from 3 to 20 the sulphur content of the coal decreased to 0.75%. In experiments with greater ethyl alcohol/coal ratios mercaptane type sulphur chemicals have been extracted, disulphides were missing in these extracts.

  9. Free-radical scavengers and antioxidants from Peumus boldus Mol. ("Boldo").

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Rodriguez, J A; Theoduloz, C; Astudillo, S L; Feresin, G E; Tapia, A

    2003-04-01

    The dry leaves of Peumus boldus (Monimiaceae) are used in infusion or decoction as a digestive and to improve hepatic complains. Preliminary assays showed free-radical scavenging activity in hot water extracts of boldo leaves, measured by the decoloration of a methanolic solution of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH). Assay-guided isolation led to the active compounds. Catechin proved to be the main free-radical scavenger of the extracts. Lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes was inhibited by boldo extracts and fractions at 500 microg/ml with higher effect for the ethyl acetate soluble and alkaloid fractions. The IC50 for catechin and boldine in the lipid peroxidation test were 75.6 and 12.5 microg/ml, respectively. On the basis of dry starting material the catechin content in the crude drug was 2.25% while the total alkaloid calculated as boldine was 0.06%. The activity of boldine was six times higher than catechin in the lipid peroxidation assay. However, the mean catechin:total alkaloid content ratio was 37:1. The relative concentration of alkaloids and phenolics in boldo leaves and their activity suggest that free-radical scavenging effect is mainly due to catechin and flavonoids and that antioxidant effect is mainly related with the catechin content The high catechin content of boldo leaves and its bioactivity suggest that quality control of Boldo folium has to combine the analysis of catechin as well as their characteristic aporphine alkaloids.

  10. Free radical scavenging potential of Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl fruits extract.

    PubMed

    Mayakrishnan, Vijayakumar; Veluswamy, Selvi; Sundaram, Krishnakumari Shanmuga; Kannappan, Priya; Abdullah, Noorlidah

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate free radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extract Lagenaria siceraria (L. siceraria) (Molina) fruit. The free radical scavenging activity of the L. siceraria (Molina) fruit extract was assayed by using α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,20-azinobis 3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS), FRAP, reducing power, chelating ability and β-carotene bleaching assay. The IC(50) values of DPPH and ABTS radical-scavenging activity was found to be 1.95 mg/mL and 19 mg/mL, respectively. In ferrous chelation assay, the percentage of inhibition was found to be 89.21%. The reducing power of ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Molina) fruit was 0.068 at 1 mg/mL and increased to 0.192 at 5 mg/mL. The β-carotene linoleate bleaching assay was 46.7% at 5 mg/mL and antioxidant activity using FRAP at 0.305 for 1 mg/mL to 0.969 for 5 mg/mL. The results indicate that L. siceraria (Molina) fruit could be an important sources of natural radical scavengers. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Free radical scavenging and total phenolic contents from methanolic extracts of Ulmus davidiana.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mee Jung; Heo, Seong-Il; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2008-05-15

    A methanolic (MeOH) extract of Ulmus davidiana was analyzed for antioxidant activity using model systems, including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging, reducing power, and total phenolic content. The MeOH extract exhibited strong antioxidant activity in the tested model systems. Among fractions using several solvents, the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-soluble fraction, which exhibited strong antioxidant activity, was further purified by silica-gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The (-)-Catechin (1) and (-)-catechin-7-O-β-d-apiofuranoside (2) were isolated as the active principles. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited strong antioxidant activity on DPPH radicals, with IC50 values of 6.37±0.02μM and 6.41±0.03μM, respectively, and strong activity on OH radicals at 10μg/ml, with 53.65±0.01% and 52.56±0.01% inhibition. U. davidiana extracts may be exploited as biopreservatives in food applications as well as for health supplements of functional food, to alleviate oxidative stress. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  13. REVERSIBILITY OF RADICAL-OLEFIN REACTIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALKENES, *STYRENES, *POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, POLYMERIZATION, POLYMERIZATION, FREE RADICALS , MOLECULAR ISOMERISM, TRACER STUDIES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, DECOMPOSITION, SYNTHESIS(CHEMISTRY).

  14. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters in Meconium: Are They Biomarkers of Fetal Alcohol Exposure and Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Ostrea, Enrique M.; Hernandez, Joel D.; Bielawski, Dawn M.; Kan, Jack M.; Leonardo, Gregorio M.; Abela, Michelle Buda; Church, Michael W.; Hannigan, John H.; Janisse, James J.; Ager, Joel W.; Sokol, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomarkers of fetal exposure to alcohol are important to establish so that early detection and intervention can be made on these infants to prevent undesirable outcomes. The aim of this study was to analyze long-chain fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium as potential biomarkers of fetal alcohol exposure and effect. Methods Fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed in the meconium of 124 singleton infants by positive chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and correlated to maternal ethanol use. Results A total of 124 mother/infant dyads were enrolled in the study: 31 were in the control group and 93 were in the alcohol-exposed group. The incidence (28% vs 9.7%, p=0.037) of ethyl linoleate detected in meconium was significantly higher in the alcohol-exposed groups than the control groups. Similarly, when the concentrations of ethyl linoleate in meconium were grouped (trichotomized), there was a significant linear by linear association between alcohol exposure and group concentrations of ethyl linoleate (p=0.013). Furthermore, only alcohol-exposed infants were found in the group with the highest ethyl linoleate concentration. The sensitivity of ethyl linoleate in detecting prenatal alcohol exposure was only 26.9%, and its specificity and positive predictive value were 96.8 and 96.2%, respectively. There was no significant correlation between the concentration of ethyl linoleate in meconium and absolute alcohol consumed (oz) per drinking day across pregnancy, although a trend toward a positive correlation is seen at lower amounts of alcohol consumed. Among the polyunsaturated, long-chain FAEEs, there was weak evidence that the incidence (21.5% vs 6.5%, p=0.057) and concentration (p=0.064) of ethyl arachidonate (AA) were significantly higher in the alcohol-exposed groups than the control groups. Ethyl linolenate and ethyl docosahexanoate (DHA) in meconium were found only in the alcohol group, although not at statistically

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  16. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite.

    PubMed Central

    Neta, P; Huie, R E

    1985-01-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO3 and the peroxy derivative SO5 with organic compounds. PMID:3830699

  17. The Radical Axis: A Motion Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivney, Ray; McKim, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Interesting problems sometimes have surprising sources. In this paper we take an innocent looking problem from a calculus book and rediscover the radical axis of classical geometry. For intersecting circles the radical axis is the line through the two points of intersection. For nonintersecting, nonconcentric circles, the radical axis still…

  18. Ethyl loflazepate: a prodrug from the benzodiazepine series designed to dissociate anxiolytic and sedative activities.

    PubMed

    Chambon, J P; Perio, A; Demarne, H; Hallot, A; Dantzer, R; Roncucci, R; Bizière, K

    1985-01-01

    Ethyl loflazepate (Victan) is an original 1,4-benzodiazepine (BZD) being used as a potent, nonsedative, minor tranquillizer. Ethyl loflazepate was designed to be a prodrug that would gradually release within the organism an active 1,4-BZD. It was hypothesized that this type of pharmacokinetic profile would dissociate anxiolytic from sedative activities. Previously published pharmacokinetic studies performed in rats, baboons and humans have confirmed that ethyl loflazepate gradually releases in the plasma an active 1,4-BZD, descarboxyloflazepate. In the present study, the activity of ethyl loflazepate and its main plasmatic metabolites were examined in rodent models predictive of anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, myorelaxant and sedative properties. The activities of ethyl loflazepate and its metabolites were compared to those of reference BZDs: diazepam, bromazepam, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, clorazepate. Ethyl loflazepate and its metabolites revealed the typical profile of activity of minor tranquillizers. The activity of ethyl loflazepate was long-lasting. The overall anxiolytic potency of ethyl loflazepate was similar to that of diazepam but ethyl loflazepate appeared to be less sedative than diazepam. Thus in the approach-avoidance conflict procedure in rats the threshold anxiolytic doses were 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. for ethyl loflazepate and diazepam, respectively, whereas the threshold sedative doses were 16 and 8 mg/kg i.p., respectively. In vitro ethyl loflazepate exhibited a weak affinity for the BZD receptor site. In vivo ethyl loflazepate displaced [3H]-flunitrazepam from mice brain membranes with a potency comparable to that of lorazepam. In vitro, descarboxyloflazepate, the main plasmatic metabolites of ethyl loflazepate, revealed a 4-fold greater affinity for the BZD receptor than diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Highly durable photochromic radical complexes having no steric protections of radicals.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Mishima, Yasuhiro; Mutoh, Katsuya; Abe, Jiro

    2017-04-21

    Steric protection groups are usually necessary for stable radicals. However, here, we developed novel photochromic radical complexes which generate sterically unprotected imidazolyl and phenoxyl radicals upon UV light irradiation based on the phenoxyl-imidazolyl radical complex (PIC) framework. These photochromic compounds show excellent durability against repeated irradiation of intense nanosecond laser pulses even in polar protic solvents, such as ethanol.

  20. Mutagenicity of Oxygen Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Carmella S.; Hassan, Hosni M.

    1982-05-01

    Paraquat 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was used as an intracellular generator of oxygen free radicals and was found to be highly mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium. It caused both base-pair substitution and frameshift mutations. Paraquat was much more toxic and mutagenic in a simple nutritionally restricted medium than in a rich complex medium. The mutagenicity of paraquat was dependent upon the presence of a supply of both electrons and oxygen. Cells containing high levels of superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) were more resistant to the toxicity and the mutagenicity of paraquat than were cells containing normal levels of this enzyme. The mutagenicity of paraquat thus appears to be due to its ability to exacerbate the intracellular production of superoxide radicals.

  1. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  2. Radical Islam in East Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    carrying out operations. The documents paint a portrait of al-Qaeda cells operating freely in Kenya without concern about being monitored or detained...against Ethiopian Christians.80 For the United States, the Ethiopian occupation has removed the immediate problem of a radical ICU faction sheltering...the U.S. decision to support the Ethiopian invasion and occupation of 8 William Reno, review of monograph. 9 International Crisis Group, Counter

  3. Preventive efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus against radiation-induced DNA damage on V79 cells and free radical scavenging ability against radicals generated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rao, B S S; Shanbhoge, R; Rao, B N; Adiga, S K; Upadhya, D; Aithal, B K; Kumar, M R S

    2009-04-01

    This study presents the findings of free radical scavenging and antigenotoxic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus (CCE). The CCE at a concentration of 60 microg/mL resulted in a significant scavenging ability of 2,2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH; (85%), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS; 77%), hydroxyl (70%), superoxide (76%), nitric oxide (78%) free radicals generated using in vitro and also a moderate anti-lipid peroxidative effect (57%). Further, the radiation-induced antigenotoxic potential of CCE was assessed in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V79) using micronucleus assay. The CCE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the yield of radiation-induced micronuclei, with a maximum effect at 125 microg/mL CCE for 1 h before 2 Gy of radiation. Similarly, there was a significant (P < 0.05-0.0001) decrease in percentage of micronuclei when V79 cells were treated with optimal dose of CCE (125 microg/mL) before exposure to different doses of gamma radiation, that is, 0.5-4 Gy, compared with radiation alone groups. The results of the micronucleus study indicated antigenotoxic effect demonstrating the radioprotective potential of CCE and, which may partly due to its and antioxidant capacity as it presented its ability to scavenge various free radicals in vitro and anti-lipid peroxidative potential.

  4. Photoredox radical conjugate addition of dithiane-2-carboxylate promoted by an iridium(iii) phenyl-tetrazole complex: a formal radical methylation of Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Gualandi, Andrea; Matteucci, Elia; Monti, Filippo; Baschieri, Andrea; Armaroli, Nicola; Sambri, Letizia; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio

    2017-02-01

    A readily accessible iridium(iii) phenyl-tetrazole complex ([Ir(ptrz)2(tBu-bpy)](+), 2; Hptrz = 2-methyl-5-phenyl-tetrazole; tBu-bpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine) is shown to be a versatile catalyst for a new photocatalytic Michael reaction. Under light irradiation in the presence of 2, a dithiane 2-carboxylic acid, obtained by simple hydrolysis of a commercially available ethyl ester, generates a 1,3-dithiane radical capable of performing addition to a variety of Michael acceptors (e.g., unsaturated ketones, esters, amides and malonates). This broad scope reaction with high yields is a formal photo-redox addition of the elusive methyl radical and the adducts obtained can be starting materials for a variety of functionalized products. The excited-state oxidation potential of catalyst 2 allows selective formation of radicals only from α-heterosubstituted carboxylates. Chemical modification of this metal complex can tune the electrochemical properties, opening a route to new highly selective catalytic photo-oxidation reactions.

  5. Hydroxyl radical detection in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chevion, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals have been implicated as the actual species responsible for the deleterious effects of active oxygen in biology. However, in most cases, its presence has only been inferred by circumstantial evidence. Using electrochemical detection coupled to HPLC separation technique the authors can identify and quantitate (at sub-picomole level) the hydroxylated products of 3 aromatic compounds (phenol, salicylate, and 2-deoxy-guanosine) as a direct measure of hydroxyl radical formation. Firstly, the authors showed that mixing ascorbate with copper ions (in the absence of presence of a protein) yields catechols, dihydroxybenzoic acids and 8-OH-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). This approach has been used to study the formation of OH in vivo. Human granulocytes stimulated with TPA showed that 8-OHdG was formed in the cellular DNA at high levels (one 8-OHdG/800 DNA bases). Unstimulated granulocytes contained 8-OHdG below detection level. Formation of 8-OHdG in the TPA-stimulated granulocytes DNA was decreased by the addition of SOD and catalase. Using salicylate as an in vivo scavenger of hydroxyl radicals the authors showed that the level of trapped-dihydroxybenzoic acids is increased approx.8 and approx.3 fold in the lungs and liver of paraquat-poisoned mice, respectively, as compared to normal animals. Similarly, the detected level of dihydroxybenzoic acids in the hearts of adriamycin-treated rats was increased over 100-fold as compared to the hearts of control animals.

  6. A radical way to burn

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-08-01

    By manipulating chamber geometries as well as engine cycle pressures and timing, engineers are exploiting a long-obscure technology known as activated radical combustion. Piston-driven internal combustion engines generally come in two varieties: compression-ignited diesels and spark-ignited gasoline power plants. There, is however, a third way to initiate burning of the fuel-air mixture. The technique--variously called radical ignition (RI), activated radical (AR) combustion, Toyota-Soken combustion, and active thermo-atmosphere combustion--is not exactly new, but only recently have engineers begun to exploit the process in practical power plants. These new units include a lightweight two-stroke racing-motorcycle engine, truck diesels with reduced soot output, and lean-burn spark-ignited car engines. This long-obscure combustion process is based on a range of specialized chemical kinetic and physical acoustic techniques developed over decades. Engineers manipulate fundamental combustion parameter such as chamber geometries, valving and porting configurations, and engine cycle pressures and timing to foster the formation of certain highly reactive chemical species that lower the fuel-air mixture`s flash point so that even modest compression make sit self-ignite. These chemical initiators are then retained into the next cycle to start combustion, allowing the engineer to run stably with no spark.

  7. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  8. Chemistry of The Oio Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, M.; Ashworth, S. H.; Plane, J. M. C.

    This paper will describe a laboratory study of the chemistry that the OIO radical under- goes in the marine boundary layer. The radical was produced by the pulsed photolysis at 193 nm of a N2O/CF3I mixture. The resulting OIO radicals, formed by the self- reaction of IO, were then observed by time-resolved cavity ringdown spectroscopy, using the vibrational bands between 540 and 620 nm. A high resoluting spectral scan found no rotational structure in these bands, indicating that the upper state of this electronic transition is predissociative (lifetime = 150 fs). Ab initio quantum calcula- tions indicate that I + O2 is formed, and this was confirmed by adding a third laser to photolyse OIO as a function of wavelength, with detection of atomic I by resonance fluorescence at 178 nm. This system was also used to measure the absolute absorption cross-section of OIO (1.6 x 10(-17) cm2 at 568 nm). The photodissociation lifetime of OIO is about 0.5 s at midday. Although of minor atmospheric importance, the reac- tions of OIO with NO and OH will also be discussed.

  9. Influence of Gilbert's syndrome on the formation of ethyl glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Laura M; Gunsilius, Leonie; Lardi, Christelle; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-09-01

    A drinking experiment with participants suffering from Gilbert's syndrome was performed to study the possible influence of this glucuronidation disorder on the formation of ethyl glucuronide (EtG). Gilbert's syndrome is a rather common and, in most cases, asymptomatic congenital metabolic aberration with a prevalence of about 5 %. It is characterized by a reduction of the enzyme activity of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform 1A1 up to 80 %. One of the glucuronidation products is EtG, which is formed in the organism following exposure to ethanol. EtG is used as a short-term marker for ethyl alcohol consumption to prove abstinence in various settings. After 2 days of abstinence from ethanol and giving a void urine sample, 30 study participants drank 0.1 L of sparkling wine (9 g ethanol). 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after drinking, urine samples were collected. 3 hours after drinking, an additional blood sample was taken, in which liver enzyme activities, ethanol, hematological parameters, and bilirubin were measured. EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS), another short-term marker of ethanol consumption, were determined in the urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); creatinine was measured photometrically. In all participants, EtG and EtS were detected in concentrations showing a wide range (EtG: 3 h sample 0.5-18.43 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.67-13.8 mg/L; EtS: 3 h sample 0.87-6.87 mg/L and 6 h sample 0.29-4.48 mg/L). No evidence of impaired EtG formation was found. Thus, EtG seems to be a suitable marker for ethanol consumption even in individuals with Gilbert's syndrome.

  10. Pallidol hexa­acetate ethyl acetate monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qinyong; Taylor, Dennis K.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2013-01-01

    The entire mol­ecule of pallidol hexa­acetate {systematic name: (±)-(4bR,5R,9bR,10R)-5,10-bis­[4-(acet­yloxy)phen­yl]-4b,5,9b,10-tetra­hydro­indeno­[2,1-a]indene-1,3,6,8-tetrayl tetra­acetate} is completed by the application of twofold rotational symmetry in the title ethyl acetate solvate, C40H34O12·C4H8O2. The ethyl acetate mol­ecule was highly disordered and was treated with the SQUEEZE routine [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155]; the crystallographic data take into account the presence of the solvent. In pallidol hexa­acetate, the dihedral angle between the fused five-membered rings (r.m.s. deviation = 0.100 Å) is 54.73 (6)°, indicating a significant fold in the mol­ecule. Significant twists between residues are also evident as seen in the dihedral angle of 80.70 (5)° between the five-membered ring and the pendent benzene ring to which it is attached. Similarly, the acetate residues are twisted with respect to the benzene ring to which they are attached [C—O(carb­oxy)—C—C torsion angles = −70.24 (14), −114.43 (10) and −72.54 (13)°]. In the crystal, a three-dimensional architecture is sustained by C—H⋯O inter­actions which encompass channels in which the disordered ethyl acetate mol­ecules reside. PMID:24046702

  11. 4.6.1 Acyl and related radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 4.5.2.2 Radicals from bridged rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  14. Cytotoxic constituents of ethyl acetate fraction from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengli; Zhang, Wu; Li, Jie; Lei, Jiachuan; Yu, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate fraction (EE-DS) from Dianthus superbus was found to possess the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in previous study. To investigate cytotoxic constituents, the bioassay-guided isolation of compounds from EE-DS was performed. Two dianthramides (1 and 2), three flavonoids (3-5), two coumarins (6 and 7) and three other compounds (8-10) were obtained. Structures of isolated compounds were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Cytotoxicity of the compounds against HepG2 cells was evaluated. Compound 1 showed the strongest cytotoxicity, compounds 10, 4, 3 and 5 had moderate cytotoxicity.

  15. Ethyl alcohol boiling heat transfer on multilayer meshed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dåbek, Lidia; Kapjor, Andrej; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the problem of heat transfer enhancement with the application of multilayer metal mesh structures during boiling of ethyl alcohol at ambient pressure. The preparation of samples involved sintering fine copper meshes with the copper base in the reduction atmosphere in order to prevent oxidation of the samples. The experiments included testing up to 4 layers of copper meshes. Significant augmentation of boiling heat transfer is possible, however, considerable number of meshes actually hinders heat transfer conditions and leads to the reduction in the heat flux transferred from the heater surface.

  16. Short synthesis of ethyl 3-(3-aminophenyl)propanoate.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Ulrike; Radau, Gregor; Link, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    A short and effective synthesis of ethyl 3-(3-aminophenyl)propanoate is presented, employing a tandem Knoevenagel condensation/alkylidene reduction of 3-nitrobenzaldehyde with Meldrum's acid in TEAF (triethylammonium formate) followed by reduction of the intermediate 3-(3-nitrophenyl)propanoic acid by stannous chloride in ethanol. The use of stannous chloride as the reducing agent in ethanol enabled the simultaneous esterification of the carboxylic acid. Thus, stannous chloride was acting simultaneously as a Lewis acid, which activates the carboxylic acid towards a nucleophilic attack by ethanol.

  17. Micellar phase boundaries under the influence of ethyl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Denis E.

    2016-01-01

    The Compton spectrum quenching technique is used to monitor the effect of ethyl alcohol (EtOH) additions on phase boundaries in two systems. In toluenic solutions of the nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, EtOH shifts the boundary separating the first clear phase from the first turbid phase to higher water:surfactant ratios. In a commonly used scintillant, Ultima Gold AB, the critical micelle concentration is not shifted. The molecular interactions behind the observations and implications for liquid scintillation counting are discussed. PMID:26585642

  18. Extracts and constituents of Rubus chingii with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of the fruits of Rubus chingii was studied in vitro. Ethanolic extract, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions from dried R. chingii fruits revealed strong DPPH free radical scavenging activity with IC(50) values of 17.9, 3.4 and 4.0 μg/mL, respectively. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were further purified by a combination of silica gel chromatography, Lobar RP-8 chromatography, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Nine compounds were isolated, where methyl (3-hydroxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydroindol-3-yl)-acetate (2), vanillic acid (5), kaempferol (7), and tiliroside (9) showed stronger DPPH free radical scavenging activity than that of ascorbic acid (131.8 μM) with IC(50) values of 45.2, 34.9, 78.5, and 13.7 μM, respectively. In addition, rubusine (1) is a new compound discovered in the present study and methyl (3-hydroxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydroindol-3-yl)-acetate (2), methyl dioxindole-3-acetate (3), and 2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-4-carboxylic acid (4) were isolated from the fruits for the first time.

  19. Possibility of removing heavy impurities from ethyl alcohol by rectification under reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zuereva, V.I.; Elliev, Y.E.

    1986-01-10

    This paper develops a method of gas-chromatographic determination of trace amounts of higher alcohols in ethyl alcohol and examines the possibility of removing these impurities from ethyl alcohol by rectification under reduced pressure. The Tsvet-102 chromatograph with a flame-ionization detector was used in development of a method for gas-chromatographic analysis of ethyl alcohol. The experimental results show that good separation of the impurities is achieved in the capillary column where the impurities were separated. The relative retention volumes of the components are given. The best separation is achieved at 50 mm pressure. At this pressure the content of higher alcohols in ethyl alcohol is lowered by rectification from 1.5.10/sup -1/ to 5.10/sup -4/ vol. %. Thus, rectification of ethyl alcohol under reduced pressure is an effective method of removing heavy impurities from ethyl alcohol.

  20. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  1. Detection of free radicals in low-temperature gas-grain reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnikov, R. A.; Dmitriev, Yu. A.

    2002-05-01

    For laboratory detection and investigation of free radicals which often appear in chemical reactions of astrophysical interest either as important intermediate or as final products, we pioneered the use of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique, which is very effective in observing these substances. This has allowed both formyl (HCO and DCO) and methyl (CH3 and CD3) free radicals to be detected in a sequence of low-temperature gas-grain reactions of H and D atom addition in solid CO. The solid samples subjected to the EPR study were obtained by simultaneous independent deposition of CO molecules and either H or D atoms on the substrate cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The sequence of the H-atom addition gas-grain reactions in solid CO is acknowledged to be among the fundamental processes responsible for the synthesis of organic molecules in interstellar cloud dust grains. The present observation of the above free radicals confirms that the solid-state gas-grain sequence of the reactions is efficient at low temperatures; it also suggests that there should be considerable concentrations of formyl and methyl radicals in the ISM. Another study concentrated on the formation of ethyl free radicals (C2H5) in a low-temperature gas-grain reaction of H-atom abstraction from a C2H6 molecule by free H-atom in solid CH4. These experiments were carried out by deposition onto a substrate, cooled by liquid helium, of a flow of CH4 molecules containing a small amount of impurities such as ethane molecules (C2H6), free H-atoms and CH3 radicals formed in a discharge in a pure gaseous methane. EPR spectra of CH3 radicals, H-atoms, and C2H5 radicals matrix-isolated in solid CH4 were detected. The relative concentrations of the radicals were found to depend on the experimental conditions. The abstraction reaction, C2H6 + H -> C2H5 + H2, took place in CH4-ice.

  2. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Photodissociation dynamics of the ortho- and para-xylyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachner, Kai; Steglich, Mathias; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo

    2017-08-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the C8H9 isomers ortho- and para-xylyl are investigated in a free jet. The xylyl radicals are generated by flash pyrolysis from 2-(2-methylphenyl)- and 2-(4-methylphenyl) ethyl nitrite and are excited into the D3 state. REMPI- spectra show vibronic structure and the origin of the transition is identified at 32 291 cm-1 for the para- and at 32 132 cm-1 for the ortho-isomer. Photofragment H-atom action spectra show bands at the same energy and thus confirm H-atom loss from xylyl radicals. To gain further insight into the photodissociation dynamics, velocity map images of the hydrogen atom photofragments are recorded. Their angular distribution is isotropic and the translational energy release is in agreement with a dissociation to products in their electronic ground state. Photodissociation of para-xylyl leads to the formation of para-xylylene (C8H8), while the data for ortho-xylyl agree much better with the isomer benzocyclobutene as the dominant molecular fragment rather than ortho-xylylene. In computations we identified a new pathway for the reaction ortho-xylyl → benzocyclobutene + H with a barrier of 3.39 eV (27 340 cm-1), which becomes accessible at the employed excitation energy. It proceeds via a combination of scissoring and rotational motion of the -CH2 and -CH3 groups. However, the observed rate constants measured by delaying the excitation and ionization laser with respect to each other are significantly faster than computed ones, indicating intrinsic non-RRKM behaviour. A comparably high value of around 30% of the excess energy is released as translation of the H-atom photofragment.

  4. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  5. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assessment of new ethyl-carbamates with ixodicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Prado-Ochoa, María Guadalupe; Muñoz-Guzmán, Marco Antonio; Vázquez-Valadez, Víctor Hugo; Velázquez-Sánchez, Ana María; Salazar, Ana María; Ramírez-Noguera, Patricia; Angeles, Enrique; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test was used on the peripheral blood of Wistar rats exposed to two new ethyl-carbamates: ethyl-4-bromophenyl-carbamate (LQM 919) and ethyl-4-chlorophenyl-carbamate (LQM 996) to analyze their genotoxic potential. The mitotic index and cell proliferation kinetics in human lymphocyte cultures in the presence of these ethyl-carbamates were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytostaticity respectively. Exposure to greater acute doses (300mg/kg) and to all of the subchronic doses (12.5, 25 and 50mg/kg daily for 90 days) of these ethyl-carbamates induced an increased frequency (p<0.05) of micro-nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) compared with rats not exposed to the ethyl-carbamates. Increases in MN-PCE was higher in males than in females exposed to LQM 996 50mg/Kg (p<0.05). All observed changes in rats return 21days after suspending ethyl-carbamate exposure. The highest concentration (0.3mM) of both ethyl-carbamates in lymphocyte cultures increased the percentage of cells in first division metaphase and decreased the percentage of cells in third division metaphase, indicating an increase in cell cycle length or a possible cell cycle arrest in metaphase (cytostatic effect). The results of this study show that the evaluated ethyl-carbamates may induce genotoxic damage in rats and alterations in the human lymphocyte cell cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mixture effects during the oxidation of toluene, ethyl acetate and ethanol over a cryptomelane catalyst.

    PubMed

    Santos, V P; Pereira, M F R; Órfão, J J M; Figueiredo, J L

    2011-01-30

    The catalytic oxidation of two-component VOC mixtures (ethanol, ethyl acetate and toluene) was studied over cryptomelane. Remarkable mixture effects were observed on the activity and the selectivity. Toluene inhibits both ethyl acetate and ethanol oxidation, this effect being more evident in the case of ethyl acetate. For instance, the temperature for 100% conversion is about 210 °C when ethyl acetate is oxidised alone, and 250 °C or higher, when it is oxidised in mixtures with toluene. On the contrary, toluene oxidation is only slightly inhibited by the presence of ethyl acetate, while the presence of ethanol has a promoting effect. Concerning the mixtures of ethyl acetate and ethanol, both compounds have a mutual inhibitory effect, which is more evident in the case of ethyl acetate (the temperature for 100% conversion of ethyl acetate is about 45 °C higher when ethyl acetate is oxidised in mixtures with ethanol, while in the case of ethanol the corresponding increase is only 10 °C). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Drying of ethyl alcohol by extractive rectification and choosing a fractionating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, A.S.; Borisov, A.V.; Raskina, M.G. Chesnokov, B.B.

    1987-11-10

    Ethyl alcohol can be dried by extractive rectification with monoethylene glycol more efficiently than with the triethylene glycol used industrially. The extractive rectification of ethyl alcohol does not require stabilization of the column with the distillate of dried alcohol, which can only worsen the process characteristics. The required reflux ratio is generated as a result of absorption of ethyl alcohol vapor by the extractant. To reduce the water content of ethyl alcohol from 6 to 0.5 wt. % with a yield not less than 70% the rectifying section of the column must have not less than six theoretical plates.

  8. Growth and characterization of ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystals by modified vertical Bridgman technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, S. Siva Bala; Rajesh, N. P.; Suthan, T.

    2017-08-01

    The ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystals were grown by modified vertical Bridgman technique using two different temperature profiles. The grown ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate crystals were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies is used to identify the functional groups of the grown ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate. The thermal behaviour of the ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate was analyzed by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis. The grown crystals were subjected to UV-Vis-NIR, fluorescence, photoconductivity, Vickers microhardness, dielectric studies and these results were compared.

  9. Combined Ab Initio, Kinetic Modeling, and Shock Tube Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Ethyl Formate.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hongbo; Wu, Junjun; Ma, Liuhao; Ren, Wei; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2017-09-07

    The potential energy surfaces (PESs) and reaction rate constants of the unimolecular decomposition of ethyl formate (EF) were investigated using high-precision theoretical methods at the CCSD(T)/CBS(T-Q)//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated PESs of EF dissociation and molecular decomposition reactions indicate that the intramolecular H-shift to produce formic acid and ethylene is the dominant decomposition pathway. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for EF pyrolysis was constructed by incorporating the important reactions of EF and its radicals into an existing mechanism previously developed for small methyl esters. The updated mechanism was first used to reproduce CO, CO2, and H2O concentration time histories during EF pyrolysis in the shock tube reported by Ren et al. [ Ren , W. , Mitchell Spearrin , R. , Davidson , D. F. , and Hanson , R. K. J. Phys. Chem. A 2014 , 118 , 1785 - 1798 ]. The rate of production and sensitivity analyses show that the competing dehydration and decarboxylation channels of the intermediate formic acid control the final product yields of EF pyrolysis. The EF mechanism was further validated against the shock tube data of OH, CO, CO2, and H2O time histories measured during EF oxidation (equivalence ratio Φ = 1.0) at 1331-1615 K and 1.52-1.74 atm. This revised EF mechanism captured all of the species' time histories over the entire temperature range. Such modeling capability was due to the more accurate rate constants of EF reactions determined by high-precision theoretical calculations and a high-fidelity C0-C2 basis mechanism.

  10. Phellinus baumii ethyl acetate extract alleviated collagen type II induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Yayeh, Taddesse; Lee, Whi Min; Ko, Dukhwan; Park, Seung-Choon; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Hwa-Jin; Lee, In-Kyoung; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Hong, Seung-Bok; Kim, Suk; Yun, Bong-Sik; Rhee, Man Hee

    2013-10-01

    Mushrooms have a long history of dietary benefits in Asia due to their health-promoting effects. Phellinus baumii, a wild mushroom, has been reported to have anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory, anti-obesity and free radical scavenging activities. However, its anti-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) property remains poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the protective effect of Phellinus baumii ethyl acetate extract (PBEAE) against bovine collagen type II induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. PBEAE (50 and 150 mg/kg) reduced the CIA score and leukocyte count in draining lymph nodes (DLNs) and inflamed joints. PBEAE also attenuated the expressions of CD3⁺ (T cells), CD19⁺ (B cells), CD4⁺ (T-helper), CD8⁺ (T-cytotoxic), MHC class II/CD11c⁺ (antigen-presenting cells), double positives (B220⁺/CD23⁺ and CD3⁺/CD69⁺: early lymphocyte activation markers) and CD4⁺/CD25⁺ (activated T-helper) leukocyte subpopulations in DLNs. Likewise, CD3⁺ and Gr-1⁺CD11b⁺ (neutrophil) counts in inflamed joints were also decreased. Furthermore, PBEAE reduced the serum levels of anti-collagen type immunoglobulin G, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Taken together, PBEAE impaired cellular recruitment to the inflamed joint and alleviated CIA, and thus could be considered as a potential agent against rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Transesterification process to manufacture ethyl ester of rape oil

    SciTech Connect

    Korus, R.A.; Hoffman, D.S.; Bam, N.; Peterson, C.L.; Drown, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    A process for the production of the ethyl ester of winter rape [EEWR] for use as a biodiesel fuel has been studied. The essential part of the process is the transesterification of rape oil with ethanol, in the presence of a catalyst, to yield the ethyl ester of rape oil as a product and glycerin as a by-product. Experiments have been performed to determine the optimum conditions for the preparation of EEWR. The process variables were: (1) temperature, (2) catalyst, (3) rate of agitation, (4) water content of the alcohol used, and (5) the amount of excess alcohol used. The optimum conditions were: (1) room temperature, (2) 0.5% sodium methoxide or 1% potassium hydroxide catalyst by weight of rapeseed oil, (3) extremely vigorous agitation with some splashing during the initial phase of the reaction and agitation was not necessary after the reaction mixture became homogeneous, (4) absolute ethanol was necessary for high conversion, and (5) 50% excess ethanol with NaOCH{sub 3} or 100% excess with KOH gave a maximum conversion. Viscosity, cloud point and pour point of the EEWR were measured. A preliminary break-even cost for the commercial production of EEWR was found to be $0.55/liter [$2.08/US gallon].

  12. Influence of Body Mass Index on Hair Ethyl Glucuronide Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Crunelle, Cleo L; Neels, Hugo; Maudens, Kristof; De Doncker, Mireille; Cappelle, Delphine; Matthys, Frieda; Dom, Geert; Fransen, Erik; Michielsen, Peter; De Keukeleire, Steven; Covaci, Adrian; Yegles, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) concentrations in hair is increasingly used to estimate the consumption of alcohol of the prior months. Linear correlations between the amount of alcohol consumed and the concentration of EtG in hair have been reported, and several variables that may influence this correlation have been investigated: e.g. cosmetic hair treatments, gender influences or hair color. Here, we investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI) on this correlation. A post hoc analysis on the influence of BMI on the relation between amounts of alcohol consumed and the measured EtG concentrations in hair in 199 participants. Our data show higher EtG concentrations in participants with high BMI (≥25) compared to participants with low BMI (<25) (P = 0.001) across a wide range of amounts of alcohol consumed. We conclude that BMI should be taken into account when interpreting hair EtG concentrations. Ethyl glucuronide concentrations in hair (hEtG) can be used to estimate the consumption of alcohol of the prior months. Body mass index (BMI) influences this relation and BMI should be taken into account when interpreting hEtG concentrations in participants with high BMI (≥25) compared to participants with low BMI (<25). © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of ethyl glucuronide in blood spotted on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Kaufmann, E; Thoma, D; Thierauf, A; Weinmann, W; Skopp, G; Alt, A

    2011-07-15

    This study aims to show that sensitive detection of ethyl glucuronide in dried blood spotted onto various surfaces after a period of 24h is feasible. At present, there is insufficient information how tightly ethyl glucuronide (EtG) binds to various materials and how easily it can be eluted. 4ml aliquots of blood samples obtained from seven volunteers after consumption of alcoholic beverages were applied to six different surfaces. After drying and a 24h-storage at 20±2°C the samples were re-dissolved in water, and EtG was subsequently analyzed by a LC-MS Paul-type ion trap. A comparison was made between dried and corresponding fluid samples. EtG was detectable in all subjects' samples following consumption of alcohol. EtG was also detectable after a storage time of four weeks at 4°C in whole blood that had been preserved with EDTA. EtG was detectable in all samples dried on different surfaces and its concentration remained relatively constant irrespective of the particular condition of the material. Detection of EtG in blood spots from the scene may indicate recent alcohol consumption in cases where collection of blood remained undone or could not be performed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Discovery and Optimization of Isoquinoline Ethyl Ureas as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Philippe; Bruyère, Thierry; Blumstein, Anne-Catherine; Bur, Daniel; Chambovey, Alain; Ertel, Eric A; Gude, Markus; Hubschwerlen, Christian; Jacob, Loïc; Kimmerlin, Thierry; Pfeifer, Thomas; Prade, Lars; Seiler, Peter; Ritz, Daniel; Rueedi, Georg

    2017-05-11

    Our strategy to combat resistant bacteria consisted of targeting the GyrB/ParE ATP-binding sites located on bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and not utilized by marketed antibiotics. Screening around the minimal ethyl urea binding motif led to the identification of isoquinoline ethyl urea 13 as a promising starting point for fragment evolution. The optimization was guided by structure-based design and focused on antibacterial activity in vitro and in vivo, culminating in the discovery of unprecedented substituents able to interact with conserved residues within the ATP-binding site. A detailed characterization of the lead compound highlighted the potential for treatment of the problematic fluoroquinolone-resistant MRSA, VRE, and S. pneumoniae, and the possibility to offer patients an intravenous-to-oral switch therapy was supported by the identification of a suitable prodrug concept. Eventually, hERG K-channel block was identified as the main limitation of this chemical series, and efforts toward its minimization are reported.

  15. Dissociative photoionization of ethyl acrylate: Theoretical and experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yanlin; Chen, Jun; Ding, Mengmeng; Wei, Bin; Cao, Maoqi; Shan, Xiaobin; Zhao, Yujie; Huang, Chaoqun; Sheng, Liusi; Liu, Fuyi

    2015-08-01

    The photoionization and dissociation of ethyl acrylate have been investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source in the range of 9.0-20.0 eV. The photoionization mass spectrum (PIMS) for ethyl acrylate and photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for its major fragment ions: C5H7O2+, C4H5O2+, C3H5O2+, C3H4O+, C3H3O+, C2H5O+, C2H3O+, C2H5+ and C2H4+ have been obtained. The formation channels of main fragments are predicted by Gaussian 09 program at G3B3 level and examined via their dissociation energies from experimental results. Based on our analysis, nine main dissociative photoionization channels are proposed: C5H7O2+ + H, C4H5O2+ + CH3, C3H5O2+ + C2H3, C3H4O+ + C2H4O, C3H3O+ + C2H5O, C2H5O+ + C3H3O, C2H3O+ + C3H5O, C2H5+ + C3H3O2, C2H4+ + C3H4O2, respectively. The results of this work lead to a better understanding of photochemistry in the environment.

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Etbe) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In August 2013, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for ETBE to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in comments on the following: Draft literature search strategies The approach for identifying studies The screening process for selecting pertinent studies The resulting list of pertinent studies Preliminary evidence tables The process for selecting studies to include in evidence tables The quality of the studies in the evidence tables The literature search strategy, which describes the processes for identifying scientific literature, contains the studies that EPA considered and selected to include in the evidence tables. The preliminary evidence tables and exposure-response arrays present the key study data in a standardized format. The evidence tables summarize the available critical scientific literature. The exposure-response figures provide a graphical representation of the responses at different levels of exposure for each study in the evidence table. The draft Toxicological Review of Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether.

  17. Growth of glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride and its characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, G.; Pari, S.

    2016-11-01

    Single crystal of glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride by slow evaporation method is reported. The grown crystal characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, UV-Vis-NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is established that the crystal falls under the monoclinic system and space group P21/c with the cell parameters as: a=8.565 Å, b=12.943 Å, c=6.272 Å, α=γ=90°, β=103.630º. UV-Vis-NIR spectrum shows indirect allowed transition with a band gap of 5.21 eV and other optical properties are measured. The crystal is also shown to have a high transmittance in the visible region. The third order nonlinear property and optical limiting have been investigated using Z-Scan technique. Complex impedance spectrum measured at the dc conductivity. Dependence of dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity on frequency at different temperature of applied ac field is analyzed. The mechanical behavior has been assessed by Vickers microhardness indenter. The thermal behavior of glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride was analyzed using TG/DTA thermal curves. From the thermal study, the material was found to possess thermal stability up to 174 °C. The predicted NLO properties, UV-Vis transmittance and Z-scan studies indicate that is an attractive material for photonics optical limiting applications.

  18. Ethyl sulphate: a direct ethanol metabolite reflecting recent alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Dresen, Sebastian; Allen, John P; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Graf, Marc; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2006-02-01

    Ethyl sulphate (EtS), a direct ethanol metabolite, appears to offer potential as a biomarker for recent alcohol consumption. Although its window of assessment is similar to that of ethyl glucuronide (EtG), there are differences between the two markers in their pathways for formation and degradation. (a) To assess the excretion of EtS compared to EtG and ethanol in drinking experiments with healthy volunteers, and (b) to elucidate the possibility of using the two metabolites for monitoring abstinence in substance use disorder patients during rehabilitation treatment. (a) Nine drinking experiments were performed by six healthy volunteers (two females, four males), with a mean age of 34.1 years (20-62), average oral intake of 0.2 g/kg ethanol (0.1-0.61), and having 74 spot urine samples. (b) Thirty-six substance abuse patients (mean age 41.9 years, 20-59; 22 males, 14 females) in a rehabilitation programme after withdrawal, producing 98 urine samples. Ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate were measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using d5-EtG and d5-EtS, respectively, as an internal standard. (a) EtG and EtS were detectable for up to 36 hours and reached the limits of determination in urine at 20.6 hours and 21.2 hours (median), respectively, after ethanol intake. EtG-100 (standardized to a creatinine of 100 mg/dl) reached its maximum level at 2.8 hours and EtS-100 at 2.1 hours (median) after the beginning of the experiment. Of the ethanol ingested, 0.022% was excreted as EtS in one volunteer. Eight samples were positive for EtS only and six for EtG only. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 0.84 (P < 0.0001) between EtG and EtS and 0.87 (P < 0.0001) between EtG-100 and EtS-100 were found. (b) of the 98 urine samples evaluated, 27 were positive for EtS and of these only 20 were also positive for EtG. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 0.84 (P < 0.0001) between EtG and EtS and 0.82 (P < 0.0001) between EtG-100 and Et

  19. Quenching and radical formation in the reaction of photoexcited benzophenone with thiols and thioethers (sulfides). Nanosecond flash studies

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser flash measurements have been made of rate constants and primary radical yields in the reactions of triplet benzophenone with aliphatic and aromatic thiols and with dialkyl and aryl alkyl sulfides. Reaction with n-pentylthiol in benzene leads mainly to quenching, with k/sub ir/ = 9 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and radical yield (ketyl) = 0.14; with mesitylene-2 thiol in benzene k/sub ir/ = 7 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and hydrogen transfer is efficient, radical yield (ketyl) approx. 1.0. In reactions with both p-chlorophenyl ethyl and diisopropyl sulfides, k/sub ir/ increases and radical yield (ketyl) decreases with increasing solvent polarity. Values of k/sub ir/ are higher and those of radical yield (ketyl) are lower for the dialkyl than for the aryl alkyl sulfide. Results are discussed in terms of rapid interaction of the triplet with S, followed by quenching and/or hydrogen transfer. Quenching without hydrogen transfer occurs to a much greater extent with sulfides and aliphatic thiols than with amines.

  20. Free radical scavenging activity of Kielmeyera variabilis (Clusiaceae).

    PubMed

    Coqueiro, Aline; Regasini, Luis Octávio; Skrzek, Scheila Cristina Gutkoski; Queiroz, Marcos Marçal Ferreira; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan

    2013-02-19

    As part of our ongoing research on antioxidant agents from Brazilian flora, we screened the free radical scavenging activity of two extracts and eight fractions of Kielmeyera variabilis (Clusiaceae) using DPPH· (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl-hydrate) and ABTS·+ [2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylenebenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] colorimetric assays. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of the leaves of K. variabilis displayed the strongest activity (IC₅₀ of 3.5 ± 0.3 and 4.4 ± 0.2 μg mL⁻¹ for DPPH· and 6.6 ± 0.4 and 3.1 ± 0.1 μg mL⁻¹ for ABTS·+, respectively). Chromatographic fractionation of the most potent fractions led to identification of three flavonols with previously described antioxidant activity, quercitrin (1), quercetin-3-O-β-glucoside (3), and quercetin-3-O-β-galactoside (4), and of one biflavone, podocarpusflavone A (2). This is the first time that the presence of these flavonoids in Kielmeyera variabilis has been reported.

  1. Urinary incontinence following radical vulvectomy.

    PubMed

    Reid, G C; DeLancey, J O; Hopkins, M P; Roberts, J A; Morley, G W

    1990-05-01

    Although incontinence has been reported after radical vulvectomy, its relationship to operative technique, anatomy, and treatment has not been defined. Twenty-one patients having vulvectomies for vulvar cancer were prospectively evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with urodynamic function studies. A portion of the urethra was removed in four patients undergoing radical vulvectomy, and 14 had a vulvectomy excision that came within 1 cm of the distal urethra. Six patients (28%) developed a change of continence, with three developing total incontinence, two stress incontinence, and one urge incontinence. All four patients who had a portion of the urethra excised developed stress or total incontinence. The other two patients with incontinence (one total, one urge) had the vulvectomy excision that came close to the urethra. No patient had a change in continence when surgery did not involve or come close to the urethra. When the four patients with a distal urethral resection were compared with patients in whom the urethra was not excised, there was a significant decrease postoperatively in functional urethral length (P less than .0001), anatomical urethral length (P less than .0001), and distal urethral pressure transmission ratios in Q3 (P = .004), Q4 (P = .02), and Q5 (P = .005); but no difference in urethral support (Q-tip test), flow rates, residual urine, bladder capacity, maximal urethral pressure, resting closure pressure, or squeeze pressure. Histologic examination of urethral specimens demonstrated that a portion of the compressor urethrae muscle was often excised. Radical vulvectomy by itself does not cause incontinence, but it would appear that removal of a portion of the urethra increases the chance of incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  5. Neuroprotective strategies in radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Jonathan D; Mulhall, John P

    2005-01-01

    In this section, authors from New York give their views on the various neuroprotective strategies for patients having a radical prostatectomy, such as the use of nerve grafts and other approaches. A joint study from Korea, the USA, Canada and the UK is presented in a paper on the importance of patient perception in the clinical assessment and management of BPH. There is also a review of robotic urological surgery. Finally, authors from New York give a review on the life of Isaac Newton. This is a new historical review in the journal, but one that will be of general interest.

  6. Preparation of biocompatible sterically stabilized latexes using well-defined poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) macromonomers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Bannister, Iveta; Armes, Steven P; Lewis, Andrew L

    2010-04-06

    A range of well-defined methacrylic macromonomers based on the biomimetic monomer 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) in alcoholic media using 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl-2-bromoisobutyrylamide. This tertiary amine-functionalized initiator was used to produce homopolymer precursors of various chain lengths via ATRP. These polymerizations were relatively well controlled (M(w)/M(n) < or = 1.30), provided that the target degree of polymerization (DP) did not exceed 30. For higher target DPs, polymerization was only poorly controlled and characterized by broad molecular weight distributions (M(w)/M(n) = 1.50-2.31). The tertiary amine end-group of each nearly monodisperse homopolymer precursor was then quaternized using 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4-VBC) to afford the corresponding styrene-functionalized macromonomers. PMPC(30) macromonomer proved to be an effective reactive steric stabilizer for the formation of polystyrene latexes when employed at 10 w/w % on the basis of the styrene monomer. Nearly monodisperse submicrometer-sized and micrometer-sized latexes were prepared by aqueous emulsion and alcoholic dispersion polymerization, respectively, as judged by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies. In contrast, attempted alcoholic dispersion polymerization conducted either in the presence of the PMPC(30) homopolymer precursor or in the absence of any macromonomer always resulted in macroscopic precipitation. Such control experiments confirmed the importance of the terminal styrene groups on the macromonomer chains for successful latex formation. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of the PMPC(30) macromonomer within the polystyrene latex, and XPS studies indicated that these stabilizer chains are located at (or very near) the latex surface, as expected. Using PMPC(20) and PMPC(10) macromonomers for the alcoholic dispersion polymerization of styrene led to latexes with

  7. Favoured conformations of methyl isopropyl, ethyl isopropyl, methyl tert-butyl, and ethyl tert-butyl 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)malonate.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Fernando; Silva, Paul; Bunton, Clifford A; Garland, María Teresa; Baggio, Ricardo

    2008-07-01

    The conformations of organic compounds determined in the solid state are important because they can be compared with those in solution and/or from theoretical calculations. In this work, the crystal and molecular structures of four closely related diesters, namely methyl isopropyl 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)malonate, C(25)H(25)O(4)P, ethyl isopropyl 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)malonate, C(26)H(27)O(4)P, methyl tert-butyl 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)malonate, C(26)H(27)O(4)P, and ethyl tert-butyl 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)malonate, C(27)H(29)O(4)P, have been analysed as a preliminary step for such comparative studies. As a result of extensive electronic delocalization, as well as intra- and intermolecular interactions, a remarkably similar pattern of preferred conformations in the crystal structures results, viz. a syn-anti conformation of the acyl groups with respect to the P atom, with the bulkier alkoxy groups oriented towards the P atom. The crystal structures are controlled by nonconventional hydrogen-bonding and intramolecular interactions between cationoid P and acyl and alkoxy O atoms in syn positions.

  8. Determination of the main hydrolysis product of O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, in human serum.

    PubMed

    Katagi, M; Nishikawa, M; Tatsuno, M; Tsuchihashi, H

    1997-02-21

    For the unequivocal proof of the use of a nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX), a rapid, accurate and sensitive method which allows us to identify its main hydrolysis product ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) in human serum was explored by GC-MS. GC-MS analysis was performed after solvent extraction with acetonitrile in acidic conditions from the serum sample, which was previously deproteinized by micro-ultrafiltration, and subsequent tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatization with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% tert.-butyldimethylsilyl chloride (t-BDMSC). Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range from 50 to 500 ng/ml for EMPA in the full-scan EI mode and from 5 to 50 ng/ml for EMPA in the SIM EI mode. The relative standard deviation obtained at a sample concentration of 50 ng/ml was 8.4% in the full-scan mode and 7.3% in the SIM mode. Upon applying the full-scan EI and CI mode, 40 ng/ml and 80 ng/ml were the detection limits. Using the SIM-EI mode, in which the ion at m/z 153 was chosen, the limit was 3 ng/ml.

  9. Two mechanisms for toxic effects of hydroxylamines in human erythrocytes: involvement of free radicals and risk of potentiation.

    PubMed

    Evelo, C T; Spooren, A A; Bisschops, R A; Baars, L G; Neis, J M

    1998-09-01

    The toxic potency of three industrially used hydroxylamines was studied in human blood cells in vitro. The parent compound hydroxylamine and the O-ethyl derivative gave very similar results. Both compounds induced a high degree of methemoglobin formation and glutathione depletion. Cytotoxicity was visible as Heinz body formation and hemolysis. High levels of lipid peroxidation occurred, in this respect O-ethyl hydroxylamine was more active than hydroxylamine. In contrast H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation was lowered after O-ethyl hydroxylamine or hydroxylamine treatment, this is explained by the ferrohemoglobin dependence of H2O2 induced radical species formation. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NADPH methemoglobin reductase (NADPH-HbR) activities were also impaired, probably as a result of the radical stress occurring. The riboflavin availability was decreased. Other enzyme activities glutathione reductase (GR), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), glucose phosphate isomerase and NADH methemoglobin reductase, were not or only slightly impaired by hydroxylamine or O-ethyl hydroxylamine treatment. A different scheme of reactivity was found for N,O-dimethyl hydroxylamine. This compound gave much less methemoglobin formation and no hemolysis or Heinz body formation at concentrations up to and including 7 mM. Lipid peroxidase induction was not detectable, but could be induced by subsequent H2O2 treatment. GST and NADPH-HbR activities and riboflavin availability were not decreased. On the other hand GR and G6PDH activities were inhibited. These results combined with literature data indicate the existence of two different routes of hematotoxicity induced by hydroxylamines. Hydroxylamine as well as O-alkylated derivatives primarily induce methemoglobin, a process involving radical formation. The radical stress occurring is probably responsible for most other effects. N-alkylated species like N,O-dimethyl hydroxylamine primarily lead to inhibition of the protective

  10. Spectroscopic detection, characterization and dynamics of free radicals relevant to combustion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Terry

    2015-06-04

    Combustion chemistry is enormously complex. The chemical mechanisms involve a multitude of elementary reaction steps and a comparable number of reactive intermediates, many of which are free radicals. Computer simulations based upon these mechanisms are limited by the validity of the mechanisms and the parameters characterizing the properties of the intermediates and their reactivity. Spectroscopy can provide data for sensitive and selective diagnostics to follow their reactions. Spectroscopic analysis also provides detailed parameters characterizing the properties of these intermediates. These parameters serve as experimental gold standards to benchmark predictions of these properties from large-scale, electronic structure calculations. This work has demonstrated the unique capabilities of near-infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy (NIR CRDS) to identify, characterize and monitor intermediates of key importance in complex chemical reactions. Our studies have focussed on the large family of organic peroxy radicals which are arguably themost important intermediates in combustion chemistry and many other reactions involving the oxidation of organic compounds. Our spectroscopic studies have shown that the NIR Ã - ˜X electronic spectra of the peroxy radicals allows one to differentiate among chemical species in the organic peroxy family and also determine their isomeric and conformic structure in many cases. We have clearly demonstrated this capability on saturated and unsaturated peroxy radicals and β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. In addition we have developed a unique dual wavelength CRDS apparatus specifically for the purpose of measuring absolute absorption cross section and following the reaction of chemical intermediates. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by measuring the cross-section and self-reaction rate constant for ethyl peroxy.

  11. Comparison of formalin-ethyl ether sedimentation, formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation, and zinc sulfate flotation techniques for detection of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Truant, A L; Elliott, S H; Kelly, M T; Smith, J H

    1981-01-01

    Formalin-ethyl ether sedimentation, Formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation, and zinc sulfate flotation techniques were compared using over 250 clinical parasitology specimens. Fifty positive specimens were identified, and a variety of parasites, including amoebae, flagellates, cestodes, nematodes, and trematodes, were encountered. The Formalin-ether and Formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation procedures gave identical results for the detection of cysts, ova, and larvae, and these methods offered an advantage over the flotation procedure for the detection of selected ova. However, the zinc sulfate procedure was more effective for the detection of protozoan cysts, Hymenolepis nana, and hookworm eggs. The results indicate that the Formalin-ethyl acetate procedure provides a suitable alternative to the Formalin-ether method, and they demonstrate the value of using both flotation and sedimentation procedures in the analysis of fecal specimens for parasites. PMID:7240400

  12. Vibrational state distribution and relaxation of vinoxy radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hongmei; Bersohn, Richard

    2001-07-01

    The vinoxy radical ṡCH2CHO is a product of the reaction of O(3P) atoms with terminal alkenes and can also be made by photodissociation of an alkyl vinyl ether. In either case it is formed in a vibrationally excited state. The nascent radical displays a rich electronic spectrum to the red of its X→B band origin consisting of bands originating from vibrationally excited states. Some transitions, true "hot bands," terminate on the vibrationless B state; others, sequence bands, terminate on vibrationally excited B states. The spectra become unobservably weak at a certain energy. The difference between that energy and the energy of the band origin is roughly the maximum vibrational energy in the radical. This is 5600 cm-1 for the vinoxy produced by photodissociation of ethyl vinyl ether at 193 nm and 3200 cm-1 for the product of the reaction of O(3P) with ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and 1-pentene. There is a remarkable cooling of the vibrations as the hydrocarbon chain lengthens. The average vibrational energy of the vinoxy product of the reaction O(3P) with ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and 1-pentene is 2100, 1800, 1570, and 1180 cm-1, respectively. This cooling implies that the reaction complex lives long enough for internal vibrational relaxation to occur. The average vibrational energy in the reaction-produced vinoxy is small, which implies that there is considerable kinetic energy. The time dependence of the intensity of the hot bands measures the relaxation rates of different energies, some of which are the energies of a single vibrational state. The ground-state population increases monotonically to an asymptote. The population of most states grows with time and then decays. The growth is due to a cascading from upper states. The populations of the highest energy states decay monotonically; the still higher energy states are almost unpopulated. These results prove that the relaxation proceeds stepwise. The magnitude of the step, ˜200-300 cm-1, can be

  13. Determination of Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenols of Wine and Spices: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Lugemwa, Fulgentius Nelson; Snyder, Amanda L.; Shaikh, Koonj

    2013-01-01

    Thirty eight bottles of red wine (Carbanet Sauvignon) were randomly selected based on vintage, region, price, and age (number of months in a barrel). The total phenolic content of each wine was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Apart from a few bottles that exhibited above average radical scavenging activity and phenolic content, there was no good correlation of those two quantities with region, price or vintage. The average phenolic amount was 2874 mg/L. The lowest phenolic content was found to be 1648 mg/L for an eight dollar wine. Wine with the highest amount of phenol of 4495 mg/L was a 2007, nine dollar bottle from South America. High amount of phenols did not translate into high radical scavenging activity. Barrel-aging did not increase the amount of phenols or the radical scavenging activity of wine. In order to discover new and potent sources of antioxidants from plants, the following spices were studied: ginger, cilantro, cumin, anise, linden, eucalyptus, marjoram, oregano, sage, thyme and rosemary. Whole spices were crushed and extracted for 96 h at room temperature using a combination of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 4.5:4.5:1 (v/v/v). The radical scavenging activity of extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The total phenolic content of each spice was also determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. Eucalyptus was found to be the most potent antioxidant with an LC50 of 324.1 mg of phenol/L, followed by marjoram with an LC50 of 407.5 mg of phenol/L, and rosemary with an LC50 of 414.0 mg/L. The least potent antioxidants were ginger and cilantro with LC50 of 7604 mg/L of phenol and 7876 mg of phenol/L, respectively. PMID:26784340

  14. Continuous hot pressurized solvent extraction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging compounds from Taiwan yams (Dioscorea alata).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Tu, Yu-Xun; Wu, Cheng-Tar; Jong, Ting-Ting; Chang, Chieh-Ming J

    2004-04-07

    This study investigates a semicontinuous hot pressurized fluid extraction process and the scavenging activity on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical of the extract from Taiwan yams (Dioscorea alata). Liquid-liquid extractions were preliminarily employed to generate six fractions, initially extracted by ethanol. Then, the aqueous solution of dried crude ethanol extract was sequentially fractionated by hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The EC50 value was defined as the UV absorption of DPPH concentrations sufficiently decreased to 50% of the original value. It was found that all peel portions have a better effect on scavenging of the DPPH free radical than meat portions, especially for the ethyl acetate partition of the peel portion of Tainung #2 yam. Its EC50 value (14.5 microg mL(-1)) was even lower than that of ascorbic acid (21.4 microg mL(-1)). Furthermore, semicontinuous hot pressurized ethanol was superior to hot pressurized water in extracting the compound scavenging the DPPH radical from the Purpurea-Roxb peel. The recovery of four unknown compounds corresponded to the scavenging ratio of DPPH free radical in the hot pressurized ethanol extract. Finally, three-level and four-factor experimental design revealed that ethanol ratio and temperature were the most effective factors in order. Conditions of 80% of aqueous ethanol, 20.0 kg/kg solid ratio, 180 psig (1.342 MPa), and 100 degrees C were preferred to extract those antioxidants from the yam peel.

  15. Bioinspired terpene synthesis: a radical approach.

    PubMed

    Justicia, José; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Campaña, Araceli G; Miguel, Delia; Jakoby, Verena; Gansäuer, Andreas; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    This tutorial review highlights the development of radical-based bioinspired synthesis of terpenes from the initial proposal to the development of modern catalytic methods for performing such processes. The power of the radical approach is demonstrated by the straightforward syntheses of many natural products from readily available starting materials. The efficiency of these processes nicely complements the described cationic polyolefin cyclisations and even suggests that modern radical methods provide means to improve upon nature's synthetic pathways.

  16. Emergence of oxyl radicals as selective oxidants.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (HO*) are derived in Fenton reaction with ferrous salt and H2O2 in acid medium, and at neutral pH, metal-oxyl radicals (M-O*) predominate. Evidence is accumulating that M-O* radicals are also active in oxidation reactions, in addition to metal-oxo (M=O) now shown in many publications. Reactivity of these radicals gives selective oxidized products useful in cellular activities, in contrast to purported indiscriminate cell damage by hydroxyl radicals. Reactions with vanadium compounds, such as diperoxovanadate, peroxo-bridged mixed valency divanadate, vanadium-oxyl radical, tetravalent vanadyl and decavanadate illustrates selective gain in oxidative capacity of oxo- and oxyl- species. Occurrence of ESR signals typical of hydroxyl radicals is demonstrated in cell homogenates and tissue perfusates treated with spin trap agents. It is known for a long time lipid peroxides are formed in tissue microsomal systems exclusively in presence of salts of iron, among many metals tested. Oxygen and a reducing agent, ascorbate (non-enzymic) or NADPH (enzymic) are required to produce 'ferryl', the chelated Fe=O active form (possibly Fe-O* and Fe-O-O-Fe ?) for the crucial step of H-atom abstraction. Yet literature is replete with unsupported affirmations that hydroxyl radicals initiate lipid peroxidation, an unexplained fixation of mindset. The best-known *OH generator, a mixture of ferrous salt and H2O2, does not promote lipid peroxidation, nor do the many hydroxyl radical quenching agents stop it. The availability of oxo and oxyl-radical forms with transition metals, and also with non metals, P, S, N and V, calls for expansion of vision beyond superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and explore functions of multiple oxygen radicals for their biological relevance.

  17. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOEpatents

    Springston, Stephen R.; Lloyd, Judith; Zheng, Jun

    2007-10-23

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

  18. Laser induced photoluminescence spectroscopy of cometary radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.; Cody, R. J.; Sabety-Dzvonik, M.

    1976-01-01

    Flash photolysis together with laser excitation of the product fragments was used in laboratory studies of cometary radicals. The LIPS method has been applied to the CN radical to determine: (1) Radiative lifetimes of individual rotational levels in the zeroth vibrational level of the B state; (2) energy partitioning during photodissociation of C2N2; and (3) vibrational and rotational excitation during formation of CN radicals in the photodissociation of dicyanoacetylene.

  19. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  20. Formation of free radicals during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Rolfsen, W; Svensson, B; Ollinger, K; Lundgren, B

    1993-04-01

    During phacoemulsification cavitation bubbles are formed. These bubbles are believed to be one source of damage to corneal endothelium seen after phacoemulsification. Free radicals are induced whenever cavitation bubbles implode. The aim of this study was to confirm the initiation of free radicals by phacoemulsification and to correlate the power of ultrasound in the phacoemulsification process to the amount of free radicals formed, using both in vitro and in vivo techniques. The formation of free radicals was determined by adding luminol to a buffer and measuring the chemoluminescence in vitro and in rabbit eyes (Lumacounter 2080 or a single-photon-counting apparatus) during phacoemulsification. The data obtained show that free radicals are formed during phacoemulsification and that the amount of free radicals correlates with the power of ultrasound. Furthermore, the radical formation could be inhibited by the radical scavengers SOD, Healon and Healon GV. These results were achieved both in vitro in the test tube and in vivo in rabbit eyes. By showing that the addition of SOD to the irrigation buffer during phacoemulsification decreases the corneal endothelial cell damage, we show that free radicals could have a role in postoperative complications seen clinically.