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Sample records for etiologic viral strains

  1. Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Panama: fatal endemic disease and genetic diversity of etiologic viral strains.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2009-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961-2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America.

  2. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-31

    function in viral gastroenteritis. Ann.Int.Med. 22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino , T.A., Schreiber, D.S., Trier, J.S., Kapikian, A.Z., Blacklow, N.R.: Clin- ical...subclinical illness. 8. Parrino , T.A., Schreiber, D.S., Trier, J.S., Kapikian, A.Z., Blacklow, N.R.: Clinical immunity in acute gastroenteritis caused...gastric motor function in viral gastroenteritis. Ann.Int.Med. 22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino , T.A., Schreiber,D.S.,Trier,J.S.,Kapikian,A.Z.,Blacklow, N.R

  3. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-31

    gastroenteritis. Ann.Int.Med. 22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino , T.A.,Schreiber, D.S., Trier, J.S.,Kapikian, A.Z.,Blacklow, N.R.:Clin- ical immunity in acute...gastric motor function in viral gastroenteritis. Ann.Int.Med. 22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino , T.A., Schreiber’ D.S.,Trier,J.S.,Kapikian,A.Z.,Blacklow

  4. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-31

    22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino ,T.A.,Schreiber,D.S.,Trier,J.S.,Kapikian,A.Z.,Blacklow,N.R.: Clinical immunity in acute gastroenteritis caused by Norwalk...for evidence of infection with Norwalk virus. Such studies have already shown the epidemiologic importance of Norwalk 8. Parrino ,T.A.,Schreiber,D.S...function in viral gastroenteritis. Ann.Int.Med. 22:370-373,1980. 8. Parrino , T.A., Schreiber, D.S., Trier, J.S.,Kapikian,A.Z.,Blacklow,N.R.: Clini- cal

  5. Zika Fetal Neuropathogenesis: Etiology of a Viral Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klase, Zachary A.; Khakhina, Svetlana; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Zika virus epidemic in the Americas and the observed association with both fetal abnormalities (primary microcephaly) and adult autoimmune pathology (Guillain–Barré syndrome) has brought attention to this neglected pathogen. While initial case studies generated significant interest in the Zika virus outbreak, larger prospective epidemiology and basic virology studies examining the mechanisms of Zika viral infection and associated pathophysiology are only now starting to be published. In this review, we analyze Zika fetal neuropathogenesis from a comparative pathology perspective, using the historic metaphor of “TORCH” viral pathogenesis to provide context. By drawing parallels to other viral infections of the fetus, we identify common themes and mechanisms that may illuminate the observed pathology. The existing data on the susceptibility of various cells to both Zika and other flavivirus infections are summarized. Finally, we highlight relevant aspects of the known molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication. PMID:27560129

  6. Viral carcinogenesis: revelation of molecular mechanisms and etiology of human disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    The RNA and DNA tumor viruses have made fundamental contributions to two major areas of cancer research. Viruses were vital, first, to the discovery and analysis of cellular growth control pathways and the synthesis of current concepts of cancer biology and, second, to the recognition of the etiology of some human cancers. Transforming retroviruses carry oncogenes derived from cellular genes that are involved in mitogenic signalling and growth control. DNA tumor viruses encode oncogenes of viral origin that are essential for viral replication and cell transformation; viral oncoproteins complex with cellular proteins to stimulate cell cycle progression and led to the discovery of tumor suppressors. Viral systems support the concept that cancer development occurs by the accumulation of multiple cooperating events. Viruses are now accepted as bona fide etiologic factors of human cancer; these include hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomaviruses, human T-cell leukemia virus type I and hepatitis C virus, plus several candidate human cancer viruses. It is estimated that 15% of all human tumors worldwide are caused by viruses. The infectious nature of viruses distinguishes them from all other cancer-causing factors; tumor viruses establish long-term persistent infections in humans, with cancer an accidental side effect of viral replication strategies. Viruses are usually not complete carcinogens, and the known human cancer viruses display different roles in transformation. Many years may pass between initial infection and tumor appearance and most infected individuals do not develop cancer, although immunocompromised individuals are at elevated risk of viral-associated cancers. Variable factors that influence viral carcinogenesis are reviewed, including possible synergy between viruses and environmental cofactors. The difficulties in establishing an etiologic role for a virus in human cancer are discussed, as well as the different approaches that proved

  7. Viral Etiologies of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Among Egyptian Children under Five Years of Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-13

    authors thank Dr. Dean Erdman from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Atlanta, GA for providing the primers/probes and protocol...Etiology of acute respiratory tract infections among children in a combined community and hospital study in Rio de Janeiro. Clin Infect Dis 1995, 20(4...Garcia-Garcia ML, Blanco C, Vazquez MC, Frias ME, Perez-Brena P, Casas I: Multiple simultaneous viral infections in infants with acute respiratory

  8. Sports related hamstring strains--two cases with different etiologies and injury sites.

    PubMed

    Askling, C; Tengvar, M; Saartok, T; Thorstensson, A

    2000-10-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries in sports. Knowledge about their etiology and localization is, however, limited. The two cases described here both had acute hamstring strains, but the etiologies were entirely different. The sprinter was injured when running at maximal speed, whereas the hamstring strain in the dancer occurred during slow stretching. Also the anatomical localizations of the injuries clearly differed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed pathological changes in the distal semitendinosus muscle in the sprinter and the proximal tendon of the semimembranosus muscle in the dancer. Subjectively, both athletes severely underestimated the recovery time. These case observations suggest a possible link between etiology and localization of hamstring strains.

  9. Etiology and Viral Genotype in Patients with End-Stage Liver Diseases admitted to a Hepatology Unit in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan-Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Jaramillo, Sergio; Norder, Helene; Pujol, Flor Helene; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are the principal risk factor associated to end-stage liver diseases in the world. A study was carried out on end-stage liver disease cases admitted to an important hepatology unit in Medellin, the second largest city in Colombia. From 131 patients recruited in this prospective study, 71% of cases were diagnosed as cirrhosis, 12.2% as HCC, and 16.8% as cirrhosis and HCC. Regarding the risk factors of these patients, alcohol consumption was the most frequent (37.4%), followed by viral etiology (17.6%). Blood and/or hepatic tissue samples from patients with serological markers for HCV or HBV infection were characterized; on the basis of the phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5′ UTR and HBV S gene, isolates belonged to HCV/1 and HBV/F3, respectively. These results confirm the presence of strains associated with poor clinical outcome, in patients with liver disease in Colombia; additionally, HBV basal core promoter double mutant was identified in HCC cases. Here we show the first study of cirrhosis and/or HCC in Colombian and HBV and HCV molecular characterization of these patients. Viral aetiology was not the main risk factor in this cohort but alcohol consumption. PMID:21941645

  10. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for cancer: stress or viral etiology?

    PubMed

    Cebioglu, Melanie; Schild, Hans H; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder. Currently over 230 million patients demonstrate already an epidemic scale of the disease. It is a lifelong progressive disease with a high mortality worldwide: every 10 seconds one patient dies on DM-related consequences. Whereas cardio-vascular complications are well-known for DM, it is relatively new consideration that diabetic patients are highly predisposed to cancer. Particularities of molecular pathomechanisms of cancer in diabetes are currently largely unclear. Disturbed glucose/insulin homeostasis is DM-specific stress factor resulting in increased production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and oxidative damage to chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA frequently observed in diabetic patients. Long-term accumulation of DNA mutations is well-acknowledged as triggering cancer. DNA-repair is highly energy consuming process which provokes increased mitochondrial activity. Particularly dangerous is a provoked activity of damaged mitochondria which leads to the "vicious circle" lowing energy supply and potentiating ROS production. Mitochondrial dysfunction is the well-acknowledged risk factor for neuro/degenerative diseases--one of possible pathomechanisms for various complications developed secondary to diabetes. At the same time, mitochondrial dysfunction might be implicated in pathomechanisms of diabetes-provoked cancer. There is a growing body of evidence that DM predisposes to almost all cancer types with some particular preferences. Frequently suffering from compromised immune response, diabetic patients is high-risk group for infectious disorders including viral infections. In its turn, viral infections are known to be implicated in cancer pathology. This review considers both stress and viral infections as possible etiology of cancer in diabetes.

  11. [Repetitive strain injury (RSI): occurrence, etiology, therapy and prevention].

    PubMed

    Bongers, P M; de Vet, H C W; Blatter, B M

    2002-10-19

    In the Netherlands, work related upper-limb disorders are called Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI). RSI is not a diagnosis but a catch-all term for symptoms and signs located in the neck, upper back, shoulder, arm, elbow, hand, wrist and fingers. These symptoms may include pain, stiffness, tingling, clumsiness, loss of co-ordination, loss of strength, skin discoloration and temperature differences. Each year, 8% of working Dutch citizens take time off work due to RSI symptoms. Although the number of people claiming disability benefit due to RSI is limited, this figure has risen consecutively over the last three years. There is consensus that repetitive work at a high frequency and possibly accompanied by exertion of force is accompanied by RSI symptoms. There are indications of a relation between visual display unit use and these symptoms. However, these relations have not been established in a longitudinal study of adequate quality. High perceived job stress and a high workload are thought to be related to RSI, and women report more symptoms than men. There is insufficient information available on the role of different coping styles, perfectionism and dealing with symptoms. There is little information on the underlying mechanisms in the development of RSI, the diagnostics, therapy and prevention. In view of the lack of clear diagnostic criteria, suggestions have been made for a standardised description of the symptoms involved in the syndrome. A multidisciplinary treatment is likely to have the most effect. In terms of prevention, an integrated approach aimed at improving the working posture, reduction of static load and job stress and at individual factors is assumed to be the most effective.

  12. Viral etiology and seasonality of influenza-like illness in Gabon, March 2010 to June 2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Central Africa began only recently, and few data are therefore available on the circulation of influenza virus and other respiratory viruses. In Gabon, a Central African country, we established a surveillance network in four major towns in order to analyze cases of ILI among patients who visited health centers between March 2010 and June 2011, and to determine the viral etiology. Methods Nasal swabs were sent for analysis to the Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, where they were screened for 17 respiratory viruses in a multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for all pathogens according the following pairs: adenovirus/parainfluenza virus 4, respiratory syncytial virus/human metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 1/parainfluenza virus 2, pandemic influenza virus A/seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1, H3N2)/seasonal influenza virus B, human coronaviruses 229E/OC43, human coronaviruses NL63/HKU1, rhinovirus/human parechovirus, and enterovirus/parainfluenza virus 3. Results We analyzed a total of 1041 specimens, of which 639 (61%) were positive for at least one virus. Three-quarters of the patients were children under five years old. We therefore focused on this age group, in which 68.1% of patients were positive for at least one virus. The most common viruses were adenoviruses (17.5%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) 1–4 (16.8%), enteroviruses (EV) (14.7%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (13.5%), and influenza virus (11.9%). The prevalence of some viruses was subject to geographic and seasonal variations. One-third of positive samples contained more than one virus. Conclusions Like most studies in the world, the virus PIVs, EV, RSV, Influenza virus, HRV were predominant among children under five years old in Gabon. An exception is made for adenoviruses which have a high prevalence in our study. However adenoviruses can be detected in asymptomatic

  13. Viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases in Rio de Janeiro: first two years of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Sutmoller, F.; Nascimento, J. P.; Chaves, J. R. S.; Ferreira, V.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study was undertaken to establish the incidence and possible viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases among the child population of a shanty town in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrated that nearly half of all the illnesses seen were respiratory infections, 10% of them affecting the lower respiratory tract. Viruses were isolated from 20% of the throat swabs collected. Of the viruses identified, 47% were adenoviruses, 25% were enteroviruses, 9% were influenza A, 8% herpes simplex, 7% parainfluenza, 3% respiratory syncytial and 1% influenza B viruses. PMID:6606500

  14. Viral diversity of Junín virus field strains.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Sandra E; Stephan, Betina I; Iserte, Javier A; Contigiani, Marta S; Lozano, Mario E; Tenorio, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    The Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever, an endemic disease present in a much of Argentina, is caused by the Junín virus (JUNV). Currently, there are sequences available from several strains of this virus, like those belonging to the vaccine lineage (XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1), as well as MC2 (rodent isolate) and IV4454 (human isolate). In this article, we report sequence information on two fragments of genomic segment S of viral isolates from the endemic area. A Nested-RT-PCR was used to amplify discrete genomic regions of 13 isolates of rodent and human origin. The bioinformatics studies revealed a great homogeneity of sequences among the JUNV isolates. The phylogenetic classification showed greater evolutionary distance between the old world arenaviruses (Lassa and LCM virus) than between the new world arenaviruses (JUNV and Machupo virus).

  15. Etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and prevalence of markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in north India*

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, B. N.; Gandhi, B. M.; Joshi, Y. K.

    1984-01-01

    The etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and the prevalence of serological markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in healthy persons in north India were studied. Hepatitis A virus was found to be the most common cause of acute hepatitis in children (67%). It was a less frequent cause of this disease in adults (14%). Hepatitis A virus was only rarely the cause of acute (12%) and subacute (4%) liver failure. It was recorded as the etiological agent in an epidemic among schoolchildren. Exposure to hepatitis A virus occurs in early childhood, and by the age of 10 years, 90% of healthy persons have serological evidence of hepatitis A virus infection. Hepatitis non-A non-B virus was the cause of acute hepatitis in 44% of adults and 24% of children with this disease. This virus was also the most important etiological agent in acute liver failure (55%) and subacute hepatic failure (51%). It was the cause of all the hepatitis epidemics in the general population. Only 9% of hepatitis cases in children were due to hepatitis B virus whereas 42% of cases in adults were attributable to this virus. Hepatitis B virus was the causative agent in 33% of cases of acute hepatic failure and 45% of cases of subacute hepatic failure. The carrier rate for hepatitis B virus was 5% and antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was found in up to 38% of specific population groups. PMID:6424958

  16. Does the prostate retain an endogenous antiviral defense system suggesting a past viral etiology for cancer?

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Marvin; Hollowell, Courtney M P; Guinan, Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Evidence of viral infection of the prostate is presented, and consists of viral isolation as well as antigen and genomic detection of integrated or episomal forms. Prior infection from "ancient" exogenous retroviruses is suggested by residual endogenous forms. The presence of an antiviral defense system based upon interferon induction has been suggested for the testes. I suggest that a similar system is also present in the prostate. Prostate cell lines (or tissue) can be tested directly for expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, enhanced expression should be induced by IFN inducers such as bispecific oligonucleotides having double stranded regions or poly I:C. RNA can be extracted and RT-PCR performed using commercially available primers for gamma interferon. Evidence for the presence of an interferon based anti-viral system would be indicated not only by interferon expression, but also its enhanced expression following exposure to the inducers. Gamma interferon is primarily associated with lymphocytic expression and immune regulation. Demonstration of its controlled expression in non-immune cells would support the hypotheses suggested here.

  17. Speculations on the viral etiology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Conant, M A

    1984-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) appeared in the United States in late 1978 and has spread at an epidemic rate through the four major coastal cities of this country. The disease appears to show the same epidemiologic distribution as hepatitis B virus infection, and for this reason, most investigators feel that this new disease is caused by a blood-borne sexually transmitted virus. A number of viral agents have been suggested as the cause of AIDS, but to date, no virus has been consistently isolated. The most likely candidate is a retrovirus that has recently been introduced into the human population and has found its way into two extremely high-risk groups, namely, promiscuous male homosexuals and intravenous drug abusers. The relationship between Kaposi's sarcoma and cytomegalovirus is still unclear, but evidence is mounting that cytomegalovirus may be the agent that initiates this multifocal malignancy. Multiple factors must be involved in this process. It is known that some immunosuppressed individuals develop Kaposi's sarcoma, which completely resolves when the immunosuppression is reversed; however, in individuals with classical Kaposi's sarcoma, the profound degree of helper T-cell depression that characterizes the acquired immune deficiency syndrome is not seen.

  18. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  19. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Gedi A.; Ahmed, Jamal A.; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010–2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5–14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15–24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp. PMID:26458776

  20. Mate-Pair Sequencing as a Powerful Clinical Tool for the Characterization of Cancers with a DNA Viral Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses are known to be associated with a variety of different cancers. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a family of viruses and several of its sub-types are classified as high-risk HPVs as they are found to be associated with the development of a number of different cancers. Almost all cervical cancers appear to be driven by HPV infection and HPV is also found in most cancers of the anus and at least half the cancers of the vulva, penis and vagina, and increasingly found in one sub-type of head and neck cancers namely oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Our understanding of HPVs role in cancer development comes from extensive studies done on cervical cancer and it has just been assumed that HPV plays an identical role in the development of all other cancers arising in the presence of HPV sequences, although this has not been proven. Most invasive cervical cancers have the HPV genome integrated into one or more sites within the human genome. One powerful tool to examine all the sites of HPV integration in a cancer but that also provides a comprehensive view of genomic alterations in that cancer is the use of next generation sequencing of mate-pair libraries produced from the DNA isolated. We will describe how this powerful technology can provide important information about the genomic organization within an individual cancer genome, and how this has demonstrated that HPVs role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is distinct from that in cervical cancer. We will also describe why the sequencing of mate-pair libraries could be a powerful clinical tool for the management of patients with a DNA viral etiology and how this could quickly transform the care of these patients. PMID:26262638

  1. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1e Strain Isolated in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hanspeter; Bachofen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain Carlito. It belongs to the subgenotype 1e that is described in Europe only and represents the second most prevalent subgenotype in Switzerland. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1e. PMID:26067971

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Giammarioli, Monica; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-02-23

    We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h. PMID:28232427

  5. Genotypic characteristics of bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 strains isolated in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, M; Harasawa, R; Zecconi, A; Luzzago, C

    2001-09-01

    Two strains of Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2) were isolated from calves in northern Italy. Variations in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of the genome were studied by primary structure alignment and neighbor-joining method based phylogenetic tree analyses and by palindromic nucleotide substitutions at the three variable loci in the 5'-UTR. Genetic analysis indicated their appurtenance to genovar BVDV-2a. Nucleotide sequence at the 5'-UTR of strain BS-95-II, one of the Italian isolates from healthy calves, showed 98% homology to that of the Japanese isolate OY89, a cytopathic strain derived from cattle with mucosal disease.

  6. Clinical correlations of human cytomegalovirus strains and viral load in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eliana; Ozaki, Kikumi Suzete; Tomiyama, Helena; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Granato, Celso Francisco Hernandes

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about clinical differences associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by distinct strains in renal transplant patients. Different clinical pictures may be associated with specific viral genotypes, viral load, as well as host factors. The objective of this study was to identify CMV strains to determine viral load (antigenemia), and their correlation with clinical data in renal transplant recipients. Seventy-one patients were enrolled, comprising 91 samples. After selection, polymorphonuclear cells were used to amplify and sequence the gB region of CMV DNA. The sequences were analyzed to ascertain the frequency of different genotypes. Additionally, the results of this study showed that the gB coding gene presents a great variability, revealing a variety of patterns: classical gB1 (1.4%), gB1V (46.4%), classical gB2 (35.2%), gB2V (2.8%), gB3 (1.4%), classical gB4 (4.9%) and gB4V (4.9%). The mean viral load in kidney transplant patient was 75.1 positive cells (1-1000). A higher viral load was observed in patients with genotype 4 infection. Statistically significant differences were detected between gB1 and gB4 (p=0.010), and between gB2 and gB4 (p=0.021). The average numbers of positive cells in relation to clinical presentation were: 34.5 in asymptomatic, 49.5 in CMV associated syndrome and 120.7 in patients with invasive disease (p=0.048). As a group, gB1 was the most frequent strain and revealed a potential risk for developing invasive disease. Viral load also seemed to be important as a marker associated with clinical presentation of the disease.

  7. Distribution pattern of bovine viral diarrhoea virus strains in intensive cattle herds in Italy.

    PubMed

    Luzzago, C; Bandi, C; Bronzo, V; Ruffo, G; Zecconi, A

    2001-11-26

    The genetic variation of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was studied by comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of 26 Italian field strains collected during the period 1995-2000 in 18 cattle herds. A fragment within the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was sequenced directly from gel-purified products obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. BVDV-1b (n=14), -1c (n=1), -1d (n=1) and BVDV-2 (n=2) strains have been isolated. Most herds were infected by BVDV-1b. Pairwise similarity and cluster analysis of the remaining BVDV-1 isolates (n=8) did not provide a clear-cut assignation to defined BVDV-1 groups. This is the first time that a BVDV-2 isolation was reported in Italy. Among BVDV-2 reference strains, Italian BVDV-2 isolates showed the highest sequence similarity with the CD87 strain. Both BVDV-2 strains were isolated in two healthy animals from different herds. The 5'-UTR sequence of one of the two BVDV-2 strains was identical to a German BVDV field strain. Complete nucleotide homology was found only among BVDV strains isolated from the same herd, showing a herd-specific clustering. Moreover, 99.6% homology was observed between strains from herds linked by livestock trade. Despite the small number of BVDV isolates analysed, it revealed a high level of genetic diversity among Italian field BVDV strains.

  8. Timing of the emergence of new successful viral strains in seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Omori, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2013-07-21

    High evolvability of influenza virus and the complex nature of its antagonistic interaction with the host immune system make it difficult to predict which strain of virus will become epidemic next and when it will emerge. To investigate the most likely time at which a new successful strain emerges every year in seasonal influenza, we use an individual-based model that takes into account the seasonality in transmission rate and host cross-immunity against a current viral strain due to previous infections with other strains. Our model deals with antigenic evolution of influenza virus that originated by point mutations at amino acid sites that constitute epitope and is driven by host immune response. Under the range of parameters by which influenza virus shows a "trunk" shape in its phylogenetic tree, as is typical in influenza A virus evolution, we find that most successful mutant strains emerge in an early part of the epidemic season, and that the time when the number of infected hosts reaches a maximum tends to be more than one season after viral emergence. This carryover of the epidemic peak timing implies that we can predict the strain that will become dominant in the epidemic in the following year.

  9. The peritoneal macrophage inflammatory profile in cirrhosis depends on the alcoholic or hepatitis C viral etiology and is related to ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of ascites in cirrhotic patients generally heralds a deterioration in their clinical status. A differential gene expression profile between alcohol- and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis has been described from liver biopsies, especially those associated with innate immune responses. The aim of this work was to identify functional differences in the inflammatory profile of monocyte-derived macrophages from ascites in cirrhotic patients of different etiologies in an attempt to extrapolate studies from liver biopsies to immune cells in ascites. To this end 45 patients with cirrhosis and non-infected ascites, distributed according to disease etiology, HCV (n = 15) or alcohol (n = 30) were studied. Cytokines and the cell content in ascites were assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytokines and ERK phosphorylation in peritoneal monocyte-derived macrophages isolated and stimulated in vitro were also determined. Results A different pattern of leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity and differences in the primed status of macrophages in cirrhosis were observed depending on the viral or alcoholic etiology. Whereas no differences in peripheral blood cell subpopulations could be observed, T lymphocyte, monocyte and polymorphonuclear cell populations in ascites were more abundant in the HCV than the alcohol etiology. HCV-related cirrhosis etiology was associated with a decreased inflammatory profile in ascites compared with the alcoholic etiology. Higher levels of IL-10 and lower levels of IL-6 and IL-12 were observed in ascitic fluid from the HCV group. Isolated peritoneal monocyte-derived macrophages maintained their primed status in vitro throughout the 24 h culture period. The level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation was higher in ALC peritoneal macrophages at baseline than in HCV patients, although the addition of LPS induced a greater increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HCV than in ALC patients. Conclusions The

  10. Etiological epidemiology of viral diarrhea on the basis of sentinel surveillance in children younger than 5 years in Gansu, northwest China, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Meng, Lei; Li, Juansheng; Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Yana; Yu, Deshan; Ren, Xiaowei; Liu, Haixia; Shen, Xiping; Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaobin; Wei, Kongfu; Pei, Hongbo; Kang, Qian

    2015-12-01

    To explore the etiological spectrum of diarrhea and its epidemiological characteristics in diarrhea symptoms surveillance cases younger than 5 years from 2009 to 2013 in Gansu province, northwest China. Systematic diarrhea symptoms surveillance were conducted in 27 sentinel sites in Gansu province and outpatients with three or more loose, watery, or sticky pus stools per day were defined as surveillance cases. All stool specimens were tested for Rotavirus, Human calicivirus, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus. Totally, 1,119 cases (51.54%) were identified as any enteric virus. The average isolation rate of Rotavirus was 51.13%, Astrovirus was 10.84%, Adenovirus was 6.94%, and Human calicivirus was 6.60% (P < 0.01). Rotavirus was identified with the highest frequency among these enteric pathogens except in 2011, with a notable downward trend over time (P < 0.01). Rotavirus A was the most proportion in rotavirus, G3P[8] and G9P[8] were the most common combination. Rotavirus mixed Human calicivirus infections was the most common mixed infected patterns. Viral-positive rate was higher among children aged group of 0-12 and 13-24 months (P < 0.01, respectively). The isolation rates of four enteric viral pathogens showed a similar distinct seasonal variation with a higher rate in spring, autumn, and winter months. Rotavirus was the major epidemiological viral pathogen in diarrhea symptom surveillance cases in Gansu province, northwest China, during period 2009-2013. Seasonal and age-related variations were observed in enteric viral pathogen isolation rate. The comprehensive and continuous surveillance is needed to identify the prevalence of different enteric viral pathogens.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Virulent Strain AUSTRAL-005 of Piscirickettsia salmonis, the Etiological Agent of Piscirickettsiosis

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Cristian; Haro, Ronie E.; Sanchez, Patricio; Isla, Adolfo; Mendoza, Julio; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Trombert, Annette; Silva, Andrea X.; Cárcamo, Juan G.; Figueroa, Jaime; Polanco, Victor; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a lethal pathogen of farmed salmonids, Piscirickettsia salmonis strain AUSTRAL-005. This virulent strain was isolated in 2008 from Oncorhynchus mykiss farms, and multiple genes involved in pathogenicity, environmental adaptation, and metabolic pathways were identified. PMID:25323708

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Virulent Strain AUSTRAL-005 of Piscirickettsia salmonis, the Etiological Agent of Piscirickettsiosis.

    PubMed

    Yañez, Alejandro J; Molina, Cristian; Haro, Ronie E; Sanchez, Patricio; Isla, Adolfo; Mendoza, Julio; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Trombert, Annette; Silva, Andrea X; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime; Polanco, Victor; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Olavarría, Víctor H

    2014-10-16

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a lethal pathogen of farmed salmonids, Piscirickettsia salmonis strain AUSTRAL-005. This virulent strain was isolated in 2008 from Oncorhynchus mykiss farms, and multiple genes involved in pathogenicity, environmental adaptation, and metabolic pathways were identified.

  13. Genetic variety of bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 strains isolated from sheep.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Harasawa, Ryô

    2004-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2) strains, isolated from sheep showing clinical symptoms of border disease, have been evaluated by the palindromic nucleotide substitution (PNS) method at the three variable loci (V1, V2 and V3) in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of genomic RNA. The characteristic two base-pairings common to the BVDV-2 species, a C-G pairing which was common to the V1 locus, and a G*U pairing common to the V2 locus, were observed in all tested strains. Strains BD-78 and C413 were identified by a unique C-G pairing at position 4 from the bottom of the V2 stem region, which is characteristic to BVDV-2b. BVDV-2d characteristic U-A pairing at position 18 of the V1 stem region was observed in five strains, Lees, 167 237, 168 149, 173 157 and 175 375. No strains have been assigned to the genotypes BVDV-2a or BVDV-2c. Furthermore, the investigation at the level of the 5'-UTR excluded the application in sheep of the proposed BVDV-2 genetic virulence markers described in cattle. The two specific positions of uracil and cytosine nucleotides related to low or high virulence where indifferently present in the ovine BVDV-2 strains responsible of border disease.

  14. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Sergeev, Alexander A.; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1e Strain, SLO/2407/2006, Isolated in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Kuhar, Urška; Kušar, Darja; Papić, Bojan; Koren, Simon; Toplak, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) subgenotype 1e was isolated for the first time in Slovenia in 2006. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of BVDV-1e, strain SLO/2407/2006. The published genome will increase our understanding of the molecular characteristics of the BVDV-1e strains circulating in Europe. PMID:27856597

  16. Did medieval trade activity and a viral etiology control the spatial extent and seasonal distribution of Black Death mortality?

    PubMed

    Bossak, Brian H; Welford, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Recent research into the world's greatest recorded epidemic, the Medieval Black Death (MBD), has cast doubt on Bubonic Plague as the etiologic agent. Prior research has recently culminated in outstanding advances in our understanding of the spatio-temporal pattern of MBD mortality, and a characterization of the incubation, latent, infectious, and symptomatic periods of the MBD. However, until now, several mysteries remained unexplained, including perhaps the biggest quandary of all: why did the MBD exhibit inverse seasonal peaks in mortality from diseases recorded in modern times, such as seasonal Influenza or the Indian Plague Epidemics of the early 1900 s? Although some have argued that climate changes likely explain the observed differences between modern clinical Bubonic Plague seasonality and MBD mortality accounts, we believe that another factor explains these dissimilarities. Here, we provide a synthetic hypothesis which builds upon previous theories developed in the last ten years or so. Our all-encompassing theory explains the causation, dissemination, and lethality of the MBD. We theorize that the MBD was a human-to-human transmitted virus, originating in East-Central Asia and not Africa (as some recent work has proposed), and that its areal extent during the first great epidemic wave of 1347-1350 was controlled hierarchically by proximity to trade routes. We also propose that the seasonality of medieval trade controlled the warm-weather mortality peaks witnessed during 1347-1350; during the time of greatest market activity, traders, fairgoers, and religious pilgrims served as unintentional vectors of a lethal virus with an incubation period of approximately 32 days, including a largely asymptomatic yet infectious period of roughly three weeks. We include a description of the rigorous research agenda that we have proposed in order to subject our theory to scientific scrutiny and a description of our plans to generate the first publicly available

  17. Viral and Atypical Bacterial Etiology of Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under 5 Years Old Living in a Rural Tropical Area of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Randriamarotia, Martin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Najjar, Josette; Vernet, Guy; Contamin, Bénédicte; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2012-01-01

    Background In Madagascar, very little is known about the etiology and prevalence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in a rural tropical area. Recent data are needed to determine the viral and atypical bacterial etiologies in children with defined clinical manifestations of ARIs. Methods During one year, we conducted a prospective study on ARIs in children between 2 to 59 months in the community hospital of Ampasimanjeva, located in the south-east of Madagascar. Respiratory samples were analyzed by multiplex real-time RT-PCR, including 18 viruses and 2 atypical bacteria. The various episodes of ARI were grouped into four clinical manifestations with well-documented diagnosis: “Community Acquired Pneumonia”(CAP, group I), “Other acute lower respiratory infections (Other ALRIs, group II)”, “Upper respiratory tract infections with cough (URTIs with cough, group III)”and “Upper respiratory tract infections without cough (URTIs without cough, group IV)”. Results 295 children were included in the study between February 2010 and February 2011. Viruses and/or atypical bacteria respiratory pathogens were detected in 74.6% of samples, the rate of co-infection was 27.3%. Human rhinovirus (HRV; 20.5%), metapneumovirus (HMPV A/B, 13.8%), coronaviruses (HCoV, 12.5%), parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 11.8%) and respiratory syncytial virus A and B (RSV A/B, 11.8%) were the most detected. HRV was predominantly single detected (23.8%) in all the clinical groups while HMPV A/B (23.9%) was mainly related to CAP (group I), HPIV (17.3%) to the “Other ALRIs” (group II), RSV A/B (19.5%) predominated in the group “URTIs with cough” (group III) and Adenovirus (HAdV, 17.8%) was mainly detected in the “without cough” (group IV). Interpretation This study describes for the first time the etiology of respiratory infections in febrile children under 5 years in a malaria rural area of Madagascar and highlights the role of respiratory viruses in a well clinically defined

  18. A live attenuated human metapneumovirus vaccine strain provides complete protection against homologous viral infection and cross-protection against heterologous viral infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Shu, Zhou; Qin, Xian; Dou, Ying; Zhao, Yao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    A live attenuated vaccine candidate strain (M2) of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) was generated by removing the N-linked carbohydrate at amino acid 172 in the fusion (F) protein. Previously, replication of M2 in mouse lungs could be detected by molecular assays but not by viral titration. In the present study, the protective effects of M2 against infection by homologous or heterologous viruses were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Immunization with M2 produced a high titer of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies in BALB/c mice at 4 and 8 weeks postimmunization, with the titers against the homologous virus being higher than those against the heterologous virus. Challenges at 4 and 8 weeks postinoculation with M2 or wild-type virus led to no replication when mice were challenged with a homologous virus and extremely reduced replication when mice were challenged with a heterologous virus, as determined by the detection of viral genomic RNA copies in the lungs, as well as significantly milder pulmonary pathology. Thus, M2, with only one N-linked carbohydrate removed in the F protein, provides complete protection from homologous virus infection and substantial cross-protection from heterologous virus infection for at least 56 days after inoculation. This vaccine strain may therefore be a candidate for further preclinical study. Furthermore, this attenuating strategy (changing the glycosylation of a major viral protein) may be useful in the development of other viral vaccines.

  19. Immune factors and viral interactions in brain cancer etiology and outcomes, The 2016 Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Woehrer, Adelheid; Wiemels, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) is an international consortium that aims to advance development of multicenter and interdisciplinary collaborations that focus on research related to the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors. The 17th annual BTEC meeting was held in Barcelona, Spain on June 21 – 23, 2016. The meeting focused on immune and viral factors that influence brain tumor development. Fundamentals of innate and adaptive immunity were reviewed, the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in primary and secondary brain tumors was addressed, vaccination strategies for glioma treatment were presented, and the potential contribution of immune dysfunction and viruses tropic for glial cells in gliomagenesis was discussed. Further contributions addressed the risk of non-ionizing radiation, molecular and birth characteristics on brain tumor induction/outcomes, and patterns of care and effects of different treatments on brain tumor survival in the real world setting. The next BTEC meeting will be held in June 2017 in Banff, Canada, and will focus on brain tumor epidemiology in the era of precision medicine. PMID:27546018

  20. Novel Trichoderma polysporum Strain for the Biocontrol of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Fungal Etiologic Agent of Bat White Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS), an emerging disease of hibernating bats, has rapidly spread across eastern North America killing millions of bats. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the sole etiologic agent of WNS, is widespread and persistent in bat hibernacula. Control of Pd in the affected sites is urgently needed to break the transmission cycle while minimizing any adverse impact on the native organisms. We isolated a novel strain of Trichoderma polysporum (Tp) from one of the caves at the epicenter of WNS zoonotic. Detailed experimental studies revealed: (1) Tp WPM 39143 was highly adapted to grow at temperatures simulating the cave environment (6°C-15°C), (2) Tp WPM 39143 restricted Pd colony growth in dual culture challenges, (3) Tp WPM 39143 caused four logs reduction of Pd colony forming units and genome copies in autoclaved soil samples from one of the WNS affected caves, (4) Tp WPM 39143 extract showed specific fungicidal activity against Pd in disk diffusion assay, but not against closely related fungus P. pannorum (Pp), (5) Tp WPM 39143 extract retained inhibitory activity after exposure to high temperatures, light and proteinase K, and (6) Inhibitory metabolites in Tp WPM 39143 extract comprised of water-soluble, high polarity compounds. These results suggest that Tp WPM 39143 is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a biocontrol agent of Pd in WNS affected sites. PMID:26509269

  1. Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strain 10JJ-SKR, Belonging to Genotype 1d.

    PubMed

    Joo, Soo-Kyung; Lim, Seong-In; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Song, Jae-Young; Oem, Jae-Ku; Mun, Seong-Hwan; An, Dong-Jun

    2013-08-08

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) belonging to genotype 1d, strain 10JJ-SKR, which was isolated from cattle. The complete genome is 12,267 nucleotides (nt) in length, with a single large open reading frame. This is the first report of a BVDV belonging to genotype 1d and will enable further study of the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of this virus.

  2. Identification of immune and viral correlates of norovirus protective immunity through comparative study of intra-cluster norovirus strains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Regev, Doron; Watanabe, Makiko; Hickman, Danielle; Moussatche, Nissin; Jesus, Desyree Murta; Kahan, Shannon M; Napthine, Sawsan; Brierley, Ian; Hunter, Robert N; Devabhaktuni, Divya; Jones, Melissa K; Karst, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not primary norovirus infections induce protective immunity has become a controversial issue, potentially confounded by the comparison of data from genetically distinct norovirus strains. Early human volunteer studies performed with a norovirus-positive inoculum initially led to the conclusion that primary infection does not generate long-term, protective immunity. More recently though, the epidemiological pattern of norovirus pandemics has led to the extrapolation that primary norovirus infection induces herd immunity. While these are seemingly discordant observations, they may in fact reflect virus strain-, cluster-, or genogroup-specific differences in protective immunity induction. Here, we report that highly genetically related intra-cluster murine norovirus strains differ dramatically in their ability to induce a protective immune response: Primary MNV-3 infection induced robust and cross-reactive protection, whereas primary MNV-1 infection induced modest homotypic and no heterotypic protection. In addition to this fundamental observation that intra-cluster norovirus strains display remarkable differences in protective immunity induction, we report three additional important observations relevant to norovirus:host interactions. First, antibody and CD4⁺ T cells are essential to controlling secondary norovirus infections. Second, the viral minor structural protein VP2 regulates the maturation of antigen presenting cells and protective immunity induction in a virus strain-specific manner, pointing to a mechanism by which MNV-1 may prevent the stimulation of memory immune responses. Third, VF1-mediated regulation of cytokine induction also correlates with protective immunity induction. Thus, two highly genetically-related norovirus strains displayed striking differences in induction of protective immune responses, strongly suggesting that the interpretation of norovirus immunity and vaccine studies must consider potential virus strain

  3. Evaluation of a fully human monoclonal antibody against multiple influenza A viral strains in mice and a pandemic H1N1 strain in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Song, Aihua; Myojo, Kensuke; Laudenslager, John; Harada, Daisuke; Miura, Toru; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kuni-Kamochi, Reiko; Soloff, Rachel; Ohgami, Kinya; Kanda, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. Frequent mutations of surface molecules, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), contribute to low efficacy of the annual flu vaccine and therapeutic resistance to standard antiviral agents. The populations at high risk of influenza virus infection, such as the elderly and infants, generally mount low immune responses to vaccines, and develop severe disease after infection. Novel therapeutics with high effectiveness and mutation resistance are needed. Previously, we described the generation of a fully human influenza virus matrix protein 2 (M2) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), Z3G1, which recognized the majority of M2 variants from natural viral isolates, including highly pathogenic avian strains. Passive immunotherapy with Z3G1 significantly protected mice from the infection when administered either prophylactically or 1-2days post infection. In the present study, we showed that Z3G1 significantly protected mice from lethal infection when treatment was initiated 3days post infection. In addition, therapeutic administration of Z3G1 reduced lung viral titers in mice infected with different viral strains, including amantadine and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Furthermore, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Z3G1 sustained O2 saturation and reduced lung pathology in monkeys infected with a pandemic H1N1 strain. Finally, de-fucosylated Z3G1 with an IgG1/IgG3 chimeric Fc region was generated (AccretaMab® Z3G1), and showed increased ADCC and CDC in vitro. Our data suggest that the anti-M2 mAb Z3G1 has great potential as a novel anti-flu therapeutic agent.

  4. Complete genome analysis of velogenic Newcastle disease virus reference strain "Chimalhuacan": evolution of viral lineages in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Absalón, Angel E; Mariano-Matías, Andrea; García, Laura J; Morales-Garzón, Andrés; Toscano-Contreras, Arnulfo; Lucio-Decanini, Eduardo; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2014-10-01

    Newcastle disease virus with velogenic characteristics circulates in the poultry industry in Mexico and various other American countries. In Mexico, vaccine efficacy testing to obtain commercial registration is reliant on a challenge with a velogenic strain known colloquially as Chimalhuacan due to the site where it was isolated. In this paper, we performed a full genome sequencing of the Chimalhuacan strain. The strain belongs to Class II of APMV, particularly genotype V. The viral RNA genome is 15,192 nt in size and contains six genes: 3' NP-P-M-F-HN-L 5'. The 3' leader sequence is 55 nt in size and the 5' trailer sequence 113 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence confirms a velogenic genotype with four basic amino acids at the cleavage site: (112)RRQKR(↓)F(117). In addition, evolutionary relatedness based on the gene sequence of the fusion protein indicates that this strain is the ancestor of the strains currently circulating in Mexico.

  5. Lipid composition of viral envelope of three strains of influenza virus – not all viruses are created equal

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Milne, Stephen B.; McClaren, Jennifer L.; Thomas, Paul G.; Brown, H. Alex

    2015-01-01

    While differences in the rate of virus fusion and budding from the host cell membrane have been correlated with pathogenicity, no systematic study of the contribution of differences in viral envelope composition has previously been attempted. Using rigorous virus purification, marked differences between virions and host were observed. Over 125 phospholipid species have been quantitated for three strains of influenza (HKx31- H3N2, PR8- H1N1, and VN1203- H5N1) grown in eggs. The glycerophospholipid composition of purified virions differs from that of the host or that of typical mammalian cells. Phosphatidylcholine is the major component in most mammalian cell membranes, while in purified virions phosphatidylethanolamine dominates. Due to its effects on membrane curvature, it is likely that the variations in its content are important to viral processing during infection. This integrated method of virion isolation with systematic analysis of glycerophospholipids provides a tool for the assessment of species specific biomarkers of viral pathogenicity. PMID:26448476

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against Aleutian disease virus distinguish virus strains and differentiate sites of virus replication from sites of viral antigen sequestration.

    PubMed Central

    Race, R E; Chesebro, B; Bloom, M E; Aasted, B; Wolfinbarger, J

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used to study antigenic differences among strains of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) and to characterize viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. A number of ADV field strains could be discriminated, and highly virulent Utah I ADV was clearly delineated from the tissue culture-adapted avirulent ADV-G strain. This specificity could be demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence against infected cultures of Crandell feline kidney cells or against tissues of Utah I ADV-infected mink. Viral antigens were demonstrated in both the nuclei and the cytoplasm of infected tissue culture cells. However, in mink mesenteric lymph node, spleen, and liver, viral antigen was observed only in the cytoplasm. Absence of nuclear fluorescence suggested that the detected antigen represented phagocytized viral antigens rather than replicating virus. This conclusion was supported by the finding that mAbs reactive only against low-molecular-weight polypeptides derived from intact viral proteins gave the same pattern of in vivo fluorescence as mAbs with broad reactivity for large or small (or both) viral polypeptides. The distribution of infected cells was the same as that described for macrophages in these tissues and suggested that cells of the reticuloendothelial system had sequestered viral antigens. Images PMID:3001352

  7. International trades, local spread and viral evolution: the case of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) strains heterogeneity in Italy.

    PubMed

    Franzo, Giovanni; Tucciarone, Claudia M; Dotto, Giorgia; Gigli, Alessandra; Ceglie, Letizia; Drigo, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 is one of the most widespread and economically relevant infections of swine. Four genotypes have been recognized, but currently, only three (PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2d) are effectively circulating. The widespread livestock trade and rapid viral evolution have contributed to determining the high heterogeneity of PCV2 and the dispersal of potentially more virulent strains. Italian swine farming and the related processing industry are relevant in the national economy. Despite the noteworthy losses associated with direct and control measure costs, no data are currently available on the molecular epidemiology of PCV2 in Italy. Our study, which was intended to fill this gap, considered 75 completed genome PCV2 sequences, which were obtained from samples collected from the highly densely populated area of Northern Italy between 2007 and 2014. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison with reference sequences demonstrated the co-circulation, with different prevalences, of PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2d within the national borders, with PCV2b being the most prevalent. Recombination between different genotypes was also proven to be frequent. Phylogeographic analysis demonstrated that the marked variability of Italian PCV2 strains can be attributable to multiple introduction events. The comparison of the phylogenetic analysis results, the location of different haplotypes and the international commercial routs of live pigs allow the speculation of several links as well as the role of Italy as both an importer and exporter of PCV2 haplotypes, mainly from and to European and Asian countries. A similarly intricate contact network was demonstrated within national borders, with different haplotypes being detected in the same province and different provinces harbouring the same haplotype. Overall, this paper represents the first description of PCV2 in Italy and demonstrates that the high variability of circulating Italian strains is due to multiple introduction events, wide

  8. A multi-strain Synbiotic may reduce viral respiratory infections in asthmatic children: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Ansari, Elham; Ganji, Toktam; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Khalesi, Maryam; Momen, Tooba; Kianifar, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    prednisolone use, outpatient visits, or hospital admissions. Conclusion This new synbiotic (a mixture of seven probiotic strains plus fructooligosacharide may reduce episodes of viral infection in asthmatic children. Trial registration This study is registered in Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials with registration number of IRCT201509234976N3. Funding This research was supported financially by the Research Council of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Grant Number: 911048). PMID:27790333

  9. Characterization of viral loads, strain and state of equine herpesvirus-1 using real-time PCR in horses following natural exposure at a racetrack in California.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Wilson, W David; Mapes, Samantha; Finno, Carrie; Isbell, Diane; Arthur, Rick M; Ferraro, Gregory L

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine viral loads, strain (neuropathogenic versus non-neuropathogenic) and state (lytic, non-replicating, latent) of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the blood and nasopharyngeal secretions of adult horses following natural exposure. The index case, a 4-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with confirmed EHV-1 myeloencephalopathy, as well as potentially exposed horses, were sampled over a period of 3 weeks. The study population comprised of 39 adult Thoroughbred horses and 35 adult "pony" and outrider horses of various breeds housed at a racetrack in Northern California. Blood samples and nasopharyngeal secretions (NPS) from all horses were tested on several occasions for EHV-1 DNA viral loads, targeting the glycoprotein B (gB) gene, viral strain, targeting the ORF 30 gene, and transcriptional activity of EHV-1, targeting the gB gene and latency-associated transcripts (LATs). Viral loads and transcriptional activity of the gB gene declined rapidly in the index case following antiviral treatment. The prevalence of EHV-1 infection in NPS determined by PCR slowly decreased over the 22 day study period from 25% to 14%. The initial surveillance showed multiple clusters of exposure, one associated with the index case and two related to horses that had recently returned from a different racetrack. Viral strain differentiation showed that only two horses (the index case and a neighboring horse) were infected with only a neuropathogenic strain, while all other horses were infected with either a non-neuropathogenic strain or were dually infected with both neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic strains. In most cases, the virus was present in either a lytic or a non-replicating form, while latent virus was found in blood and NPS much less frequently. The molecular approach used in this study showed promise for assessing the risk of exposing other horses to EHV-1 and for studying viral kinetics in

  10. Viral Strain Dependent Differences in Experimental Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (Junin Virus) Infection of Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    with hema- stains as Romero (P3235), Coronel (P3827), Espin - toxylin and eosin for light microscopy. dola (P3790), and Ledesma (P3406) strains. Blood...Gonzalez, P.H.: Maiztegui. J. I.: plaques. Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. Med. 130:1013 1019 Laguens, R.P.: Estudio morfologico de la medula (1969). osea humana en

  11. Host and geographic range extensions of the North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, R.P.; Batts, W.N.; Yun, S.; Traxler, G.S.; Kaufman, J.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from populations of Pacific sardine Sardinops sagaxfrom the coastal waters of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, and central and southern California, USA. The virus was also isolated from Pacific mackerel Scomber japonicus in southern California, from eulachon or smeltThaleichthys pacificus, and surf smelt Hypomesus pretiosus pretiosus from Oregon, USA. Mortality and skin lesions typical of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in other marine fish species were observed among sardine in Canada and in a few surf smelt from Oregon, but the remaining isolates of VHSV were obtained from healthy appearing fish. The prevalence of VHSV among groups of apparently healthy sardine, mackerel and smelt ranged from 4 to 8% in California and Oregon. A greater prevalence of infection (58%) occurred in groups of sardine sampled in Canada that sustained a naturally occurring epidemic during 1998-99. A captive group of surf smelt in Oregon exhibited an 81% prevalence of infection with clinical signs in only a few fish. The new isolates were confirmed as North American VHSV and were closely related based on comparisons of the partial nucleotide sequence of the glycoprotein (G) gene. The VHSV isolates from sardine in Canada and California were the most closely related, differing from isolates obtained from other marine fish species and salmonids in British Columbia, Canada, Alaska and Washington, USA. These new virus isolations extend both the known hosts (sardine, mackerel and 2 species of smelt) and geographic range (Oregon and California, USA) of VHSV.

  12. Interchange of L polymerase protein between two strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IV alters temperature sensitivities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Yusuff, Shamila; Vakharia, Vikram N; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-02

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) has four genotypes (I-IV) and sub-lineages within genotype I and IV. Using a reverse genetics approach, we explored the importance of the L gene for growth characteristics at different temperatures following interchange of the L gene within genotype IV (IVa and IVb) strains. VHSV strains harboring heterologous L gene were recovered and we show that the L gene determines growth characteristics at different temperatures in permissive cell lines.

  13. Spread of the Emerging Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Strain, Genotype IVb, in Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Mohamed; Shavalier, Megan; Kim, Robert K.; Millard, Elena V.; Gunn, Michelle R.; Winters, Andrew D.; Schulz, Carolyn A.; Eissa, Alaa; Thomas, Michael V.; Wolgamood, Martha; Whelan, Gary E.; Winton, James

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) emerged in the Laurentian Great Lakes causing serious losses in a number of ecologically and recreationally important fish species. Within six years, despite concerted managerial preventive measures, the virus spread into the five Great Lakes and to a number of inland waterbodies. In response to this emerging threat, cooperative efforts between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR), the Michigan State University Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory (MSU-AAHL), and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA-APHIS) were focused on performing a series of general and VHSV-targeted surveillances to determine the extent of virus trafficking in the State of Michigan. Herein we describe six years (2005–2010) of testing, covering hundreds of sites throughout Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. A total of 96,228 fish representing 73 species were checked for lesions suggestive of VHSV and their internal organs tested for the presence of VHSV using susceptible cell lines. Of the 1,823 cases tested, 30 cases from 19 fish species tested positive for VHSV by tissue culture and were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gene sequence analyses of all VHSV isolates retrieved in Michigan demonstrated that they belong to the emerging sublineage “b” of the North American VHSV genotype IV. These findings underscore the complexity of VHSV ecology in the Great Lakes basin and the critical need for rigorous legislation and regulatory guidelines in order to reduce the virus spread within and outside of the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed. PMID:22754647

  14. Significant differences in cell-cell fusion and viral entry between strains revealed by scanning mutagenesis of the C-heptad repeat of HIV gp41.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Aguilar, Barbara; Dewispelaere, Karen; Yi, Hyun Ah; Jacobs, Amy

    2013-05-21

    The transmembrane subunit, gp41, of the HIV envelope mediates the viral fusion step of entry into the host cell. The protein consists of an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The extracellular domain contains a fusion peptide, an N-terminal heptad repeat, a loop region, a C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR), and a membrane-proximal external region. For this study, we examined each amino acid in the CHR (residues 623-659) by alanine scanning mutagenesis in two HIV strains: one CCR5-utilizing strain (JRFL) and one CXCR4-utilizing strain (HXB2). We studied the functional importance of each amino acid residue by measuring mutational effects in both cell-cell fusion and viral entry and assessing envelope expression and gp120-gp41 proteolytic processing. The transmembrane subunit of the HIV envelope, gp41, is very sensitive to subtle changes, like alanine substitution, which severely affect envelope function at multiple sites. Two important general findings are apparent when the entire data set from this study is taken into account. (1) Strain HXB2 is much more stable to mutagenesis than strain JRFL, and (2) viral entry is much more stable to mutagenesis than cell-cell fusion. These findings strengthen our notion that gp41 is a vulnerable target for therapeutic and prophylactic intervention. Further structural studies aimed at gaining a full understanding of the intermediate states that drive HIV membrane fusion are imperative.

  15. Vaccination with a modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1a vaccine completely protected calves against challenge with BVDV type 1b strains.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Umbaugh, Jerry; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-12-10

    Vaccination plays a significant role in the control of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection and spread. Recent studies revealed that type 1b is the predominant BVDV type 1 subgenotype, representing more than 75% of field isolates of BVDV-1. However, nearly all current, commercially available BVDV type 1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. Previous studies have indicated that anti-BVDV sera, induced by BVDV-1a viruses, show less neutralization activity to BVDV-1b isolates than type 1a. Therefore, it is critically important to evaluate BVDV-1a vaccines in their ability to prevent BVDV-1b infection in calves. In current studies, calves were vaccinated subcutaneously, intradermally or intranasally with a single dose of a multivalent, modified-live viral vaccine containing a BVDV-1a strain, and were challenged with differing BVDV-1b strains to determine the efficacy and duration of immunity of the vaccine against these heterologous virus strains. Vaccinated calves, in all administration routes, were protected from respiratory disease caused by the BVDV-1b viruses, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding and greater white blood cell counts than non-vaccinated control animals. The BVDV-1a vaccine elicited efficacious protection in calves against each BVDV-1b challenge strain, with a duration of immunity of at least 6 months.

  16. Pattern of disease after murine hepatitis virus strain 3 infection correlates with macrophage activation and not viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, M; Rotstein, O; Cole, E; Sinclair, S; Parr, R; Cruz, B; Fingerote, R; Chung, S; Gorczynski, R; Fung, L

    1995-01-01

    Murine hepatitis virus strain (MHV-3) produces a strain-dependent pattern of disease which has been used as a model for fulminant viral hepatitis. This study was undertaken to examine whether there was a correlation between macrophage activation and susceptibility or resistance to MHV-3 infection. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from resistant A/J and susceptible BALB/cJ mice and, following stimulation with MHV-3 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), analyzed for transcription of mRNA and production of interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), mouse fibrinogen-like protein (musfiblp), tissue factor (TF), leukotriene B4, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Macrophages from BALB/cJ mice produced greater amounts of IL-1, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, leukotriene B4, and musfiblp following MHV-3 infection than macrophages from resistant A/J mice, whereas in response to LPS, equivalent amounts of IL-1, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, and TF were produced by macrophages from both strains of mice. Levels of mRNA of IL-1, TNF-alpha, and musfiblp were greater and more persistent in BALB/cJ than in A/J macrophages, whereas the levels and kinetics of IL-1, TNF-alpha, and TF mRNA following LPS stimulation were identical in macrophages from both strains of mice. Levels of production of PGE2 by MHV-3-stimulated macrophages from resistant and susceptible mice were equivalent; however, the time course for induction of PGE2, differed, but the total quantity of PGE2 produced was insufficient to inhibit induction of musfiblp, a procoagulant known to correlate with development of fulminant hepatic necrosis in susceptible mice. These results demonstrate marked differences in production of inflammatory mediators to MHV-3 infection in macrophages from resistant A/J and susceptible BALB/cJ mice, which may explain the marked hepatic necrosis and fibrin deposition and account for the lethality of MHV-3 in susceptible mice. PMID:7636967

  17. Proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 derivatives reveal highly conserved patterns of viral and cellular proteins in infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Reyda, Sabine; Büscher, Nicole; Tenzer, Stefan; Plachter, Bodo

    2014-01-07

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particle morphogenesis in infected cells is an orchestrated process that eventually results in the release of enveloped virions. Proteomic analysis has been employed to reveal the complexity in the protein composition of these extracellular particles. Only limited information is however available regarding the proteome of infected cells preceding the release of HCMV virions. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to address the pattern of viral and cellular proteins in cells, infected with derivatives of the AD169 laboratory strain. Our analyses revealed a remarkable conservation in the patterns of viral and of abundant cellular proteins in cells, infected for 2 hours, 2 days, or 4 days. Most viral proteins increased in abundance as the infection progressed over time. Of the proteins that were reliably detectable by mass spectrometry, only IE1 (pUL123), pTRS1, and pIRS1 were downregulated at 4 days after infection. In addition, little variation of viral proteins in the virions of the different viruses was detectable, independent of the expression of the major tegument protein pp65. Taken together these data suggest that there is little variation in the expression program of viral and cellular proteins in cells infected with related HCMVs, resulting in a conserved pattern of viral proteins ultimately associated with extracellular virions.

  18. Enhancing epidemiological analysis of intercontinental dispersion of H5N1 viral strains by migratory waterfowl using phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercontinental migratory waterfowl are the primary vectors for dispersion of H5N1 viruses and have been implicated in several zoonotic epidemics and pandemics. Recent investigations have established that with a single mutation, the virus gains the ability to transmit between humans. Consequently, there is a heightened urgency to identify innovative approaches to proactively mitigate emergent epidemics. Accordingly, a novel methodology combining temporo-geospatial epidemiology and phylogeographic analysis of viral strains is proposed to identify critical epicenters and epidemic pathways along with high risk candidate regions for increased surveillance. Results Epidemiological analysis was used to identify 91,245 candidate global infection transmission pathways between 22 high risk waterfowl species. Dominant infection pathways (25,625 and 54,500 in summering and wintering zones) were identified through annotation using phylogeographical data computed from the phylogram of 2417 H5N1 HA isolates (from GISAID EpiFlu database). Annotation of infection pathways in turn delineated 23 influential clades out of 130 clades in the phylogram. Conclusions The phylogeographic analyses provides strong cross-validation of epidemic pathways and identifies the dominant pathways for use in other epidemiological and prophylactic studies. The temporo-geospatial characteristics of infection transmission provides corroborating, but novel evidence for rapid genesis of H5N1 lineages in S.E. Asia. The proposed method pinpoints several regions, particularly in the southern hemisphere, as candidates for increased surveillance. PMID:25374610

  19. The Modes of Evolutionary Emergence of Primal and Late Pandemic Influenza Virus Strains from Viral Reservoir in Animals: An Interdisciplinary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Dany

    2011-01-01

    Based on a wealth of recent findings, in conjunction with earliest chronologies pertaining to evolutionary emergences of ancestral RNA viruses, ducks, Influenzavirus A (assumingly within ducks), and hominids, as well as to the initial domestication of mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), wild boar (Sus scrofa), and wild horse (Equus ferus), presumed genesis modes of primordial pandemic influenza strains have multidisciplinarily been configured. The virological fundamentality of domestication and farming of those various avian and mammalian species has thereby been demonstrated and broadly elucidated, within distinctive coevolutionary paradigms. The mentioned viral genesis modes were then analyzed, compatibly with common denominators and flexibility that mark the geographic profile of the last 18 pandemic strains, which reputedly emerged since 1510, the antigenic profile of the last 10 pandemic strains since 1847, and the genomic profile of the last 5 pandemic strains since 1918, until present. Related ecophylogenetic and biogeographic aspects have been enlightened, alongside with the crucial role of spatial virus gene dissemination by avian hosts. A fairly coherent picture of primary and late evolutionary and genomic courses of pandemic strains has thus been attained, tentatively. Specific patterns underlying complexes prone to generate past and future pandemic strains from viral reservoir in animals are consequentially derived. PMID:23074663

  20. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  1. Comparison of temporal transcriptomic profiles from immature lungs of two rat strains reveals a viral response signature associated with chronic lung dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hines, Elizabeth A; Szakaly, Renee J; Leng, Ning; Webster, Anais T; Verheyden, Jamie M; Lashua, Amber J; Kendziorski, Christina; Rosenthal, Louis A; Gern, James E; Sorkness, Ronald L; Sun, Xin; Lemanske, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Early life respiratory viral infections and atopic characteristics are significant risk factors for the development of childhood asthma. It is hypothesized that repeated respiratory viral infections might induce structural remodeling by interfering with the normal process of lung maturation; however, the specific molecular processes that underlie these pathological changes are not understood. To investigate the molecular basis for these changes, we used an established Sendai virus infection model in weanling rats to compare the post-infection transcriptomes of an atopic asthma susceptible strain, Brown Norway, and a non-atopic asthma resistant strain, Fischer 344. Specific to this weanling infection model and not described in adult infection models, Sendai virus in the susceptible, but not the resistant strain, results in morphological abnormalities in distal airways that persist into adulthood. Gene expression data from infected and control lungs across five time points indicated that specific features of the immune response following viral infection were heightened and prolonged in lungs from Brown Norway rats compared with Fischer 344 rats. These features included an increase in macrophage cell number and related gene expression, which then transitioned to an increase in mast cell number and related gene expression. In contrast, infected Fischer F344 lungs exhibited more efficient restoration of the airway epithelial morphology, with transient appearance of basal cell pods near distal airways. Together, these findings indicate that the pronounced macrophage and mast cell responses and abnormal re-epithelialization precede the structural defects that developed and persisted in Brown Norway, but not Fischer 344 lungs.

  2. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    understanding of this disease. Initially, he transmitted enteritis to healthy adult volunteers by the oral administration of bacteria-free, toxin...serotypes of adenoviruses which are readily propagated in standard tissue cultures and are not commonly associated with gastroenteritis. The "enteric...TA. We at so found 9 ~7 . 7o.7o 7 I. that defined human sera possessing Norwalk antibody failed to react by immuno- fluorescence with feline

  3. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  4. Viral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Smith, L A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has been recognized for thousands of years. Egyptians believed that cancer occurred at the will of the gods. Hippocrates believed human disease resulted from an imbalance of the four humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile with cancer being caused by excess black bile. The lymph theory of cancer replaced the humoral theory and the blastema theory replaced the lymph theory. Rudolph Virchow was the first to recognize that cancer cells like all cells came from other cells and believed chronic irritation caused cancer. At the same time there was a belief that trauma caused cancer, though it never evolved after many experiments inducing trauma. The birth of virology occurred in 1892 when Dimitri Ivanofsky demonstrated that diseased tobacco plants remained infective after filtering their sap through a filter that trapped bacteria. Martinus Beijerinck would call the tiny infective agent a virus and both Dimitri Ivanofsky and Marinus Beijerinck would become the fathers of virology. Not to long thereafter, Payton Rous founded the field of tumor virology in 1911 with his discovery of a transmittable sarcoma of chickens by what would come to be called Rous sarcoma virus or RSV for short. The first identified human tumor virus was the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), named after Tony Epstein and Yvonne Barr who visualized the virus particles in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by electron microscopy in 1965. Since that time, many viruses have been associated with carcinogenesis including the most studied, human papilloma virus associated with cervical carcinoma, many other anogenital carcinomas, and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The World Health Organization currently estimates that approximately 22% of worldwide cancers are attributable to infectious etiologies, of which viral etiologies is estimated at 15-20%. The field of tumor virology/viral carcinogenesis has not only identified viruses as etiologic agents of human cancers, but has also given molecular insights to all human

  5. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  6. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  7. Permissive changes in the neuraminidase play a dominant role in improving the viral fitness of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strains.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Bouhy, Xavier; Boivin, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Permissive neuraminidase (NA) substitutions such as R222Q, V234M and D344N have facilitated the emergence and worldwide spread of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1)-H275Y viruses. However, the potential contribution of genetic changes in other viral segments on viral fitness remains poorly investigated. A series of recombinant A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the wild-type (WT) A/Brisbane/59/2007 NA gene or its single (H275Y) and double (H275Y/Q222R, H275Y/M234V and H275Y/N344D) variants were generated and their replicative properties were assessed in vitro. The Q222R reversion substitution significantly reduced viral titers when evaluated in both A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 backgrounds. The permissive role of the R222Q was further confirmed using A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the NA gene of the oseltamivir-susceptible or oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Mississippi/03/2001 strains. Therefore, NA permissive substitutions play a dominant role for improving viral replication of oseltamivir-resistant A (H1N1)-H275Y viruses in vitro.

  8. Viral forensic genomics reveals the relatedness of classic herpes simplex virus strains KOS, KOS63, and KOS79.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Christopher D; Renner, Daniel W; Shreve, Jacob T; Tafuri, Yolanda; Payne, Kimberly M; Dix, Richard D; Kinchington, Paul R; Gatherer, Derek; Szpara, Moriah L

    2016-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread global pathogen, of which the strain KOS is one of the most extensively studied. Previous sequence studies revealed that KOS does not cluster with other strains of North American geographic origin, but instead clustered with Asian strains. We sequenced a historical isolate of the original KOS strain, called KOS63, along with a separately isolated strain attributed to the same source individual, termed KOS79. Genomic analyses revealed that KOS63 closely resembled other recently sequenced isolates of KOS and was of Asian origin, but that KOS79 was a genetically unrelated strain that clustered in genetic distance analyses with HSV-1 strains of North American/European origin. These data suggest that the human source of KOS63 and KOS79 could have been infected with two genetically unrelated strains of disparate geographic origins. A PCR RFLP test was developed for rapid identification of these strains.

  9. A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M.; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines.

  10. Using a viral vector to reveal the role of microRNA159 in disease symptom induction by a severe strain of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyou; Chen, Aizhong; Chen, Wenhu; Westwood, Jack H; Baulcombe, David C; Carr, John P

    2014-03-01

    In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), expression of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b silencing suppressor protein from the severe subgroup IA strain Fny disrupted microRNA (miRNA)-regulated development but orthologs from mild subgroup II strains (Q and LS) did not, explaining strain-specific differences in symptom severity. However, it is unknown which miRNAs affected by Fny2b critically affect viral symptoms. Observations that Fny2b-transgenic plants phenocopy microRNA159ab (mir159ab) mutant plants and that Fny2b altered miR159ab-regulated transcript levels suggested a role for miR159ab in elicitation of severe symptoms by Fny-CMV. Using restoration of the normal phenotype in transgenic plants expressing an artificial miRNA as a proof of concept, we developed a LS-CMV-based vector to express sequences mimicking miRNA targets. Expressing a miR159 target mimic sequence using LS-CMV depleted miR159 and induced symptoms resembling those of Fny-CMV. Suppression of Fny-CMV-induced symptoms in plants harboring mutant alleles for the miR159ab targets MYB domain protein33 (MYB33) and MYB65 confirmed the importance of this miRNA in pathogenesis. This study demonstrates the utility of a viral vector to express miRNA target mimics to facilitate functional studies of miRNAs in plants.

  11. Maintenance of picobirnavirus (PBV) infection in an adult orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and genetic diversity of excreted viral strains during a three-year period.

    PubMed

    Masachessi, Gisela; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Martinez, Laura C; Giordano, Miguel O; Barril, Patricia A; Isa, Maria B; Paván, Giorgio V; Mateos, Carlos A; Nates, Silvia V

    2015-01-01

    The present work provide data about the maintenance of picobirnavirus (PBV) infection during adulthood in a mammalian host. For this purpose PBV infection was studied in an adult orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) by PAGE/SS, RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. PBV infection in the animal was asymptomatic and was characterized by interspaced silent and high/ low active viral excretion periods. The PBV strains excreted by the studied individual were identified as genogroup I and revealed a nucleotide identity among them of 64-81%. The results obtained allowed to arrive to a deeper understanding of the natural history of PBV infection, which seems to be characterized by new-born, juvenile and adult asymptomatic hosts which persistently excrete closely related strains in their feces. Consequently, picobirnaviruses could be considered frequent inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract, leaving the question open about the molecular mechanisms governing persistent and asymptomatic coexistence within the host and the potential host suitability to maintain this relationship.

  12. Influence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus O/CHN/Mya98/33-P Strain Leader Protein on Viral Replication and Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaodong; Bai, Xingwen; Li, Pinghua; Zhang, Meng; Bao, Huifang; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Cao, Yimei; Chen, Yingli; Li, Dong; Fu, Yuanfang; Liu, Zaixin

    2015-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain was isolated from the esophageal-pharyngeal fluid sample of cattle, and was shown to cause persistent infection. Its leader protein contains 200 amino acids with one amino acid deletion, which is upstream and next to the second initiation codon compared with the majority of FMDV Mya98 strains. The FMDV genome includes two initiation codons that can produce two different leader proteins, Lab (from the first AUG) and Lb (from the second AUG). For convenience, the inter-AUG region was named as La. Previously, it was found that a recombinant virus with Lab of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain had higher proliferation efficiency, and better ability to inhibit the host innate immune response. Three full-length infectious cDNA clones-rHN33-Lb, rHN33-La, and rHNGSLX-Lb-containing the FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain leader proteins Lb, La, or the FMDV O/GSLX/2010 strain leader protein Lb, respectively, were constructed based on an established infectious clone r-HN rescued from FMDV O/HN/CHN/93 strain. After infecting pig kidney primary cells, rHN33-La showed higher replication efficiency than r-HN, and rHN33-Lb displayed better ability to resist host innate immunity than rHNGSLX-Lb. These results demonstrated that the inter-AUG region of FMDV strain O/CHN/Mya98/33-P leader protein must be involved in increasing viral replication efficiency. Additionally, the Lb of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P must be involve in increasing its ability to inhibit host innate immune response, and the distinctive amino acids G56 and/or R118 of FMDV leader protein may play essential roles in it.

  13. Neutralization of Diverse Human Cytomegalovirus Strains Conferred by Antibodies Targeting Viral gH/gL/pUL128-131 Pentameric Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sha; Li, Fengsheng; Troutman, Matthew C.; Freed, Daniel C.; Tang, Aimin; Loughney, John W.; Wang, I-Ming; Vlasak, Josef; Nickle, David C.; Rustandi, Richard R.; Hamm, Melissa; DePhillips, Pete A.; Zhang, Ningyan; McLellan, Jason S.; Zhu, Hua; Adler, Stuart P.; McVoy, Michael A.; An, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of congenital viral infection, and developing a prophylactic vaccine is of high priority to public health. We recently reported a replication-defective human cytomegalovirus with restored pentameric complex glycoprotein H (gH)/gL/pUL128-131 for prevention of congenital HCMV infection. While the quantity of vaccine-induced antibody responses can be measured in a viral neutralization assay, assessing the quality of such responses, including the ability of vaccine-induced antibodies to cross-neutralize the field strains of HCMV, remains a challenge. In this study, with a panel of neutralizing antibodies from three healthy human donors with natural HCMV infection or a vaccinated animal, we mapped eight sites on the dominant virus-neutralizing antigen—the pentameric complex of glycoprotein H (gH), gL, and pUL128, pUL130, and pUL131. By evaluating the site-specific antibodies in vaccine immune sera, we demonstrated that vaccination elicited functional antiviral antibodies to multiple neutralizing sites in rhesus macaques, with quality attributes comparable to those of CMV hyperimmune globulin. Furthermore, these immune sera showed antiviral activities against a panel of genetically distinct HCMV clinical isolates. These results highlighted the importance of understanding the quality of vaccine-induced antibody responses, which includes not only the neutralizing potency in key cell types but also the ability to protect against the genetically diverse field strains. IMPORTANCE HCMV is the leading cause of congenital viral infection, and development of a preventive vaccine is a high public health priority. To understand the strain coverage of vaccine-induced immune responses in comparison with natural immunity, we used a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies to identify the immunogenic sites of a dominant viral antigen—the pentameric complex. We further demonstrated that following vaccination of a replication

  14. Live attenuated measles and mumps viral strain-containing vaccines and hearing loss: Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), United States, 1990--2003.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Armenak; Pool, Vitali; Chen, Robert T; Kohl, Katrin S; Davis, Robert L; Iskander, John K

    2008-02-26

    Hearing loss (HL) is a known complication of wild measles and mumps viral infections. As vaccines against measles and mumps contain live attenuated viral strains, it is biologically plausible that in some individuals HL could develop as a complication of vaccination against measles and/or mumps. Our objectives for this study were: to find and describe all cases of HL reported in the scientific literature and to the US Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) for the period 1990--2003; and to determine reporting rate of HL after live attenuated measles and/or mumps viral strain-containing vaccines (MMCV) administration. We searched published reports for cases of HL identified after vaccination with MMCV. We also searched for reports of HL after MMCV administration submitted to VAERS from 1990 through 2003 and determined the dose-adjusted reporting rate of HL. Our main outcome measure was reported cases of HL after immunization with MMCV which were classified as idiopathic. We found 11 published case reports of HL following MMCV. The review of the VAERS reports identified 44 cases of likely idiopathic sensorineural HL after MMCV administration. The onset of HL in the majority of VAERS and published cases was consistent with the incubation periods of wild measles and mumps viruses. Based on the annual usage of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, we estimated the reporting rate of HL to be 1 case per 6-8 million doses. Thus, HL following MMCV has been reported in the literature and to the VAERS. Further studies are needed to better understand if there is a causal relationship between MMCV and HL.

  15. Patient-to-Patient Transmission of Hepatitis C at Iranian Thalassemia Centers Shown by Genetic Characterization of Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Asgari, Freshteh; Nasiritoosi, Mohsen; Esteghamati, Abdoulreza; Azarkeyvan, Azar; Eslami, Seyedeh Masoomeh; Zamani, Farhad; Magnius, Lars; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Norder, Heléne

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C is prevalent among thalassemia patients in Iran. It is mainly transfusion mediated, in particular among patients treated before 1996 when blood screening was introduced. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate why patients still seroconvert to anti-HCV in Iranian thalassemia centers. Patients and Methods During 2006-2007 sera were sampled from 217 anti-HCV positive thalassemia patients at nine thalassemia centers in Tehran and Amol city, where 34 (16%) patients had been infected after 1996. The HCV subtype could be determined by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial NS5B and/or 5׳NCR-core region in 130 strains. Results 1a (53%) was predominant followed by 3a (30%), 1b (15%), and one strain each of 2k, 3k and 4a. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 19 clades with up to five strains diverging with less than six nucleotides from each other within subtypes 1a and 3a. Strains in seven clades were from nine patients infected between 1999 and 2005 and similar to strains from eight patients infected before 1996, indicating ongoing transmission at the centers. Further epidemiological investigation revealed that 28 patients infected with strains within the same clade had frequently been transfused at the same shift sitting on the same bed. An additional eight patients with related strains had frequently been transfused simultaneously in the same room. Conclusions The results suggest nosocomial transmission at these thalassemia centers both before and after the introduction of blood screening. Further training of staff and strict adherence to preventive measures are thus essential to reduce the incidence of new HCV infections. PMID:23585766

  16. Unraveling the etiology of North American grapevine yellows (NAGY): multilocus genotyping and structural analysis of secY proteins distinguish NAGYIII phytoplasma strains from strains causing X-disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American grapevine yellows (NAGY) disease has sometimes been ascribed to infection of Vitis vinifera L. by X-disease phytoplasma, but the accuracy of this attribution has remained open to question. In the present study of NAGY etiology, the disease was discovered in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Oh...

  17. Characterisation of genotypes among bovine viral diarrhoea virus 2 strains according to palindromic nucleotide substitutions in the 5 untranslated genomic region.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, M; Harasawa, R

    2004-01-01

    Pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2) strains from 61 isolates from cattle and sheep, and from some adventitious contaminants of biologicals, have been assessed using the palindromic nucleotide substitutions (PNS) method at three variable loci (V1, V2 and V3) located delin the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of genomic RNA. This genotyping procedure is new, simple and practical. Two characteristics of the base pairings common to BVDV-2 species, a C-G or U-A pairing at the V1 locus, and a G*U pairing at the V2 locus, were observed in isolates tested. The PNS method showed six genotypes: BVDV-2a, BVDV-2b, BVDV-2c, BVDV- 2d, BVDV-2e and BVDV-2f. Twenty-five strains showed the BVDV-2a genotype specific combination of three base pairings (A-U in position 1 and C-G or U*G in position 18 in V1 and U-A or U*G in position 4 in V2). Ten strains were identified by a single C-G pairing in position 4 from the bottom of the V2 stem region, characteristic to genotype BVDV-2b. Three strains were assigned to genotype BVDV-2c, due to their recognition by a G*U pairing at the bottom of the V1 stem region. A U-A pairing, characteristic of the BVDV-2d genotype when found in position 18 of the V1 stem region, was observed in fourteen strains. Genotype BVDV- 2e, present in only six South American cattle isolates, was characterized by G-C pairing in position 12, by U-A pairing in position 16 and G_G or G-_A bulges in position 18 in the V1 region. One strain from Argentina was classified as genotype BVDV-2f, showing: A-U pairing in position 9 and 12, U-A in position 16 and G_A bulge in position 18 in V1 region. Two strains were not characterized due to incomplete sequence of V1 locus.

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  19. One time intranasal vaccination with a modified vaccinia Tiantan strain MVTT(ZCI) protects animals against pathogenic viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbo; Fang, Qing; Zhu, Weijun; Wang, Haibo; Tien, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2010-02-25

    To combat variola virus in bioterrorist attacks, it is desirable to develop a noninvasive vaccine. Based on the vaccinia Tiantan (VTT) strain, which was historically used to eradicate the smallpox in China, we generated a modified VTT (MVTT(ZCI)) by removing the hemagglutinin gene and an 11,944bp genomic region from HindIII fragment C2L to F3L. MVTT(ZCI) was characterized for its host cell range in vitro and preclinical safety and efficacy profiles in mice. Despite replication-competency in some cell lines, unlike VTT, MVTT(ZCI) did not cause death after intracranial injection or body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. MVTT(ZCI) did not replicate in mouse brain and was safe in immunodeficient mice. MVTT(ZCI) induced neutralizing antibodies via the intranasal route of immunization. One time intranasal immunization protected animals from the challenge of the pathogenic vaccinia WR strain. This study established proof-of-concept that the attenuated replicating MVTT(ZCI) may serve as a safe noninvasive smallpox vaccine candidate.

  20. PhyloFlu, a DNA Microarray for Determining the Phylogenetic Origin of Influenza A Virus Gene Segments and the Genomic Fingerprint of Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Luis F.; Soto-Del Río, María de los D.; Sánchez, Iván; Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M.; López-Martínez, Irma; Wong-Chew, Rosa M.; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Isa, P.; López, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that most influenza A virus gene segments can contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus. In this regard, the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of the circulating strains has been closely surveyed, but the reassortment of internal gene segments is usually not monitored as a potential source of an increased pathogenicity. In this work, an oligonucleotide DNA microarray (PhyloFlu) designed to determine the phylogenetic origins of the eight segments of the influenza virus genome was constructed and validated. Clades were defined for each segment and also for the 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. Viral genetic material was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the conserved 5′ and 3′ ends of the influenza A virus genes, followed by PCR amplification with random primers and Cy3 labeling. The microarray unambiguously determined the clades for all eight influenza virus genes in 74% (28/38) of the samples. The microarray was validated with reference strains from different animal origins, as well as from human, swine, and avian viruses from field or clinical samples. In most cases, the phylogenetic clade of each segment defined its animal host of origin. The genomic fingerprint deduced by the combined information of the individual clades allowed for the determination of the time and place that strains with the same genomic pattern were previously reported. PhyloFlu is useful for characterizing and surveying the genetic diversity and variation of animal viruses circulating in different environmental niches and for obtaining a more detailed surveillance and follow up of reassortant events that can potentially modify virus pathogenicity. PMID:24353006

  1. The North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus is highly pathogenic for laboratory-reared Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Bradley, M.; Elder, N.; Meyers, T.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1997-01-01

    Specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasi were reared in the laboratory from eggs and then challenged at 5, 9, and 13 months of age by waterborne exposure to low (101.5–2.5 plaque-forming units [PFU] per milliliter), medium (103.5–4.5 PFU/mL), or high (105.5–6.5 PFU/mL) levels of a North American isolate of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). The fish were extremely susceptible to the virus, showing clinical disease, mortality approaching 100%, and only a limited increase in resistance with age. Mortality began 4–6 d after exposure and peaked at approximately day 7 in fish exposed to high levels of virus. Whereas the mean time to death showed a significant dose response (P < 0.001), the percent mortality and virus titers in dead fish were generally high in all groups regardless of initial challenge dose. External signs of disease were usually limited to 1–2-mm hemorrhagic areas on the lower jaw and isthmus and around the eye, but 2 of 130 infected fish exhibited extensive cutaneous hemorrhaging. Histopathologic examination of tissues from moribund fish sampled at 2–8 d after exposure revealed multifocal coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes, diffuse necrosis of interstitial hematopoietic tissues in the kidney, diffuse necrosis of the spleen, epidermis, and subcutis, and occasional necrosis of pancreatic acinar cells. Virus titers in tissues of experimentally infected herring were first detected 48 h after exposure and peaked 6-8 d after exposure at 107.7 PFU/g. Fish began shedding virus at 48 h after exposure with titers in the flow-through aquaria reaching 102.5 PFU/mL at 4–5 d after exposure, just before peak mortality. When the water flow was turned off for 3 h, titers in the water rose to 103.5 PFU/mL, and the amount of virus shed by infected fish (on average, greater than 106.5 PFU/h per fish) appeared sufficient to sustain a natural epizootic among schooling herring. Taken together, these data suggest that VHSV could be a

  2. Viral induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  3. Genetic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus strains in Beijing, China and innate immune responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in persistently infected dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Xiao Gang; Song, Quan Jiang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming Chao; Wang, Meng Ling

    2015-01-01

    To acquire epidemiological data on the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and identify cattle persistently infected (PI) with this virus, 4,327 samples from Holstein dairy cows were screened over a four-year period in Beijing, China. Eighteen BVD viruses were isolated, 12 from PI cattle. Based on genetic analysis of their 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), the 18 isolates were assigned to subgenotype BVDV-1m, 1a, 1d, 1q, and 1b. To investigate the innate immune responses in the peripheral-blood mononuclear cells of PI cattle, the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors, interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-β, myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1), and interferon stimulatory gene 15 (ISG15) was assessed by qPCR. When compared with healthy cattle, the expression of TLR-7, IFN-α, and IFN-β mRNA was downregulated, but the expression of MX1 and ISG-15 mRNA was upregulated in PI cattle. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and IRF-7 was lower in PI cattle than in healthy cattle. Thus, BVDV-1m and 1a are the predominant subgenotypes in the Beijing region, and the strains are highly divergent. Our findings also suggest that the TLR-7/IRF-7 signaling pathway plays a role in evasion of host restriction by BVDV. PMID:26119170

  4. Paraconsistents artificial neural networks applied to the study of mutational patterns of the F subtype of the viral strains of HIV-1 to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Paulo C C; Lopes, Helder F S; Alcalde, Rosana; Gonsalez, Cláudio R; Abe, Jair M; Lopez, Luis F

    2016-03-01

    The high variability of HIV-1 as well as the lack of efficient repair mechanisms during the stages of viral replication, contribute to the rapid emergence of HIV-1 strains resistant to antiretroviral drugs. The selective pressure exerted by the drug leads to fixation of mutations capable of imparting varying degrees of resistance. The presence of these mutations is one of the most important factors in the failure of therapeutic response to medications. Thus, it is of critical to understand the resistance patterns and mechanisms associated with them, allowing the choice of an appropriate therapeutic scheme, which considers the frequency, and other characteristics of mutations. Utilizing Paraconsistents Artificial Neural Networks, seated in Paraconsistent Annotated Logic Et which has the capability of measuring uncertainties and inconsistencies, we have achieved levels of agreement above 90% when compared to the methodology proposed with the current methodology used to classify HIV-1 subtypes. The results demonstrate that Paraconsistents Artificial Neural Networks can serve as a promising tool of analysis.

  5. Genetic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus strains in Beijing, China and innate immune responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in persistently infected dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiao Gang; Song, Quan Jiang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming Chao; Wang, Meng Ling; Wang, Jiu Feng

    2015-01-01

    To acquire epidemiological data on the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and identify cattle persistently infected (PI) with this virus, 4,327 samples from Holstein dairy cows were screened over a four-year period in Beijing, China. Eighteen BVD viruses were isolated, 12 from PI cattle. Based on genetic analysis of their 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), the 18 isolates were assigned to subgenotype BVDV-1m, 1a, 1d, 1q, and 1b. To investigate the innate immune responses in the peripheral-blood mononuclear cells of PI cattle, the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors, interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-β, myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1), and interferon stimulatory gene 15 (ISG15) was assessed by qPCR. When compared with healthy cattle, the expression of TLR-7, IFN-α, and IFN-β mRNA was downregulated, but the expression of MX1 and ISG-15 mRNA was upregulated in PI cattle. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and IRF-7 was lower in PI cattle than in healthy cattle. Thus, BVDV-1m and 1a are the predominant subgenotypes in the Beijing region, and the strains are highly divergent. Our findings also suggest that the TLR-7/IRF-7 signaling pathway plays a role in evasion of host restriction by BVDV.

  6. Survival of the North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in filtered seawater and seawater containing ovarian fluid, crude oil and serum-enriched culture medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.

    2001-01-01

     The North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (NA-VHSV) could be recovered for up to 40 h in natural filtered seawater (27 ppt) with a 50% loss of infectivity after approximately 10 h at 15°C. Addition of 10 ppb North Slope crude oil to the seawater had no effect on virus survival. However, when various concentrations of teleost ovarian fluid were added to seawater, virus could be recovered after 72 h at 0.01% ovarian fluid and after 96 h at 1.0%. When cell culture medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum was added to the seawater, 100% of the virus could be recovered for the first 15 d and 60% of the virus remained after 36 d. These findings quantify NA-VHSV infectivity in natural seawater and demonstrate that ovarian fluid, which occurs naturally during spawning events, significantly prolongs the survival and infectivity of the virus. The extended stabilization of virus in culture medium supplemented with serum allows for low titer field samples to be collected and transported in an unfrozen state without significant loss of virus titer.

  7. Comparative susceptibility among three stocks of yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus strain IVb from the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Olson, W; Emmenegger, E; Glenn, J; Winton, J; Goetz, F

    2013-08-01

    The Great Lakes strain of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus IVb (VHSV-IVb) is capable of infecting a wide number of naive species and has been associated with large fish kills in the Midwestern United States since its discovery in 2005. The yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), a freshwater species commonly found throughout inland waters of the United States and prized for its high value in sport and commercial fisheries, is a species documented in several fish kills affiliated with VHS. In the present study, differences in survival after infection with VHSV IVb were observed among juvenile fish from three yellow perch broodstocks that were originally derived from distinct wild populations, suggesting innate differences in susceptibility due to genetic variance. While all three stocks were susceptible upon waterborne exposure to VHS virus infection, fish derived from the Midwest (Lake Winnebago, WI) showed significantly lower cumulative % survival compared with two perch stocks derived from the East Coast (Perquimans River, NC and Choptank River, MD) of the United States. However, despite differences in apparent susceptibility, clinical signs did not vary between stocks and included moderate-to-severe haemorrhages at the pelvic and pectoral fin bases and exophthalmia. After the 28-day challenge was complete, VHS virus was analysed in subsets of whole fish that had either survived or succumbed to the infection using both plaque assay and quantitative PCR methodologies. A direct correlation was identified between the two methods, suggesting the potential for both methods to be used to detect virus in a research setting.

  8. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... have severe illness from viral meningitis. Causes Non-polio enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral ... following viruses spread by visiting CDC’s websites: Non-polio enteroviruses Mumps virus Herpesviruses, including Epstein-Barr virus , ...

  9. Viral Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  10. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  11. Comparative susceptibility among three stocks of yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus strain IVb from the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, W.; Emmenegger, E.; Glenn, J.; Winton, J.; Goetz, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Great Lakes strain of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus IVb (VHSV-IVb) is capable of infecting a wide number of naive species and has been associated with large fish kills in the Midwestern United States since its discovery in 2005. The yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), a freshwater species commonly found throughout inland waters of the United States and prized for its high value in sport and commercial fisheries, is a species documented in several fish kills affiliated with VHS. In the present study, differences in survival after infection with VHSV IVb were observed among juvenile fish from three yellow perch broodstocks that were originally derived from distinct wild populations, suggesting innate differences in susceptibility due to genetic variance. While all three stocks were susceptible upon waterborne exposure to VHS virus infection, fish derived from the Midwest (Lake Winnebago, WI) showed significantly lower cumulative % survival compared with two perch stocks derived from the East Coast (Perquimans River, NC and Choptank River, MD) of the United States. However, despite differences in apparent susceptibility, clinical signs did not vary between stocks and included moderate-to-severe haemorrhages at the pelvic and pectoral fin bases and exophthalmia. After the 28-day challenge was complete, VHS virus was analysed in subsets of whole fish that had either survived or succumbed to the infection using both plaque assay and quantitative PCR methodologies. A direct correlation was identified between the two methods, suggesting the potential for both methods to be used to detect virus in a research setting.

  12. Characteristics of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viral Strains Circulating at the Wildlife/livestock Interface of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area.

    PubMed

    Jori, F; Caron, A; Thompson, P N; Dwarka, R; Foggin, C; de Garine-Wichatitsky, M; Hofmeyr, M; Van Heerden, J; Heath, L

    2016-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) inflicts severe economic losses within infected countries and is arguably the most important trade-restricting livestock disease in the world. In southern Africa, infected African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) are the major reservoir of the South African Territories (SAT) types of the virus. With the progressive expansion of transfrontier conservation areas (TFCAs), the risk of FMD outbreaks is expected to increase due to a higher probability of buffalo/livestock contacts. To investigate the dynamics of FMD within and around the Great Limpopo TFCA (GLTFCA), 5 herds of buffaloes were sampled in June 2010 to characterize circulating viruses in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Three SAT-2 and three SAT-3 viral strains were isolated in both countries, including one that was genetically linked with a recent SAT-2 outbreak in Mozambique in 2011. In addition, two groups of unvaccinated cattle (n = 192) were serologically monitored for 1 year at the wildlife/livestock interface of Gonarezhou National Park (GNP) in Zimbabwe between April 2009 and January 2010, using the liquid-phase blocking ELISA (LPBE) and a test for antibodies directed against non-structural proteins (NSP). Neither clinical signs nor vaccination of cattle were reported during the study, yet a high proportion of the monitored cattle showed antibody responses against SAT-3 and SAT-1. Antibodies against NSP were also detected in 10% of the monitored cattle. The results of this study suggest that cattle grazing in areas adjacent to the GLTFCA can be infected by buffalo or other infected livestock and that cattle trade movements can act as efficient disseminators of FMD viruses to areas several hundred kilometres from the virus source. Current methods of surveillance of FMD at the GLTFCA interface seem insufficient to control for FMD emergence and dissemination and require urgent reassessment and regional coordination.

  13. Quantification and determination of spread mechanisms of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in blood and tissues from colostrum-deprived calves during an experimental acute infection induced by a non-cytopathic genotype 1 strain.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, M; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Molina, V; Risalde, M A; Rodríguez-Sánchez, B; Sánchez-Cordón, P J

    2012-10-01

    To detect and monitor the sequential changes in virus levels, a reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using a TaqMan probe was carried out on frozen blood and tissues samples collected from calves experimentally infected with a non-cytopathic Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) genotype 1 strain. Blood samples were collected among days 1-14 post-inoculation (p.i). On day 3 p.i, viral RNA was detected in blood samples from six of the eight inoculated animals. Viral RNA was detected in all remaining inoculated animals between 5 and 12 days p.i. The levels of viral RNA increased along the experiment, with a maximal peak between 6 and 9 days p.i. Analysis of virus load in tissues collected from calves euthanized on days 3, 6, 9 and 14 p.i displayed that BVDV was detected on day 3 p.i, being especially abundant in tonsils and ileocaecal valve, highlighting the role of tonsils as the main earliest viral replication sites as well as the principal source for virus spread to other lymphoid tissues and visceral organs. Coinciding with the highest viraemia levels, the highest viral loads were recorded at 9 days p.i. in tonsils, ileal lymph nodes, distal ileum and spleen, showing the main role of these secondary lymphoid organs in the pathogenic mechanisms of BVDV. However, virus levels in the liver and lung increased only towards the end of the infection. This fact could influence in the appearance of bovine respiratory diseases because of the capacity of BVDV for enhancing susceptibility to secondary infections.

  14. Viral arthritides.

    PubMed

    Outhred, Alexander C; Kok, Jen; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections may manifest as acute or chronic arthritis. Joint involvement arises from either direct infection of the joint, through an immunological response directed towards the virus or autoimmunity. Epidemiological clues to the diagnosis include geographic location and exposure to vector-borne, blood-borne or sexually transmitted viruses. Although not always possible, it is important to diagnose the pathogenic virus, usually by serology, nucleic acid tests or rarely, viral culture. In general, viral arthritides are self-limiting and treatment is targeted at symptomatic relief. This article focuses on the causes, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of viral arthritides.

  15. Etiology of leukaemias

    PubMed Central

    Law, L. W.

    1962-01-01

    A critical review is made of the present knowledge of the etiology of neoplasms of the haematopoietic system in experimental animals and man. Genetic factors play a dominant role in the origin of leukaemias in mice. A Mendelian interpretation of the data is excluded and several genes appear to be involved in susceptibility. The data available on leukaemias in man are equivocal so far as the role of genetic factors is involved. The author discusses the value of family and twin studies—which suggest the operation of rare, highly penetrant, recessive genes—and of cytogenetic studies in contributing to a fuller understanding of the nature and etiology of leukaemia. PMID:14462960

  16. The Etiology of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lee Anne; Oehlert, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Many theories of giftedness either explicitly or implicitly acknowledge the role of genetic influences; yet, empirical work has not been able to establish the impact that genes have specifically on gifted behavior. In contrast, a great deal of research has been targeted at understanding the etiology of individual differences in general and…

  17. Expression of chicken interleukin-2 by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus leads to decreased systemic viral load but does not significantly affect mortality in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mammals, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been shown to decrease replication or attenuate pathogenicity of numerous viral pathogens by activating natural killer cells (NK), cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and expanding subsets of memory cells. In chickens, IL-2 has been shown to activate T cells, and as such i...

  18. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  19. Disease etiology and diagnosis by TCR repertoire analysis goes viral.

    PubMed

    Attaf, Meriem; Sewell, Andrew K

    2016-11-01

    The importance of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity is highlighted in murine models of immunodeficiency and in many human pathologies. However, the true extent of TCR diversity and how this diversity varies in health and disease is poorly understood. In a previous issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Lossius et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2014. 44: 3439-3452] dissected the composition of the TCR repertoire in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS) using high-throughput sequencing of TCR-β chains in cerebrospinal fluid samples and blood. The authors demonstrated that the TCR repertoire of the CSF was largely distinct from the blood and enriched in EBV-reactive CD8(+) T cells in MS patients. Studies of this kind have long been hindered by technical limitations and remain scarce in the literature. However, TCR sequencing methodologies are progressing apace and will undoubtedly shed light on the genetic basis of T-cell responses and the ontogeny of T-cell-mediated diseases, such as MS.

  20. Viral Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Etiology and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium which often follows microbial infections and is a significant cause of sudden unexpected death in the young (<40 years of age) and an underlying cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Although histologically, the disease is usually associated with infiltration of the myocardium with either eosinophils or leukocytes, use of immunosuppression is controversial outside of giant cell myocarditis and has been found to be of limited value in lymphocytic myocarditis. The relatively limited response might reflect the need for host immunity to control persistent virus infection in the heart which may be the predominant cause of the chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Treating the persistent virus infection with interferon-beta improved cardiac function in a clinical trial. However, classic immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide, are not effective against all types of immunity and experimental myocarditis models have shown that certain immunopathogenic forms of the disease are resistant to these immunosuppressive agents. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease and the various infectious agents which can cause it will be essential for developing effective therapeutic agents.

  1. Etiology and Rapid Diagnosis of Human Viral Gastroenteritis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Background Information section) between Norwalk virus and human caliciviruses ( HCV ), we have sought evidence for immunological relatedness among these...seroconversions in 45 of 47 HCV UK cases. These results may reflect different reactivities of various immunologic tests for the identification of...diarrheal disease. In addition, we are studying the immunological relationships of various gastroenteritis viruses to aid in classification and

  2. Non-viral causes of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Blonski, Wojciech; Kotlyar, David S; Forde, Kimberly A

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy and represents an international public health concern as one of the most deadly cancers worldwide. The main etiology of HCC is chronic infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. However, there are other important factors that contribute to the international burden of HCC. Among these are obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and dietary exposures. Emerging evidence suggests that the etiology of many cases of HCC is in fact multifactorial, encompassing infectious etiologies, comorbid conditions and environmental exposures. Clarification of relevant non-viral causes of HCC will aid in preventative efforts to curb the rising incidence of this disease. PMID:20677332

  3. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  4. The attenuation of vaccinia Tian Tan strain by the removal of the viral M1L-K2L genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weijun; Fang, Qing; Zhuang, Ke; Wang, Haibo; Yu, Wenbo; Zhou, Jingying; Liu, Li; Tien, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2007-09-01

    To generate a safe vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT)-based vaccine vector, it is necessary to develop a method to attenuate the virus. A modified VTT (MVTT(2-GFP)) was constructed by replacing the viral M1L-K2L genes with a GFP gene. In comparison to the parental VTT, MVTT(2-GFP) lost its replication capacity in rabbit RK13 and human HeLa cell lines. The life cycle of viral replication was blocked at different stages in these two cell lines as determined by electron microscope examination. MVTT(2-GFP) was less virulent than VTT for 100-fold by measuring mouse body weight loss after intranasal viral inoculation and for 340-fold by determining the intracranial LD(50) value in mice. The foreign GFP gene was stable genetically after 10 rounds of passage in Vero cells. Importantly, MVTT(2-GFP) elicited both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the GFP gene in mice. With two intramuscular inoculations of 10(5)PFU virus, the anti-GFP antibody reciprocal endpoint titer reached over 700 as determined by an ELISA. The number of IFN-gamma secreting T cells reached over 350SFU per million splenocytes against a CD8+ T cell-specific epitope of GFP. Collectively, the removal of the M1L-K2L genes is a useful method to generate an attenuated vaccinia Tian Tan vaccine vector.

  5. Viral quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections.

  6. Etiology of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Koh, H K; Sinks, T H; Geller, A C; Miller, D R; Lew, R A

    1993-01-01

    Although the precise etiology of melanoma remains unknown, much data link sunlight to melanoma. The imperfect evidence associating sun exposure (particularly UVB radiation) with melanoma emerges from human data, obviating problems inherent in extrapolation from animal and other models. However, the mechanism by which sunlight might possibly initiate or promote melanoma remains obscure. Some clarification should emerge from the potential isolation of genes that carry susceptibility to melanoma in families prone to the disease; such work could serve as a basis to distinguish genetic and environmental influences in melanoma [167]. Continued studies of faulty DNA repair in XP patients may elucidate the steps in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Future case-control studies must address the limits on the accuracy of recall and the limits on statistical methods to separate the cluster of phenotypic risk needed in determining biologically effective dose. Animal and in vitro studies must contribute more insight. Further research in the South American opossum models appears promising [72]. Although ozone depletion has been documented, there has been little definitive evidence of subsequent increase of UVB at the Earth's surface. Nevertheless, the threat posed by ozone depletion deserves continued environmental action and public education. The role of precursor lesions, particularly dysplastic nevi/atypical moles, must be clarified with future research. The distribution of melanoma among various work forces suggests that occupational risk factors may play an important role in the etiology of this disease [168-170]. The consistent reports of excess melanoma among accountants, clerical workers, professional workers, and teachers deserve further study. Furthermore, evidence of excesses in printing and press, petrochemical, and the telecommunications industries require follow-up. Carefully planned studies that account for nonoccupational risk factors are recommended. Research over

  7. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  8. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-specific goose TLR21 initiates an anti-viral immune response against NGVEV but not AIV strain H9N2 infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Sun, Kunfeng; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize components of pathogens and mediate the host innate immune response. TLR21 is a TLR that specifically recognizes exogenous double-stranded DNA and rapidly signals to downstream innate immune factors. This study reports the cDNA of goose TLR21 and identifies its immune characteristics. The goose TLR21 is 3161 base pairs and encodes a 975 amino acid protein. As predicted, the goose transmembrane protein TLR21 has a signal peptide, leucine-rich repeat regions, a transmembrane domain, and a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analyses showed that goose TLR21 has homology to chicken TLR21. The tissue distribution of TLR21 suggested that it has high transcript levels in immune-associated tissues, especially in the bursa of Fabricius, the Hadrian gland, and the thymus. After challenge with agonist ODN2006 and new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV), significant induction of TLR21 production, pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and interferons were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both synthetic DNA (ODN2006) and viral DNA (NGVEV) can be recognized by goose TLR21, which leads to a rapid up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-viral molecules. In vivo, avian influenza A virus H9N2 and NGVEV were used to infect goslings, which was followed by a significant up-regulation of TLR21 mRNA transcripts in multiple tissues of NGVEV-infected geese. In general, goose TLR21 plays an important role in binding invading pathogenic DNA viruses, which subsequently triggers an innate immune response; furthermore, it acts as a functional homologue of mammalian TLR9, as TLR21 recognizes a mammalian TLR9 agonist.

  9. Extraoral etiology of halitosis.

    PubMed

    Tomás Carmona, I; Limeres Posse, J; Diz Dios, P; Fernández Feijoo, J; Vázquez García, E

    2001-01-01

    Halitosis is a frequent complaint which is estimated to be found in around 50 to 60% of the general population and that carries serious personal and social repercussions. Although the majority of cases are due to oral problems, it is considered that 10-13% of halitosis cases are of extraoral etiology. In these cases the responsibility of the general dental practitioner, who is frequently the first person to examine and treat these patients, is to refer the patient for evaluation to an otorhinolaryngologist in order to rule out the presence of chronic tonsillitis or chronic sinusitis. If the otorhinolaryngologist does not detect alterations concerning his specialty, the digestive system should be explored in order to detect gastric pathology, obstructions or inflammatory gastrointestinal processes, the liver to rule out hepatic insufficiency or cirrhosis, the endocrine system to exclude diagnoses of diabetes or trimethylaminuria, the airways to rule out bronchiectasis or pulmonary abscesses, and the kidney to eliminate possible renal insufficiency. Finally, in the absence of any systemic organic pathology, the possibility of halitosis of psychiatric etiology, which requires the patient's psychological profile to be checked by the corresponding specialist, should be considered.

  10. ETIOLOGY OF YELLOW FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1919-01-01

    By the inoculation of guinea pigs intraperitoneally with the emulsions of kidneys from wild rats and mice captured in Guayaquil, it was found that 67 per cent of the wild rats tested harbored in their kidneys a leptospira which produced in guinea pigs symptoms and lesions identical with those produced by Leptospira icterohamorrhagia derived either from patients suffering from infectious jaundice in Japan or Europe, or from wild rats caught in New York. Immune sera were prepared in rabbits by injecting different strains of the Guayaquil leptospira. These sera had a marked agglutinating and disintegrating influence upon the homologous strains, and also, but often to a less pronounced degree, upon the strains of Leptospira icterohœmorrhagiœ from other sources. Pfeiffer's phenomenon was also found to be positive, and protection was demonstrated against infection with virulent cultures of strains of Leptospira icterohœmorrhagiœ. The same sera had no effect, or at most a very slight one, upon Leptospira icteroides. Guinea pigs inoculated with icteroides strains were not noticeably protected by the use of the immune sera prepared with the Guayaquil rat strains. Guinea pigs inoculated with killed cultures of the Guayaquil strains of leptospira proved to be resistant to a subsequent infection with heterologous as well as homologous strains of Leptospira icterohœmorrhagiœ. It is concluded, therefore, that the leptospira isolated from the kidneys of wild rats and mice in Guayaquil belongs to the group of Leptospira icterohœmorrhagiœ, and differs from Leptospira icteroides in its immunity reactions. No positive transmission was obtained with kidney material from bats and an opossum. PMID:19868353

  11. [Viral serology in ear diseases of presumably neuritic origin].

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Gaudin, O; Martin, H; Prades, J M; Vidalain, E

    1986-01-01

    A viral etiology is often advanced to explain the origin of Bell's palsy, sudden deafness and certain vertigos. Virology findings were compared in 72 patients with either chicken pox, herpes, zona or other "viral" infections, where the viral origin was not absolutely clear, and a population of healthy volunteers. Results confirmed the indefinite viral nature of these affections. However, recent studies have shown that definite viral disorders are not always associated with an increase in antibody levels, and the intervention of a virus should not be totally discounted in some of these affections, especially as several particularly demonstrative cases have provided confirmation of a virus origin, particularly the Epstein-Barr virus.

  12. [Hepatoblastoma, Etiology, Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Puchmajerová, A; Křepelová, A; Indráková, J; Sítková, R; Balaščak, I; Kruseová, J; Švojgr, K; Kodet, R; Kynčl, M; Vícha, A; Macek, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm in general, yet, it is the most common liver malignancy in children with the incidence about one per milion children. This type of liver tumor usually occurs before the age of three years. The etiology of hepatoblastoma remains unknown. However, there are some genetic conditions known to be associated with an increased risk of developing hepatoblastoma such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, APC-associated polyposis, α-1-antitrypsin defficiency and some metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia, galactosemia and glycogen storage disease type 1. There is a higher risk of hepatoblastoma in children with very low birthweight, children who acquire hepatitis B at an early age and children with congenital biliary atresia.

  13. Diagnosis and Control of Viral Diseases of Reproductive Importance: Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Both bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine herpesvirus 1 can have significant negative reproductive impacts on cattle health. Vaccination is the primary control method for the viral pathogens in US cattle herds. Polyvalent, modified-live vaccines are recommended to provide optimal protection against various viral field strains. Of particular importance to bovine viral diarrhea control is the limitation of contact of pregnant cattle with potential viral reservoirs during the critical first 125 days of gestation.

  14. Attenuation of vaccinia Tian Tan strain by removal of viral TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shifu; Wang, Yuhang; Sun, Lili; Jia, Peng; Qi, Yanxin; Su, Jiaqiang; Liu, Lei; Yang, Guohua; Liu, Liming; Wang, Zhuoyue; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Guangchen; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao; Ding, Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was attenuated by deletion of the TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes to generate MVTT3. The mutant was generated by replacing the open reading frames by a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) flanked by loxP sites. Viruses expressing EGFP were then screened for and purified by serial plaque formation. In a second step the marker EGFP gene was removed by transfecting cells with a plasmid encoding cre recombinase and selecting for viruses that had lost the EGFP phenotype. The MVTT3 mutant was shown to be avirulent and immunogenic. These results support the conclusion that TC7L-TK2L and TA35R deletion mutants can be used as safe viral vectors or as platform for vaccines.

  15. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV-1 Subtypes A, B, G and Unique Recombinant AC and AD Viral Strains Identified in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Holzmayer, Vera; Jacobs, Graeme B.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Brennan, Catherine A.; Hackett, John; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By the end of 2012, more than 6.1 million people were infected with HIV-1 in South Africa. Subtype C was responsible for the majority of these infections and more than 300 near full-length genomes (NFLGs) have been published. Currently very few non-subtype C isolates have been identified and characterized within the country, particularly full genome non-C isolates. Seven patients from the Tygerberg Virology (TV) cohort were previously identified as possible non-C subtypes and were selected for further analyses. RNA was isolated from five individuals (TV047, TV096, TV101, TV218, and TV546) and DNA from TV016 and TV1057. The NFLGs of these samples were amplified in overlapping fragments and sequenced. Online subtyping tools REGA version 3 and jpHMM were used to screen for subtypes and recombinants. Maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis (phyML) was used to infer subtypes and SimPlot was used to confirm possible intersubtype recombinants. We identified three subtype B (TV016, TV047, and TV1057) isolates, one subtype A1 (TV096), one subtype G (TV546), one unique AD (TV101), and one unique AC (TV218) recombinant form. This is the first NFLG of subtype G that has been described in South Africa. The subtype B sequences described also increased the NFLG subtype B sequences in Africa from three to six. There is a need for more NFLG sequences, as partial HIV-1 sequences may underrepresent viral recombinant forms. It is also necessary to continue monitoring the evolution and spread of HIV-1 in South Africa, because understanding viral diversity may play an important role in HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:25492033

  16. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  17. BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction enzyme maps of the DNAs of herpes simplex virus strains Justin and F: occurrence of heterogeneities in defined regions of the viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Locker, H; Frenkel, N

    1979-01-01

    We present the locations of the cleavage sites for the BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction endonucleases within the DNA molecules of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains Justin and F. These restriction enzymes cleave the HSV-1 DNA at many sites, producing relatively small fragments which should prove useful in future studies of HSV-1 gene structure and function. The mapping data revealed the occurrence of heterogeneity within three regions of the viral genome including (i) the region spanning map coordinates 0.74--0.76, (ii) the ends of the large (L) DNA component, and (iii) the junction between the large (L) and the small (S) components. The heterogeneity in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of HSV-1 (Justin) and HSV-1 (F) DNAs was grossly similar to that previously reported to occur in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of the HSV-1 (KOS) DNA (M. J. Wagner and W. C. Summers, J. Virol. 27:374--387, 1978). Thus, cleavage of these regions with restriction endonucleases yielded sets of minor fragments differing in size by constant increments. However, the various strains of HSV-1 differed with respect to the numbers, size increments, and relative molarities of the various minor fragments, suggesting that the parameters of the heterogeneity are inherited in the structural makeup of the HSV-1 genome. The strain dependence of the pattern of heterogeneity can be most easily explained in terms of variable sizes of the terminally reiterated a sequence, contained in the DNA molecules of these three strains of HSV-1. Images PMID:228068

  18. Etiologic heterogeneity in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, S B; Reich, T; Cloninger, C R

    1987-01-01

    Etiologic heterogeneity in alcohol abuse was evaluated in 195 extended pedigrees, comprising 288 nuclear families of 140 male and 55 female Caucasian American hospitalized alcoholics. Previous adoption studies in Sweden demonstrated differential heritability of two patterns of alcohol abuse in men: type-2 alcoholism exhibited early onset of abuse associated with criminal behavior, while type-1 abuse began at a later age, uncomplicated by antisocial traits. Alcohol abuse in female Swedish adoptees was relatively homogeneous and similar to the late-onset, type-1 abuse. The notion of etiologic heterogeneity, as suggested by the Stockholm Adoption Studies, was examined in the American pedigrees by contrasting the models of familial transmission of susceptibility to alcoholism obtained via segregation analyses of families of male versus female probands. Families of male probands demonstrated significant familial resemblance, accounted for by a multifactorial-polygenic background in addition to a major (gene) effect. In contrast, familial resemblance in the pedigrees of female probands was attributed solely to a multifactorial-polygenic effect. We considered whether some families of male alcoholics were similar to families of female probands, who expressed type-1 abuse predominantly. Pedigrees of male probands were separated in two groups: (1) "female-like" families had a better likelihood for the model obtained for families of female probands than the one for families of all male probands, (2) "male-like" families had a better likelihood for the model of familial transmission describing families of all male probands. A statistically significant difference in the pattern of familial transmission was observed between the "male-like" and "female-like" groups. Discriminant function analysis of alcohol-related symptoms showed that the familial subtypes differed in clinical features as well. Alcohol abuse by male relatives in "male-like" families was characterized by the

  19. Molecular characterization of feline infectious peritonitis virus strain DF-2 and studies of the role of ORF3abc in viral cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Zádori, Zoltán; Hornyák, Ákos; Dencso, László; Almazán, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis; Belák, Sándor

    2012-06-01

    The full-length genome of the highly lethal feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) strain DF-2 was sequenced and cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to study the role of ORF3abc in the FIPV-feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) transition. The reverse genetic system allowed the replacement of the truncated ORF3abc of the original FIPV DF-2 genome with the intact ORF3abc of the canine coronavirus (CCoV) reference strain Elmo/02. The in vitro replication kinetics of these two viruses was studied in CrFK and FCWF-4 cell lines, as well as in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Both viruses showed similar replication kinetics in established cell lines. However, the strain with a full-length ORF3 showed markedly lower replication of more than 2 log(10) titers in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Our results suggest that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II FIPV.

  20. Viral epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  1. Issues and updates in emerging neurologic viral infections.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael R; Tyler, Kenneth L

    2011-07-01

    This review discusses the recent advances in the identification of viral pathogens and other etiologies responsible for cases of suspected viral encephalitis. The authors describe new molecular diagnostic strategies for identifying novel causes of viral encephalitis, including MassTag PCR, DNA microarrays, and high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. They also highlight the increasing recognition of immune-mediated causes of encephalitis among those cases previously thought to be viral encephalitis of unknown etiology. Lastly, they review some of the most recent updates in the field of emerging neurologic viral infections impacting the United States, including the neurologic complications of H1N1 virus and the reemergence of dengue virus in the Florida Keys.

  2. Epilepsy in the tropics: Emerging etiologies.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa Moog, Jaime; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Tan, Chong Tin

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is considered by the World Health Organization a public health priority with more than 50 million human beings affected by the disease. More than 80% of persons with epilepsy live in low and middle income countries and most of them in tropical areas. Several emerging, re-emerging and neglected diseases are symptomatic etiologies that jointly contribute to the enormous global burden of epilepsy. Besides the clinical strengths to reduce diagnostic and treatment gaps, other strategies in social, economic, cultural, educational and health policies are needed to prevent and treat appropriately vulnerable and affected persons with epilepsy. From the public health point of view, several of those strategies could be more effective in reducing the incidence and burden of the disease than the clinical approach of diagnosis and treatment. Special attention has to be given to stigma reduction and promotion of human rights. Several aspects mentioned in this abstract slip away the scope of the article, but it is a remainder to approach epilepsy in an inter- and transdisciplinary manner, an integral and pertinent approach needed and requested in tropical counties. The article focuses only on emergent and re-emergent etiologies of epilepsy in the tropics like malaria, HIV, neurocysticercosis, viral encephalitis and traumatic brain injury.

  3. Viral Miniproteins

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses encode short transmembrane proteins that play vital roles in virus replication or virulence. Because these proteins are often less than 50 amino acids long and not homologous to cellular proteins, their open reading frames were often overlooked during the initial annotation of viral genomes. Some of these proteins oligomerize in membranes and form ion channels. Other miniproteins bind to cellular transmembrane proteins and modulate their activity, whereas still others have an unknown mechanism of action. Based on the underlying principles of transmembrane miniprotein structure, it is possible to build artificial small transmembrane proteins that modulate a variety of biological processes. These findings suggest that short transmembrane proteins provide a versatile mechanism to regulate a wide range of cellular activities, and we speculate that cells also express many similar proteins that have not yet been discovered. PMID:24742054

  4. Reduced maximal inhibition in phenotypic susceptibility assays indicates that viral strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc utilize inhibitor-bound receptor for entry.

    PubMed

    Westby, Mike; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Mori, Julie; Lewis, Marilyn; Mosley, Michael; Stockdale, Mark; Dorr, Patrick; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Perros, Manos

    2007-03-01

    Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist in clinical development as one of a new class of antiretrovirals targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor binding. We investigated the mechanism of HIV resistance to maraviroc by using in vitro sequential passage and site-directed mutagenesis. Serial passage through increasing maraviroc concentrations failed to select maraviroc-resistant variants from some laboratory-adapted and clinical isolates of HIV-1. However, high-level resistance to maraviroc was selected from three of six primary isolates passaged in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The SF162 strain acquired resistance to maraviroc in both treated and control cultures; all resistant variants were able to use CXCR4 as a coreceptor. In contrast, maraviroc-resistant virus derived from isolates CC1/85 and RU570 remained CCR5 tropic, as evidenced by susceptibility to the CCR5 antagonist SCH-C, resistance to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, and an inability to replicate in CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 PBL. Strain-specific mutations were identified in the V3 loop of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 and RU570. The envelope-encoding region of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 was inserted into an NL4-3 background. This recombinant virus was completely resistant to maraviroc but retained susceptibility to aplaviroc. Reverse mutation of gp120 residues 316 and 323 in the V3 loop (numbering from HXB2) to their original sequence restored wild-type susceptibility to maraviroc, while reversion of either mutation resulted in a partially sensitive virus with reduced maximal inhibition (plateau). The plateaus are consistent with the virus having acquired the ability to utilize maraviroc-bound receptor for entry. This hypothesis was further corroborated by the observation that a high concentration of maraviroc blocks the activity of aplaviroc against maraviroc-resistant virus.

  5. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) By Mayo Clinic Staff Viral gastroenteritis is an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and ...

  6. The PSAP motif within the ORF3 protein of an avian strain of the hepatitis E virus is not critical for viral infectivity in vivo but plays a role in virus release.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Pudupakam, R S; Huang, Yao-Wei; Pierson, F William; LeRoith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-05-01

    The ORF3 protein of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a multifunctional protein important for virus replication. The ORF3 proteins from human, swine, and avian strains of HEV contain a conserved PXXP amino acid motif, resembling either Src homology 3 (SH3) cell signaling interaction motifs or "late domains" involved in host cell interactions aiding in particle release. Using an avian strain of HEV, we determined the roles of the conserved prolines within the PREPSAPP motif in HEV replication and infectivity in Leghorn male hepatoma (LMH) chicken liver cells and in chickens. Each proline was changed to alanine to produce 8 avian HEV mutants containing single mutations (P64, P67, P70, and P71 to A), double mutations (P64/67A, P64/70A, and P67/70A), and triple mutations (P64/67/70A). The results showed that avian HEV mutants are replication competent in vitro, and none of the prolines in the PXXPXXPP motif are essential for infectivity in vivo; however, the second and third prolines appear to aid in fecal virus shedding, suggesting that the PSAP motif, but not the PREP motif, is involved in virus release. We also showed that the PSAP motif interacts with the host protein tumor suppressor gene 101 (TSG101) and that altering any proline within the PSAP motif disrupts this interaction. However, we showed that the ORF2 protein expressed in LMH cells is efficiently released from the cells in the absence of ORF3 and that coexpression of ORF2 and ORF3 did not act synergistically in this release, suggesting that another factor(s) such as ORF1 or viral genomic RNA may be necessary for proper particle release.

  7. Etiologic diagnosis of jaw osteonecrosis, other than bisphosphonate and radiotherapy related osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Magremanne, M; Picheca, S; Reychler, H

    2014-02-01

    Our purpose was to highlight the various etiologies of maxillo-mandibular osteonecrosis, other than radiotherapy and biphosphonate related osteitis that have been abundantly reported. We performed a PubMed search from August 1, 1972 to August 1, 2012 using the following MeSH terms: "osteonecrosis", "bone", "necrosis", "jaw", "maxilla", "mandible", "palate", "oral", "avascular necrosis", NOT "bisphosphonate" NOT "osteoradionecrosis". Most cases of osteonecrosis were iatrogenic. Viral, mycotic, or bacterial infections were less frequent causes. Cocaine abuse, Wegener's granulomatosis, and N/K lymphoma were other etiologies. It is important to identify the various etiologies rapidly to manage this sometimes very mutilating condition adequately.

  8. [Etiologic diagnosis of jaw osteonecrosis, other than bisphosphonate and radiotherapy related osteitis].

    PubMed

    Magremanne, M; Picheca, S; Reychler, H

    2014-02-01

    Our purpose was to highlight the various etiologies of maxillo-mandibular osteonecrosis, other than radiotherapy and biphosphonate related osteitis that have been abundantly reported. We performed a PubMed search from August 1, 1972 to August 1, 2012 using the following MeSH terms: "osteonecrosis", "bone", "necrosis", "jaw", "maxilla", "mandible", "palate", "oral", "avascular necrosis", NOT "bisphosphonate" NOT "osteoradionecrosis". Most cases of osteonecrosis were iatrogenic. Viral, mycotic, or bacterial infections were less frequent causes. Cocaine abuse, Wegener's granulomatosis, and N/K lymphoma were other etiologies. It is important to identify the various etiologies rapidly to manage this sometimes very mutilating condition adequately.

  9. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L.; Sempértegui, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. Methods This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Results Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929 PMID:28182741

  10. Human viral cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Ristic, Arsen D; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Viral infection of the heart is relatively common, usually asymptomatic and has a spontaneous and complete resolution. It can, however, in rare cases, lead to substantial cardiac damage, development of viral cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Viral cardiomyopathy is defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (<14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm ) the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in dilated cardiomyopathy should be applied. The diagnosis of myocarditis and viral cardiomyopathy can be made only by endomyocardial biopsy, implementing the WHO/WHF criteria, and PCR techniques for identification of viral genome. The most frequent cardiotropic viruses detected by endomyocardial biopsy are Parvo B19, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, cytomegalovirus, and less frequently Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza virus.

  11. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases.

  12. [Role of poliomyelitis viruses in the etiology of serous meningitis in Odessa 1979-1983].

    PubMed

    Zevakov, V F; Semak, S Ia; Titarenko, V I; Andreĭchenko, N V; Gedzul, O V

    1987-01-01

    The etiology of aseptic meningitides has been studied in the patients hospitalized in the Odessa city clinical hospital in 1979-1983. Altogether 268 strains of enteroviruses have been isolated, among them 105 poliomyelitis viruses (38.8%); 26 poliomyelitis virus strains have been isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. Most frequently, type I poliovirus has been isolated. Poliovirus strains isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid had the genetic markers of virulent strains. The authors believe that isolation of poliomyelitis virus from the cerebrospinal fluid in aseptic meningitis proves its etiological role in the disease.

  13. Etiology of Depression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Shirley J.; Markham, Ramona A.

    2005-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is experienced by a significant proportion of youth today, occurring at an earlier age than found in previous generations. Major Depressive Disorder can produce long-lasting detrimental effects on a child's life, which raises the question of etiology. Three areas were examined for evidence identifying specific…

  14. ViralZone: a knowledge resource to understand virus diversity.

    PubMed

    Hulo, Chantal; de Castro, Edouard; Masson, Patrick; Bougueleret, Lydie; Bairoch, Amos; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The molecular diversity of viruses complicates the interpretation of viral genomic and proteomic data. To make sense of viral gene functions, investigators must be familiar with the virus host range, replication cycle and virion structure. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive resource bridging together textbook knowledge with genomic and proteomic sequences. ViralZone web resource (www.expasy.org/viralzone/) provides fact sheets on all known virus families/genera with easy access to sequence data. A selection of reference strains (RefStrain) provides annotated standards to circumvent the exponential increase of virus sequences. Moreover ViralZone offers a complete set of detailed and accurate virion pictures.

  15. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  16. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Virus Families Arenaviruses Old World/New World ...

  17. THE ETIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Noll, Katia Sutyak; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection among women of childbearing age. This condition is notorious for causing severe complications related to the reproductive health of women. Five decades of intense research established many risk factors for acquisition of BV, however due to the complexity of BV and due to lack of a reliable animal model for this condition, its exact etiology remains elusive. In this manuscript we use a historical perspective to critically review the development of major theories on the etiology of BV, ultimately implicating BV-related pathogens, healthy vaginal microbiota, bacteriophages and the immune response of the host. None of these theories on their own can reliably explain the epidemiological data. Instead, BV is caused by a complex interaction of multiple factors, which include the numerous components of the vaginal microbial ecosystem and their human host. Many of these factors are yet to be characterized because a clear understanding of their relative contribution to the etiology of BV is pivotal to formulation of an effective treatment for and prophylaxis of this condition. PMID:21332897

  18. Viral-associated glomerulopathies in children

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections associate temporally with the onset of many glomerular diseases, particularly in children. In other cases of glomerulonephritis, when infection is clinically silent, viral syndromes can still be implicated as a trigger. However, strong evidence for viral causality in most glomerular disease is still lacking. While numerous case reports in children document the occurrence of specific forms of glomerular disease after seroconversion to a wide range of viruses, relatively few reports provide pathologic evidence of viral infection associated with glomerular lesions on kidney biopsy. Strong associations between hepatitis viruses and glomerular injury have been acknowledged in adults, but hepatitis C virus appears not to be an etiology in children. In the context of treating glomerular diseases, when diagnosed, the treatment of hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency virus in children with membranoproliferative, membranous and collapsing glomerulopathy plays an important role. Otherwise, there is no evidence suggesting that the identification of a viral infection in a child with glomerulopathy should change the management of the infection or the glomerulonephritis. Therefore, additional research into this topic is very much needed. PMID:25752759

  19. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  20. Etiology of myasthenia gravis: innate immunity signature in pathological thymus.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Cufi, Perrine; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), whose clinical hallmark is muscle weakness and early fatigability. The main target of autoimmunity in MG is the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) located in the NMJ. It is now widely accepted that the thymus is probably the prime site of autoimmunity development and maintenance in AChR-positive MG patients; however, the exact mechanisms triggering and perpetuating the intra-thymic autoimmune response to AChR are still unknown. As with many autoimmune diseases, MG has a multifactorial etiology, resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, as fully described in this review. Among environmental factors, viral infections could play a central role in autoimmunity, mainly through the induction of dysregulated Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated innate immune responses, which can lead to inflammation and adaptive autoimmune response. Growing evidence of chronic inflammation, TLR activation, and persistent viral infections in the thymus of MG patients, strongly supports the hypothesis that, in the context of a genetic susceptible background, the intrathymic innate immune responses to pathogen infections might contribute to MG etiology.

  1. Viruses and Bacteria in the Etiology of the Common Cold

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Mika J.; Puhakka, Tuomo; Ruuskanen, Olli; Leinonen, Maija; Saikku, Pekka; Kimpimäki, Marko; Blomqvist, Soile; Hyypiä, Timo; Arstila, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    Two hundred young adults with common colds were studied during a 10-month period. Virus culture, antigen detection, PCR, and serology with paired samples were used to identify the infection. Viral etiology was established for 138 of the 200 patients (69%). Rhinoviruses were detected in 105 patients, coronavirus OC43 or 229E infection was detected in 17, influenza A or B virus was detected in 12, and single infections with parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and enterovirus were found in 14 patients. Evidence for bacterial infection was found in seven patients. Four patients had a rise in antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, one had a rise in antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae, one had a rise in antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, and one had immunoglobulin M antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The results show that although approximately 50% of episodes of the common cold were caused by rhinoviruses, the etiology can vary depending on the epidemiological situation with regard to circulating viruses. Bacterial infections were rare, supporting the concept that the common cold is almost exclusively a viral disease. PMID:9466772

  2. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  3. Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our

  4. Bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Carol; Togawa, Yu; Shindo, Nahoko

    2013-09-01

    Influenza-associated bacterial and viral infections are responsible for high levels of morbidity and death during pandemic and seasonal influenza episodes. A review was undertaken to assess and evaluate the incidence, epidemiology, aetiology, clinical importance and impact of bacterial and viral co-infection and secondary infection associated with influenza. A review was carried out of published articles covering bacterial and viral infections associated with pandemic and seasonal influenza between 1918 and 2009 (and published through December 2011) to include both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary infections. While pneumococcal infection remains the predominant cause of bacterial pneumonia, the review highlights the importance of other co- and secondary bacterial and viral infections associated with influenza, and the emergence of newly identified dual infections associated with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Severe influenza-associated pneumonia is often bacterial and will necessitate antibiotic treatment. In addition to the well-known bacterial causes, less common bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila may also be associated with influenza when new influenza strains emerge. This review should provide clinicians with an overview of the range of bacterial and viral co- or secondary infections that could present with influenza illness.

  5. [Etiological factors in Burkitt's disease].

    PubMed

    Capdevielle, P; Darie, H; Barabé, P

    1983-01-01

    Different aetiological factors of Burkitt's disease, or Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) are considered in an analytical, then synthetical point of view, according to present admitted facts. Epidemiologic data are recalled in order to assign a place to the disease. Relations with Epstein-Barr virus (E.B.V.) are well-known by comparative pathology (connections between animal tumors and herpetic virus), virologic and serologic studies; the role of E.B.V. is based on the presence of viral genomas and nuclear antigens in tumoral cells of B.L.; there are B.L. without E.B.V., but constantly improved study of anti-E.B.V. antibodies, and viral markers, will may be decrease their number. Connections with malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum are recognized. Discovery of chromosomal aberrations is a new important stage. At the present time, it is generally guessed that: a) the initiation of malignant process might be induced by E.B.V. b) an external agent might cause the promotion of cellular division. c) chromosomal abnormality might be responsible for the malignant transformation.

  6. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction related to viral infections.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, R; Ricciardiello, L; Naponelli, V; Selgrad, M; Piazzi, G; Felicani, C; Serra, M; Fronzoni, L; Antonucci, A; Cogliandro, R F; Barbara, G; Corinaldesi, R; Tonini, M; Knowles, C H; Stanghellini, V

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), one of the most severe gastrointestinal motility disorders, is a condition characterized by a clinical picture mimicking small bowel occlusion with related symptoms and signs in the absence of demonstrable mechanical obstruction. Analysis of full-thickness biopsy samples may unravel structural changes of the neuromuscular layer involving the whole gut, although the midgut is usually worst affected. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction can occur in association with systemic neurological, endocrine, and connective tissue diseases or malignancy but, when no recognizable etiology is found, CIPO is referred to as idiopathic (CIIPO). The latter form can be diagnosed early in life due to a genetic etiology or in adulthood when a viral origin may be considered. This review addresses the hypothesis that some systemic neurotrophic viral infections can affect the enteric nervous system thereby altering normal peristaltic activity. Available data are reviewed, focusing specifically on herpesviruses or polyomaviruses (JC virus). These suggest that in comparison to a proportion of CIIPO patients, healthy controls rarely harbor viral DNA in the myenteric plexus, leaving open the possibility that a viral infection might have an etiologic role in the development of CIIPO. The review thus provides some new perspectives in the pathophysiology and perhaps targeted treatment of CIIPO.

  7. Noise Injury: Etiology and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to noise might be responsible for a wide and varied spectrum of physical and mental morbidity, although many of the claims of cause and effect relationship are controversial and unproven. The etiological relationship between noise and high frequency hearing loss is, however, well documented. While noise-induced hearing loss is considered to be primarily an occupational problem, current leisure time activities have created the potential for it to become more common in the community at large. Once developed, this hearing loss is permanent and cannot be influenced by therapy. Noise-induced hearing loss is almost completely preventable and the family physician has an important responsibility for primary and secondary prevention, whether the noise source is in the workplace or in some other location. PMID:21286519

  8. Bats as Viral Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hayman, David T S

    2016-09-29

    Bats are hosts of a range of viruses, including ebolaviruses, and many important human viral infections, such as measles and mumps, may have their ancestry traced back to bats. Here, I review viruses of all viral families detected in global bat populations. The viral diversity in bats is substantial, and viruses with all known types of genomic structures and replication strategies have been discovered in bats. However, the discovery of viruses is not geographically even, with some apparently undersampled regions, such as South America. Furthermore, some bat families, including those with global or wide distributions such as Emballonuridae and Miniopteridae, are underrepresented on viral databases. Future studies, including those that address these sampling gaps along with those that develop our understanding of viral-host relationships, are highlighted.

  9. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  10. Clinical and experimental aspects of viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K; Blay, R; Haisch, C; Lodge, A; Weller, A; Huber, S

    1989-01-01

    Picornaviruses are frequently implicated as the etiological agents of acute myocarditis. This association is based historically on serological evidence of rising antibody titers to specific pathogens and more recently on identification of viral genomic material in endocardial biopsy specimens through in situ hybridization. Only rarely is infectious virus isolated from either the patient or the heart during periods of maximum myocardial inflammation and injury. Thus, despite a probable viral etiology, much interest centers on the role of the immune system in cardiac damage and the likelihood that the infection triggers an autoimmune response to heart-specific antigens. Heart-reactive antibodies and T cells are found in most myocarditis patients, and immunosuppressive therapy has proven beneficial in many, though not all, cases. Furthermore, murine models of coxsackievirus group B type 3-induced myocarditis also demonstrate that virus infection initiates autoimmunity and that these autoimmune effectors are predominately responsible for tissue injury. How virus-host interactions overcome presumed self-tolerance to heart antigens is discussed, and evidence supporting various theories of virus-initiated autoimmunity and disease pathogenesis are delineated. PMID:2650861

  11. ViralORFeome: an integrated database to generate a versatile collection of viral ORFs

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, J.; Tafforeau, L.; Lucas-Hourani, M.; Navratil, V.; Meyniel, L.; Achaz, G.; Guironnet-Paquet, A.; Aublin-Gex, A.; Caignard, G.; Cassonnet, P.; Chaboud, A.; Chantier, T.; Deloire, A.; Demeret, C.; Le Breton, M.; Neveu, G.; Jacotot, L.; Vaglio, P.; Delmotte, S.; Gautier, C.; Combet, C.; Deleage, G.; Favre, M.; Tangy, F.; Jacob, Y.; Andre, P.; Lotteau, V.; Rabourdin-Combe, C.; Vidalain, P. O.

    2010-01-01

    Large collections of protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) established in a versatile recombination-based cloning system have been instrumental to study protein functions in high-throughput assays. Such ‘ORFeome’ resources have been developed for several organisms but in virology, plasmid collections covering a significant fraction of the virosphere are still needed. In this perspective, we present ViralORFeome 1.0 (http://www.viralorfeome.com), an open-access database and management system that provides an integrated set of bioinformatic tools to clone viral ORFs in the Gateway® system. ViralORFeome provides a convenient interface to navigate through virus genome sequences, to design ORF-specific cloning primers, to validate the sequence of generated constructs and to browse established collections of virus ORFs. Most importantly, ViralORFeome has been designed to manage all possible variants or mutants of a given ORF so that the cloning procedure can be applied to any emerging virus strain. A subset of plasmid constructs generated with ViralORFeome platform has been tested with success for heterologous protein expression in different expression systems at proteome scale. ViralORFeome should provide our community with a framework to establish a large collection of virus ORF clones, an instrumental resource to determine functions, activities and binding partners of viral proteins. PMID:20007148

  12. ViralORFeome: an integrated database to generate a versatile collection of viral ORFs.

    PubMed

    Pellet, J; Tafforeau, L; Lucas-Hourani, M; Navratil, V; Meyniel, L; Achaz, G; Guironnet-Paquet, A; Aublin-Gex, A; Caignard, G; Cassonnet, P; Chaboud, A; Chantier, T; Deloire, A; Demeret, C; Le Breton, M; Neveu, G; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; Delmotte, S; Gautier, C; Combet, C; Deleage, G; Favre, M; Tangy, F; Jacob, Y; Andre, P; Lotteau, V; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Vidalain, P O

    2010-01-01

    Large collections of protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) established in a versatile recombination-based cloning system have been instrumental to study protein functions in high-throughput assays. Such 'ORFeome' resources have been developed for several organisms but in virology, plasmid collections covering a significant fraction of the virosphere are still needed. In this perspective, we present ViralORFeome 1.0 (http://www.viralorfeome.com), an open-access database and management system that provides an integrated set of bioinformatic tools to clone viral ORFs in the Gateway(R) system. ViralORFeome provides a convenient interface to navigate through virus genome sequences, to design ORF-specific cloning primers, to validate the sequence of generated constructs and to browse established collections of virus ORFs. Most importantly, ViralORFeome has been designed to manage all possible variants or mutants of a given ORF so that the cloning procedure can be applied to any emerging virus strain. A subset of plasmid constructs generated with ViralORFeome platform has been tested with success for heterologous protein expression in different expression systems at proteome scale. ViralORFeome should provide our community with a framework to establish a large collection of virus ORF clones, an instrumental resource to determine functions, activities and binding partners of viral proteins.

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus: From the Detection of Sequence Polymorphisms to the Recognition of Viral Types.

    PubMed

    Feederle, Regina; Klinke, Olaf; Kutikhin, Anton; Poirey, Remy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus is etiologically linked with the development of benign and malignant diseases, characterized by their diversity and a heterogeneous geographic distribution across the world. The virus possesses a 170-kb-large genome that encodes for multiple proteins and non-coding RNAs. Early on there have been numerous attempts to link particular diseases with particular EBV strains, or at least with viral genetic polymorphisms. This has given rise to a wealth of information whose value has been difficult to evaluate for at least four reasons. First, most studies have looked only at one particular gene and missed the global picture. Second, they usually have not studied sufficient numbers of diseased and control cases to reach robust statistical significance. Third, the functional significance of most polymorphisms has remained unclear, although there are exceptions such as the 30-bp deletion in LMP1. Fourth, different biological properties of the virus do not necessarily equate with a different pathogenicity. This was best illustrated by the type 1 and type 2 viruses that markedly differ in terms of their transformation abilities, yet do not seem to cause different diseases. Reciprocally, environmental and genetic factors in the host are likely to influence the outcome of infections with the same virus type. However, with recent developments in recombinant virus technology and in the availability of high throughput sequencing, the tide is now turning. The availability of 23 complete or nearly complete genomes has led to the recognition of viral subtypes, some of which possess nearly identical genotypes. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that some genetic polymorphisms among EBV strains markedly influence the biological and clinical behavior of the virus. Some virus strains are endowed with biological properties that explain crucial clinical features of patients with EBV-associated diseases. Although we now have a better overview of the genetic

  14. Syncope: epidemiology, etiology, and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose M. F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Syncope is a common medical problem, with a frequency between 15% and 39%. In the general population, the annual number episodes are 18.1–39.7 per 1000 patients, with similar incidence between genders. The first report of the incidence of syncope is 6.2 per 1000 person-years. However, there is a significant increase in the incidence of syncope after 70 years of age with rate annual 19.5 per thousand individuals after 80 years. It presents a recurrence rate of 35% and 29% of physical injury. Among the causes of syncope, the mediated neural reflex, known as neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope, is the most frequent. The others are of cardiac origin, orthostatic hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, neurological and endocrinological causes and psychiatric disorders. The diagnosis of syncope can be made by clinical method associated with the electrocardiogram in up 50% of patients. Its prognosis is determined by the underlying etiology specifically the presence and severity of cardiac disease. The annual mortality can reach between 18 and 33% if cardiac cause, and between 0 and 12% if the non-cardiac cause. Thus, it is imperative to identify its cause and risk stratification for positive impact in reducing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25538626

  15. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  16. Perspectives on retroviruses and the etiologic agent of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, G. D.

    1987-01-01

    In 1911, the first retrovirus was described: the Rous sarcoma virus, an avian retrovirus. Forty years later the murine leukemic virus, a mouse retrovirus, was reported. Although many other retroviruses from non-primate species were identified during the 1960s, the first primate retrovirus was not recognized until it was isolated from a monkey tumor in 1970. The search for human retroviruses in human leukemic cells remained unsuccessful at that time. Facilitated by the discovery of T-cell growth factor, a substance used for the propagation of human leukocytes in cultures, the first human retrovirus was discovered in 1980. Soon thereafter, in 1983, another human retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was reported and implicated as the etiologic agent of AIDS. The isolation and identification of HIV has stimulated much interest in the study of human retroviruses and the control of this new viral disease. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:2829449

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of the BioFire FilmArray Gastrointestinal Panel for Etiologic Diagnosis of Infectious Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Amy; Chapin, Kimberle; Fey, Paul D.; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Jones, Matthew K.; Rogatcheva, Margarita; Kanack, Kristen J.; Bourzac, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate treatment and control of infectious gastroenteritis depend on the ability to rapidly detect the wide range of etiologic agents associated with the disease. Clinical laboratories currently utilize an array of different methodologies to test for bacterial, parasitic, and viral causes of gastroenteritis, a strategy that suffers from poor sensitivity, potentially long turnaround times, and complicated ordering practices and workflows. Additionally, there are limited or no testing methods routinely available for most diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains, astroviruses, and sapoviruses. This study assessed the performance of the FilmArray Gastrointestinal (GI) Panel for the simultaneous detection of 22 different enteric pathogens directly from stool specimens: Campylobacter spp., Clostridium difficile (toxin A/B), Plesiomonas shigelloides, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, enteroaggregative E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (stx1 and stx2) (including specific detection of E. coli O157), Shigella spp./enteroinvasive E. coli, Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora cayetanensis, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, adenovirus F 40/41, astrovirus, norovirus GI/GII, rotavirus A, and sapovirus. Prospectively collected stool specimens (n = 1,556) were evaluated using the BioFire FilmArray GI Panel and tested with conventional stool culture and molecular methods for comparison. The FilmArray GI Panel sensitivity was 100% for 12/22 targets and ≥94.5% for an additional 7/22 targets. For the remaining three targets, sensitivity could not be calculated due to the low prevalences in this study. The FilmArray GI Panel specificity was ≥97.1% for all panel targets. The FilmArray GI Panel provides a comprehensive, rapid, and streamlined alternative to conventional methods for the etiologic diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis in the laboratory setting. The potential

  18. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  19. Ball Python Nidovirus: a Candidate Etiologic Agent for Severe Respiratory Disease in Python regius

    PubMed Central

    Stenglein, Mark D.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Wozniak, Edward J.; Wellehan, James F. X.; Kincaid, Anne; Gordon, Marcus; Porter, Brian F.; Baumgartner, Wes; Stahl, Scott; Kelley, Karen; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A severe, sometimes fatal respiratory disease has been observed in captive ball pythons (Python regius) since the late 1990s. In order to better understand this disease and its etiology, we collected case and control samples and performed pathological and diagnostic analyses. Electron micrographs revealed filamentous virus-like particles in lung epithelial cells of sick animals. Diagnostic testing for known pathogens did not identify an etiologic agent, so unbiased metagenomic sequencing was performed. Abundant nidovirus-like sequences were identified in cases and were used to assemble the genome of a previously unknown virus in the order Nidovirales. The nidoviruses, which were not previously known to infect nonavian reptiles, are a diverse order that includes important human and veterinary pathogens. The presence of the viral RNA was confirmed in all diseased animals (n = 8) but was not detected in healthy pythons or other snakes (n = 57). Viral RNA levels were generally highest in the lung and other respiratory tract tissues. The 33.5-kb viral genome is the largest RNA genome yet described and shares canonical characteristics with other nidovirus genomes, although several features distinguish this from related viruses. This virus, which we named ball python nidovirus (BPNV), will likely establish a new genus in Torovirinae subfamily. The identification of a novel nidovirus in reptiles contributes to our understanding of the biology and evolution of related viruses, and its association with lung disease in pythons is a promising step toward elucidating an etiology for this long-standing veterinary disease. PMID:25205093

  20. Viruses and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2014-11-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes.

  1. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  2. [Classification and etiology of hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Łacka, Katarzyna; Fraczek, Magdalena Maria

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of hyperthyroidism in women is between 0.5-2% and it is 10 times less common in men. The most common causes are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goiter, and autonomously functioning thyroid adenoma. Rare causes of hyperthyroidisms are as follow: pituitary adenoma, autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashitoxicosis), levothyroxine overdose, inadequate iodine supplementation (including amiodaron induced hyperthyroidism, iodine-based contrast media), hCG excess (pregnancy, gestational trophoblastic disease, germ-cell tumors), drug induced hyperthyroidism, differentiated thyroid carcinomas and/or their metastases, struma ovarii, and familial nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism. This article focuses on the current data of etiopathogenesis of hyperthyroidisms. Genetic factors (like HLA-DR3,CD40, CTLA-4, PTPN22, FOXP3 CD25) and thyroid specific genes (thyroglobulin, TSHR, G(s)alpha) and environmental and endogenous factors (such as age, iodine, selenium, emotional stress, smoking, gender, pregnancy, sex hormones, fetal microchimerism, fetal growth, bacterial infections, viral infections, allergies, drugs (alemtuzumab, interferon alpha, iplimumab/tremelimumab, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, denileukindiftitox, thalidomide/lenalidomide, exposition to fallout and radiotherapy) have been described.

  3. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  4. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed.

  5. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  6. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  7. Etiology of the 1965 epidemic of febrile illness in Nagpur City, Maharashtra State, India

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, F. M.; Patankar, M. R.; Banerjee, K.; Bhatt, P. N.; Goverdhan, M. K.; Pavri, K. M.; Vittal, M.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of an extensive outbreak of febrile illness during the months of April, May, and June 1965, in the city of Nagpur, Maharashtra State, showed that the main etiological agent was chikungunya virus. Dengue type 4 and Chandipura viruses were also active during this period. In all, 26 strains of virus were isolated from 60 acute phase human sera, and of these strains, 23 were identified as chikungunya virus, 2 as Chandipura, and 1 as dengue type 4. Five strains of chikungunya virus and 9 strains of dengue type 4 virus were isolated from 34 pools of Aedes aegypti collected from the affected areas. Results of complement fixation tests with acute—convalescent paired serum samples and single convalescent sera confirmed that chikungunya virus was the main etiological agent. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:4537481

  8. The evolution of bovine viral diarrhea: a review.

    PubMed

    Goens, S Denise

    2002-12-01

    The economic importance of bovine viral diarrhea is increasing with the emergence of seemingly more virulent viruses, as evidenced by outbreaks of hemorrhagic syndrome and severe acute bovine viral diarrhea beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. It appears that evolutionary changes in bovine viral diarrhea virus were responsible for these outbreaks. The genetic properties of the classical bovine viral diarrhea virus that contribute to the basis of current diagnostic tests, vaccines, and our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms are now being reevaluated because of these "new" virus strains. This shift in virulence has confounded both nomenclature and the significance of current bovine viral diarrhea virus categorization. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of bovine viral diarrhea virus with a chronological review of prevailing scientific tenets and practices as described in clinical and scientific North American veterinary journals and textbooks. The first part of this review describes how we have arrived at our current understanding of the viruses, the diseases, and their nomenclature. The second part of the review deals with current concepts in virology and how these concepts may both explain and predict bovine viral diarrhea virus pathogenesis. By reviewing how knowledge of bovine viral diarrhea has evolved and the theories of how the virus itself is able to evolve, the interpretation of diagnostic tests are more effectively utilized in the control and treatment of bovine viral diarrhea virus associated disease.

  9. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  10. Less Common Etiologies of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus is treated as a neurologic emergency and only later are the potential etiologies assessed. While sometimes the cause for status epilepticus is apparent (e.g., antiepileptic drug withdrawal), all too often it is not identified, even after extensive diagnostic testing has been performed. With emphasis on the less-common etiologies, this review will cover various probable and known causes of status epilepticus among adults, children, and those patients with refractory epilepsy. PMID:20231917

  11. Genome Sequence of a Subgenotype 1a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shandian; Du, Junzheng; Tian, Zhancheng; Xing, Shanshan; Luo, Jianxun; Liu, Guangyuan

    2016-01-01

    A bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), GS5, of the BVDV-1a subgenotype was isolated from dairy cattle in Gansu Province, northwest China. Its near-full-length genome was determined to be closely related to an early Belgian BVDV-1a strain, WAX-N, but the relatedness to domestic strains is relatively low, indicating that different genetic evolution occurred between the viral strains in cattle in China. PMID:27834720

  12. Acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, Robert; Crijns, Harry J.; Heymans, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Acute myocarditis is one of the most challenging diagnosis in cardiology. At present, no diagnostic gold standard is generally accepted, due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This leads to the need for new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical analysis of endomyocardial biopsies. Recent findings using these new diagnostic tests resulted in increased interest in inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a better understanding of its pathophysiology, the recognition in overlap of virus-mediated damage, inflammation, and autoimmune dysregulation. Novel results also pointed towards a broader spectrum of viral genomes responsible for acute myocarditis, indicating a shift of enterovirus and adenovirus to parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6. The present review proposes a general diagnostic approach, focuses on the viral aetiology and associated autoimmune processes, and reviews treatment options for patients with acute viral myocarditis. PMID:18617482

  13. [Vasculitis and viral infection].

    PubMed

    Martínez Aguilar, N E; Guido Bayardo, R; Vargas Camaño, M E; Compañ González, D; Miranda Feria, A J

    1997-01-01

    Viruses have been implicated in vasculitis. To determine activity of viral infection associated with vasculitis. 17 patients with vasculitis had been in immunological and antiviral antibodies evaluation. Twenty five healthy controls sex and age matched with hematic biometry (BH) and AA. All subjects were negative to HIV and HBV. Viral activity was demonstrated in eight patients; vascular purpura (5), Takayasu disease (1), polyarteritis nodosa (1), erythema nodosum (1). None subject of control group had IgM activity. Antibodies response of IgG in patients were of lesser intensity than in control group. 14 abnormalities in BH were found in patients and 4 in control group. Immune response in patients, measured by lymphocyte subpopulations and circulating immune complexes was abnormal. In conclusion 47% showed viral activity, but the dominant feature was abnormal immune response in 82%.

  14. Viral infections and allergies.

    PubMed

    Xepapadaki, Paraskevi; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections have been implicated in the origin of, protection from and exacerbation of allergy-related symptoms in a variety of ways. Viral infections are closely linked to infantile wheezing. Severe bronchiolitis in early infancy may predispose to chronic childhood asthma as well as allergic sensitization; alternatively it could represent a marker of susceptible individuals. In contrast, repeated mild infections in early life may have a protective role in the development of asthma or atopy by driving the immune system towards Th1 responses. However, evidence on this hypothesis is not consistent as far as respiratory viruses are concerned. Several factors, including the presence of an atopic environment, timing of exposure and severity of the infection, interactively contribute to the allergy-infection relationship. In the present report, recent data on the role of viral infections in the development and progression of allergy and asthma are reviewed.

  15. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  16. Viral apoptotic mimicry.

    PubMed

    Amara, Ali; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As opportunistic pathogens, viruses have evolved many elegant strategies to manipulate host cells for infectious entry and replication. Viral apoptotic mimicry, defined by the exposure of phosphatidylserine - a marker for apoptosis - on the pathogen surface, is emerging as a common theme used by enveloped viruses to promote infection. Focusing on the four best described examples (vaccinia virus, dengue virus, Ebola virus and pseudotyped lentivirus), we summarize our current understanding of apoptotic mimicry as a mechanism for virus entry, binding and immune evasion. We also describe recent examples of non-enveloped viruses that use this mimicry strategy, and discuss future directions and how viral apoptotic mimicry could be targeted therapeutically.

  17. Advances in viral oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 of Advances in Viral Oncology presents experimental approaches to multifactorial interactions in tumor development. Included are in-depth analyses of malignant phenotypes by oncogene complementation, as well as studies of complementary interactions among DNA viral oncogenes; multiple cell-derived sequences in single retroviral genomes; and sequences that influence the transforming activity and expression of the mos oncogene. The genetic regulation of tumorigenic expression in somatic cell hybrids, the inhibition of oncogenes by cellular genes, and the interaction of genes that favor and genes that suppress tumorigenesis are examined in detail. The book concludes with a study of the relationship of oncogenes to the evolution of the metastatic phenotype.

  18. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  19. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  20. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  1. Marine Viral Pathogens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    toxin producing microalgae (Raphidophyceae). Although we have not definitively shown that the pathogen is viral, it has many characteristics that...Society America, Miami, FL, June 1994. 40.Hennes, K.P. and C.A. Suttle. 1994. The use of cyanine dyes for quantifying free viruses in natural water

  2. Inflammatory response in mixed viral-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of mixed pneumonia (virus + bacteria) in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been described in recent years. However, it is not known whether the systemic inflammatory profile is different compared to monomicrobial CAP. We wanted to investigate this profile of mixed viral-bacterial infection and to compare it to monomicrobial bacterial or viral CAP. Methods We measured baseline serum procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in 171 patients with CAP with definite etiology admitted to a tertiary hospital: 59 (34.5%) bacterial, 66 (39.%) viral and 46 (27%) mixed (viral-bacterial). Results Serum PCT levels were higher in mixed and bacterial CAP compared to viral CAP. CRP levels were higher in mixed CAP compared to the other groups. CRP was independently associated with mixed CAP. CRP levels below 26 mg/dL were indicative of an etiology other than mixed in 83% of cases, but the positive predictive value was 45%. PCT levels over 2.10 ng/mL had a positive predictive value for bacterial-involved CAP versus viral CAP of 78%, but the negative predictive value was 48%. Conclusions Mixed CAP has a different inflammatory pattern compared to bacterial or viral CAP. High CRP levels may be useful for clinicians to suspect mixed CAP. PMID:25073709

  3. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  4. Geographic dynamics of viral encephalitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hutchaleelaha, Sombat; Jiwariyavej, Vitaya; Barbazan, Philippe; Nitatpattana, Narong; Yoksan, Sutee; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2003-06-01

    Viral encephalitis (VE) continues to be a major disease in Asia, causing serious illness which may result in death or have neurological sequelae. This study involves an ecological analysis of the climatic, geographic and seasonal patterns of clinically reported VE in Thailand from 1993 to 1998 to investigate regional and seasonal differences in disease incidence. Three thousand eight hundred and twenty nine cases of VE were clinically diagnosed nationwide during the study period by the Thai Ministry of Public Health. Spearman rank correlations of temporal, spatial and geographic variables with disease incidence were performed. The monthly incidence of VE correlated significantly with seasonal changes in temperature, relative humidity and rainfall in the north-northeast region of Thailand (P < 0.001), whereas incidence in the south-central region correlated only with relative humidity (P = 0.003). Spatial analysis revealed a positive correlation of disease with elevation (P < 0.001), and negative correlations with rice-field cover (P < 0.001), agricultural land-use (P < 0.001) and temperature (P = 0.004) in the north-northeast region. No significant spatial correlation was identified in the south-central region. The spatial distribution of VE suggests that etiologic variations may be responsible, in part, for the geographic patterns of disease. Active etiologic surveillance is necessary in a variety of geographic settings in order to provide physicians with information necessary for disease prevention and clinical management.

  5. HEV, TTV and GBV-C/HGV markers in patients with acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A C; Pinho, J R R; Silva, L K; Sousa, L; Saraceni, C P; Braga, E L; Pereira, J E; Zarife, M A S; Reis, M G; Lyra, L G C; Silva, L C da; Carrilho, F J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of HEV, TTV and GBV-C/GBV-C/HGV in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. We evaluated sera of 94 patients from a sentinel program who had acute hepatitis A (N = 40), B (N = 42) and non-A-C (N = 12); 71 blood donors served as controls. IgM and anti-HEV IgG antibodies were detected by enzyme immunoassay using commercial kits. TTV and GBV-C/HGV were detected by nested PCR; genotyping was done by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Anti-HEV IgG was present in 38, 10 and 17% of patients with hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. Four patients with hepatitis A and 1 with non-A-C hepatitis also had anti-HEV IgM detected in serum. TTV was detected in 21% of patients with acute hepatitis and in 31% of donors. GBV-C/HGV was detected in 9% of patients with hepatitis, and in 10% of donors. We found TTV isolates of genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 and GBV-C/HGV isolates of genotypes 1 and 2. Mean aminotransferase levels were lower in patients who were TTV or GBV-C/HGV positive. In conclusion, the detection of anti-HEV IgM in some acute hepatitis A cases suggests co-infection with HEV and hepatitis E could be the etiology of a few cases of sporadic non-A-C hepatitis in Salvador, Brazil. TTV genotype 1, 2, 3 and 4 isolates and GBV-C/HGV genotype 1 and 2 strains are frequent in the studied population. TTV and GBV-C/HGV infection does not appear to have a role in the etiology of acute hepatitis.

  6. [Xerostomia: clinic, etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Guobis, Zygimantas; Baseviciene, Nomeda; Paipaliene, Pajauta; Sabalys, Gintautas; Kubilius, Ricardas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the problem of xerostomia considering its clinical, etiological, diagnostic and treatment features, basing on the today's tutorials and scientific articles found in databases on the Internet. Recent epidemiologic data on the prevalence of xerostomia in different countries are introduced. There are analyzed the main aspects of clinical manifestations of xerostomia, according to the different etiology analyzed. The most common etiological factors causing xerostomia, especially the main three of them: radiation therapy, Sjögren's syndrome, and drugs, are pointed out. The most popular and accepted clinical and laboratory assays for measuring and evaluating the function of salivary glands are represented. Attention is paid to xerostomia as substantiation of the separate diagnosis and its role in diagnosing other diseases. The concept of possible treatment modalities and prognosis are discussed. The main and most common problems concerning xerostomia are revealed.

  7. Strokes in Thai children : etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Visudhiphan, P; Chiemchanya, S; Wattanasirichaigoon, D

    1996-12-01

    In Asian countries, specific etiology and outcome of stroke in children are rarely reported. During January 1979 to December 1997, 68 children with stroke, admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok were reviewed for etiology and outcome; 38 patients (22 males) had ischemic stroke and 30 (20 males) had hemorrhagic stroke. Severe headache, vomiting, disturbance of consciousness and papilledema were prominent presentations of hemorrhagic stroke. Bleeding from vascular anomalies of the brain (AVM) was the most common etiology of hemorrhagic stroke while septic and non-septic emboli from congenital and acquired heart diseases were the most common cause of ischemic stroke. The mortality rate was 7% and 9% in hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, respectively. Complete recovery was observed in 52% of cases of hemorrhagic stroke but in only 26% of ischemic stroke. Hemiparesis was the most common residual neurological deficit with higher occurrence in ischemic stroke.

  8. Etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sanjad, Sami A

    2010-01-01

    While most hypertension in children has been previously considered secondary to renal, cardiovascular or endocrine etiology, a substantial number of children aged 6 to 20 years are now diagnosed with primary or essential hypertension. Hypertension in children and adolescents seems to be increasing over the past two decades. This is attributed at least in part to an increased prevalence of overweight in this population. Essential hypertension in childhood is a diagnosis arrived at by excluding the known causes of secondary hypertension. This paper will discuss the etiology of hypertension in children and adolescents.

  9. Systemic and Odontogenic Etiologies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Systemic and odontogenic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis, although rare, are an integral consideration in the comprehensive management of patients with sinonasal disease. Proper knowledge and timely recognition of each disease process, with referrals to appropriate consultants, will facilitate treatment, because many of these conditions require both local and systemic therapy. In some instances, medical therapy plays a pivotal role, with surgery being a supplemental treatment technique. We review the most commonly encountered systemic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis and odontogenic sinusitis, including clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and treatment outcomes.

  10. Etiology, diagnosis and management of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Manes, R Peter; Batra, Pete S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common health care problem, yet many aspects of this diagnosis remain poorly understood. Its etiology is often debated and remains a significant area of research. The diagnosis of CRS is based on subjective symptoms, duration of symptoms and objective evidence of inflammation. Each of these criteria must be met to make a diagnosis of CRS. Management of CRS often involves a combination of systemic and topical therapies with surgery reserved for patients who fail medical therapy. This review provides a comprehensive view of the etiology, diagnosis and management of CRS.

  11. [Tendinitis in athletes: etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Gremion, G; Zufferey, P

    2015-03-11

    Tendinopathy is one of the most common diagnosis in sports. Knowledges about their etiology, the repair process to their diagnosis and their treatment have improved thanks to the development of imaging, especially ultra- sound. The disorder whose etiology could be mechanical or degenerative can cause long- term disability and sometimes the end of the sport carreer. The risk of reccurence is com- mon; this may lead to tendon rupture whose functional effects can be significative. The management should be early: it must respect the deadlines for tendon healing and pro- pose a gradual recovery efforts after elimina tion of the contributing factors involved.

  12. [Etiology, clinical presentation and outcome of severe viral acute childhood encephalitis (ECOVE study)].

    PubMed

    Flores-Gonzalez, José C; Jordan-Garcia, Iolanda; Turon-Vinas, Eulàlia; Montero-Valladares, Cristina; Tellez-Gonzalez, Cinta; Fernandez-Carrion, Francisco; Garcia-Iniguez, Juan P; Onate-Vergara, Eider; Rodriguez-Nunez, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Introduccion. Las encefalitis viricas son procesos raros y potencialmente graves, con etiologia diversa y no siempre identificable. El objetivo es describir las caracteristicas etiologicas, la presentacion clinica y la evolucion neurologica de las encefalitis viricas que ingresaron en las unidades de cuidados intensivos pediatricos (UCIP) en España. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio prospectivo multicentrico observacional. Se incluyeron los niños ingresados en 14 UCIP con diagnostico de encefalitis virica durante un periodo de tres años (2010-2013). Para el diagnostico etiologico se utilizo reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa y serologia a virus neurotropos en la sangre y el liquido cefalorraquideo. Se registraron los antecedentes personales, la presentacion clinica, la evolucion y la situacion neurologica en el momento del alta. Resultados. Se incluyeron 80 pacientes con edad media de 5 años; el 70%, varones. Los sintomas clinicos mas relevantes fueron disminucion de conciencia (86%), fiebre (82,4%), convulsiones (67%), vomitos (42%), cefalea (27%), agitacion (25%) y desorientacion (23%). Se llego al diagnostico etiologico en un 35%, y los mas frecuentes fueron virus herpes simple y enterovirus. La evolucion fue curacion sin secuelas en 55 pacientes (69%, sobre todo enterovirus, rotavirus y virus respiratorios), secuelas leves-moderadas en 19 (23,5%) y graves en seis (7,5%). Dos pacientes fallecieron. Conclusiones. En las UCIP españolas solo se realizo el diagnostico etiologico en un tercio de los niños con sospecha de encefalitis virica grave. A pesar de la gravedad clinica, hemos observado una tasa de mortalidad y morbilidad baja. La amplia mayoria son dados de alta de la UCIP con ninguna o escasa secuela neurologica.

  13. Outbreaks of food-borne and waterborne viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, C W; Osterholm, M T

    1993-01-01

    Norwalk virus infection is the epidemiologic prototype for outbreaks of food-borne and waterborne gastroenteritis. Around the world, Norwalk virus and Norwalk-like viruses appear to be major causes of food-borne and waterborne illness. Assessment of the overall significance of viral agents to the epidemiology of food-borne and waterborne illness is hampered by the lack of surveillance throughout much of the world. In areas where food-borne and waterborne illness surveillance is conducted, outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis are underreported because of the lack of availability of routine laboratory services to confirm the viral etiology. Routine use of epidemiologic criteria as an alternative to laboratory confirmation will allow better assessments of the importance of viral gastroenteritis until effective laboratory methods can be widely implemented. Outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis have been propagated by contamination of water supplies, raw foods, and ill food handlers. Controlling an outbreak depends on identifying and removing the source of contamination. The demonstrated occurrence of person-to-person transmission and the likely occurrence of transmission of Norwalk-like viruses by aerosol make it necessary to evaluate the potential for transmission by food handlers and servers in every outbreak, regardless of primary source. PMID:8395330

  14. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection: Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Saif, Linda J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a member of the genera Alphacoronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and high mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. For the last three decades, PEDV infection has resulted in significant economic losses in the European and Asian pig industries, but in 2013-2014 the disease was also reported in the US, Canada and Mexico. The PED epidemic in the US, from April 2013 to the present, has led to the loss of more than 10% of the US pig population. The disappearance and re-emergence of epidemic PED indicates that the virus is able to escape from current vaccination protocols, biosecurity and control systems. Endemic PED is a significant problem, which is exacerbated by the emergence (or potential importation) of multiple PEDV variants. Epidemic PEDV strains spread rapidly and cause a high number of pig deaths. These strains are highly enteropathogenic and acutely infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites. PEDV infections cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by viremia that leads to profound diarrhea and vomiting, followed by extensive dehydration, which is the major cause of death in nursing piglets. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenic characteristics of epidemic or endemic PEDV strains is needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis as well as immunoprophylaxis against PEDV infection.

  15. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  16. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery.

  17. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    Infection by viruses having lipid-bilayer envelopes proceeds through fusion of the viral membrane with a membrane of the target cell. Viral ‘fusion proteins’ facilitate this process. They vary greatly in structure, but all seem to have a common mechanism of action, in which a ligand-triggered, large-scale conformational change in the fusion protein is coupled to apposition and merger of the two bilayers. We describe three examples—the influenza virus hemagglutinin, the flavivirus E protein and the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein—in some detail, to illustrate the ways in which different structures have evolved to implement this common mechanism. Fusion inhibitors can be effective antiviral agents. PMID:18596815

  18. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  19. Non-viral factors contributing to hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Manal A; Ali, Sanaa A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for over half a million deaths per year. The geographic pattern of HCC incidence is parallel to exposure to viral etiologic factors. Its incidence is increasing, ranging between 3% and 9% annually depending on the geographical location, and variability in the incidence rates correspond closely to the prevalence and pattern of the primary etiologic factors. Chronic infections with hepatitis B viruses or hepatitis C viruses have both been recognized as human liver carcinogens with a combined attributable fraction of at least 75% of all HCC cases. Multiple non-viral factors have been implicated in the development of HCC. Increased body mass index and diabetes with subsequent development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis represent significant risk factors for HCC. Other non-viral causes of HCC include iron overload syndromes, alcohol use, tobacco, oral contraceptive, aflatoxin, pesticides exposure and betel quid chewing, a prevalent habit in the developing world. Wilson disease, α-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Porphyrias, autoimmune hepatitis, Schistosoma japonicum associated with positive hepatitis B surface antigen, and thorotrast-ray are also contributing hepatocellualar carcinoma. In addition, primary biliary cirrhosis, congestive liver disease and family history of liver cancer increase the risk of HCC incident. In conclusion, clarification of relevant non-viral causes of HCC will help to focus clinicians on those risk factors that are modifiable. The multilevel preventative approach will hopefully lead to a reduction in incidence of non-viral HCC, and a decrease in the patient morbidity and mortality as well as the societal economic burden associated with HCC. PMID:23805355

  20. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  1. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  2. Viral Communities Associated with Human Pericardial Fluids in Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Laura; Monteil, Sonia; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Rivet, Romain; Gouriet, Frédérique; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    Pericarditis is a common human disease defined by inflammation of the pericardium. Currently, 40% to 85% of pericarditis cases have no identified etiology. Most of these cases are thought to be caused by an infection of undetected, unsuspected or unknown viruses. In this work, we used a culture- and sequence-independent approach to investigate the viral DNA communities present in human pericardial fluids. Seven viral metagenomes were generated from the pericardial fluid of patients affected by pericarditis of unknown etiology and one metagenome was generated from the pericardial fluid of a sudden infant death case. As a positive control we generated one metagenome from the pericardial fluid of a patient affected by pericarditis caused by herpesvirus type 3. Furthermore, we used as negative controls a total of 6 pericardial fluids from 6 different individuals affected by pericarditis of non-infectious origin: 5 of them were sequenced as a unique pool and the remaining one was sequenced separately. The results showed a significant presence of torque teno viruses especially in one patient, while herpesviruses and papillomaviruses were present in the positive control. Co-infections by different genotypes of the same viral type (torque teno viruses) or different viruses (herpesviruses and papillomaviruses) were observed. Sequences related to bacteriophages infecting Staphylococcus, Enterobacteria, Streptococcus, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas were also detected in three patients. This study detected torque teno viruses and papillomaviruses, for the first time, in human pericardial fluids. PMID:24690743

  3. Recent Research on the Etiologies of Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Eileen; Van Dyke, Don C.; Sears, Lonnie; Matzen, Jane; Lin-Dyken, Deborah; McBrien, Dianne M.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the etiologies of autism, including genetic research, anatomic and neuroimaging studies, topics in neurophysiology research (including serotonin, dopamine, and opiods), immunologic research, studies of autism phenotype, and electroencephalographic studies. It concludes that, as of yet, research has found no clear…

  4. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Etiologic and pathologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Quiles, M; Marchisello, P J; Tsairis, P

    1978-03-01

    The etiologic factors and pathologic findings in 38 patients with lumbar arachnoiditis are presented. Lumbar spine surgery and the injection of contrast materials prior to the diagnosis of this condition are considered the most important factors in its genesis. In this series, there was microscopic evidence of arachnoiditis ossificans in 3 patients and arachnoiditis calcificans in 1 patient.

  5. Future Directions in ADHD Etiology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.

    2012-01-01

    Reviews salient emerging themes in the scientific literature related to identifying etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD. While bypassing the need for new treatment research, the review highlights three themes. First, recognition of the epigenetic effects is expected to revitalize the search for and mapping of early environmental influences on the…

  6. On the Etiology of Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfelbaum, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Lack of consideration of the sexually functional population has led to misconceptions about causes of sexual dysfunction functioning. Automatic functioning can mask effects of pathogenic influences on sexuality, making these effects appear random, confounding etiological issues and creating the belief that causes of sexual dysfunction and disorder…

  7. Towards a Balanced Account of Autism Etiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Genae A.

    2004-01-01

    Drash and Tudor describe six sets of reinforcement contingencies which may be present in the environments of some children eventually diagnosed with autism and suggest that these contingencies account for the etiology of "autistic" behaviors. Nevertheless, merely observing such contingencies in the environments of these children is insufficient to…

  8. [Hyperemesis gravidarum--etiology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Imperato, F; Canova, I; Basili, R; Iuele, T; Mossa, B

    2003-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is a common pathology encountered by the obstetrician in 0.1-2% of all pregnancies. The purpose of our review, along with other literature, is to report general outline of the syndrome, with etiology, complications and some guidelines about conventional and newer therapy.

  9. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cristin C. W.; Olival, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007–2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  10. Differential Host Response, Rather Than Early Viral Replication Efficiency, Correlates with Pathogenicity Caused by Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Askovich, Peter S.; Sanders, Catherine J.; Rosenberger, Carrie M.; Diercks, Alan H.; Dash, Pradyot; Navarro, Garnet; Vogel, Peter; Doherty, Peter C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses exhibit large, strain-dependent differences in pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. Although the characteristics of severe disease, including uncontrolled viral replication, infection of the lower airway, and highly inflammatory cytokine responses have been extensively documented, the specific virulence mechanisms that distinguish highly pathogenic strains remain elusive. In this study, we focused on the early events in influenza infection, measuring the growth rate of three strains of varying pathogenicity in the mouse airway epithelium and simultaneously examining the global host transcriptional response over the first 24 hours. Although all strains replicated equally rapidly over the first viral life-cycle, their growth rates in both lung and tracheal tissue strongly diverged at later times, resulting in nearly 10-fold differences in viral load by 24 hours following infection. We identified separate networks of genes in both the lung and tracheal tissues whose rapid up-regulation at early time points by specific strains correlated with a reduced viral replication rate of those strains. The set of early-induced genes in the lung that led to viral growth restriction is enriched for both NF-κB binding site motifs and members of the TREM1 and IL-17 signaling pathways, suggesting that rapid, NF-κB –mediated activation of these pathways may contribute to control of viral replication. Because influenza infection extending into the lung generally results in severe disease, early activation of these pathways may be one factor distinguishing high- and low-pathogenicity strains. PMID:24073225

  11. Mapping Viral Functional Domains for Genetic Diversity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) comprises numerous isolates with various levels of in-host diversity. Subgroup-distinctive features of the Fny and LS strains provided us with a platform to genetically map the viral control elements for genetic variation in planta. We found that both RNAs 1 and 2 controlled levels of genetic diversity, and further fine mapping revealed that the control elements of mutation frequency reside within the first 596 amino acids (aa) of RNA 1. The 2a/2b overlapping region of the 2a protein also contributed to control of viral genetic variation. Furthermore, the 3′ nontranslated region (NTR) of RNA 3 constituted a hot spot of polymorphism, where the majority of fixed mutations found in the population were clustered. The 2b gene of CMV, a viral suppressor of gene silencing, controls the abundance of the fixed mutants in the viral population via a host-dependent mechanism. PMID:23115283

  12. Etiology and Prevention of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung S.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Tu, Shuiping

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) occurs commonly, especially in Asia, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Recently, great progress has been made in research on the etiology and prevention of EC. Summary The major risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking, which act synergistically. Dietary parameters, including dietary carcinogens and insufficiency of micronutrients, could also be important risk factors in certain areas. A common etiological factor for both EC and some other cancers are low levels of intake of fruits and vegetables. With improvements in diet and drinking water in developing countries, the incidence of ESCC decreased. However, in economically well-developed countries, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has markedly increased in the past 40 years. The major etiological factor for EAC is gastroesophageal reflux, which is also an etiological factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA). In certain areas of China, the occurrence of GCA is closely related to ESCC. Susceptibility genes for EC are starting to be discovered, and this may help to identify high-risk groups that have more need for preventive measures. Mitigation of the risk factors, early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions are effective approaches for prevention. Smoking cessation, avoidance of excessive alcohol, meat and caloric consumption, increasing physical activity and frequent consumption of vegetables and fruits are prudent lifestyle modifications for the prevention of EC as well as other diseases. Key Message The etiology of EC includes tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, low levels of intake of fruits and vegetables as well as gastroesophageal reflux and susceptibility genes. Practical Implications A healthy lifestyle including smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, consumption of vegetables as well as reduction of alcohol intake and caloric consumption are major

  13. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model for the study of vaccination against viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Novoa, Beatriz; Romero, Alejandro; Mulero, Victoriano; Rodríguez, Iván; Fernández, Ignacio; Figueras, Antonio

    2006-07-26

    The rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is the etiological agent of one of the most important salmonid viral diseases. In the present work, the ability of VHSV to infect and replicate in zebrafish at low temperature (15 degrees C) was demonstrated. Zebrafish was also used to determine the effectiveness of the recombinant virus rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP as a live attenuated vaccine against the virulent VHSV strain. Fish intraperitoneally injected with 3 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(5)TCID50/ml of the wild type VHSV showed a 100% of cumulative mortality, meanwhile only 57% of mortality was obtained in bath infections. Infected fish showed external clinical signs and histological observations revealed the appearance of small haemorrhages in the muscle, kidney, liver and dermis. Neither mortalities nor clinical signs were recorded in fish infected with a live attenuated recombinant virus. By RT-PCR technique, VHSV was detected in all the organs as early as 24h, but the recombinant virus was not detected in all the sampled days. VHSV was able to replicate "in vitro" in head kidney cells but the replication capacity of the attenuated viral strain was limited. The recombinant virus rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP was able to protect against VHSV with a survival rate ranging from 20% to 60% depending of the vaccine dose. The increase of TLR3, IFNalphabeta, Mx, IFNgamma and TNFalpha expression at 72h post-infection in the kidney of VHSV-infected fish contrasted with the results obtained with the avirulent virus, which did not induce an increment of this expression in infected fish. Zebrafish is a suitable animal model to study VHSV infection and immune (innate and adaptive) responses and, more importantly, we demonstrate for the first time the usefulness of the zebrafish as a vaccination model to viral diseases. In addition, the high protection obtained with the live attenuated virus demonstrates that the zebrafish is able to mount an efficient antiviral immune response at 15 degrees C.

  14. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: global status.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia F

    2010-03-01

    Despite the success of regional bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) eradication programs, infections remain a source of economic loss for producers. The wide variation among BVDV results in differences in genotype, biotype, virulence, and types of infections. BVDV infect a range of domestic and wild ruminants. Clinical presentation varies depending on strain of virus, species of host, immune status of host, reproductive status of host, age of host, and concurrent infections. Recent advances in BVDV research and diagnostics have led to the development of regional eradication/control programs, the most efficacious of which focus on biosecurity, surveillance, and control.

  15. The etiology of otosclerosis: a combination of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-06-01

    Otosclerosis is a common form of hearing loss characterized by abnormal bone remodeling in the otic capsule. It is a complex genetic disease, caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. During the past decade, several attempts have been made to identify factors for otosclerosis. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the etiology of otosclerosis and describes the genetic and environmental factors that have been implicated in the disease. Environmental factors include fluoride and viral factors, particularly measles. Genetic association studies for otosclerosis have reported several associations of genetic variants that influence the risk of disease, mainly involving bone remodeling pathways, although their individual risk contributions are small. Rare monogenic forms of otosclerosis also exist, which are caused by a mutation in a single gene leading to a clear familial segregation of the disease. Linkage analysis of large otosclerosis families has led to the identification of seven loci, and recently evidence was found that T cell receptor beta is a gene responsible for familial otosclerosis, suggesting an underlying immunological pathway. However, this might also represent an autoimmune process, a hypothesis that is supported by other data as well. In conclusion, a variety of pathways have been identified to be involved in the development of otosclerosis, showing that distinct mechanisms involving both genetic and environmental risk factors can influence and contribute to a similar disease outcome.

  16. Pruritic dermatoses: overview of etiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Ernest N; Beltrani, Vincent S

    2002-12-16

    This review begins with a brief survey of the neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of pruritus, and goes on to describe the etiology of the major allergic and nonallergic pruritic disorders. The etiology of pruritus often suggests the appropriate treatment. For example, urticaria, which is primarily mediated by histamine, is amenable to treatment with H1 antihistamines. Second-generation, nonsedating antihistamines appear to be more effective than sedating antihistamines, perhaps because of better compliance. Other systemic pharmacologic options may be useful in nonhistamine-mediated disorders, for example, immunomodulators for inflammation-induced pruritus or opiate antagonists for atopic dermatitis. Nonpharmacologic measures, such as proper skin care, and physical modalities, such as phototherapy or acupuncture, may also be helpful.

  17. Facial Dysostoses: Etiology, Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Paul A.; Andrews, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all live births exhibit a minor or major congenital anomaly. Of these approximately one-third display craniofacial abnormalities which are a significant cause of infant mortality and dramatically affect national health care budgets. To date, more than 700 distinct craniofacial syndromes have been described and in this review, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and management of facial dysostoses with a particular emphasis on Treacher Collins, Nager and Miller syndromes. As we continue to develop and improve medical and surgical care for the management of individual conditions, it is essential at the same time to better characterize their etiology and pathogenesis. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of the development of facial dysostosis with a view towards early in-utero identification and intervention which could minimize the manifestation of anomalies prior to birth. The ultimate management for any craniofacial anomaly however, would be prevention and we discuss this possibility in relation to facial dysostosis. PMID:24123981

  18. Childhood cancer: etiologic clues from epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Safyer, A W; Miller, R W

    1977-03-01

    Epidemiologic reseach has revealed a wide spectrum of etiologic information concerning childhood cancer. Often, important clues have come from observations made by alert practitioners. The school health professional can help further progress in cancer research by observing peculiarities of environmental exposures as well as the family's medical history when cancer affects a child. Any unusual findings should be referred to an appropriate research center for evaluation.

  19. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  20. Cellulitis: definition, etiology, and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Craig G

    2011-12-01

    Cellulitis is a common condition seen by physicians. Over the past decade, skin and soft tissue infections from community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have become increasingly common. In this article, the definition, etiology, and clinical features of cellulitis are reviewed, and the importance of differentiating cellulitis from necrotizing soft tissue infections is emphasized. Empiric antimicrobial recommendations are suggested, including the most recent recommendations from the Infectious Disease Society of America.

  1. Angular cheilitis, part 1: local etiologies.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K; Brodell, Robert T; Helms, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    Angular cheilitis (AC) is a common condition characterized by erythema, moist maceration, ulceration, and crusting at the corners of the mouth. This article focuses on the common local factors that act alone and in combination to produce AC. These factors are categorized as irritant, allergic, and infectious causes. Identifying the underlying etiology of AC is a critical step in developing an effective treatment plan for this condition.

  2. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: “what is causing the disease?” in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by “what is out there?” In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral genome from a metagenomic sample. However, retrieval of a full-length genome of a divergent virus is technically challenging and can be time-consuming and costly. Here we discuss different assembly and fragment linkage strategies such as iterative assembly, motif searches, k-mer frequency profiling, coverage profile binning, and other strategies used to recover genomes of potential viral pathogens in a timely and cost-effective manner. PMID:26483782

  3. [Viral safety of biologicals].

    PubMed

    Barin, F

    2008-06-01

    The viral safety of biologicals, either human blood derivatives or animal products or recombinant proteins issued from biotechnology, relies on the quality of the starting material, the manufacturing process and, if necessary, the control of the final product. The quality of the starting material is highly guaranteed for blood derivatives due to the individual screening for specific markers (antigens, genome, antibodies) for major blood borne viruses such as hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It can be reinforced by the detection through amplification procedures (polymerase chain reaction) in the plasma pool of genomes from viruses that have been implicated in contaminations of blood derivatives in the past (parvovirus B19, hepatitis A virus). The association in the manufacturing process of different steps dedicated to purification of plasma proteins (partitioning), virus inactivation (solvent/detergent treatment, heat inactivation) or specific procedures allowing virus removal (nanofiltration) allows to reduce the viral risk very efficiently. The validation studies using scaled down systems and model viruses allow to evaluate the virus safety of any product quantitatively. The aim of these procedures is to guarantee the lack of infectivity due to any virus, either known or unknown.

  4. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  5. Viral infections of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned.

  6. Saliva and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 10 years there have been only a handful of publications dealing with the oral virome, which is in contrast to the oral microbiome, an area that has seen considerable interest. Here, we survey viral infections in general and then focus on those viruses that are found in and/or are transmitted via the oral cavity; norovirus, rabies, human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex viruses, hepatitis C virus, and HIV. Increasingly, viral infections have been diagnosed using an oral sample (e.g. saliva mucosal transudate or an oral swab) instead of blood or urine. The results of two studies using a rapid and semi-quantitative lateral flow assay format demonstrating the correlation of HIV anti-IgG/sIgA detection with saliva and serum samples are presented. When immediate detection of infection is important, point-of-care devices that obtain a non-invasive sample from the oral cavity can be used to provide a first line diagnosis to assist in determining appropriate counselling and therapeutic path for an increasing number of diseases.

  7. Development of a symptom score for clinical studies to identify children with a documented viral upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James A; Weber, Wendy J; Martin, Emily T; McCarty, Rachelle L; Englund, Janet A

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a symptom scoring system for use in clinical studies that differentiates children with cold symptoms who have an identifiable viral etiology for their upper respiratory tract infection (URI) from those in whom no virus is detected. Nasal swabs for PCR testing for identification of respiratory viruses were obtained on children aged 2-11 y at baseline and when parents thought their child was developing a cold. Parental-recorded severity of specific symptoms in children with and without a documented viral URI were compared. Nasal swabs were obtained on 108 children whose parents reported their child was developing a cold. A viral etiology was identified in 62 of 108 (57.4%) samples. Symptom measures that best differentiated children with a viral etiology from those without were significant runny nose and significant cough on days 1-4 of the illness. A URI symptom score was developed based on these symptoms, with a sensitivity of 81.4%, specificity of 61.9%, and accuracy of 73.3%. Parental impression is only a moderately accurate predictor of viral URI in children. Our URI symptom score provided a more accurate method for identifying children with viral URIs for clinical studies.

  8. Interstitial cystitis. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of interstitial cystitis, with special emphasis on management of this condition by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles were identified through MEDLINE and review of abstracts presented at Urology and Interstitial Cystitis meetings during the last decade. Recent reviews were further searched for additional studies and trials. Data were summarized from large epidemiologic studies. Etiologic theories were extracted from current concepts and reviews of scientific studies. Diagnostic criteria described in this review are based on clinical interpretation of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research guidelines, interpretation of data from the NIH Interstitial Cystitis Cohort Study, and recent evidence on use of the potassium sensitivity test. Treatment suggestions are based on six randomized placebo-controlled clinical treatment trials and best available clinical data. MAIN MESSAGE: Interstitial cystitis affects about 0.01% to 0.5% of women. Its etiology is unknown, but might involve microbiologic, immunologic, mucosal, neurogenic, and other yet undefined agents. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is impossible to provide a purely evidence-based treatment strategy, but review of available evidence suggests that conservative supportive therapy (including diet modification); oral treatment with pentosan polysulfate, amitriptyline, or hydroxyzine; and intravesical treatments with heparinlike medications, dimethyl sulfoxide, or BCG vaccine could benefit some patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians should have an understanding of interstitial cystitis and be able to make a diagnosis and formulate an evidence-based treatment strategy for their patients. PMID:11153410

  9. Gene expression in the etiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicholas J

    2008-05-01

    Gene expression represents a fundamental interface between genes and environment in the development and ongoing plasticity of the human brain. Individual differences in gene expression are likely to underpin much of human diversity, including psychiatric illness. In the past decade, the development of microarray and proteomic technology has enabled global description of gene expression in schizophrenia. However, it is difficult on the basis of gene expression assays alone to distinguish between those changes that constitute primary etiology and those that reflect secondary pathology, compensatory mechanisms, or confounding influences. In this respect, tests of genetic association with schizophrenia will be instructive because changes in gene expression that result from gene variants that are associated with the disorder are likely to be of primary etiological significance. However, regulatory polymorphism is extremely difficult to recognize on the basis of sequence interrogation alone. Functional assays at the messenger RNA and/or protein level will be essential in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying genetic association with schizophrenia and are likely to become increasingly important in the identification of regulatory variants with which to test for association with the disorder and related traits. Once established, etiologically relevant changes in gene expression can be recapitulated in model systems in order to elucidate the molecular and physiological pathways that may ultimately give rise to the condition.

  10. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  11. Viral Hepatitis Surveillance--India, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tripurari; Shrivastava, Aakash; Kumar, Anil; Laserson, Kayla F; Narain, Jai P; Venkatesh, Srinivasaraghavan; Chauhan, Lakhbir S; Averhoff, Francisco

    2015-07-24

    The burden of viral hepatitis in India is not well characterized. In 2009, the national Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP) began conducting surveillance across all Indian states for epidemic-prone diseases, including foodborne and waterborne forms of viral hepatitis (e.g., hepatitis A and E). Information on outbreaks of all forms of viral hepatitis, including A, B, C, and E, also is collected. This report summarizes viral hepatitis surveillance and outbreak data reported to IDSP during 2011-2013. During this period, 804,782 hepatitis cases and 291 outbreaks were reported; the virus type was unspecified in 92% of cases. Among 599,605 cases tested for hepatitis A, 44,663 (7.4%) were positive, and among 187,040 tested for hepatitis E, 19,508 (10.4%) were positive. At least one hepatitis outbreak report was received from 23 (66%) of 35 Indian states. Two-thirds of outbreaks were reported from rural areas. Among 163 (56%) outbreaks with known etiology, 78 (48%) were caused by hepatitis E, 54 (33%) by hepatitis A, 19 (12%) by both hepatitis A and E, and 12 (7%) by hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Contaminated drinking water was the source of most outbreaks. Improvements in water quality and sanitation as well as inclusion of hepatitis A vaccine in childhood immunization programs should be considered to reduce the public health burden of hepatitis in India. Efforts to decrease the proportion of cases for which the etiology is unspecified, including expanding the IDSP to support hepatitis B and C testing, might help further elucidate the epidemiology of these diseases.

  12. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2007-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

  13. The Class II/1 anomaly of hereditary etiology vs. Thumb-sucking etiology

    PubMed Central

    Pădure, H; Negru, AR; Stanciu, D

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The etiology of class II division 1 Angle anomaly comprises many entities, including heredity and the vicious habit of sucking the finger. A close connection between the etiology and the clinical features needs to be outlined, in order to have a more appropriate treatment approach. Aim: This study aims to find common clinical features for two groups of Class II division 1 etiological factors (heredity and the vicious habit of sucking the finger), outlining a characteristic dento-facial pattern for each etiological factor. Materials and methods: 160 orthodontic cases were studied, taken randomly from the Department of Orthodontics in "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, between 2005 and 2011. From a total of 46 diagnosed with Class II/1, the following data were noted for each subject in a table: age, sex, etiology, facial symmetry, profile, size of the lower face, stage lip, labiomentonier ditch, menton, form of arches, palate, occlusion in the three plans, Spee curve, other dental anomalies. Discussions: The facial asymmetry was found in a greater proportion within the finger-sucking group. Subjects in the finger sucking group have 100% pronounced convex profile, with pronounced lip stage and sharp curve of Spee, being known that the thumb-sucking stops the mandible growth and stimulates the upper jaw protrusion. Conclusions: The predominant etiological factor is heredity and the clinical features obvious for II/1 Angle anomaly are present in the highest proportion in the thumb-sucking group, but no significant differences were observed between the groups studied according to etiology. PMID:22802900

  14. Immune Responses to Circulating and Vaccine Viral Strains in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Children and Youth Who Received the 2013/2014 Quadrivalent Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Curtis, Donna; Ning, Mariangeli Freitas; Claypool, David Jeremy; Jalbert, Emilie; Patterson, Julie; Frank, Daniel N.; Ir, Diana; Armon, Carl

    2016-01-01

    to LAIV4. In conclusion, HIV-infected and uninfected children and youth had comparable responses to LAIV4. H1N1-09 immune responses were lower than BY and higher than H1N1-14, suggesting that both antigenic mismatches between circulating and vaccine H1N1 and lower immunogenicity of the H1N1 vaccine strain may have contributed to the decreased H1N1 effectiveness of 2013–2014 LAIV4. PMID:27148262

  15. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  16. [Viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Kager, P A

    1998-02-28

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers, such as Lassa fever and yellow fever, cause tens of thousands of deaths annually outside the Netherlands. The viruses are mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks or via excreta of rodents. Important to travellers are yellow fever, dengue and Lassa and Ebola fever. For yellow fever there is an efficacious vaccine. Dengue is frequently observed in travellers; prevention consists in avoiding mosquito bites, the treatment is symptomatic. Lassa and Ebola fever are extremely rare among travellers; a management protocol can be obtained from the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. Diagnostics of a patient from the tropics with fever and haemorrhagic diathesis should be aimed at treatable disorders such as malaria, typhoid fever, rickettsiosis or bacterial sepsis, because the probability of such a disease is much higher than that of Lassa or Ebola fever.

  17. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Racsa, Lori D.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Olinger, Gene G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  18. Viral Quasispecies Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

  19. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  20. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  1. Viral quasispecies evolution.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory.

  2. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  3. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  4. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; ...

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection wasmore » cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.« less

  5. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  6. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine.The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management.The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine.The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to viral agents or

  7. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  8. Confined aquifers as viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Seymour, Justin R; Fitch, Alison J; Simons, Keryn L; Speck, Peter G; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about viral diversity and abundance in deep groundwater reserves is limited. We found that the viral community inhabiting a deep confined aquifer in South Australia was more similar to reclaimed water communities than to the viral communities in the overlying unconfined aquifer community. This similarity was driven by high relative occurrence of the single-stranded DNA viral groups Circoviridae, Geminiviridae and Microviridae, which include many known plant and animal pathogens. These groups were present in a 1500-year-old water situated 80 m below the surface, which suggests the potential for long-term survival and spread of potentially pathogenic viruses in deep, confined groundwater. Obtaining a broader understanding of potentially pathogenic viral communities within aquifers is particularly important given the ability of viruses to spread within groundwater ecosystems.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Roya; Reguera, David

    2005-03-01

    Viral genomes, whether they involve RNA or DNA molecules, are invariably protected by a rigid, single-protein-thick, shell referred to as ``capsid.'' Viral capsids are known to tolerate wide ranges of pH and salt conditions and to withstand internal pressures as high as 100 atms. We study the mechanical properties of viral capsids, calling explicit attention to the inhomogeneity of the shells that is inherent in their being discrete/polyhedral rather than continuous/spherical. We analyze the distribution of stress in these capsids due to isotropic internal pressure (arising, for instance, from genome confinement and/or osmotic activity), and compare the results with appropriate generalizations of classical elasticity theory. We also examine the competing mechanisms for viral shell failure, e.g., in-plane crack formation vs radial bursting. The biological consequences of the special stabilities and stress distributions of viral capsids are also discussed.

  10. Epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Gendreau, Linda; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-06-01

    Denture stomatitis, a common disorder affecting denture wearers, is characterized as inflammation and erythema of the oral mucosal areas covered by the denture. Despite its commonality, the etiology of denture stomatitis is not completely understood. A search of the literature was conducted in the PubMed electronic database (through November 2009) to identify relevant articles for inclusion in a review updating information on the epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis and the potential role of denture materials in this disorder. Epidemiological studies report prevalence of denture stomatitis among denture wearers to range from 15% to over 70%. Studies have been conducted among various population samples, and this appears to influence prevalence rates. In general, where reported, incidence of denture stomatitis is higher among elderly denture users and among women. Etiological factors include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures, accumulation of denture plaque, and bacterial and yeast contamination of denture surface. In addition, poor-fitting dentures can increase mucosal trauma. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, where it acts as an opportunistic pathogen. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms, but unless dentures are decontaminated and their cleanliness maintained, stomatitis will recur when antifungal therapy is discontinued. New developments related to denture materials are focusing on means to reduce development of adherent biofilms. These may have value in reducing bacterial and yeast colonization, and could lead to reductions in denture stomatitis with appropriate denture hygiene.

  11. Human Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viral Pathogens in Border Areas of Western Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Samon, Nou; Uthaimongkol, Nichapat; Klungthong, Chonticha; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Tyner, Stuart D.; Rith, Sareth; Horm, Viseth Srey; Jarman, Richard G.; Bethell, Delia; Chanarat, Nitima; Pavlin, Julie; Wongstitwilairoong, Tippa; Saingam, Piyaporn; El, But Sam; Fukuda, Mark M.; Touch, Sok; Sovann, Ly; Fernandez, Stefan; Buchy, Philippe; Chanthap, Lon; Saunders, David

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about circulation of influenza and other respiratory viruses in remote populations along the Thai-Cambodia border in western Cambodia. We screened 586 outpatients (median age 5, range 1–77) presenting with influenza-like-illness (ILI) at 4 sentinel sites in western Cambodia between May 2010 and December 2012. Real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT) PCR for influenza was performed on combined nasal and throat specimens followed by viral culture, antigenic analysis, antiviral susceptibility testing and full genome sequencing for phylogenetic analysis. ILI-specimens negative for influenza were cultured, followed by rRT-PCR for enterovirus and rhinovirus (EV/RV) and EV71. Influenza was found in 168 cases (29%) and occurred almost exclusively in the rainy season from June to November. Isolated influenza strains had close antigenic and phylogenetic relationships, matching vaccine and circulating strains found elsewhere in Cambodia. Influenza vaccination coverage was low (<20%). Western Cambodian H1N1(2009) isolate genomes were more closely related to 10 earlier Cambodia isolates (94.4% genome conservation) than to 13 Thai isolates (75.9% genome conservation), despite sharing the majority of the amino acid changes with the Thai references. Most genes showed signatures of purifying selection. Viral culture detected only adenovirus (5.7%) and parainfluenza virus (3.8%), while non-polio enteroviruses (10.3%) were detected among 164 culture-negative samples including coxsackievirus A4, A6, A8, A9, A12, B3, B4 and echovirus E6 and E9 using nested RT-PCR methods. A single specimen of EV71 was found. Despite proximity to Thailand, influenza epidemiology of these western Cambodian isolates followed patterns observed elsewhere in Cambodia, continuing to support current vaccine and treatment recommendations from the Cambodian National Influenza Center. Amino acid mutations at non-epitope sites, particularly hemagglutinin genes, require further investigation in light

  12. Persistent Tachypnea and Alveolar Hemorrhage in an Infant: An Unexpected Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Angela; Valsamis, Christina; Halaby, Claudia; Pirzada, Melodi

    2016-01-01

    Persistent tachypnea and failure to thrive during infancy have a broad differential diagnosis which includes pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare entity in children. DAH requires an extensive work-up as certain conditions may need chronic therapy. Cardiovascular disorders are included in the etiology of DAH. We present a case of an 8-month-old female with a moderate, restrictive patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) admitted to the hospital with respiratory distress and failure to thrive. An extensive work-up into tachypnea including multiple echocardiograms did not find an etiology. Open lung biopsy was performed and consistent with pulmonary hypertension. After closure of the PDA, patient's tachypnea improved, and she was discharged home with periodic follow-up showing a growing, thriving child. When an infant presents with tachypnea, a respiratory viral illness is often a common cause. The diagnosis of persistent tachypnea requires further investigation. Echocardiography, although readily available, may not always be sensitive in detecting clinically significant pulmonary hypertension. A clinician must have a heightened index of suspicion to proceed in evaluating for causes of tachypnea with a nonrespiratory etiology. PMID:27895951

  13. Etiology of breast cancer I. Genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The subject of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on the genetic aspect of its etiology. A number of studies using various approaches gave the same results: the familial form occurs earlier and there is a higher risk in female members of the breast-cancer families. An association between breast cancer and cancer of certain other sites among women is reported. Cytogenetic studies of “cancer families” revealed increased frequency of aneuploidy in some members. However, the role of chromosome abnormalities in carcinogenesis is still not clear. PMID:4577599

  14. Exercise addiction: symptoms, diagnosis, epidemiology, and etiology.

    PubMed

    Berczik, Krisztina; Szabó, Attila; Griffiths, Mark D; Kurimay, Tamás; Kun, Bernadette; Urbán, Róbert; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2012-03-01

    Regular physical activity plays a crucial role in health maintenance and disease prevention. However, excessive exercise has the potential to have adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The scholastic and empirical discussion of excessive physical activity focuses on obsessive and compulsive exercising, and uses several labels. However, in this review, we argue that the most appropriate term for this phenomenon is exercise addiction, emphasizing that excessive physical exercise fits the typical and most common characteristics of behavioral addictions. The aim of this review is to synthesize the current knowledge on symptomology, diagnosis, epidemiology, and etiology of exercise addiction.

  15. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Kaić, Bernard; Vilibić-Cavlek, Tatjana; Filipović, Sanja Kurecić; Nemeth-Blazić, Tatjana; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Vucina, Vesna Visekruna; Simunović, Aleksandar; Zajec, Martina; Radić, Ivan; Pavlić, Jasmina; Glamocanin, Marica; Gjenero-Margan, Ira

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the country-specific epidemiology of disease, which may vary greatly among countries, is crucial for identifying the most appropriate preventive and control measures. An overview of the local epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Croatia is given in this paper. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B in Croatia is low (less than 2% HBsAg carriers in the general population). Hepatitis B incidence and prevalence began to decline significantly following the introduction of universal hepatitis B vaccination in 1999. Information on HBsAg seroprevalence is derived from routine testing of certain subpopulations (pregnant women, blood donors) and seroprevalence studies mostly targeted at high-risk populations. Universal childhood vaccination against hepatitis B remains the main preventive measure. We recommend testing for immunity one to two months after the third dose of hepatitis B vaccine for health-care workers. The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C have also been declining in the general population. The main preventive measures are ensuring safety of blood products, prevention of drug abuse, and harm reduction programs for intravenous drug users. Hepatitis A incidence has declined dramatically since fifty years ago, when thousands of cases were reported annually. In the last five years, an average of twenty cases have been reported per year. The reduction of hepatitis A is a consequence of improved personal and community hygiene and sanitation. Hepatitis D has not been reported in Croatia. The risk of hepatitis D will get to be even smaller as the proportion of population vaccinated against hepatitis B builds up. Hepatitis E is reported only sporadically in Croatia, mostly in persons occupationally in contact with pigs and in travelers to endemic countries. In conclusion, Croatia is a low prevalence country for hepatitides A, B and C. Hepatitis D has not been reported to occur in Croatia and there are only sporadic cases of hepatitis E. Since hepatitis

  16. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Historical reported cases and estimates Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  17. Recurring waterbird mortalities and unusual etiologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, R.A.; Franson, J.C.; Boere, Gerard C.; Galbraith, Colin A.; Stroud, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, the National Wildlife Health Center of the United States Geological Survey has documented various largescale mortalities of birds caused by infectious and non-infectious disease agents. Some of these mortality events have unusual or unidentified etiologies and have been recurring. While some of the causes of mortalities have been elucidated, others remain in various stages of investigation and identification. Two examples are discussed: 1) Leyogonimus polyoon (Class: Trematoda), not found in the New World until 1999, causes severe enteritis and has killed over 15 000 American Coot Fulica americana in the upper mid-western United States. The geographic range of this parasite within North America is predicted to be limited to the Great Lakes Basin. 2) In the early 1990s, estimates of up to 6% of the North American population of the Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis died at Salton Sea, California, with smaller mortalities occurring throughout the 1990s. Birds were observed to have unusual preening behaviour, and to congregate at freshwater drains and move onto land. Suggested etiologies included interactions of contaminants, immuno-suppression, an unusual form of a bacterial disease, and an unknown biotoxin. During studies carried out from 2000 to 2003, Eared Grebe mortality did not approach the level seen in the early 1990s and, although bacteria were identified as minor factors, the principal cause of mortality remains undetermined. The potential population impact of these emerging and novel disease agents is currently unknown.

  18. The developmental etiology of high IQ.

    PubMed

    Brant, Angela M; Haberstick, Brett C; Corley, Robin P; Wadsworth, Sally J; DeFries, John C; Hewitt, John K

    2009-07-01

    The genetic and environmental trends in IQ development were assessed in 483 same-sex twin pairs in the Colorado longitudinal twin study using maximum-likelihood model-fitting analysis. The twins were assessed periodically from ages 1 to 16. Results show a decreasing influence of shared environment and an increasing influence of heritability across development, with large and increasing age to age stability of genetic influences. Non-shared environment contributes almost exclusively to age to age change. Similar analyses were conducted designating the top 15% of the sample as having high IQ at each age. The developmental etiology of high IQ did not significantly differ from that found for the continuous measure in this relatively novel analysis. These results demonstrate early stability in etiological influences on IQ and have potential implications for gene-finding efforts, suggesting that samples selected for high IQ can be used to find genetic variation that will be applicable to the full range of the IQ distribution, although conclusive demonstration that the same genes are indeed involved was beyond the scope of this study.

  19. The epidemiology and etiology of azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Alvarenga, Conrado; Pagani, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The misconception that infertility is typically associated with the female is commonly faced in the management of infertile men. It is uncommon for a patient to present for an infertility evaluation with an abnormal semen analysis report before an extensive female partner workup has been performed. Additionally, a man is usually considered fertile based only on seminal parameters without a physical exam. This behavior may lead to a delay in both the exact diagnosis and in possible specific infertility treatment. Moreover, male factor infertility can result from an underlying medical condition that is often treatable but could possibly be life-threatening. The responsibility of male factor in couple's infertility has been exponentially rising in recent years due to a comprehensive evaluation of reproductive male function and improved diagnostic tools. Despite this improvement in diagnosis, azoospermia is always the most challenging topic associated with infertility treatment. Several conditions that interfere with spermatogenesis and reduce sperm production and quality can lead to azoospermia. Azoospermia may also occur because of a reproductive tract obstruction. Optimal management of patients with azoospermia requires a full understanding of the disease etiology. This review will discuss in detail the epidemiology and etiology of azoospermia. A thorough literature survey was performed using the Medline, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane databases. We restricted the survey to clinical publications that were relevant to male infertility and azoospermia. Many of the recommendations included are not based on controlled studies. PMID:23503951

  20. Etiology, diagnosis, and clinical management of vulvodynia

    PubMed Central

    Sadownik, Leslie A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic vulvar pain or discomfort for which no obvious etiology can be found, ie, vulvodynia, can affect up to 16% of women. It may affect girls and women across all age groups and ethnicities. Vulvodynia is a significant burden to society, the health care system, the affected woman, and her intimate partner. The etiology is multifactorial and may involve local injury or inflammation, and peripheral and or central sensitization of the nervous system. An approach to the diagnosis and management of a woman presenting with chronic vulvar pain should address the biological, psychological, and social/interpersonal factors that contribute to her illness. The gynecologist has a key role in excluding other causes for vulvar pain, screening for psychosexual and pelvic floor dysfunction, and collaborating with other health care providers to manage a woman’s pain. An important component of treatment is patient education regarding the pathogenesis of the pain and the negative impact of experiencing pain on a woman’s overall quality of life. An individualized, holistic, and often multidisciplinary approach is needed to effectively manage the woman’s pain and pain-related distress. PMID:24833921

  1. [Etiology and pathogenesis of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism(pHPT)is a frequent endocrine disease in which abnormal calcium(Ca)regulation leads to hypercalcemia. The most frequent cause of pHPT in more than 80% of patients is an adenoma, followed by hyperplasia in about 15%, and cancer in 1~5%. Although most cases of pHPT are sporadic, a few are familial(hereditary), and this is known as familial hyperparathyroidism(FHPT). Gene abnormalities that affect cyclin D1 signaling(CCND1, CDC73, CDKN1B), Wnt/β-catenin signaling(MEN1), and calcium-sensing receptor signaling(CaSR, GNA11, AP2S1)play a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of pHPT. Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and CaSR dysfunction also play a role in pHPT severity. Continued elucidation of the etiology and pathogenesis of pHPT may lead to development of new treatments for pHPT as well as further understanding of Ca regulation.

  2. [Hormonal factors in etiology of common acne].

    PubMed

    Bergler-Czop, Beata; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2004-05-01

    Common acne is steatorrhoeic chronic disease, to which specific is, among others, the presence of blackheads, papulopustular eruptions, purulent cysts and cicatrices. Such hormonal factors belong to elements inherent in etiology of the affection. Sebaceous glands have cell receptors on their surface for androgens. In etiopathogenesis of common/simple acne, a decisive role is played by a derivative of testosterone, i.e. 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, some experts are of opinion that there is no correlation between the increased intensity of common acne and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism. Numerous authors assume, however, that common acne-affected patients may be sometimes subjected to intense reactions caused by sebaceous glands against physiological androgens concentrations. Naturally, estrogens can inhibit release of such androgens. Under physiological conditions, natural progesterone does not conduct to intensification of the seborrhea, but the activity of sebum secretion may be triggered off by its synthetic counterparts. Hormonal etiology can be very distinctly visible in the steroid, androgenic, premenstrual, menopausal acne, as well as in juvenile acne and acne neonatorum. In case of females affected by acne, hormonal therapy should be persistently supported and consulted with dermatologists, endocrinologists and gynecologists. Antiandrogenic preparations are applied, such as: cyproterone acetate concurrently administered with estrogens and, as well as not so frequently with chlormadinone acetate (independently or during estrogenic therapy).

  3. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

  4. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

  5. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  6. Genome sequence of Haemophilus parasuis strain 29755

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a member of the family Pasteurellaceae and is the etiologic agent of Glasser's disease in pigs, a systemic syndrome associated with only a subset of isolates. The genetic basis for virulence and systemic spread of particular H. parasuis isolates is currently unknown. Strain 2...

  7. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed Central

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and

  8. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  9. Viral hepatitis and the surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A. J.; Assy, N.; Moser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by one or more of six known (HAV-HGV) hepatotropic viruses. It is a common problem among health care workers and their patients. Surgeons are at particular risk of both acquiring and transmitting some of these viruses from and to their patients. Unfortunately, specific immunoprophylaxis for viral hepatitis is presently limited to protecting against the spread of hepatitis A and B viral infections, leaving a high degree of vigilance and careful surgical technique as the only means available to prevent the transmission of other viruses relative to the surgeon. The purpose of this paper is to review the various forms of viral hepatitis including the nature of the virus, serologic testing, clinical features, epidemiology (with specific reference to those issues that arise in surgical practice), treatment and prevention. PMID:18333162

  10. Viral infections of the face.

    PubMed

    Avci, Oktay; Ertam, Ilgen

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections affecting the face may cause significant morbidity, cosmetic disfigurement, and psychological distress. The success of therapy needs whole and correct evaluation of the clinical signs and symptoms. Some viruses such as Papillomaviridae, Herpesviridae, and Polyomaviridae primarily infect the facial skin, whereas others affect the face infrequently, as in parapox virus infections. Sometimes, involvement of the face can be a part of more generalized eruption and systemic symptoms in viral infections caused by Todaviridae, Flaviviridae, Arenaviridiae, and Flaviviridae. Clinical diagnosis can be challenging in various viral diseases when they occur in nonendemic geographic areas. The objective of this review was to concentrate on epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the viral illnesses with facial skin involvement.

  11. Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  12. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,781 (2013) Number of new ...

  13. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Bartee, Eric

    2009-09-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a cell type, tissue or species - collectively known as viral tropism - is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly the interferons and tumour necrosis factor, in dictating viral tropism and how these cytokine pathways can be exploited therapeutically for cancer treatment and to better counter future threats from emerging zoonotic pathogens.

  14. Pulmonary vein stenosis: Etiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pazos-López, Pablo; García-Rodríguez, Cristina; Guitián-González, Alba; Paredes-Galán, Emilio; Álvarez-Moure, María Ángel De La Guarda; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Marta; Baz-Alonso, José Antonio; Teijeira-Fernández, Elvis; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco Eugenio; Íñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2016-01-26

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is rare condition characterized by a challenging diagnosis and unfavorable prognosis at advance stages. At present, injury from radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has become the main cause of the disease. PVS is characterized by a progressive lumen size reduction of one or more pulmonary veins that, when hemodynamically significant, may raise lobar capillary pressure leading to signs and symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, and hemoptysis. Image techniques (transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and perfusion imaging) are essential to reach a final diagnosis and decide an appropriate therapy. In this regard, series from referral centers have shown that surgical and transcatheter interventions may improve prognosis. The purpose of this article is to review the etiology, assessment and management of PVS.

  15. Etiology of breast cancer. II. Epidemiologic aspects *

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The epidemiology of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on its etiology. A number of studies suggest that differences in breast cancer incidence are associated with differences in marital status, number of pregnancies, age at menarche, age at menopause, height and weight, socioeconomic status, geographic location and residence. However, in no case is the evidence adequate to establish a “cause and effect” relationship. The genetic component of these associations may be of primary importance, while other conditions such as marital status are probably indirect reflections of the operation of more fundamental factors. There is a general consensus that endocrine factors play an important part in mammary cancer occurrence. At present, the association between breast cancer and the presence of the virus-like (type B) particles in human milk is not established. PMID:4353980

  16. Perspectives on the etiology of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mozar, H.N.; Bal, D.G.; Howard, J.T.

    1987-03-20

    There is a lack of consensus among investigators concerning the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Clues are lacking, however, and the authors have assessed them in a broad biologic context. This inquiry has led us to regard Alzheimer's disease as a multifactorial disorder in which a putative infective agent is an essential element. Despite seeming competition among current hypotheses, there is overall unity. The concept that Down's syndrome is a congenital form of Alzheimer's disease and that both conditions are the result of a ubiquitous infective pathogen that affects genetically susceptible individuals offers the broadest unification. In both conditions slow infections develops against the background of aging. Indirect evidence involving immunologic and other biologic phenomena supports the postulated infectious origin. Overlapping pathologic and clinical features of Alzheimer's disease and the known transmissible encephalopathies suggest a similar pathogenesis.

  17. Fecal Incontinence: Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Weiss, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a debilitating problem facing ~2.2% of the U.S. general population over 65 years of age. Etiologic factors include traumatic, neurologic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Most commonly, obstetric trauma causes fecal incontinence as well as poorly performed anorectal surgery or pelvic radiation. Several severity scores and quality of life indexes have been developed to quantify incontinent symptoms. There are several nonsurgical and surgical options for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Biofeedback is among the most successful nonoperative strategies. Depending on the cause, anal sphincter repair, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation are used to treat fecal incontinence with some success. Unfortunately, fecal incontinence is an extremely difficult problem to manage: there has not been one, single treatment option that has proven to be both safe and effective in long-term studies. PMID:22379407

  18. [Breast feeding in the etiology of diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Hurtado, E

    1989-09-01

    Information derived from different anthropological studies carried out in Guatemala as part of the activities of the maternal and child health and nutrition project reveal that, according to popular beliefs, maternal milk plays a definite role in the etiology of diarrheal diseases in the lactating child. This paper presents information on popular classification of diarrheal diseases that differ from biomedical definitions of same. Different factors that may alter the quality of mothers' breast milk and that may cause gastrointestinal diseases in the lactating child are given in detail. The possibilities and limitations of the popular concept frame of "hot-cold", so common in the popular medical beliefs in Latin American populations, are also pointed out as an explanatory model. Lastly, implications of findings in this study are suggested for public health programs, especially for the communication and education programs on breast feeding, and for the application of the high-risk focus.

  19. [Peptic ulcer disease etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Płaneta-Małecka, Izabela

    2004-01-01

    Authors in this article present etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children and adults. Increased gastric acid output, Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and stress are the basic risk factors in peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori infection is a widely known risk factor in peptic ulcer disease and influences diagnostic and treatment procedures. Primary ulcer disease concerns mainly duodenum and is accompanied by H. pylori infection. Gastroscopy and Helicobacter tests are the only reliable procedures to diagnose peptic ulcer disease. Nowadays the most important aim in peptic ulcer treatment is the H. pylori eradication. Therapy with two antibiotics and a protein pomp inhibitor eradicates the bacteria, treats the ulceration and lowers the number of ulcer recurrence. In non-infected H. pylori ulcers or in a long-term treatment protein pomp inhibitors and H2-inhibitors are effective as well in gastroprotective therapy.

  20. Yersinia pestis--etiologic agent of plague.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, R D; Fetherston, J D

    1997-01-01

    Plague is a widespread zoonotic disease that is caused by Yersinia pestis and has had devastating effects on the human population throughout history. Disappearance of the disease is unlikely due to the wide range of mammalian hosts and their attendant fleas. The flea/rodent life cycle of Y. pestis, a gram-negative obligate pathogen, exposes it to very different environmental conditions and has resulted in some novel traits facilitating transmission and infection. Studies characterizing virulence determinants of Y. pestis have identified novel mechanisms for overcoming host defenses. Regulatory systems controlling the expression of some of these virulence factors have proven quite complex. These areas of research have provide new insights into the host-parasite relationship. This review will update our present understanding of the history, etiology, epidemiology, clinical aspects, and public health issues of plague. PMID:8993858

  1. Pulmonary vein stenosis: Etiology, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Pazos-López, Pablo; García-Rodríguez, Cristina; Guitián-González, Alba; Paredes-Galán, Emilio; Álvarez-Moure, María Ángel De La Guarda; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Marta; Baz-Alonso, José Antonio; Teijeira-Fernández, Elvis; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco Eugenio; Íñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is rare condition characterized by a challenging diagnosis and unfavorable prognosis at advance stages. At present, injury from radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has become the main cause of the disease. PVS is characterized by a progressive lumen size reduction of one or more pulmonary veins that, when hemodynamically significant, may raise lobar capillary pressure leading to signs and symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, and hemoptysis. Image techniques (transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and perfusion imaging) are essential to reach a final diagnosis and decide an appropriate therapy. In this regard, series from referral centers have shown that surgical and transcatheter interventions may improve prognosis. The purpose of this article is to review the etiology, assessment and management of PVS. PMID:26839659

  2. [Etiology of pediatric inpatients with pneumonia--analysis of clinical symptoms, physical examination and simple laboratory findings].

    PubMed

    Ishiwada, N; Kurosaki, T; Toba, T; Niimi, H

    1995-03-01

    In pediatric patients with community-acquired pneumonia, most of the patients have received antibiotics before admission. In this study, we tried to determine whether we could identify the etiology of pneumonia by clinical and laboratory findings on admission. The etiology of acute pneumonia was studied in 596 pediatric inpatients. A pathogen was identified in 384 (64.4%) episodes of pneumonia. These 384 episodes were divided into six groups as follows; I: pneumonia with blood culture positive or pneumonia with bacterial antigen positive in urine, II: pneumonia with dominant bacterial pathogens in washed sputum. III: Mycoplasma pneumonia, IV: viral pneumonia, V: bacterial (I, II) + viral pneumonia, VI: bacterial (I, II) + Mycoplasma pneumonia. These groups were analyzed by clinical symptoms, physical examination and simple laboratory findings on admission. Patients with Mycoplasma pneumonia have increased blood sedimentation rate, high value of positive C-reactive protein and normal white blood cell count. It was difficult to distinguish bacterial pneumonia from viral pneumonia only based upon clinical symptoms, physical examination and simple laboratory findings.

  3. Use of computer algorithms to reduce viral quasispecies sequence space.

    PubMed

    Epperson, E S; Tyrer, H W

    1995-01-01

    A virus may express multiple simple mutations producing a set of viral subspecies called quasispecies: the quasispecies are considered the same species as the original virus. We are interested in reducing the point mutation space to enumerate that sequence space. We form a point mutation by applying a single bit mutation to a strand of viral DNA. How many differing viruses are possible if we allow any of the base pairs to change along the strand? For a strand of arbitrary length n we see that there is a possible sequence space of 4n-1.4 = 4n combinations. We can further remove identical sequences due to redundant amino acid codon encoding. This requires the use of a computer, but this time the complexity is a product: the number of possible amino acids times the number of codons. This substantial reduction from an exponential complexity O(4n) to a product O(n.amino-acid-number) gives us the complete list of mutant viral entities which are one mutation away from the original. Further reduction is possible, but requires biological insight regarding the viability of the mutation. By recognizing the possible sequence space, prediction can be made toward identifying future viral strains of HIV and influenza (to name two important viral particles), and perhaps develop a predictive intervention.

  4. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  5. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E; Yoffe, Aron M; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L N; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  6. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made. PMID:25709166

  7. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made.

  8. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Encodes a Viral Deubiquitinase▿

    PubMed Central

    González, Carlos M.; Wang, Ling; Damania, Blossom

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV can exist in either a lytic or a latent phase during its life cycle. We report that the lytic protein encoded by KSHV open reading frame 64 (Orf64) is a viral deubiquitinase (DUB) enzyme capable of deubiquitinating cellular proteins in vitro and in vivo. Orf64 DUB activity is effective against lysine 48 (K48)- and lysine 63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains. Thus, KSHV Orf64 is a viral DUB that does not show specificity toward K48 or K63 ubiquitin linkages. Orf64 DUB activity lies within the first 205 residues of the protein, and deubiquitination is dependent on a cysteine at position 29, since mutation of this residue ablated this activity. Cell fractionation studies revealed that the N terminus and the full-length protein localized to both the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. The function of Orf64 was tested by short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown studies on latently infected cells that were induced into lytic replication. We found that depletion of Orf64 by siRNA resulted in decreased viral lytic transcription and lytic protein expression. These experiments indicate that Orf64 plays a role in KSHV lytic replication. PMID:19640989

  9. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, Theodore R; Winton, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The first detections of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in North America were in Washington State from adult coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon in 1988. Subsequently, VHSV was isolated from adult coho salmon returning to hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest in 1989, 1991 and 1994. These isolates represented a strain of VHSV that was genetically different from European VHSV as determined by DNA sequence analysis and T1 ribonuclease fingerprinting. The North American strain of VHSV was also isolated from skin lesions of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) taken from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska in 1990, 1991 and 1993. In 1993 and 1994, the virus was isolated from Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi) in Alaskan waters of PWS, Kodiak Island, Auke Bay and Port Frederick. During 1993 and 1994 the herring fishery in PWS failed from a probable complex of environmental stressors but VHSV isolates were associated with hemorrhages of the skin and fins in fish that returned to spawn. Also in 1993 and 1994, VHSV was isolated from apparently healthy stocks of herring in British Columbia, Canada and Puget Sound, Washington. Thus, the North American strain of VHSV is enzootic in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean among Pacific herring stocks with Pacific cod serving as a secondary reservoir. Although the North American strain of the virus appears to be moderately pathogenic for herring, causing occasional self-limiting epizootics, it was shown to be relatively avirulent for several species of salmonids. Pacific herring are common prey for cod and salmon and were most probably the source of the VHSV isolates from the adult salmon returning to spawn in rivers or at hatcheries in Washington State. Compelling circumstances involving the European isolates of VHSV suggest that this strain of the virus also is enzootic among marine fish in the Atlantic Oean. The highly pathogenic nature of the European strain of VHSV for salmonid fish may be the

  10. Hepatitis B virus: pathogenesis, viral intermediates, and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Locarnini, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Although HBV has the potential to generate an almost limitless spectrum of quasispecies during chronic infection, the viability of the majority of these quasispecies is almost certainly impaired due to constraints imposed by the remarkably compact organization of the HBV genome. On the other hand, single mutations may affect more than one gene and result in complex and unpredictable effects on viral phenotype. Better understanding of the constraints imposed by gene overlap and of genotype-phenotype relationships should help in the development of improved antiviral strategies and management approaches. Although the probability of developing viral resistance is directly proportional to the intensity of selection pressure and the diversity of quasispecies, potent inhibition of HBV replication should be able to prevent development of drug resistance because mutagenesis is replication dependent. If viral replication can be suppressed for a sufficient length of time, viral load should decline to a point where the continued production of quasispecies with the potential to resist new drug treatments no longer occurs. Clinical application of this concept will require optimization of combination therapies analogous to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection. Total cure of hepatitis B will require elimination of the intranuclear pool of viral minichromosomes, which will probably only be achieved by normal cell turnover, reactivation of host immunity, or elucidation of the antiviral mechanisms operating during cytokine clearance in acute hepatitis B (see Fig. 1).

  11. Postoperative Delayed Cervical Palsies: Understanding the Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Planchard, Ryan F.; Maloney, Patrick R.; Mallory, Grant W.; Puffer, Ross C.; Spinner, Robert J.; Nassr, Ahmad; Fogelson, Jeremy L.; Krauss, William E.; Clarke, Michelle J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective study. Objective  This study reviews 1,768 consecutive cervical decompressions with or without instrumented fusion to identify patient-specific and procedural risk factors significantly correlated with the development of delayed cervical palsy (DCP). Methods  Baseline demographic and procedural information was collected from the electronic medical record. Particular attention was devoted to reviewing each chart for recognized risk factors of postsurgical inflammatory neuropathy: autoimmune disease, blood transfusions, diabetes, and smoking. Results  Of 1,669 patients, 56 (3.4%) developed a DCP. Although 71% of the palsies involved C5, 55% of palsies were multimyotomal and 18% were bilateral. Significant risk factors on univariate analysis included age (p = 0.0061, odds ratio [OR] = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.008 to 1.050), posterior instrumented fusion (p < 0.0001, OR = 3.30, 95% CI 1.920 to 5.653), prone versus semisitting/sitting position (p = 0.0036, OR = 3.58, 95% CI 1.451 to 11.881), number of operative levels (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.247 to 1.605), intraoperative transfusions (p = 0.0231, OR = 2.57, 95% CI 1.152 to 5.132), and nonspecific autoimmune disease (p = 0.0107, OR = 3.83, 95% CI 1.418 to 8.730). On multivariate analysis, number of operative levels (p = 0.0053, OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.075 to 1.496) and nonspecific autoimmune disease (p = 0.0416, OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.047 to 7.092) remained significant. Conclusions  Although this study partially supports a mechanical etiology in the pathogenesis of a DCP, we also describe a notable correlation with autoimmune risk factors. Bilateral and multimyotomal involvement provides additional support that some DCPs may result from an inflammatory response and thus an underlying multifactorial etiology for this complication. PMID:27555999

  12. Recovery of divergent avian bornaviruses from cases of proventricular dilatation disease: Identification of a candidate etiologic agent

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Amy L; Gancz, Ady; Clubb, Susan; Skewes-Cox, Peter; Fischer, Kael; Sorber, Katherine; Chiu, Charles Y; Lublin, Avishai; Mechani, Sara; Farnoushi, Yigal; Greninger, Alexander; Wen, Christopher C; Karlene, Scott B; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2008-01-01

    Background Proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) is a fatal disorder threatening domesticated and wild psittacine birds worldwide. It is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the ganglia of the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to central nervous system disorders as well as disordered enteric motility and associated wasting. For almost 40 years, a viral etiology for PDD has been suspected, but to date no candidate etiologic agent has been reproducibly linked to the disease. Results Analysis of 2 PDD case-control series collected independently on different continents using a pan-viral microarray revealed a bornavirus hybridization signature in 62.5% of the PDD cases (5/8) and none of the controls (0/8). Ultra high throughput sequencing was utilized to recover the complete viral genome sequence from one of the virus-positive PDD cases. This revealed a bornavirus-like genome organization for this agent with a high degree of sequence divergence from all prior bornavirus isolates. We propose the name avian bornavirus (ABV) for this agent. Further specific ABV PCR analysis of an additional set of independently collected PDD cases and controls yielded a significant difference in ABV detection rate among PDD cases (71%, n = 7) compared to controls (0%, n = 14) (P = 0.01; Fisher's Exact Test). Partial sequence analysis of a total of 16 ABV isolates we have now recovered from these and an additional set of cases reveals at least 5 distinct ABV genetic subgroups. Conclusion These studies clearly demonstrate the existence of an avian reservoir of remarkably diverse bornaviruses and provide a compelling candidate in the search for an etiologic agent of PDD. PMID:18671869

  13. Topology of viral evolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joseph Minhow; Carlsson, Gunnar; Rabadan, Raul

    2013-11-12

    The tree structure is currently the accepted paradigm to represent evolutionary relationships between organisms, species or other taxa. However, horizontal, or reticulate, genomic exchanges are pervasive in nature and confound characterization of phylogenetic trees. Drawing from algebraic topology, we present a unique evolutionary framework that comprehensively captures both clonal and reticulate evolution. We show that whereas clonal evolution can be summarized as a tree, reticulate evolution exhibits nontrivial topology of dimension greater than zero. Our method effectively characterizes clonal evolution, reassortment, and recombination in RNA viruses. Beyond detecting reticulate evolution, we succinctly recapitulate the history of complex genetic exchanges involving more than two parental strains, such as the triple reassortment of H7N9 avian influenza and the formation of circulating HIV-1 recombinants. In addition, we identify recurrent, large-scale patterns of reticulate evolution, including frequent PB2-PB1-PA-NP cosegregation during avian influenza reassortment. Finally, we bound the rate of reticulate events (i.e., 20 reassortments per year in avian influenza). Our method provides an evolutionary perspective that not only captures reticulate events precluding phylogeny, but also indicates the evolutionary scales where phylogenetic inference could be accurate.

  14. Viral infections of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kalter, S S; Heberling, R L; Cooke, A W; Barry, J D; Tian, P Y; Northam, W J

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 53,000 serologic tests and viral isolation studies were performed on 1,700 nonhuman primate specimens for evidence of past and/or current viral infection. Information, other than the requested test, generally was not provided with the specimen. This lack of information does not permit any attempt at interpretation of results. Requested testing included a large number of diverse viral agents in approximately 40 primate species. The resulting data are in keeping with those of previous studies and offer an insight into the needs of colony management, as well as some general information on the overall frequency of infection with the indicated viruses. Inasmuch as the results represent testing of single specimens, they are not to be construed as "diagnostic," and simply indicate past infection as represented by the presence of antibody in the test animal. Viral isolation results are listed, and the number of positive results versus the number of animals tested emphasizes the limitations of the procedure. Investigations such as these continue to assist in the maintenance of healthy nonhuman primate colonies. This information also supports continued use of nonhuman primates for research in human viral infections and may be helpful in terms of animal selection for use in xenotransplants.

  15. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety.

  16. The chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garaulet, M; Ordovás, JM; Madrid, JA

    2015-01-01

    The effect of CD on human health is an emerging issue. Many records link CD with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, cognitive impairment and obesity, all of them conducive to premature aging. The amount of sleep has declined by 1.5 h over the past century, accompanied by an important increase in obesity. Shift work, sleep deprivation and exposure to bright light at night increase the prevalence of adiposity. Animal models have shown that mice with Clock gene disruption are prone to developing obesity and MetS. This review summarizes the latest developments with regard to chronobiology and obesity, considering (1) how molecular clocks coordinate metabolism and the specific role of the adipocyte; (2) CD and its causes and pathological consequences; (3) the epidemiological evidence of obesity as a chronobiological illness; and (4) theories of circadian disruption and obesity. Energy intake and expenditure, relevance of sleep, fat intake from a circadian perspective and psychological and genetic aspects of obesity are examined. Finally, ideas about the use of chronobiology in the treatment of obesity are discussed. Such knowledge has the potential to become a valuable tool in the understanding of the relationship between the chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity. PMID:20567242

  17. Molar incisor hypomineralization, prevalence, and etiology.

    PubMed

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  18. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake. PMID:24949012

  19. Understanding and determining the etiology of autism.

    PubMed

    Currenti, Salvatore A

    2010-03-01

    Worldwide, the rate of autism has been steadily rising. There are several environmental factors in concert with genetic susceptibilities that are contributing to this rise. Impaired methylation and mutations of mecp2 have been associated with autistic spectrum disorders, and related Rett syndrome. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 enzymes have also been linked to autism, specifically CYP27B1 that is essential for proper vitamin D metabolism. Vitamin D is important for neuronal growth and neurodevelopment, and defects in metabolism or deficiency have been implicated in autistic individuals. Other factors that have been considered include: maternally derived antibodies, maternal infection, heavy metal exposure, folic acid supplementation, epigenetics, measles, mumps, rubella vaccination, and even electromagnetic radiation. In each case, the consequences, whether direct or indirect, negatively affect the nervous system, neurodevelopment, and environmental responsive genes. The etiology of autism is a topic of controversial debate, while researchers strive to achieve a common objective. The goal is to identify the cause(s) of autism to understand the complex interplay between environment and gene regulation. There is optimism that specific causes and risk factors will be identified. The results of future investigations will facilitate enhanced screening, prevention, and therapy for "at risk" and autistic patients.

  20. The chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity.

    PubMed

    Garaulet, M; Ordovás, J M; Madrid, J A

    2010-12-01

    The effect of CD on human health is an emerging issue. Many records link CD with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, cognitive impairment and obesity, all of them conducive to premature aging. The amount of sleep has declined by 1.5 h over the past century, accompanied by an important increase in obesity. Shift work, sleep deprivation and exposure to bright light at night increase the prevalence of adiposity. Animal models have shown that mice with Clock gene disruption are prone to developing obesity and MetS. This review summarizes the latest developments with regard to chronobiology and obesity, considering (1) how molecular clocks coordinate metabolism and the specific role of the adipocyte; (2) CD and its causes and pathological consequences; (3) the epidemiological evidence of obesity as a chronobiological illness; and (4) theories of circadian disruption and obesity. Energy intake and expenditure, relevance of sleep, fat intake from a circadian perspective and psychological and genetic aspects of obesity are examined. Finally, ideas about the use of chronobiology in the treatment of obesity are discussed. Such knowledge has the potential to become a valuable tool in the understanding of the relationship between the chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity.

  1. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  2. Scrotal abscess: Varied etiology, associations, and management

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu S.; Alladi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To report a series of scrotal abscess, a rare problem, their etiology, and management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of children who presented with scrotal abscess between January 2010 and March 2015, analyzed with respect to clinical features, pathophysiology of spread and management. Results: Eight infants and a 3-year-old phenotypically male child presented with scrotal abscess as a result of abdominal pathologies which included mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) [1]; three anorectal malformations with ectopic ureter [1], urethral stricture [1], and neurogenic bladder [1]; meconium peritonitis with meconium periorchitis [2], ileal atresia [1], and intra-abdominal abscess [1]; posturethroplasty for Y urethral duplication with metal stenosis [1] and idiopathic pyocele [1]. Transmission of the organism had varied routes include fallopian tube [1], urethra ejaculatory reflux [4], hematogenous [2], and the patent process of vaginalis [2]. Two of the nine required extensive evaluation for further management. Treating the predisposing pathology resolved scrotal abscesses in eight of nine patients, one of whom, required vasectomy additionally. Idiopathic pyocele responded to needle aspiration and antibiotics. Conclusion: Scrotal abscess needs a high index of suspicion for predisposing pathology, especially in infants. Laparoscopy is safe and effective in the management of the MGD and ectopic ureter. PMID:27695207

  3. From hepatic diseases and jaundice to viral hepatitis: the configuration of a kaleidoscope.

    PubMed

    Gaze, Rosangela; Carvalho, Diana Maul de; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2013-02-01

    Viral hepatitis A, B, C, D and E--systemic hepatotropic viral infections--present as acute hepatitis that, depending on the etiological agent, viral load and host conditions, may evolve into chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and acute fulminant disease. The ecological versatility of these viruses, their spectrum of transmission in time and space, potentialized by the sub-clinical course of a large proportion of infections, comprise an epidemiological challenge. This essay describes scenarios and tendencies in the socioepidemiologic profile, based on the history of these infections, and indicates the need to overcome patterns, models, and protocols and instead investigate each particular situation. In other words, it highlights the need to explore singularities in order to be able to develop new proposals for general actions tailored to local specificities.

  4. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation.

  5. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  6. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  7. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  8. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  9. 38 CFR 3.380 - Diseases of allergic etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diseases of allergic... Specific Diseases § 3.380 Diseases of allergic etiology. Diseases of allergic etiology, including bronchial... progress nor as due to the inherent nature of the disease. Seasonal and other acute allergic...

  10. 38 CFR 4.17a - Misconduct etiology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Misconduct etiology. 4... RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.17a Misconduct etiology. A permanent and total... coexistence of misconduct disability when: (a) A veteran, regardless of employment status, also has...

  11. Early Family Influences in the Etiology of Homosexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, Stephanie Anne

    The etiology of homosexuality is probably best explained from a multidimensional framework which takes into account socialization, family background, and individual developmental factors. A research review was conducted to examine the influence of parental characteristics in the etiology of homosexuality. The findings of the review support the…

  12. 42 CFR 71.54 - Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors. 71.54..., INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.54 Etiological agents, hosts, and vectors. (a) A... any arthropod or other animal host or vector of human disease, or any exotic living arthropod or...

  13. In vitro antiviral efficacy of ribavirin against feline calicivirus, feline viral rhinotracheitis virus, and canine parainfluenza virus.

    PubMed

    Povey, R C

    1978-01-01

    Ribavirin had marked in vitro activity against feline calcivirus, strain 255, and canine parainfluenza virus, but showed only slight antiviral effect on feline viral rhinotracheitis virus. Antiviral activity was manifested by partial to complete suppression of viral cytopathic effect and of viral replication, depending on concentration of ribavirin in the culture medium and dosage of viral inoculum. Concentrations of ribavirin as small as 3.2 microgram/ml and 1.0 microgram/ml showed some activity against feline calcivirus and canine parainfluenza virus, respectively.

  14. Etiologic study vis-à-vis intervention study.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2010-10-01

    Understanding of the logic-dictated essence of the etiologic study, and similarly that of the intervention-study, in the advancement of the knowledge-base of medicine, remains incomplete. Viewing experimental intervention-studies ('clinical trials') as paradigmatic for etiologic studies-necessarily non-experimental-has been wrongheaded. This misunderstanding continues to impede understanding of the essence of what logic dictates to be the etiologic study, adduced decades ago but still commonly confused with the essence of the (seriously malformed) 'case-control' study. Correct understanding of the essence of the etiologic study would pave the way to improved understanding of the intervention study, notably as to how prognostic probability functions could be derived from the data now routinely produced in clinical trials. This paradigm reversal, too, has been previously proposed, but its understanding has remained fogged by wanting understanding of the etiologic study.

  15. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  16. New infectious etiologies for posterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Moncef; Kahloun, Rim; Ben Yahia, Salim; Jelliti, Bechir; Messaoud, Riadh

    2013-01-01

    Emergent and resurgent arthropod vector-borne diseases are major causes of systemic morbidity and death and expanding worldwide. Among them, viral and bacterial agents including West Nile virus, Dengue fever, Chikungunya, Rift Valley fever, and rickettsioses have been recently associated with an array of ocular manifestations. These include anterior uveitis, retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic nerve involvement. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious diseases is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular involvement. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by the detection of a specific antibody in serum. Ocular involvement associated with emergent infections usually has a self-limited course, but it can result in persistent visual impairment. There is currently no proven specific treatment for arboviral diseases, and therapy is mostly supportive. Vaccination for humans against these viruses is still in the research phase. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for rickettsial diseases. Prevention, including public measures to reduce the number of mosquitoes and personal protection, remains the mainstay for arthropod vector disease control. Influenza A (H1N1) virus was responsible for a pandemic human influenza in 2009, and was recently associated with various posterior segment changes.

  17. [Definition, etiology, classification and presentation forms].

    PubMed

    Mas Garriga, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is defined as a degenerative process affecting the joints as a result of mechanical and biological disorders that destabilize the balance between the synthesis and degradation of joint cartilage, stimulating the growth of subchondral bone; chronic synovitis is also present. Currently, the joint is considered as a functional unit that includes distinct tissues, mainly cartilage, the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Distinct risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis have been described: general, unmodifiable risk factors (age, sex, and genetic makeup), general, modifiable risk factors (obesity and hormonal factors) and local risk factors (prior joint anomalies and joint overload). Notable among the main factors related to disease progression are joint alignment defects and generalized osteoarthritis. Several classifications of osteoarthritis have been proposed but none is particularly important for the primary care management of the disease. These classifications include etiological (primary or idiopathic forms and secondary forms) and topographical (typical and atypical localizations) classifications, the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (radiological repercussions) and that of the American College of Rheumatology for osteoarthritis of the hand, hip and knee. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is 10.2% in Spain and shows a marked discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings. Hand osteoarthritis, with a prevalence of symptomatic involvement of around 6.2%, has several forms of presentation (nodal osteoarthritis, generalized osteoarthritis, rhizarthrosis, and erosive osteoarthritis). Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip affects between 3.5% and 5.6% of persons older than 50 years and has different radiological patterns depending on femoral head migration.

  18. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia Nr; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists' management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons.

  19. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia NR; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists’ management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons. PMID:27217799

  20. Virus diseases of the salmonidae in the western United States. I. Etiology and epizootiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1965-01-01

    The history of fish diseases in western United States shows an increasing awareness that viruses could cause epizootics in fish. Fishery biologists bunked first, for protozoan and metazoan parasites, then for bacteria, and if none could be identified assumed that the mortalities were attributable to nutritional deficiency, Microbiologists in general were cognizant of virus diseases in other animals and investigators of fish diseases were alert to the possibility that piscine epizootics could be of similar cause. In 1950 an epizootic occurred in sockeye salmon (Gncorhynchus norkm) that was shown to have a viral etiologic agent.In recent years, with increasing frequency, we have been able to demonstrate a virus utiology for epizootics and panzootics in trout and salmon in several states in the West.  FIGURE 1 is a map showing the location of epizootics of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN), Sacramento River chinook disease (SRCD), Oregon sockeye disease (OSD), and Columbia River sockeye disease (CRSDJ. The pathology and immunopathology of these are discussed in detail in other reports. The present report was initiated as a review of the literature concerning the diseases and to present in brief a description of their etiologic agents.

  1. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  2. Transfusion transmissible virus TTV and its putative role in the etiology of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Poovorawan, Y; Tangkijvanich, P; Theamboonlers, A; Hirsch, P

    2001-01-01

    TTV, the transfusion transmissible hepatitis virus infects mainly patients at risk for parenteral exposure and hence, prone to develop chronic liver disease, as well as healthy populations worldwide. Most TTV infections appear to occur parenterally, with viremia detected frequently in blood donors and blood products. The substantial proportion of asymptomatic individuals never exposed to blood-borne agents, and its high prevalence among healthy subjects implicates the fecal-oral route as another potential for transmission. According to the TTV DNA levels detected in liver tissue, it apparently replicates in hepatocytes, and TTV DNA is present in sera of patients with posttransfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology closely correlated with ALT levels. However, TTV initiating the development of chronic liver disease or causing posttransfusion hepatitis could not be confirmed, as most patients positive for TTV DNA remain asymptomatic and those progressing towards chronic liver disease are invariably coinfected with either the hepatitis B or C virus. Also, TTV coinfection does not aggravate the symptoms associated with hepatitis B or C. Similarly, it does not cause posthepatitis aplastic anemia, and high-risk patients can immunologically clear the viral DNA. In conclusion, being widely distributed and apparently nonpathogenic, TTV might represent an opportunistic but innocent virus reminiscent of hepatitis G virus, with a negligible role in the etiology of chronic liver disease.

  3. Genetic change in the open reading frame of bovine viral diarrhea virus is introduced more rapidly during the establishment of a single persistent infection than by multiple acute infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are ubiquitous viral pathogens of cattle. There is a high degree of sequence diversity between strains circulating in livestock herds. The driving force behind change in sequence is not known but the inaccurate replication of the genomic RNA by a viral RNA polyme...

  4. Etiology of microglial nodules in brains of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, M; Pellegrinelli, A; Ferri, A; Tosoni, A; Bonetto, S; Zerbi, P; Boldorini, R; Vago, L; Costanzi, G

    2000-02-01

    Microglial nodules associated with opportunistic and HIV-related lesions are frequently found in the brains of AIDS patients. However, in many cases, the causative agent is only presumptively suspected. We reviewed 199 brains of AIDS patients with micronodular lesions to clarify their etiology by immunohistochemistry (to Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus I/II, varicella zoster virus and HIV-p24 core protein), PCR (for herpetic viruses and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and electron microscopy. Productive HIV infection was observed in 110 cases (55.1%): 30 cases with Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis, 30 with cytomegalovirus encephalitis, eight with multiple cerebral diseases, while in the remaining 42 cases HIV was the only pathogenetic agent. Multinucleated giant cells (hallmark of HIV infection) were found in the MGNs of 85/110 cases with HIV-related lesions; the remaining 25 cases had only p24 positive cells but no multinucleated giant cells. In these latter cases the micronodular lesions had been initially attributed to the main opportunistic agent found in the brain, or defined as subacute encephalitis. Individual microglial nodules positive for an opportunistic pathogen were generally negative for HIV antigens. In 13 cases no opportunistic agent or HIV productive infection was found. In these cases, PCR and electron microscopy examination for HIV and other viral infections were negative. Our data suggest that HIV-immunohistochemistry should be used for the etiological diagnosis of micronodular lesions in AIDS brains, even in the presence of other pathogens. After extensive search, the etiology of the microglial nodules remains unknown in only a small percentage of cases.

  5. Expression of Interleukin-8, Interleukin-10 and Epstein-Barr Viral-Load as Prognostic Indicator in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Savitri, Eka; Haryana, Mubarika Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is angiogeneic chemokine that plays a potential role in both development and progression of many human malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Epstein- Barr virus (EBV) is recognized to be an important etiologic agent of NPC as the viral gene products are frequently detected in NPC tissue along with the elevation of antibody titre to the viral protein (VCA-p18+ EBNA1) of IgA in the majority of patients. Elevated plasma of Viral Load is regarded as an important marker for the presence of the disease and for the monitoring of disease progression. However, other serum/plasma parameters such as the level of certain interleukins (IL-8 and IL-10) has also been implicated in NPC progression. The study aimed to investigate the correlations between plasma Viral Load and the level of interleukin (IL-8) and Interleukin (IL-10) in relating these parameters to the stages of NPC. In addition of Viral Load (VCA-p18+EBNA1) IgA, Interleukin-8 and Interleukin-10 before and after therapy will be investigated to seek the possible marker for disease progression. A total of 39 NPC patients and 29 healthy control individuals enrolled in this study. Plasma Viral Load was quantified using real-time quantitative PCR. The Level of plasma interleukins both IL-8 and IL-10 were analyzed using ELISA methods. Results indicated there was a significant decrease in viral load was detected in plasma of NPC patients following therapy. Plasma of viral load was shown to be a good prognosticator for disease progression. There were positive correlation between plasma of viral load and IL-8. These non invasive parameters expressed in blood, could be substitutes of viral load using brushing method, which is invasive. In conclusion that: Viral Load, (VCA-p18+EBNA1) IgA and IL-8 levels are promising markers for the presence of NPC and progression of the disease. PMID:25948470

  6. The Paradigm of Viral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Carl B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

  7. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  8. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  9. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  10. Hepatitis B viral antigenic structure: signature analysis by monoclonal radioimmunoassays.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Wong, M A; Shorey, J; Brown, R D; Marciniak, R A; Isselbacher, K J

    1984-01-01

    An approach has been developed for the analysis of hepatitis B viral (HBV) antigenic structure that creates numerical "signatures" of HBV strains. This technique employs high-affinity IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBsAg) directed toward distinct and separate determinants on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Such antibodies have been used to develop sensitive and specific radioimmuno-assays for measurement of HBsAg-associated determinants in serum. In performing "signature" analysis separate binding curves for each monoclonal anti-HBsAg are generated by measuring immunoreactivity in serial dilutions of HBsAg-positive serum. Since the HBsAg concentration in serum is unknown, the binding profiles of groups of samples from the same "classic" HBV subtype are aligned by an iterative maximum likelihood procedure to give the numerical signature of that HBV subtype. By using this approach, HBsAg shows far more antigenic heterogeneity than previously recognized by polyvalent anti-HBsAg antibodies. Indeed, there are subgroups within the classic HBsAg subtypes. In addition, the a domain (common to all known subtypes or strains of HBV) has been shown to be multideterminant. Thus, these studies have demonstrated heretofore unrecognized differences in HBV subtypes. This approach also has broader significance for the study of subtle or major antigenic changes among other viral agents since it is not necessary to know the concentration of virus or viral protein in complex protein mixtures. PMID:6585796

  11. Spoken language outcomes after hemispherectomy: factoring in etiology.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, S; de Bode, S; Mathern, G W

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed postsurgery linguistic outcomes of 43 hemispherectomy patients operated on at UCLA. We rated spoken language (Spoken Language Rank, SLR) on a scale from 0 (no language) to 6 (mature grammar) and examined the effects of side of resection/damage, age at surgery/seizure onset, seizure control postsurgery, and etiology on language development. Etiology was defined as developmental (cortical dysplasia and prenatal stroke) and acquired pathology (Rasmussen's encephalitis and postnatal stroke). We found that clinical variables were predictive of language outcomes only when they were considered within distinct etiology groups. Specifically, children with developmental etiologies had lower SLRs than those with acquired pathologies (p =.0006); age factors correlated positively with higher SLRs only for children with acquired etiologies (p =.0006); right-sided resections led to higher SLRs only for the acquired group (p =.0008); and postsurgery seizure control correlated positively with SLR only for those with developmental etiologies (p =.0047). We argue that the variables considered are not independent predictors of spoken language outcome posthemispherectomy but should be viewed instead as characteristics of etiology.

  12. Mechanisms Controlling Virulence Thresholds of Mixed Viral Populations ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Karen Z.; Pfeiffer, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    The propensity of RNA viruses to revert attenuating mutations contributes to disease and complicates vaccine development. Despite the presence of virulent revertant viruses in some live-attenuated vaccines, disease from vaccination is rare. This suggests that in mixed viral populations, attenuated viruses may limit the pathogenesis of virulent viruses, thus establishing a virulence threshold. Here we examined virulence thresholds using mixtures of virulent and attenuated viruses in a transgenic mouse model of poliovirus infection. We determined that a 1,000-fold excess of the attenuated Sabin strain of poliovirus was protective against disease induced by the virulent Mahoney strain. Protection was induced locally, and inactivated virus conferred protection. Treatment with a poliovirus receptor-blocking antibody phenocopied the protective effect of inactivated viruses in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that one mechanism controlling virulence thresholds may be competition for a viral receptor. Additionally, the type I interferon response reduces poliovirus pathogenesis; therefore, we examined virulence thresholds in mice lacking the alpha/beta interferon receptor. We found that the attenuated virus was virulent in immunodeficient mice due to the enhanced replication and reversion of attenuating mutations. Therefore, while the type I interferon response limits the virulence of the attenuated strain by reducing replication, protection from disease conferred by the attenuated strain in immunocompetent mice can occur independently of replication. Our results identified mechanisms controlling the virulence of mixed viral populations and indicate that live-attenuated vaccines containing virulent virus may be safe, as long as virulent viruses are present at levels below a critical threshold. PMID:21795346

  13. [An update on viral diseases of the dog and cat].

    PubMed

    Bodewes, R; Egberink, H F

    2009-04-15

    In this review, recent developments in the field of viral diseases of the dog and the cat are discussed. In the dog, infection with the coronavirus type 2 is associated with respiratory signs, while infection of a highly pathogenic strain of the coronavirus type 1 has been identified as the cause of mortality in puppies. A new strain of the canine parvovirus is identified, from which the pathogenicity is not yet completely clarified. Infection with West Nile virus is associated with progressive neurological disease and subclinical infections in dogs. Infection with equine influenza A (H3N8) or a highly related influenza virus can cause severe respiratory disease and mortality in greyhounds and other dogs. Infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) can cause disease and mortality in cats and is mostly subclinical in dogs. A number of outbreaks of highly virulent strains of the calicivirus in cats have been described.

  14. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR): epidemiology and etiology.

    PubMed

    Romo, Agustín; Carceller, Raquel; Tobajas, Javier

    2009-02-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is mainly due to a pathologic slow-down in the fetal growth pace, resulting in a fetus that is unable to reach its growth potential. IUGR frequency will vary depending on the discrimination criteria adopted. It is extremely important to use local or national fetal growth graphs in order to avoid some confounding factors. IUGR incidence in newborns would be between 3% and 7% of the total population. In our experience it is 5.13% a figure similar to the one obtained by other authors but with a progressively higher incidence during the last decade. There are multiple maternal factors that can generally be grouped into constitutional and general factors given that they affect age, weight, race, maternal cardiac volume, etc, socioeconomic factors with key incidence in the mother's nutrition level, where a poor maternal nutrition level would be the key factor in this group. We have evaluated multiple factors as possible contributors to the IUGR risk: race, parents' age, mother's height (cm), mother's birth weight and before pregnancy (kg), ponderal gain and blood pressure during pregnancy, and previous SGA newborns. Socioeconomic factors like social class, parents' profession, habitual residence, salary, immigration, and diet were also evaluated. We also included variables such as total daily working time and time mothers spent standing up, daily sleeping time (hrs), stress self-perception test at work and primiparity age. Toxic factors during pregnancy: tobacco (active and passive), alcohol, drugs and coffee consumption. Fetal or utero-placental factors were considered. In our study, the most significant etiologic factors were: Active and passive tobacco consuming, mother's stress level, increase of total months worked during pregnancy, total daily working hours and time mothers spent standing up and finally, the parent's height. Our data support the main objective of reducing the incidence of SGA newborns after IUGR by fighting

  15. Bacterial Etiologies of Five Core Syndromes: Laboratory-Based Syndromic Surveillance Conducted in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Baiqing; Liang, Dabin; Lin, Mei; Wang, Mingliu; Zeng, Jun; Liao, Hezhuang; Zhou, Lingyun; Huang, Jun; Wei, Xiaolin; Zou, Guanyang; Jing, Huaiqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Under the existing national surveillance system in China for selected infectious diseases, bacterial cultures are performed for only a small percentage of reported cases. We set up a laboratory-based syndromic surveillance system to elucidate bacterial etiologic spectrum and detect infection by rare etiologies (or serogroups) for five core syndromes in the given study area. Methods Patients presenting with one of five core syndromes at nine sentinel hospitals in Guagnxi, China were evaluated using laboratory-based syndrome surveillance to elucidate bacterial etiologies. We collected respiratory and stool specimens, as well as CSF, blood and other related samples for bacterial cultures and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assays. Results From February 2009 to December 2011, 2,964 patients were enrolled in the study. Etiologies were identified in 320 (10.08%) patients. Streptococcus pneumonia (37 strains, 24.18%), Klebsiella pneumonia (34, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) were the most frequent pathogens for fever and respiratory syndrome, while Salmonella (77, 81.05%) was most often seen in diarrhea syndrome cases. Salmonella paratyphi A (38, 86.36%) occurred in fever and rash syndrome, with Cryptococcus neoformans (20, 35.09%), Streptococcus pneumonia (5, 8.77%), Klebsiella pneumonia (5, 8.77%),streptococcus suis (3, 5.26%) and Neisseria meningitides group B (2, 3.51%) being the most frequently detected in encephalitis-meningitis syndrome. To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients. Conclusions In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention. Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area. PMID:25360596

  16. Etiology and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Etiology and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) is a component of the PLCO Trial. By collecting biologic materials and risk factor information from trial participants before the diagnosis of disease, PLCO EEMS adds substantial value to the trial, providing a resource for cancer research, focused, in particular, on cancer etiology and early markers. Etiologic studies investigate the environmental, biochemical and genetic risk factors for cancer. Early detection studies aim to develop reproducible, diagnostics-ready biomarkers of early disease. | Risk factor data and biospecimens collected before the diagnosis of disease from participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.

  17. THE ETIOLOGY OF RAT-BITE FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Francis G.

    1916-01-01

    The similarity in the cases of rat-bite fever recorded in the literature establishes it as a definite clinical entity. The same symptomatology occurs in cases from Asia, Europe, and America. The greater frequency of the disease in Japan than elsewhere is probably due to the housing conditions and habits of the people resulting in the more frequent occurrence of rat-bites. It does not seem necessary to consider that cases occurring in Europe and America are due to the bites of rats that have been imported from Japan. The clinical picture and course of the disease indicate that it is infectious in origin. Until Schottmüller's case appeared in 1914, the etiology had been undiscovered. He isolated from his case in eight consecutive blood cultures a streptothrix which he has designated Streptothrix muris ratti. His work has been confirmed by the isolation of an identical streptothrix from the blood during life and at autopsy in the case here reported. Further confirmation of the etiological relationship of this organism to the infection in our patient is found in the production of powerful agglutinins for the organism in the blood serum of this case and in the demonstration of the organism in the vegetation on the mitral valve. It is not unreasonable to suppose that Proescher (13) observed the same organism in the sections of the excised wound in his case. Although it is fully realized that Koch's postulates have not been fulfilled in the absence of successful animal experimentation, nevertheless the accumulated evidence here presented leaves little reason to doubt that the specific cause of rat-bite fever is Streptothrix muris ratti. The pathology of rat-bite fever has hitherto been largely a matter of surmise. One autopsy only has been recorded in the literature (Miura (22)), and nothing abnormal was noted other than injection of the pial vessels. The autopsy in the case here reported has proved of considerable interest in the extent and character of the lesions

  18. Bioreactor concepts for cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí Esmeralda; Nikolay, Alexander; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine manufacturing processes are designed to meet present and upcoming challenges associated with a growing vaccine market and to include multi-use facilities offering a broad portfolio and faster reaction times in case of pandemics and emerging diseases. The final products, from whole viruses to recombinant viral proteins, are very diverse, making standard process strategies hardly universally applicable. Numerous factors such as cell substrate, virus strain or expression system, medium, cultivation system, cultivation method, and scale need consideration. Reviewing options for efficient and economical production of human vaccines, this paper discusses basic factors relevant for viral antigen production in mammalian cells, avian cells and insect cells. In addition, bioreactor concepts, including static systems, single-use systems, stirred tanks and packed-beds are addressed. On this basis, methods towards process intensification, in particular operational strategies, the use of perfusion systems for high product yields, and steps to establish continuous processes are introduced.

  19. Bench-to-bedside review: Rare and common viral infections in the intensive care unit – linking pathophysiology to clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Harper, Richart W; Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Viral infections are common causes of respiratory tract disease in the outpatient setting but much less common in the intensive care unit. However, a finite number of viral agents cause respiratory tract disease in the intensive care unit. Some viruses, such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are relatively common. Others, such as adenovirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus, Hantavirus, and the viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs), are rare but have an immense public health impact. Recognizing these viral etiologies becomes paramount in treatment, infection control, and public health measures. Therefore, a basic understanding of the pathogenesis of viral entry, replication, and host response is important for clinical diagnosis and initiating therapeutic options. This review discusses the basic pathophysiology leading to clinical presentations in a few common and rare, but important, viruses found in the intensive care unit: influenza, RSV, SARS, VZV, adenovirus, CMV, VHF, and Hantavirus. PMID:18671826

  20. About viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) virus. Potential threat of Great Lakes VHS virus in Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, Jerri L; Kurath, Gael; Emmenegger, Evi

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is a disease caused by a virus (VHSV). There are different strains of the virus that can infect marine and freshwater fish species, and the different strains may affect species differently. VHSV has recently invaded the Great Lakes, resulting in many large-scale fish die-offs and new regulatory restrictions for aquaculture throughout the region.

  1. Etiology and treatment of occlusal pathosis and associated facial pain.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P

    1981-02-01

    The treatment of occlusal pathosis and associated facial pain is a difficult and complex problem. The interaction of two etiologic factors, occlusal interferences and psychologic stress, results in parafunctional activity. The most important prerequisite to selection of a treatment method is an understanding of the etiology of the problem. What dentistry needs is a mechanism by which the major etiologic factor of parafunctional activity can be identified for each patient. Treatment can then be directed toward the reduction or elimination of that factor. When treatment is directed toward the major cause of the problem, the likelihood of success will increase greatly. Continued research on this problem will yield new insights and means for the accurate determination of the etiology of parafunctional activity for each patient.

  2. Viral Pneumonias in Forensic Autopsies: Evaluation and Classification of Histopathologic Changes With Microbiologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Daş, Taner; Sargan, Aytül; Yağmur, Gülhan; Yildirim, Muzaffer; Topal, Cumhur Selçuk; Gürler, Ahmet Selçuk; Asliyüksek, Hizir; Arslan, Murat Nihat; Özdemirel, Rifat

    2016-12-01

    Lower respiratory infections are commonly due to viruses and are the third largest cause of death. Respiratory tract viruses have a tendency to target the specific regions in the lung and can harm the host via direct effect of the virus and the host's inflammatory response. In this study, relationships between morphologic changes in the lung and the viral agent type isolated in the lung by the polymerase chain reaction technique were investigated. This study was performed retrospectively at 113 autopsy cases in the Council of Forensic Medicine in Istanbul. Slides from the lung tissues diagnosed as interstitial pneumonia and detected viral agent in polymerase chain reaction were evaluated and reviewed under light microscope by 2 pathologists simultaneously according to predetermined bronchiolar, alveolar, and interstitial findings. Alveolar findings were detected in 108 cases (95.6%), whereas interstitial and bronchiolar findings were detected in 91 (80.5%) and 38 (33.6%) cases, respectively. Intra-alveolar edema was the most common alveolar finding. Some findings such as multinucleated syncytial cells and smudge cells can aid the search for etiologic agent. Interstitial inflammation was the most common histopathologic finding in the lung in viral infections and the most prominent clue to viral infections in the lung histopathologically without discrimination of viral agent type.

  3. Consistent detection of Felis domesticus papillomavirus 2 DNA sequences within feline viral plaques.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Peters-Kennedy, Jeanine

    2010-11-01

    Viral plaques are well recognized skin lesions of cats. They are thought to be caused by papillomavirus infection; however, the causative papillomavirus is uncertain. In the current study, polymerase chain reaction using 2 consensus primer sets and 1 primer set specific for Felis domesticus papillomavirus 2 (FdPV-2) was used to amplify DNA from a series of 14 feline viral plaques. The FdPV-2 sequences were detected in all 14 viral plaques by the specific primers but in only 1 of 14 feline cutaneous trichoblastomas. Papillomavirus DNA was amplified from 8 plaques using the consensus primers. Sequences from FdPV-2 were amplified using the consensus primers from 4 plaques. In addition, 3 plaques contained papillomavirus DNA sequences from Felis domesticus papillomavirus sequence MY1, and a previously unreported papillomavirus DNA sequence was amplified from 1 plaque. As FdPV-2 was consistently present within the plaques, this suggests that this papillomavirus is the likely etiologic agent. Feline viral plaques can undergo neoplastic transformation to Bowenoid in situ carcinomas (BISCs). As FdPV-2 DNA is frequently present within BISCs, this suggests that FdPV-2 induces viral plaque formation and then remains detectible after neoplastic transformation.

  4. Vaccines and Vaccination for Veterinary Viral Diseases: A General Overview.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A high number of infectious diseases affecting livestock and companion animals are caused by pathogens of viral etiology. Ensuring the maximum standards of quality and welfare in animal production requires developing effective tools to halt and prevent the spread of those infectious diseases affecting animal husbandry. To date, one of the best strategies is to implement vaccination policies whenever possible. However many of the currently manufactured vaccines relies in classical vaccine technologies (killed or attenuated vaccines) which, under some circumstances, may not be optimal in terms of safety or adequate for widespread application in disease-free countries at risk of disease introduction. One step ahead is needed to improve and adapt vaccine manufacturing to the use of new generation vaccine technologies already tested in experimental settings. Here we present in the context of animal viral diseases of veterinary interest, an overview of some current vaccine technologies that can be approached for virus pathogens with a brief insight in the type of immunity elicited.

  5. Genetic characterization of measles vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Bankamp, Bettina; Takeda, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wenbo; Rota, Paul A

    2011-07-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 9 measles vaccine strains were compared with the sequence of the Edmonston wild-type virus. AIK-C, Moraten, Rubeovax, Schwarz, and Zagreb are vaccine strains of the Edmonston lineage, whereas CAM-70, Changchun-47, Leningrad-4 and Shanghai-191 were derived from 4 different wild-type isolates. Nucleotide substitutions were found in the noncoding regions of the genomes as well as in all coding regions, leading to deduced amino acid substitutions in all 8 viral proteins. Although the precise mechanisms involved in the attenuation of individual measles vaccines remain to be elucidated, in vitro assays of viral protein functions and recombinant viruses with defined genetic modifications have been used to characterize the differences between vaccine and wild-type strains. Although almost every protein contributes to an attenuated phenotype, substitutions affecting host cell tropism, virus assembly, and the ability to inhibit cellular antiviral defense mechanisms play an especially important role in attenuation.

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Strain Variation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    What is wild-type Epstein-Barr virus and are there genetic differences in EBV strains that contribute to some of the EBV-associated diseases? Recent progress in DNA sequencing has resulted in many new Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences becoming available. EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into type 1 and type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than type 2 EBV and molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming understood. Study of geographic variation of EBV strains independent of the type 1/type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease are now becoming possible. So we should consider more directly whether viral sequence variation might play a role in the incidence of some EBV-associated diseases.

  7. Transmission of Two Distinct HIV Type 1 Strains to an Individual That Were Harbored for Many Years by Another

    PubMed Central

    van Werkhoven, Maaike B.; Baan, Elly; Bakker, Margreet; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Paxton, William A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The concept of transmission bottlenecks in HIV-1 infection is well established. Coinfections and superinfections have been increasingly documented and provide a founding cause for the expansion of viral diversity through recombination. It is still relatively unclear how HIV-1 will propagate and evolve in individuals infected with more than one viral strain. Here we report on the parallel transmission of genetically distant viral strains cocirculating in one individual over many years to a single recipient. PMID:21790473

  8. Canine viral enteritis. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R V; Carmichael, L

    1979-05-01

    Two apparently novel viral gastroenteritides of dogs were recognized in 1978: one caused by a parvo-like virus (CPV) and one by a corona-like virus (CCV). A rotavirus has also been tentatively associated with neonatal pup enteritis. Canine viral enteritis is characterized by a sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea, rapid spread and high morbidity. Treatment is only supportive but must be initiated promptly. Infected animals should be isolated immediately; the extremely contagious nature of these diseases makes them difficult to contain. Feces from infected dogs appear to be the primary means of transmission. Sodium hypochlorite solutions (eg, Clorox) are recommended for disinfection. The development of effective vaccines is an immediate and pressing problem.

  9. [Recent acquisitions on viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Resti, M; Tucci, F; Vierucci, A

    1990-01-01

    In the last years the research on viral hepatitis let to better understand the biological, molecular, immunological and epidemiologic characteristics of the viruses that are responsible for hepatitis. The first studied virus was hepatitis B virus (HBv). The scientific attention is still, today, focused on that virus since new markers of infectivity and biological importance in early diagnosis and in disease evolution have been found. The most important result in the last years in the field of viral hepatitis has been, however, the identification of agents responsible for Non-A-Non-B hepatitis. Its epidemiology and clinical importance are discussed in the present paper. Virus C is the most important parenteral agent of NANB hepatitis. Its epidemiology in at risk populations and its role in post-transfusional and cryptogenetic hepatitis are here discussed. The research of new markers of HCV infection is today considered a main goal since the role of the only marker now available is still under discussion.

  10. Survival of Viral Biowarfare Agents in Disinfected Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Mary Margaret; Chambers, Amanda E.; Insalaco, Joseph M.; Zulich, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    Protecting civilian and military water supplies has received more attention since the United States began its war on terror in 2001. Both chlorine and bromine are used by branches of the U.S. military for disinfecting water supplies; however, limited data exists as to the effectiveness of these additives when used against viral biowarfare agents. The present study sought to evaluate the survival of selected viral biothreat agents in disinfected water. Disinfected water samples were spiked with vaccinia virus strain WR and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus strain TC-83 each separately to a final concentration of approximately 1 × 106 PFU/mL, and survival was assessed by plaque assay. Both viruses were inactivated by 1 mg/L free available chlorine (FAC) and 2mg/L total bromine within one hour. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that both chlorine and bromine are effective disinfectants against vaccinia virus and VEE strain TC-83 at the concentrations tested. PMID:21197430

  11. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  12. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  13. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  14. A practical approach estimating etiologic agents using real-time PCR in pediatric inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takafumi; Morozumi, Miyuki; Sakata, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Reiko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Sato, Yoshitake; Oishi, Tomohiro; Tajima, Takeshi; Haruta, Tunekazu; Kawamura, Naohisa; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Matsubara, Keita; Chiba, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Iwata, Satoshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate pathogens in pediatric inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), an Acute Respiratory Diseases Study Group organized by ten Japanese medical institutions devised a rapid, reliable process based on real-time PCR results in nasopharyngeal swab samples plus admission blood test results. From April 2008 to April 2009, we enrolled 903 children with CAP based on chest radiographs and clinical findings who were hospitalized within 5 days of onset. Comprehensive real-time PCR was used to detect 6 bacteria and 11 respiratory viruses. The swab specimens also were used for bacterial cultures. After initial determination of presence or absence of viral and mycoplasmal infections, significant bacterial contributions were defined by bacterial identification, clinical efficacy of antimicrobial agent, and reference to blood test results. Children were stratified by age: below 1 year, 1 year, 2-5 years, or at least 6 years old. Among patients studied, 34.4 % were diagnosed with viral infection; 21.8 %, bacterial infection; 17.5 %, viral/bacterial co-infection; 5.9 %, mycoplasmal infection; 0.3 %, mycoplasmal/bacterial co-infection; and 1.7 %, viral/mycoplasmal co-infection. The remaining 18.4 % had unknown pathogens. Purely viral infection was suggested mainly in infants younger than 1 year; mycoplasmal infection typically occurred in children at least 6 years old. Our results suggest usefulness of real-time PCR for nasopharyngeal samples together with blood tests in estimating etiologic agents in clinical settings.

  15. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  16. Current Advances on Virus Discovery and Diagnostic Role of Viral Metagenomics in Aquatic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Munang'andu, Hetron M.; Mugimba, Kizito K.; Byarugaba, Denis K.; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    The global expansion of the aquaculture industry has brought with it a corresponding increase of novel viruses infecting different aquatic organisms. These emerging viral pathogens have proved to be a challenge to the use of traditional cell-cultures and immunoassays for identification of new viruses especially in situations where the novel viruses are unculturable and no antibodies exist for their identification. Viral metagenomics has the potential to identify novel viruses without prior knowledge of their genomic sequence data and may provide a solution for the study of unculturable viruses. This review provides a synopsis on the contribution of viral metagenomics to the discovery of viruses infecting different aquatic organisms as well as its potential role in viral diagnostics. High throughput Next Generation sequencing (NGS) and library construction used in metagenomic projects have simplified the task of generating complete viral genomes unlike the challenge faced in traditional methods that use multiple primers targeted at different segments and VPs to generate the entire genome of a novel virus. In terms of diagnostics, studies carried out this far show that viral metagenomics has the potential to serve as a multifaceted tool able to study and identify etiological agents of single infections, co-infections, tissue tropism, profiling viral infections of different aquatic organisms, epidemiological monitoring of disease prevalence, evolutionary phylogenetic analyses, and the study of genomic diversity in quasispecies viruses. With sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analytical tools becoming cheaper and easier, we anticipate that metagenomics will soon become a routine tool for the discovery, study, and identification of novel pathogens including viruses to enable timely disease control for emerging diseases in aquaculture. PMID:28382024

  17. Current Advances on Virus Discovery and Diagnostic Role of Viral Metagenomics in Aquatic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Mugimba, Kizito K; Byarugaba, Denis K; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    The global expansion of the aquaculture industry has brought with it a corresponding increase of novel viruses infecting different aquatic organisms. These emerging viral pathogens have proved to be a challenge to the use of traditional cell-cultures and immunoassays for identification of new viruses especially in situations where the novel viruses are unculturable and no antibodies exist for their identification. Viral metagenomics has the potential to identify novel viruses without prior knowledge of their genomic sequence data and may provide a solution for the study of unculturable viruses. This review provides a synopsis on the contribution of viral metagenomics to the discovery of viruses infecting different aquatic organisms as well as its potential role in viral diagnostics. High throughput Next Generation sequencing (NGS) and library construction used in metagenomic projects have simplified the task of generating complete viral genomes unlike the challenge faced in traditional methods that use multiple primers targeted at different segments and VPs to generate the entire genome of a novel virus. In terms of diagnostics, studies carried out this far show that viral metagenomics has the potential to serve as a multifaceted tool able to study and identify etiological agents of single infections, co-infections, tissue tropism, profiling viral infections of different aquatic organisms, epidemiological monitoring of disease prevalence, evolutionary phylogenetic analyses, and the study of genomic diversity in quasispecies viruses. With sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analytical tools becoming cheaper and easier, we anticipate that metagenomics will soon become a routine tool for the discovery, study, and identification of novel pathogens including viruses to enable timely disease control for emerging diseases in aquaculture.

  18. Translating HIV sequences into quantitative fitness landscapes predicts viral vulnerabilities for rational immunogen design.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Andrew L; Mann, Jaclyn K; Omarjee, Saleha; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2013-03-21

    A prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine offers the best hope to curb the HIV-AIDS epidemic gripping sub-Saharan Africa, but it remains elusive. A major challenge is the extreme viral sequence variability among strains. Systematic means to guide immunogen design for highly variable pathogens like HIV are not available. Using computational models, we have developed an approach to translate available viral sequence data into quantitative landscapes of viral fitness as a function of the amino acid sequences of its constituent proteins. Predictions emerging from our computationally defined landscapes for the proteins of HIV-1 clade B Gag were positively tested against new in vitro fitness measurements and were consistent with previously defined in vitro measurements and clinical observations. These landscapes chart the peaks and valleys of viral fitness as protein sequences change and inform the design of immunogens and therapies that can target regions of the virus most vulnerable to selection pressure.

  19. Translating HIV sequences into quantitative fitness landscapes predicts viral vulnerabilities for rational immunogen design

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Omarjee, Saleha; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine offers the best hope to curb the HIV-AIDS epidemic gripping sub-Saharan Africa, but remains elusive. A major challenge is the extreme viral sequence variability among strains. Systematic means to guide immunogen design for highly variable pathogens like HIV are not available. Using computational models, we have developed an approach to translate available viral sequence data into quantitative landscapes of viral fitness as a function of the amino acid sequences of its constituent proteins. Predictions emerging from our computationally defined landscapes for the proteins of HIV-1 clade B Gag were positively tested against new in vitro fitness measurements, and were consistent with previously defined in vitro measurements and clinical observations. These landscapes chart the peaks and valleys of viral fitness as protein sequences change, and inform the design of immunogens and therapies that can target regions of the virus most vulnerable to selection pressure. PMID:23521886

  20. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: a mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kohio, Hinissan P; Adamson, Amy L

    2013-09-01

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection.

  1. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  2. STUDIES UPON THE ETIOLOGY OF DENGUE FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Harris, William H.; Duval, Charles W.

    1924-01-01

    organism of any proportion other than a minute body is the excitant of dengue fever. In the experimentally induced infection of the guinea pigs by the inoculation of dengue virus there occurs a rather constant and characteristic gross alteration of the lymphoid tissues, and of the spleen especially, which latter organ often attains a size three to four times that of the normal. Enlarged lymph glands in the peritoneal areas are also a fairly constant finding. The adrenal glands occasionally show marked enlargement. The histopathology consists of an endothelial proliferation occurring chiefly in connection with the Malpighian bodies of the spleen and the germinal centers of the lymph nodes. Experiments performed with a view of demonstrating the protection afforded the recovered guinea pig were somewhat confused by delayed fatalities or later intercurrent infections to which the dengue-inoculated animal seems highly susceptible. The constant and uniform results for all the positive cases indicate that the virus of dengue fever is not only transmissible to the guinea pig but is susceptible to propagation in this species through an undetermined number of successive generations. After certain of the virus strains had been propagated through four or more generations they were discontinued. Two strains, however, have been continued for 36 and 45 generations respectively. The equally successful results with Berkefeld filtered material and whole defibrinated blood indicate that the excitant of dengue fever belongs in the group of filterable viruses. PMID:19868961

  3. The V3 Loop of HIV-1 Env Determines Viral Susceptibility to IFITM3 Impairment of Viral Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Pan, Qinghua; Ding, Shilei; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Jingyou; Finzi, Andrés; Liu, Shan-Lu; Liang, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit a broad spectrum of viruses, including HIV-1. IFITM proteins deter HIV-1 entry when expressed in target cells and also impair HIV-1 infectivity when expressed in virus producer cells. However, little is known about how viruses resist IFITM inhibition. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibilities of different primary isolates of HIV-1 to the inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITMs. Our results demonstrate that the infectivity of different HIV-1 primary isolates, including transmitted founder viruses, is diminished by IFITM3 to various levels, with strain AD8-1 exhibiting strong resistance. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that HIV-1 Env, and the V3 loop sequence in particular, determines the extent of inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITM3. IFITM3-sensitive Env proteins are also more susceptible to neutralization by soluble CD4 or the 17b antibody than are IFITM3-resistant Env proteins. Together, data from our study suggest that the propensity of HIV-1 Env to sample CD4-bound-like conformations modulates viral sensitivity to IFITM3 inhibition.IMPORTANCE Results of our study have revealed the key features of the HIV-1 envelope protein that are associated with viral resistance to the IFITM3 protein. IFITM proteins are important effectors in interferon-mediated antiviral defense. A variety of viruses are inhibited by IFITMs at the virus entry step. Although it is known that envelope proteins of several different viruses resist IFITM inhibition, the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Taking advantage of the fact that envelope proteins of different HIV-1 strains exhibit different degrees of resistance to IFITM3 and that these HIV-1 envelope proteins share the same domain structure and similar sequences, we performed mutagenesis studies and determined the key role of the V3 loop in this viral resistance phenotype. We were also able to associate viral resistance to IFITM3

  4. Host gene expression classifiers diagnose acute respiratory illness etiology

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Marshall; Burke, Thomas; Ko, Emily R.; McClain, Micah T.; Hudson, Lori L.; Mazur, Anna; Freeman, Debra H.; Veldman, Tim; Langley, Raymond J.; Quackenbush, Eugenia B.; Glickman, Seth W.; Cairns, Charles B.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lucas, Joseph; Fowler, Vance G.; Carin, Lawrence; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections caused by bacterial or viral pathogens are among the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Despite improvements in pathogen-based diagnostics, most patients receive inappropriate antibiotics. Host response biomarkers offer an alternative diagnostic approach to direct antimicrobial use. This observational, cohort study determined whether host gene expression patterns discriminate non-infectious from infectious illness, and bacterial from viral causes of acute respiratory infection in the acute care setting. Peripheral whole blood gene expression from 273 subjects with community-onset acute respiratory infection (ARI) or non-infectious illness as well as 44 healthy controls was measured using microarrays. Sparse logistic regression was used to develop classifiers for bacterial ARI (71 probes), viral ARI (33 probes), or a non-infectious cause of illness (26 probes). Overall accuracy was 87% (238/273 concordant with clinical adjudication), which was more accurate than procalcitonin (78%, p<0.03) and three published classifiers of bacterial vs. viral infection (78-83%). The classifiers developed here externally validated in five publicly available datasets (AUC 0.90-0.99). A sixth publically available dataset included twenty-five patients with co-identification of bacterial and viral pathogens. Applying the ARI classifiers defined four distinct groups: a host response to bacterial ARI; viral ARI; co-infection; and neither a bacterial nor viral response. These findings create an opportunity to develop and utilize host gene expression classifiers as diagnostic platforms to combat inappropriate antibiotic use and emerging antibiotic resistance. PMID:26791949

  5. [Etiologic agents and risk factors in nosocomial urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Akkoyun, Seviç; Kuloğlu, Figen; Tokuç, Burcu

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (NUSI) is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors, frequency and the bacterial etiology of NUSI in hospitalized patients at Trace University Hospital, Turkey. Between September 1st 2004 to March 1st 2005, 104 NUSI episodes from 91 adult patients (mean age; 60.8 +/- 16.1 years; 46 were female) were determined among 8704 patients admitted to the hospital. During the study period, cumulative incidence of NUSI was 1.04% and episode rate of NUSI was 1.19%. The most important risk factors for NUSI were detected as urinary catheterization (78.8%), antimicrobial therapy within the previous 15 days (60.6%), fecal incontinence (33.7%) and surgical operations [29.8% (42% of them were urological pertainings)]. In 37.8% of the episodes urinary catheterization was considered as performed unnecessarily. In 26% of the episodes another infection (pneumoniae, abdominal infection, wound infection) accompanied. The causative microorganisms were resistant to the antibiotics used for therapy in 93.6% of the episodes. A total of 118 microorganisms (14 were polymicrobial) have been isolated from the urine cultures. The most frequently isolated ones were Escherichia coil (n: 48; 40.8%), Candida spp. (n: 27; 23%), Enterococcus spp. (n: 13; 11%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n: 9; 7.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n: 8; 6.8%) and Acinetobacter spp. (n: 5; 4.2%). The highest susceptibility rates of E. coli isolates were against imipenem and nitrofurantoin (100%) and amikacin (97.7%), the lowest susceptibility rates were against ampicillin (26.7%) and amoxycillin-clavulonate (44.4%). No glycopeptid resistance was detected for Enterococcus spp. while the susceptibility rates to penicilin and nitrofurantoin were 38.5% and 63.6%, respectively. Since the number of the other bacterial species was low (<10) their antimicrobial resistance rates were not evaluated. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL

  6. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  7. Viral factors in influenza pandemic risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lipsitch, Marc; Barclay, Wendy; Raman, Rahul; Russell, Charles J; Belser, Jessica A; Cobey, Sarah; Kasson, Peter M; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Riley, Steven; Beauchemin, Catherine AA; Bedford, Trevor; Friedrich, Thomas C; Handel, Andreas; Herfst, Sander; Murcia, Pablo R; Roche, Benjamin; Wilke, Claus O; Russell, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The threat of an influenza A virus pandemic stems from continual virus spillovers from reservoir species, a tiny fraction of which spark sustained transmission in humans. To date, no pandemic emergence of a new influenza strain has been preceded by detection of a closely related precursor in an animal or human. Nonetheless, influenza surveillance efforts are expanding, prompting a need for tools to assess the pandemic risk posed by a detected virus. The goal would be to use genetic sequence and/or biological assays of viral traits to identify those non-human influenza viruses with the greatest risk of evolving into pandemic threats, and/or to understand drivers of such evolution, to prioritize pandemic prevention or response measures. We describe such efforts, identify progress and ongoing challenges, and discuss three specific traits of influenza viruses (hemagglutinin receptor binding specificity, hemagglutinin pH of activation, and polymerase complex efficiency) that contribute to pandemic risk. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18491.001 PMID:27834632

  8. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  9. [The SSPE model: suggestions for an explication of viral persistence].

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C

    1989-01-01

    The detection of a latent viral flora intrinsic to the central nervous system (CNS) raises the problem to know if some neuropathogenic strains have the property of initiating persistent infections or if the persistence is the result of the immune response particularities at the CNS level. A review is done of the pathogenic explanations of virus persistence in SSPE, followed by the discussion about two pathogenic alternatives issues from the author's studies: the antigenic "drift" hypothesis and the one of the defective interfering particles preferential synthesis.

  10. Dynamics of fecal microbial communities in children with diarrhea of unknown etiology and genomic analysis of associated Streptococcus lutetiensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes extracted from fecal samples provide insights into the dynamics of fecal microflora. This potentially gives valuable etiological information for patients whose conditions have been ascribed to unknown pathogens, which cannot be accomplished using routine culture methods. We studied 33 children with diarrhea who were admitted to the Children’s Hospital in Shanxi Province during 2006. Results Nineteen of 33 children with diarrhea could not be etiologically diagnosed by routine culture and polymerase chain reaction methods. Eleven of 19 children with diarrhea of unknown etiology had Streptococcus as the most dominant fecal bacterial genus at admission. Eight of nine children whom three consecutive fecal samples were collected had Streptococcus as the dominant fecal bacterial genus, including three in the Streptococcus bovis group and three Streptococcus sp., which was reduced during and after recovery. We isolated strains that were possibly from the S. bovis group from feces sampled at admission, which were then identified as Streptococcus lutetiensis from one child and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus from two children. We sequenced the genome of S. lutetiensis and identified five antibiotic islands, two pathogenicity islands, and five unique genomic islands. The identified virulence genes included hemolytic toxin cylZ of Streptococcus agalactiae and sortase associated with colonization of pathogenic streptococci. Conclusions We identified S. lutetiensis and S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus from children with diarrhea of unknown etiology, and found pathogenic islands and virulence genes in the genome of S. lutetiensis. PMID:23782707

  11. Periparturient infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 causes hemorrhagic proctocolitis in a cow

    PubMed Central

    Laureyns, Jozef; Pardon, Bart; Letellier, Carine; Deprez, Piet

    2011-01-01

    After 3 cows of a dairy herd had died from severe hemorrhagic diarrhea, a 4th sick cow was transported to the clinic. Blood analyses revealed the complete absence of white blood cells, the presence of a type 1b strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and seroconversion to BVDV. PMID:22467972

  12. A case of Kaposi sarcoma in an immunocompetent, heterosexual Irish man: a discussion of etiology and viral transmission.

    PubMed

    Florek, Aleksandra G; Eilers, David; Armstrong, April W

    2015-10-16

    Four types of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) have been described, all of which are caused by human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8).  The incidence of KS in the United States is highest among HIV-positive homosexual men and elderly men of Eastern European, Jewish, or Mediterranean descent. However, few reports describe KS in HIV-negative, immunocompetent heterosexual men in the United States. HHV-8 is transmitted largely via saliva and close sexual contact, whereas there are only a handful of reports of transmission via blood and blood products. We report a case of an HIV-negative, immunocompetent heterosexual man who acquired KS via blood transfusion. A 77-year-old immunocompetent, monogamously heterosexual, HIV-negative Irish man presented with a biopsy-proven KS lesion on the right thigh. Past surgical history included a coronary artery bypass graft, during which he received a blood transfusion from an unknown donor source.  His ecchymotic KS lesions progressed while on doxycycline, intralesional vinblastine, and topical anti-angiogenic medications.  The patient eventually achieved stabilization of KS lesions with acitretin. Our case report emphasizes the need to characterize the phenotype and transmission route of HHV-8 in heterosexual, immunocompetent patients in geographic regions with low HHV-8 seroprevalence.

  13. Multiple Viral Infection Detected from Influenza-Like Illness Cases in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Adam, Kindi; Pangesti, Krisna Nur Andriana; Setiawaty, Vivi

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is one of the common etiologies of the upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). However, influenza virus only contributes about 20 percent of influenza-like illness patients. The aim of the study is to investigate the other viral etiologies from ILI cases in Indonesia. Of the 334 samples, 266 samples (78%) were positive at least for one virus, including 107 (42%) cases of multiple infections. Influenza virus is the most detected virus. The most frequent combination of viruses identified was adenovirus and human rhinovirus. This recent study demonstrated high detection rate of several respiratory viruses from ILI cases in Indonesia. Further studies to determine the relationship between viruses and clinical features are needed to improve respiratory disease control program.

  14. Multiple Viral Infection Detected from Influenza-Like Illness Cases in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Kindi

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is one of the common etiologies of the upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). However, influenza virus only contributes about 20 percent of influenza-like illness patients. The aim of the study is to investigate the other viral etiologies from ILI cases in Indonesia. Of the 334 samples, 266 samples (78%) were positive at least for one virus, including 107 (42%) cases of multiple infections. Influenza virus is the most detected virus. The most frequent combination of viruses identified was adenovirus and human rhinovirus. This recent study demonstrated high detection rate of several respiratory viruses from ILI cases in Indonesia. Further studies to determine the relationship between viruses and clinical features are needed to improve respiratory disease control program. PMID:28232948

  15. Long noncoding RNAs in viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Puri; Morris, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections induce strong modifications in the cell transcriptome. Among the RNAs whose expression is altered by infection are long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs are transcripts with potential to function as RNA molecules. Infected cells may express viral lncRNAs, cellular lncRNAs and chimeric lncRNAs formed by viral and cellular sequences. Some viruses express viral lncRNAs whose function is essential for viral viability. They are transcribed by polymerase II or III and some of them can be processed by unique maturation steps performed by host cell machineries. Some viral lncRNAs control transcription, stability or translation of cellular and viral genes. Surprisingly, similar functions can be exerted by cellular lncRNAs induced by infection. Expression of cellular lncRNAs may be altered in response to viral replication or viral protein expression. However, many cellular lncRNAs respond to the antiviral pathways induced by infection. In fact, many lncRNAs function as positive or negative regulators of the innate antiviral response. Our current knowledge about the identity and function of lncRNAs in infected cells is very limited. However, research into this field has already helped in the identification of novel cellular pathways and may help in the development of therapeutic tools for the treatment of viral infections, autoimmune diseases, neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:26454188

  16. Etiological causes of pancytopenia: A report of 137 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yokuş, Osman; Gedik, Habip

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the etiological causes of pancytopenia in patients who were admitted to the hematology ward due to pancytopenia. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the hematology ward of Ministry of Health Istanbul Training and Research Hospital due to pancytopenia between 2013 and 2015 were retrospectively evaluated regarding etiological causes. Results: A total of 137 patients was evaluated. The etiological causes of pancytopenia were recorded as Vitamin B12 deficiency (n: 24; 17%), chronic liver disease (n: 21; 15%), malignancy (n: 19; 13%), myelodysplastic syndrome (n: 18; 13%), aplastic anemia (n: 11; 8%), rheumatic diseases (n: 7; 5%), and endocrine causes (n: 3; 2%). Conclusion: The etiological causes of pancytopenia vary depends on patients' age, gender, country, and other conditions. Vitamin B12 deficiency is the most common treatable cause of pancytopenia. Most of the etiological causes could be diagnosed with laboratory analysis and radiological imagings, without the need of a bone marrow examination. PMID:27843799

  17. How Important Is the Etiology in the Treatment of Epiphora?

    PubMed Central

    Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun; Akova-Budak, Berna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. There are several etiological factors that cause epiphora, and treatment differs according to the cause. We aimed to evaluate the etiology of epiphora and the treatment modalities of the affected patients. Materials and Methods. Data of patients who were referred to ophthalmology clinics for epiphora were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were evaluated for epiphora etiology, treatment modalities, and duration of complaints, after complete ophthalmologic examination. Results. This study consisted of 163 patients with a mean age of 64.61 ± 16.52 years (range 1–92 years). Lacrimal system disease (48.4% [79/163]) was the most common cause, followed by ocular surface disease (dry eye/blepharitis) (38.7% [63/163]). Among the patients included in this study, 69% (113/163) did not receive any treatment, whereas only 1.8% (3/163) were treated surgically. About 4.3% of the patients (7/163) had a complaint for more than 5 years (p = 0.012) and six of these had chronic dacryocystitis and one had ectropion. Conclusion. Epiphora not only has a negative impact on patients' comfort, but also puts them at risk for probable intraocular operations in the future. Therefore, the wide range of its etiology must be taken into consideration and adequate etiology-specific treatment options must be applied. PMID:27595013

  18. How Important Is the Etiology in the Treatment of Epiphora?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Mahmut Oğuz; Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun; Atakan, Mehmet; Akova-Budak, Berna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. There are several etiological factors that cause epiphora, and treatment differs according to the cause. We aimed to evaluate the etiology of epiphora and the treatment modalities of the affected patients. Materials and Methods. Data of patients who were referred to ophthalmology clinics for epiphora were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were evaluated for epiphora etiology, treatment modalities, and duration of complaints, after complete ophthalmologic examination. Results. This study consisted of 163 patients with a mean age of 64.61 ± 16.52 years (range 1-92 years). Lacrimal system disease (48.4% [79/163]) was the most common cause, followed by ocular surface disease (dry eye/blepharitis) (38.7% [63/163]). Among the patients included in this study, 69% (113/163) did not receive any treatment, whereas only 1.8% (3/163) were treated surgically. About 4.3% of the patients (7/163) had a complaint for more than 5 years (p = 0.012) and six of these had chronic dacryocystitis and one had ectropion. Conclusion. Epiphora not only has a negative impact on patients' comfort, but also puts them at risk for probable intraocular operations in the future. Therefore, the wide range of its etiology must be taken into consideration and adequate etiology-specific treatment options must be applied.

  19. Viral Infection Is Not Uncommon in Adult Patients with Severe Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Hong, Sang-Bum; Ko, Gwang-Beom; Huh, Jin Won; Sung, Heungsup; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Mi-Na; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lim, Chae-Man; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Koh, Younsuck; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral pathogens have not generally been regarded as important causes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), except in patients with hematologic malignancy or transplant recipients. We investigated the role and distribution of viruses in adult with severe HAP who required intensive care. Methods From March 2010 to February 2012, adult patients with severe HAP required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), 28-bed medical ICU in a tertiary care hospital, were prospectively enrolled. Respiratory viruses were detected using multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and/or shell vial culture. Results A total of 262 patients were enrolled and 107 patients (40.8%) underwent bronchoscopic BAL for etiologic diagnosis. One hundred and fifty-six patients (59.5%) had bacterial infections and 59 patients (22.5%) had viral infections. Viruses were detected in BAL fluid specimens of 37 patients (62.7%, 37/59). The most commonly identified viruses were respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus (both 27.1%, 16/59), followed by rhinovirus (25.4%, 15/59), and influenza virus (16.9%, 10/59). Twenty-one patients (8.0%, 21/262) had bacterial-viral coinfections and Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly coexisting bacteria (n = 10). Viral infection in non-immunocompromised patients was not uncommon (11.1%, 16/143), although it was not as frequent as that in immunocompromised patients (36.4%, 43/119). Non-immunocompromised patients were significantly older than immunocompromised patients and had significantly higher rates of underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculous destroyed lung and chronic kidney disease. The 28 day mortalities of patients with bacterial infections, viral infections and bacterial-viral coinfections were not significantly different (29.5%, 35.6% and 19.0%, respectively; p = 0.321). Conclusions Viral pathogens are not uncommon in adult patients with severe HAP who required ICU admission

  20. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of

  1. [The ABC of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Van Bambeke, F

    2008-03-01

    Viral hepatitis has long been under-diagnosed. Hepatitis A is an acute disease, while patients infected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are likely to develop chronical infections and severe complications (cancer, cirrhosis). The current treatment of hepatitis B and C consists in alpha interferon (preferably under its pegylated form), in combination with ribavirin for hepatitis C. The frequent and severe adverse effects of interferon-based therapy constitute, however, a major limiting factor (reactions at the injection site, flu-like syndrome, neurological disorders, ...). For hepatitis B, two alternatives are available so far, namely lamivudine and adefovir (used as a prodrug with highe oral bioavailability).

  2. Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero strains of Junin virus in two strains of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judy F; Chumakova, Olga V; Lander, Heather M; Peters, Clarence J; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-08-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus strains in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ strain is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero strain is highly virulent in Strain 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated aspartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig strains are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero strain) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development.

  3. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    PubMed

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  4. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  5. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of Korean bovine viral diarrhea viruses.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Cha, Sang-Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2009-11-18

    Thirty-six bovine viral disease viruses (BVDVs) were identified in bovine feces (n=16), brains (n=2), and aborted fetuses (n=18) in Korea. To reveal the genetic diversity and characteristics of these Korean strains, the sequences of their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) were determined and then compared with published reference sequences. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the Korean viruses were of the BVDV subtypes 1a (n=17) or 2a (n=17). The remaining strains were of subtypes 1b (n=1) and 1n (n=1). This analysis indicates that the 1a and 2a BVDV subtypes are predominant and widespread in Korea. In addition, the prevalence of BVDV-2 was markedly higher in aborted fetuses than in other samples and was more often associated with reproductive problems and significant mortality in cattle.

  6. Understanding Viral Transmission Behavior via Protein Intrinsic Disorder Prediction: Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A. Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Besides being a common threat to farm animals and poultry, coronavirus (CoV) was responsible for the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002–4. However, many aspects of CoV behavior, including modes of its transmission, are yet to be fully understood. We show that the amount and the peculiarities of distribution of the protein intrinsic disorder in the viral shell can be used for the efficient analysis of the behavior and transmission modes of CoV. The proposed model allows categorization of the various CoVs by the peculiarities of disorder distribution in their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N). This categorization enables quick identification of viruses with similar behaviors in transmission, regardless of genetic proximity. Based on this analysis, an empirical model for predicting the viral transmission behavior is developed. This model is able to explain some behavioral aspects of important coronaviruses that previously were not fully understood. The new predictor can be a useful tool for better epidemiological, clinical, and structural understanding of behavior of both newly emerging viruses and viruses that have been known for a long time. A potentially new vaccine strategy could involve searches for viral strains that are characterized by the evolutionary misfit between the peculiarities of the disorder distribution in their shells and their behavior. PMID:23097708

  7. Toe Necrosis, Etiologies and Management, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Abdelfatah Abou; Newman, Mackenzie; Simman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Toe necrosis may have vast different etiologies. These include ischemia, embolus, and others. (1) The most common etiology is ischemia. It is a reduction in blood supply to a viable tissue that can lead to susceptibility to infection and tissue death. Peripheral ischemia, which is rooted in the lower limbs, is a major risk factor for toe necrosis because the basal metabolic requirements of tissue are not being sufficiently met. As a result, pain, ulcers, and gangrene commonly occur. (2) Other causes of direct and indirect toe necrosis and related lower limb gangrene include mechanical trauma, infectious, pharmacological sensitivity, cancer, blue toe syndrome, and other granulomatous diseases, such as Churg-Strauss syndrome. We present a case series of toes necrosis which resulted from different etiologies and their management. PMID:26199887

  8. Particularities regarding the etiology of sepsis in forensic services.

    PubMed

    Dermengiu, Dan; Curca, George Cristian; Ceausu, Mihai; Hostiuc, Sorin

    2013-09-01

    If in clinical practice definitive diagnostic criteria had been established, after death sepsis is often difficult to diagnose, especially if a site of origin is not found or if no clinical data are available. This article will analyze the etiology of sepsis in a medical-legal service with emphasis on the differences in diagnosing it in clinical and forensic environments. A total of 78 cases of sepsis cases diagnosed or confirmed at the autopsy were selected. The etiological agent was determined either during the hospitalization or by postmortem bacteriology. A high prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis was found, especially multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Most frequent etiological agents were Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, and Klebsiella. Polymicrobial sepsis is much more frequent than in nonforensic cases. In legal medicine, the prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis is much higher than in nonforensic autopsies, and the point of origin is shifted toward the skin and the gastrointestinal system.

  9. Etiology of Sarcoidosis: Does Infection Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Saidha, Shiv; Sotirchos, Elias S.; Eckstein, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disorder of unclear etiology, which is known to affect multiple organ systems including the lungs, heart, skin, central nervous system, and eyes, among others. For this reason, sarcoidosis represents a systemic medical disorder that is clinically relevant to multiple medical sub-specialties. Despite extensive research, the etiology of sarcoidosis has yet to be elucidated, although most evidence supports that the pathogenetic mechanism of sarcoidosis is an aberrant immune response, driven by an unidentified antigen (or antigens) in genetically susceptible individuals. Multiple candidate etiologic agents, including microbial organisms and environmental agents, have been investigated, but study results are inconclusive. In this review, we describe the known histologic and immunologic features of sarcoidosis and discuss the evidence supporting a role for infectious processes in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:22461752

  10. Etiology of Severe Febrile Illness in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Namrata; Murdoch, David R.; Reyburn, Hugh; Crump, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background With apparent declines in malaria worldwide during the last decade and more widespread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests, healthcare workers in low-resource areas face a growing proportion of febrile patients without malaria. We sought to describe current knowledge and identify information gaps of the etiology severe febrile illness in low-and middle-income countries. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review of studies conducted in low-and-middle income countries 1980–2013 that prospectively assessed consecutive febrile patients admitted to hospital using rigorous laboratory-based case definitions. We found 45 eligible studies describing 54,578 patients; 9,771 (17.9%) had a positive result for ≥1 pathogen meeting diagnostic criteria. There were no eligible studies identified from Southern and Middle Africa, Eastern Asia, Oceania, Latin American and Caribbean regions, and the European region. The median (range) number of diagnostic tests meeting our confirmed laboratory case definitions was 2 (1 to 11) per study. Of diagnostic tests, 5,052 (10.3%) of 49,143 had confirmed bacterial or fungal bloodstream infection; 709 (3.8%) of 18,142 had bacterial zoonosis; 3,488 (28.5%) of 12,245 had malaria; and 1,804 (17.4%) of 10,389 had a viral infection. Conclusions We demonstrate a wide range of pathogens associated with severe febrile illness and highlight the substantial information gaps regarding the geographic distribution and role of common pathogens. High quality severe febrile illness etiology research that is comprehensive with respect to pathogens and geographically representative is needed. PMID:26126200

  11. Etiology of maculopapular rash in measles and rubella suspected patients from Belarus.

    PubMed

    Yermalovich, Marina A; Semeiko, Galina V; Samoilovich, Elena O; Svirchevskaya, Ekaterina Y; Muller, Claude P; Hübschen, Judith M

    2014-01-01

    As a result of successful implementation of the measles/rubella elimination program, the etiology of more and more double negative cases remains elusive. The present study determined the role of different viruses as causative agents in measles or rubella suspected cases in Belarus. A total of 856 sera sent to the WHO National Laboratory between 2009 and 2011 were tested for specific IgM antibodies to measles virus (MV), rubella virus (RV) and human parvovirus B19 (B19V). The negatives were further investigated for antibodies to enterovirus (EV) and adenovirus (AdV). Children of up to 3 years were tested for IgM antibodies to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). A viral etiology was identified in 451 (52.7%) cases, with 6.1% of the samples being positive for MV; 2.6% for RV; 26.2% for B19V; 9.7% for EV; 4.6% for AdV; and 3.6% for HHV6. Almost all measles and rubella cases occurred during limited outbreaks in 2011 and nearly all patients were at least 15 years old. B19V, EV and AdV infections were prevalent both in children and adults and were found throughout the 3 years. B19V occurred mainly in 3-10 years old children and 20-29 years old adults. EV infection was most common in children up to 6 years of age and AdV was confirmed mainly in 3-6 years old children. HHV6 infection was mostly detected in 6-11 months old infants. Laboratory investigation of measles/rubella suspected cases also for B19V, EV, AdV and HHV6 allows diagnosing more than half of all cases, thus strengthening rash/fever disease surveillance in Belarus.

  12. Viral Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cukuranovic, Jovana; Ugrenovic, Sladjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Visnjic, Milan; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are among the most common causes of opportunistic infection after transplantation. The risk for viral infection is a function of the specific virus encountered, the intensity of immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection, and other host factors governing susceptibility. Although cytomegalovirus is the most common opportunistic pathogen seen in transplant recipients, numerous other viruses have also affected outcomes. In some cases, preventive measures such as pretransplant screening, prophylactic antiviral therapy, or posttransplant viral monitoring may limit the impact of these infections. Recent advances in laboratory monitoring and antiviral therapy have improved outcomes. Studies of viral latency, reactivation, and the cellular effects of viral infection will provide clues for future strategies in prevention and treatment of viral infections. This paper will summarize the major viral infections seen following transplant and discuss strategies for prevention and management of these potential pathogens. PMID:22654630

  13. Membrane dynamics associated with viral infection.

    PubMed

    de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Valera, María-Soledad; Marrero-Hernández, Sara; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    Viral replication and spreading are fundamental events in the viral life cycle, accounting for the assembly and egression of nascent virions, events that are directly associated with viral pathogenesis in target hosts. These processes occur in cellular compartments that are modified by specialized viral proteins, causing a rearrangement of different cell membranes in infected cells and affecting the ER, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, vesicles and endosomes, as well as processes such as autophagic membrane flux. In fact, the activation or inhibition of membrane trafficking and other related activities are fundamental to ensure the adequate replication and spreading of certain viruses. In this review, data will be presented that support the key role of membrane dynamics in the viral cycle, especially in terms of the assembly, egression and infection processes. By defining how viruses orchestrate these events it will be possible to understand how they successfully complete their route of infection, establishing viral pathogenesis and provoking disease.

  14. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  15. Controlling viral outbreaks: Quantitative strategies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Preparing for and responding to outbreaks of serious livestock infectious diseases are critical measures to safeguard animal health, public health, and food supply. Almost all of the current control strategies are empirical, and mass culling or “stamping out” is frequently the principal strategy for controlling epidemics. However, there are ethical, ecological, and economic reasons to consider less drastic control strategies. Here we use modeling to quantitatively study the efficacy of different control measures for viral outbreaks, where the infectiousness, transmissibility and death rate of animals commonly depends on their viral load. We develop a broad theoretical framework for exploring and understanding this heterogeneity. The model includes both direct transmission from infectious animals and indirect transmission from an environmental reservoir. We then incorporate a large variety of control measures, including vaccination, antivirals, isolation, environmental disinfection, and several forms of culling, which may result in fewer culled animals. We provide explicit formulae for the basic reproduction number, R0, for each intervention and for combinations. We evaluate the control methods for a realistic simulated outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza on a mid-sized turkey farm. In this simulated outbreak, culling results in more total dead birds and dramatically more when culling all of the infected birds. PMID:28187137

  16. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This

  17. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa; Bailey, Dalan; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This constitutes

  18. Testicular tumor with clinical picture of febricity of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sladjana

    2010-01-01

    We present a typical example of a previously healthy boy, whose febricity of unknown etiology lasting for several months was not taken seriously, regardless of the presence of general symptoms of the disease. He was treated as an outpatient with antibiotics and antipyretics under different diagnoses until he was admitted to the Department for Febrile Conditions of Unknown Etiology of the Institute for Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center of Serbia. At that point, a diagnosis of testicular tumor of extragonadal origin with bilateral metastatic changes of lung parenchyma and retroperitoneal lymph nodes was made, after which the appropriate treatment was administered.

  19. [Value of MRI in the etiologic diagnosis of cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Gauvrit, J Y; Leclerc, X; Pernodet, M; Oppenheim, C; Leys, D; Pruvo, J P

    2005-09-01

    The causes of ischaemic brain damage are numerous. Four main groups are described: atherosclerotic disease of the cervical and intracranial arteries represents 50% of the causes, small vessel disease with lacunar infarcts 25%, cardio-embolic disease 20% and non-atheromatous arterial disease and blood dyscrasias 10%. In 10% of cases, no etiology is identified. MRI has a dominating place in the etiologic assessment of cerebral infarction, by distinguishing the various types of infarction, detecting associated abnormalities like leukoencephalopathy and haemorrhage and by analyzing the lumen and wall of vessels.

  20. Arthrogryposis: an update on clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Feluś, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Arthrogryposes – multiple joint contractures – are a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous class of diseases, where accurate diagnosis, recognition of the underlying pathology and classification are of key importance for the prognosis as well as for selection of appropriate management. This treatment remains challenging and optimally in arthrogrypotic patients should be carried out by a team of specialists familiar with all aspects of arthrogryposis pathology and treatment modalities: rehabilitation, orthotics and surgery. In this comprehensive review article, based on literature and clinical experience, the authors present an update on current knowledge on etiology, classifications and treatment options for skeletal deformations possible in arthrogryposis. PMID:26925114

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Autochthonous Dengue Virus Strains Circulating in Mexico ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Vaughan, Gilberto; Ramírez-González, Jose Ernesto; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Ruíz-Tovar, Karina; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra Yolanda; Ruíz-Pacheco, Juan Alberto; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Cázares, Fernando; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important arthropod-borne viral infection in humans. Here, the genetic relatedness among autochthonous DENV Mexican isolates was assessed. Phylogenetic and median-joining network analyses showed that viral strains recovered from different geographic locations are genetically related and relatively homogeneous, exhibiting limited nucleotide diversity. PMID:21775538

  2. Mosquito defense strategies against viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to non-pathogenic levels. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues. PMID:26626596

  3. Iron withholding: a defense against viral infections.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    1996-10-01

    A variety of laboratory and clinical investigations during the past 15 years have observed that one of the dangers of excessive iron is its ability to favor animal viral infections. The metal is essential for host cell synthesis of virions and can also impair defense cell function and increase oxidative stress. In both animal models and humans, viral infections cause upregulation of the iron withholding defense system. Factors that suppress the system enhance viral progression; factors that strengthen the system augment host defense. Procedures designed to reinforce the system are being developed and tested; some of these may become useful adjuncts in prevention and management of viral diseases.

  4. Myasthenia gravis: a comprehensive review of immune dysregulation and etiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by muscle weakness caused by antibodies directed against proteins of the neuromuscular junction. The main antigenic target is the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), but the muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP4) are also targets. This review summarizes the clinical and biological data available for different subgroups of patients, who are classified according to antigenic target, age of onset, and observed thymic abnormalities, such as follicular hyperplasia or thymoma. Here, we analyze in detail the role of the thymus in the physiopathology of MG and propose an explanation for the development of the thymic follicular hyperplasia that is commonly observed in young female patients with anti-AChR antibodies. The influence of the pro-inflammatory environment is discussed, particularly the role of TNF-α and Th17-related cytokines, which could explain the escape of thymic T cells from regulation and the chronic inflammation in the MG thymus. Together with this immune dysregulation, active angiogenic processes and the upregulation of chemokines could promote thymic follicular hyperplasia. MG is a multifactorial disease, and we review the etiological mechanisms that could lead to its onset. Recent global genetic analyses have highlighted potential susceptibility genes. In addition, miRNAs, which play a crucial role in immune function, have been implicated in MG by recent studies. We also discuss the role of sex hormones and the influence of environmental factors, such as the viral hypothesis. This hypothesis is supported by reports that type I interferon and molecules mimicking viral infection can induce thymic changes similar to those observed in MG patients with anti-AChR antibodies.

  5. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Recent Progress and Current Priorities on Etiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To expedite improved understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare malignancy of cutaneous neuroendocrine cells that has a 28% 2-year mortality rate. Methods This article summarizes a workshop that discussed the state-of-the-art research and priorities for research on MCC and on a new human polyomavirus (ie, MCPyV) recently discovered in 80% of MCC tumors. Results Normal Merkel cells are widely distributed in the epidermis near the end of nerve axons and may function as mechanoreceptors or chemoreceptors. Malignant MCC cells typically stain for cytokeratin 20 as well as for other epithelial and neuroendocrine markers. MCC subtypes, which are based on histology, on cell line growth properties, and on gene expression profiles, have been reported but have not been linked to prognosis. Clinical management has been empiric. MCPyV is clonally integrated at various sites in the human genome of MCC tumors, with truncating mutations in the viral, large T antigen gene that interrupt viral replication. MCPyV seroprevalence may be high, as with previously known human polyomaviruses. MCC risk is increased 11-fold with AIDS and with other cell-mediated immune deficiencies, B-cell neoplasms, and ultraviolet radiation exposure. Conclusion Development and validation of a range quantitative polymerase chain reaction and serologic assays for detection of MCPyV, as well as an infectious clone of the virus, would clarify the fundamental biology, natural history, and epidemiology of the virus, of MCC, and of other diseases. Contingent on standardized histologic diagnosis and staging of MCC, consortia are needed to clarify the risks and benefits of sentinel lymph node biopsy, adjuvant radiation therapy, and salvage therapies; consortia are needed also for epidemiologic studies of MCC etiology. PMID:19597021

  6. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  7. Severe acute bovine viral diarrhea in Ontario, 1993-1995.

    PubMed

    Carman, S; van Dreumel, T; Ridpath, J; Hazlett, M; Alves, D; Dubovi, E; Tremblay, R; Bolin, S; Godkin, A; Anderson, N

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains with enhanced virulence caused unprecedented outbreaks of severe acute bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) in dairy, beef, and veal herds in Ontario (Canada). Fever, pneumonia, diarrhea, and sudden death occurred in all age groups of cattle. Abortions often occurred in pregnant animals. Gross lesions in the alimentary tract were similar to those associated with mucosal disease, especially in animals >6 months of age. Cattle of all age groups had microscopic lesions in the alimentary tract similar to those seen with mucosal disease. The epidemic peaked in the summer of 1993, with 15% of all bovine accessions from diseased cattle presented to the diagnostic laboratory being associated with BVDV. The virus strains involved in the outbreak were analyzed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and the polymerase chain reaction. The virus isolates from these outbreaks of severe disease were determined to be type 2 BVDV. Type 2 BVDV has been present in Ontario at least since 1981 without causing widespread outbreaks of severe acute BVD, which suggests that type 2 designation in itself does not imply enhanced virulence. Cattle properly vaccinated with type 1 BVDV vaccines appear to be protected from clinical disease.

  8. Viral infection and innate pattern recognition receptors in induction of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yurie; Mori, Kouki

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a common organ-specific autoimmune disease, is multifactorial in which both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors including infection play a critical role in its pathogenesis. Viral infection activates both the innate and adaptive immunity and is implicated as a trigger of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Candidate viruses include hepatitis C virus and human parvovirus B19. Viral components, which are recognized by innate receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are detected in thyroid tissues and sera of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While conflicting results have been obtained regarding the role of TLRs in autoimmune diseases, our preliminary study suggested a contribution of TLR2 and dectin-1 in combination, TLR4, or TLR7 to the production of anti-thyroglobulin antibody in nonobese diabetic mice, a mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Despite interesting circumstantial evidence, however, whether viral infection and innate receptors are involved in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains largely unclear. In this review, we summarize our knowledge regarding the role of viral infection and innate receptors in the etiology of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  9. In vitro inhibition of African swine fever virus-topoisomerase II disrupts viral replication.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ferdinando B; Frouco, Gonçalo; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a highly-contagious and fatal disease of domestic pigs, leading to serious socio-economic impact in affected countries. To date, neither a vaccine nor a selective anti-viral drug are available for prevention or treatment of African swine fever (ASF), emphasizing the need for more detailed studies at the role of ASFV proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcription. Notably, ASFV encodes for a functional type II topoisomerase (ASFV-Topo II) and we recently showed that several fluoroquinolones (bacterial DNA topoisomerase inhibitors) fully abrogate ASFV replication in vitro. Here, we report that ASFV-Topo II gene is actively transcribed throughout infection, with transcripts being detected as early as 2 hpi and reaching a maximum peak concentration around 16 hpi, when viral DNA synthesis, transcription and translation are more active. siRNA knockdown experiments showed that ASFV-Topo II plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells presenting lower viral transcripts (up to 89% decrease) and reduced cytopathic effect (-66%) when compared to the control group. Further, a significant decrease in the number of both infected cells (75.5%) and viral factories per cell and in virus yields (up to 99.7%, 2.5 log) was found only in cells transfected with siRNA targeting ASFV-Topo II. We also demonstrate that a short exposure to enrofloxacin during the late phase of infection (from 15 to 1 hpi) induces fragmentation of viral genomes, whereas no viral genomes were detected when enrofloxacin was added from the early phase of infection (from 2 to 16 hpi), suggesting that fluoroquinolones are ASFV-Topo II poisons. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ASFV-Topo II enzyme has an essential role during viral genome replication and transcription, emphasizing the idea that this enzyme can be a potential target for drug and vaccine development against ASF.

  10. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recent Zaire ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses--Filoviridae, Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Flaviviridae--we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective.

  11. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  12. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  13. Structure unifies the viral universe.

    PubMed

    Abrescia, Nicola G A; Bamford, Dennis H; Grimes, Jonathan M; Stuart, David I

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to meaningfully comprehend the diversity of the viral world? We propose that it is. This is based on the observation that, although there is immense genomic variation, every infective virion is restricted by strict constraints in structure space (i.e., there are a limited number of ways to fold a protein chain, and only a small subset of these have the potential to construct a virion, the hallmark of a virus). We have previously suggested the use of structure for the higher-order classification of viruses, where genomic similarities are no longer observable. Here, we summarize the arguments behind this proposal, describe the current status of structural work, highlighting its power to infer common ancestry, and discuss the limitations and obstacles ahead of us. We also reflect on the future opportunities for a more concerted effort to provide high-throughput methods to facilitate the large-scale sampling of the virosphere.

  14. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheal strain ORT-UMN 88

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (O. rhinotracheale) strain ORT-UMN 88 is a Gram-negative pleomorphic rod-shaped bacterium and an etiologic agent of pneumonia and airsacculitis in poultry. It is a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. O. rhinotracheale strain ORT-UMN 8...

  16. The etiological significance of the primal scene in perversions.

    PubMed

    Peto, A

    1975-01-01

    The etiological significance of the actually observed primal scene in fetishism and other perversions is discussed. The impact of the primal scene on the pathology of part object relationships, self and object image, and on the development of superego structures in perversion is stressed.

  17. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions: Etiology, Treatment Options and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke movement disorders are uncommon, but comprise an important part of secondary movement disorders. These exert variable and heterogeneous clinical courses according to the stroke lesion and its temporal relationships. Moreover, the predominant stroke symptoms hinder a proper diagnosis in clinical practice. This article describes the etiology, treatment options and prognosis of post-stroke movement disorders. PMID:27240807

  18. A Review of Etiological Formulations and Possible Treatments of Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    This literature review discusses enuresis from various etiological formulations: pyschoanalytic and psychodynamic; medical and physiological; and behavioral. Both historical and current perspectives on a definition of enuresis are offered. Treatment methodologies are reviewed. An emphasis is placed on the ruling out of medical causes before any…

  19. Language Impairment from 4 to 12 Years: Prediction and Etiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors of this article examined the etiology of developmental language impairment (LI) at 4 and 12 years of age, as well as the relationship between the 2. Method: Phenotypic and quantitative genetic analyses using longitudinal data from the Twins Early Development Study (Oliver & Plomin, 2007) were conducted. A total of 2,923…

  20. Evaluation of etiological factors in patients with chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Colgecen, Emine; Ozyurt, Kemal; Gul, Ali Irfan; Utas, Serap

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, increasing understanding of the pathomechanisms involved in chronic urticaria has highlighted the heterogeneity of different subtypes, and chronic urticaria is now classified as chronic spontaneous urticaria and inducible urticaria. Although many factors are thought to be involved in chronic urticaria, the etiology is yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate etiological factors in patients with chronic urticaria. Five hundred patients with chronic urticaria, 351 women and 149 men, were studied for etiological factors. The autologous serum skin test was performed on 197 patients. Provocation testing for physical urticaria was performed on 354 patients. Patients with acute urticaria were excluded from the study. We determined at least one focus of infection that might be involved in the etiology of the disease in 18.8% of cases. Patients with infections were treated, and symptoms resolved after treatment in six cases (5.3%). Autologous serum skin tests were positive in 125 patients (63.5%). Provocation tests for physical urticaria were positive in 131 (37%) patients with urticaria. We suggest that physical stimuli and autoantibodies play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of urticaria.

  1. Physical Trauma as an Etiological Agent in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, Carol R., Ed.; Bering, Edgar A., Jr., Ed.

    The conference on Physical Trauma as a Cause of Mental Retardation dealt with two major areas of etiological concern - postnatal and perinatal trauma. Following two introductory statements on the problem of and issues related to mental retardation (MR) after early trauma to the brain, five papers on the epidemiology of head trauma cover…

  2. Etiology of Attention Disorders: A Neurological/Genetic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Madeline Kay

    This paper explores the historical origins of attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) as a neurological disorder, current neurological and genetic research concerning the etiology of ADD/ADHD, and implications for diagnosis and treatment. First, ADD/ADHD is defined and then the origins of ADD/ADHD as a…

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis: an immune disease in search of an etiology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D L

    1975-01-01

    The current knowledge of the immunologic and etiologic factors which play a role in rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed and extrapolated to the systemic effects of rheumatoid disease. The disease process is viewed as the incidental result of an atypical immuno-inflammatory mechanism initiated by an unidentified antigenic stimulus.

  4. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: A mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kohio, Hinissan P.; Adamson, Amy L.

    2013-09-15

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection. - Highlights: • Increased glucose levels increase Influenza A viral infection of MDCK cells. • Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase inhibited Influenza A viral infection. • Inhibition of hexokinase induced disassembly the V-ATPase. • Disassembly of the V-ATPase and Influenza A infection was bypassed with ATP. • The state of V-ATPase assembly correlated with Influenza A infection of cells.

  5. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax.

  6. Viruses in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Etiology and Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections are important contributors to exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is less clear. This likely reflects that fact that IPF acute exacerbations are defined clinically as “noninfectious,” and little attention has been paid to the outcomes of patients with IPF with diagnosed infections. However, accumulating evidence suggests that infections (both bacterial and viral) may influence disease outcomes either as exacerbating agents or initiators of disease. Support for a viral role in disease initiation comes from studies demonstrating the presence of herpesviral DNA and epithelial cell stress in the lungs of asymptomatic relatives at risk for developing familial IPF. In addition, the number of studies that can associate viral (especially herpesviral) signatures in the lung with the development of IPF is steadily growing, and activated leukocyte signatures in patients with IPF provide further support for infectious processes driving IPF progression. Animal modeling has been used to better understand how a gamma herpesvirus infection can modulate the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and has demonstrated that preceding infections appear to reprogram lung epithelial cells during latency to produce profibrotic factors, making the lung more susceptible to subsequent fibrotic insult, whereas exacerbations of existing fibrosis, or infections in susceptible hosts, involve active viral replication and are influenced by antiviral therapy. In addition, there is new evidence that bacterial burden in the lungs of patients with IPF may predict a poor prognosis. PMID:26595738

  7. Stroke etiology is associated with outcome in posterior circulation stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chih-Ping; Yong, Chin-Sern; Chang, Feng-Chi; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Huang, Hui-Chi; Tsai, Jui-Yao; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke research and clinical trials have focused mainly on anterior circulation stroke (ACS). Since clinical characteristics, mechanisms, and outcomes of posterior circulation stroke (PCS) have been reported different from ACS, more PCS studies are required, particularly researching the etiologies, to help establish an optimal management strategy. Methods The present study analyzed patients of PCS who were consecutively admitted and registered in Taipei Veterans General Hospital Stroke Registry between 1 January 2012 to 28 February 2014. We demonstrated the distribution of etiologies, compared the clinical characteristics/outcomes among different etiology groups, and used univariate/multivariate analyses to identify the predictors for poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≥5) at discharge and 3 month. Results About 286 patients of PCS were included for analyses. Basilar artery atheromatous branch occlusive disease (BABO, 28.0%) and large artery dissection (25.9%) were the two most common etiologies, followed by large artery atherosclerotic stenosis/occlusion (LAA, 20.6%), cardioembolism (CE, 18.5%) and small vessel disease (7.0%). Age, vascular risk factors, infarct locations and patterns, and outcomes were different among these five etiology groups. Multivariate analyses showed that age >70 y/o (discharge/3 month, OR, 95% CI: 3.05, 1.23–7.56/8.39, 2.32–30.33), admission NIH Stroke Scale >9 (19.50, 8.69–43.75/13.45, 5.59–32.39), and etiology (LAA versus BABO: 5.00, 1.58–15.83/4.00, 1.19–13.4; CE versus BABO: 3.36, 1.02–11.09/4.66, 1.40–15.46) were independently associated with poor functional outcome. Interpretation The etiologies of PCS are heterogeneous and shown to be associated with functional outcomes. Our results have shed lights on future pathophysiological research and designs of clinical trials for PCS. PMID:26000323

  8. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  9. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  10. The etiology of urinary tract infection: traditional and emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ronald, Allan

    2003-02-01

    The microbial etiology of urinary infections has been regarded as well established and reasonably consistent. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen (80%) isolated in acute community-acquired uncomplicated infections, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (10% to 15%). Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Proteus species, and enterococci infrequently cause uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis. The pathogens traditionally associated with UTI are changing many of their features, particularly because of antimicrobial resistance. The etiology of UTI is also affected by underlying host factors that complicate UTI, such as age, diabetes, spinal cord injury, or catheterization. Consequently, complicated UTI has a more diverse etiology than uncomplicated UTI, and organisms that rarely cause disease in healthy patients can cause significant disease in hosts with anatomic, metabolic, or immunologic underlying disease. The majority of community-acquired symptomatic UTIs in elderly women are caused by E coli. However, gram-positive organisms are common, and polymicrobial infections account for up to 1 in 3 infections in the elderly. In comparison, the most common organisms isolated in children with uncomplicated UTI are Enterobacteriaceae. Etiologic pathogens associated with UTI among patients with diabetes include Klebsiella spp., Group B streptococci, and Enterococcus spp., as well as E coli. Patients with spinal cord injuries commonly have E coli infections. Other common uropathogens include Pseudomonas and Proteus mirabilis.Recent advances in molecular biology may facilitate the identification of new etiologic agents for UTI. The need for accurate and updated population surveillance data is apparent, particularly in light of concerns regarding antimicrobial resistance. This information will directly affect selection of empiric therapy for UTI.

  11. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  12. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.

  13. Isolation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus from mummichog, stickleback, striped bass and brown trout in eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Gagné, N; Mackinnon, A-M; Boston, L; Souter, B; Cook-Versloot, M; Griffiths, S; Olivier, G

    2007-04-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from mortalities occurring in populations of mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus aculeatus, brown trout, Salmo trutta, and striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The isolated viral strains produced a cytopathic effect on the epithelioma papillosum cyprini cell line. Serum neutralization indicated the virus was VHSV and sequencing identified the rhabdovirus isolates as the North American strain of VHSV. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolates are closely related and form a distinguishable subgroup of North American type VHSV. To our knowledge, this is the first report of VHSV in mummichog and striped bass.

  14. Viral-type orchitis: a potential mimic of testicular neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Kristina M; Young, Robert H; Ferry, Judith A

    2009-10-01

    Orchitis of viral or presumed viral etiology is an uncommon cause of testicular pain or enlargement. Rarely orchitis is clinically or radiographically suggestive of neoplasia, resulting in a testicular biopsy or orchiectomy being performed. Between 1978 and 2004, 10 cases submitted in consultation were diagnosed as orchitis at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The patients were from 18 to 37 years of age and presented with testicular enlargement or a mass, pain, or both. Radiographic studies were suspicious for a neoplasm in all 5 cases in which results were available. The patients underwent testicular biopsy (2 cases), orchiectomy (6 cases), biopsy immediately followed by orchiectomy (1 case), or biopsy followed by orchiectomy 3 weeks later (1 case). The cases were submitted with diagnoses that included intratubular seminoma, intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unspecified, Sertoli cell hyperplasia, myeloid sarcoma, and lymphoma. Microscopic examination revealed preservation of the architecture of the testicular parenchyma, typically with hemorrhage and edema, with patchy inflammation in the form of a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate within seminiferous tubules and also between tubules. The intratubular infiltrate usually predominated. Immunohistochemical studies, performed in 7 cases showed a mixture of CD68+ histiocytes and CD3+ T cells, with few B cells (CD20+) and few granulocytes. Follow-up was available in 5 cases; all 5 patients were alive and well 11 months to 10 years after diagnosis. In the rare instance in which a testicular specimen with orchitis is submitted for pathologic evaluation, diagnosis may be difficult. Familiarity with the pathologic changes characteristic of orchitis will help avoid misdiagnosis.

  15. Determination of buoyant density and sensitivity to chloroform and freon for the etiological agent of infectious salmonid anaemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, K.E.; Hjeltnes, B.; Uglenes , I.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma was collected from Atlantic salmon Salrno salar with acute infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and used to challenge Atlantic salmon parr by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment of plasma with the lipid solvent, chloroform, showed that the etiological agent of ISA contained essential lipids, probably as a viral envelope. Some infectivity remained following treatment with freon. Injection challenges using fractions from equilibrium density gradient centrifugation of plasma from fish with acute ISA revealed a band of infectivity in the range 1.184 to 1.262 g cm-3. The band was believed to conta~n both complete ISA-virus particles and infectious particles lacking a complete envelope, nucleocapsid or genome. Density gradient centrifugation of infectious plasma for enrichment of the putative ISA virus appeared to offer a suitable method for obtaining virus-specific nucleic acid for use in the construction of cDNA libraries. 

  16. Origins and challenges of viral dark matter.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Wang, David

    2017-02-09

    The accurate classification of viral dark matter - metagenomic sequences that originate from viruses but do not align to any reference virus sequences - is one of the major obstacles in comprehensively defining the virome. Depending on the sample, viral dark matter can make up from anywhere between 40 and 90% of sequences. This review focuses on the specific nature of dark matter as it relates to viral sequences. We identify three factors that contribute to the existence of viral dark matter: the divergence and length of virus sequences, the limitations of alignment based classification, and limited representation of viruses in reference sequence databases. We then discuss current methods that have been developed to at least partially circumvent these limitations and thereby reduce the extent of viral dark matter.

  17. Non-random patterns in viral diversity.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Simon J; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-09-22

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely.

  18. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  19. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment.

  20. [Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Toledano-Sierra, Pilar; Arriola-Hernández, Maite; Orueta-Sánchez, Ramón

    2015-01-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  1. Etiologies and Outcomes of Acute Liver Failure in a Spanish Community

    PubMed Central

    Fábrega, Emilio; Mieses, Miguel Ángel; Terán, Alvaro; Moraleja, Irene; Casafont, Fernando; Crespo, Javier; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Previous retrospective study (1992 to 2000) performed in Spain showed that drug toxicity, viral hepatitis, and indeterminate etiology were the most prevalent causes of acute liver failure (ALF). In the last decade, there is no information about ALF in our country. For these reasons we analyze retrospectively, in a ten-year period (2000 to 2010), the presumed causes, clinical characteristics, course, and outcome of ALF in a Spanish community. Causes of ALF were indeterminate in 4 patients (24%), acute hepatitis B infection in 4 patients (24%), drug or toxic reactions in 4 patients (24%), including one case of acetaminophen overdose, followed by miscellaneous causes. The overall short-term survival (6 weeks after admission) was 65%. Liver transplantation was performed in 11 patients with a survival of 82%. Despite fulfilling criteria, 2 patients were not transplanted because of contraindications; they both died. In summary, acute hepatitis B and indeterminate cause are still being the most frequent causes of ALF in our region, and patients with ALF have an excellent chance of survival after emergency liver transplantation. Acetaminophen overdose still represents a very rare cause of ALF in our community. PMID:24024035

  2. The Prevalence, Etiologic Agents and Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infection Among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Durukan, Elif; Arslan, Hande

    2014-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with spinal cord injury and 22% of patients with acute spinal cord injury develop UTI during the first 50 days. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiologic agents and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injury. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective investigation of spinal cord injury patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in Baskent University Medical Faculty Ayas Rehabilitation Center and Ankara Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Center between January 2008 and December 2010. The demographic status, clinical and laboratory findings of 93 patients with spinal cord injury were analyzed in order to determine the risk factors for asymptomatic or symptomatic bacteriuria Results: Sixty three (67.7%) of 93 patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria and 21 (22.6%) had symptomatic urinary tract infection. Assessment of the frequency of urinary bladder emptying methods revealed that 57 (61.3%) of 93 patients employed permanent catheters and 24 (25.8%) employed clean intermittent catheterization. One hundred and thirty-five (48.0%) of 281 strains isolated form asymptomatic bacteriuria attacks and 16 (66.6%) of 24 strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infection attacks, totaling 151 strains, had multidrug resistance (P > 0.05). One hundred (70.4%) of 142 Escherichia coli strains and 19 (34.5%) of 55 Klebsiella spp strains proliferated in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria; 8 (80%) of 10 E. coli strains and 4 (80%) of 5 Klebsiella spp. strains were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: The most common infectious episode among spinal cord injury patients was found to be urinary tract ınfection. E. coli was the most common microorganism isolated from urine samples. Antibiotic use in the previous 2 weeks or 3 months

  3. Association between Respiratory Disease and Bacterial and Viral Infections in British Racehorses

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J. L. N.; Newton, J. R.; Chanter, N.; Mumford, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory disease is important in horses, particularly in young Thoroughbred racehorses, and inflammation that is detected in the trachea and bronchi (termed inflammatory airway disease [IAD]) is more significant in this population in terms of impact and frequency than other presentations of respiratory disease. IAD, which is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, mild clinical signs, and accumulation of mucus in the trachea, may be multifactorial, possibly involving infections and environmental and immunological factors, and its etiology remains unclear. This 3-year longitudinal study of young Thoroughbred racehorses was undertaken to characterize the associations of IAD and nasal discharge with viral and bacterial infections. IAD was statistically associated with tracheal infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (capsule type 3), Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Actinobacillus spp., and Mycoplasma equirhinis and equine herpesvirus 1 and 4 infections, after adjustment for variation between training yards, seasons, and age groups. The association with S. pneumoniae and S. zooepidemicus was independent of prior viral infection and, critically, was dependent on the numbers of organisms isolated. S. pneumoniae was significant only in horses that were 2 years old or younger. The prevalence and incidence of IAD, S. zooepidemicus, and S. pneumoniae decreased in parallel with age, consistent with increased disease resistance, perhaps by the acquisition of immunity. The study provided evidence for S. zooepidemicus and S. pneumoniae playing an important etiological role in the pathogenesis of IAD in young horses. PMID:15634959

  4. Differences in nitrogen metabolism between Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, the two etiologic agents of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Chang, Yun; Roh, Jamin; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2012-01-01

    Two members of the Cryptococcus neoformans-gattii species complex, the etiologic agents of cryptococcosis, can be differentiated by biological, biochemical, serological and molecular typing techniques. Based on their differences in carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns, cost effective and very specific diagnostic tests using D-proline and canvanine-glycine-bromthymol blue (CGB) media have been formulated and are widely used for identification of the two species. However, these methods have yet to be tested for strains with confirmed molecular types to assess the degree of specificity for each molecular type in the two species. We collected global isolates of every major molecular type available and tested their patterns of nitrogen utilization. We confirmed specificity of the CGB test to be 100% regardless of molecular type while the D-proline test yielded 8-38% false negative results in three of the four C. gattii molecular types, VGI-VGIII. The utilization pattern of a new set of amino acids: D-alanine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine, showed species specificity comparable to that of D-proline. We discovered that the transcription factor Gat1 (Are1) regulates the utilization of nitrogen differently between C. neoformans and C. gattii strains. Unlike in C. neoformans, expression of the genes encoding glycine decarboxylase complex in C. gatti was only partially suppressed by nitrogen catabolite repression in the presence of ammonium. GAT1 in C. neoformans controlled the induction of three of the four genes encoding the glycine decarboxylase complex when glycine was used as the sole nitrogen source while in C. gattii its regulation of these genes was less stringent. Moreover, while virulence of C. neoformans strains in mice was not affected by Gat1, the transcription factor positively influenced the virulence of C. gattii strain.

  5. [Viral hepatitis of enteric origin].

    PubMed

    Debord, T; Buisson, Y

    1998-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses of oral-fecal origin are responsible for a high morbidity and mortality throughout the world, even if they never result in chronic hepatitis. Two viruses, the virus of hepatitis A (VHA) and of hepatitis E (VHE) are at present the cause of severe viral hepatitis of enteric origin. Water is the principle vector in the spread of these viruses. However, the epidemiological aspects vary according to the pathogenic agent. VHA is excreted in a highly concentrated form in the feces for a relatively short period of time. Since it resists in an exterior environment, the virus remains infectious for a long time. VHE is excreted for a short period of time and in low concentrations. The viral particles are fragile in vitro and their variability in the environment is little known. The possible reservoir role of certain animals has been envisaged. Epidemics arise especially in countries suffering from poor hygiene and massive water pollution. Hepatitis A should no longer be considered a benign disease of childhood. The progress made in hygiene and economic development in industrialized countries have made contacts with this virus scarce, rendering the populations more receptive to it and epidemics more widespread. When the sickness occurs later in life, infection is more often symptomatic and can be serious, resulting sometimes long-term indisposition. Hepatitis E has a vast distribution throughout the world and manifests itself either in epidemic or endemic-sporadic form in many poor countries. In developed countries, it comes about mostly as a result of imported pathology, even if there exists a "substratum" of infection in these areas. The main clinical aspects, such as we were able to study them in 39 cases of military men from Tchad, Guyana and Somalia, are comparable to those of hepatitis A. The reasons for the particular gravity of symptoms in pregnant women are unknown. These affections have no specific treatment. In the field of prevention, vaccination

  6. Anti-viral effect of interferon-alpha on bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Sentsui, H; Takami, R; Nishimori, T; Murakami, K; Yokoyama, T; Yokomizo, Y

    1998-12-01

    To get basic information to control persistent virus infection among domestic animals by cytokines, the antiviral activity of four natural human cytokines against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was evaluated. Normal bovine peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) and fetal bovine muscular cells (FBMC) were treated with varying doses of human interferon (IFN)-alpha, IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF-beta. The antiviral activity in treated cells was measured by the titration of virus infectivity in comparison with non-treated controls. IFN-alpha significantly suppressed virus growth in both PBML and FBMC. The growth of two cytopathogenic and two noncytopathogenic strains was suppressed in the presence of more than 10(3) u/ml of IFN-alpha. Addition of either TNF-alpha or TNF-beta to IFN-alpha did not potentiate the suppressive effect. IFN-alpha also suppressed the replication of BVDV in PBML from cattle persistently infected with BVDV.

  7. Genome Comparison of Virulent and Avirulent Strains of the Arenavirus Pichinde

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Shuiyun; McLay, Lisa; Aronson, Judy; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2008-01-01

    A virulent (P18) strain of the Pichinde arenavirus produces a disease in guinea pigs that somewhat mimics human Lassa fever, whereas an avirulent (P2) strain of this virus is attenuated in infected animals. It has been speculated that the composition of viral genomes may confer the degree of virulence in an infected host; the complete sequence of the viral genomes, however, is not known. Here, we provide for the first time genomic sequences of both S and L segments for both the P2 and P18 strains. Sequence comparisons identify three mutations in the GP1 subunit of the viral glycoprotein, one in the nucleoprotein NP, and five in the viral RNA polymerase L protein. These mutations, alone or in combination, may contribute to the acquired virulence of Pichinde infection in animals. The 3 amino acid changes in the variable region of the GP1 glycoprotein subunit may affect viral entry by altering its receptor-binding activity. While NP has previously been shown to modulate the host immune responses to viral infection, we found that the R374K change in this protein does not affect the NP function in suppressing interferon-β expression. Four out of the five amino acid changes in the L protein occur in a small region of the protein that may contribute to viral virulence by enhancing its function on viral genomic RNA synthesis. PMID:18506572

  8. The Expression of Water and Ion Channels in Diffuse Alveolar Damage Is Not Dependent on DAD Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Del Carlo Bernardi, Fabiola; Alves de Araujo, Priscila; Mauad, Thais; Dolhnikoff, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aquaporins and ion channels are membrane proteins that facilitate the rapid movement of water and solutes across biological membranes. Experimental and in vitro studies reported that the function of these channels and pulmonary edema resolution are impaired in acute lung injury (ALI). Although current evidence indicates that alveolar fluid clearance is impaired in patients with ALI/diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), few human studies have addressed the alterations in pulmonary channels in this clinical condition. Additionally, it is not known whether the primary cause of DAD is a relevant variable for the channel dysfunction. Methods Autopsied lungs of 43 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to DAD of three different etiologies, non-pulmonary sepsis, H1N1 viral infection and leptospirosis, were compared to 18 normal lungs. We quantified the expression of aquaporin (AQP) 1, AQP3, AQP5, epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and sodium potassium ATPase (Na-K-ATPase) in the alveolar septum using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results The DAD group presented with increased expression of AQP3, AQP5 and Na-K-ATPase and decreased expression of ENaC compared to controls. However, there was no difference in protein expression within the DAD groups of different etiologies. Conclusion Water and ion channels are altered in patients with ARF due to DAD. The cause of DAD does not seem to influence the level of impairment of these channels. PMID:27835672

  9. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for typing ruminant pestiviruses: bovine viral diarrhea viruses and border disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Saliki, J T; Burge, L J; Helman, R G; Confer, A W; Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1999-01-01

    A nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was evaluated for differentiating reference bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains, BVDV from diagnostic accessions, modified-live virus (MLV) BVDV strains in bovine viral vaccines, and a reference border disease virus (BDV). The detection level of this assay was compared to viral infection in cell culture. The PCR assay was used to distinguish 3 ruminant pestiviruses, types 1 and 2 BVDV, and type 3 BDV. The consensus (first) PCR assay detected all 3 ruminant pestiviruses, a result of the shared sequence homology. The consensus PCR product was subjected to a second (nested) PCR which used type-specific primers. The nested PCR was able to differentiate the 3 ruminant pestiviruses. Viral stocks of BVDV were diluted 10-fold and processed for the 2-step PCR assay. The sensitivity of this 2-step PCR assay was compared to viral infectivity in cell culture based on identical volumes of the system tested (cell culture assay and processing for RNA). The RT-PCR type-specific assay differentiated BVDV laboratory reference strains (12), diagnostic laboratory isolates (15), 2 MLV BVDV vaccine strains, and a BDV strain. The 30 ruminant pestiviruses typed included: (1) 27 reference strains and diagnostic laboratory isolates; 18 cytopathic (CP) type 1 strains, 3 CP type 2 strains, 3 noncytopathic (NCP) type 1 strains, and 3 NCP type 2 strains; (2) 2 MLV strains, type 1; and (3) 1 CP BDV type 3. The PCR assay had a detection limit of 10 TCID50/0.025 mL of virus when 3 separate BVDV were tested. This 2 step RT-PCR assay would be useful for the typing of ruminant pestiviruses, particularly BVDV isolates from the diagnostic laboratory. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10534007

  10. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  11. Lactoferrin for prevention of common viral infections.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

    2014-11-01

    Although lactoferrin has many biological functions, the host-protective effects against pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses are regarded as one of the most important. Here, we review research on the protective role of lactoferrin administration against common viral infections. Many studies have shown the in vitro antiviral activity of lactoferrin against viral pathogens that cause common infections such as the common cold, influenza, gastroenteritis, summer cold, and herpes, where lactoferrin inhibits mainly viral attachment to the target cells. Recently, studies indicating the in vivo protective effects of lactoferrin by oral administration against common viral infections have been increasing. For instance, norovirus is an extremely important emerging human pathogen that causes a majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide that may be a target candidate for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin consumption reduced the incidence of noroviral gastroenteritis in children and a similar effect was observed in a wide range of ages in a preliminary survey. A recent in vitro study reported that lactoferrin inhibits both cellular attachment of the murine norovirus, a virus closely-related to the human norovirus, and viral replication in the cells by inducing antiviral cytokines interferon (IFN)-α/β. Lactoferrin administration also enhances NK cell activity and Th1 cytokine responses, which lead to protection against viral infections. In conclusion, lactoferrin consumption may protect the host from viral infections through inhibiting the attachment of a virus to the cells, replication of the virus in the cells, and enhancement of systemic immune functions.

  12. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viralmore » replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.« less

  13. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  14. Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Caluwaerts, Séverine; Achar, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral disease’s interaction with pregnancy is poorly understood and remains a particular challenge for medical and para-medical personnel responding to an outbreak. This review article is written with the benefit of hindsight and experience from the largest recorded Ebola outbreak in history. We have provided a broad overview of the issues that arise for pregnant women and for the professionals treating them during an Ebola outbreak. The discussion focuses on the specifics of Ebola infection in pregnancy and possible management strategies, including the delivery of an infected woman. We have also discussed the wider challenges posed to pregnant women and their carers during an epidemic, including the identification of suspected Ebola-infected pregnant women and the impact of the disease on pre-existing health services. This paper outlines current practices in the field, as well as highlighting the gaps in our knowledge and the paramount need to protect the health-care workers directly involved in the management of pregnant women. PMID:26457118

  15. [Treatment of viral hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Chassany, O

    1996-12-14

    Viral hepatitis C is a serious public health problem in France by the number of infected patients, the evolutive profile and by the lack of fully efficient therapeutics. However, the risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may not be so high as it has been stated until now. Interferon alpha is at the present time, the only approved drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Its efficiency on criteria such as normalization of aminotransferases values or negativation of viremia is obtained in less than 25% of patients. The present recommendation is to use 3 MU of interferon alpha, 3 times per week during 12 months. While interferon leads to improvement of histologic lesions, it is not yet proved that a treatment by interferon can reduce, years after, the incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. No therapeutic strategy has been defined yet for the frequent situations of "no response", relapses or presence of factors that reduce the efficacy of treatment (high initial viremia level, genotype 1b, cirrhosis). It is possible that the course of patients having low or no elevation of aminotransferases and/or minimal histologic lesions, is good without any treatment. The efficacy of interferon alone appears insufficient. Thus trials in progress concern associations of antiviral drugs such as vidarabine. In lack of vaccine, preventive treatment is essential and depends upon knowledge of conditions of transmission of the virus. Transmission through blood and intravenous drug addiction represent 60 to 70% of cases of hepatitis C.

  16. Prevalence and possible etiology of dental enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    El-Najjar, M Y; DeSanti, M V; Ozebek, L

    1978-02-01

    Two hundred black and white adult human skeletons and 200 living black and white children from the greater Cleveland area were examined for evidence of enamel hypoplasia. Enamel hypoplasia, present in varying expressings (pits, lines and grooves), was found to be more prevalent in both skeletal samples, than in the living groups. In the majority of cases, sex differences between white and black males and females through time and space are highly significant for all tooth catagories. Regardless of the mechanisms behind it, prevalence of enamel hypoplasia for both white and black group has significantly declined through time. No evidence suggesting specific etiologies responsible for enamel hypoplasia can be found. In the majority of previously published reports, the etiology is still idiopathic. The reduction in the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in the groups examined through time may be related to improved nutritional conditions and the elimination or decline of childhood diseases that have been implicated in this condition.

  17. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  18. Using Epidemiology and Genomics to Understand Osteosarcoma Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sharon A.; Mirabello, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a primary bone malignancy that typically occurs during adolescence but also has a second incidence peak in the elderly. It occurs most commonly in the long bones, although there is variability in location between age groups. The etiology of osteosarcoma is not well understood; it occurs at increased rates in individuals with Paget disease of bone, after therapeutic radiation, and in certain cancer predisposition syndromes. It also occurs more commonly in taller individuals, but a strong environmental component to osteosarcoma risk has not been identified. Several studies suggest that osteosarcoma may be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes important in growth and tumor suppression but the studies are limited by sample size. Herein, we review the epidemiology of osteosarcoma as well as its known and suspected risk factors in an effort to gain insight into its etiology. PMID:21437228

  19. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    PubMed

    Packer, Jonathan D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI.

  20. Anger in psychological disorders: Prevalence, presentation, etiology and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Johnson, Sheri L

    2016-06-01

    Anger is present as a key criterion in five diagnoses within DSM-5: Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. This review amasses scientific literature demonstrating that within each of these disorders, anger is a central clinical feature that is highly prevalent and predictive of important outcomes. For each disorder, we also discuss the phenomenology and etiology of anger. Although models of anger have been quite distinct across these disorders, few empirical studies have truly tested whether anger stems from different etiological factors across these different conditions. We end with a discussion of transdiagnostic research that draws from cognitive psychology, affective science, and the neuroscience of anger, and that also fits with integrative approaches to treatment.

  1. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  2. Space adaptation syndrome: multiple etiological factors and individual differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1991-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a significant operational concern in the American and Soviet space programs. Nearly 70% of all astronauts and cosmonauts are affected to some degree during their first several days of flight. It is now beginning to appear that space motion sickness like terrestrial motion sickness is the consequence of multiple etiological factors. As we come to understand basic mechanisms of spatial orientation and sensory-motor adaptation we can begin to predict etiological factors in different motion environments. Individuals vary greatly in the extent to which they are susceptible to these different factors. However, individuals seem to be relatively self-consistent in terms of their rates of adaptation to provocative stimulation and their retention of adaptation. Attempts to relate susceptibility to motion sickness during the microgravity phases of parabolic flight maneuvers to vestibular function under 1G and 0G test conditions are described.

  3. Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment; A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Davari, AR; Ataei, E; Assarzadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to inform practitioners about dentin hypersensitivity (DH); to provide a brief overview of the diagnosis, etiology and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity and to discuss technical approaches to relieve sensitivity. This clinical information is described in the context of the underlying biology. The author used PUBMED to find relevant English-language literature published in the period 1999 to 2010. The author used combinations of the search terms “dentin*”, “tooth”, “teeth”, “hypersensit*”, “desensitiz*”. Abstracts and also full text articles to identify studies describing etiology, prevalence, clinical features, controlled clinical trials of treatments and relevant laboratory research on mechanisms of action were used. PMID:24724135

  4. Controversies about a common etiology for eating and mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Clara; Halfon, Olivier; Boutrel, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and depression represent a growing health concern worldwide. For many years, basic science and medicine have considered obesity as a metabolic illness, while depression was classified a psychiatric disorder. Despite accumulating evidence suggesting that obesity and depression may share commonalities, the causal link between eating and mood disorders remains to be fully understood. This etiology is highly complex, consisting of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors that interact with each other. In this review, we sought to summarize the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting a common etiology for eating and mood disorders, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance and mood stability, among which orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, metabolic factors, stress responsive hormones, cytokines, and neurotrophic factors. PMID:25386150

  5. [Etiological diagnosis of hirsutism and implications for the treatment].

    PubMed

    Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2009-01-01

    Hirsutism may be defined as the presence of terminal hair in the women, with a male pattern of distribution. The clinical presentation is variable, from isolated hirsutism to the presence of other signs of hyperandrogenism, menstrual irregularities and/or infertility. Hirsutism is related to serum androgens and to the cutaneous sensitivity to these hormones. The most prevalent causes of hirsutism are polycystic ovary syndrome and isolated hirsutism, in the presence of ovulatory cycles. Non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (21-hydroxylase deficiency) and drug-induced hirsutism are less frequent causes. Androgen-secreting neoplasms and Cushing syndrome are rare etiologies related to hirsutism. Diagnostic evaluation should address on identifying the etiology and potential risk for associated comorbidities. The aims of the treatment are: to suppress androgen overproduction, if present; to block androgen action on hair follicles; to identify and treat patients at risk for metabolic disturbances or reproductive neoplasias.

  6. Etiologies underlying sex differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Sara M; Pfaff, Donald W

    2014-08-01

    The male predominance of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is one of the best-known, and at the same time, one of the least understood characteristics of these disorders. In this paper we review genetic, epigenetic, hormonal, and environmental mechanisms underlying this male preponderance. Sex-specific effects of Y-linked genes (including SRY expression leading to testicular development), balanced and skewed X-inactivation, genes that escape X-inactivation, parent-of-origin allelic imprinting, and the hypothetical heterochromatin sink are reviewed. These mechanisms likely contribute to etiology, instead of being simply causative to ASD. Environments, both internal and external, also play important roles in ASD's etiology. Early exposure to androgenic hormones and early maternal immune activation comprise environmental factors affecting sex-specific susceptibility to ASD. The gene-environment interactions underlying ASD, suggested here, implicate early prenatal stress as being especially detrimental to boys with a vulnerable genotype.

  7. Unexpected hazard of illegal immigration: Outbreak of viral myocarditis exacerbated by confinement and deprivation in a shipboard cargo container.

    PubMed

    Li, Melissa K; Beck, Melinda A; Shi, Qing; Harruff, Richard C

    2004-06-01

    We present a group of 18 illegal immigrant stowaways who arrived in a shipboard cargo container suffering from gastroenteritis, dehydration, and malnutrition and showing evidence of viral myocarditis in 3 of 4 fatalities. Our investigation included an evaluation of the 2-week ocean voyage, analysis of medical records and laboratory results of the survivors, autopsies on the decedents, and viral studies on their heart tissue. Of 3 stowaways who died shipboard, 2 showed lymphocytic myocarditis and 1 could not be evaluated histologically due to decomposition. A fourth stowaway died 4 months after arrival with dilated cardiomyopathy and lymphocytic myocarditis. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing of viral isolates from the decedents' heart tissues demonstrated Coxsackie virus B3 genome. We believe that these cases represent an outbreak of viral myocarditis, exacerbated by acute dehydration and malnutrition, due to confinement within the shipping container. Our evidence indicates that close confinement promoted the spread of the virus, and nutritional deprivation increased the stowaways' vulnerability. Furthermore, our observations support the conclusion, based on experimental studies, that nutritionally induced oxidative stress increased the virulence of the etiologic viral agent. In summary, these cases represent a potential infectious disease hazard of illegal immigration.

  8. The need to accessorize: molecular roles of HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 accessory proteins in the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Doueiri, Rami; Green, Patrick L

    2013-09-17

    Extensive studies of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 and HTLV-2 over the last three decades have provided detailed knowledge on viral transformation, host-viral interactions and pathogenesis. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia and multiple neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases while HTLV-2 disease association remains elusive, with few infected individuals displaying neurodegenerative diseases similar to HTLV-1. The HTLV group of oncoretroviruses has a genome that encodes structural and enzymatic proteins Gag, Pro, and Env, regulatory proteins Tax and Rex, and several accessory proteins from the pX region. Of these proteins, HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 are encoded by the open reading frame II of the pX region. Like most other accessory proteins, p30 and p28 are dispensable for in vitro viral replication and transformation but are required for efficient viral replication and persistence in vivo. Both p30 and p28 regulate viral gene expression at the post-transcriptional level whereas p30 can also function at the transcriptional level. Recently, several reports have implicated p30 and p28 in multiple cellular processes, which provide novel insight into HTLV spread and survival and ultimately pathogenesis. In this review we summarize and compare what is known about p30 and p28, highlighting their roles in viral replication and viral pathogenesis.

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Human Diarrhea: Viral Detection and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Phillip I.; Klein, Eileen J.; Kirkwood, Carl D.; Wang, David

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 1.8 million children die from diarrhea annually, and millions more suffer multiple episodes of nonfatal diarrhea. On average, in up to 40% of cases, no etiologic agent can be identified. The advent of metagenomic sequencing has enabled systematic and unbiased characterization of microbial populations; thus, metagenomic approaches have the potential to define the spectrum of viruses, including novel viruses, present in stool during episodes of acute diarrhea. The detection of novel or unexpected viruses would then enable investigations to assess whether these agents play a causal role in human diarrhea. In this study, we characterized the eukaryotic viral communities present in diarrhea specimens from 12 children by employing a strategy of “micro-mass sequencing” that entails minimal starting sample quantity (<100 mg stool), minimal sample purification, and limited sequencing (384 reads per sample). Using this methodology we detected known enteric viruses as well as multiple sequences from putatively novel viruses with only limited sequence similarity to viruses in GenBank. PMID:18398449

  10. Oral cancer: Etiology and risk factors: A review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Malay; Nanavati, Ronak; Modi, Tapan G; Dobariya, Chintan

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Oral cancer is of major concern in Southeast Asia primarily because of the prevalent oral habits of betel quid chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Despite recent advances in cancer diagnoses and therapies, the 5.year survival rate of oral cancer patients has remained at a dismal 50% in the last few decades. This paper is an overview of the various etiological agents and risk factors implicated in the development of oral cancer.

  11. Fever of undetermined etiology after cleaning of steam turbine condensers.

    PubMed

    Deubner, D C; Gilliam, D K

    1977-01-01

    Two outbreaks of a febrile syndrome marked by chills, headaches, myalgia, nausea, and malaise occurred in workers who had cleaned the steam condensers of electric power turbines. Mean incubation period was 38 hours. Twenty-two of twenty-three exposed men became ill. Clinical and environmental investigation failed to reveal the etiology of the outbreaks. The circumstances and clinical syndrome have points of similarity to fever following inhalation of metal fumes and low-grade, stained cotton dust, and to Pontiac fever.

  12. Etiological yield of SNP microarrays in idiopathic intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Utine, G Eda; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Volkan-Salancı, Bilge; Çetinkaya, Arda; Kiper, Pelin Ö; Alanay, Yasemin; Aktaş, Dilek; Anlar, Banu; Topçu, Meral; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2014-05-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) has a prevalence of 3% and is classified according to its severity. An underlying etiology cannot be determined in 75-80% in mild ID, and in 20-50% of severe ID. After it has been shown that copy number variations involving short DNA segments may cause ID, genome-wide SNP microarrays are being used as a tool for detecting submicroscopic copy number changes and uniparental disomy. This study was performed to investigate the presence of copy number changes in patients with ID of unidentified etiology. Affymetrix(®) 6.0 SNP microarray platform was used for analysis of 100 patients and their healthy parents, and data were evaluated using various databases and literature. Etiological diagnoses were made in 12 patients (12%). Homozygous deletion in NRXN1 gene and duplication in IL1RAPL1 gene were detected for the first time. Two separate patients had deletions in FOXP2 and UBE2A genes, respectively, for which only few patients have recently been reported. Interstitial and subtelomeric copy number changes were described in 6 patients, in whom routine cytogenetic tools revealed normal results. In one patient uniparental disomy type of Angelman syndrome was diagnosed. SNP microarrays constitute a screening test able to detect very small genomic changes, with a high etiological yield even in patients already evaluated using traditional cytogenetic tools, offer analysis for uniparental disomy and homozygosity, and thereby are helpful in finding novel disease-causing genes: for these reasons they should be considered as a first-tier genetic screening test in the evaluation of patients with ID and autism.

  13. Etiologies of obesity in children: nature and nurture.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Joseph A; Irby, Megan B; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Miller, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Childhood obesity is a profoundly complex problem and serves as an example of a biospsychosocial issue. Scientific inquiry has provided incredible insight into the complex etiology of weight gain but must be viewed as an interaction between a human's propensity to conserve calories for survival in a world with an abundance of it. This article provides a brief overview divided between biological (nature) and psychosocial and behavioral (nurture) factors.

  14. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers.

    PubMed

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C; Poole, C; Almstrup, K; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; McGlynn, K A

    2015-01-01

    Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops and corresponding authors of PubMed-indexed articles identified by the search term 'testicular cancer' and published within 10 years (in total 2750 recipients) were invited to respond to an e-mail-based survey. Participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop in May 2014 were subsequently asked to rate the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses that scored as most plausible. We also present plans for improving the survey that may be repeated at a next international meeting of experts in testicular cancer. Overall 52 of 99 (53%) registered participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop submitted the plausibility rating form. Fourteen of 27 hypotheses were related to exposures during pregnancy. Hypotheses with the highest mean plausibility ratings were either related to pre-natal exposures or exposures that might have an effect during pregnancy and in post-natal life. The results of the survey may be helpful for triggering more specific etiologic hypotheses that include factors related to endocrine disruption, DNA damage, inflammation, and nutrition during pregnancy. The survey results may stimulate a multidisciplinary discussion about new etiologic hypotheses of testicular cancer.

  15. SARCOPENIA: ITS ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, CONSEQUENCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    ROLLAND, Y.; CZERWINSKI, S.; VAN KAN, G. ABELLAN; MORLEY, J.E.; CESARI, M.; ONDER, G.; WOO, J.; BAUMGARTNER, R.; PILLARD, F.; BOIRIE, Y.; CHUMLEA, W.M.C.; VELLAS, B.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle protein mass and loss of muscle function. It occurs with increasing age, being a major component in the development of frailty. Current knowledge on its assessment, etiology, pathogenesis, consequences and future perspectives are reported in the present review. On-going and future clinical trials on sarcopenia may radically change our preventive and therapeutic approaches of mobility disability in older people. PMID:18615225

  16. Etiology and differential diagnosis of non-trachomatous follicular conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Thygeson, P.

    1957-01-01

    The author points out that while previously only follicular conjunctivitis of the inclusion or swimming-pool type, and of the Béal type, was classified as “acute follicular conjunctivitis”, it is now necessary to enlarge this group to include at least four other clinical or etiological entities: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, acute herpetic keratoconjunctivitis, Newcastle disease conjunctivitis, and pharyngoconjunctival fever. The author then defines and describes chronic follicular conjunctivitis, toxic follicular conjunctivitis (molluscum contagiosum) and folliculosis. Imagesp1001-a PMID:13472441

  17. [Multiple sclerosis: etiology, epidemiology, some questions of pathogenicity].

    PubMed

    Chuprina, H M

    2012-01-01

    In the article the questions of ways of development of the dissipated sclerosis, as nosologies, are affected from the group of autoimmune diseases. Examined etiology, epidedemiologiya, separate links of pathogeny of the dissipated sclerosis. The analysis of multifaktors of his origin is conducted, with the detailed study of internal and external factors, marked on the important role of inherited predisposition, infectious and klimato-geograficheskogo factors in genesis of the dissipated sclerosis.

  18. The etiology of autoimmune diseases: the case of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases comprise a wide variety of disorders, from those that are acute and spontaneously regressive to chronic diseases. Their occurrence is the sign of a loss of tolerance to self-antigens. With few exceptions, the etiology of autoimmune diseases has not been clearly established. In all cases, it is complex, involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. In this article I will attempt to analyze the various factors that have a triggering or protecting role, with particular reference to myasthenia gravis.

  19. [Intestinal cystic duplication in infants and the etiology of intussusception].

    PubMed

    Kasis, A; Sabo, E; Mogilner, J G; Boss, J

    1993-11-15

    2 infants, 3 months old and 8 months, respectively, with restlessness and vomiting were each found to have ileocolic intussusception with barium filling defects. Laparotomy disclosed in each a dome-shaped structure, 2 cm and 0.6 cm in greatest diameter, respectively, on the antimesenteric side of the ileal wall. Histological examination showed cystic duplication of the ileum. It is suggested that manual reduction generally fails when cystic duplication is an etiological factor, and surgery is then mandatory.

  20. Etiologies of Obesity in Children: Nature and Nurture

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Joseph A.; Irby, Megan B.; Grzywacz, Joseph; Miller, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Childhood obesity is a profoundly complex problem and serves as an example of a biospychosocial issue. Scientific inquiry has provided incredible insight into the complex etiology of weight gain, but must be viewed as an interaction between a human’s propensity to conserve calories for survival in a world with an abundance of it. This chapter will provide a brief overview divided between biologic (Nature) and psychosocial and behavioral (Nurture) factors. PMID:22093854

  1. Epidemiological and etiological aspects of burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coculescu, E C; Tovaru, S; Coculescu, B I

    2014-09-15

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in clinically healthy oral mucosa. Incidence BMS diagnosed in the Department of Oral Medicine - Oral Pathology Dental Faculty of Medicine, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy Bucharest is 16,23%. The etiology of BMS remains far less known. This article makes an overview of the latest theories about possible etiopathogenic factors involved in the occurrence of BMS.

  2. The effect of muscle fatigue on in vivo tibial strains.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa R; Finestone, Aharon; Nyska, Meir; Mendelson, Stephen; Benjuya, Nisim; Simkin, Ariel; Burr, David

    2007-01-01

    Stress fracture is a common musculoskeletal problem affecting athletes and soldiers. Repetitive high bone strains and strain rates are considered to be its etiology. The strain level necessary to cause fatigue failure of bone ex vivo is higher than the strains recorded in humans during vigorous physical activity. We hypothesized that during fatiguing exercises, bone strains may increase and reach levels exceeding those measured in the non-fatigued state. To test this hypothesis, we measured in vivo tibial strains, the maximum gastrocnemius isokinetic torque and ground reaction forces in four subjects before and after two fatiguing levels of exercise: a 2km run and a 30km desert march. Strains were measured using strain-gauged staples inserted percutaneously in the medial aspect of their mid-tibial diaphysis. There was a decrease in the peak gastrocnemius isokinetic torque of all four subjects' post-march as compared to pre-run (p=0.0001), indicating the presence of gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. Tension strains increased 26% post-run (p=0.002, 95 % confidence interval (CI) and 29% post-march (p=0.0002, 95% CI) as compared to the pre-run phase. Tension strain rates increased 13% post-run (p=0.001, 95% CI) and 11% post-march (p=0.009, 95% CI) and the compression strain rates increased 9% post-run (p=0.0004, 95% CI) and 17% post-march (p=0.0001, 95% CI). The fatigue state increases bone strains well above those recorded in rested individuals and may be a major factor in the stress fracture etiology.

  3. A skeptical look at viral immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Davis, I A; Rouse, B T

    1997-12-01

    In the past several years, many viral gene products have been found to encode proteins which interfere with immune defense mechanisms. Whether these interactions between virus and immune system components are actually evasion mechanisms used during viral infections in their natural hosts remains to be proven. In vitro studies do, however, reveal several tactics which may aid viral replication and dissemination by interfering with components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this manuscript, we discuss the more intensively studied of these putative in vitro evasion tactics and ponder their relevance in in vivo situations.

  4. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia.

  5. Some vexations that challenge viral immunology

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Barry T.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    The field of viral immunology seeks to understand mechanisms of virus-host interaction with a view of applying this knowledge to the design of effective vaccines and immunomodulators that control viral infections. This brief review discusses several areas of the field that hold substantial promise for translation, but where further work is critically required to find solutions. We emphasize that our fundamental understanding of virus-host relationships is moving in leaps and bounds, but we lag behind in applying this knowledge to the successful control of many viral infections. PMID:27303640

  6. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  7. Alterations in favipiravir (T-705) pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Westover, Jonna B.; Smee, Donald F.; Hagloch, Joseph; Furuta, Yousuke; Hall, Jeffery O.

    2015-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new anti-influenza drug approved for human use in Japan and progressing through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. In addition to its potent inhibitory effects against influenza virus infection, the compound has been shown to be broadly active against RNA viruses from 9 different families, including the Arenaviridae. Several members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses are significant human pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe systemic syndrome where vascular leak is a cardinal feature. Because arenaviral infections are unlikely to be diagnosed and treated until the illness has progressed to a more advanced state, it is important to understand the effects of the disease state on favipiravir pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution to help guide therapeutic strategy. During acute arenavirus infection in hamsters, we found reduced plasma favipiravir concentrations and altered kinetics of absorption, elimination and time to maximum drug concentration. In addition, the amounts of the favipiravir M1 primary metabolite were higher in the infected animals, suggesting that favipiravir metabolism may favor the formation of this inactive metabolite during viral infection. We also discovered differences in favipiravir and M1 PK parameters associated with arenavirus infection in a number of hamster tissues. Finally, analysis at the individual animal level demonstrated a correlation between reduced plasma favipiravir concentration with increased disease burden as reflected by weight loss and viral load. Our study is the first to show the impact of active viral infection and disease on favipiravir PK and biodistribution, highlighting the need to consider alterations in these parameters when treating individuals with viral hemorrhagic fever of arenavirus or other etiology. PMID:26186980

  8. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Snow, Michael

    2011-04-05

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate

  9. Alterations in favipiravir (T-705) pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Sefing, Eric J; Westover, Jonna B; Smee, Donald F; Hagloch, Joseph; Furuta, Yousuke; Hall, Jeffery O

    2015-09-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new anti-influenza drug approved for human use in Japan and progressing through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. In addition to its potent inhibitory effects against influenza virus infection, the compound has been shown to be broadly active against RNA viruses from 9 different families, including the Arenaviridae. Several members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses are significant human pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe systemic syndrome where vascular leak is a cardinal feature. Because arenaviral infections are unlikely to be diagnosed and treated until the illness has progressed to a more advanced state, it is important to understand the effects of the disease state on favipiravir pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution to help guide therapeutic strategy. During acute arenavirus infection in hamsters, we found reduced plasma favipiravir concentrations and altered kinetics of absorption, elimination and time to maximum drug concentration. In addition, the amounts of the favipiravir M1 primary metabolite were higher in the infected animals, suggesting that favipiravir metabolism may favor the formation of this inactive metabolite during viral infection. We also discovered differences in favipiravir and M1 PK parameters associated with arenavirus infection in a number of hamster tissues. Finally, analysis at the individual animal level demonstrated a correlation between reduced plasma favipiravir concentration with increased disease burden as reflected by weight loss and viral load. Our study is the first to show the impact of active viral infection and disease on favipiravir PK and biodistribution, highlighting the need to consider alterations in these parameters when treating individuals with viral hemorrhagic fever of arenavirus or other etiology.

  10. Etiology of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Iran: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh-Sefidan, Fatemeh; Salahi-Eshlaqi, Behnaz; Ebrahimzadeh-Leylabadlo, Hamed

    2015-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is one of the most severe infectious diseases, causing neurologic sequel, and a case fatality rate of 20-30%. The aim of this paper was to summarize the main causes of ABM in Iran. We searched the data for relevant articles using meningitis, etiology, and Iran as search terms. We found 23 papers for inclusion in the review that focused specifically on the ABM, addressing etiology and acute meningitis. Finally, during the 23 years, a total of 18163 cases were recorded, and 1074 cases of which met the criteria for bacterial meningitis. The most common agent associated with bacterial meningitis was S. pneumoniae, followed by H. influenzae, Enterobacter spp., N. meningitidis, and group B streptococcus. The total incidence of ABM during 1991 to 2002 was higher than during 2003-2013. S. pneumoniae still remains a main cause of bacterial meningitis. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further clarify the etiology of meningitis in Iran, explore simple, accurate, and practical diagnostic tools as PCR, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent meningitis as vaccination.

  11. [Bell's palsy (etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, course, outcome)].

    PubMed

    Al'perovich, P M; Korneichuk, A G; Konstantinovich, T I; Starinets, G A; Pshuk, Ia I

    1978-01-01

    The authors studied 908 patients with Bell's paralysis. In 373 cases the etiology was cooling, in 52--vascular diseases, in 207 cases the etiology was not established. An analysis of the clinical picture development permits to assume that different modern theories of the pathogenesis of Bell's paralysis (the theory of primary ischemia, secondary ischemia a combination of primary and secondary ischemia) do not exclude each other, finding a different application depending upon the etiology of the paralysis. The report contains a detailed description of the clinical picture and development of Bell's paralysis. It is established, that the facial nerve in Bell's paralysis is usually affected in the inferior part of the Fallopian tube. A follow-up study of 536 patients demonstrated that in 174 cases (32.4%) (those who were discharged from the hospital with an incomplete therapeutical effect) a contracture of the mimical muscles was formed. In 70 of them the symptom of "crocodile tears" was found. In 73 patients there were homolateral relapses of Bell's paralysis.

  12. Degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Detamore, M S; Mercuri, L G

    2008-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders have complex and sometimes controversial etiologies. Also, under similar circumstances, one person's TMJ may appear to deteriorate, while another's does not. However, once degenerative changes start in the TMJ, this pathology can be crippling, leading to a variety of morphological and functional deformities. Primarily, TMJ disorders have a non-inflammatory origin. The pathological process is characterized by deterioration and abrasion of articular cartilage and local thickening. These changes are accompanied by the superimposition of secondary inflammatory changes. Therefore, appreciating the pathophysiology of the TMJ degenerative disorders is important to an understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of internal derangement and osteoarthrosis of the TMJ. The degenerative changes in the TMJ are believed to result from dysfunctional remodeling, due to a decreased host-adaptive capacity of the articulating surfaces and/or functional overloading of the joint that exceeds the normal adaptive capacity. This paper reviews etiologies that involve biomechanical and biochemical factors associated with functional overloading of the joint and the clinical, radiographic, and biochemical findings important in the diagnosis of TMJ-osteoarthrosis. In addition, non-invasive and invasive modalities utilized in TMJ-osteoarthrosis management, and the possibility of tissue engineering, are discussed.

  13. [The concept, the symptoms and the etiological factors of codependency].

    PubMed

    Knapek, Eva; Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2014-01-01

    The concept of codependency stems from the field of chemical dependency. Initially, codependent individuals meant women who dominated their partners and took care of them, while women actually were dependent upon their husbands. Nowadays, it has been recognized that men can become codependent as well, and its presence is not limited only to the relationship. This paper reviews the various interpretations of codependency and the empirical researches on the etiological factors of codependency. The explanatory models of codependency can be placed on a continuum of severity: psychopathology on the level of personality disorder, behavioural addiction, or excessive feminine behaviour. The etiology is mutifactorical: biological, psychological and social elements are also listed among etiology factors. The individual variability of the predisposition to care, failure of prefrontal cortex to inhibit empathic responses, a multitude of aversive experiences in a dysfunctional family (e.g. parental conflicts, emotional abuse, neglect and parentification), changes in the perception of women's role, and the emergence of substance abuse in the family could play a role in the development of codependency. Codependency is often unrecognized. Codependent individuals visit the health care system with stress-related or depressive symptoms which can mask the underlying causes, thus, it is possible that they will only receive symptomatic treatment. Through its trans-generational nature, codependency endangers children growing up in the family.

  14. Etiologic agents of otitis media in Benin city, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Osazuwa, Favour; Osazuwa, Emmanuel; Osime, Clement; Igharo, Esohe Amanda; Imade, Paul Erhumwunse; Lofor, Patrick; Momoh, Moses; Omoregie, Richard; Dirisu, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Otitis Media continues to be a major presentation in the ear, nose and throat clinic. Aim: This study aimed to isolate, characterize and identify the bacteriological and mycological etiologic agents of otitis media in Benin city. Patients and Methods: Ear discharge from 569 (299 males and 270 females) patients diagnosed clinically of otitis media between August 2009 and August 2010 were processed to recover the bacterial and fungal etiologic agents. Susceptibility test was performed on all bacterial isolate. Result: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (28.3%) was the predominant bacteria isolate causing otitis media followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21.0%), Klebsiella sp (8.9%), Proteus sp (8.2%), Alkaligenes spp (4.3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (3.9%), Escherichia coli (3.0%) and Citrobacter freundi (1.7%). Fungi isolated were Aspergillus niger (9.2%), Candida albicans (5.4%), Candida tropicalis (3.0%), Aspergillus flavus (2.1%) and Candida parasilopsis (1.5%). 413 had a single organism isolated from the middle ear culture while twenty (3.51%) patients had mixed organisms isolated. Infection was highest among 0 - 5 years, and lowest among aged 18 - 23. All bacterial isolates were poorly susceptible to the antibacterial agents. Conclusion: The study uncovers a high frequency of bacteria associated otitis media with the finding of fungi too as a significant etiologic agent. PMID:22540074

  15. Evaluation of etiologic and prognostic factors in neonatal convulsions.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Edibe Pembegul; Tatlı, Burak; Ekici, Barış; Eraslan, Emine; Aydınlı, Nur; Calışkan, Mine; Ozmen, Meral

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated etiologic and risk factors affecting long-term prognoses of neurologic outcomes in newborns with neonatal seizures. We enrolled patients at chronologic ages of 23-44 months, referred to the Department of Pediatric Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, from January 1, 2007-December 31, 2009, after manifesting seizures in their first postnatal 28 days. Of 112 newborns, 41 were female, 71 were male, 33 were preterm, and 79 were full-term. Perinatal asphyxia (28.6%) and intracranial hemorrhage (17%) were the most common causes of neonatal seizures. Cerebral palsy developed in 27.6% of patients during follow-up. The incidence of epilepsy was 35.7%. Almost 50% of patients manifested developmental delay in one or more areas. Global developmental delay was the most common (50.8%) neurologic disorder. The correlation between gestational age or birth weight and adverse outcomes was nonsignificant. Etiology, Apgar score, need for resuscitation at birth, background electroencephalogram, neonatal status epilepticus, cranial imaging findings, type/duration of antiepileptic treatment, and response to acute treatment were all strong prognostic factors in neurologic outcomes. Neonatal seizures pose a threat of neurologic sequelae for preterm and full-term infants. Although the number of recognized etiologic factors in neonatal seizures has increased because of improvements in neonatology and diagnostic methods, perinatal asphyxia remains the most common factor.

  16. Experimental infection of Newcastle disease virus in pigeons (Columba livia): humoral antibody response, contact transmission and viral genome shedding.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Torres Carrasco, Adriano; Seki, Meire Christina; de Freitas Raso, Tânia; Paulillo, Antônio Carlos; Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2008-05-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the humoral antibody response, the genome viral excretion and the contact transmission of pathogenic chicken origin Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from experimentally infected pigeons (Columba livia) to in-contact pigeon. The antibody response to infection was assessed by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and the genome viral excretion was detected by RT-PCR. Viral strain induced high antibody levels, both in inoculated and in sentinel birds. The pathogenic viral strain for chickens was unable to produce clinical signs of the disease in experimentally infected pigeons, although it induced the humoral antibody response and produced NDV genome shedding. NDV genome was detected intermittently throughout the experimental period, from 5 days post-infection (dpi) to 24 dpi. Therefore, viral genome shedding occurred for 20 days. The viral genome was detected in all birds, between 11 and 13 dpi. Furthermore, the high infectivity of the virus was confirmed, as all non-inoculated sentinel pigeons showed antibody levels as high as those of inoculated birds.

  17. [Molecular characterization of rotavirus in the city of Santafé de Bogotá, Colombia. Determination of the electrophenotypes and typing of a strain by RT-PCR].

    PubMed

    Correa, A; Solarte, Y; Barrera, J; Mogollón, D; Gutiérrez, M F

    1999-01-01

    131 diarrheic samples obtained from children taken to the emergency room of the Misericordia Hospital in Santafé de Bogotá were cultivated for rotavirus. These virus were found to be etiological agents for the diarrhea in 42 (32%) of the patients. In order to characterize electrophoretically the rotavirus they were cultured in cell line MA-104, total RNA was extracted and subjected to electrophoresis in SDS-PAGE and then the retrotranscription polymerase chain reaction. Eight different electrophoretic patterns were found. All patterns correspond to group A. Eight positive PAGE samples and the control type RRV were cultured in cell line MA-104. Viral growth was found only in the control and four of the samples. Total RNA was extracted from all five infected cultures and gene 9, which codifies for protein VP7 was amplified. All four samples and the control were shown to be G3. The finding of eight different electrophoretic types, all of them belonging to group A, show a diversity in co-circulating rotavirus strains. These findings contribute to a better understanding of viral acute gastroenteritis natural history and should help in developing new epidemiological vigilance strategies, prevention and control of rotavirus in children population of Santafé de Bogotá.

  18. Dual-pathogen etiology of avian trichomonosis in a declining band-tailed pigeon population.

    PubMed

    Girard, Yvette A; Rogers, Krysta H; Woods, Leslie W; Chouicha, Nadira; Miller, Woutrina A; Johnson, Christine K

    2014-06-01

    The Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata monilis) is a migratory game bird of North America that is at risk for population decline. Epidemics of avian trichomonosis caused by upper digestive tract infection with Trichomonas spp. protozoa in these and other doves and pigeons of the United States are sporadic, but can involve tens of thousands of birds in a single event. Herein, we analyze the role of trichomonosis in band-tailed pigeon mortality and relate spatial, temporal and demographic patterns of parasite transmission to the genetic background of the infecting organism. Infections were most common in adult birds and prevalence was high in band-tailed pigeons sampled at mortality events (96%) and rehabilitation centers (36%) compared to those that were hunter-killed (11%) or live-caught (4%). During non-epidemic periods, animals were primarily infected with T. gallinae Fe-hydrogenase subtype A2, and were less often infected with either T. gallinae subtype A1 (the British finch epidemic strain), T. stableri n. sp. (a T. vaginalis-like species), or Tritrichomonas blagburni n. sp.-like organisms. Birds sampled during multiple epidemics in California were only infected with T. gallinae subtype A2 and T. stableri. The non-clonal etiology of avian trichomonosis outbreaks in band-tailed pigeons and the risk of spill-over to raptor and passerine species highlights the need for additional studies that clarify the host range and evolutionary relationships between strains of Trichomonas spp. in regions of trichomonosis endemicity.

  19. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  20. Prognostic value of EEG in different etiological types of coma.

    PubMed

    Khaburzania, M; Beridze, M

    2013-06-01

    Study aimed at evaluation of prognostic value of standard EEG in different etiology of coma and the influence of etiological factor on the EEG patterns and coma outcome. Totally 175 coma patients were investigated. Patients were evaluated by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), clinically and by 16 channel electroencephalography. Auditory evoked potentials studied by EEG -regime for evoked potentials in patients with vegetative state (VS). Patients divided in 8 groups according to coma etiology. All patients were studied for photoreaction, brainstem reflexes, localization of sound and pain, length of coma state and outcome. Brain injury visualized by conventional CT. Outcome defined as death, VS, recovery with disability and without disability. Disability was rated by Disability Rating Scale (DRS). Recovered patients assessed by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale. Statistics performed by SPSS-11.0. From 175 coma patients 55 patients died, 23 patients found in VS, 97 patients recovered with and without disability. In all etiological groups of coma the background EEG patterns were established. Correspondence analysis of all investigated factors revealed that sound localization had the significant association with EEG delta and theta rhythms and with recovery from coma state (Chi-sqr. =31.10493; p= 0.000001). Among 23 VS patients 9 patients had the signs of MCS and showed the long latency waves (p300) after binaural stimulation. The high amplitude theta frequencies in frontal and temporal lobes significantly correlated with prolongation of latency of cognitive evoked potentials (r=+0.47; p<0.01). Etiological factor had the significant effect on EEG patterns' association with coma outcome only in hemorrhagic and traumatic coma (chi-sqr.=12.95; p<0.005; chi-sqr.=7.92; p<0.03 respectively). Significant correlations established between the delta and theta EEG patterns and coma outcome. Low amplitude decreased power delta and theta frequencies correlated with SND in survived