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Sample records for etpa mediates adhesion

  1. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  2. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  3. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling. PMID:21057645

  4. Regulation of integrin-mediated adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Daniel V.; Calderwood, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular environment and bidirectionally relay signals across the cell membrane. These processes are critical for cell attachment, migration, differentiation, and survival, and therefore play essential roles in metazoan development, physiology, and pathology. Integrin-mediated adhesions are regulated by diverse factors, including the conformation-specific affinities of integrin receptors for their extracellular ligands, the clustering of integrins and their intracellular binding partners into discrete adhesive structures, mechanical forces exerted on the adhesion, and the intracellular trafficking of integrins themselves. Recent advances shed light onto how the interaction of specific intracellular proteins with the short cytoplasmic tails of integrins controls each of these activities. PMID:26189062

  5. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Colonization following Intradermal, Sublingual, or Oral Vaccination with EtpA Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingwei; Vickers, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a common cause of diarrhea. Extraordinary antigenic diversity has prompted a search for conserved antigens to complement canonical approaches to ETEC vaccine development. EtpA, an immunogenic extracellular ETEC adhesin relatively conserved in the ETEC pathovar, has previously been shown to be a protective antigen following intranasal immunization. These studies were undertaken to explore alternative routes of EtpA vaccination that would permit use of a double mutant (R192G L211A) heat-labile toxin (dmLT) adjuvant. Here, oral vaccination with EtpA adjuvanted with dmLT afforded significant protection against small intestinal colonization, and the degree of protection correlated with fecal IgG, IgA, or total fecal antibody responses to EtpA. Sublingual vaccination yielded compartmentalized mucosal immune responses with significant increases in anti-EtpA fecal IgG and IgA, and mice vaccinated via this route were also protected against colonization. In contrast, while intradermal (i.d.) vaccination achieved high levels of both serum and fecal antibodies against both EtpA and dmLT, mice vaccinated via the i.d. route were not protected against subsequent colonization and the avidity of serum IgG and IgA EtpA-specific antibodies was significantly lower after i.d. immunization compared to other routes. Finally, we demonstrate that antiserum from vaccinated mice significantly impairs binding of LT to cognate GM1 receptors and shows near complete neutralization of toxin delivery by ETEC in vitro. Collectively, these data provide further evidence that EtpA could complement future vaccine strategies but also suggest that additional effort will be required to optimize its use as a protective immunogen. PMID:27226279

  6. Drosophila neurotactin mediates heterophilic cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Barthalay, Y; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R; de la Escalera, S; Jiménez, F; Piovant, M

    1990-01-01

    Neurotactin is a 135 kd membrane glycoprotein which consists of a core protein, with an apparent molecular weight of 120 kd, and of N-linked oligosaccharides. In vivo, the protein can be phosphorylated in presence of radioactive orthophosphate. Neurotactin expression in the larval CNS and in primary embryonic cell cultures suggests that it behaves as a contact molecule between neurons or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy studies reveal that neurotactin is uniformly expressed along the areas of contacts between cells, without, however, being restricted to a particular type of junction. It putative adhesive properties have been tested by transfecting non adhesive Drosophila S2 cells with neurotactin cDNA. Heat shocked transfected cells do not aggregate, suggesting that neurotactin does not mediate homophilic cell adhesion. However, these transfected cells bind to a subpopulation of embryonic cells which probably possess a related ligand. The location at cellular junctions between specific neurons or epithelial cells, the heterophilic binding to a putative ligand and the ability to be phosphorylated are consistent with the suggestion that neurotactin functions as an adhesion molecule. Images Fig.1 Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.4 Fig.5 PMID:2120048

  7. Molecular mechanisms regulating CD13-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Gerber, Claire; Rahman, M Mamunur; Vernier, Kaitlyn M; Pereira, Flavia E; Subramani, Jaganathan; Caromile, Leslie A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    CD13/Aminopeptidase N is a transmembrane metalloproteinase that is expressed in many tissues where it regulates various cellular functions. In inflammation, CD13 is expressed on myeloid cells, is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation and mediates monocyte/endothelial adhesion by homotypic interactions. In animal models the lack of CD13 alters the profiles of infiltrating inflammatory cells at sites of ischaemic injury. Here, we found that CD13 expression is enriched specifically on the pro-inflammatory subset of monocytes, suggesting that CD13 may regulate trafficking and function of specific subsets of immune cells. To further dissect the mechanisms regulating CD13-dependent trafficking we used the murine model of thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis. Peritoneal monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells were significantly decreased in inflammatory exudates from global CD13KO animals when compared with wild-type controls. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of wild-type and CD13KO primary myeloid cells, or wild-type myeloid cells pre-treated with CD13-blocking antibodies into thioglycollate-challenged wild-type recipients demonstrated fewer CD13KO or treated cells in the lavage, suggesting that CD13 expression confers a competitive advantage in trafficking. Similarly, both wild-type and CD13KO cells were reduced in infiltrates in CD13KO recipients, confirming that both monocytic and endothelial CD13 contribute to trafficking. Finally, murine monocyte cell lines expressing mouse/human chimeric CD13 molecules demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of the protein mediates CD13 adhesion. Therefore, this work verifies that the altered inflammatory trafficking in CD13KO mice is the result of aberrant myeloid cell subset trafficking and further defines the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:24627994

  8. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  9. Analysis of the Behaviours Mediating Barnacle Cyprid Reversible Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T.; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic ‘walking’ behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as ‘footprints’ on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic ‘suction cup’. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous ‘temporary adhesive’, ‘dry’ adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface – presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond – seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion

  10. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  11. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  12. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  13. Minimal synthetic cells to study integrin-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-10-12

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIb β3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIb β3 .

  14. Minimal Synthetic Cells to Study Integrin-Mediated Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIbβ3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26257266

  15. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  16. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  17. CD151-mediated adhesion is crucial to osteosarcoma pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengxiong; Zhou, Chenghao; Chen, Jian; Yin, Fei; Wang, Hongsheng; Lin, Binhui; Zuo, Dongqing; Li, Suoyuan; Feng, Lijin; Duan, Zhenfeng; Cai, Zhengdong; Hua, Yingqi

    2016-01-01

    CD151, a tetraspanin family protein involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interaction, is differentially expressed in osteosarcoma cell membranes. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the role of CD151 in osteosarcoma metastasis. We analyzed CD151 expression in patient tissue samples using immunohistochemistry. CD151 expression was also silenced with shRNA in osteosarcoma cells of high metastatic potential, and cell adhesion, migration and invasion were evaluated in vitro and pulmonary metastasis was investigated in vivo. Mediators of cell signaling pathways were also examined following suppression of CD151 expression. Overall survival for patients with low versus high CD151 expression level was 94 vs. 41 months (p=0.0451). CD151 expression in osteosarcoma cells with high metastatic potential was significantly higher than in those with low metastatic potential (p<0.001). shRNA-mediated silencing of CD151 did not influence cell viability or proliferation; however, cell adhesion, migration and invasion were all inhibited (all p<0.001). In mice inoculated with shRNA-transduced osteosarcoma cells, the number and size of lung metastatic lesions were reduced compared to the mice inoculated with control-shRNA transduced cells (p<0.001). In addition, CD151 knockdown significantly reduced Akt, p38, and p65 phosphorylation as well as focal adhesion kinase, integrin β1, p70s6, and p-mTOR levels. Taken together, CD151 induced osteosarcoma metastasis likely by regulating cell function through adhesion signaling. Further studies are necessary to fully explore the diagnostic and prognostic value of determining CD151 expression in osteosarcoma patients. PMID:27556355

  18. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Mediates Leukocyte Adhesion to Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Pakozdi, Angela; Michel, James E.; Gujar, Bansari S.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Imhof, Beat A.; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Leukocyte infiltration into the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium is a multistep process in which leukocytes leave the bloodstream and invade the synovial tissue (ST). Leukocyte transendothelial migration and adhesion to RA ST requires adhesion molecules on the surface of endothelial cells and RA ST fibroblasts. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) in mediating leukocyte recruitment and retention in the RA joint. Methods Immunohistologic analysis was performed on RA, osteoarthritis (OA), and normal ST samples to quantify JAM-C expression. Fibroblast JAM-C expression was also analyzed using Western blotting, cell surface enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. To determine the role of JAM-C in leukocyte retention in the RA synovium, in vitro and in situ adhesion assays and RA ST fibroblast transmigration assays were performed. Results JAM-C was highly expressed by RA ST lining cells, and its expression was increased in OA ST and RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal ST endothelial cells. JAM-C was also expressed on the surface of OA ST and RA ST fibroblasts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myeloid U937 cell adhesion to both OA ST and RA ST fibroblasts and to RA ST was dependent on JAM-C. U937 cell migration through an RA ST fibroblast monolayer was enhanced in the presence of neutralizing antibodies against JAM-C. Conclusion Our results highlight the novel role of JAM-C in recruiting and retaining leukocytes in the RA synovium and suggest that targeting JAM-C may be important in combating inflammatory diseases such as RA. PMID:18821692

  19. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  20. Platelet-mediated adhesion facilitates leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senfeng; Cao, Yanting; Zhang, Wenjian; Liu, Honglin; You, Jia; Yin, Yiqing; Lou, Jinning; Li, Chenghui

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration and sequestration are two distinct outcomes following leukocyte adhesion to endothelium during ischemia-reperfusion injury, in which platelets may play a pivotal role. In the present study, we established an in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation model to mimic ischemia-reperfusion injury and found platelet pre-incubation significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells after hyoxia-reoxygenation (over 67%). Blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules inhibited leukocyte direct adhesion to endothelial cells, while platelet-mediated leukocyte adhesion was suppressed by blockade of platelet-expressed adhesion molecules. Further experiments revealed platelets acted as a bridge to mediate leukocyte adhesion, and platelet-mediated adhesion was the predominant pattern in the presence of platelets. However, platelet pre-incubation significantly suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration after hypoxia-reoxygenation (over 31%), which could be aggravated by blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules, but alleviated by blockade of platelet- expressed adhesion molecules. This would indicate that platelet-mediated adhesion disrupted leukocyte transendothelial migration. An in vivo mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion model demonstrated leukocyte transfusion alone caused mild leukocyte adhesion to reperfused vessels and subsequent leukocyte infiltration, while simultaneous leukocyte and platelet transfusion led to massive leukocyte adhesion and sequestration within reperfused microvessels. Our studies revealed platelets enhanced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, but suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration. Overall, this leads to leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

  1. Polarized Integrin Mediates Human Keratinocyte Adhesion to Basal Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, Michele; Tamura, Richard N.; Kajiji, Shama; Bondanza, Sergio; Rossino, Paola; Cancedda, Ranieri; Carlo Marchisio, Pier; Quaranta, Vito

    1990-09-01

    Epithelial cell interactions with matrices are critical to tissue organization. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitations of cell lysates prepared from stratified cultures of human epidermal cells showed that the major integrins expressed by keratinocytes are α_Eβ_4 (also called α_6β_4) and α_2β_1/α_3β_1. The α_Eβ_4 integrin is localized at the surface of basal cells in contact with the basement membrane, whereas α_2β_1/ α_3β_1 integrins are absent from the basal surface and are localized only on the lateral surface of basal and spinous keratinocytes. Anti-β_4 antibodies potently inhibited keratinocyte adhesion to matrigel or purified laminin, whereas anti-β_1 antibodies were ineffective. Only anti-β_4 antibodies were able to detach established keratinocyte colonies. These data suggest that α_Eβ_4 mediates keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina, whereas the β_1 subfamily is involved in cell-cell adhesion of keratinocytes.

  2. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  3. Cadherin-mediated adhesion regulates posterior body formation

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Michael J; Hong, Elim; Fasanmi, Oluwafoyinsa; Brewster, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background The anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate embryo undergoes a dramatic elongation during early development. Convergence and extension of the mesoderm, occurring during gastrulation, initiates the narrowing and lengthening of the embryo. However the lengthening of the axis continues during post-gastrula stages in the tailbud region, and is thought to involve convergent extension movements as well as other cell behaviors specific to posterior regions. Results We demonstrate here, using a semi-dominant N-cadherin allele, that members of the classical cadherin subfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules are required for tailbud elongation in the zebrafish. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors suggests that the extension of posterior axial mesodermal cells is impaired in embryos that carry the semi-dominant N-cadherin allele. This defect most likely results from a general loss of cell-cell adhesion in the tailbud region. Consistent with these observations, N-cadherin is expressed throughout the tailbud during post-gastrulation stages. In addition, we show that N-cadherin interacts synergistically with vang-like 2, a member of the non-canonical Wnt signaling/planar cell polarity pathway, to mediate tail morphogenesis. Conclusion We provide the first evidence here that N-cadherin and other members of the classical cadherin subfamily function in parallel with the planar cell polarity pathway to shape the posterior axis during post-gastrulation stages. These findings further highlight the central role that adhesion molecules play in the cellular rearrangements that drive morphogenesis in vertebrates and identify classical cadherins as major contributors to tail development. PMID:18045497

  4. Structural insights into Ail-mediated adhesion in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M; Krukonis, Eric S; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K

    2011-11-09

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adhesion to tooth structure mediated by contemporary bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Stangel, Ivan; Ellis, Thomas H; Sacher, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Given the enormity of the field of adhesion and the number of commercial products available, the discipline of modern adhesive dentistry can be daunting with respect to materials and techniques. This article organizes contemporary bonding practice and materials around an understanding of the fundamentals of adhesion to tooth structure. In providing this context, adhesive development, bonding systems, and their appropriate use are better understood. The end result is the better practice of adhesive dentistry.

  6. Deacetylation of Fungal Exopolysaccharide Mediates Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Geller, Alexander M.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Liu, Hong; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Le Mauff, François; Chabot, Joseé; Ralph, Benjamin; Ostapska, Hanna; Lehoux, Mélanie; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stephanie D.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Filler, Scott G.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. Recently, galactosaminogalactan (GAG), an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), was identified as a virulence factor required for biofilm formation. The molecular mechanisms underlying GAG biosynthesis and GAG-mediated biofilm formation were unknown. We identified a cluster of five coregulated genes that were dysregulated in GAG-deficient mutants and whose gene products share functional similarity with proteins that mediate the synthesis of the bacterial biofilm exopolysaccharide poly-(β1-6)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG). Bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GAG cluster gene agd3 encodes a protein containing a deacetylase domain. Because deacetylation of N-acetylglucosamine residues is critical for the function of PNAG, we investigated the role of GAG deacetylation in fungal biofilm formation. Agd3 was found to mediate deacetylation of GalNAc residues within GAG and render the polysaccharide polycationic. As with PNAG, deacetylation is required for the adherence of GAG to hyphae and for biofilm formation. Growth of the Δagd3 mutant in the presence of culture supernatants of the GAG-deficient Δuge3 mutant rescued the biofilm defect of the Δagd3 mutant and restored the adhesive properties of GAG, suggesting that deacetylation is an extracellular process. The GAG biosynthetic gene cluster is present in the genomes of members of the Pezizomycotina subphylum of the Ascomycota including a number of plant-pathogenic fungi and a single basidiomycete species, Trichosporon asahii, likely a result of recent horizontal gene transfer. The current study demonstrates that the production of cationic, deacetylated exopolysaccharides is a strategy used by both fungi and bacteria for biofilm formation. PMID:27048799

  7. [Molecular mechanisms underlying cell adhesion--molecules mediating lymphocyte migration].

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, M

    2000-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play crucial roles in a variety of in vivo responses such as development of various tissues in embryos and also in the body defence mechanism in the postnatal period. Defects in adhesion molecules thus result in various pathological disorders. Recent investigation has identified a large number of novel adhesion molecules, particularly those involved in the extravasation of leukocytes including lymphocytes. However, there still appears to be a substantial number of unidentified adhesion molecules. In addition, signal transduction as well as regulatory mechanisms of adhesion molecules remain not fully explored. I will herein describe general characteristics of adhesion molecules and also discuss issues that need to be urgently resolved in the field of cell adhesion.

  8. Prolactin stimulates integrin-mediated adhesion of circulating mononuclear cells to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Pável; Macotela, Yazmín; Nava, Gabriel; López-Barrera, Fernando; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2005-05-01

    Attachment of leukocytes to endothelial cells is an essential step for the extravasation and recruitment of cells at sites of inflammation. The pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) is involved in the inflammatory process. Here, we show that treatment with PRL of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulates their adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) activated by interleukin-1beta. Stimulation of adhesion by PRL is mediated via integrins leukocyte functional antigen-1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), because immunoneutralization of both integrins prevents PRL action. Also, PRL promotes the adhesion of PBMC to immobilized intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin, ligands for LFA-1 and VLA-4, respectively. Stimulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion by PRL may involve the activation of chemokine receptors, because PRL upregulates the expression of the G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR3 in PBMC, and pertussis toxin, a specific G-protein inhibitor, blocks PRL stimulation of PBMC adhesion to HUVEC. In addition, PRL stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation pathways leading to leukocyte adhesion. PRL triggered the tyrosine phosphorylation of Janus kinase-2, of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 and 5, and of the focal adhesion protein paxillin. Furthermore, genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked PRL-stimulated adhesion of PBMC and Jurkat T-cells to HUVEC. These results suggest that PRL promotes integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells via chemokine receptors and tyrosine phosphorylation signaling pathways.

  9. Temperature Modulation of Integrin-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Félix; Chu, Calvin; Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Qin, Yujing; Moy, Vincent T.

    2010-01-01

    In response to external stimuli, cells modulate their adhesive state by regulating the number and intrinsic affinity of receptor/ligand bonds. A number of studies have shown that cell adhesion is dramatically reduced at room or lower temperatures as compared with physiological temperature. However, the underlying mechanism that modulates adhesion is still unclear. Here, we investigated the adhesion of the monocytic cell line THP-1 to a surface coated with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as a function of temperature. THP-1 cells express the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a receptor for ICAM-1. Direct force measurements of cell adhesion and cell elasticity were carried out by atomic force microscopy. Force measurements revealed an increase of the work of de-adhesion with temperature that was coupled to a gradual decrease in cellular stiffness. Of interest, single-molecule measurements revealed that the rupture force of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex decreased with temperature. A detailed analysis of the force curves indicated that temperature-modulated cell adhesion was mainly due to the enhanced ability of cells to deform and to form a greater number of longer membrane tethers at physiological temperatures. Together, these results emphasize the importance of cell mechanics and membrane-cytoskeleton interaction on the modulation of cell adhesion. PMID:20816050

  10. Adhesive Dynamics Simulation of G-Protein-Mediated Chemokine-Activated Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To reach sites of inflammation, a blood-borne neutrophil first rolls over the vessel wall, becoming firmly adherent on activation, and then transmigrates through the endothelium. In this study, we simulate the transition to firm adhesion via chemokine-induced integrin activation. To recreate the transition from rolling to firm adhesion, we use an integrated signaling adhesive dynamics simulation that includes selectin, integrin, and chemokine interactions between the cell and an adhesive substrate. Integrin bonds are of low affinity until activated by chemokine binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the model cell. The signal propagates within the cell through probabilistic diffusion and reaction of the signaling elements to induce the high-affinity integrins required for firm adhesion. This model showed that integrins become progressively active as cells roll and interact with chemokines, leading to a slight slowing before firm adhesion on a timescale similar to that observed in experiments. Increasing the density of chemokine resulted in decreases in the rolling time before stopping, consistent with experimental observations. However, a limit is reached where further increases in chemokine density do not increase adhesion. We found that the timescale for integrin activation correlated with the time to stop. Further, altering parameters within the intracellular signaling cascade that changed the speed of integrin activation, such as effector activation and dissociation rates, correspondingly affected the time to firm adhesion. For all conditions tested, the number of active integrin bonds at the point of firm adhesion was relatively constant. The model predicts that the time to stop would be relatively independent of selectin or integrin density, but strongly dependent on the shear rate because higher shear rates limit the intrinsic activation rate of integrins and require more integrins for adhesion. PMID:19383446

  11. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  12. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  13. Episialin (MUC1) overexpression inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1) is a transmembrane molecule with a large mucin-like extracellular domain protruding high above the cell surface. The molecule is located at the apical side of most glandular epithelial cells, whereas in carcinoma cells it is often present at the entire surface and it is frequently expressed in abnormally large quantities. We have previously shown that overexpression of episialin reduces cell- cell interactions. Here we show that the integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix of transfectants of a melanoma cell line (A375), a transformed epithelial cell line (MDCK-ras-e) and a human breast epithelial cell line (HBL-100) is reduced by high levels of episialin. This reduction can be reversed by inducing high avidity of the beta 1 integrins by mAb TS2/16 (at least for beta 1-mediated adhesion). The adhesion can also be restored by redistribution of episialin on the cell surface by monoclonal antibodies into patches or caps. Similarly, capping of episialin on ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells, growing in suspension, caused adherence and spreading of these cells. We propose that there is a delicate balance between adhesion and anti-adhesion forces in episialin expressing cells, which can be shifted towards adhesion by strengthening the integrin-mediated adhesion, or towards anti-adhesion by increasing the level of expression of episialin. PMID:7698991

  14. Angiogenesis mediated by soluble forms of E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Alisa E.; Halloran, Margaret M.; Haskell, Catherine J.; Shah, Manisha R.; Polverini, Peter J.

    1995-08-01

    ENDOTHELIAL adhesion molecules facilitate the entry of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. This in turn promotes neovascularization, a process central to the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, tumour growth and wound repair1. Here we test the hypothesis that soluble endothelial adhesion molecules promote angiogenesis2á¤-4. Human recombinant soluble E-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced chemotaxis of human endothelial cells in vitro and were angiogenic in rat cornea. Soluble E-selectin acted on endothelial cells in part through a sialyl Lewis-X-dependent mechanism, while soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 acted on endothelial cells in part through a very late antigen (VLA)-4 dependent mechanism. The chemotactic activity of rheumatoid synovial fluid for endothelial cells, and also its angiogenic activity, were blocked by antibodies to either soluble E-selectin or soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. These results suggest a novel function for soluble endothelial adhesion molecules as mediators of angiogenesis.

  15. Antibodies derived from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin tip MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) against adherence of nine ETEC adhesins: CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Ruan, Xiaosai; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-06-30

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years in developing countries. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading bacterial cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. ETEC bacteria initiate diarrheal disease by attaching to host receptors at epithelial cells and colonizing in small intestine. Therefore, preventing ETEC attachment has been considered the first line of defense against ETEC diarrhea. However, developing vaccines effectively against ETEC bacterial attachment encounters challenge because ETEC strains produce over 23 immunologically heterogeneous adhesins. In this study, we applied MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) approach to integrate epitopes from adhesin tips or adhesive subunits of CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA adhesins and to construct an adhesin tip MEFA peptide. We then examined immunogenicity of this tip MEFA in mouse immunization, and assessed potential application of this tip MEFA for ETEC vaccine development. Data showed that mice intraperitoneally immunized with this adhesin tip MEFA developed IgG antibody responses to all nine ETEC adhesins. Moreover, ETEC and E. coli bacteria expressing these nine adhesins, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, exhibited significant reduction in attachment to Caco-2 cells. These results indicated that anti-adhesin antibodies induced by this adhesin tip MEFA blocked adherence of the most important ETEC adhesins, suggesting this multivalent tip MEFA may be useful for developing a broadly protective anti-adhesin vaccine against ETEC diarrhea.

  16. Differential adhesion of microspheres mediated by DNA hybridization I: experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Milam, Valeria T; Graves, David J; Hammer, Daniel A

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel method to study collective behavior of multiple hybridized DNA chains by measuring the adhesion of DNA-coated micron-scale beads under hydrodynamic flow. Beads coated with single-stranded DNA probes are linked to surfaces coated with single target strands through DNA hybridization, and hydrodynamic shear forces are used to discriminate between strongly and weakly bound beads. The adhesiveness of microspheres depends on the strength of interaction between DNA chains on the bead and substrate surfaces, which is a function of the degree of DNA chain overlap, the fidelity of the match between hybridizing pairs, and other factors that affect the hybridization energy, such as the salt concentration in the hybridization buffer. The force for bead detachment is linearly proportional to the degree of chain overlap. There is a detectable drop in adhesion strength when there is a single base mismatch in one of the hybridizing chains. The effect of single nucleotide mismatch was tested with two different strand chemistries, with mutations placed at several different locations. All mutations were detectable, but there was no comprehensive rule relating the drop in adhesive strength to the location of the defect. Since adhesiveness can be coupled to the strength of overlap, the method holds promise to be a novel methodology for oligonucleotide detection.

  17. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  18. Activation of the repulsive receptor Roundabout inhibits N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Mahfooz, Najmus S; Arregui, Carlos; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne; VanBerkum, Mark F A

    2002-10-01

    The formation of axon trajectories requires integration of local adhesive interactions with directional information from attractive and repulsive cues. Here, we show that these two types of information are functionally integrated; activation of the transmembrane receptor Roundabout (Robo) by its ligand, the secreted repulsive guidance cue Slit, inactivates N-cadherin-mediated adhesion. Loss of N-cadherin-mediated adhesion is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its loss from the N-cadherin complex, concomitant with the formation of a supramolecular complex containing Robo, Abelson (Abl) kinase and N-cadherin. Local formation of such a receptor complex is an ideal mechanism to steer the growth cone while still allowing adhesion and growth in other directions.

  19. Mini-review: The role of redox in DOPA-mediated marine adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nicklisch, Sascha; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylanine (Dopa)-containing proteins are key to wet adhesion in mussels and possibly other sessile organisms also. However, Dopa-mediated adhesive bonding is a hard act to follow in that, at least in mussels, bonding depends on Dopa in both reduced and oxidized forms, for adhesion and cohesion, respectively. Given the vulnerability of Dopa to spontaneous oxidation, the most significant challenge to using it in practical adhesion is controlling Dopa redox in a temporally- and spatially defined manner. Mussels appear to achieve such control in their byssal attachment plaques, and factors involved in redox control can be measured with precision using redox probes such as the diphenylpicryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. Understanding the specifics of natural redox control may provide fundamentally important insights for adhesive polymer engineering and antifouling strategies. PMID:22924420

  20. Cross talk between tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein-mediated transport and L1-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Hinners, Ina; Muzerelle, Aude; Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Irinopoulou, Theano; Marthiens, Veronique; Tooze, Sharon; Rathjen, Fritz; Gaspar, Patricia; Galli, Thierry

    2003-10-01

    The membrane-trafficking pathway mediated by tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in neurons is still unknown. We show herein that TI-VAMP expression is necessary for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons in culture. TI-VAMP interacts with plasma membrane and endosomal target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors, suggesting that TI-VAMP mediates a recycling pathway. L1, a cell-cell adhesion molecule involved in axonal outgrowth, colocalized with TI-VAMP in the developing brain, neurons in culture, and PC12 cells. Plasma membrane L1 was internalized into the TI-VAMP-containing compartment. Silencing of TI-VAMP resulted in reduced expression of L1 at the plasma membrane. Finally, using the extracellular domain of L1 and N-cadherin immobilized on beads, we found that the silencing of TI-VAMP led to impaired L1- but not N-cadherin-mediated adhesion. Furthermore, TI-VAMP- but not synaptobrevin 2-containing vesicles accumulated at the site of the L1 bead-cell junction. We conclude that TI-VAMP mediates the intracellular transport of L1 and that L1-mediated adhesion controls this membrane trafficking, thereby suggesting an important cross talk between membrane trafficking and cell-cell adhesion.

  1. Kinetics of membrane adhesion mediated by ligand-receptor interaction studied with a biomimetic system.

    PubMed Central

    Boulbitch, A; Guttenberg, Z; Sackmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the kinetics of adhesion of a single giant vesicle controlled by the competition between membrane-substrate interaction mediated by ligand-receptor interaction, gravitation, and Helfrich repulsion. To model the cell-tissue interaction, we doped the vesicles with lipid-coupled polymers (mimicking the glycocalix) and the reconstituted ligands selectively recognized by alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin-mediating specific attraction forces. The integrin was grafted on glass substrates to act as a target cell. The adhesion of the vesicle membrane to the integrin-covered surface starts with the spontaneous formation of a small (approximately 200 nm) domain of tight adhesion, which then gradually grows until the whole adhesion area is in the state of tight adhesion. The time of adhesion varies from few tens of seconds to about one hour depending on the ligand and lipopolymer concentration. At small ligand concentrations, we observed the displacement xi of the front of tight adhesion following the square root law xi approximately t(1/2), whereas, at high concentrations, we found a linear law xi approximately t. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the t(1/2)-regime is dominated by diffusion of ligands, and the xi approximately t-regime by the kinetics of ligands-receptors association. PMID:11606287

  2. β1-Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Is Lipid-Bilayer Dependent.

    PubMed

    Son, Seoyoung; Moroney, George J; Butler, Peter J

    2017-09-05

    Integrin-mediated adhesion is a central feature of cellular adhesion, locomotion, and endothelial cell mechanobiology. Although integrins are known to be transmembrane proteins, little is known about the role of membrane biophysics and dynamics in integrin adhesion. We treated human aortic endothelial cells with exogenous amphiphiles, shown previously in model membranes, and computationally, to affect bilayer thickness and lipid phase separation, and subsequently measured single-integrin-molecule adhesion kinetics using an optical trap, and diffusion using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Benzyl alcohol (BA) partitions to liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, thins them, and causes the greatest increase in hydrophobic mismatch between liquid-ordered (Lo) and Ld domains among the three amphiphiles, leading to domain separation. In human aortic endothelial cells, BA increased β1-integrin-Arg-Gly-Asp-peptide affinity by 18% with a transition from single to double valency, consistent with a doubling of the molecular brightness of mCherry-tagged β1-integrins measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Accordingly, BA caused an increase in the size of focal-adhesion-kinase/paxillin-positive peripheral adhesions and reduced migration speeds as measured using wound-healing assays. Vitamin E, which thickens Lo domains and disperses them by lowering edge energy on domain boundaries, left integrin affinity unchanged but reduced binding probability, leading to smaller focal adhesions and equivalent migration speed relative to untreated cells. Vitamin E reversed the BA-induced decrease in migration speed. Triton X-100 also thickens Lo domains, but partitions to both lipid phases and left unchanged binding kinetics, focal adhesion sizes, and migration speed. These results demonstrate that only the amphiphile that thinned Ld lipid domains increased β1-integrin-Arg-Gly-Asp-peptide affinity and valency, thus implicating Ld domains in modulation of integrin adhesion

  3. Ancient origin of the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling machinery.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Roger, Andrew J; Lang, Franz B; King, Nicole; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-06-01

    The evolution of animals (metazoans) from their unicellular ancestors required the emergence of novel mechanisms for cell adhesion and cell-cell communication. One of the most important cell adhesion mechanisms for metazoan development is integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling. The integrin adhesion complex mediates critical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix, modulating several aspects of cell physiology. To date this machinery has been considered strictly metazoan specific. Here we report the results of a comparative genomic analysis of the integrin adhesion machinery, using genomic data from several unicellular relatives of Metazoa and Fungi. Unexpectedly, we found that core components of the integrin adhesion complex are encoded in the genome of the apusozoan protist Amastigomonas sp., and therefore their origins predate the divergence of Opisthokonta, the clade that includes metazoans and fungi. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that key components of this apparatus have been lost independently in fungi and choanoflagellates. Our data highlight the fact that many of the key genes that had formerly been cited as crucial for metazoan origins have a much earlier origin. This underscores the importance of gene cooption in the unicellular-to-multicellular transition that led to the emergence of the Metazoa.

  4. Ancient origin of the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling machinery

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Roger, Andrew J.; Lang, Franz B.; King, Nicole; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of animals (metazoans) from their unicellular ancestors required the emergence of novel mechanisms for cell adhesion and cell–cell communication. One of the most important cell adhesion mechanisms for metazoan development is integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling. The integrin adhesion complex mediates critical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix, modulating several aspects of cell physiology. To date this machinery has been considered strictly metazoan specific. Here we report the results of a comparative genomic analysis of the integrin adhesion machinery, using genomic data from several unicellular relatives of Metazoa and Fungi. Unexpectedly, we found that core components of the integrin adhesion complex are encoded in the genome of the apusozoan protist Amastigomonas sp., and therefore their origins predate the divergence of Opisthokonta, the clade that includes metazoans and fungi. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that key components of this apparatus have been lost independently in fungi and choanoflagellates. Our data highlight the fact that many of the key genes that had formerly been cited as crucial for metazoan origins have a much earlier origin. This underscores the importance of gene cooption in the unicellular-to-multicellular transition that led to the emergence of the Metazoa. PMID:20479219

  5. Localized, positive charge mediates adhesion of rhodosporidium toruloides to barley leaves and polystyrene

    PubMed

    Buck; Andrews

    1999-05-01

    The physicochemical forces that mediate attachment of yeasts to the phylloplane are unknown. Cell surface charge and hydrophobicity and adhesion to polystyrene, glass, and barley were assessed for wild-type Rhodosporidium toruloides and attachment-minus (Att-) mutants. Cells were grown under conditions promoting (excess carbon) or not promoting (excess nitrogen) capsule production. Hydrophobicity was measured by adhesion to xylenes, and surface charge characteristics were assessed by attachment to either DEAE (positive)- or carboxymethyl (CM) (negative)-Sephadex ion-exchange beads. Hydrophobicity and adhesiveness of nonencapsulated, wild-type R. toruloides decreased from mid-log to late stationary phase. Encapsulated wild-type R. toruloides cells were more hydrophobic and more adhesive than nonencapsulated cells. However, two encapsulated Att- mutants were more hydrophobic than the wild type and levels of adhesion of R. toruloides were similar on polystyrene and less hydrophobic glass surfaces. Adhesion of wild-type yeast to barley and polystyrene was correlated with attachment to CM-Sephadex beads, indicating a positive cell surface charge. Sixteen Att- mutants did not exhibit a positive cell surface charge, and wild-type yeast cells that did not attach to CM-Sephadex did not adhere to either polystyrene or barley. Wild-type R. toruloides attached to CM-Sephadex beads by the poles of the cells, indicating a localization of positive charge which was also visualized with India ink. We conclude that localized, positive charge, and not hydrophobic interactions, mediates attachment of R. toruloides to barley leaves.

  6. Localized, Positive Charge Mediates Adhesion of Rhodosporidium toruloides to Barley Leaves and Polystyrene

    PubMed Central

    Buck, James W.; Andrews, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The physicochemical forces that mediate attachment of yeasts to the phylloplane are unknown. Cell surface charge and hydrophobicity and adhesion to polystyrene, glass, and barley were assessed for wild-type Rhodosporidium toruloides and attachment-minus (Att−) mutants. Cells were grown under conditions promoting (excess carbon) or not promoting (excess nitrogen) capsule production. Hydrophobicity was measured by adhesion to xylenes, and surface charge characteristics were assessed by attachment to either DEAE (positive)- or carboxymethyl (CM) (negative)-Sephadex ion-exchange beads. Hydrophobicity and adhesiveness of nonencapsulated, wild-type R. toruloides decreased from mid-log to late stationary phase. Encapsulated wild-type R. toruloides cells were more hydrophobic and more adhesive than nonencapsulated cells. However, two encapsulated Att− mutants were more hydrophobic than the wild type and levels of adhesion of R. toruloides were similar on polystyrene and less hydrophobic glass surfaces. Adhesion of wild-type yeast to barley and polystyrene was correlated with attachment to CM-Sephadex beads, indicating a positive cell surface charge. Sixteen Att− mutants did not exhibit a positive cell surface charge, and wild-type yeast cells that did not attach to CM-Sephadex did not adhere to either polystyrene or barley. Wild-type R. toruloides attached to CM-Sephadex beads by the poles of the cells, indicating a localization of positive charge which was also visualized with India ink. We conclude that localized, positive charge, and not hydrophobic interactions, mediates attachment of R. toruloides to barley leaves. PMID:10224017

  7. Calcium-Mediated Adhesion of Nanomaterials in Reservoir Fluids.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Shannon L; Burnham, Nancy A

    2017-09-14

    Globally, a small percentage of oil is recovered from reservoirs using primary and secondary recovery mechanisms, and thus a major focus of the oil industry is toward developing new technologies to increase recovery. Many new technologies utilize surfactants, macromolecules, and even nanoparticles, which are difficult to deploy in harsh reservoir conditions and where failures cause material aggregation and sticking to rock surfaces. To combat these issues, typically material properties are adjusted, but recent studies show that adjusting the dispersing fluid chemistry could have significant impact on material survivability. Herein, the effect of injection fluid salinity and composition on nanomaterial fate is explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the calcium content in reservoir fluids affects the interactions of an AFM tip with a calcite surface, as surrogates for nanomaterials interacting with carbonate reservoir rock. The extreme force sensitivity of AFM provides the ability to elucidate small differences in adhesion at the pico-Newton (pN) level and provides direct information about material survivability. Increasing the calcium content mitigates adhesion at the pN-scale, a possible means to increase nanomaterial survivability in oil reservoirs or to control nanomaterial fate in other aqueous environments.

  8. Transglutaminase-mediated oligomerization promotes osteoblast adhesive properties of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Forsprecher, Jennifer; Wang, Zhemeng; Goldberg, Harvey A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a widely distributed, protein-crosslinking enzyme having a prominent role in cell adhesion as a β1 integrin co-receptor for fibronectin. In bone and teeth, its substrates include the matricellular proteins osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP). The aim of this study was to examine effects of TG2-mediated crosslinking and oligomerization of OPN and BSP on osteoblast cell adhesion. We show that surfaces coated with oligomerized OPN and BSP promote MC3T3-E1/C4 osteoblastic cell adhesion significantly better than surfaces coated with the monomeric form of the proteins. Both OPN and BSP oligomer-adherent cells showed more cytoplasmic extensions than those cells grown on the monomer-coated surfaces indicative of increased cell connectivity. Our study suggests a role for TG2 in promoting the cell adhesion function of two matricellular substrate proteins prominent in bone, tooth cementum and certain tumors. PMID:20864802

  9. Evidence for cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schmidmaier, R; Mörsdorf, K; Baumann, P; Emmerich, B; Meinhardt, G

    2006-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease and patients eventually die of disease progression due to drug resistance. VLA-4 (very late antigen 4), VCAM (vascular adhesion molecule), LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen 1), and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1)-mediated adhesion of myeloma cells to bone marrow stromal cells induces primary multidrug resistance in vitro. Based on these preclinical data we hypothesized that myeloma cells with strong adhesion - due to strong expression of adhesion molecules on the cell surface - are selected by chemotherapy in patients. To prove this hypothesis we determined the expression levels of adhesion molecules in 31 multiple myeloma patients by flow cytometry. A 3-color stain with CD38, CD138 and antibodies against VLA-4, ICAM-1, LFA-1, and VCAM was performed. The patients were either at diagnosis (chemo-naive; n=17) or at relapse (pre-treated; n=15). Furthermore, the response to the next chemotherapy of chemo-naive patients was correlated with the expression levels of adhesion molecules. ICAM-1, VLA-4, and VCAM expression was higher in pre-treated patients than in chemo-naive patients and the expression levels increased with the number of chemotherapy regimens. Primarily multidrug-resistant patients had significantly higher expression levels of VLA-4 and ICAM-1 than responders. This study suggests that multiple myeloma cells expressing high levels of VLA-4 and ICAM-1 are drug resistant and that such a subpopulation of cells is selected by chemotherapy.

  10. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion.

  11. Curli mediate bacterial adhesion to fibronectin via tensile multiple bonds

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Gruber, Hermann J.; Cui, Yidan; Traxler, Lukas; Siligan, Christine; Park, Sungsu; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many enteric bacteria including pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains produce curli fibers that bind to host surfaces, leading to bacterial internalization into host cells. By using a nanomechanical force-sensing approach, we obtained real-time information about the distribution of molecular bonds involved in the adhesion of curliated bacteria to fibronectin. We found that curliated E. coli and fibronectin formed dense quantized and multiple specific bonds with high tensile strength, resulting in tight bacterial binding. Nanomechanical recognition measurements revealed that approximately 10 bonds were disrupted either sequentially or simultaneously under force load. Thus the curli formation of bacterial surfaces leads to multi-bond structural components of fibrous nature, which may explain the strong mechanical binding of curliated bacteria to host cells and unveil the functions of these proteins in bacterial internalization and invasion. PMID:27652888

  12. Prostaglandins produced during class A scavenger receptor-mediated macrophage adhesion differentially regulate cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Dejan M; Vadali, Shanthi; He, Beixiang; Ware, Jerry; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation is associated with modification of the extracellular environment, changes in cytokine expression, and the accumulation of immune cells. Such modifications create ligands that support SR-A-mediated macrophage adhesion and retention. This may be particularly important in settings, such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, as modified lipoproteins and gluc-collagen are ligands for SR-A. SR-A-mediated adhesion requires the PLA2-dependent generation of AA and its metabolism by 12/15 LOX. In contrast, the inhibition of the COX-dependent conversion of AA to PG had no effect on SR-A-mediated adhesion. In this study, macrophages were isolated from SR-A(+/+) and SR-A(-/-) mice and plated on gluc-collagen to test the hypothesis that COX-derived PGs are produced during SR-A-mediated adhesion and regulate macrophage function. SR-A-mediated binding to gluc-collagen induced a rapid but transient increase in PG production, which required the activation of PLA2 and Src kinase but not PI3K. SR-A(+/+) macrophages cultured on gluc-collagen for 24 h secreted a similar amount of TNF-α and 2.5-fold more IL-10 than SR-A(-/-) macrophages. The inhibition of COX substantially increased TNF-α production but reduced IL-10 levels in SR-A(+/+) macrophages. These effects of COX inhibition were reversed by exogenous PGE2 and mimicked by specific antagonism of the EP4 receptor. Thus, in addition to the enhancement of macrophage adhesion, SR-A binding to gluc-collagen stimulates PG production, which in turn, differentially regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 mediates murine colon adenocarcinoma invasion.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kenton; Lo, Karen K; Ao, Lihua; Gamboni, Fabia; Edil, Barish H; Schulick, Richard; Barnett, Carlton C

    2014-03-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) modulates cell-cell adhesion and is a receptor for cognate ligands on leukocytes. Upregulation of ICAM-1 has been demonstrated in malignant transformation of adenomas and is associated with poor prognosis for many malignancies. ICAM-1 is upregulated on the invasive front of pancreatic metastases and melanomas. These data suggest that the upregulated ICAM-1 expression promotes malignant progression. We hypothesize that the downregulation of ICAM-1 will mitigate tumor progression. Mouse colon adenocarcinoma cells (MC38) were evaluated for the expression of ICAM-1 using Western immunoblot analysis. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) transduction was used to downregulate ICAM-1. Tumor invasion determined via a modified Boyden chamber was used as a surrogate of tumor progression examining MC38 cells, MC38 ICAM-1 knockdowns, and MC38 transduced with vehicle control. The cells were cultured in full media for 24 h and serum-starved for 24 h. A total of 5 × 10(4) cells were plated and allowed to migrate for 24 h using full media with 10% fetal bovine serum as a chemoattractant. Inserts were fixed and stained with crystal violet. Blinded investigators counted the cells using a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance with Fischer protected least significant difference and a P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on MC38 cells. Transduction with anti-ICAM-1 shRNA vector downregulated ICAM-1 protein expression by 30% according to the Western blot analysis (P < 0.03) and decreased ICAM-1 messenger RNA expression by 70% according to the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. shRNA knockdown cells had a significant reduction in invasion >45% (P < 0.03). There were no significant differences between the invasion rates of MC38 and MC38 vehicle controls. Downregulation of ICAM-1 mitigates MC38 invasion. These data suggest that targeted

  14. The endothelial glycocalyx as a barrier to leukocyte adhesion and its mediation by extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, Herbert H

    2012-04-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) surface is coated with a layer of polysaccharides linked to membrane-bound and trans-membrane proteoglycans that comprise the glycocalyx, which is augmented by adsorbed proteins derived from the blood stream. This surface layer has been shown to affect hemodynamics in small blood vessels of the microcirculation, the resistance to flow, and leukocyte (WBC) to EC adhesion. Parallel studies of WBC-EC adhesion in response to chemoattractants and cytokines, and shedding of constituents of the glycocalyx, have suggested a role for activation of extracellular proteases in mediating the dynamics of WBC adhesion in response to inflammatory and ischemic stimuli. Likely candidates among the many proteases present are the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Inhibition of MMP activation with sub-antimicrobial doses of doxycycline, or zinc chelators, has also inhibited WBC adhesion and shedding of glycans from the EC surface in response to the chemoattractant fMLP. Taken together, these studies suggest that shedding of the EC glycocalyx exposes adhesion receptors and thus enhances WBC-EC adhesion. Future therapeutic strategies for treating pathologies such as the low flow state and inflammation may benefit by further exploration of the mechanics of the glycocalyx in light of protease activation and shear-dependent effects.

  15. PAF mediates neutrophil adhesion to thrombin or TNF-stimulated endothelial cells under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Macconi, D; Foppolo, M; Paris, S; Noris, M; Aiello, S; Remuzzi, G; Remuzzi, A

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to modulate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion to endothelial cells cultured under static conditions and activated by thrombin. In contrast, there are no data on the role of PAF in PMN adhesion to cells exposed to flow conditions and activated by stimuli other than thrombin. Here we used the PAF receptor antagonist L-659,989 to evaluate PMN adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in basal conditions or upon challenge with thrombin or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Experiments were performed under dynamic flow using a parallel-plate flow chamber and a computer-based image analysis system. Rolling and adhesion of PMNs to endothelial cells significantly increased upon stimulation with thrombin. Thrombin-stimulated HUVEC also synthesized higher amounts of PAF than untreated cells. Pretreatment of PMNs with L-659,989 significantly reduced their rolling and adhesion to thrombin-activated HUVEC. Stimulation of HUVEC with TNF-alpha significantly increased the number of rolling and adherent PMNs as compared with untreated cells. Adhesion of PMNs to and migration across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC were reduced by L-659,989, whereas cell rolling was unchanged. We conclude that PAF mediates leukocyte interaction under flow conditions with HUVEC activated by inflammatory stimuli.

  16. Bicalutamide inhibits androgen-mediated adhesion of prostate cancer cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Alavian, Michael R.; Goel, Hira Lal; Languino, Lucia R.; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cell adhesion plays an important role in proliferation, metastasis, and tumor growth and may represent a potential vulnerability in treatment of prostate cancer patients. Bicalutamide (Casodex) has been used as an anti-androgen agent for prostate cancer patients during hormone ablation therapy. This study focuses on the effect of Bicalutamide on cell adhesion to fibronectin in prostate cancer cells. Methods LNCaP prostate cancer cells were stimulated with androgen before being irradiated with doses of 0, 5, 10 or 15 Gy. Cell adhesion to fibronectin was then measured to ascertain androgen's role in integrin mediated prostate cancer cell adhesion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze surface expression of integrin subtypes in LNCaP cells upon androgen stimulation and 15 Gy ionizing radiation. Results LNCaP cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) was significantly increased by stimulation with androgen when treated with 10 or 15 Gy ionizing radiations but not at 0 or 5 Gy. This increase was inhibited by treatment with Bicalutamide. LNCaP cells exposed to high dose radiation showed an increased expression of αV and β1 integrins in response to androgen treatment while Bicalutamide abolished this effect. Conclusions Our data show that Bicalutamide inhibits the effect of androgen on cell adhesion to FN through changes of integrin subtypes in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells given high dose radiation. This suggests new molecular targets and possible treatment strategies for prostate cancer patients to improve the outcome during hormone ablation therapy and radiation therapy. PMID:18729104

  17. Pili mediate specific adhesion of Streptococcus pyogenes to human tonsil and skin.

    PubMed

    Abbot, Emily L; Smith, Wendy D; Siou, Gerard P S; Chiriboga, Carlos; Smith, Rebecca J; Wilson, Janet A; Hirst, Barry H; Kehoe, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    Very little is known about the biological functions of pili that have recently been found to be expressed by important Gram-positive pathogens such as Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Streptococcus agalacticae, S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. Using various ex vivo tissue and cellular models, here we show that pili mediate adhesion of serotype M1 S. pyogenes strain SF370 to both human tonsil epithelium and primary human keratinocytes, which represent the two main sites of infection by this human-specific pathogen. Mutants lacking minor pilus subunits retained the ability to express cell-surface pili, but these were functionally defective. In contrast to above, pili were not required for S. pyogenes adhesion to either immortalized HEp-2 or A549 cells, highlighting an important limitation of these extensively used adhesion/invasion models. Adhering bacteria were internalized very effectively by both HEp-2 and A549 cells, but not by tonsil epithelium or primary keratinocytes. While pili acted as the primary adhesin, the surface M1 protein clearly enhanced adhesion to tonsil, but surprisingly, had the opposite effect on adhesion to keratinocytes. These studies provide clear evidence that S. pyogenes pili display an adhesive specificity for clinically relevant human tissues and are likely to play a critical role in the initial stages of infection.

  18. Monocyte adhesion to endothelium in simian immunodeficiency virus-induced AIDS encephalitis is mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, V. G.; Newman, W.; Brodie, S. J.; Hesterberg, P.; Pauley, D.; Ringler, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because the mechanisms associated with recruitment of monocytes to brain in AIDS encephalitis are unknown, we used tissues from rhesus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to examine the relative contributions of various adhesion pathways in mediating monocyte adhesion to endothelium from encephalitic brain. Using a modified Stamper and Woodruff tissue adhesion assay, we found that the human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and the B cell line, Ramos, preferentially bound to brain vessels from monkeys with AIDS encephalitis. Using a combined tissue adhesion/immunohistochemistry approach, these cells only bound to vessels expressing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Furthermore, pretreatment of tissues with antibodies to VCAM-1 or cell lines with antibodies to VLA-4 (CD49d) inhibited adhesion by more than 70%. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/beta 2 integrin interactions were not significant in mediating cell adhesion to the vasculature in encephalitic simian brain using a cell line (JY) capable of binding rhesus monkey ICAM-1. In addition, selectin-mediated interactions did not significantly contribute to cell binding to encephalitic brain as there was no immunohistochemical expression of E-selectin and P-selectin in either normal or encephalitic brain, nor was there a demonstrable adhesive effect from L-selectin using L-selectin-transfected 300.19 cells on simian encephalitic brain. These results demonstrate that using the tissue adhesion assay, THP-1, U937, and Ramos cells bind to vessels in brain from animals with AIDS encephalitis using VCAM-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions and suggest that VCAM-1 and VLA-4 may be integral for monocyte recruitment to the central nervous system during the development of AIDS encephalitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7507300

  19. P-Selectin Activates Integrin-mediated Colon Carcinoma Cell Adhesion to Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Reyes, E. Merit; George, Margaret D.; Roberts, John D.; Akiyama, Steven K.

    2006-01-01

    During hematogenous cancer metastasis, tumor cells separate from a primary mass, enter the bloodstream, disperse throughout the body, migrate across vessel walls, and generate distant colonies. The later steps of metastasis superficially resemble leukocyte extravasation, a process initiated by selectin-mediated cell tethering to the blood vessel wall followed by integrin-mediated arrest and transendothelial migration. Some cancer cells express P-selectin ligands and attach to immobilized Pselectin, suggesting that these cells can arrest in blood vessels using sequential selectin- and integrin-mediated adhesion, as do leukocytes. We hypothesize that selectin binding may regulate subsequent integrin-mediated steps in metastasis. Using a model system of cultured Colo 320 human colon adenocarcinoma cells incubated with soluble P-selectin-IgG chimeric protein, we have found that P-selectin can stimulate activation of the α5β1 integrin resulting in a specific increase of adhesion and spreading of these cells on fibronectin substrates. P-selectin binding also induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). PI3-K inhibitors blocked P-selectin-mediated integrin activation, cell attachment, and cell spreading. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activation blocked cell spreading, but not cell attachment. P-Selectin binding also resulted in formation of a signaling complex containing PI3-K and p38 MAPK. These results suggest that P-selectin binding to tumor cells can activate α5β1 integrin via PI3-K and p38 MAPK signaling pathways leading to increased cell adhesion. We propose that P-selectin ligands are important tumor cell signaling molecules that modulate integrin-mediated cell adhesion in the metastatic process. PMID:17056038

  20. Regulation of cell motile behavior by crosstalk between cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Nicolas; Lowndes, Molly; Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Gardel, Margaret L.; Nelson, W. James

    2010-01-01

    During normal development and in disease, cohesive tissues undergo rearrangements that require integration of signals from cell adhesions to neighboring cells and to the extracellular matrix (ECM). How a range of cell behaviors is coordinated by these different adhesion complexes is unknown. To analyze epithelial cell motile behavior in response to combinations of cell–ECM and cell–cell adhesion cues, we took a reductionist approach at the single-cell scale by using unique, functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating stripes of ECM (collagenIV) and adjustable amounts of E-cadherin-Fc (EcadFc). On these surfaces, individual cells spatially segregated integrin- and cadherin-based complexes between collagenIV and EcadFc surfaces, respectively. Cell migration required collagenIV and did not occur on surfaces functionalized with only EcadFc. However, E-cadherin adhesion dampened lamellipodia activity on both collagenIV and EcadFc surfaces and biased the direction of cell migration without affecting the migration rate, all in an EcadFc concentration-dependent manner. Traction force microscopy showed that spatial confinement of integrin-based adhesions to collagenIV stripes induced anisotropic cell traction on collagenIV and migration directional bias. Selective depletion of different pools of αE-catenin, an E-cadherin and actin binding protein, identified a membrane-associated pool required for E-cadherin–mediated adhesion and down-regulation of lamellipodia activity and a cytosolic pool that down-regulated the migration rate in an E-cadherin adhesion-independent manner. These results demonstrate that there is crosstalk between E-cadherin– and integrin-based adhesion complexes and that E-cadherin regulates lamellipodia activity and cell migration directionality, but not cell migration rate. PMID:20566866

  1. Regulation of cell motile behavior by crosstalk between cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesions.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Nicolas; Lowndes, Molly; Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Gardel, Margaret L; Nelson, W James

    2010-07-27

    During normal development and in disease, cohesive tissues undergo rearrangements that require integration of signals from cell adhesions to neighboring cells and to the extracellular matrix (ECM). How a range of cell behaviors is coordinated by these different adhesion complexes is unknown. To analyze epithelial cell motile behavior in response to combinations of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion cues, we took a reductionist approach at the single-cell scale by using unique, functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating stripes of ECM (collagenIV) and adjustable amounts of E-cadherin-Fc (EcadFc). On these surfaces, individual cells spatially segregated integrin- and cadherin-based complexes between collagenIV and EcadFc surfaces, respectively. Cell migration required collagenIV and did not occur on surfaces functionalized with only EcadFc. However, E-cadherin adhesion dampened lamellipodia activity on both collagenIV and EcadFc surfaces and biased the direction of cell migration without affecting the migration rate, all in an EcadFc concentration-dependent manner. Traction force microscopy showed that spatial confinement of integrin-based adhesions to collagenIV stripes induced anisotropic cell traction on collagenIV and migration directional bias. Selective depletion of different pools of alphaE-catenin, an E-cadherin and actin binding protein, identified a membrane-associated pool required for E-cadherin-mediated adhesion and down-regulation of lamellipodia activity and a cytosolic pool that down-regulated the migration rate in an E-cadherin adhesion-independent manner. These results demonstrate that there is crosstalk between E-cadherin- and integrin-based adhesion complexes and that E-cadherin regulates lamellipodia activity and cell migration directionality, but not cell migration rate.

  2. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is critical for the closing of the mouse optic fissure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewis, Brandy; Moran, Andrea; Xie, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Coloboma is a congenital disease that contributes significantly to childhood blindness. It results from the failure in closing the optic fissure, a transient opening on the ventral side of the developing eye. Although human and mouse genetic studies have identified a number of genes associated with coloboma, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying the optic fissure closure and coloboma formation remain largely undefined. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion has been shown to be important for the optic fissure closure in zebrafish, but it remains to be determined experimentally how cell-cell adhesions are involved in the mammalian optic fissure closing process. α-Catenin is required for cell adhesion mediated by all of the classic cadherin molecules, including N-cadherin. In this study, we used the Cre-mediated conditional knockout technique to specifically delete α-catenin from the developing mouse eye to show that it is required for the successful closing of the optic fissure. In α-catenin conditional mutant optic cups, the major cell fates, including the optic fissure margin, neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, are specified normally, and the retinal progenitor cells proliferate normally. However, adherens junctions components, including N-cadherin, β-catenin and filamentous actin, fail to accumulate on the apical side of α-catenin mutant retinal progenitor cells, where adherens junctions are normally abundant, and the organization of the neural retina and the optic fissure margin is disrupted. Finally, the α-catenin mutant retina gradually degenerates in the adult mouse eye. Therefore, our results show that α-catenin-mediated cell adhesion and cell organization are important for the fissure closure in mice, and further suggest that genes that regulate cell adhesion may underlie certain coloboma cases in humans.

  3. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  4. Temporal changes in integrin-mediated cardiomyocyte adhesion secondary to chronic cardiac volume overload in rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James A.; Gardner, Jason D.; Brower, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have established integrins as cell surface receptors that mediate cardiomyocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachments. This study sought to determine the contributions of the myocardial β1- and β3-integrin subunits to ventricular dilatation and coronary flow regulation using a blood-perfused isolated heart preparation. Furthermore, cardiomyocyte adhesion to collagen types I and IV, fibronectin, and laminin with and without a β1-integrin subunit neutralizing antibody was assessed during the course of remodeling secondary to a sustained cardiac volume overload, including the onset of heart failure. Isolated cardiomyocytes were obtained during the initial, compensated, and decompensated phases of remodeling resulting from an aortocaval fistula created in 8-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blocking the β1-integrin subunit in isolated normal hearts produced ventricular dilatation, whereas this was not the case when the β3-subunit was blocked. Substantial reductions in cardiomyocyte adhesion coincided with the previously documented development of ventricular dilatation and decreased contractility postfistula, with the β1-integrin contribution to adhesion ranging from 28% to 73% over the course of remodeling being essentially substrate independent. In contrast, both integrin subunits were found to be involved in regulating coronary vascular resistance. It is concluded that marked reductions in integrin-mediated cardiomyocyte adhesion to the ECM play a significant role in the progression of adverse myocardial remodeling that leads to heart failure. Furthermore, although both the β1- and β3-integrin subunits were involved in regulating coronary vascular resistance, only inhibition of β1-integrin-mediated adhesion resulted in ventricular dilatation of the normal heart. PMID:24163072

  5. Aurora kinase A mediates epithelial ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Do, T-V; Xiao, F; Bickel, L E; Klein-Szanto, A J; Pathak, H B; Hua, X; Howe, C; O'Brien, S W; Maglaty, M; Ecsedy, J A; Litwin, S; Golemis, E A; Schilder, R J; Godwin, A K; Connolly, D C

    2014-01-30

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) localizes to centrosomes and mitotic spindles where it mediates mitotic progression and chromosomal stability. Overexpression of AURKA is common in cancer, resulting in acquisition of alternate non-mitotic functions. In the current study, we identified a novel role for AURKA in regulating ovarian cancer cell dissemination and evaluated the efficacy of an AURKA-selective small molecule inhibitor, alisertib (MLN8237), as a single agent and combined with paclitaxel using an orthotopic xenograft model of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of AURKA inhibition and overexpression on migration and adhesion. Pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of AURKA significantly reduced ovarian carcinoma cell migration and adhesion and the activation-associated phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal regulatory protein SRC at tyrosine 416 (pSRC(Y416)). Conversely, enforced expression of AURKA resulted in increased migration, adhesion and activation of SRC in cultured cells. In vivo tumor growth and dissemination were inhibited by alisertib treatment as a single agent. Moreover, combination of alisertib with paclitaxel, an agent commonly used in treatment of EOC, resulted in more potent inhibition of tumor growth and dissemination compared with either drug alone. Taken together, these findings support a role for AURKA in EOC dissemination by regulating migration and adhesion. They also point to the potential utility of combining AURKA inhibitors with taxanes as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of EOC patients.

  6. L1 increases adhesion-mediated proliferation and chemoresistance of retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Jun, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Young-Lai; Yu, Young Suk; Min, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular cancer in children, affecting 1/20,000 live births. Currently, children with retinoblastoma were treated with chemotherapy using drugs such as carboplatin, vincristine, and etoposide. Unfortunately, if conventional treatment fails, the affected eyes should be removed to prevent extension into adjacent tissues and metastasis. This study is to investigate the roles of L1 in adhesion-mediated proliferation and chemoresistance of retinoblastoma. L1 was differentially expressed in 30 retinoblastoma tissues and 2 retinoblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, the proportions of L1-positive cells in retinoblastoma tumors were negatively linked with the number of Flexner-Wintersteiner rosettes, a characteristic of differentiated retinoblastoma tumors, in each tumor sample. Following in vitro experiments using L1-deleted and -overexpressing cells showed that L1 increased adhesion-mediated proliferation of retinoblastoma cells via regulation of cell cycle-associated proteins with modulation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 pathways. In addition, L1 increased resistance against carboplatin, vincristine, and esoposide through up-regulation of apoptosis- and multidrug resistance-related genes. In vivo tumor formation and chemoresistance were also positively linked with the levels of L1 in an orthotopic transplantation model in mice. In this manner, L1 increases adhesion-mediated proliferation and chemoresistance of retinoblastoma. Targeted therapy to L1 might be effective in the treatment of retinoblastoma tumors, especially which rapidly proliferate and demonstrate resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:28061460

  7. Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Patrick C; Patel, Kevin M; Gomez, Timothy M

    2017-02-08

    Guidance of axons to their proper synaptic target sites requires spatially and temporally precise modulation of biochemical signals within growth cones. Ionic calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential signal for axon guidance that mediates opposing effects on growth cone motility. The diverse effects of Ca(2+) arise from the precise localization of Ca(2+) signals into microdomains containing specific Ca(2+) effectors. For example, differences in the mechanical and chemical composition of the underlying substrata elicit local Ca(2+) signals within growth cone filopodia that regulate axon guidance through activation of the protease calpain. However, how calpain regulates growth cone motility remains unclear. Here, we identify the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as proteolytic targets of calpain in Xenopus laevis spinal cord neurons both in vivo and in vitro Inhibition of calpain increases the localization of endogenous adhesion signaling to growth cone filopodia. Using live cell microscopy and specific calpain-resistant point-mutants of talin (L432G) and FAK (V744G), we find that calpain inhibits paxillin-based adhesion assembly through cleavage of talin and FAK, and adhesion disassembly through cleavage of FAK. Blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK inhibits repulsive turning from focal uncaging of Ca(2+) within filopodia. In addition, blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK in vivo promotes Rohon-Beard peripheral axon extension into the skin. These data demonstrate that filopodial Ca(2+) signals regulate axon outgrowth and guidance through calpain regulation of adhesion dynamics through specific cleavage of talin and FAK.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The proper formation of neuronal networks requires accurate guidance of axons and dendrites during development by motile structures known as growth cones. Understanding the intracellular signaling mechanisms that govern growth cone motility will clarify how the nervous system develops and regenerates

  8. TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role in monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is known to mediate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, however, its role on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR4 on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules, and determined the functional role of TLR4-induced adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. When THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with Kdo2-Lipid A (KLA), a specific TLR4 agonist, Mac-1 expression was markedly increased in association with an increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These were attenuated by anti-Mac-1 antibody, suggesting a functional role of TLR4-induced Mac-1 on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In monocytes treated with MK886, a 5-lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, both Mac-1 expression and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by KLA were markedly attenuated. Moreover, KLA increased the expression of mRNA and protein of 5-LO, suggesting a pivotal role of 5-LO on these processes. In in vivo studies, KLA increased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelium of wild-type (WT) mice, which was attenuated in WT mice treated with anti-Mac-1 antibody as well as in TLR4-deficient mice. Taken together, TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, leading to increased foam cell formation in the development of atherosclerosis.

  9. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  10. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa’s notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus to investigate the adhesion of Mfp3 (mussel foot protein 3) slow, a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow like Mfp3 fast adhesion to mica is directly proportional to the mol% of Dopa present in the protein. At pH 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (Ead = −3 mJ/m2). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH-independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives. PMID:23214725

  11. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2013-01-09

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa's notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a surface forces apparatus to investigate the adhesion of mussel foot protein 3 (Mfp3) "slow", a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow, like Mfp3 "fast" adhesion to mica, is directly proportional to the mol % of Dopa present in the protein. At pH of 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH of 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (E(ad) = -3 mJ/m(2)). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives.

  13. ILK mediates LPS-induced vascular adhesion receptor expression and subsequent leucocyte trans-endothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, Sonsoles; López-Fontal, Raquel; Través, Paqui G; Villa, Natividad; Grashoff, Carsten; Boscá, Lisardo; Luque, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    The inflammatory response to injurious agents is tightly regulated to avoid adverse consequences of inappropriate leucocyte accumulation or failed resolution. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated endothelium recruits leucocytes to the inflamed tissue through controlled expression of membrane-associated adhesion molecules. LPS responses in macrophages are known to be regulated by integrin-linked kinase (ILK); in this study, we investigated the role of ILK in the regulation of the LPS-elicited inflammatory response in endothelium. This study was performed on immortalized mouse endothelial cells (EC) isolated from lung and coronary vasculature. Cells were thoroughly characterized and the role of ILK in the regulation of the LPS response was investigated by suppressing ILK expression using siRNA and shRNA technologies. Phenotypic and functional analyses confirmed that the immortalized cells behaved as true EC. LPS induced the expression of the inflammatory genes E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). ILK knockdown impaired LPS-mediated endothelial activation by preventing the induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Blockade of the LPS-induced response inhibited the inflammatory-related processes of firm adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of leucocytes. ILK is involved in the expression of cell adhesion molecules by EC activated with the inflammatory stimulus LPS. This reduced expression modulates leucocyte adhesion to the endothelium and the extravasation process. This finding suggests ILK as a potential anti-inflammatory target for the development of vascular-specific treatments for inflammation-related diseases.

  14. Cis and Trans Cooperativity of E-Cadherin Mediates Adhesion in Biomimetic Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Jorjadze, Ivane; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of cell-cell adhesion is important in cell motility, tissue growth, and for the mechanical integrity of tissues. Although the role of active cytoskeleton dynamics in regulating cadherin interactions is crucial in vivo, here we present a biomimetic emulsion system to characterize the passive E-cadherin-mediated adhesion between droplets. The visualization of a three-dimensional assembly of lipid droplets, functionalized with extracellular E-cadherin domains, reveals a hierarchy of homophilic interactions. First, the high interfacial tension of droplets facilitates trans cadherin-cadherin adhesion, which is strong enough to stabilize looser than random close packing configurations. Second, fluorescence enhancement shows that adding clustering agents, such as calcium or chelating ligands, favor the lateral cis adhesion of the already bound cadherin pairs over the clustering of monomer cadherin on the surface. Finally, above a threshold cadherin and calcium concentration, the cis and trans protein interactions become strong enough to trigger and promote droplet fusion. While E-cadherin is not known to participate in cellular fusion, this mechanism is general because replacing calcium with cholesterol to cluster the cadherin-carrying lipids also promotes fusion. These results suggest that passive clustering, via calcium-induced dimerization or membrane ordering, may contribute to the reinforcement of cell-cell contacts. Alternatively, a molecular switch for fusion offers a route to mixing droplet contents and controlling their size in situ. PMID:26789762

  15. Structural basis for human PECAM-1-mediated trans-homophilic cell adhesion

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; ...

    2016-12-13

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgLmore » 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. As a result, cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication.« less

  16. Structural Basis for Human PECAM-1-Mediated Trans-homophilic Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; Hao, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgL 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. Cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication. PMID:27958302

  17. Keratins control intercellular adhesion involving PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Cornelia; Loschke, Fanny; Schwarz, Nicole; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell adhesion is crucial for epidermal morphogenesis and homeostasis and relies predominantly on the interaction of keratins with desmosomes. Although the importance of desmosomes to epidermal coherence and keratin organization is well established, the significance of keratins in desmosome organization has not been fully resolved. Here, we report that keratinocytes lacking all keratins show elevated, PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation and subsequent destabilization of desmosomes. We find that PKC-α activity is regulated by Rack1–keratin interaction. Without keratins, desmosomes assemble but are endocytosed at accelerated rates, rendering epithelial sheets highly susceptible to mechanical stress. Re-expression of the keratin pair K5/14, inhibition of PKC-α activity, or blocking of endocytosis reconstituted both desmosome localization at the plasma membrane and epithelial adhesion. Our findings identify a hitherto unknown mechanism by which keratins control intercellular adhesion, with potential implications for tumor invasion and keratinopathies, settings in which diminished cell adhesion facilitates tissue fragility and neoplastic growth. PMID:23690176

  18. Structural basis for human PECAM-1-mediated trans-homophilic cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Menglong; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Qun; Hao, Quan

    2016-12-13

    Cell adhesion involved in signal transduction, tissue integrity and pathogen infection is mainly mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAM). One CAM member, platelet–endothelial-cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), plays an important role in tight junction among endothelia cells, leukocyte trafficking, and immune response through its homophilic and heterophilic binding patterns. Both kinds of interactions, which lead to endogenous and exogenous signal transmission, are derived from extracellular immunoglobulin-like (IgL) domains and cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) of PECAM-1. To date, the mechanism of trans-homophilic interaction of PECAM-1 remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of PECAM-1 IgL1-2 trans-homo dimer. Both IgL 1 and 2 adopt the classical Ig domain conformation comprised of two layers of β-sheets possessing antiparallel β-strands with each being anchored by a pair of cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The dimer interface includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. The Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) envelope of PECAM-1 IgL1-6 supported such a dimer formation in solution. As a result, cell adhesion assays on wildtype and mutant PECAM-1 further characterized the structural determinants in cell junction and communication.

  19. Thrombomodulin-mediated cell adhesion: involvement of its lectin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Chun-Mei; Yang, Hsi-Yuan; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2003-11-21

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an integral membrane glycoprotein that is a potent anticoagulant factor. TM may also possess functions distinct from its anticoagulant activity. Here the influence of TM on cell adhesion was studied in TM-negative melanoma A2058 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein-tagged TM (TMG) or lectin domain-deleted TM (TMG(DeltaL)). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that both TMG and TMG(DeltaL) were distributed in the plasma membrane. TMG-expressed cells grew as closely clustered colonies, with TM localized prominently in the intercellular boundaries. TMG(DeltaL)-expressed cells grew singly. Overexpression of TMG, but not TMG(DeltaL), decreased monolayer permeability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. The cell-to-cell adhesion in TMG-expressed cells was Ca2+-dependent and was inhibited by monoclonal antibody against the lectin-like domain of TM. The effects of TM-mediated cell adhesion were abolished by the addition of mannose, chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin sulfate C. In addition, anti-lectin-like domain antibody disrupted the close clustering of the endogenous TM-expressed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line derived from normal human epidermis. Double-labeling immunofluorescence staining revealed similar distributions of TM and actin filament in the cortex region of the TMG-expressed cells. Thus, TM can function as a Ca2+-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Binding of specific carbohydrates to the lectin-like domain is essential for this specific function.

  20. A stochastic model for adhesion-mediated cell random motility and haptotaxis.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, R B; Tranquillo, R T

    1993-01-01

    The active migration of blood and tissue cells is important in a number of physiological processes including inflammation, wound healing, embryogenesis, and tumor cell metastasis. These cells move by transmitting cytoplasmic force through membrane receptors which are bound specifically to adhesion ligands in the surrounding substratum. Recently, much research has focused on the influence of the composition of extracellular matrix and the distribution of its components on the speed and direction of cell migration. It is commonly believed that the magnitude of the adhesion influences cell speed and/or random turning behavior, whereas a gradient of adhesion may bias the net direction of the cell movement, a phenomenon known as haptotaxis. The mechanisms underlying these responses are presently not understood. A stochastic model is presented to provide a mechanistic understanding of how the magnitude and distribution of adhesion ligands in the substratum influence cell movement. The receptor-mediated cell migration is modeled as an interrelation of random processes on distinct time scales. Adhesion receptors undergo rapid binding and transport, resulting in a stochastic spatial distribution of bound receptors fluctuating about some mean distribution. This results in a fluctuating spatio-temporal pattern of forces on the cell, which in turn affects the speed and turning behavior on a longer time scale. The model equations are a system of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDE's) which govern the time evolution of the spatial distribution of bound and free receptors, and the orientation and position of the cell. These SDE's are integrated numerically to simulate the behavior of the model cell on both a uniform substratum, and on a gradient of adhesion ligand concentration. Furthermore, analysis of the governing SDE system and corresponding Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) yields analytical expressions for indices which characterize cell movement on multiple time

  1. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J A

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell spreading on fibronectin but not on plastic. Cell adhesion on anti-integrin antibodies is also able to specifically induce PECAM-1 dephosphorylation while concurrently inducing pp125 focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Inhibition of dephosphorylation with sodium orthovanadate suggests that this effect is at least partially mediated by phosphatase activity. Tyr-663 and Tyr-686 are identified as potential phosphorylation sites and mutated to phenylalanine. When expressed, both mutants show reduced PECAM-1 phosphorylation but Phe-686 mutants also show significant reversal of PECAM-1-mediated inhibition of cell migration and do not localize PECAM-1 to cell borders. Our results suggest that beta 1-integrin engagement can signal to dephosphorylate PECAM-1 and that this signaling pathway may play a role during endothelial cell migration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8876219

  2. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  3. Type 1 Fimbria-Mediated Adhesion of Enteric Bacteria to Grass Roots

    PubMed Central

    Haahtela, Kielo; Tarkka, Eveliina; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1985-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter agglomerans mediated bacterial adhesion to the roots of bluegrass, Poa pratensis. Purified, radiolabeled fimbriae bound to grass roots in vitro; binding was inhibited by α-methyl-d-mannoside or Fab fragments to the fimbriae. Anti-type 1 fimbriae Fab fragments and α-methyl-d-mannoside also inhibited adhesion of type 1-fimbriated bacteria to P. pratensis roots. It is proposed that associative nitrogen fixation by Klebsiella and Enterobacter strains also involves type 1 fimbriae, in addition to the type 3 fimbriae of Klebsiella spp. (T. K. Korhonen, E. Tarkka, H. Ranta, and K. Haahtela, J. Bacteriol. 155:860-865, 1983). Images PMID:16346792

  4. Role of Titanium Surface Topography and Surface Wettability on Focal Adhesion Kinase Mediated Signaling in Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Oates, Christine J.; Wen, Weiyan; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Changes of titanium surface roughness and surface free energy may influence protein absorption that increases cell differentiation through activation of focal adhesion kinase related pathways. However, the influence of titanium surface roughness and hydrophilicity on fibroblast behavior is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of topography and hydrophilicity on fibroblast attachment, spreading, morphology, intracellular signaling, proliferation, and collagen I mRNA levels. Using a cellular FAK knockout (FAK−/−) model and wild-type (WT) controls, we also investigated the contribution of adhesion in fibroblasts cultured on smooth (PT), sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) and hydrophilic SLA topographies. Loss of FAK did not significantly affect fibroblast attachment to any surface, but SLA and hydrophilic SLA surface attenuated spreading of WT cells significantly more than FAK−/− fibroblasts. Both FAK−/− and WT cells formed numerous focal adhesions on PT surfaces, but significantly less on SLA and hydrophilic SLA surfaces. In WT cells, phosphorylation levels of FAK were lower on SLA and hydrophilic SLA in comparison with PT 24 h post seeding. Labeling of cells with antibodies to cortactin showed that FAK−/− cells contained significantly more cortactin-rich focal adhesion in comparison with WT cells on PT surfaces, but not on SLA or hydrophilic SLA. ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was highest in WT cells on all surfaces which correlated with collagen I expression levels. We conclude that fibroblasts are sensitive to changes in surface roughness and hydrophilicity, with adhesive interactions mediated through FAK, an important modulator of fibroblast response. PMID:28879956

  5. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kerry M; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (via trans interactions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (via cis interactions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition between cis and trans interactions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19058.001 PMID:27644106

  6. Focal adhesion kinase regulates syndecan-2-mediated tumorigenic activity of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Haein; Han, Innoc; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2005-11-01

    Expression of syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is crucial for the tumorigenic activity in colon carcinoma cells. However, despite the high-level expression of syndecan-2 in mesenchymal cells, few studies have addressed the function of syndecan-2 in sarcoma cells. In HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, we found that syndecan-2 regulated migration, invasion into Matrigel, and anchorage-independent growth but not cell-extracellular matrix adhesion or proliferation, suggesting that syndecan-2 plays different functional roles in fibrosarcoma and colon carcinoma cells. Consistent with the increased cell migration/invasion of syndecan-2-overexpressing HT1080 cells, syndecan-2 overexpression increased phosphorylation and interaction of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), membrane localization of T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene-1 (Tiam-1), and activation of Rac. Syndecan-2-mediated cell migration/invasion of HT1080 cells was diminished when (a) cells were cotransfected with nonphosphorylatable mutant FAK Y397F or with other FAK mutants lacking PI3K interactions, (b) cells were treated with a specific PI3K inhibitor, or (c) levels of Tiam-1 were knocked down with small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, expression of several FAK mutants inhibited syndecan-2-mediated enhancement of anchorage-independent growth in HT1080 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates the tumorigenic activities of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and that FAK is a key regulator of syndecan-2-mediated tumorigenic activities.

  7. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  8. Adhesion to the host cell surface is sufficient to mediate Listeria monocytogenes entry into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Fabian E; Rengarajan, Michelle; Chavez, Natalie; Radhakrishnan, Prathima; Gloerich, Martijn; Bianchini, Julie; Siemers, Kathleen; Luckett, William S; Lauer, Peter; Nelson, W James; Theriot, Julie A

    2017-09-06

    An intestinal epithelium is the first physiological barrier breached by the Gram-positive facultative pathogen Listeria monocytogenes during an in vivo infection. L. monocytogenes binds to the epithelial host cell receptor E-cadherin, which mediates a physical link between the bacterium and filamentous actin (F-actin). However, the importance of anchoring the bacterium to F-actin through E-cadherin for bacterial invasion has not been tested directly in epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that depleting αE-catenin, which indirectly links E-cadherin to F-actin, did not decrease L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells in tissue culture. Instead, invasion increased due to increased bacterial adhesion to epithelial monolayers with compromised cell-cell junctions. Furthermore, expression of a mutant E-cadherin lacking the intracellular domain was sufficient for efficient L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells. Importantly, direct biotin-mediated binding of bacteria to surface lipids in the plasma membrane of host epithelial cells was sufficient for uptake. Our results indicate that the only requirement for L. monocytogenes invasion of epithelial cells is adhesion to the host cell surface, and that E-cadherin-mediated coupling of the bacterium to F-actin is not required. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  9. Class A scavenger receptor-mediated cell adhesion requires the sequential activation of Lyn and PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Dejan M; Cholewa, Jill; Gass, Cecelia; Gong, Ming C; Post, Steven R

    2007-04-01

    Class A scavenger receptors (SR-A) participate in multiple macrophage functions including macrophage adhesion to modified proteins. SR-A-mediated adhesion may therefore contribute to chronic inflammation by promoting macrophage accumulation at sites of protein modification. The mechanisms that couple SR-A binding to modified proteins with increased cell adhesion have not been defined. In this study, SR-A expressing HEK cells and SR-A+/+ or SR-A-/- macrophages were used to delineate the signaling pathways required for SR-A-mediated adhesion to modified protein. Inhibiting G(i/o) activation, which decreases initial SR-A-mediated cell attachment, did not prevent the subsequent spreading of attached cells. In contrast, inhibition of Src kinases or PI3-kinase abolished SR-A-dependent cell spreading without affecting SR-A-mediated cell attachment. Consistent with these results, the Src kinase Lyn and PI3-kinase were sequentially activated during SR-A-mediated cell spreading. Furthermore, activation of both Lyn and PI3-kinase was required for enhancing paxillin phosphorylation. Activation of a Src kinase-PI3-kinase-Akt pathway was also observed in cells expressing a truncated SR-A protein that does not internalize indicating that SR-A-mediated activation of intracellular signaling cascades following adhesion to MDA-BSA is independent of receptor internalization. Thus SR-A binding to modified protein activates signaling cascades that have distinct roles in regulating initial cell attachment and subsequent cell spreading.

  10. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  11. Saikosaponin D isolated from Bupleurum falcatum inhibits selectin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoung-Jun; Kim, Ye Sol; Bae, Eun Young; Oh, Tae-Seok; Choi, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jung-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Seung Woong

    2014-12-04

    Three saikosaponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L.: saikosaponins B3 (1); B4 (2); and D (3). Of the three, compound 3 inhibited the interaction of selectins (E, L, and P) and THP-1 cells with IC50 values of 1.8, 3.0 and 4.3 µM, respectively. Also, the aglycone structure 4 of compound 3 showed moderate inhibitory activity on L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion. From these results, we suspect that compound 3 isolated from Bupleurum falcatum roots would be a good candidate for therapeutic strategies to treat inflammation.

  12. αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jacqueline M.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Yang, Changsong; Korobova, Farida; Pokutta, Sabine; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    αE-catenin binds the cell–cell adhesion complex of E-cadherin and β-catenin (β-cat) and regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. In vitro, binding of αE-catenin to the E-cadherin–β-cat complex lowers αE-catenin affinity for F-actin, and αE-catenin alone can bind F-actin and inhibit Arp2/3 complex–mediated actin polymerization. In cells, to test whether αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of the cadherin complex, the cytosolic αE-catenin pool was sequestered to mitochondria without affecting overall levels of αE-catenin or the cadherin–catenin complex. Sequestering cytosolic αE-catenin to mitochondria alters lamellipodia architecture and increases membrane dynamics and cell migration without affecting cell–cell adhesion. In contrast, sequestration of cytosolic αE-catenin to the plasma membrane reduces membrane dynamics. These results demonstrate that the cytosolic pool of αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20404114

  13. Epinephrine-induced activation of LW-mediated sickle cell adhesion and vaso-occlusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zennadi, Rahima; Moeller, Benjamin J; Whalen, Erin J; Batchvarova, Milena; Xu, Ke; Shan, Siqing; Delahunty, Martha; Dewhirst, Mark W; Telen, Marilyn J

    2007-10-01

    Sickle red cell (SS RBC) adhesion is believed to contribute to the process of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously found that the LW RBC adhesion receptor can be activated by epinephrine to mediate SS RBC adhesion to endothelial alphavbeta3 integrin. To determine the contribution of LW activation to vaso-occlusive events in vivo, we investigated whether in vitro treatment of SS RBCs by epinephrine resulted in vaso-occlusion in intact microvasculature after RBC infusion into nude mice. Epinephrine enhanced human SS but not normal RBC adhesion to murine endothelial cells in vitro and to endothelium in vivo, promoting vaso-occlusion and RBC organ sequestration. Murine sickle RBCs also responded to epinephrine with increased adhesion to postcapillary endothelium in nude mice. Epinephrine-induced SS RBC adhesion, vaso-occlusion, and RBC organ trapping could be prevented by the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) antagonist, propranolol. Infusion of soluble recombinant LW also significantly reduced adhesion and vaso-occlusion. In addition, epinephrine-treated SS RBCs induced activation of murine leukocyte adhesion to endothelium as well. We conclude that LW activation by epinephrine via beta-AR stimulation can promote both SS RBC and leukocyte adhesion as well as vaso-occlusion, suggesting that both epinephrine and LW play potentially pathophysiological roles in SCD.

  14. Kindlin-3 Is Essential for the Resting α4β1 Integrin-mediated Firm Cell Adhesion under Shear Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Lin, ChangDong; Yan, ZhanJun; Wang, Shu; Zhang, YouHua; Wang, ShiHui; Wang, JunLei; Liu, Cui; Chen, JianFeng

    2016-05-06

    Integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion are two critical steps in leukocyte trafficking. Integrin α4β1 mediates a mixture of rolling and firm cell adhesion on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) when in its resting state but only supports firm cell adhesion upon activation. The transition from rolling to firm cell adhesion is controlled by integrin activation. Kindlin-3 has been shown to bind to integrin β tails and trigger integrin activation via inside-out signaling. However, the role of kindlin-3 in regulating resting α4β1-mediated cell adhesion is not well characterized. Herein we demonstrate that kindlin-3 was required for the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion but not rolling adhesion. Knockdown of kindlin-3 significantly decreased the binding of kindlin-3 to β1 and down-regulated the binding affinity of the resting α4β1 to soluble VCAM-1. Notably, it converted the resting α4β1-mediated firm cell adhesion to rolling adhesion on VCAM-1 substrates, increased cell rolling velocity, and impaired the stability of cell adhesion. By contrast, firm cell adhesion mediated by Mn(2+)-activated α4β1 was barely affected by knockdown of kindlin-3. Structurally, lack of kindlin-3 led to a more bent conformation of the resting α4β1. Thus, kindlin-3 plays an important role in maintaining a proper conformation of the resting α4β1 to mediate both rolling and firm cell adhesion. Defective kindlin-3 binding to the resting α4β1 leads to a transition from firm to rolling cell adhesion on VCAM-1, implying its potential role in regulating the transition between integrin-mediated rolling and firm cell adhesion.

  15. Histamine H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis with cell shape change and adhesion molecule upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ping; Ngo, Karen; Nguyen, Steven; Thurmond, Robin L; Edwards, James P; Karlsson, Lars; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping

    2004-01-01

    During mast cell degranulation, histamine is released in large quantities. Human eosinophils were found to express histamine H4 but not H3 receptors. The possible effects of histamine on eosinophils and the receptor mediating these effects were investigated in our studies. Histamine (0.01–30 μM) induced a rapid and transient cell shape change in human eosinophils, but had no effects on neutrophils. The maximal shape change was at 0.3 μM histamine with EC50 at 19 nM. After 60 min incubation with 1 μM histamine, eosinophils were desensitized and were refractory to shape change response upon histamine restimulation. Histamine (0.01–1 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. Histamine-induced eosinophil shape change was mediated by the H4 receptor. This effect was completely inhibited by H4 receptor-specific antagonist JNJ 7777120 (IC50 0.3 μM) and H3/H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (IC50 1.4 μM), but not by selective H1, H2 or H3 receptor antagonists. H4 receptor agonists imetit (EC50 25 nM) and clobenpropit (EC50 72 nM) could mimic histamine effect in inducing eosinophil shape change. Histamine (0.01–100 μM) induced upregulation of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on eosinophils. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 and thioperamide. Histamine (0.01–10 μM) induced eosinophil chemotaxis with an EC50 of 83 nM. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 (IC50 86 nM) and thioperamide (IC50 519 nM). Histamine (0.5 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a new mechanism of eosinophil recruitment driven by mast cells via the release of histamine. Using specific histamine receptor ligands, we have provided a definitive proof that the H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis, cell shape change and

  16. Homocysteine and its thiolactone-mediated modification of fibrinogen affect blood platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Olas, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcys) and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) concentrations in organism are correlated with a number of serious pathologies. In the literature, there are few papers describing studies on the effects of homocysteine on proteins that participate in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in human. However, mechanisms involved in the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and hemostatic process are still unclear. The role of N- or S-homocysteinylation (induced by Hcys and its derivatives) of different hemostatic proteins, including fibrinogen is also still poorly known. The aim of this study was to establish the functional changes of the fibrinogen molecule induced by Hcys (at final doses of 10-100 µM) and the most reactive form of Hcys - its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 µM), and to examine the effects of these changes on the capability of fibrinogen to interact with human blood platelets (by measuring the platelet adhesion). Our present results demonstrated that Hcys-treated fibrinogen in comparison with native molecule had a distinct capability to mediate platelet adhesion. Both, unstimulated and thrombin-activated platelets showed a reduced ability to adhere to Hcys-mediated fibrinogen. HTL (at all tested concentrations) had similar properties when we used thrombin-activated platelets. In conclusion, the results reported in this study could be useful for a better understanding of changes in hemostasis during hyperhomocysteinemia.

  17. Microparticle Adhesive Dynamics and Rolling Mediated by Selectin-Specific Antibodies Under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Anthony Sang Won; Goetz, Douglas J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to characterize the relative performance of candidate receptors to target microparticles to inflammatory markers on vascular endothelium. To model the interactions of drug-bearing micro-particles or imaging contrast agents with the vasculature, 6 micron polystyrene particles bearing antibodies, peptides, or carbohydrates were perfused over immobilized E- or P-selectin in a flow chamber. Microparticles conjugated with HuEP5C7.g2 (HuEP), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to E- and P-selectin, supported leukocyte-like rolling and transient adhesion at venular shear rates. In contrast, microparticles conjugated with a higher affinity mAb specific for P-selectin (G1) were unable to form bonds at venular flow rates. When both HuEP and G1 were conjugated to the microparticle, HuEP supported binding to P-selectin in flow which allowed G1 to form bonds leading to stable adhesion. While the microparticle attachment and rolling performance was not as stable as that mediated by the natural ligands P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 or sialyl Lewisx, HuEP performed significantly better than any previously characterized mAb in terms of mediating micro-particle binding under flow conditions. HuEP may be a viable alternative to natural ligands to selectins for targeting particles to inflamed endothelium. PMID:16917925

  18. A genome-wide screen identifies conserved protein hubs required for cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Toret, Christopher P.; D’Ambrosio, Michael V.; Vale, Ronald D.; Simon, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherins and associated catenins provide an important structural interface between neighboring cells, the actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular signaling pathways in a variety of cell types throughout the Metazoa. However, the full inventory of the proteins and pathways required for cadherin-mediated adhesion has not been established. To this end, we completed a genome-wide (∼14,000 genes) ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) screen that targeted Ca2+-dependent adhesion in DE-cadherin–expressing Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in suspension culture. This novel screen eliminated Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion, integrin-based adhesion, cell spreading, and cell migration. We identified 17 interconnected regulatory hubs, based on protein functions and protein–protein interactions that regulate the levels of the core cadherin–catenin complex and coordinate cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion. Representative proteins from these hubs were analyzed further in Drosophila oogenesis, using targeted germline RNAi, and adhesion was analyzed in Madin–Darby canine kidney mammalian epithelial cell–cell adhesion. These experiments reveal roles for a diversity of cellular pathways that are required for cadherin function in Metazoa, including cytoskeleton organization, cell–substrate interactions, and nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling. PMID:24446484

  19. Vav1 and Rac Control Chemokine-promoted T Lymphocyte Adhesion Mediated by the Integrin α4β1D⃞

    PubMed Central

    García-Bernal, David; Wright, Natalia; Sotillo-Mallo, Elena; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Stein, Jens V.; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 promotes T lymphocyte adhesion mediated by the integrin α4β1. CXCL12 activates the GTPase Rac, as well as Vav1, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, concomitant with up-regulation of α4β1-dependent adhesion. Inhibition of CXCL12-promoted Rac and Vav1 activation by transfection of dominant negative Rac or Vav1 forms, or by transfection of their siRNA, remarkably impaired the increase in T lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands in response to this chemokine. Importantly, inhibition of Vav1 expression by RNA interference resulted in a blockade of Rac activation in response to CXCL12. Adhesions in flow chambers and soluble binding assays using these transfectants indicated that initial ligand binding and adhesion strengthening mediated by α4β1 were dependent on Vav1 and Rac activation by CXCL12. Finally, CXCL12-promoted T-cell transendothelial migration involving α4β1-mediated adhesion was notably inhibited by expression of dominant negative Vav1 and Rac. These results indicate that activation of Vav1-Rac signaling pathway by CXCL12 represents an important inside-out event controlling efficient up-regulation of α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:15872091

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase modulates ethanol inhibition of cell adhesion mediated by the L1 neural cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaowei; Wilkemeyer, Michael F.; Menkari, Carrie E.; Parnell, Scott E.; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Charness, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    There is a genetic contribution to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), but the identification of candidate genes has been elusive. Ethanol may cause FASD in part by decreasing the adhesion of the developmentally critical L1 cell adhesion molecule through interactions with an alcohol binding pocket on the extracellular domain. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic knockdown of ERK2 did not alter L1 adhesion, but markedly decreased ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion in NIH/3T3 cells and NG108-15 cells. Likewise, leucine replacement of S1248, an ERK2 substrate on the L1 cytoplasmic domain, did not decrease L1 adhesion, but abolished ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion. Stable transfection of NIH/3T3 cells with human L1 resulted in clonal cell lines in which L1 adhesion was consistently sensitive or insensitive to ethanol for more than a decade. ERK2 activity and S1248 phosphorylation were greater in ethanol-sensitive NIH/3T3 clonal cell lines than in their ethanol-insensitive counterparts. Ethanol-insensitive cells became ethanol sensitive after increasing ERK2 activity by transfection with a constitutively active MAP kinase kinase 1. Finally, embryos from two substrains of C57BL mice that differ in susceptibility to ethanol teratogenesis showed corresponding differences in MAPK activity. Our data suggest that ERK2 phosphorylation of S1248 modulates ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion by inside-out signaling and that differential regulation of ERK2 signaling might contribute to genetic susceptibility to FASD. Moreover, identification of a specific locus that regulates ethanol sensitivity, but not L1 function, might facilitate the rational design of drugs that block ethanol neurotoxicity. PMID:23431142

  1. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  2. P-selectin mediates adhesion of platelets to neuroblastoma and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J P; Wagner, D D

    1993-01-01

    Activated platelets and stimulated endothelial cells express P-selectin, an integral membrane protein receptor that binds monocytes and neutrophils. P-selectin mediates adhesion to glycoproteins with carbohydrate structures containing sialyl-Lewis X. Since many carcinoma cells also express these carbohydrate structures and are known to interact with platelets, we asked whether P-selectin may mediate this interaction. Both small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines bound to activated platelets, and this interaction was blocked with inhibitory anti-P-selectin antibodies and by pretreatment of these cancer cells with neuraminidase or trypsin. Platelet binding to the small cell lung cancer cells was not inhibited with anti-GP IIb-IIIa antibody or Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. Pretreatment of the neuroblastoma cells with inhibitors of N-linked carbohydrate biosynthesis had little effect on binding to P-selectin, indicating that relevant carbohydrate ligand(s) may be O-linked. In addition, lipospheres containing P-selectin specifically bound to cryostat sections derived from a small cell lung tumor and two neuroblastoma tumors, but not to sections of normal lung. These observations demonstrate that P-selectin mediates binding of platelets to small cell lung cancer and to neuroblastoma and suggest a possible role for this lectin in metastasis. Images PMID:7688763

  3. Two distinct actin networks mediate traction oscillations to confer mechanosensitivity of focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhanghan; Plotnikov, Sergey; Waterman, Clare; Liu, Jian

    Cells sense the mechanical stiffness of their extracellular matrix (ECM) by exerting traction force through focal adhesions (FAs), which are integrin-based protein assemblies. Strikingly, FA-mediated traction forces oscillate in time and space and govern durotaxis - the tendency of most cell types to migrate toward stiffer ECM. The underlying mechanism of this intriguing oscillation of FA traction force is unknown. Combing theory and experiment, we develop a model of FA growth, which integrates coordinated contributions of a branched actin network and stress fibers in the process. We show that retrograde flux of branched actin network contributes to a traction peak near the FA distal tip and that stress fiber-mediated actomyosin Contractility generates a second traction peak near the FA center. Formin-mediated stress fiber elongation negatively feeds back with actomyosin Contractility, resulting in the central traction peak oscillation. This underpins observed spatio-temporal patterns of the FA traction, and broadens the ECM stiffness range, over which FAs could accurately adapt with traction force generation. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of FA mechanosensing and hence durotaxis.

  4. The fibronectin synergy site re-enforces cell adhesion and mediates a crosstalk between integrin classes.

    PubMed

    Benito-Jardón, Maria; Klapproth, Sarah; Gimeno-LLuch, Irene; Petzold, Tobias; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Müller, Daniel J; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph A; Costell, Mercedes

    2017-01-16

    Fibronectin (FN), a major extracellular matrix component, enables integrin-mediated cell adhesion via binding of α5β1, αIIbβ3 and αv-class integrins to an RGD-motif. An additional linkage for α5 and αIIb is the synergy site located in close proximity to the RGD motif. We report that mice with a dysfunctional FN-synergy motif (Fn1(syn/syn)) suffer from surprisingly mild platelet adhesion and bleeding defects due to delayed thrombus formation after vessel injury. Additional loss of β3 integrins dramatically aggravates the bleedings and severely compromises smooth muscle cell coverage of the vasculature leading to embryonic lethality. Cell-based studies revealed that the synergy site is dispensable for the initial contact of α5β1 with the RGD, but essential to re-enforce the binding of α5β1/αIIbβ3 to FN. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for the FN synergy site when external forces exceed a certain threshold or when αvβ3 integrin levels decrease below a critical level.

  5. The fibronectin synergy site re-enforces cell adhesion and mediates a crosstalk between integrin classes

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Jardón, Maria; Klapproth, Sarah; Gimeno-LLuch, Irene; Petzold, Tobias; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Müller, Daniel J; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph A; Costell, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a major extracellular matrix component, enables integrin-mediated cell adhesion via binding of α5β1, αIIbβ3 and αv-class integrins to an RGD-motif. An additional linkage for α5 and αIIb is the synergy site located in close proximity to the RGD motif. We report that mice with a dysfunctional FN-synergy motif (Fn1syn/syn) suffer from surprisingly mild platelet adhesion and bleeding defects due to delayed thrombus formation after vessel injury. Additional loss of β3 integrins dramatically aggravates the bleedings and severely compromises smooth muscle cell coverage of the vasculature leading to embryonic lethality. Cell-based studies revealed that the synergy site is dispensable for the initial contact of α5β1 with the RGD, but essential to re-enforce the binding of α5β1/αIIbβ3 to FN. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for the FN synergy site when external forces exceed a certain threshold or when αvβ3 integrin levels decrease below a critical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22264.001 PMID:28092265

  6. Mutations in the cytoplasmic domain of P0 reveal a role for PKC-mediated phosphorylation in adhesion and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenbo; Shy, Michael; Kamholz, John; Elferink, Lisa; Xu, Gang; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in P0 (MPZ), the major myelin protein of the peripheral nervous system, cause the inherited demyelinating neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. P0 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule. We now show that point mutations in the cytoplasmic domain that modify a PKC target motif (RSTK) or an adjacent serine residue abolish P0 adhesion function and can cause peripheral neuropathy in humans. Consistent with these data, PKCα along with the PKC binding protein RACK1 are immunoprecipitated with wild-type P0, and inhibition of PKC activity abolishes P0-mediated adhesion. Point mutations in the RSTK target site that abolish adhesion do not alter the association of PKC with P0; however, deletion of a 14 amino acid region, which includes the RSTK motif, does abolish the association. Thus, the interaction of PKCα with the cytoplasmic domain of P0 is independent of specific target residues but is dependent on a nearby sequence. We conclude that PKC-mediated phosphorylation of specific residues within the cytoplasmic domain of P0 is necessary for P0-mediated adhesion, and alteration of this process can cause demyelinating neuropathy in humans. PMID:11673479

  7. The Trw Type IV Secretion System of Bartonella Mediates Host-Specific Adhesion to Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Le Rhun, Danielle; Deng, Hong Kuan; Biville, Francis; Cescau, Sandra; Danchin, Antoine; Marignac, Geneviève; Lenaour, Evelyne; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Mavris, Maria; Arnaud, Lionel; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jing; Quebatte, Maxime; Engel, Philipp; Saenz, Henri; Dehio, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage to facilitate host

  8. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development.

  9. RIAM, an Ena/VASP and Profilin ligand, interacts with Rap1-GTP and mediates Rap1-induced adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Esther M; van Puijenbroek, André A F L; Krause, Matthias; Carman, Christopher V; Freeman, Gordon J; Berezovskaya, Alla; Constantine, Erica; Springer, Timothy A; Gertler, Frank B; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2004-10-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 induces integrin-mediated adhesion and changes in the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms that mediate these effects of Rap1 are poorly understood. We have identified RIAM as a Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule. RIAM defines a family of adaptor molecules that contain a RA-like (Ras association) domain, a PH (pleckstrin homology) domain, and various proline-rich motifs. RIAM also interacts with Profilin and Ena/VASP proteins, molecules that regulate actin dynamics. Overexpression of RIAM induced cell spreading and lamellipodia formation, changes that require actin polymerization. In contrast, RIAM knockdown cells had reduced content of polymerized actin. RIAM overexpression also induced integrin activation and cell adhesion. RIAM knockdown displaced Rap1-GTP from the plasma membrane and abrogated Rap1-induced adhesion. Thus, RIAM links Rap1 to integrin activation and plays a role in regulating actin dynamics.

  10. Characterization of toposomes from sea urchin blastula cells: a cell organelle mediating cell adhesion and expressing positional information.

    PubMed Central

    Noll, H; Matranga, V; Cervello, M; Humphreys, T; Kuwasaki, B; Adelson, D

    1985-01-01

    Cell adhesion in the sea urchin blastula is mediated by a 22S genus-specific glycoprotein complex consisting initially of six 160-kDa subunits that are processed proteolytically as development proceeds. Noncytolytic removal of the 22S particle from the surface with either 2.5% butanol or trypsin renders dissociated cells reaggregation incompetent, and addition restores reaggregation and development. Polyclonal antibodies against the 22S complex prevent reaggregation in a genus-specific manner while monoclonal antibodies stain cell surface structures in a pattern consistent with a code that specifies the position of a cell in the embryo by a unique combination of subunits in its cell adhesion particles. The existence of similar particles in Drosophila and amphibian embryos suggests that these glycoprotein complexes are a general class of organelles, the toposomes, that in the embryo mediate cell adhesion and express positional information. Images PMID:3865216

  11. Secreted Listeria adhesion protein (Lap) influences Lap-mediated Listeria monocytogenes paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyochin; Bhunia, Arun K

    2013-06-24

    Listeria adhesion protein (Lap), an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (lmo1634) promotes bacterial paracellular translocation through epithelial cell junctions during gastrointestinal phase of infection. Secreted Lap is critical for pathogenesis and is mediated by SecA2 system; however, if strain dependent variation in Lap secretion would affect L. monocytogenes paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier is unknown. Amounts of Lap secretion were examined in clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes by cell fractionation analysis using Western blot. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to verify protein expression profiles. Adhesion and invasion of isolates were analyzed by in vitro Caco-2 cell culture model and paracellular translocation was determined using a trans-well model pre-seeded with Caco-2 cells. Western blot revealed that expression of Lap in whole cell preparation of isolates was very similar; however, cell fractionation analysis indicated variable Lap secretion among isolates. The strains showing high Lap secretion in supernatant exhibited significantly higher adhesion (3.4 - 4.8% vs 1.5 - 2.3%, P < 0.05), invasion and paracellular translocation in Caco-2 cells than the low secreting isolates. In cell wall fraction, Lap level was mostly uniform for both groups, while Lap accumulated in cytosol in low secreting strains indicating that Lap distribution in cellular compartments is a strain-dependent phenomenon, which may be controlled by the protein transport system, SecA2. ΔsecA2 mutants showed significantly reduced paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier (0.48 ± 0.01 vs 0.24 ± 0.02, P < 0.05). qRT-PCR did not show any discernible variation in lap transcript levels in either high or low secreting isolates. This study revealed that secreted Lap is an important determinant in Lap-mediated L. monocytogenes translocation through paracellular route and may serve as an indicator for pathogenic

  12. Secreted Listeria adhesion protein (Lap) influences Lap-mediated Listeria monocytogenes paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Listeria adhesion protein (Lap), an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (lmo1634) promotes bacterial paracellular translocation through epithelial cell junctions during gastrointestinal phase of infection. Secreted Lap is critical for pathogenesis and is mediated by SecA2 system; however, if strain dependent variation in Lap secretion would affect L. monocytogenes paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier is unknown. Methods Amounts of Lap secretion were examined in clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes by cell fractionation analysis using Western blot. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to verify protein expression profiles. Adhesion and invasion of isolates were analyzed by in vitro Caco-2 cell culture model and paracellular translocation was determined using a trans-well model pre-seeded with Caco-2 cells. Results Western blot revealed that expression of Lap in whole cell preparation of isolates was very similar; however, cell fractionation analysis indicated variable Lap secretion among isolates. The strains showing high Lap secretion in supernatant exhibited significantly higher adhesion (3.4 - 4.8% vs 1.5 - 2.3%, P < 0.05), invasion and paracellular translocation in Caco-2 cells than the low secreting isolates. In cell wall fraction, Lap level was mostly uniform for both groups, while Lap accumulated in cytosol in low secreting strains indicating that Lap distribution in cellular compartments is a strain-dependent phenomenon, which may be controlled by the protein transport system, SecA2. ΔsecA2 mutants showed significantly reduced paracellular translocation through epithelial barrier (0.48 ± 0.01 vs 0.24 ± 0.02, P < 0.05). qRT-PCR did not show any discernible variation in lap transcript levels in either high or low secreting isolates. Conclusion This study revealed that secreted Lap is an important determinant in Lap-mediated L. monocytogenes translocation through paracellular route and may

  13. Two Distinct Actin Networks Mediate Traction Oscillations to Confer Focal Adhesion Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanghan; Plotnikov, Sergey V; Moalim, Abdiwahab Y; Waterman, Clare M; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-28

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are integrin-based transmembrane assemblies that connect a cell to its extracellular matrix (ECM). They are mechanosensors through which cells exert actin cytoskeleton-mediated traction forces to sense the ECM stiffness. Interestingly, FAs themselves are dynamic structures that adapt their growth in response to mechanical force. It is unclear how the cell manages the plasticity of the FA structure and the associated traction force to accurately sense ECM stiffness. Strikingly, FA traction forces oscillate in time and space, and govern the cell mechanosensing of ECM stiffness. However, precisely how and why the FA traction oscillates is unknown. We developed a model of FA growth that integrates the contributions of the branched actin network and stress fibers (SFs). Using the model in combination with experimental tests, we show that the retrograde flux of the branched actin network promotes the proximal growth of the FA and contributes to a traction peak near the FA's distal tip. The resulting traction gradient within the growing FA favors SF formation near the FA's proximal end. The SF-mediated actomyosin contractility further stabilizes the FA and generates a second traction peak near the center of the FA. Formin-mediated SF elongation negatively feeds back with actomyosin contractility, resulting in central traction peak oscillation. This underpins the observed FA traction oscillation and, importantly, broadens the ECM stiffness range over which FAs can accurately adapt to traction force generation. Actin cytoskeleton-mediated FA growth and maturation thus culminate with FA traction oscillation to drive efficient FA mechanosensing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  15. ZRP-1 controls Rho GTPase-mediated actin reorganization by localizing at cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen-Yu; Ohsugi, Miho; Abe, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2007-08-15

    Focal adhesion protein ZRP-1/TRIP6 has been implicated in actin reorganization and cell motility. The role of ZRP-1, however, remained obscure because previously reported data are often conflicting one another. In the present study, we examined roles of ZRP-1 in HeLa cells. ZRP-1 is localized to the cell-cell contact sites as well as to cell-matrix contact sites in HeLa cells. RNA-interference-mediated depletion of ZRP-1 from HeLa cells revealed that ZRP-1 is essential not only for the formation of stress fibers and assembly of mature focal adhesions, but also for the actin reorganization at cell-cell contact sites and for correct cell-cell adhesion and, thus, for collective cell migration. Impairment of focal adhesions and stress fibers caused by ZRP-1 depletion has been associated with reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. However, maturation of focal adhesions could not be recovered by expression of active FAK. Interestingly, stress fibers in ZRP-1-depleted cells were ameliorated by exogenous expression of RhoA. We also found that total Rac1 activity is elevated in ZRP-1-depleted cells, resulting in abnormal burst of actin polymerization and dynamic membrane protrusions. Taken together, we conclude that that ZRP-1 plays a crucial role in coupling the cell-matrix/cell-cell-contact signals with Rho GTPase-mediated actin remodeling by localizing at cell-matrix and cell-cell contact sites.

  16. Isolation of αL I domain mutants mediating firm cell adhesion using a novel flow-based sorting method.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Lauren R; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Robbins, Gregory P; Dang, Nicholas N; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2013-08-01

    The inserted (I) domain of αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) contains the entire binding site of the molecule. It mediates both rolling and firm adhesion of leukocytes at sites of inflammation depending on the activation state of the integrin. The affinity change of the entire integrin can be mimicked by the I domain alone through mutations that affect the conformation of the molecule. High-affinity mutants of the I domain have been discovered previously using both rational design and directed evolution. We have found that binding affinity fails to dictate the behavior of I domain adhesion under shear flow. In order to better understand I domain adhesion, we have developed a novel panning method to separate yeast expressing a library of I domain variants on the surface by adhesion under flow. Using conditions analogous to those experienced by cells interacting with the post-capillary vascular endothelium, we have identified mutations supporting firm adhesion that are not found using typical directed evolution techniques that select for tight binding to soluble ligands. Mutants isolated using this method do not cluster with those found by sorting with soluble ligand. Furthermore, these mutants mediate shear-driven cell rolling dynamics decorrelated from binding affinity, as previously observed for I domains bearing engineered disulfide bridges to stabilize activated conformational states. Characterization of these mutants supports a greater understanding of the structure-function relationship of the αL I domain, and of the relationship between applied force and bioadhesion in a broader context.

  17. Attachment of the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides is mediated by adhesives localized at sites of bud cell development.

    PubMed

    Buck, J W; Andrews, J H

    1999-02-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides (anamorph, Rhodotorula glutinis) is a common phylloplane epiphyte with biocontrol potential. To understand how R. toruloides adheres to plant surfaces, we obtained nonadherent fungal mutants after chemical mutagenesis with methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester. Sixteen attachment-minus (Att-) mutants were identified by three methods: (i) screening capsule-minus colonies for loss of adhesive ability; (ii) enrichment for mutants unable to attach to polystyrene; and (iii) selection for reduced fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate-concanavalin A (Con A)-stained cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. None of the 16 mutants attached to polystyrene or barley leaves. The lectin Con A eliminated adhesion in all of the wild-type isolates tested. Hapten competition assays indicated that Con A bound to mannose residues on the cell surface. Adhesion of wild-type R. toruloides was transient; nonadhesive cells subsequently became adhesive, with bud development. All Att- mutants and nonattaching wild-type cells lacked polar regions that stained intensely with fluorescein isothiocyanate-Con A and India ink. Lectin, enzyme, and chemical treatments showed that the polar regions consisted of alkali-soluble materials, including mannose residues. Tunicamycin treatment reduced wild-type adhesion, indicating that the mannose residues could be associated with glycoproteins. We concluded that compounds, including mannose residues, that are localized at sites of bud development mediate adhesion of R. toruloides to both polystyrene and barley leaf surfaces.

  18. Galaptin Mediates the Effect of Hypergravity on Vascular Smooth Muscle cell (SMC) Adhesion to Laminin Containing Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enahora, Fatisha T.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Galaptin, an endogenous beta-galactoside specific lectin, has been reported to bind to laminin and subsequently decrease the binding of SMC. Cellular function depend on cell:matrix interactions. Hypergravity (HGrav) affect a number of cellular functions, yet little is known about its affect on cell adhesion. We examined the possibility that galaptin mediates the effects of hypergravity on SMC adherence. Confluent primate aorta SMC cultures were subjected to Hgrav (centrifuged at 6G) for 24 and 48 hr. Cells were non-enzymatically dispersed, pretreated with antisense (AS-oligo) or control sense (SS-oligo) oligonucleotides to galaptin mRNA (0.01 micro g/ml), then seeded in uncoated or ECL-matrix coated plates. Adhesion of cells were monitored after 6 hr. HGrav increased adhesion by 100-300% compared to controls. AS-oligo decreased adhesion for both HGrav and control cells. SS-oligo did not affect adhesion for either HGrav or control cells. These studies show that HGrav affects cell adhesion and that galaptin expression is required for this effect.

  19. Galaptin Mediates the Effect of Hypergravity on Vascular Smooth Muscle cell (SMC) Adhesion to Laminin Containing Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enahora, Fatisha T.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Galaptin, an endogenous beta-galactoside specific lectin, has been reported to bind to laminin and subsequently decrease the binding of SMC. Cellular function depend on cell:matrix interactions. Hypergravity (HGrav) affect a number of cellular functions, yet little is known about its affect on cell adhesion. We examined the possibility that galaptin mediates the effects of hypergravity on SMC adherence. Confluent primate aorta SMC cultures were subjected to Hgrav (centrifuged at 6G) for 24 and 48 hr. Cells were non-enzymatically dispersed, pretreated with antisense (AS-oligo) or control sense (SS-oligo) oligonucleotides to galaptin mRNA (0.01 micro g/ml), then seeded in uncoated or ECL-matrix coated plates. Adhesion of cells were monitored after 6 hr. HGrav increased adhesion by 100-300% compared to controls. AS-oligo decreased adhesion for both HGrav and control cells. SS-oligo did not affect adhesion for either HGrav or control cells. These studies show that HGrav affects cell adhesion and that galaptin expression is required for this effect.

  20. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M; Meehan, Daniel T; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  1. Laminin α2-Mediated Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation Triggers Alport Glomerular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M.; Meehan, Daniel T.; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages. PMID:24915008

  2. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Correction of a Mouse Model of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I.

    PubMed

    Leon-Rico, Diego; Aldea, Montserrat; Sanchez-Baltasar, Raquel; Mesa-Nuñez, Cristina; Record, Julien; Burns, Siobhan O; Santilli, Giorgia; Thrasher, Adrian J; Bueren, Juan A; Almarza, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the ITGB2 gene and is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening bacterial infections. These mutations lead to defective or absent expression of β2 integrins on the leukocyte surface, compromising adhesion and extravasation at sites of infection. Three different lentiviral vectors (LVs) conferring ubiquitous or preferential expression of CD18 in myeloid cells were constructed and tested in human and mouse LAD-I cells. All three hCD18-LVs restored CD18 and CD11a membrane expression in LAD-I patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Corrected cells recovered the ability to aggregate and bind to sICAM-1 after stimulation. All vectors induced stable hCD18 expression in hematopoietic cells from mice with a hypomorphic Itgb2 mutation (CD18(HYP)), both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation of corrected cells into primary and secondary CD18(HYP) recipients. hCD18(+) hematopoietic cells from transplanted CD18(HYP) mice also showed restoration of mCD11a surface co-expression. The analysis of in vivo neutrophil migration in CD18(HYP) mice subjected to two different inflammation models demonstrated that the LV-mediated gene therapy completely restored neutrophil extravasation in response to inflammatory stimuli. Finally, these vectors were able to correct the phenotype of human myeloid cells derived from CD34(+) progenitors defective in ITGB2 expression. These results support for the first time the use of hCD18-LVs for the treatment of LAD-I patients in clinical trials.

  3. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Correction of a Mouse Model of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Rico, Diego; Aldea, Montserrat; Sanchez-Baltasar, Raquel; Mesa-Nuñez, Cristina; Record, Julien; Burns, Siobhan O.; Santilli, Giorgia; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Bueren, Juan A.; Almarza, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the ITGB2 gene and is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening bacterial infections. These mutations lead to defective or absent expression of β2 integrins on the leukocyte surface, compromising adhesion and extravasation at sites of infection. Three different lentiviral vectors (LVs) conferring ubiquitous or preferential expression of CD18 in myeloid cells were constructed and tested in human and mouse LAD-I cells. All three hCD18-LVs restored CD18 and CD11a membrane expression in LAD-I patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Corrected cells recovered the ability to aggregate and bind to sICAM-1 after stimulation. All vectors induced stable hCD18 expression in hematopoietic cells from mice with a hypomorphic Itgb2 mutation (CD18HYP), both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation of corrected cells into primary and secondary CD18HYP recipients. hCD18+ hematopoietic cells from transplanted CD18HYP mice also showed restoration of mCD11a surface co-expression. The analysis of in vivo neutrophil migration in CD18HYP mice subjected to two different inflammation models demonstrated that the LV-mediated gene therapy completely restored neutrophil extravasation in response to inflammatory stimuli. Finally, these vectors were able to correct the phenotype of human myeloid cells derived from CD34+ progenitors defective in ITGB2 expression. These results support for the first time the use of hCD18-LVs for the treatment of LAD-I patients in clinical trials. PMID:27056660

  4. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Ivey A.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  5. Oncostatin M is a proinflammatory mediator. In vivo effects correlate with endothelial cell expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Modur, V; Feldhaus, M J; Weyrich, A S; Jicha, D L; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1997-01-01

    Oncostatin M is a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines that is primarily known for its effects on cell growth. Endothelial cells have an abundance of receptors for oncostatin M, and may be its primary target. We determined if oncostatin M induces a key endothelial cell function, initiation of the inflammatory response. We found that subcutaneous injection of oncostatin M in mice caused an acute inflammatory reaction. Oncostatin M in vitro stimulated: (a) polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transmigration through confluent monolayers of primary human endothelial cells; (b) biphasic PMN adhesion through rapid P-selectin expression, and delayed adhesion mediated by E-selectin synthesis; (c) intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 accumulation; and (d) the expression of PMN activators IL-6, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78, growth-related cytokine alpha and growth-related cytokine beta without concomitant IL-8 synthesis. The nature of the response to oncostatin M varied with concentration, suggesting high and low affinity oncostatin M receptors independently stimulated specific responses. Immunohistochemistry showed that macrophage-like cells infiltrating human aortic aneurysms expressed oncostatin M, so it is present during a chronic inflammatory reaction. Therefore, oncostatin M, but not other IL-6 family members, fulfills Koch's postulates as an inflammatory mediator. Since its effects on endothelial cells differ significantly from established mediators like TNFalpha, it may uniquely contribute to the inflammatory cycle. PMID:9202068

  6. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages.

  7. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A modulates integrin β1-mediated epithelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Daria R; Akimov, Yevhen A; Rokka, Anne; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Kouvonen, Petri; Pellinen, Teijo; Kuznetsov, Sergey G

    2016-10-07

    G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR), Class C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) has been implicated in several malignancies. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Using a panel of human cell lines, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout and RNAi-mediated depletion of GPRC5A impairs cell adhesion to integrin substrates: collagens I and IV, fibronectin, as well as to extracellular matrix proteins derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) mouse sarcoma (Matrigel). Consistent with the phenotype, knock-out of GPRC5A correlated with a reduced integrin β1 (ITGB1) protein expression, impaired phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and lower activity of small GTPases RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between GPRC5A and a receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2, an upstream regulator of FAK, although its contribution to the observed adhesion phenotype is unclear. Our findings reveal an unprecedented role for GPRC5A in regulation of the ITGB1-mediated cell adhesion and it's downstream signaling, thus indicating a potential novel role for GPRC5A in human epithelial cancers.

  8. A serine-rich glycoprotein of Streptococcus sanguis mediates adhesion to platelets via GPIb.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Christopher; Wu, Hui; Kerrigan, Steven W; Meade, Gerardene; Cox, Dermot; Ian Douglas, C W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguis is the most common oral bacterium causing infective endocarditis and its ability to adhere to platelets, leading to their activation and aggregation, is thought to be an important virulent factor. Previous work has shown that S. sanguis can bind directly to platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib but the nature of the adhesin was unknown. Here, we have shown that a high molecular weight glycoprotein of S. sanguis mediates adhesion to glycocalacin. The bacterial glycoprotein was purified from cell extracts by chromatography on GPIb- and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity matrices and its interaction with GPIb was shown to be sialic acid-dependent. We designated the glycoprotein serine-rich protein A (SrpA). An insertional inactivation mutant lacking the SrpA of S. sanguis showed significantly reduced binding to glycocalacin, reduced adherence to platelets and a prolonged lag time to platelet aggregation. In addition, under flow conditions, platelets rolled and subsequently adhered on films of wild-type S. sanguis cells at low shear (50/s) but did not bind to films of the SrpA mutant. Platelets did not bind to wild-type bacterial cells at high shear (1500/s). These findings help to understand the mechanisms by which the organism might colonize platelet-fibrin vegetations.

  9. Identification of PblB mediating galactose-specific adhesion in a successful Streptococcus pneumoniae clone.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Lin, Che-Ming; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-07-21

    The pneumococcal genome is variable and there are minimal data on the influence of the accessory genome on phenotype. Pneumococcal serotype 14 sequence type (ST) 46 had been the most prevalent clone causing pneumonia in children in Taiwan. A microarray was constructed using the genomic DNA of a clinical strain (NTUH-P15) of serotype 14 ST46. Using DNA hybridization, genomic variations in NTUH-P15 were compared to those of 3 control strains. Microarray analysis identified 7 genomic regions that had significant increases in hybridization signals in the NTUH-P15 strain compared to control strains. One of these regions encoded PblB, a phage-encoded virulence factor implicated (in Streptococcus mitis) in infective endocarditis. The isogenic pblB mutant decreased adherence to A549 human lung epithelial cell compared to wild-type NTUH-P15 strain (P = 0.01). Complementation with pblB restored the adherence. PblB is predicted to contain a galactose-binding domain-like region. Preincubation of NTUH-P15 with D-galactose resulted in decreases of adherence to A549 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge of mice with NTUH-P15, isogenic pblB mutant and pblB complementation strains determined that PblB was required for bacterial persistence in the nasopharynx and lung. PblB, as an adhesin mediating the galactose-specific adhesion activity of pneumococci, promote pneumococcal clonal success.

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated Fyn activation promotes GABAergic synapse maturation in postnatal mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Baho, Elie; Huang, Z Josh; Schachner, Melitta; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2013-04-03

    GABAergic basket interneurons form perisomatic synapses, which are essential for regulating neural networks, and their alterations are linked to various cognitive dysfunction. Maturation of basket synapses in postnatal cortex is activity dependent. In particular, activity-dependent downregulation of polysialiac acid carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates the timing of their maturation. Whether and how NCAM per se affects GABAergic synapse development is unknown. Using single-cell genetics to knock out NCAM in individual basket interneurons in mouse cortical slice cultures, at specific developmental time periods, we found that NCAM loss during perisomatic synapse formation impairs the process of basket cell axonal branching and bouton formation. However, loss of NCAM once the synapses are already formed did not show any effect. We further show that NCAM120 and NCAM140, but not the NCAM180 isoform, rescue the phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate that a dominant-negative form of Fyn kinase mimics, whereas a constitutively active form of Fyn kinase rescues, the effects of NCAM knockdown. Altogether, our data suggest that NCAM120/NCAM140-mediated Fyn activation promotes GABAergic synapse maturation in postnatal cortex.

  11. Identification of a unique gene cluster of Brucella spp. that mediates adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed

    Czibener, Cecilia; Ugalde, Juan Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease affecting a broad range of mammals, is a gram-negative bacterium whose virulence is dependent on the capacity to attach and invade different cells of the host. The bacterium is able to infect through a diverse repertoire of epitheliums: skin, airways or gastric. Although much has been studied on the mechanisms Brucella uses to establish an intracellular replication niche, almost none is known on how the bacterium adheres and invades host cells. We report here the identification of a pathogenicity island that harbors a gene homologous to proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains present in other pathogens that play a role in attachment and invasion. Deletion of the entire island results in a mutant with a reduced attachment capacity measured by intracellular replication and adhesion assays. Intraperitoneal and oral experimental infection of mice strongly suggests that this island plays a role during the oral infection probably mediating attachment and trespassing of the gastric epithelium to establish a systemic infection. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a unique gene cluster of Brucella spp. that mediates adhesion to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Czibener, Cecilia; Ugalde, Juan Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease affecting a broad range of mammals, is a gram negative bacterium whose virulence is dependent on the capacity to attach and invade different cells of the host. The bacterium is able to infect through a diverse repertoire of epitheliums: skin, airways or gastric. Although much has been studied on the mechanisms Brucella uses to establish an intracellular replication niche, almost none is known on how the bacterium adheres and invades host cells. We report here the identification of a pathogenicity island that harbors a gene homologous to proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains present in other pathogens that play a role in attachment and invasion. Deletion of the entire island results in a mutant with a reduced attachment capacity measured by intracellular replication and adhesion assays. Intraperitoneal and oral experimental infection of mice strongly suggests that this island plays a role during the oral infection probably mediating attachment and trespassing of the gastric epithelium to establish a systemic infection. PMID:21911075

  13. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  14. Cell division and cadherin-mediated adhesion regulate lens epithelial cell movement in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Luo, Yi-Jyun; Tsai, Hsieh-Fu; Hagiwara, Akane; Masai, Ichiro

    2017-02-15

    In vertebrates, lens epithelial cells cover the anterior half of the lens fiber core. During development, lens epithelial cells proliferate, move posteriorly and differentiate into lens fiber cells after passing through the equator. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying lens epithelial cell movement, we conducted time-lapse imaging of zebrafish lens epithelium. Lens epithelial cells do not intermingle but maintain their relative positions during development. Cell division induces epithelial rearrangement, which subsequently promotes cell movement towards the equator. These data suggest that cell division is the major driving force for cell movement. In zebrafish, E-cadherin is expressed in lens epithelium, whereas N-cadherin is required for lens fiber growth. E-cadherin reduced lens epithelial cell movement, whereas N-cadherin enhanced it. Laser ablation experiments revealed that lens epithelium is governed by pulling tension, which is modulated by these cadherins. Thus, cell division and cadherin-mediated adhesion regulate lens epithelial cell movement via modulation of epithelial tension. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Structural Insights into SraP-Mediated Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Lei; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Ren, Yan-Min; Li, Na; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gong, Qingguo; Mei, Yide; Xue, Ting; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium causes a number of devastating human diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and sepsis. S. aureus SraP, a surface-exposed serine-rich repeat glycoprotein (SRRP), is required for the pathogenesis of human infective endocarditis via its ligand-binding region (BR) adhering to human platelets. It remains unclear how SraP interacts with human host. Here we report the 2.05 Å crystal structure of the BR of SraP, revealing an extended rod-like architecture of four discrete modules. The N-terminal legume lectin-like module specifically binds to N-acetylneuraminic acid. The second module adopts a β-grasp fold similar to Ig-binding proteins, whereas the last two tandem repetitive modules resemble eukaryotic cadherins but differ in calcium coordination pattern. Under the conditions tested, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the three C-terminal modules function as a relatively rigid stem to extend the N-terminal lectin module outwards. Structure-guided mutagenesis analyses, in addition to a recently identified trisaccharide ligand of SraP, enabled us to elucidate that SraP binding to sialylated receptors promotes S. aureus adhesion to and invasion into host epithelial cells. Our findings have thus provided novel structural and functional insights into the SraP-mediated host-pathogen interaction of S. aureus. PMID:24901708

  16. Neural differentiation, NCAM-mediated adhesion, and gap junctional communication in neuroectoderm. A study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We studied the development of NCAM and gap junctional communication, and their mutual relationship in chick neuroectoderm in vitro. Expression of NCAM, as detected by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and development of junctional communication, as detected by extensive cell-to-cell transfer of 400-500-D fluorescent tracers, occurred in cultures from stage-2 embryos onward. Both expressions presumably required primary induction. The differentiating cells formed discrete fields of expression on the second to third day in culture, with the NCAM fields coinciding with the junctional communication fields delineated by the tracers. Other neural differentiations developed in the following order: tetanus toxin receptors, neurofilament protein, and neurite outgrowth. Chronic treatment with antibody Fab fragments against NCAM interfered with the development of communication, suggesting that NCAM-mediated adhesion promotes formation of cell-to-cell channels. Temperature-sensitive mutant Rous sarcoma virus blocked (reversibly) communication and the subsequent development of neurofilament protein and neurites, but expression of NCAM continued. PMID:2834404

  17. Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy of Als-Mediated Fungal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Alsteens, David; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Park, Hye Rim; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic assays that are traditionally used to investigate the adhesion behaviour of microbial cells provide averaged information obtained on large populations of cells and do not measure the fundamental forces driving single-cell adhesion. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the specific and non-specific forces engaged in the adhesion of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing the C. albicans adhesion protein Als5p were attached on atomic force microscopy tipless cantilevers using a bioinspired polydopamine wet polymer, and force-distance curves were recorded between the obtained cell probes and various solid surfaces. Force signatures obtained on hydrophobic substrates exhibited large adhesion forces (1.25 ± 0.2 nN) with extended rupture lengths (up to 400 nm), attributed to the binding and stretching of the hydrophobic tandem repeats of Als5p. Data collected on fibronectin (Fn) -coated substrates featured strong adhesion forces (2.8 ± 0.6 nN), reflecting specific binding between Fn and the N-terminal immunoglobulin-like regions of Als5p, followed by weakly adhesive macromolecular bonds. Both hydrophobic and Fn adhesion forces increased with contact time, emphasizing the important role that time plays in strengthening adhesion. Our SCFS methodology provides a versatile platform in biomedicine for understanding the fundamental forces driving adhesion and biofilm formation in fungal pathogens. PMID:23956795

  18. Notch signaling mediates the age-associated decrease in adhesion of germline stem cells to the niche.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion.

  19. Evidence of a role for CD44 and cell adhesion in mediating resistance to lenalidomide in multiple myeloma: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, C C; Baladandayuthapani, V; Lin, H Y; Jones, R J; Kuiatse, I; Wang, H; Yang, J; Shah, J J; Thomas, S K; Wang, M; Weber, D M; Orlowski, R Z

    2014-02-01

    Resistance of myeloma to lenalidomide is an emerging clinical problem, and though it has been associated in part with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the mediators of this phenotype remained undefined. Lenalidomide-resistant models were found to overexpress the hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein CD44, a downstream Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target. Consistent with a role of CD44 in cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells were more adhesive to bone marrow stroma and HA-coated plates. Blockade of CD44 with monoclonal antibodies, free HA or CD44 knockdown reduced adhesion and sensitized to lenalidomide. Wnt/β-catenin suppression by FH535 enhanced the activity of lenalidomide, as did interleukin-6 neutralization with siltuximab. Notably, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) downregulated total β-catenin, cell-surface and total CD44, reduced adhesion of lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells and enhanced the activity of lenalidomide in a lenalidomide-resistant in vivo murine xenograft model. Finally, ATRA sensitized primary myeloma samples from patients that had relapsed and/or refractory disease after lenalidomide therapy to this immunomodulatory agent ex vivo. Taken together, our findings support the hypotheses that CD44 and CAM-DR contribute to lenalidomide resistance in multiple myeloma, that CD44 should be evaluated as a putative biomarker of sensitivity to lenalidomide, and that ATRA or other approaches that target CD44 may overcome clinical lenalidomide resistance.

  20. Link protein hyaluronan-binding motif abrogates CD44-hyaluronan-mediated leukemia-liver cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Na; Li, Gongchu

    2013-05-01

    The liver is a frequent site for the metastasis of cancer cells originating from other sites. Leukemic liver metastasis is associated with poor prognosis. The ligation of CD44 with hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to contribute to the drug resistance of leukemic cells. In this study, a link protein HA-binding motif was genetically fused with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) to generate an EGFP-L fusion protein. Furthermore, a coculture system was established to investigate the interaction of leukemic cells with liver cells. CD44-positive Kasumi-1, but not CD44-negative HL-60 cells, were observed to adhere to the liver cell line L02. This cell-cell adhesion was significantly blocked by HA, indicating that Kasumi-L02 cell adhesion was mediated by the CD44-HA interaction. Compared to EGFP, EGFP-L fusion protein bound to L02 and BEL7404 liver cells. EGFP-L partially abrogated the Kasumi-L02 adhesion, suggesting that the link protein-binding motif is able to inhibit CD44-HA-mediated leukemia-liver adhesion. These results may help provide insight into novel therapeutic methods for leukemic patients diagnosed with liver metastasis.

  1. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  3. Role of receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) in low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMWHA)-mediated fibrosarcoma cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kouvidi, Katerina; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Nikitovic, Dragana; Katonis, Pavlos; Afratis, Nikos; Hascall, Vincent C; Karamanos, Nikos K; Tzanakakis, George N

    2011-11-04

    Hyaluronan (HA) modulates key cancer cell functions through interaction with its CD44 and receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) receptors. HA was recently found to regulate the migration of fibrosarcoma cells in a manner specifically dependent on its size. Here, we investigated the effect of HA/RHAMM signaling on the ability of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells to adhere onto fibronectin. Low molecular weight HA (LMWHA) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.01) the adhesion capacity of HT1080 cells, which high molecular weight HA inhibited. The ability of HT1080 RHAMM-deficient cells, but not of CD44-deficient ones, to adhere was significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.001) as compared with control cells. Importantly, the effect of LMWHA on HT1080 cell adhesion was completely attenuated in RHAMM-deficient cells. In contrast, adhesion of RHAMM-deficient cells was not sensitive to high molecular weight HA treatment, which identifies RHAMM as a specific conduit of the LMWHA effect. Western blot and real time-PCR analyses indicated that LMWHA significantly increased RHAMM transcript (p ≤ 0.05) and protein isoform levels (53%, 95 kDa; 37%, 73 kDa) in fibrosarcoma cells. Moreover, Western blot analyses showed that LMWHA in a RHAMM-dependent manner enhanced basal and adhesion-dependent ERK1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in HT1080 cells. Utilization of a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor completely inhibited (p ≤ 0.001) LMWHA-dependent adhesion, suggesting that ERK1/2 is a downstream effector of LMWHA/RHAMM signaling. Likewise, the utilization of the specific ERK1 inhibitor resulted in a strong down-regulation of FAK activation in HT1080 cells, which identifies ERK1/2 as a FAK upstream activator. In conclusion, our results suggest that RHAMM/HA interaction regulates fibrosarcoma cell adhesion via the activation of FAK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

  4. Role of Receptor for Hyaluronic Acid-mediated Motility (RHAMM) in Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan (LMWHA)-mediated Fibrosarcoma Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kouvidi, Katerina; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Nikitovic, Dragana; Katonis, Pavlos; Afratis, Nikos; Hascall, Vincent C.; Karamanos, Nikos K.; Tzanakakis, George N.

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) modulates key cancer cell functions through interaction with its CD44 and receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) receptors. HA was recently found to regulate the migration of fibrosarcoma cells in a manner specifically dependent on its size. Here, we investigated the effect of HA/RHAMM signaling on the ability of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells to adhere onto fibronectin. Low molecular weight HA (LMWHA) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.01) the adhesion capacity of HT1080 cells, which high molecular weight HA inhibited. The ability of HT1080 RHAMM-deficient cells, but not of CD44-deficient ones, to adhere was significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.001) as compared with control cells. Importantly, the effect of LMWHA on HT1080 cell adhesion was completely attenuated in RHAMM-deficient cells. In contrast, adhesion of RHAMM-deficient cells was not sensitive to high molecular weight HA treatment, which identifies RHAMM as a specific conduit of the LMWHA effect. Western blot and real time-PCR analyses indicated that LMWHA significantly increased RHAMM transcript (p ≤ 0.05) and protein isoform levels (53%, 95 kDa; 37%, 73 kDa) in fibrosarcoma cells. Moreover, Western blot analyses showed that LMWHA in a RHAMM-dependent manner enhanced basal and adhesion-dependent ERK1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in HT1080 cells. Utilization of a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor completely inhibited (p ≤ 0.001) LMWHA-dependent adhesion, suggesting that ERK1/2 is a downstream effector of LMWHA/RHAMM signaling. Likewise, the utilization of the specific ERK1 inhibitor resulted in a strong down-regulation of FAK activation in HT1080 cells, which identifies ERK1/2 as a FAK upstream activator. In conclusion, our results suggest that RHAMM/HA interaction regulates fibrosarcoma cell adhesion via the activation of FAK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:21914806

  5. Protein-mediated adhesion of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caccavo, F. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HGO adhesion molecules. A. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO.

  6. Protein-Mediated Adhesion of the Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to Hydrous Ferric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HFO adhesion molecules. S. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO. PMID:10543817

  7. Role of focal adhesion kinase in regulating YB-1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Hu, Wei; Ivan, Cristina; Dalton, Heather J; Miyake, Takahito; Pecot, Chad V; Zand, Behrouz; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jie; Jennings, Nicholas B; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Taylor, Morgan; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry Y; Lu, Chunhua; Wen, Yunfei; Huang, Jianfei; Liu, Jinsong; Sood, Anil K

    2013-10-02

    We previously found focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibition sensitizes ovarian cancer to taxanes; however, the mechanisms are not well understood. We characterized the biologic response of taxane-resistant and taxane-sensitive ovarian cancer models to a novel FAK inhibitor (VS-6063). We used reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) to identify novel downstream targets in taxane-resistant cell lines. Furthermore, we correlated clinical and pathological data with nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of FAK and YB-1 in 105 ovarian cancer samples. Statistical tests were two-sided, and P values were calculated with Student t test or Fisher exact test. We found that VS-6063 inhibited FAK phosphorylation at the Tyr397 site in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The combination of VS-6063 and paclitaxel markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis, which resulted in 92.7% to 97.9% reductions in tumor weight. RPPA data showed that VS-6063 reduced levels of AKT and YB-1 in taxane-resistant cell lines. FAK inhibition enhanced chemosensitivity in taxane-resistant cells by decreasing YB-1 phosphorylation and subsequently CD44 in an AKT-dependent manner. In human ovarian cancer samples, nuclear FAK expression was associated with increased nuclear YB-1 expression (χ²) = 37.7; P < .001). Coexpression of nuclear FAK and YB-1 was associated with statistically significantly worse median overall survival (24.9 vs 67.3 months; hazard ratio = 2.64; 95% confidence interval = 1.38 to 5.05; P = .006). We have identified a novel pathway whereby FAK inhibition with VS-6063 overcomes YB-1-mediated paclitaxel resistance by an AKT-dependent pathway. These findings have implications for clinical trials aimed at targeting FAK.

  8. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-01-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied. Images PMID:1347758

  9. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-04-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied.

  10. CD44-mediated adhesion to hyaluronic acid contributes to mechanosensing and invasive motility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yushan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    The high-molecular-weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronic acid (HA), makes up a significant portion of the brain extracellular matrix. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive brain tumor, is associated with aberrant HA secretion, tissue stiffening, and overexpression of the HA receptor CD44. Here, transcriptomic analysis, engineered materials, and measurements of adhesion, migration, and invasion were used to investigate how HA/CD44 ligation contributes to the mechanosensing and invasive motility of GBM tumor cells, both intrinsically and in the context of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide/integrin adhesion. Analysis of transcriptomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas reveals upregulation of transcripts associated with HA/CD44 adhesion. CD44 suppression in culture reduces cell adhesion to HA on short time scales (0.5-hour postincubation) even if RGD is present, whereas maximal adhesion on longer time scales (3 hours) requires both CD44 and integrins. Moreover, time-lapse imaging demonstrates that cell adhesive structures formed during migration on bare HA matrices are more short lived than cellular protrusions formed on surfaces containing RGD. Interestingly, adhesion and migration speed were dependent on HA hydrogel stiffness, implying that CD44-based signaling is intrinsically mechanosensitive. Finally, CD44 expression paired with an HA-rich microenvironment maximized three-dimensional invasion, whereas CD44 suppression or abundant integrin-based adhesion limited it. These findings demonstrate that CD44 transduces HA-based stiffness cues, temporally precedes integrin-based adhesion maturation, and facilitates invasion. This study reveals that the CD44 receptor, which is commonly overexpressed in GBM tumors, is critical for cell adhesion, invasion, and mechanosensing of an HA-based matrix. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. A direct comparison of selectin-mediated transient, adhesive events using high temporal resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M J; Berg, E L; Lawrence, M B

    1999-01-01

    Leukocyte capture and rolling on the vascular endothelium is mediated principally by the selectin family of cell adhesion receptors. In a parallel plate flow chamber, neutrophil rolling on purified selectins or a selectin-ligand substrate was resolved by high speed videomicroscopy as a series of ratchet-like steps with a characteristic time constant (Kaplanski, G., C. Farnarier, O. Tissot, A. Pierres, A.-M. Benoliel, M. C. Alessi, S. Kaplanski, and P. Bongrand. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:1922-1933; Alon, R., D. A. Hammer, and T. A. Springer. 1995. Nature (Lond.). 374:539-542). Under shear, neutrophil arrests due to bond formation events were as brief as 4 ms. Pause time distributions for neutrophils tethering on P-, E-, L-selectin, or peripheral node addressin (PNAd) were compared at estimated single bond forces ranging from 37 to 250 pN. Distributions of selectin mediated pause times were fit to a first order exponential, resulting in a molecular dissociation constant (k(off)) for the respective selectin as a function of force. At estimated single bond forces of 125 pN and below, all three selectin dissociation constants fit the Bell and Hookean spring models of force-driven bond breakage equivalently. Unstressed k(off) values based on the Bell model were 2.4, 2.6, 2.8, 3.8 s(-1) for P-selectin, E-selectin, L-selectin, and PNAd, respectively. Bond separation distances (reactive compliance) were 0.39, 0.18, 1.11, 0.59 A for P-selectin, E-selectin, L-selectin, and PNAd, respectively. Dissociation constants for L-selectin and P-selectin at single bond forces above 125 pN were considerably lower than either Bell or Hookean spring model predictions, suggesting the existence of two regimes of reactive compliance. Additionally, interactions between L-selectin and its leukocyte ligand(s) were more labile in the presence of flow than the L-selectin endothelial ligand, PNAd, suggesting that L-selectin ligands may have different molecular and mechanical properties. Both types of L

  12. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  13. Repulsion by Slit and Roundabout prevents Shotgun/E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion during Drosophila heart tube lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, Edgardo; Soplop, Nadine H; Patel, Rajesh; Kramer, Sunita G

    2008-07-28

    During Drosophila melanogaster heart development, a lumen forms between apical surfaces of contralateral cardioblasts (CBs). We show that Slit and its receptor Roundabout (Robo) are required at CB apical domains for lumen formation. Mislocalization of Slit outside the apical domain causes ectopic lumen formation and the mislocalization of cell junction proteins, E-cadherin (E-Cad) and Enabled, without disrupting overall CB cell polarity. Ectopic lumen formation is suppressed in robo mutants, which indicates robo's requirement for this process. Genetic evidence suggests that Robo and Shotgun (Shg)/E-Cad function together in modulating CB adhesion. robo and shg/E-Cad transheterozygotes have lumen defects. In robo loss-of-function or shg/E-Cad gain-of-function embryos, lumen formation is blocked because of inappropriate CB adhesion and an accumulation of E-Cad at the apical membrane. In contrast, shg/E-Cad loss-of-function or robo gain-of-function blocks lumen formation due to a loss of CB adhesion. Our data show that Slit and Robo pathways function in lumen formation as a repulsive signal to antagonize E-Cad-mediated cell adhesion.

  14. Distinct Fcγ receptors mediate the effect of Serum Amyloid P on neutrophil adhesion and fibrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Nehemiah; Pilling, Darrell; Gomer, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma protein Serum Amyloid P (SAP) reduces neutrophil adhesion, inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and promotes phagocytosis of cell debris by macrophages. Together, these effects of SAP reduce key aspects of inflammation and fibrosis, and SAP injections improve lung function in pulmonary fibrosis patients. SAP functions are mediated in part by Fcγ receptors, but the contribution of each Fcγ receptor is not fully understood. We found that amino acids Q55 and E126 in human SAP affect human fibrocyte differentiation and SAP binding to FcγRI. E126, K130 and Q128 affect neutrophil adhesion and SAP affinity for FcγRIIa. Q128 also affects phagocytosis by macrophages and SAP affinity for FcγRI. All the identified functionally significant amino acids in SAP form a binding site that is distinct from the previously described SAP-FcγRIIa binding site. Blocking FcγRI with an IgG blocking antibody reduces the SAP effect on fibrocyte differentiation, and ligating FcγRIIa with antibodies reduces neutrophil adhesion. Together, these results suggest that SAP binds to FcγRI on monocytes to inhibit fibrocyte differentiation, and binds to FcγRIIa on neutrophils to reduce neutrophil adhesion. PMID:25024390

  15. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery.

  16. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  17. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  18. Actin polymerization stabilizes α4β1 integrin anchors that mediate monocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henry; Hyduk, Sharon J.; Wong, Janice C.; Digby, Genevieve; Arora, Pamma D.; Cano, Adrianet Puig; Hartwig, John; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes arrested on inflamed endothelium via integrins are subjected to force imparted by flowing blood. How leukocytes respond to this force and resist detachment is poorly understood. Live-cell imaging with Lifeact-transfected U937 cells revealed that force triggers actin polymerization at upstream α4β1 integrin adhesion sites and the adjacent cortical cytoskeleton. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that this culminates in the formation of structures that anchor monocyte adhesion. Inhibition of actin polymerization resulted in cell deformation, displacement, and detachment. Transfection of dominant-negative constructs and inhibition of function or expression revealed key signaling steps required for upstream actin polymerization and adhesion stabilization. These included activation of Rap1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ isoform, and Rac but not Cdc42. Thus, rapid signaling and structural adaptations enable leukocytes to stabilize adhesion and resist detachment forces. PMID:22472442

  19. Surface roughness mediated adhesion forces between borosilicate glass and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily; Perni, Stefano; Nipiĉ, Damijan; Bohinc, Klemen; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-08-12

    It is well-known that a number of surface characteristics affect the extent of adhesion between two adjacent materials. One of such parameters is the surface roughness as surface asperities at the nanoscale level govern the overall adhesive forces. For example, the extent of bacterial adhesion is determined by the surface topography; also, once a bacteria colonizes a surface, proliferation of that species will take place and a biofilm may form, increasing the resistance of bacterial cells to removal. In this study, borosilicate glass was employed with varying surface roughness and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to replicate the protein layer that covers orthopedic devices on implantation. As roughness is a scale-dependent process, relevant scan areas were analyzed using atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine Ra; furthermore, appropriate bacterial species were attached to the tip to measure the adhesion forces between cells and substrates. The bacterial species chosen (Staphylococci and Streptococci) are common pathogens associated with a number of implant related infections that are detrimental to the biomedical devices and patients. Correlation between adhesion forces and surface roughness (Ra) was generally better when the surface roughness was measured through scanned areas with size (2 × 2 μm) comparable to bacteria cells. Furthermore, the BSA coating altered the surface roughness without correlation with the initial values of such parameter; therefore, better correlations were found between adhesion forces and BSA-coated surfaces when actual surface roughness was used instead of the initial (nominal) values. It was also found that BSA induced a more hydrophilic and electron donor characteristic to the surfaces; in agreement with increasing adhesion forces of hydrophilic bacteria (as determined through microbial adhesion to solvents test) on BSA-coated substrates.

  20. TGF-beta(3)-induced chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan mediates palatal shelf adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martinez, M L; Tudela, C; Alonso, I; Moro, J A; Formoso, M A; Ferguson, M W J; Martínez-Alvarez, C

    2002-10-15

    In mammals, the adhesion and fusion of the palatal shelves are essential mechanisms in the development of the secondary palate. Failure of any of these processes leads to the formation of cleft palate. The mechanisms underlying palatal shelf adhesion are poorly understood, although the presence of filopodia on the apical surfaces of the superficial medial edge epithelial (MEE) cells seems to play an important role in the adhesion of the opposing MEE. We demonstrate here the appearance of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) on the apical surface of MEE cells only immediately prior to contact between the palatal shelves. This apical CSPG has a functional role in palatal shelf adhesion, as either the alteration of CSPG synthesis by beta-D-Xyloside or its specific digestion by chondroitinase AC strikingly alters the in vitro adhesion of palatal shelves. We also demonstrate the absence of this apical CSPG in the clefted palates of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta(3)) null mutant mice, and its induction, together with palatal shelf adhesion, when TGF-beta(3) is added to TGF-beta(3) null mutant palatal shelves in culture. When chick palatal shelves (that do not adherein vivo nor express TGF-beta(3), nor CSPG in the MEE) are cultured in vitro, they do not express CSPG and partially adhere, but when TGF-beta(3) is added to the media, they express CSPG and their adhesion increases strikingly. We therefore conclude that the expression of CSPG on the apical surface of MEE cells is a key factor in palatal shelf adhesion and that this expression is regulated by TGF-beta(3).

  1. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  2. Interface Immobilization Chemistry of cRGD-based Peptides Regulates Integrin Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pallarola, Diego; Bochen, Alexander; Boehm, Heike; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq R; Spatz, Joachim P; Kessler, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of specific surface receptors of the integrin family with different extracellular matrix-based ligands is of utmost importance for the cellular adhesion process. A ligand consists of an integrin-binding group, here cyclic RGDfX, a spacer molecule that lifts the integrin-binding group from the surface and a surface anchoring group. c(-RGDfX-) peptides are bound to gold nanoparticle structured surfaces via polyproline, polyethylene glycol or aminohexanoic acid containing spacers of different lengths. Although keeping the integrin-binding c(-RGDfX-) peptides constant for all compounds, changes of the ligand's spacer chemistry and length reveal significant differences in cell adhesion activation and focal adhesion formation. Polyproline-based peptides demonstrate improved cell adhesion kinetics and focal adhesion formation compared with common aminohexanoic acid or polyethylene glycol spacers. Binding activity can additionally be improved by applying ligands with two head groups, inducing a multimeric effect. This study gives insights into spacer-based differences in integrin-driven cell adhesion processes and remarkably highlights the polyproline-based spacers as suitable ligand-presenting templates for surface functionalization. PMID:25810710

  3. Overexpressed Ly-6A.2 mediates cell-cell adhesion by binding a ligand expressed on lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bamezai, A; Rock, K L

    1995-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus encodes several cell surface proteins whose functions are unknown. Although it is hypothesized that these proteins may be receptors, there is no direct evidence that they bind a ligand. Herein we present evidence that Ly-6A.2, a Ly-6 protein expressed on T lymphocytes, binds a ligand expressed on normal thymocytes and splenic B and T cells. We find that transgenic thymocytes that overexpress Ly-6A.2 spontaneously aggregate in culture. This homotypic adhesion requires the overexpression of Ly-6A.2 because it is not observed in cultures of nontransgenic thymocytes. The aggregation of Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is inhibited by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (which removes Ly-6A.2 and other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins from the membrane). Some anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies, including nonactivating ones and Fab' fragments, inhibit this aggregation. In contrast, other anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies increase the aggregation of transgenic but not nontransgenic thymocytes. To further examine whether Ly-6A.2 mediates adhesion (versus inducing another adhesion pathway) reaggregation assays were performed with paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes reaggregate in culture and this aggregation is also blocked by phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C and anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that the homotypic adhesion of cultured Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is directly mediated by Ly-6A.2 and, more importantly, strongly suggests that Ly-6A.2 binds a ligand that is expressed on thymocytes. Tg+ thymocytes also bind to nontransgenic thymocytes, B cells, and T cells, indicating that normal cells naturally express the Ly-6A.2 ligand. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753800

  4. Complete Functional Segregation of Planarian β-Catenin-1 and -2 in Mediating Wnt Signaling and Cell Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Guoliang; Ma, Changxin; Bao, Kai; Zheng, Liang; Wang, Xinquan; Sun, Zhirong; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa; Wu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    β-Catenin is a bifunctional protein participating in both cell adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling. In cell adhesion, it bridges the transmembrane cadherin and the actin-binding protein α-catenin and is essential for adherens junction formation, whereas in canonical Wnt signaling, it shuttles between the cytosol and nucleus and functions as an essential transcriptional activator. Schmidtea mediterranea β-catenin-1 was identified as a determinant of antero-posterior polarity during body regeneration by mediating Wnt signaling. Here we show that S. mediterranea β-catenin-2 is specifically expressed in epithelial cells in the gut and pharynx, where it has a putative role in mediating cell adhesion. We show evidence that planarian β-catenin-1 and -2 have distinct biochemical properties. β-Catenin-1 can interact with the components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway but not with α-catenin, whereas β-catenin-2 interacts with cell adhesion molecules, including E-cadherin and α-catenin, but not with Wnt signaling components. Consistent with their specific function, β-catenin-1 is a potent transcriptional activator, whereas β-catenin-2 has no transcriptional activity. Protein sequence alignment also indicates that the planarian β-catenin-1 and -2 retain distinct critical residues and motifs, which are in agreement with the differences in their biochemical properties. At last, phylogenetic analysis reveals a probable Platyhelminthes- specific structural and functional segregation from which the monofunctional β-catenins evolved. Our results thus identify the first two monofunctional β-catenins in metazoans. PMID:20511647

  5. Dual role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating cell adhesion mediated by the integrin lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lub, M; van Kooyk, Y; van Vliet, S J; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Intracellular signals are required to activate the leukocyte-specific adhesion receptor lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18) to bind its ligand, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this study, we investigated the role of the cytoskeleton in LFA-1 activation and demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) can both enhance and inhibit LFA-1-mediated adhesion, depending on the distribution of LFA-1 on the cell surface. We observed that LFA-1 is already clustered on the cell surface of interleukin-2/phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. These cells bind strongly ICAM-1 and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton inhibits adhesion. In contrast to interleukin-2/phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, resting lymphocytes, which display a homogenous cell surface distribution of LFA-1, respond poorly to intracellular signals to bind ICAM-1, unless the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted. On resting peripheral blood lymphocytes, uncoupling of LFA-1 from the actin cytoskeleton induces clustering of LFA-1 and this, along with induction of a high-affinity form of LFA-1, via "inside-out" signaling, results in enhanced binding to ICAM-1, which is dependent on intact intermediate filaments, microtubules, and metabolic energy. We hypothesize that linkage of LFA-1 to cytoskeletal elements prevents movement of LFA-1 over the cell surface, thus inhibiting clustering and strong ligand binding. Release from these cytoskeletal elements allows lateral movement and activation of LFA-1, resulting in ligand binding and "outside-in" signaling, that subsequently stimulates actin polymerization and stabilizes cell adhesion. Images PMID:9190212

  6. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  7. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-06-30

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells.

  8. Accessory cells of the microenvironment protect multiple myeloma from T-cell cytotoxicity through cell adhesion-mediated immune resistance.

    PubMed

    de Haart, Sanne J; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Minnema, Monique C; Huang, Julie H; Aarts-Riemens, Tineke; Bovenschen, Niels; Yuan, Huipin; Groen, Richard W J; McMillin, Douglas W; Jakubikova, Jana; Lokhorst, Henk M; Martens, Anton C; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Mutis, Tuna

    2013-10-15

    Cellular immunotherapy frequently fails to induce sustained remissions in patients with multiple myeloma, indicating the ability of multiple myeloma cells to evade cellular immunity. Toward a better understanding and effective therapeutic modulation of multiple myeloma immune evasion mechanisms, we here investigated the role of the tumor microenvironment in rendering multiple myeloma cells resistant to the cytotoxic machinery of T cells. Using a compartment-specific, bioluminescence imaging-based assay system, we measured the lysis of luciferase-transduced multiple myeloma cells by CD4(+) or CD8(+) CTLs in the presence versus absence of adherent accessory cells of the bone marrow microenvironment. We simultaneously determined the level of CTL activation by measuring the granzyme B release in culture supernatants. Bone marrow stromal cells from patients with multiple myeloma and healthy individuals, as well as vascular endothelial cells, significantly inhibited the lysis of multiple myeloma cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner and without substantial T-cell suppression, thus showing the induction of a cell adhesion-mediated immune resistance (CAM-IR) against CTL lysis. Further analyses revealed that adhesion to accessory cells downregulated Fas and upregulated the caspase-3 inhibitor survivin in multiple myeloma cells. Reconstitution of Fas expression with bortezomib enhanced the CTL-mediated lysis of multiple myeloma cells. Repressing survivin with the small-molecule YM155 synergized with CTLs and abrogated CAM-IR in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal the cell adhesion-mediated induction of apoptosis resistance as a novel immune escape mechanism and provide a rationale to improve the efficacy of cellular therapies by pharmacologic modulation of CAM-IR. ©2013 AACR.

  9. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tong Seng; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hui Shi; Kausalya, P. Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-08-15

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be < 0.65 k{sub B}T, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (> 1.37 k{sub B}T). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments.

  10. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection.

  11. The Ret receptor regulates sensory neuron dendrite growth and integrin mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Soba, Peter; Han, Chun; Zheng, Yi; Perea, Daniel; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2015-03-12

    Neurons develop highly stereotyped receptive fields by coordinated growth of their dendrites. Although cell surface cues play a major role in this process, few dendrite specific signals have been identified to date. We conducted an in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (C4da) neurons and identified the conserved Ret receptor, known to play a role in axon guidance, as an important regulator of dendrite development. The loss of Ret results in severe dendrite defects due to loss of extracellular matrix adhesion, thus impairing growth within a 2D plane. We provide evidence that Ret interacts with integrins to regulate dendrite adhesion via rac1. In addition, Ret is required for dendrite stability and normal F-actin distribution suggesting it has an essential role in dendrite maintenance. We propose novel functions for Ret as a regulator in dendrite patterning and adhesion distinct from its role in axon guidance.

  12. Polydopamine-Mediated Immobilization of Alginate Lyase to Prevent P. aeruginosa Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alves, Diana; Sileika, Tadas; Messersmith, Phillip B; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2016-09-01

    Given alginate's contribution to Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence, it has long been considered a promising target for interventional therapies, which have been performed by using the enzyme alginate lyase. In this work, instead of treating pre-established mucoid biofilms, alginate lyase is immobilized onto a surface as a preventive measure against P. aeruginosa adhesion. A polydopamine dip-coating strategy is employed for functionalization of polycarbonate surfaces. Enzyme immobilization is confirmed by surface characterization. Surfaces functionalized with alginate lyase exhibit anti-adhesive properties, inhibiting the attachment of the mucoid strain. Moreover, surfaces modified with this enzyme also inhibit the adhesion of the tested non-mucoid strain. Unexpectedly, treatment with heat-inactivated enzyme also inhibits the attachment of mucoid and non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strains. These findings suggest that the antibacterial performance of alginate lyase functional coatings is catalysis-independent, highlighting the importance of further studies to better understand its mechanism of action against P. aeruginosa strains.

  13. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M; Alford, Patrick W; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P

    2017-04-12

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously 'sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell-substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell-substratum and cell-cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level.

  14. Mannoprotein MP84 mediates the adhesion of Cryptococcus neoformans to epithelial lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Pedro A. C.; Penha, Luciana L.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, Jose O.

    2014-01-01

    The capsule is the most important virulence factor of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This structure consists of highly hydrated polysaccharides, including glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), and galactoxylomannan (GalXM). It is also composed of mannoproteins (MPs) which corresponds to less than 1% of the capsular weight. Despite MPs being the minority and least studied components, four of these molecules with molecular masses of 115, 98, 88, and 84 kDa were identified and characterized as C. neoformans immunoreactive antigens involved in the pathogenesis, and are potential cryptococcosis vaccine candidates. With the aim to describe the adhesive property of MPs, we cloned and expressed the MP84, a mannoprotein with molecular weight of 84 kDa, on Pichia pastoris yeast, and performed interaction assays of C. neoformans with epithelial lung cells, in the presence or absence of capsule components. Two fungal strains, the wild type, NE-241, and a mutant, CAP67, deficient in GXM production, were used throughout this study. The adhesion assays were completed using epithelial lung cells, A549, and human prostate cancer cells, PC3, as a control. We observed that capsulated wild type (NE-241), and acapsular (CAP67) strains adhered significantly to A549 cells, compared with PC3 cells (p < 0.05). GXM inhibits the NE-241 adhesion, but not the CAP67. In contrast, CAP67 adhesion was only inhibited in the presence of MP84. These results demonstrate the involvement of MP in the adhesion of C. neoformans to epithelial lung cells. We conclude that this interaction possibly involves an adhesion-like interaction between MP on the fungal surface and the complementary receptor molecules on the epithelial cells. PMID:25191644

  15. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  16. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-01-14

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  17. Mechanism for adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56-mediated RhoA activation induced by collagen III stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E; Lencer, Wayne I; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family.

  18. cAMP receptor protein regulates mouse colonization, motility, fimbria-mediated adhesion, and stress tolerance in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Lin; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Huang, Kuo-Tong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2017-08-04

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a major transcriptional regulator in bacteria. This study demonstrated that Crp affects numerous virulence-related phenotypes, including colonization of mice, motility, fimbria-mediated adhesion, and glucose stress tolerance in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Diabetic mice were more susceptible to kidney colonization by wild-type strain than nondiabetic mice, in which the crp mutant exhibited increased kidney colonization. Loss of crp or addition of 10% glucose increased the P. mirabilis adhesion to kidney cells. Direct negative regulation of pmpA (which encodes the major subunit of P-like fimbriae) expression by Crp was demonstrated using a reporter assay and DNase I footprinting. Moreover, the pmpA/crp double mutant exhibited reduced kidney adhesion comparable to that of the pmpA mutant, and mouse kidney colonization by the pmpA mutant was significantly attenuated. Hence, the upregulation of P-like fimbriae in the crp mutant substantially enhanced kidney colonization. Moreover, increased survival in macrophages, increased stress tolerance, RpoS upregulation, and flagellum deficiency leading to immune evasion may promote kidney colonization by the crp mutant. This is the first study to elucidate the role of Crp in the virulence of uropathogenic P. mirabilis, underlying mechanisms, and related therapeutic potential.

  19. Biodegradable-Polymer-Blend-Based Surgical Sealant with Body-Temperature-Mediated Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Lee, Nora G; Casey, Brendan J; Srinivasan, Priya; Sikorski, Michael J; Daristotle, John L; Sandler, Anthony D; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The development of practical and efficient surgical sealants has the propensity to improve operational outcomes. A biodegradable polymer blend is fabricated as a nonwoven fiber mat in situ. After direct deposition onto the tissue of interest, the material transitions from a fiber mat to a film. This transition promotes polymer-substrate interfacial interactions leading to improved adhesion and surgical sealant performance.

  20. BigA is a novel adhesin of Brucella that mediates adhesion to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Czibener, Cecilia; Merwaiss, Fernando; Guaimas, Francisco; Del Giudice, Mariela Giselda; Serantes, Diego Armando Rey; Spera, Juan Manuel; Ugalde, Juan Esteban

    2016-04-01

    Adhesion to cells is the initial step in the infectious cycle of basically all pathogenic bacteria, and to do so, microorganisms have evolved surface molecules that target different cellular receptors. Brucella is an intracellular pathogen that infects a wide range of mammals whose virulence is completely dependent on the capacity to replicate in phagocytes. Although much has been done to elucidate how Brucella multiplies in macrophages, we still do not understand how bacteria invade epithelial cells to perform a replicative cycle or what adhesion molecules are involved in the process. We report the identification in Brucella abortus of a novel adhesin that harbours a bacterial immunoglobulin-like domain and demonstrate that this protein is involved in the adhesion to polarized epithelial cells such as the Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney models targeting the bacteria to the cell-cell interaction membrane. While deletion of the gene significantly reduced adhesion, over-expression dramatically increased it. Addition of the recombinant protein to cells induced cytoskeleton rearrangements and showed that this adhesin targets proteins of the cell-cell interaction membrane in confluent cultures. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tumor exosome-mediated promotion of adhesion to mesothelial cells in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Tomohiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Konishi, Hirotaka; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Ogino, Shinpei; Fujita, Yuji; Hiramoto, Hidekazu; Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Background Peritoneal metastasis consists of a highly complex series of steps, and the details of the underlying molecular mechanism remain largely unclear. In this study, the effects of tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) on the progression of gastric cancers were investigated in peritoneal metastasis. Results TEX were internalized in both mesothelial and gastric cancer cells in a cellular origin non-specific manner. Internalization of TEX into mesothelial cells promoted significant adhesion between mesothelial and gastric cancer cells, and TEX internalization into gastric cancer cells significantly promoted migratory ability, while internalization of mesothelial cell-derived exosomes did not. Expression of adhesion-related molecules, such as fibronectin 1 (FN1) and laminin gamma 1 (LAMC1), were increased in mesothelial cells after internalization of TEX from gastric cancer cell line and malignant pleural effusion. Methods TEX were extracted from cell-conditioned medium by ultracentrifugation. The effects of TEX on the malignant potential of gastric cancer were investigated in adhesion, invasion, and proliferation assays. PCR array as well as western blotting were performed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms. The molecular changes in mesothelial cell after internalization of TEX derived from malignant pleural effusion were also confirmed. Conclusions TEX may play a critical role in the development of peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer, which may be partially due to inducing increased expression of adhesion molecules in mesothelial cells. PMID:27487135

  2. The DSPII splice variant is crucial for desmosome-mediated adhesion in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Rita M; Tattersall, Daniel; Patel, Vishal; McPhail, Graham D; Hatzimasoura, Elizabeth; Abrams, Dominic J; South, Andrew P; Kelsell, David P

    2012-06-15

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions specialised for strong adhesion that are prominent in the epidermis and heart muscle. Defective desmosomal function due to inherited mutations in the constitutive desmosomal gene desmoplakin (DSP) causes skin or heart disorders and in some instances both. Different mutations have different disease-causing molecular mechanisms as evidenced by the varying phenotypes resulting from mutations affecting different domains of the same protein, but the majority of these mechanisms remain to be determined. Here, we studied two mutations in DSP that lead to different dosages of the two major DSP splice variants, DSPI and DSPII, and compared their molecular mechanisms. One of the mutations results in total DSP haploinsufficiency and is associated with autosomal dominant striate palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). The other leads to complete absence of DSPI and the minor isoform DSPIa but normal levels of DSPII, and is associated with autosomal recessive epidermolytic PPK, woolly hair and severe arrhythmogenic dilated cardiomyopathy. Using siRNA treatments to mimic these two mutations and additionally a DSPII-specific siRNA, we found striking differences between DSP isoforms with respect to keratinocyte adhesion upon cellular stress with DSPII being the key component in intermediate filament (IF) stability and desmosome-mediated adhesion. In addition, reduction in DSP expression reduced the amount of plakophilin 1, desmocollin (DSC) 2 and DSC3 with DSPI having a greater influence than DSPII on the expression levels of DSC3. These results suggest that the two major DSP splice variants are not completely redundant in function and that DSPII dosage is particularly important for desmosomal adhesion in the skin.

  3. SIGNR1-mediated phagocytosis, but not SIGNR1-mediated endocytosis or cell adhesion, suppresses LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Yoko; Takagi, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Kei; Kono, Mirei; Yamatani, Minami; Kojima, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) serve as phagocytosis receptors for pathogens and also function as adhesion molecules and in the recognition and endocytosis of glycosylated self-antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated that phagocytosis mediated by a mouse mannose-binding CLR, SIGNR1 significantly suppressed the LPS-induced secretion of the specific pro-inflammatory cytokines from the resident peritoneal macrophages and the mouse macrophage-like cells that express SIGNR1 (RAW-SIGNR1). LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from peritoneal macrophages suppressed in response to uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs), and the suppression was partly inhibited by treatment with an anti-SIGNR1 antibody. LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from RAW-SIGNR1 cells was also clearly inhibited by treatment of the cells with OMLs >0.4μm in diameter, but treatment with OMLs <0.4μm in diameter did not affect the IL-6 secretion. In contrast, LPS-induced TNF-α secretion from the cells was not affected on treatment of the cells with OMLs. Suppression of the IL-6 secretion was not observed following treatment with oligomannose-containing soluble polymers or when cells were bound to an oligomannose-coated solid phase. Phagocytosis of oligomannose-coated liposomes did not interfere with the transcription of IL-6 mRNA, but did affect IL-6 mRNA stability, leading to suppression of IL-6 secretion. Interestingly, treatment of the cells with Ly290042, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, partly blocked the suppression of LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 by OML. Thus, we conclude that SIGNR1-mediated phagocytosis but not SIGNR1-mediated endocytosis and cell adhesion, suppresses the TLR4-mediated production of specific proinflammatory cytokines via PI3 kinase signaling.

  4. Long-Term Follow-up of Foamy Viral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R; Tuschong, Laura M; Calvo, Katherine R; Shive, Heather R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Karlsson, Eleanor K; West, Robert R; Russell, David W; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2013-01-01

    The development of leukemia following gammaretroviral vector-mediated gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has emphasized the need for long-term follow-up in animals treated with hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. In this study, we report the long-term follow-up (4–7 years) of four dogs with canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) treated with foamy viral (FV) vector-mediated gene therapy. All four CLAD dogs previously received nonmyeloablative conditioning with 200 cGy total body irradiation followed by infusion of autologous, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced by a FV vector expressing canine CD18 from an internal Murine Stem Cell Virus (MSCV) promoter. CD18+ leukocyte levels were >2% following infusion of vector-transduced cells leading to ongoing reversal of the CLAD phenotype for >4 years. There was no clinical development of lymphoid or myeloid leukemia in any of the four dogs and integration site analysis did not reveal insertional oncogenesis. These results showing disease correction/amelioration of disease in CLAD without significant adverse events provide support for the use of a FV vector to treat children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) in a human gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:23531552

  5. Direct evidence for cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR) on the level of individual integrin β1 clusters.

    PubMed

    Babel, Laura; Grunewald, Miriam; Lehn, Robert; Langhans, Markus; Meckel, Tobias

    2017-06-13

    The cellular interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) modulates many key processes such as proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. In addition, cells cultured under 3D conditions in presence of an ECM display a marked radioresistance towards ionizing radiation (IR) in comparison to conventionally 2D cultured cells. This process, also known as "cell-adhesion-mediated-radio-resistance" (CAM-RR), has been linked to the chromatin structure that differs between cells cultured on stiff surfaces versus cell grown on soft planar supports or in 3D environments. As integrins are the key mediators of cell adhesion and mechanosensing, they originate the molecular signalling towards chromatin remodelling in response to a cell's microenvironment. We aimed to investigate this molecular origin that leads to CAM-RR by investigating the distribution of integrins at the single molecule level and show that cells cultured in 2D keep a lower fraction of integrin β1 in clusters and maintain a less defined cluster status than 3D cultured cells. Upon X-irradiation this nanoscale distribution of integrin β1 is disturbed at much lower dosages in 2D versus 3D cultured cells. Radioresistance is thus linked to the ability to maintain a well defined organization of integrins in clusters, making integrin distribution a potential drug target for radiosensitization.

  6. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  7. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  8. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  9. The novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 promotes the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Kauttu, Tuuli; Seppänen, Hanna; Vainionpää, Sanna; Wang, Shan; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2013-02-01

    Kindlin-2 is a novel focal adhesion gene mediating the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in linking chronic inflammation to cancer progression. Both kindlin-2 and TAMs have been found to promote the invasion of gastric cancer cells in our previous studies. However, the correlation between kindlin-2 and TAMs remains unclear. Real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate kindlin-2 expression in the AGS, NCI and Hs-746T gastric cancer cell lines co-cultured with TAMs under normal or hypoxic conditions. IL8, IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL18, IL22 and IL24 expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR in the gastric cancer lines with varying levels of kindlin-2 expression, as well as after downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA expression by the siRNA method. We found that kindlin-2 was upregulated in all three gastric cancer cell lines when co-cultured with TAMs under normal conditions. Under hypoxic conditions, the induction of kindlin-2 expression induced by macrophages was significantly downregulated in the Hs-746T cell line. IL8, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression was significantly higher in gastric cell lines with high kindlin-2 expression. Downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA decreased IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression but IL8 and IL18 expression was upregulated. Therefore, the novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 may play an important role in promoting the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by TAMs through regulating interleukin expression.

  10. Murine junctional adhesion molecules JAM-B and JAM-C mediate endothelial and stellate cell interactions during hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, Edith; Bayer, Monika; Ehser, Janine; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Imhof, Beat A; Christen, Urs

    2016-07-03

    Classical junctional adhesion molecules JAM-A, JAM-B and JAM-C influence vascular permeability, cell polarity as well as leukocyte recruitment and immigration into inflamed tissue. As the vasculature becomes remodelled in chronically injured, fibrotic livers we aimed to determine distribution and role of junctional adhesion molecules during this pathological process. Therefore, livers of naïve or carbon tetrachloride-treated mice were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to localize all 3 classical junctional adhesion molecules. Hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells were isolated and subjected to immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry to determine localization and functionality of JAM-B and JAM-C. Cells were further used to perform contractility and migration assays and to study endothelial tubulogenesis and pericytic coverage by hepatic stellate cells. We found that in healthy tissue, JAM-A was ubiquitously expressed whereas JAM-B and JAM-C were restricted to the vasculature. During fibrosis, JAM-B and JAM-C levels increased in endothelial cells and JAM-C was de novo generated in myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells. Soluble JAM-C blocked contractility but increased motility in hepatic stellate cells. Furthermore, soluble JAM-C reduced endothelial tubulogenesis and endothelial cell/stellate cell interaction. Thus, during liver fibrogenesis, JAM-B and JAM-C expression increase on the vascular endothelium. More importantly, JAM-C appears on myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells linking them as pericytes to JAM-B positive endothelial cells. This JAM-B/JAM-C mediated interaction between endothelial cells and stellate cells stabilizes vessel walls and may control the sinusoidal diameter. Increased hepatic stellate cell contraction mediated by JAM-C/JAM-C interaction may cause intrahepatic vasoconstriction, which is a major complication in liver cirrhosis.

  11. β Integrin-like protein-mediated adhesion and its disturbances during cell cultivation of the mussel Mytilus trossulus.

    PubMed

    Maiorova, Mariia A; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we focus on the specific contribution of β integrin-like protein to adhesion-mediated events in molluscan larval cells in culture that could not have been investigated within the whole animal. An analysis of disturbances to cell-substratum adhesion, caused by the integrin receptor inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS)-peptide, the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-chelators and the stress influence of freezing-thawing, reveals that all these factors resulted in the partial destruction of the integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction in culture and, in particular, changes in the distribution and relative abundance of β integrin-positive cells. The experiments, carried out on selected substrates, found that β integrin-positive cells demonstrate different affinities for the substrates. This finding further supports the assumption that epithelial differentiation in cultivated cells of larval Mytilus may be mediated by β integrin-like proteins via binding to laminin; direct binding to other components of the ECM could not be demonstrated. The mussel β integrin-positive cells are not involved in myogenic or neuronal differentiation on any of the substrates but part of them has tubulin-positive cilia, forming some epithelia-like structures. Our data indicate that β integrin-positive cells are able to proliferate in vitro which suggests that they could participate in renewing the digestive epithelium in larvae. The findings provide evidence that the distribution pattern of β integrin-like protein depends on the cell type and the factors influencing the adhesion.

  12. SDA, a DNA aptamer inhibiting E- and P-selectin mediated adhesion of cancer and leukemia cells, the first and pivotal step in transendothelial migration during metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Faryammanesh, Rassa; Lange, Tobias; Magbanua, Eileen; Haas, Sina; Meyer, Cindy; Wicklein, Daniel; Schumacher, Udo; Hahn, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial (E-) and platelet (P-) selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA) via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) with a K(d) value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29) and leukemia (EOL-1) cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNFα-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies.

  13. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  14. Macrophages mediate colon carcinoma cell adhesion in the rat liver after exposure to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Nuray; Grewal, Simran; Bögels, Marijn; van der Bij, Gerben J.; Koppes, Malika M.A.; Oosterling, Steven J.; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Hoeben, Kees A.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2012-01-01

    The surgical resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with an enhanced risk of liver metastases. Moreover, bacterial translocation or anastomic leakage during resection has been shown to correlate with a poor long-term surgical outcome, suggesting that bacterial products may contribute to the formation of metastases. Driven by these premises, we investigated the role of the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the generation of liver metastases. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS led to enhanced tumor-cell adhesion to the rat liver as early as 1.5 h post-administration. Furthermore, a rapid loss of the expression of the tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was observed, suggesting that LPS disrupts the integrity of the microvasculature. LPS addition to endothelial-macrophage co-cultures damaged endothelial monolayers and caused the formation of intercellular gaps, which was accompanied by increased tumor-cell adhesion. These results suggest that macrophages are involved in the endothelial damage resulting from exposure to LPS. Interestingly, the expression levels of of ZO-1 were not affected by LPS treatment in rats in which liver macrophages had been depleted as well as in rats that had been treated with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. In both settings, decreased tumor-cell adhesion was observed. Taken together, our findings indicate that LPS induces ROS release by macrophages, resulting in the damage of the vascular lining of the liver and hence allowing increased tumor-cell adherence. Thus, peri-operative treatments that prevent the activation of macrophages and—as a consequence—limit endothelial damage and tumor-cell adhesion may significantly improve the long-term outcome of cancer patients undergoing surgical tumor resection. PMID:23264898

  15. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  16. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M.; Alford, Patrick W.; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-01-01

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously ‘sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell–substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell–substratum and cell–cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level. PMID:28401884

  17. A novel evolutionarily conserved domain of cell-adhesion GPCRs mediates autoproteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Araç, Demet; Boucard, Antony A; Bolliger, Marc F; Nguyen, Jenna; Soltis, S Michael; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Proteolysis Site (GPS) of cell-adhesion GPCRs and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) proteins constitutes a highly conserved autoproteolysis sequence, but its catalytic mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that unexpectedly the ∼40-residue GPS motif represents an integral part of a much larger ∼320-residue domain that we termed GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain. Crystal structures of GAIN domains from two distantly related cell-adhesion GPCRs revealed a conserved novel fold in which the GPS motif forms five β-strands that are tightly integrated into the overall GAIN domain. The GAIN domain is evolutionarily conserved from tetrahymena to mammals, is the only extracellular domain shared by all human cell-adhesion GPCRs and PKD proteins, and is the locus of multiple human disease mutations. Functionally, the GAIN domain is both necessary and sufficient for autoproteolysis, suggesting an autoproteolytic mechanism whereby the overall GAIN domain fine-tunes the chemical environment in the GPS to catalyse peptide bond hydrolysis. Thus, the GAIN domain embodies a unique, evolutionarily ancient and widespread autoproteolytic fold whose function is likely relevant for GPCR signalling and for multiple human diseases. PMID:22333914

  18. The Ret receptor regulates sensory neuron dendrite growth and integrin mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Soba, Peter; Han, Chun; Zheng, Yi; Perea, Daniel; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2015-01-01

    Neurons develop highly stereotyped receptive fields by coordinated growth of their dendrites. Although cell surface cues play a major role in this process, few dendrite specific signals have been identified to date. We conducted an in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (C4da) neurons and identified the conserved Ret receptor, known to play a role in axon guidance, as an important regulator of dendrite development. The loss of Ret results in severe dendrite defects due to loss of extracellular matrix adhesion, thus impairing growth within a 2D plane. We provide evidence that Ret interacts with integrins to regulate dendrite adhesion via rac1. In addition, Ret is required for dendrite stability and normal F-actin distribution suggesting it has an essential role in dendrite maintenance. We propose novel functions for Ret as a regulator in dendrite patterning and adhesion distinct from its role in axon guidance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05491.001 PMID:25764303

  19. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-04-20

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation.

  20. The Kindler syndrome protein is regulated by transforming growth factor-beta and involved in integrin-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kloeker, Susanne; Major, Michael B; Calderwood, David A; Ginsberg, Mark H; Jones, David A; Beckerle, Mary C

    2004-02-20

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) contributes to tumor invasion and cancer progression by increasing the motility of tumor cells. To identify genes involved in TGF-beta-mediated cell migration, the transcriptional profiles of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) treated with TGF-beta were compared with untreated cells by cDNA microarray analysis. One gene up-regulated by TGF-beta was recently named kindlerin (Jobard, F., Bouadjar, B., Caux, F., Hadj-Rabia, S., Has, C., Matsuda, F., Weissenbach, J., Lathrop, M., Prud'homme, J. F., and Fischer, J. (2003) Hum. Mol. Genet. 12, 925-935). This gene is significantly overexpressed in some cancers (Weinstein, E. J., Bourner, M., Head, R., Zakeri, H., Bauer, C., and Mazzarella, R. (2003) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1637, 207-216), and mutations in this gene lead to Kindler syndrome, an autosomal-recessive genodermatosis. TGF-beta stimulation of HMEC resulted in a marked induction of kindlerin RNA, and Western blotting demonstrated a corresponding increase in protein abundance. Kindlerin displays a putative FERM (four point one ezrin radixin moesin) domain that is closely related to the sequences in talin that interact with integrin beta subunit cytoplasmic domains. The critical residues in the talin FERM domain that mediate integrin binding show a high degree of conservation in kindlerin. Furthermore, kindlerin is recruited into a molecular complex with the beta1A and beta3 integrin cytoplasmic domains. Consistent with these biochemical findings, kindlerin is present at focal adhesions, sites of integrin-rich, membrane-substratum adhesion. Additionally, kindlerin is required for normal cell spreading. Taken together, these data suggest a role for kindlerin in mediating cell processes that depend on integrins.

  1. Positive and negative regulation by SLP-76/ADAP and Pyk2 of chemokine-stimulated T-lymphocyte adhesion mediated by integrin α4β1

    PubMed Central

    Dios-Esponera, Ana; Isern de Val, Soledad; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; García-Verdugo, Rosa; García-Bernal, David; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation by chemokines of integrin α4β1–dependent T-lymphocyte adhesion is a crucial step for lymphocyte trafficking. The adaptor Vav1 is required for chemokine-activated T-cell adhesion mediated by α4β1. Conceivably, proteins associating with Vav1 could potentially modulate this adhesion. Correlating with activation by the chemokine CXCL12 of T-lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands, a transient stimulation in the association of Vav1 with SLP-76, Pyk2, and ADAP was observed. Using T-cells depleted for SLP-76, ADAP, or Pyk2, or expressing Pyk2 kinase–inactive forms, we show that SLP-76 and ADAP stimulate chemokine-activated, α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes T-cell attachment. While CXCL12-promoted generation of high-affinity α4β1 is independent of SLP-76, ADAP, and Pyk2, the strength of α4β1-VCAM-1 interaction and cell spreading on VCAM-1 are targets of regulation by these three proteins. GTPase assays, expression of activated or dominant-negative Rac1, or combined ADAP and Pyk2 silencing indicated that Rac1 activation by CXCL12 is a common mediator response in SLP-76–, ADAP-, and Pyk2-regulated cell adhesion involving α4β1. Our data strongly suggest that chemokine-stimulated associations between Vav1, SLP-76, and ADAP facilitate Rac1 activation and α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes this adhesion by limiting Rac1 activation. PMID:26202465

  2. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Tang, Elizabeth I; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; John, Constance M; Turek, Paul J; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB)? Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5-20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4-200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by mislocalization of actin filament barbed end capping and bundling protein Eps8, and branched actin polymerization protein Arp3. Besides impeding actin dynamics

  3. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. Results In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Conclusion Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of

  4. RUNX1/ETO blocks selectin-mediated adhesion via epigenetic silencing of PSGL-1

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, K; Kohrs, N; Ptasinska, A; Assi, S A; Herold, T; Hiddemann, W; Lausen, J; Bonifer, C; Henschler, R; Wichmann, C

    2015-01-01

    RUNX1/ETO (RE), the t(8;21)-derived leukemic transcription factor associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development, deregulates genes involved in differentiation, self-renewal and proliferation. In addition, these cells show differences in cellular adhesion behavior whose molecular basis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that RE epigenetically silences the gene encoding P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and downregulates PSGL-1 expression in human CD34+ and murine lin− hematopoietic progenitor cells. Levels of PSGL-1 inversely and dose-dependently correlate with RE oncogene levels. However, a DNA-binding defective mutant fails to downregulate PSGL-1. We show by ChIP experiments that the PSGL-1 promoter is a direct target of RE and binding is accompanied by high levels of the repressive chromatin mark histone H3K27me3. In t(8;21)+ Kasumi-1 cells, PSGL-1 expression is completely restored at both the mRNA and cell surface protein levels following RE downregulation with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or RE inhibition with tetramerization-blocking peptides, and at the promoter H3K27me3 is replaced by the activating chromatin mark H3K9ac as well as by RNA polymerase II. Upregulation of PSGL-1 restores the binding of cells to P- and E-selectin and re-establishes myeloid-specific cellular adhesion while it fails to bind to lymphocyte-specific L-selectin. Overall, our data suggest that the RE oncoprotein epigenetically represses PSGL-1 via binding to its promoter region and thus affects the adhesive behavior of t(8;21)+ AML cells. PMID:25867177

  5. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  6. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  7. Junctional complex and focal adhesion rearrangement mediates pulmonary endothelial barrier enhancement by FTY720 S-phosphonate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichun; Bittman, Robert; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    Modulation of pulmonary vascular barrier function is an important clinical goal given the devastating effects of vascular leak in acute lung injury (ALI). We previously demonstrated that FTY720 S-phosphonate (Tys), an analog of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and FTY720, has more potent pulmonary barrier protective effects than these agents in vitro and in mouse models of ALI. Tys preserves expression of the barrier-promoting S1P1 receptor (S1PR1), whereas S1P and FTY720 induce its ubiquitination and degradation. Here we further characterize the novel barrier promoting effects of Tys in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells (EC). In human lung EC, Tys significantly increased peripheral redistribution of adherens junction proteins VE-cadherin and β-catenin and tight junction protein ZO-1. Inhibition of VE-cadherin with blocking antibody significantly attenuated Tys-induced transendothelial resistance (TER) elevation, while ZO-1 siRNA partially inhibited this elevation. Tys significantly increased focal adhesion formation and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Pharmacologic inhibition of FAK significantly attenuated Tys-induced TER elevation. Tys significantly increased phosphorylation and peripheral redistribution of the actin-binding protein, cortactin, while cortactin siRNA partially attenuated Tys-induced TER elevation. Although Tys significantly increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β, neither PI3 kinase nor GSK3β inhibition altered Tys-induced TER elevation. Tys significantly increased Rac1 activity, while inhibition of Rac1 activity significantly attenuated Tys-induced VE-cadherin redistribution and TER elevation. Junctional complex, focal adhesion rearrangement and Rac1 activation play critical roles in Tys-mediated barrier protection in pulmonary EC. These results provide mechanistic insights into the effects of this potential ALI therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. GADS is Required for TCR-Mediated Calcium Influx and Cytokine Release, but not Cellular Adhesion, in Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Zhang, Elizabeth Y.; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M.; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. PMID:25636200

  9. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  10. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  11. The mucin epiglycanin on TA3/Ha carcinoma cells prevents alpha 6 beta 4- mediated adhesion to laminin and kalinin and E-cadherin-mediated cell- cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    TA3/Ha murine mammary carcinoma cells grow in suspension, do not adhere to extracellular matrix molecules, but do adhere to hepatocytes and form liver metastases upon intraportal injection. Recently we showed that the integrin alpha 6 beta 4 on the TA3/Ha cells is involved in adhesion to hepatocytes. However, despite high cell surface levels of alpha 6 beta 4, TA3/Ha cells do not adhere to the alpha 6 beta 4 ligands laminin and kalinin. Here we show that this is due to the mucin epiglycanin that is highly expressed on TA3/Ha cells. Some monoclonal antibodies generated against epiglycanin induced capping of most of the epiglycanin molecules. TA3/Ha cells treated with these mAb did adhere to laminin and kalinin, and an epithelial monolayer was formed on kalinin, with alpha 6 beta 4 localized in HD1-containing hemidesmosome- like structures and E-cadherin at the cell-cell contact sites. Similar results were obtained after treatment of TA3/Ha cells with O- sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase which removes all epiglycanin. In addition, the enzyme induced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell aggregation. Both treatments also enhanced the adhesion to hepatocytes, but given the potent antiadhesive effect of epiglycanin it is remarkable that nontreated TA3/Ha cells adhere to hepatocytes at all. We found that during this interaction, epiglycanin was redistributed. We conclude that epiglycanin can completely prevent both intercellular and matrix adhesion, but that this effect can be overcome in certain intercellular interactions because of the induced redistribution of the mucin. PMID:7528749

  12. Ligand Activation of the Androgen Receptor Downregulates E-Cadherin-Mediated Cell Adhesion and Promotes Apoptosis of Prostatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Joanna; Chaudhary, Khurram S; Abel, Paul D; Stubbs, Andrew P; Romanska, Hanna M; Mitchell, Stephen E; Stamp, Gordon W H; Lalani, El-Nasir

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Androgen independence is the major cause of endocrine therapy failure in advanced prostate cancer (PC). To examine the effects of human androgen receptor (AR) expression on growth of human PC cells, transfection of full-length AR cDNA in an androgen-insensitive human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line (DU145) was performed. Transcriptional activity of AR was confirmed by the MMTV luciferase assay and AR expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Two stable transfectant cell lines expressing functional AR were established and passaged over 60 times. Under standard culture conditions, AR expression in transfected cells was predominantly cytoplasmic. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 60 pM-10 nM) resulted in a rapid (maximal at 30 minutes) translocation of AR to the nucleus. Treatment with DHT (5 nM) caused a significant reduction in cell-cell adhesion and aggregation accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin expression. This was associated with up to 40% inhibition of proliferation and approximately two-fold increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that gene transfer-mediated AR expression in DU145 cells confers sensitivity to DHT, modulates cell-cell adhesion through E-cadherin, and suppresses cell growth by inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis. This provides a model for studies of AR-regulated cell signalling and identification of novel androgen-regulated genes in PC. PMID:14511406

  13. Superresolution imaging of the cytoplasmic phosphatase PTPN22 links integrin-mediated T cell adhesion with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burn, Garth L; Cornish, Georgina H; Potrzebowska, Katarzyna; Samuelsson, Malin; Griffié, Juliette; Minoughan, Sophie; Yates, Mark; Ashdown, George; Pernodet, Nicolas; Morrison, Vicky L; Sanchez-Blanco, Cristina; Purvis, Harriet; Clarke, Fiona; Brownlie, Rebecca J; Vyse, Timothy J; Zamoyska, Rose; Owen, Dylan M; Svensson, Lena M; Cope, Andrew P

    2016-10-04

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that play a fundamental role in the migration of leukocytes to sites of infection or injury. We found that protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) inhibits signaling by the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) in effector T cells. PTPN22 colocalized with its substrates at the leading edge of cells migrating on surfaces coated with the LFA-1 ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Knockout or knockdown of PTPN22 or expression of the autoimmune disease-associated PTPN22-R620W variant resulted in the enhanced phosphorylation of signaling molecules downstream of integrins. Superresolution imaging revealed that PTPN22-R620 (wild-type PTPN22) was present as large clusters in unstimulated T cells and that these disaggregated upon stimulation of LFA-1, enabling increased association of PTPN22 with its binding partners at the leading edge. The failure of PTPN22-R620W molecules to be retained at the leading edge led to increased LFA-1 clustering and integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Our data define a previously uncharacterized mechanism for fine-tuning integrin signaling in T cells, as well as a paradigm of autoimmunity in humans in which disease susceptibility is underpinned by inherited phosphatase mutations that perturb integrin function.

  14. Influence of E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion on mouse embryonic stem cells derivation from isolated blastomeres.

    PubMed

    González, Sheyla; Ibáñez, Elena; Santaló, Josep

    2011-09-01

    Efforts to efficiently derive embryonic stem cells (ESC) from isolated blastomeres have been done to minimize ethical concerns about human embryo destruction. Previous studies in our laboratory indicated a poor derivation efficiency of mouse ESC lines from isolated blastomeres at the 8-cell stage (1/8 blastomeres) due, in part, to a low division rate of the single blastomeres in comparison to their counterparts with a higher number of blastomeres (2/8, 3/8 and 4/8 blastomeres). Communication and adhesion between blastomeres from which the derivation process begins could be important aspects to efficiently derive ESC lines. In the present study, an approach consisting in the adhesion of a chimeric E-cadherin (E-cad-Fc) to the blastomere surface was devised to recreate the signaling produced by native E-cadherin between neighboring blastomeres inside the embryo. By this approach, the division rate of 1/8 blastomeres increased from 44.6% to 88.8% and a short exposure of 24 h to the E-cad-Fc produced an ESC derivation efficiency of 33.6%, significantly higher than the 2.2% obtained from the control group without E-cad-Fc. By contrast, a longer exposure to the same chimeric protein resulted in higher proportions of trophoblastic vesicles. Thus, we establish an important role of E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions in promoting both the division of single 1/8 blastomeres and the efficiency of the ESC derivation process.

  15. Increased liposome-mediated gene transfer into haematopoietic cells grown in adhesion to stromal or fibroblast cell line monolayers.

    PubMed

    Marit, G; Cao, Y; Froussard, P; Ripoche, J; Dupouy, M; Elandaloussi, A; Lacombe, F; Mahon, F X; Keller, H; Pla, M; Reiffers, J; Theze, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigated transfection rates of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or haematopoietic cell lines (TF-1, KG1a and K562) using the LacZ gene as a reporter and cationic liposomes. The transfection efficiency of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or TF-1, KG1a and K562 grown in suspension is very low (average percentage of 0.013 for HPC and 0.03 for cell lines). Adhesion of HPC or cell lines to plates by immunological or physical methods significantly enhances transfection efficiency; however, the percentage of transfected cells still remained low. We found that adhesion of TF-1, KG1a and K562 HC to MS-5 stroma cells or NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells increased transfection efficiency. Under these conditions transfection is achieved in 11.2-25% (mean 18.30%) for the cell lines and 13.6% (range 8.2-24.2%) for CD34+ HPC. These results indicate that liposome-mediated transfection of HC is significantly increased when cells are grown in adherence to stroma or fibroblast monolayers.

  16. Kindlin-3–mediated integrin adhesion is dispensable for quiescent but essential for activated hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Raphael; Moser, Markus; Sperandio, Markus; Rognoni, Emanuel; Orban, Martin; Liu, Wen-Hsin; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Massberg, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate highly dividing hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which produce all blood cell lineages. HSCs are usually quiescent, retained by integrins in specific niches, and become activated when the pools of HPCs decrease. We report that Kindlin-3–mediated integrin activation controls homing of HSCs to the bone marrow (BM) and the retention of activated HSCs and HPCs but not of quiescent HSCs in their BM niches. Consequently, Kindlin-3–deficient HSCs enter quiescence and remain in the BM when cotransplanted with wild-type hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), whereas they are hyperactivated and lost in the circulation when wild-type HSPCs are absent, leading to their exhaustion and reduced survival of recipients. The accumulation of HSPCs in the circulation of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III patients, who lack Kindlin-3, underlines the conserved functions of Kindlin-3 in man and the importance of our findings for human disease. PMID:26282877

  17. Spontaneous unraveling of hagfish slime thread skeins is mediated by a seawater-soluble protein adhesive.

    PubMed

    Bernards, Mark A; Oke, Isdin; Heyland, Andreas; Fudge, Douglas S

    2014-04-15

    Hagfishes are known for their ability to rapidly produce vast quantities of slime when provoked. The slime is formed via the interaction between seawater and two components released by the slime glands: mucin vesicles from gland mucous cells, which swell and rupture in seawater to form a network of mucus strands, and intermediate filament-rich threads, which are produced within gland thread cells as tightly coiled bundles called skeins. A previous study showed that the unraveling of skeins from Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) requires both the presence of mucins and hydrodynamic mixing. In contrast, skeins from Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) unravel in the absence of both mucins and mixing. We tested the hypothesis that spontaneous unraveling of E. stoutii skeins is triggered by the dissolution of a seawater-soluble protein adhesive and the release of stored strain energy within the coiled thread. Here we show that, as predicted by this hypothesis, unraveling can be initiated by a protease under conditions in which unraveling does not normally occur. We also demonstrate, using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, that the treatment of skeins with solutions that cause unraveling also leads to the disappearance of surface and inter-thread features that remain when skeins are washed with stabilizing solutions. Our study provides a mechanism for the deployment of thread skeins in Pacific hagfish slime, and raises the possibility of producing novel biomimetic protein adhesives that are salt, temperature and kosmotrope sensitive.

  18. Adhesion-mediated self-renewal abilities of Ph+ blastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Saito-Kurimoto, Yumi; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Ko-ichiro; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-05-28

    The Philadelphia chromosome-positive blastoma, maintained by serial subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice, is a highly proliferating biological mass consisting of homogenous CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} myeloblastoid cells. These cells newly evolved from pluripotent leukemia stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase. Therefore, this mass may provide a unique tool for better understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of self-renewal of leukemia stem cells. In this paper, we demonstrated that intravenously injected blastoma cells can cause Ph+ blastic leukemia with multiple invasive foci in NOD/SCID mice but not in nude mice. In addition, using an in vitro culture system, we clearly showed that blastoma cell adhesion to OP9 stromal cells accelerates blastoma cell proliferation that is associated with up-regulation of BMI1 gene expression; increased levels of {beta}-catenin and the Notch1 intra-cellular domain; and changed the expression pattern of variant CD44 forms, which are constitutively expressed in these blastoma cells. These findings strongly suggest that adhesion of leukemic stem cells to stromal cells via CD44 might be indispensable for their cellular defense against attack by immune cells and for maintenance of their self-renewal ability.

  19. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Modjeski, Kristina L.; Ture, Sara K.; Field, David J.; Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  20. Biofilm mediates Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, invasion and survival into bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elhadidy, M; Zahran, E

    2014-03-01

    We proposed in this study that during intramammary infection, biofilm formation may facilitate adherence and colonization of Enterococcus faecalis to mammary gland epithelium. This was established by comparing six different Ent. faecalis isolates with different biofilm-forming profiles for their adhesive, invasive and survival capabilities to bovine mammary epithelial cell line (MAC-T). Our results showed increased ability of the biofilm-producer Ent. faecalis strains to adhere, invade and survive inside MAC-T cells rather than nonbiofilm-producer strains. We showed that growth of bacteria in bovine milk significantly augmented the adherence and invasion of all tested strains, and this feature was abolished again when strains were subcultured in brain heart infusion broth. Moreover, growth in bovine milk significantly increased biofilm formation by all tested strains. These results indicated that biofilm formation by Ent. faecalis, especially after expressing milk-dependent induction, may have special relevance in the pathogenesis of Ent. faecalis mastitis during intramammary infection by enhancing bovine mammary epithelial adhesion and colonization. Results obtained from current work highlighted the role of biofilm in the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis mastitis. Those biofilm-forming strains might be substantial as useful antigens in diagnostic assays and as future vaccine candidates to control Ent. faecalis mastitis. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. LFA-1 integrin antibodies inhibit leukocyte α4β1-mediated adhesion by intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Grönholm, Mikaela; Jahan, Farhana; Bryushkova, Ekaterina A; Madhavan, Sudarrshan; Aglialoro, Francesca; Soto Hinojosa, Laura; Uotila, Liisa M; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2016-09-01

    Binding of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 to the β2-integrin leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) is known to induce cross-talk to the α4β1 integrin. Using different LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies, we have been able to study the requirement and mechanism of action for the cross-talk in considerable detail. LFA-1-activating antibodies and those inhibitory antibodies that signal to α4β1 induce phosphorylation of Thr-758 on the β2-chain, which is followed by binding of 14-3-3 proteins and signaling through the G protein exchange factor Tiam1. This results in dephosphorylation of Thr-788/789 on the β1-chain of α4β1 and loss of binding to its ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. The results show that with LFA-1 antibodies, we can activate LFA-1 and inhibit α4β1, inhibit both LFA-1 and α4β1, inhibit LFA-1 but not α4β1, or not affect LFA-1 or α4β1 These findings are important for the understanding of integrin regulation and for the interpretation of the effect of integrin antibodies and their use in clinical applications. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. RhoA-mediated Phospholipase D1 signaling is not required for the formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenjuan; Chardin, Pierre; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Kanaho, Yasunori; Du, Guangwei

    2006-04-01

    The small GTPase RhoA regulates a wide spectrum of cellular functions including transformation and cytoskeletal reorganization. A large number of proteins have been identified as targets of RhoA, but their specific roles in these processes are not clear. Phospholipase D (PLD) was shown to be one such target several years ago; more recent work from our laboratory and others has demonstrated that of the two mammalian PLD isozymes, PLD1 but not PLD2 is activated by RhoA and this activation proceeds through direct binding both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, using a series of RhoA mutants, we have defined a PLD1-specific interacting site on RhoA composed of the residues Asn41, Trp58 and Asp76, using the yeast two-hybrid system, co-immunoprecipitation, and a PLD in vivo assay. The results further substantiate our previous finding that RhoA activates PLD1 through direct interaction. These mutants were then used to investigate the role of PLD1 in the cytoskeletal reorganization stimulated by RhoA signaling. Our results show that PLD1 is not required for the RhoA-mediated stress fiber and focal adhesion formation. The lack of importance of PLD1 signaling in RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization is further supported by the observation that PLD1 depletion using an shRNA approach and tetracycline-induced overexpression of the wild-type and the catalytically inactive mutant of PLD1 in stable cell lines do not alter stress fiber and focal adhesion formation.

  3. CXCL12 and CXCR7 are relevant targets to reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Waldschmidt, Johannes M; Simon, Anna; Wider, Dagmar; Müller, Stefan J; Follo, Marie; Ihorst, Gabriele; Decker, Sarah; Lorenz, Joschka; Chatterjee, Manik; Azab, Abdel K; Duyster, Justus; Wäsch, Ralph; Engelhardt, Monika

    2017-10-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) by the bone marrow (BM) is fundamental to multiple myeloma (MM) propagation and survival. Targeting BM protection to increase the efficacy of current anti-myeloma treatment has not been extensively pursued. To extend the understanding of CAM-DR, we hypothesized that the cytotoxic effects of novel anti-myeloma agents may be abrogated by the presence of BM stroma cells (BMSCs) and restored by addition of the CXCL12 antagonist NOX-A12 or the CXCR4 inhibitor plerixafor. Following this hypothesis, we evaluated different anti-myeloma agents alone, with BMSCs and when combined with plerixafor or NOX-A12. We verified CXCR4, CD49d (also termed ITGA4) and CD44 as essential mediators of BM adhesion on MM cells. Additionally, we show that CXCR7, the second receptor of stromal-derived-factor-1 (CXCL12), is highly expressed in active MM. Co-culture proved that co-treatment with plerixafor or NOX-A12, the latter inhibiting CXCR4 and CXCR7, functionally interfered with MM chemotaxis to the BM. This led to the resensitization of MM cells to the anti-myeloma agents vorinostat and pomalidomide and both proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib. Within a multicentre phase I/II study, NOX-A12 was tested in combination with bortezomib-dexamethasone, underlining the feasibility of NOX-A12 as an active add-on agent to antagonize myeloma CAM-DR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  5. Fibrinogen-independent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium mediated by glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex at high shear rate.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H J; Hawiger, J; Ruggeri, Z M; Turitto, V T; Thiagarajan, P; Hoffmann, T

    1989-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium, studied at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, were inhibited by two synthetic peptides known to interact with GPIIb-IIIa. One peptide (HHLGGAKQAGDV) corresponds to the carboxyl terminal segment of the fibrinogen gamma-chain (gamma 400-411) and the other (RGDS) contains the amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) common to fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin and the alpha-chain of fibrinogen. Neither platelet adhesion nor thrombus formation were decreased in a patient with severe congenital fibrinogen deficiency and this was equally true when his blood was further depleted of the small amounts of fibrinogen present utilizing an anti-fibrinogen antibody. In normal subjects, adhesion and thrombus formation were inhibited by the Fab' fragments of a monoclonal anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-CP8), which interferes with the interaction of platelets with all four adhesive proteins in both the fluid and solid phase. However, another anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-P5) that had minimal effects on the interaction of platelets with fibrinogen, but inhibited to varying degrees platelet interaction with other adhesive proteins, was equally effective. The findings demonstrate that, at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, adhesive proteins other than fibrinogen are involved in GPIIb-IIIa-mediated platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium. In addition, since LJ-P5 inhibited the binding of soluble von Willebrand factor and vitronectin, these adhesive proteins may be involved in platelet thrombus formation. In contrast to the results obtained at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, fibrinogen could play a role in mediating platelet-platelet interactions with weak agonists or lower shear rates. PMID:2910912

  6. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Diego A.; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  7. The function of multiple extracellular matrix receptors in mediating cell adhesion to extracellular matrix: preparation of monoclonal antibodies to the fibronectin receptor that specifically inhibit cell adhesion to fibronectin and react with platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have identified monoclonal antibodies that inhibit human cell adhesion to collagen (P1H5), fibronectin (P1F8 or P1D6), and collagen and fibronectin (P1B5) that react with a family of structurally similar glycoproteins referred to as extracellular matrix receptors (ECMRs) II, VI, and I, respectively. Each member of this family contains a unique alpha subunit, recognized by the antibodies, and a common beta subunit, each of approximately 140 kD. We show here that ECMR VI is identical to the fibronectin receptor (FNR), very late antigen (VLA) 5, and platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa and shall be referred to as FNR. Monoclonal antibodies to FNR inhibit lymphocyte, fibroblast, and platelet adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces. ECMRs I, II, and FNR were differentially expressed in platelets, resting or activated lymphocytes, and myeloid, epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblast cell populations, suggesting a functional role for the receptors in vascular emigration and selective tissue localization. Tissue staining of human fetal skin localized ECMRs I and II to the basal epidermis primarily, while monoclonal antibodies to the FNR stained both the dermis and epidermis. Experiments carried out to investigate the functional roles of these receptors in mediating cell adhesion to complex extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cells in culture revealed that complete inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM required antibodies to both the FNR and ECMR II, the collagen adhesion receptor. These results show that multiple ECMRs function in combination to mediate cell adhesion to complex EMC templates and predicts that variation in ECM composition and ECMR expression may direct cell localization to specific tissue domains. PMID:2846588

  8. EphA4 promotes cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance via the AKT pathway in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Linlin; Shen, Yaodong; Ni, Jing; Ou, Yiqing; Ou, Yangyu; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Eph receptor A4 (EphA4), a member of the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) family, has been reported to upregulate in several tumors. However, the role of EphA4 in multiple myeloma has not been clarified yet. In this study, we found that EphA4 promoted proliferation of multiple myeloma cells via the regulation of cell cycle. Besides, EphA4 was closely related to cell adhesion of multiple myeloma cells and promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance by enhancing the phosphorylation levels of Akt (p-AKT) expression in multiple myeloma. More interestingly, we discovered that EphA4 can interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and regulate its expression in multiple myeloma. CDK5 has been reported to be overexpressed in multiple myeloma which mediated bortezomib resistance and also participated in AKT pathway. And we have also proved the fact. So, we supposed that EphA4 interacted with CDK5 and promoted its expression which in turn enhanced p-AKT expression and promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma. Therefore, this study clarifies the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance and may be useful in identifying potential target for treatment of multiple myeloma.

  9. Regulation of Class A scavenger receptor-mediated cell adhesion and surface localization by PI3K: identification of a regulatory cytoplasmic motif

    PubMed Central

    Cholewa, Jill; Nikolic, Dejan; Post, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of cytoplasmic motifs in differentially regulating SR-A function was demonstrated by deleting the first 49 cytoplasmic aa (SR-AΔ1–49), which abolished SR-A-mediated ligand internalization without reducing cell adhesion. To identify additional cytoplasmic motifs within the first 49 aa that regulate SR-A function, the acidic residues in a conserved motif (EDAD) were changed to their amide derivatives (SR-AQNAN). The function and regulation of SR-AQNAN were compared with that of SR-AΔ1–49 and SR-A in transfected HEK-293 cells. Blocking PI3K activation inhibited SR-A, but not SR-AΔ1–49- or SR-AQNAN-mediated cell adhesion. Although deleting (SR-AΔ1–49) or mutating (SR-AQNAN) the EDAD motif abolished the PI3K sensitivity of SR-A-mediated cell adhesion, these mutations did not affect ligand internalization or PI3K activation during cell adhesion. To define the mechanism by which PI3K regulates SR-A-mediated cell adhesion, the cellular localization of wild-type and mutant SR-A was examined. PI3K inhibition reduced surface localization of SR-A but not of SR-AΔ1–49 or SR-AQNAN. The regulation of SR-A surface localization by PI3K was confirmed in peritoneal macrophages, which endogenously express SR-A. Together, these results suggest a pathway in which SR-A binding to an immobilized ligand activates PI3K to recruit more receptor to the plasma membrane and enhances cell adhesion. PMID:19952357

  10. Role of YAP/TAZ in cell-matrix adhesion-mediated signalling and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Sirio

    2016-04-10

    Signalling from the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cellular input that sustains proliferation, opposes cell death and regulates differentiation. Through integrins, cells perceive both the chemical composition and physical properties of the ECM. In particular, cell behaviour is profoundly influenced by the mechanical elasticity or stiffness of the ECM, which regulates the ability of cells to develop forces through their contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and to mature focal adhesions. This mechanosensing ability affects fundamental cellular functions, such that alterations of ECM stiffness is nowadays considered not a simple consequence of pathology, but a causative input driving aberrant cell behaviours. We here discuss recent advances on how mechanical signals intersect nuclear transcription and in particular the activity of YAP/TAZ transcriptional coactivators, known downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway and important effectors of ECM mechanical cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Flotillins control zebrafish epiboly through their role in cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eduardo A Rios; Bodin, Stéphane; Delaval, Bénédicte; Comunale, Franck; Georget, Virginie; Costa, Manoel L; Lutfalla, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2017-02-22

    Zebrafish gastrulation and particularly epiboly that involves coordinated movements of several cell layers is a dynamic process for which regulators remain to be identified. We show here that Flotillin 1 and 2, ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins, are required for epiboly. Flotillins knockdown compromised embryo survival, strongly delayed epiboly and impaired deep cell radial intercalation and directed collective migration without affecting enveloping layer cell movement. At the molecular level, we identified that Flotillins are required for the formation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that Flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions to allow epiboly progression.

  12. LEWIS X ANTIGEN MEDIATES ADHESION OF HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA CELLS TO ACTIVATED ENDOTHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Elola, María Teresa; Capurro, Mariana Isabel; Barrio, María Marcela; Coombs, Peter J.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt; Mordoh, José

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Lewis x (Lex, CD15), also known as SSEA-1 (stage specific embryonic antigen-1), is a trisaccharide with the structure Galβ(1-4)Fucα(1-3)GlcNAc, which is expressed on glycoconjugates in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and various tumors such as colon and breast carcinoma. We have investigated the role of Lex in the adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and PMN to human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the effects of two different anti-Lex mAbs (FC-2.15 and MCS-1) on this adhesion. We also analyzed the cytolysis of Lex+-cells induced by anti-Lex mAbs and complement when cells were adhered to the endothelium, and the effect of these antibodies on HUVEC. The results indicate that MCF-7 cells can bind to HUVEC, and that MCS-1 but not FC-2.15 mAb inhibit this interaction. Both mAbs can efficiently lyse MCF-7 cells bound to HUVEC in the presence of complement without damaging endothelial cells. We also found a Lex-dependent PMN interaction with HUVEC. Although both anti-Lex mAbs lysed PMN in suspension and adhered to HUVEC, PMN aggregation was only induced by mAb FC-2.15. Blotting studies revealed that the endothelial scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL), which binds Lex-trisaccharide, interacts with specific glycoproteins of Mr ∼ 28 kD and 10 kD from MCF-7 cells. The interaction between Lex+-cancer cells and vascular endothelium is a potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:16850248

  13. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  14. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 mediates endothelial-cardiomyocyte communication and regulates cardiac function.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Margaret E; Collins, Caitlin; Makarewich, Catherine A; Chen, Zhongming; Rojas, Mauricio; Willis, Monte S; Houser, Steven R; Tzima, Ellie

    2015-01-19

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by impaired contractility of cardiomyocytes, ventricular chamber dilatation, and systolic dysfunction. Although mutations in genes expressed in the cardiomyocyte are the best described causes of reduced contractility, the importance of endothelial-cardiomyocyte communication for proper cardiac function is increasingly appreciated. In the present study, we investigate the role of the endothelial adhesion molecule platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in the regulation of cardiac function. Using cell culture and animal models, we show that PECAM-1 expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) regulates cardiomyocyte contractility and cardiac function via the neuregulin-ErbB signaling pathway. Conscious echocardiography revealed left ventricular (LV) chamber dilation and systolic dysfunction in PECAM-1(-/-) mice in the absence of histological abnormalities or defects in cardiac capillary density. Despite deficits in global cardiac function, cardiomyocytes isolated from PECAM-1(-/-) hearts displayed normal baseline and isoproterenol-stimulated contractility. Mechanistically, absence of PECAM-1 resulted in elevated NO/ROS signaling and NRG-1 release from ECs, which resulted in augmented phosphorylation of its receptor ErbB2. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with conditioned media from PECAM-1(-/-) ECs resulted in enhanced ErbB2 activation, which was normalized by pre-treatment with an NRG-1 blocking antibody. To determine whether normalization of increased NRG-1 levels could correct cardiac function, PECAM-1(-/-) mice were treated with the NRG-1 blocking antibody. Echocardiography showed that treatment significantly improved cardiac function of PECAM-1(-/-) mice, as revealed by increased ejection fraction and fractional shortening. We identify a novel role for PECAM-1 in regulating cardiac function via a paracrine NRG1-ErbB pathway. These data highlight the importance of tightly regulated cellular communication for proper

  15. Hyperketonemia increases monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is mediated by LFA-1 expression in monocytes and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rains, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that hyperketonemia increases monocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and the development of vascular disease in diabetes. Human U937 and THP-1 monocyte cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with acetoacetate (AA) (0–10 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0–10 mM) for 24 h prior to evaluating adhesion and adhesion molecule expression. The results demonstrate a significant (P < 0.01) increase in both U937 and THP-1 adhesion to HUVEC monolayers treated with 4 mM AA compared with control. Equal concentrations of BHB resulted in similar increases in monocyte-EC adhesion. Similarly, treatments of AA or BHB to isolated monocytes from human blood also show increases in adhesion to endothelial cells. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was significantly increased on the surface of HUVECs and an increase in total protein expression with AA treatment compared with control. The expression level of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) was increased in monocytes treated with AA, and LFA-1 affinity was altered from low to high affinity following treatment with both AA and BHB. Monocyte adhesion could be blocked when cells were preincubated with an antibody to ICAM-1 or LFA-1. Results also show a significant increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in monocytes and HUVECs treated with 0–10 mM AA. These results suggest that hyperketonemia can induce monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and that it is mediated via increased ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells and increased expression and affinity of LFA-1 in monocytes. PMID:21540444

  16. Hyperketonemia increases monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is mediated by LFA-1 expression in monocytes and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rains, Justin L; Jain, Sushil K

    2011-08-01

    Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that hyperketonemia increases monocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and the development of vascular disease in diabetes. Human U937 and THP-1 monocyte cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with acetoacetate (AA) (0-10 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0-10 mM) for 24 h prior to evaluating adhesion and adhesion molecule expression. The results demonstrate a significant (P < 0.01) increase in both U937 and THP-1 adhesion to HUVEC monolayers treated with 4 mM AA compared with control. Equal concentrations of BHB resulted in similar increases in monocyte-EC adhesion. Similarly, treatments of AA or BHB to isolated monocytes from human blood also show increases in adhesion to endothelial cells. intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was significantly increased on the surface of HUVECs and an increase in total protein expression with AA treatment compared with control. The expression level of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) was increased in monocytes treated with AA, and LFA-1 affinity was altered from low to high affinity following treatment with both AA and BHB. Monocyte adhesion could be blocked when cells were preincubated with an antibody to ICAM-1 or LFA-1. Results also show a significant increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in monocytes and HUVECs treated with 0-10 mM AA. These results suggest that hyperketonemia can induce monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and that it is mediated via increased ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells and increased expression and affinity of LFA-1 in monocytes.

  17. Distinct determinants on collagen support alpha 2 beta 1 integrin-mediated platelet adhesion and platelet activation.

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, S A; Walsh, J J; Staatz, W D; Baranski, K J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the sequence of amino acids asp-gly-glu-ala represents an essential determinant of the site within the alpha 1(I)-CB3 fragment of collagen recognized by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin cell surface collagen receptor (Staatz et al., 1991). Studies employing chemical modifications of collagen amino acid side chains confirm both the essential nature of the acidic side chains of aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues and the nonessentiality of lysine epsilon-amino groups in supporting adhesion mediated by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin. The approach also indicates the presence of a distinct determinant on collagen separate from the alpha 2 beta 1 recognition site that contains essential lysine side chains and that is necessary for subsequent interactions with the platelet surface that give rise to collagen-induced platelet activation and secretion. The two-step, two-site model for cellular signaling involving both an integrin and a signal-transducing coreceptor suggested by these data may be common to other integrin-mediated processes. PMID:1809397

  18. Focal Adhesion Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation of Beclin1 Protein Suppresses Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Initiates Hypertrophic Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaokang; Zhu, Qiang; Dee, Rachel; Opheim, Zachary; Mack, Christopher P.; Cyr, Douglas M.; Taylor, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation/recycling system that is essential for cellular homeostasis but is dysregulated in a number of diseases, including myocardial hypertrophy. Although it is clear that limiting or accelerating autophagic flux can result in pathological cardiac remodeling, the physiological signaling pathways that fine-tune cardiac autophagy are poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that stimulation of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine (PE), a well known hypertrophic agonist, suppresses autophagy and that activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is necessary for PE-stimulated autophagy suppression and subsequent initiation of hypertrophic growth. Mechanistically, we showed that FAK phosphorylates Beclin1, a core autophagy protein, on Tyr-233 and that this post-translational modification limits Beclin1 association with Atg14L and reduces Beclin1-dependent autophagosome formation. Remarkably, although ectopic expression of wild-type Beclin1 promoted cardiomyocyte atrophy, expression of a Y233E phosphomimetic variant of Beclin1 failed to affect cardiomyocyte size. Moreover, genetic depletion of Beclin1 attenuated PE-mediated/FAK-dependent initiation of myocyte hypertrophy in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify FAK as a novel negative regulator of Beclin1-mediated autophagy and indicate that this pathway can facilitate the promotion of compensatory hypertrophic growth. This novel mechanism to limit Beclin1 activity has important implications for treating a variety of pathologies associated with altered autophagic flux. PMID:27994061

  19. Adhesive dynamics simulations of sialyl-Lewis(x)/E-selectin-mediated rolling in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Hammer, D A

    2000-10-01

    Selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling is crucial for the proper function of the immune response. Recently, selectin-mediated rolling was recreated in a cell-free system (Biophysical Journal 71:2902-2907 (1996)); it was shown that sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x))-coated microspheres roll over E-selectin-coated surfaces under hydrodynamic flow. The cell-free system removes many confounding cellular features, such as cell deformability and signaling, allowing us to focus on the role of carbohydrate/selectin physical chemistry in mediating rolling. In this paper, we use adhesive dynamics, a computational method that allows us to simulate adhesion, to analyze the experimental data produced in the cell-free system. We simulate the effects of shear rate, ligand density, and number of receptors per particle on rolling velocity and compare them with experimental results obtained with the cell-free system. If we assume the population of particles is homogeneous in receptor density, we predict that particle rolling velocity calculated in simulations is more sensitive to shear rate than found in experiments. Also, the calculated rolling velocity is more sensitive to the number of receptors on the microspheres than to the ligand density on the surface, again in contrast to experiment. We argue that heterogeneity in the distribution of receptors throughout the particle population causes these discrepancies. We improve the agreement between experiment and simulation by calculating the average rolling velocity of a population whose receptors follow a normal distribution, suggesting heterogeneity among particles significantly affects the experimental results. Further comparison between theory and experiment yields an estimate of the reactive compliance of sLe(x)/E-selectin interactions of 0.25 A, close to that reported in the literature for E-selectin and its natural ligand (0.3 A). We also provide an estimate of the value of the intrinsic association rate (between 10(4) and 10(5) s(-1)) for

  20. The PI3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor Idelalisib (GS-1101) Targets Integrin-Mediated Adhesion of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cell to Endothelial and Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O’Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Lannutti, Brian J.; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood. PMID:24376763

  1. The PI3-kinase delta inhibitor idelalisib (GS-1101) targets integrin-mediated adhesion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell to endothelial and marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S; McIntyre, Bradley W; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O'Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E; Lannutti, Brian J; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood.

  2. Human peripheral blood eosinophils express a functional c-kit receptor for stem cell factor that stimulates very late antigen 4 (VLA-4)-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Austen, K F; Friend, D S; Heidtman, M; Boyce, J A

    1997-07-21

    We evaluated mature peripheral blood eosinophils for their expression of the surface tyrosine kinase, c-kit, the receptor for the stromal cell-derived cytokine, stem cell factor (SCF). Cytofluorographic analysis revealed that c-kit was expressed on the purified peripheral blood eosinophils from 8 of 8 donors (4 nonatopic and 4 atopic) (mean channel fluorescence intensity 2.0- 3. 6-fold, average 2.8 +/- 0.6-fold, greater than the negative control). The uniform and selective expression of c-kit by eosinophils was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis of peripheral blood buffy coats. The functional integrity of c-kit was demonstrated by the capacity of 100 ng/ml (5 nM) of recombinant human (rh) SCF to increase eosinophil adhesion to 3, 10, and 30 microg/ml of immobilized FN40, a 40-kD chymotryptic fragment of plasma fibronectin, in 15 min by 7.7 +/- 1.4-, 5.3 +/- 3.3-, and 5.4 +/- 0. 2-fold, respectively, and their adhesion to 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/ml vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), by 12.7 +/- 9. 2-, 3.8 +/- 2.5-, and 1.7 +/- 0.6-fold, respectively. The SCF-stimulated adhesion occurred without concomitant changes in surface integrin expression, thereby indicating an avidity-based mechanism. rhSCF (100 ng/ml, 5 nM) was comparable to rh eotaxin (200 ng/ml, 24 nM) in stimulating adhesion. Cell adhesion to FN40 was completely inhibited with antibodies against the alpha4 and beta1 integrin subunits, revealing that the SCF/c-kit adhesion effect was mediated by a single integrin heterodimer, very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). Thus, SCF represents a newly recognized stromal ligand for the activation of eosinophils for VLA-4-mediated adhesion, which could contribute to the exit of these cells from the blood, their tissue localization, and their prominence in inflammatory lesions.

  3. Human Peripheral Blood Eosinophils Express a Functional c-kit Receptor for Stem Cell Factor that Stimulates Very Late Antigen 4 (VLA-4)–mediated Cell Adhesion to Fibronectin and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qian; Austen, K. Frank; Friend, Daniel S.; Heidtman, Matthew; Boyce, Joshua A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated mature peripheral blood eosinophils for their expression of the surface tyrosine kinase, c-kit, the receptor for the stromal cell–derived cytokine, stem cell factor (SCF). Cytofluorographic analysis revealed that c-kit was expressed on the purified peripheral blood eosinophils from 8 of 8 donors (4 nonatopic and 4 atopic) (mean channel fluorescence intensity 2.0– 3.6-fold, average 2.8 ± 0.6-fold, greater than the negative control). The uniform and selective expression of c-kit by eosinophils was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis of peripheral blood buffy coats. The functional integrity of c-kit was demonstrated by the capacity of 100 ng/ml (5 nM) of recombinant human (rh) SCF to increase eosinophil adhesion to 3, 10, and 30 μg/ml of immobilized FN40, a 40-kD chymotryptic fragment of plasma fibronectin, in 15 min by 7.7 ± 1.4-, 5.3 ± 3.3-, and 5.4 ± 0.2-fold, respectively, and their adhesion to 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 μg/ml vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), by 12.7 ± 9.2-, 3.8 ± 2.5-, and 1.7 ± 0.6-fold, respectively. The SCF-stimulated adhesion occurred without concomitant changes in surface integrin expression, thereby indicating an avidity-based mechanism. rhSCF (100 ng/ml, 5 nM) was comparable to rh eotaxin (200 ng/ml, 24 nM) in stimulating adhesion. Cell adhesion to FN40 was completely inhibited with antibodies against the α4 and β1 integrin subunits, revealing that the SCF/c-kit adhesion effect was mediated by a single integrin heterodimer, very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). Thus, SCF represents a newly recognized stromal ligand for the activation of eosinophils for VLA-4–mediated adhesion, which could contribute to the exit of these cells from the blood, their tissue localization, and their prominence in inflammatory lesions. PMID:9221761

  4. E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion prevents invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The ability of carcinomas to invade and to metastasize largely depends on the degree of epithelial differentiation within the tumors, i.e., poorly differentiated being more invasive than well-differentiated carcinomas. Here we confirmed this correlation by examining various human cell lines derived from bladder, breast, lung, and pancreas carcinomas. We found that carcinoma cell lines with an epithelioid phenotype were noninvasive and expressed the epithelium-specific cell- cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (also known as Arc-1, uvomorulin, and cell-CAM 120/80), as visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western and Northern blotting, whereas carcinoma cell lines with a fibroblastoid phenotype were invasive and had lost E-cadherin expression. Invasiveness of these latter cells could be prevented by transfection with E-cadherin cDNA and was again induced by treatment of the transfected cells with anti-E-cadherin mAbs. These findings indicate that the selective loss of E-cadherin expression can generate dedifferentiation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells, and they suggest further that E-cadherin acts as an invasion suppressor. PMID:2007622

  5. Force Fluctuations within Focal Adhesions Mediate ECM-Rigidity Sensing to Guide Directed Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Pasapera, Ana M.; Sabass, Benedikt; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell migration toward areas of higher extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity via a process called “durotaxis” is thought to contribute to development, immune response, and cancer metastasis. To understand how cells sample ECM rigidity to guide durotaxis, we characterized cell-generated forces on the nanoscale within single mature integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We found that individual FAs act autonomously, exhibiting either stable or dynamically fluctuating (“tugging”) traction. We show that a FAK/phosphopaxillin/vinculin pathway is essential for high FA traction and to enable tugging FA traction over a broad range of ECM rigidities. We show that tugging FA traction is dispensable for FA maturation, chemotaxis, and haptotaxis but is critical to direct cell migration toward rigid ECM. We conclude that individual FAs dynamically sample rigidity by applying fluctuating pulling forces to the ECM to act as sensors to guide durotaxis, and that FAK/phosphopaxillin/vinculin signaling defines the rigidity range over which this dynamic sensing process operates. PMID:23260139

  6. Humidity-mediated changes in an orb spider's glycoprotein adhesive impact prey retention time.

    PubMed

    Opell, Brent D; Buccella, Katrina E; Godwin, Meaghan K; Rivas, Malik X; Hendricks, Mary L

    2017-04-01

    Properties of the viscous prey capture threads of araneoid orb spiders change in response to their environment. Relative humidity (RH) affects the performance of the thread's hygroscopic droplets by altering the viscoelasticity of each droplet's adhesive glycoprotein core. Studies that have characterized this performance used smooth glass and steel surfaces and uniform forces. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that these changes in performance translate into differences in prey retention times. We first characterized the glycoprotein contact surface areas and maximum extension lengths of Araneus marmoreus droplets at 20%, 37%, 55%, 72% and 90% RH and then modeled the relative work required to initiate pull-off of a 4 mm thread span, concluding that this species' droplets and threads performed optimally at 72% RH. Next, we evaluated the ability of three equally spaced capture thread strands to retain a house fly at 37%, 55% and 72% RH. Each fly's struggle was captured in a video and bouts of active escape behavior were summed. House flies were retained 11 s longer at 72% RH than at 37% and 55% RH. This difference is ecologically significant because the short time after an insect strikes a web and before a spider begins wrapping it is an insect's only opportunity to escape from the web. Moreover, these results validate the mechanism by which natural selection can tune the performance of an orb spider's capture threads to the humidity of its habitat. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Myosin IIA Heavy Chain Phosphorylation Mediates Adhesion Maturation and Protrusion in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandana; Thomas, Dustin G; Beach, Jordan R; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2017-02-24

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) is a conserved force-producing cytoskeletal enzyme with important but poorly understood roles in cell migration. To investigate myosin heavy chain (MHC) phosphorylation roles in 3D migration, we expressed GFP-tagged NMIIA wild-type or mutant constructs in cells depleted of endogenous NMIIA protein. We find that individual mutation or double mutation of Ser-1916 or Ser-1943 to alanine potently blocks recruitment of GFP-NM-IIA filaments to leading edge protrusions in 2D, and this in turn blocks maturation of anterior focal adhesions. When placed in 3D collagen gels, cells expressing wild-type GFP MHC-IIA behave like parental cells, displaying robust and active formation and retraction of protrusions. However, cells depleted of NMIIA or cells expressing the mutant GFP MHC-IIA display severe defects in invasion and in stabilizing protrusions in 3D. These studies reveal an NMIIA-specific role in 3D invasion that requires competence for NMIIA phosphorylation at Ser-1916 and Ser-1943. In sum, these results demonstrate a critical and previously unrecognized role for NMIIA phosphorylation in 3D invasion.

  8. TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells through beta1 integrin-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Young-Sin; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Odontoblasts are involved in tooth repair and regeneration as well as dentin formation. The aim of this study was to examine whether delivery of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) into cells using a TAT fusion protein system (TAT-Hsp27) enhances adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells. Hsp27 was delivered into cells by the TAT-fusion protein system. To examine whether TAT-Hsp27 affects the viability of MDPC-23 cells, MTT assay was performed. The effect of TAT-Hsp27 on adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells was determined using type I collagen-coated plates and a commercial kit, respectively. In addition, a precise molecular mechanism was examined by Western blot analysis and focal adhesion activity. TAT-fusion protein system delivered Hsp27 into cells successfully. Transduction of TAT-Hsp27 induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, transduction of TAT-Hsp27 increased the protein expression of beta1 integrin and focal adhesion formation, and induced phosphorylation of FAK and ERK. TAT-Hsp27-induced migration of MDPC-23 cells was restored by treatment of anti-beta1 integrin antibody. These findings suggest that TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells via beta1 integrin-mediated signaling and is a promising candidate for therapeutic application of dental pulp regeneration.

  9. Upregulation of ADAM12 contributes to accelerated cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haibing; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Yu; Wang, Qiru; Ding, Linlin; He, Song

    2017-10-01

    ADAM12 is a member of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase family and has been reported to participate in the development of variety of tumors. However, the role of ADAM12 in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) has not been investigated. The present study was undertaken to determine the expression and biologic function of ADAM12 in human NHL. First, we constructed a model of cell adhesion in NHL, the mRNA, and protein level of ADAM12 in suspension and the adhesion model was analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot. Then, flow cytometry assay and western blot were used to investigate the mechanism of ADAM12 in the proliferation of NHL cells. In vitro, after using siRNA interfering ADAM12 expression, we performed adhesion assay and cell viability assay to determine the effect of ADAM12 on adhesive rate and drug sensitivity. ADAM12 was lowly expressed in suspended cells and highly expressed in adherent NHL cells. In addition, ADAM12 was positively correlated with the proliferation and apoptosis of NHL cells by regulating the expression of p-AKT and p-GSK-3β. Furthermore, ADAM12 promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in DLBCL via AKT signaling pathway. Our data support a role for ADAM12 in NHL cell proliferation, adhesion, and drug resistance, and it may pave the way for a novel therapeutic approach for CAM-DR in NHL.

  10. The role of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) in cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) of multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jing; Shen, Chaoyan; Ding, Linlin; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Yu; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2017-01-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) is one of the mechanisms underlying the drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) is downregulated in the apoptotic model and upregulated in the adhesive model of MM. This study was undertaken to determine the role of USP14 in CAM-DR of MM cells. We examined the expression of USP14 in the apoptotic model of MM. The mechanism of USP14 in the process of apoptosis was further explored by flow cytometry assay and co-immunoprecipitation. We then performed the cell co-culture and adhesion assay and cell viability assay to investigate the effect of USP14 on adhesive rate and drug resistance in MM. We discovered that USP14 played a negative role in cell apoptosis, which is correlated with Bcl-xl. Moreover, overexpression of USP14 in MM cell adhesion model could enhance the ability of cell adhesion by regulating Wnt-signaling pathways, thereby promoting the CAM-DR in MM. USP14 participates in CAM-DR of MM through acting as a bridge between Bcl-xl apoptotic pathway and Wnt-signaling pathways and may be represented as a good candidate for pursuing clinical trials in MM. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nrk2b-mediated NAD+ production regulates cell adhesion and is required for muscle morphogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Lessard, Kevin N.; Khalil, Andre; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) play fundamental roles during morphogenesis. Given the ubiquitous nature of CMACs and their roles in many cellular processes, one question is how specificity of CMAC function is modulated. The clearly defined cell behaviors that generate segmentally reiterated axial skeletal muscle during zebrafish development comprise an ideal system with which to investigate CMAC function during morphogenesis. We found that Nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b (Nrk2b) cell autonomously modulates the molecular composition of CMACs in vivo. Nrk2b is required for normal Laminin polymerization at the myotendinous junction (MTJ). In Nrk2b-deficient embryos, at MTJ loci where Laminin is not properly polymerized, muscle fibers elongate into adjacent myotomes and are abnormally long. In yeast and human cells, Nrk2 phosphorylates Nicotinamide Riboside and generates NAD+ through an alternative salvage pathway. Exogenous NAD+ treatment rescues MTJ development in Nrk2b-deficient embryos, but not in laminin mutant embryos. Both Nrk2b and Laminin are required for localization of Paxillin, but not β-Dystroglycan, to CMACs at the MTJ. Overexpression of Paxillin in Nrk2b-deficient embryos is sufficient to rescue MTJ integrity. Taken together, these data show that Nrk2b plays a specific role in modulating subcellular localization of discrete CMAC components that in turn play roles in musculoskeletal development. Furthermore, these data suggest that Nrk2b-mediated synthesis of NAD+ is functionally upstream of Laminin adhesion and Paxillin subcellular localization during MTJ development. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity to CMAC assembly in vivo and also elucidate a novel role for NAD+ during morphogenesis. PMID:20566368

  12. Domain 5 of high molecular weight kininogen inhibits collagen-mediated cancer cell adhesion and invasion in association with α-actinin-4.

    PubMed

    Hatoh, Tsunetoshi; Maeda, Toshinaga; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Ogikubo, Osamu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ogita, Hisakazu

    2012-10-26

    High molecular weight kininogen (HK) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple functions, including the regulation of coagulation. We previously demonstrated that domain 5 (D5(H)), a functional domain of HK, and its derived peptides played an important role in the vitronectin-mediated suppression of cancer cell adhesion and invasion. However, the underlying mechanisms of the D5(H)-mediated suppressive effects remain to be elucidated. Here, we showed that D5(H) and its derivatives inhibited the collagen-mediated cell adhesion and invasion of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells. Using purified D5(H) fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and D5(H)-derived peptides for column chromatography, an actin-binding protein, α-actinin-4, was identified as a binding protein of D5(H) with high-affinity for P-5m, a core octapeptide of D5(H). Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that D5(H) co-localized with α-actinin-4 inside MG63 cells. In addition, exogenous GST-D5(H) added to the culture media was transported into MG63 cells, although GST alone as a control was not. As α-actinin-4 regulates actin polymerization necessary for cell adhesion and is related to the integrin-dependent attachment of cells to the extracellular matrix, our results suggest that D5(H) may modulate cell adhesion and invasion together with actinin-4. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of cell adhesion to silica nanoparticle-decorated surfaces and the associated protein-mediated mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Jake D.

    sizes examined. For the first time, this study offers insight into a molecular mechanism that is linked to nanostructured material surface feature size through quantified changes in protein structure and cell adhesion behavior. These results provide an explanation of the molecular level events occurring on nanostructured material surfaces that contribute to protein-mediated size-selective and cell type-specific responses of various cell types.

  14. Cell cycling determines integrin-mediated adhesion in osteoblastic ROS 17/2.8 cells exposed to space-related conditions.

    PubMed

    Guignandon, A; Lafage-Proust, M H; Usson, Y; Laroche, N; Caillot-Augusseau, A; Alexandre, C; Vico, L

    2001-09-01

    Six days of microgravity (Bion10 mission) induced dramatic shape changes in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblasts (7). During the Foton 11 and 12 space flights, we studied the kinetics (0-4 days) of ROS 17/2.8 morphology and adhesion, the relationships between adhesion and cell cycle progression after 4 days in space, and osteoblastic growth and activity after 6 days in space. Quantitative analysis of high-resolution adhesion [focal adhesion area imaged by total interference reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM)] and integrin-dependent adhesion (imaged on confocal microscope by vinculin and phosphotyrosine staining) as well as cell cycle phase classification [Ki-67 staining, S-G2, mitotic cells and G1 (postmitotic cells)] were performed using programs validated in parabolic flight and clinostat. We observed disorganization of the cytoskeleton associated with disassembling of vinculin spots and phosphorylated proteins within focal contacts with no major change in TIRFM adhesion after 2 and 4 days of microgravity. Postmitotic cells, alone, accounted for the differences observed in the whole population. They are characterized by immature peripheral contacts with complete loss of central spots and decreased spreading. Osteocalcin, P1CP and alkaline phosphatase, and proliferation were similar in flight cells and 1 g centrifuge and ground controls after 6 days. In conclusion, microgravity substantially affected osteoblastic integrin-mediated cell adhesion. ROS17/2.8 cells responded differently, whether or not they were cycling by reorganizing adhesion plaque topography or morphology. In ROS 17/2.8, this reorganization did not impair osteoblastic phenotype.

  15. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  16. Overexpression of fibronectin confers cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) against 5-FU in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Hideki; Nagata, Masashi; Yoshida, Ryoji; Kawahara, Kenta; Hirosue, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Yuno, Akira; Matsuoka, Yuichiro; Kojima, Taku; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Shinohara, Masanori

    2014-04-01

    The tumor-associated microenvironment has been shown to protect tumor cells from treatment, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to affect drug resistance as a key regulator of the tumor microenvironment. However, little is known about cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) due to cell-ECM contact in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the present study, we evaluated the ECM molecule fibronectin (FN) using DNA microarray data obtained from parental and 5-FU-resistant OSCC cell lines. We investigated the effects of cell adhesion to FN on 5-FU resistance in OSCC cells and examined the activation of FN receptor β1 integrin-mediated survival regulators such as ILK, Akt and NF-κB. In addition, we investigated whether FNIII14, a 22-mer peptide derived from FN that potently prevents β1 integrin-mediated adhesion to FN, could overcome CAM-DR against 5-FU in OSCC cells and examined the activation of survival regulators and apoptosis-related molecules. Consequently, we obtained the following results. FN was extracellularly overexpressed in the 5-FU-resistant cells compared with that observed in the 5-FU-sensitive cells. Cell adhesion to FN enhanced 5-FU resistance and activated integrin-mediated ILK/Akt/NF-κB survival signaling in the 5-FU-resistant OSCC cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell adhesion to FN by FNIII14 enhanced chemosensitivity to 5-FU and apoptosis by suppressing ILK/Akt/NF-κB signaling in the 5-FU-resistant cells. These novel findings demonstrate that FN is a potentially useful biomarker and therapeutic target for improving the treatment of OSCC, particularly in the setting of 5-FU resistance.

  17. Cell adhesion controlled by adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR124/ADGRA2 is mediated by a protein complex comprising intersectins and Elmo-Dock.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Magda Nohemí; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Hamoud, Noumeira; Chidiac, Rony; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gratton, Jean Philippe; Côté, Jean-François; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2017-07-21

    Developmental angiogenesis and the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier involve endothelial cell adhesion, which is linked to cytoskeletal dynamics. GPR124 (also known as TEM5/ADGRA2) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family member that plays a pivotal role in brain angiogenesis and in ensuring a tight blood-brain barrier. However, the signaling properties of GPR124 remain poorly defined. Here, we show that ectopic expression of GPR124 promotes cell adhesion, additive to extracellular matrix-dependent effect, coupled with filopodia and lamellipodia formation and an enrichment of a pool of the G protein-coupled receptor at actin-rich cellular protrusions containing VASP, a filopodial marker. Accordingly, GPR124-expressing cells also displayed increased activation of both Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. Mechanistically, we uncover novel direct interactions between endogenous GPR124 and the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors Elmo/Dock and intersectin (ITSN). Small fragments of either Elmo or ITSN1 that bind GPR124 blocked GPR124-induced cell adhesion. In addition, Gβγ interacts with the C-terminal tail of GPR124 and promotes the formation of a GPR124-Elmo complex. Furthermore, GPR124 also promotes the activation of the Elmo-Dock complex, as measured by Elmo phosphorylation on a conserved C-terminal tyrosine residue. Interestingly, Elmo and ITSN1 also interact with each other independently of their GPR124-recognition regions. Moreover, endogenous phospho-Elmo and ITSN1 co-localize with GPR124 at lamellipodia of adhering endothelial cells, where GPR124 expression contributes to polarity acquisition during wound healing. Collectively, our results indicate that GPR124 promotes cell adhesion via Elmo-Dock and ITSN. This constitutes a previously unrecognized complex formed of atypical and conventional Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 that is putatively involved in GPR124-dependent angiogenic responses. © 2017 by The American Society for

  18. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  19. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  20. Integrin-mediated traction force enhances paxillin molecular associations and adhesion dynamics that increase the invasiveness of tumor cells into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mekhdjian, Armen H.; Kai, FuiBoon; Rubashkin, Matthew G.; Prahl, Louis S.; Przybyla, Laralynne M.; McGregor, Alexandra L.; Bell, Emily S.; Barnes, J. Matthew; DuFort, Christopher C.; Ou, Guanqing; Chang, Alice C.; Cassereau, Luke; Tan, Steven J.; Pickup, Michael W.; Lakins, Jonathan N.; Ye, Xin; Davidson, Michael W.; Lammerding, Jan; Odde, David J.; Dunn, Alexander R.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis requires tumor cells to navigate through a stiff stroma and squeeze through confined microenvironments. Whether tumors exploit unique biophysical properties to metastasize remains unclear. Data show that invading mammary tumor cells, when cultured in a stiffened three-dimensional extracellular matrix that recapitulates the primary tumor stroma, adopt a basal-like phenotype. Metastatic tumor cells and basal-like tumor cells exert higher integrin-mediated traction forces at the bulk and molecular levels, consistent with a motor-clutch model in which motors and clutches are both increased. Basal-like nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells also display an altered integrin adhesion molecular organization at the nanoscale and recruit a suite of paxillin-associated proteins implicated in invasion and metastasis. Phosphorylation of paxillin by Src family kinases, which regulates adhesion turnover, is similarly enhanced in the metastatic and basal-like tumor cells, fostered by a stiff matrix, and critical for tumor cell invasion in our assays. Bioinformatics reveals an unappreciated relationship between Src kinases, paxillin, and survival of breast cancer patients. Thus adoption of the basal-like adhesion phenotype may favor the recruitment of molecules that facilitate tumor metastasis to integrin-based adhesions. Analysis of the physical properties of tumor cells and integrin adhesion composition in biopsies may be predictive of patient outcome. PMID:28381423

  1. The spontaneously adhesive leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) integrin in effector T cells mediates rapid actin- and calmodulin-dependent adhesion strengthening to ligand under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lek, Hwee San; Morrison, Vicky L; Conneely, Michael; Campbell, Paul A; McGloin, David; Kliche, Stefanie; Watts, Colin; Prescott, Alan; Fagerholm, Susanna C

    2013-05-24

    Integrins in effector T cells are highly expressed and important for trafficking of these cells and for their effector functions. However, how integrins are regulated in effector T cells remains poorly characterized. Here, we have investigated effector T cell leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) regulation in primary murine effector T cells. These cells have high LFA-1 integrin expression and display high spontaneous binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) ligand under static conditions. In addition, these cells are able to migrate spontaneously on ICAM-1. Atomic force microscopy measurements showed that the force required for unbinding of integrin-ligand interactions increases over time (0.5-20-s contact time). The maximum unbinding force for this interaction was ∼140 piconewtons at 0.5-s contact time, increasing to 580 piconewtons at 20-s contact time. Also, the total work required to disrupt the interaction increased over the 20-s contact time, indicating LFA-1-mediated adhesion strengthening in primary effector T cells over a very quick time frame. Effector T cells adhered spontaneously to ICAM-1 under conditions of shear flow, in the absence of chemokine stimulation, and this binding was independent of protein kinase B/Akt and protein kinase C kinase activity, but dependent on calcium/calmodulin signaling and an intact actin cytoskeleton. These results indicate that effector T cell integrins are highly expressed and spontaneously adhesive in the absence of inside-out integrin signaling but that LFA-1-mediated firm adhesion under conditions of shear flow requires downstream integrin signaling, which is dependent on calcium/calmodulin and the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Inhibition of fibronectin binding and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion to collagen by a peptide from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The platelet and extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin interacts with various types of cells as both a positive and negative modulator of cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation. These effects may be mediated by binding of thrombospondin to cell surface receptors or indirectly by binding to other extracellular matrix components. The role of peptide sequences from the type I repeats of thrombospondin in its interaction with fibronectin were investigated. Fibronectin bound specifically to the peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin but not to the corresponding peptides from the first or third repeats or flanking sequences from the second repeat. The two Trp residues and the His residue were essential for binding, and the two Gly residues enhanced the affinity of binding. Binding of the peptide and intact thrombospondin to fibronectin were inhibited by the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin. The peptide specifically inhibited binding of fibronectin to gelatin or type I collagen and inhibited fibronectin-mediated adhesion of breast carcinoma and melanoma cells to gelatin or type I collagen substrates but not direct adhesion of the cells to fibronectin, which was inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. Thus, the fibronectin- binding thrombospondin peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp is a selective inhibitor of fibronectin-mediated interactions of cells with collagen in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8468356

  3. Coordinate role for cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 4 beta 1 integrin in mediating melanoma cell adhesion to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Cellular recognition and adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) has a complex molecular basis, involving both integrins and cell surface proteoglycans (PG). The current studies have used specific inhibitors of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) synthesis along with anti- alpha 4 integrin subunit monoclonal antibodies to demonstrate that human melanoma cell adhesion to an A-chain derived, 33-kD carboxyl- terminal heparin binding fragment of human plasma fibronectin (FN) involves both cell surface CSPG and alpha 4 beta 1 integrin. A direct role for cell surface CSPG in mediating melanoma cell adhesion to this FN fragment was demonstrated by the identification of a cationic synthetic peptide, termed FN-C/H-III, within the fragment. FN-C/H-III is located close to the amino terminal end of the fragment, representing residues #1721-1736 of intact FN. FN-C/H-III binds CSPG directly, can inhibit CSPG binding to the fragment, and promotes melanoma cell adhesion by a CSPG-dependent, alpha 4 beta 1 integrin- independent mechanism. A scrambled version of FN-C/H-III does not inhibit CSPG binding or cell adhesion to the fragment or to FN-C/H-III, indicating that the primary sequence of FN-C/H-III is important for its biological properties. Previous studies have identified three other synthetic peptides from within this 33-kD FN fragment that promote cell adhesion by an arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) independent mechanism. Two of these synthetic peptides (FN-C/H-I and FN-C/H-II) bind heparin and promote cell adhesion, implicating cell surface PG in mediating cellular recognition of these two peptides. Additionally, a third synthetic peptide, CS1, is located in close proximity to FN-C/H-I and FN-C/H-II and it promotes cell adhesion by an alpha 4 beta 1 integrin-dependent mechanism. In contrast to FN-C/H-III, cellular recognition of these three peptides involved contributions from both CSPG and alpha 4 integrin subunits. Of particular importance are observations

  4. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  5. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  6. Role of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Regulating YB–1–Mediated Paclitaxel Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously found focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibition sensitizes ovarian cancer to taxanes; however, the mechanisms are not well understood. Methods We characterized the biologic response of taxane-resistant and taxane-sensitive ovarian cancer models to a novel FAK inhibitor (VS-6063). We used reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) to identify novel downstream targets in taxane-resistant cell lines. Furthermore, we correlated clinical and pathological data with nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of FAK and YB-1 in 105 ovarian cancer samples. Statistical tests were two-sided, and P values were calculated with Student t test or Fisher exact test. Results We found that VS-6063 inhibited FAK phosphorylation at the Tyr397 site in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The combination of VS-6063 and paclitaxel markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis, which resulted in 92.7% to 97.9% reductions in tumor weight. RPPA data showed that VS-6063 reduced levels of AKT and YB-1 in taxane-resistant cell lines. FAK inhibition enhanced chemosensitivity in taxane-resistant cells by decreasing YB-1 phosphorylation and subsequently CD44 in an AKT-dependent manner. In human ovarian cancer samples, nuclear FAK expression was associated with increased nuclear YB-1 expression (χ 2 = 37.7; P < .001). Coexpression of nuclear FAK and YB-1 was associated with statistically significantly worse median overall survival (24.9 vs 67.3 months; hazard ratio = 2.64; 95% confidence interval = 1.38 to 5.05; P = .006). Conclusions We have identified a novel pathway whereby FAK inhibition with VS-6063 overcomes YB-1–mediated paclitaxel resistance by an AKT-dependent pathway. These findings have implications for clinical trials aimed at targeting FAK. PMID:24062525

  7. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M.; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Summary The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell–cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar– or Vrp1–WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. PMID:22992459

  8. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell-cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar- or Vrp1-WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation.

  9. Optimization of intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through controllable water-soluble mitomycin-C release from electrospun fibers by mediating adhesion-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Shichao; Liu, Shen; Chen, Shuai; Lin, Zhi Yuan William; Pan, Guoqing; He, Fan; Li, Fengfeng; Fan, Cunyi; Cui, Wenguo

    2015-08-01

    To balance intrinsic and extrinsic healing during tendon repair is challenging in tendon surgery. We hypothesized that by mediating apoptotic gene and collagen synthesis of exogenous fibroblasts, the adhesion formation induced by extrinsic healing could be inhibited. With the maintenance of intrinsic healing, the tendon could be healed with proper function with no adhesion. In this study, we loaded hydrophilic mitomycin-C (MMC) into hyaluronan (HA) hydrosols, which were then encapsulated in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers by micro-sol electrospinning. This strategy successfully provided a controlled release of MMC to inhibit adhesion formations with no detrimental effect on intrinsic healing. We found that micro-sol electrospinning was an effective and facile approach to incorporate and control hydrophilic drug release from hydrophobic polyester fibers. MMC exhibited an initially rapid, and gradually steadier release during 40 days, and the release rates could be tuned by its concentration. In vitro studies revealed that low concentrations of MMC could inhibit fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. When lacerate tendons were healed using the MMC-HA loaded PLLA fibers in vivo, they exhibited comparable mechanical strength to the naturally healed tendons but with no significant presence of adhesion formation. We further identified the up-regulation of apoptotic protein Bax expression and down-regulation of proteins Bcl2, collage I, collagen III and α-SMA during the healing process associated with minimum adhesion formations. This approach presented here leverages new advances in drug delivery and nanotechnology and offers a promising strategy to balance intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through modulating genes associated with fibroblast apoptosis and collagen synthesis.

  10. Are matrix-immobilized neoglycoproteins, plant and human lectins and carbohydrate--binding antibodies from human serum mediators of adhesion in vitro for carcinoma and lymphosarcoma cells?

    PubMed

    Wawotzny, R; André, S; Dong, X; Joshi, S S; Gabius, H J

    1995-01-01

    Mediation of cell adhesion by defined molecules can be studied by their immobilization onto a nitrocellulose matrix and incubation with cells. In order to infer the capacity of deliberately selected protein-carbohydrate interactions to establish sugar-inhibitable cell adhesion, a panel of immobilized neoglycoproteins was employed for the murine lymphosarcoma lines RAW-117 with low (P) and high (H10) metastatic capacity, a human mammary carcinoma line (DU4475) and three human colon carcinoma lines (C205, SW480, SW620). Exhibiting an otherwise rather similar behavior relative to the line with low metastatic potential, the murine line RAW117-H10 bound strongly to the matrix with carboxyl group-bearing N-acetylneuraminic acid and glucuronic acid as well as rhamnose. Whereas the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion yielded comparable results for the three colon carcinoma lines, a markedly reduced number of adherent cells was counted for matrix-attached alpha- and beta-galactosyl, alpha-mannosyl and alpha-glucosyl moieties in the case of the mammary carcinoma line, raising evidence for cell lineage-dependent alterations of this property. From the carbohydrate-binding proteins, the plant lectin, concanavalin A and Viscum album agglutinin almost invariably served well as cell adhesion molecules. Appropriate cell surface sugar receptors, probed with neoglycoproteins, and glycoconjugates, probed with lectins, thus can contribute to adhesion in this model system. The immobilized human beta-galactoside-binding lectin (Mr 14kDa) caused adhesion of the murine lines and one colon carcinoma line (SW480). Neither C-reactive protein under conditions that induce its activity as lectin nor serum amyloid P component nor a lactose-binding immunoglobulin G fraction from human serum were reactive. However, cell adhesion to the alpha-galactoside-binding immunoglobulin G fraction of human serum was seen with the murine line of low metastatic capacity and the mammary carcinoma line

  11. An Elmo-Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Toret, Christopher P; Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2014-12-08

    Cell-cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion identified an Elmo-Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo-Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell-cell contacts in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. At cell-cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell-cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell-cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell-cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo-Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell-cell adhesion. © 2014 Toret et al.

  12. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1–Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1–100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  13. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-08-02

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1-Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1-100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

  14. Adhesion of ADP-activated platelets to intact endothelium under stagnation point flow in vitro is mediated by the integrin alphaIIbeta3.

    PubMed

    Reininger, A J; Korndörfer, M A; Wurzinger, L J

    1998-05-01

    As we demonstrated earlier, platelets adhere to intact endothelium provided they are activated and convectively transported against the endothelial surface. To identify the platelet receptors involved we superfused cultured endothelium with activated platelet rich plasma (PRP) by means of the Stagnation Point Flow Adhesio- Aggregometer while blocking various platelet receptors. Inhibition was performed with the tetrapeptide RGDS, the non-peptide Ro-43-8857, or a monoclonal antibody directed against integrin alphaIIbeta3. Platelet deposition was video-recorded and quantified by image analysis. Infusion of RGDS or Ro-43-8857 into ADP-stimulated PRP completely prevented adhesion as well as subsequent aggregation. Interrupting the inhibitor infusion while ADP stimulation persisted, prompted adhesion and aggregation, demonstrating the reversibility of the inhibition. Platelet adhesion was irreversibly blocked by preincubation of the PRP with the moab against alphaIIbeta3. Its specific binding was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Our results suggest that platelet adhesion to intact endothelium is mediated via platelet integrin alphaIIbeta3.

  15. β1 integrin adhesion enhances IL-6 mediated STAT3 signaling in Myeloma cells: Implications for Microenvironment Influence on Tumor Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Shain, Kenneth H.; Yarde, Danielle N.; Meads, Mark B.; Huang, Mei; Jove, Richard; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Dalton, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironmental components interleukin (IL)-6 and fibronectin (FN) individually influence the proliferation and survival of Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells; however, in vivo these effectors most likely work together. We examined signaling events, cell cycle progression, and levels of drug response in MM cells either adhered to FN via β1 integrins, stimulated with IL-6, or treated with the two combined. While G1/S cell cycle arrest associated with FN adhesion was overcome when IL-6 as added, the cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) was maintained in the presence of IL-6. Concomitant exposure of MM cells to IL-6 and FN adhesion revealed a dramatic increase in STAT3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, as compared to either IL-6 or FN adhesion alone in four MM cell lines. Importantly, this increase in STAT3 activation correlated with a novel association between STAT3 and gp130 in cells adhered to FN prior to stimulation with IL-6, relative to non-adherent cells. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which collaborative signaling by β1 integrin and gp130 confers an increased survival advantage to MM cells. PMID:19155309

  16. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  17. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome The Digestive System & How it Works Abdominal Adhesions What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that ... or stool through the intestines. What causes abdominal adhesions? Abdominal surgery is the most frequent cause of ...

  18. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-04

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed.

  19. Adhesion molecules of cultured hematopoietic malignancies. A calcium-dependent lectin is the principle mediator of binding to the high endothelial venule of lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoolman, L M; Ebling, H

    1989-01-01

    This study documents that a calcium-dependent phosphomanosyl-binding site on human lymphoid malignancies mediates attachment to the peripheral node high endothelial venule (PNHEV). The phorbol ester PMA coordinately upregulates lectin activity and binding to the PNHEV in the human T-lymphoblastic cell line Jurkat but not in the less phenotypically mature lines HSB2, Molt4, CEM, and HPB-ALL. In contrast, expression of CD18, CD2, and several common epitopes of the putative adhesion receptor gp90Hermes (CD44) did not correlate with attachment to PNHEV in this series of cell lines. Insensitivity to inhibition by the CD18 MAb TS 1.18, temperature and divalent cation requirements further distinguish the Jurkat-PNHEV adhesive interaction from CD11a/18- and CD2-mediated adhesion. The PMA-induced phenotypic changes in the Jurkat line parallel late thymocyte differentiation as well as lymphocyte activation, suggesting that expression of the endothelial-binding lectin may be linked to one or both of these processes. The lectin-like activity on Jurkat cells is functionally indistinguishable from those previously linked to PNHEV recognition in normal human lymphocytes, normal rat lymphocytes and both normal and malignant murine lymphoid cells. In the mouse, this activity is either contained in or functionally linked to a member of the LEC-CAM family gp90Mel14, suggesting that Jurkat cells express the human homologue of the murine nodal homing receptor. Thus cultured T lymphoblastic malignancies express a variety of potential endothelial adhesion molecules but use primarily a highly conserved surface lectin to interact with PNHEV. Images PMID:2794056

  20. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  1. Thermogelling Bioadhesive Scaffolds for Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering: Preliminary In Vitro Comparison of Aldehyde-Based Versus Alginate Microparticle-Mediated Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wiltsey, C.; Christiani, T.; Williams, J.; Scaramazza, J.; Van Sciver, C.; Toomer, K.; Sheehan, J.; Branda, A.; Nitzl, A.; England, E.; Kadlowec, J.; Iftode, C.; Vernengo, J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of certain load-bearing parts of the body can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to generate an injectable polymer that can form covalent bonds with tissue upon contact. However, the presence of the reactive aldehyde groups can compromise the viability of encapsulated cells. Thus, liposomes were encapsulated in the blend, designed to deliver the ECM derivative, gelatin, after the polymer has adhered to tissue and reached physiological temperature. This work is based on the hypothesis that the discharge of gelatin will enhance the biocompatibility of the material by covalently reacting with, or “end-capping”, the aldehyde functionalities within the gel that did not participate in bonding with tissue upon contact. As a comparison, formulations were also created without CS aldehyde and with an alternative adhesion mediator, mucoadhesive calcium alginate particles. Gels formed from blends of PNIPAAm-g-CS and CS aldehyde exhibited increased adhesive strength compared to PNIPAAm-g-CS alone (p<0.05). However, the addition of gelatin-loaded liposomes to the blend significantly decreased the adhesive strength (p<0.05). The encapsulation of alginate microparticles within PNIPAAm-g-CS gels caused the tensile strength to increase two-fold over that of PNIPAAm-g-CS blends with CS aldehyde (p<0.05). Cytocompatibility studies indicate that formulations containing alginate particles exhibit reduced cytotoxicity over those containing CS aldehyde. Overall, the results indicated that the adhesives composed of alginate microparticles encapsulated in PNIPAAm-g-CS have the potential to serve as a scaffold for IVD regeneration. PMID:25641647

  2. Integrin-mediated traction force enhances paxillin molecular associations and adhesion dynamics that increase the invasiveness of tumor cells into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Mekhdjian, Armen H; Kai, FuiBoon; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Prahl, Louis S; Przybyla, Laralynne M; McGregor, Alexandra L; Bell, Emily S; Barnes, J Matthew; DuFort, Christopher C; Ou, Guanqing; Chang, Alice C; Cassereau, Luke; Tan, Steven J; Pickup, Michael W; Lakins, Jonathan N; Ye, Xin; Davidson, Michael W; Lammerding, Jan; Odde, David J; Dunn, Alexander R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2017-06-01

    Metastasis requires tumor cells to navigate through a stiff stroma and squeeze through confined microenvironments. Whether tumors exploit unique biophysical properties to metastasize remains unclear. Data show that invading mammary tumor cells, when cultured in a stiffened three-dimensional extracellular matrix that recapitulates the primary tumor stroma, adopt a basal-like phenotype. Metastatic tumor cells and basal-like tumor cells exert higher integrin-mediated traction forces at the bulk and molecular levels, consistent with a motor-clutch model in which motors and clutches are both increased. Basal-like nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells also display an altered integrin adhesion molecular organization at the nanoscale and recruit a suite of paxillin-associated proteins implicated in invasion and metastasis. Phosphorylation of paxillin by Src family kinases, which regulates adhesion turnover, is similarly enhanced in the metastatic and basal-like tumor cells, fostered by a stiff matrix, and critical for tumor cell invasion in our assays. Bioinformatics reveals an unappreciated relationship between Src kinases, paxillin, and survival of breast cancer patients. Thus adoption of the basal-like adhesion phenotype may favor the recruitment of molecules that facilitate tumor metastasis to integrin-based adhesions. Analysis of the physical properties of tumor cells and integrin adhesion composition in biopsies may be predictive of patient outcome. © 2017 Mekhdjian, Kai, Rubashkin, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Thermogelling bioadhesive scaffolds for intervertebral disk tissue engineering: preliminary in vitro comparison of aldehyde-based versus alginate microparticle-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wiltsey, C; Christiani, T; Williams, J; Scaramazza, J; Van Sciver, C; Toomer, K; Sheehan, J; Branda, A; Nitzl, A; England, E; Kadlowec, J; Iftode, C; Vernengo, J

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of certain load-bearing parts of the body can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to generate an injectable polymer that can form covalent bonds with tissue upon contact. However, the presence of the reactive aldehyde groups can compromise the viability of encapsulated cells. Thus, liposomes were encapsulated in the blend, designed to deliver the ECM derivative, gelatin, after the polymer has adhered to tissue and reached physiological temperature. This work is based on the hypothesis that the discharge of gelatin will enhance the biocompatibility of the material by covalently reacting with, or "end-capping", the aldehyde functionalities within the gel that did not participate in bonding with tissue upon contact. As a comparison, formulations were also created without CS aldehyde and with an alternative adhesion mediator, mucoadhesive calcium alginate particles. Gels formed from blends of PNIPAAm-g-CS and CS aldehyde exhibited increased adhesive strength compared to PNIPAAm-g-CS alone (p<0.05). However, the addition of gelatin-loaded liposomes to the blend significantly decreased the adhesive strength (p<0.05). The encapsulation of alginate microparticles within PNIPAAm-g-CS gels caused the tensile strength to increase twofold over that of PNIPAAm-g-CS blends with CS aldehyde (p<0.05). Cytocompatibility studies indicate that formulations containing alginate particles exhibit reduced cytotoxicity over those containing CS aldehyde. Overall, the results indicated that the adhesives composed of alginate microparticles encapsulated in PNIPAAm-g-CS have the potential to serve as a scaffold for IVD regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  4. MGr1-Ag/37LRP induces cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance through FAK/PI3K and MAPK pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Liu, Lili; Liu, Xiangqiang; Wang, Yafang; Li, Mengbin; Yao, Liping; Yang, Jianjun; Ji, Genlin; Guo, Changcun; Pan, Yanglin; Liang, Shuhui; Wang, Biaoluo; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Hongwei; Shi, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in drug resistance and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), a form of de novo drug resistance. In our previous study, we reported that MGr1-Ag/37LRP ligation-induced adhesion participated in protecting gastric cancer cells from a number of apoptotic stimuli caused by chemotherapeutic drugs. Further study suggested that MGr1-Ag could prompt CAM-DR through interaction with laminin. However, the MGr1-Ag-initiated intracellular signal transduction pathway is still unknown. In this study, our experimental results showed that gastric cancer MDR cell lines mediated CAM-DR through upregulation of Bcl-2 by MGr1-Ag interaction with laminin. Further study found that, as a receptor of ECM components, MGr1-Ag/37LRP may activate the downstream signal pathway PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK through interaction with phosphorylated FAK. Moreover, the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs could be significantly enhanced by inhibiting MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression through mAbs, siRNA, and antisense oligonucleotide. According to these results, we concluded that the FAK/PI3K and MAPK signal pathway plays an important role in MGr1-Ag-mediated CAM-DR in gastric cancer. MGr1-Ag/37LRP might be a potential effective reversal target to MDR in gastric cancer. PMID:24703465

  5. Deoxyelephantopin impedes mammary adenocarcinoma cell motility by inhibiting calpain-mediated adhesion dynamics and inducing reactive oxygen species and aggresome formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Leng; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-04-15

    We previously showed that deoxyelephantopin (DET), a plant sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits more profound suppression than paclitaxel (PTX) of lung metastasis of mammary adenocarcinoma TS/A cells in mice. Proteomics studies suggest that DET affects actin cytoskeletal protein networks and downregulates calpain-mediated proteolysis of several actin-associated proteins, whereas PTX mainly interferes with microtubule proteins. Here, DET was observed to significantly deregulate adhesion formation in TS/A cells, probably through inhibition of m-calpain activity. Epithelial growth factor (EGF)-mediated activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 and formation of lamellipodia in TS/A cells were remarkably suppressed by DET treatment. Further, DET impaired vesicular trafficking of EGF and induced protein carbonylation and formation of centrosomal aggregates in TS/A cells. DET-induced reactive oxygen species were observed to be the upstream stimulus for the formation of centrosomal ubiquitinated protein aggregates that might subsequently restrict cancer cell motility. PTX, however, caused dramatic morphological changes, interfered with microtubule networking, and moderately inhibited calpain-mediated cytoskeletal and focal adhesion protein cleavage in TS/A cells. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the pharmacological action of DET against metastatic mammary cell migration and suggests that modulation of oxidative stress might be a potential strategy for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Inhibition of type 1 fimbriae-mediated Escherichia coli adhesion and biofilm formation by trimeric cluster thiomannosides conjugated to diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Manakamana; Larsonneur, Fanny; Raks, Victoriia; Barras, Alexandre; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Boukherroub, Rabah; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Garcia Fernandez, Jose M.; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have seen the development of a number of microbiocidal and/or anti-adhesive nanoparticles displaying activity against biofilms. In this work, trimeric thiomannoside clusters conjugated to nanodiamond particles (ND) were targeted for investigation. NDs have attracted attention as a biocompatible nanomaterial and we were curious to see whether the high mannose glycotope density obtained upon grouping monosaccharide units in triads might lead to the corresponding ND-conjugates behaving as effective inhibitors of E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion as well as of biofilm formation. The required trimeric thiosugar clusters were obtained through a convenient thiol-ene ``click'' strategy and were subsequently conjugated to alkynyl-functionalized NDs using a Cu(i)-catalysed ``click'' reaction. We demonstrated that the tri-thiomannoside cluster-conjugated NDs (ND-Man3) show potent inhibition of type 1 fimbriae-mediated E. coli adhesion to yeast and T24 bladder cells as well as of biofilm formation. The biofilm disrupting effects demonstrated here have only rarely been reported in the past for analogues featuring such simple glycosidic motifs. Moreover, the finding that the tri-thiomannoside cluster (Man3N3) is itself a relatively efficient inhibitor, even when not conjugated to any ND edifice, suggests that alternative mono- or multivalent sugar-derived analogues might also be usefully explored for E. coli-mediated biofilm disrupting properties.Recent advances in nanotechnology have seen the development of a number of microbiocidal and/or anti-adhesive nanoparticles displaying activity against biofilms. In this work, trimeric thiomannoside clusters conjugated to nanodiamond particles (ND) were targeted for investigation. NDs have attracted attention as a biocompatible nanomaterial and we were curious to see whether the high mannose glycotope density obtained upon grouping monosaccharide units in triads might lead to the corresponding

  7. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    Epidemiological evidence has established terrestrial radiation exposure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. For example, a major side effect of therapeutic radiation, especially for breast and head-and-neck cancers, is atherosclerosis, which can result in stroke years after treatment. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors were significantly more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their countrymen. Even radiation technologists, prior to 1950 (when regulations governing shielding and occupational exposure were less rigorous) had an increased risk of clinically significant atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that 600 MeV (56) Fe similarly exacerbates plaque formation in the apoE mouse atherosclerosis model at doses 4-7 fold lower than required for x-rays to produce a similar pro-atherogenic effect. This raises concern that exposure to cosmic radiation might pose a similar risk for astronauts. Because so little is known about the mechanism of pro-atherogenic radiation effects, however, the current strategy to minimize risk from terrestrial radiation sources is to limit exposure. For astronauts on deep space missions, exposure to a significant amount of radiation will be unavoidable. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced atherosclerosis will be essential in order to develop countermeasures. Radiation can cause increased adhesiveness of vascular endothelium, leading to inappropriate accumulation of monocytes and other white blood cells, which can initiate a self-perpetuating inflammatory response. This vascular inflammation is an early event in atherosclerosis that can eventually lead to clinically significant cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. We showed earlier that x-rays, (56) Fe, and (28) Si all accelerate development of atherosclerosis in the apoE -/- mouse model. We also demonstrated that both x-rays and heavy ions increase adhesion of monocytic cells to vascular human aortic endothelial

  8. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a fragment of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 stimulate L1-mediated functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Florian; Lutz, David; Rusche, Norman; Bastús, Neus G.; Stieben, Martin; Höltig, Michael; Grüner, Florian; Weller, Horst; Schachner, Melitta; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Loers, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1 sequence of the third fibronectin type III domain of murine L1 was identified and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to obtain constructs that interact homophilically with the extracellular domain of L1 and trigger the cognate beneficial L1-mediated functions. Covalent conjugation was achieved by reacting mixtures of two cysteine-terminated forms of this L1 peptide and thiolated poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) ligands (~2.1 kDa) with citrate stabilized AuNPs of two different sizes (~14 and 40 nm in diameter). By varying the ratio of the L1 peptide-PEG mixtures, an optimized layer composition was achieved that resulted in the expected homophilic interaction of the AuNPs. These AuNPs were stable as tested over a time period of 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid and interacted with the extracellular domain of L1 on neurons and Schwann cells, as could be shown by using cells from wild-type and L1-deficient mice. In vitro, the L1-derivatized particles promoted neurite outgrowth and survival of neurons from the central and peripheral nervous system and stimulated Schwann cell process formation and proliferation. These observations raise the hope that, in combination with other therapeutic approaches, L1 peptide-functionalized AuNPs may become a useful tool to ameliorate the deficits resulting from acute and chronic injuries of the mammalian nervous system.The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1

  9. Cell fusion mediates dramatic alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, and E-cadherin in trophoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Atsuko; Omata, Waka; Ackerman, William E; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Vandré, Dale D; Robinson, John M

    2014-04-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast of the human placenta is a unique epithelia structure with millions of nuclei sharing a common cytoplasm. The syncytiotrophoblast forms by cell-cell fusion of cytotrophoblasts (CTB), the mononuclear precursor cells. The trophoblastic BeWo cell line has been used as a surrogate for CTB since they can be induced to fuse, and subsequently display numerous syncytiotrophoblast differentiation markers following syncytial formation. In this study, we have focused on alterations in the cell-adhesion molecule E-cadherin, actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesions following BeWo cell fusion, since these entities may be interrelated. There was a dramatic reorganization of the distribution of E-cadherin as well as a reduction in the amount of E-cadherin following cell fusion. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was also observed, which was associated with a change in the globular actin (G-actin)/filamentous actin (F-actin) ratio. Concomitantly, the morphology of focal adhesions was altered, but this occurred without a corresponding change in the levels of focal adhesion marker proteins. Thus, extensive remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions accompanies cell fusion and differentiation and appears related to alterations in E-cadherin in trophoblastic cells.

  10. Distinct kinetic and mechanical properties govern mucin 16- and podocalyxin-mediated tumor cell adhesion to E- and L-selectin in shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Daniel J.; Wirtz, Denis; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Selectin-mediated tumor cell tethering to host cells, such as vascular endothelial cells, is a critical step in the process of cancer metastasis. We recently identified sialofucosylated mucin16 (MUC16) and podocalyxin (PODXL) as the major functional E- and L-selectin ligands expressed on the surface of metastatic pancreatic cancer cells. While the biophysics of leukocyte binding to selectins has been well studied, little is known about the mechanics of selectin-mediated adhesion pertinent to cancer metastasis. We thus sought to evaluate the critical parameters of selectin-mediated pancreatic tumor cell tethering and rolling. Using force spectroscopy, we characterized the binding interactions of MUC16 and PODXL to E- and L-selectin at the single-molecule level. To further analyze the response of these molecular interactions under physiologically relevant regimes, we used a microfluidic assay in conjunction with a mathematical model to study the biophysics of selectin-ligand binding as a function of fluid shear stress. We demonstrate that both MUC16 and PODXL-E-selectin-mediated interactions are mechanically stronger than like L-selectin interactions at the single-molecule level, and display a higher binding frequency at all contact times. The single-molecule kinetic and micromechanical properties of selectin-ligand bonds, along with the number of receptor-ligand bonds needed to initiate tethering, regulate the average velocity of ligand-coated microspheres rolling on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow. Understanding the biophysics of selectin-ligand bonds and their responses to physiologically relevant shear stresses is vital for developing diagnostic assays and/or preventing the metastatic spread of tumor cells by interfering with selectin-mediated adhesion. PMID:26329844

  11. Characterizing Pilus-Mediated Adhesion of Biofilm-Forming E. coli to Chemically Diverse Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0–10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to “antifouling” PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells’ ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies

  12. Computer simulation of water-mediated adhesion between phospholipid bilayer and solid support functionalized with self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2012-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate, via computer simulation of the force-distance relation, the free energy of adhesion between a phosphatidylethanolamine bilayer and an alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in aqueous medium. The simulations are performed using the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and atomistic force fields. The bilayer adhesion free energy is predicted to be -22 ± 3 mJ/m(2) (-1.4 ± 0.2 kcal/mol) on a hydrophilic carboxyl-terminated SAM and -1 ± 1 mJ/m(2) (-0.06 ± 0.06 kcal/mol) on a hydrophobic methyl-terminated SAM.

  13. Glycoprotein glycans that inhibit adhesion of Escherichia coli mediated by K99 fimbriae: treatment of experimental colibacillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mouricout, M; Petit, J M; Carias, J R; Julien, R

    1990-01-01

    Calf diarrhea due to infection by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was treated by administration of glycoprotein glycans derived from bovine plasma. The glycan moieties of the nonimmunoglobulin fraction of plasma mimicked the oligosaccharide moiety of intestinal receptors recognized by K99 pili. These glycoprotein glycans inhibited adhesion of E. coli K99+ ST+ to erythrocyte glycoconjugates in vitro, and they protected colostrum-deprived newborn calves against lethal doses of enterotoxigenic E. coli (10(10) bacteria). Adhesion of bacteria to the intestines (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) was significantly reduced (by 2 orders of magnitude) in treated calves. PMID:2403535

  14. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1: evidence for involvement of cell adhesion molecules in HTLV-1 biology.

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, J E; Subramanium, A; Hampton, R A

    1997-01-01

    While studying the potential role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in infection of endothelial cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we found that VCAM-1 can mediate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation. Both expression-vector-encoded and endogenously expressed VCAM-1 supported fusion of uninfected cells with HTLV-1-infected cells. Fusion was obtained with cell lines carrying the HTLV-1 genome and expressing viral proteins but not with an HTLV-1-transformed cell line that does not express viral proteins. In clones of VCAM-1-transfected cells, the degree of syncytium formation observed directly reflected the level of VCAM-1 expression. Syncytium formation between HTLV-1-expressing cells and VCAM-1+ cells could be blocked with antiserum against HTLV-1 gp46 and with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VCAM-1. Fusion was not blocked by antiserum against HIV or a MAb against VLA-4, the physiological counter-receptor for VCAM-1. The results indicate that VCAM-1 can serve as an accessory molecule or potential coreceptor for HTLV-1-induced cell fusion and provide direct evidence of a role for cell adhesion molecules in the biology of HTLV-1. PMID:8995639

  15. Synaptic Clusters of MHC Class II Molecules Induced on DCs by Adhesion Molecule–mediated Initial T-Cell ScanningV⃞

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Mittelbrunn, María; Sánchez-Martín, Lorena; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Lamana, Amalia; Pardi, Ruggero; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Initial adhesive contacts between T lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DCs) facilitate recognition of peptide-MHC complexes by the TCR. In this report, we studied the dynamic behavior of adhesion and Ag receptors on DCs during initial contacts with T-cells. Adhesion molecules LFA-1- and ICAM-1,3-GFP as well as MHC class II-GFP molecules were very rapidly concentrated at the DC contact area. Binding of ICAM-3, and ICAM-1 to a lesser extent, to LFA-1 expressed by mature but not immature DC, induced MHC-II clustering into the immune synapse. Also, ICAM-3 binding to DC induced the activation of the Vav1-Rac1 axis, a regulatory pathway involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which was essential for MHC-II clustering on DCs. Our results support a model in which ICAM-mediated MHC-II clustering on DC constitutes a priming mechanism to enhance antigen presentation to T-cells. PMID:15872088

  16. Effect of homotypic and heterotypic interaction in 3D on the E-selectin mediated adhesive properties of breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Geng, Yue; DeLouise, Lisa A; King, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Hematogenous metastasis involves a glycoprotein mediated adhesion cascade of tumor cells with E-selectin on the endothelial layer of the blood vessels. Cell-cell interactions play a major role in cancer metastasis and invasiveness. Intercellular communication between two cancer cells or between a cancer cell with a stromal cell in the microenvironment such as fibroblasts or inflammatory cells play an important role in metastatic invasion. Culturing tumor cells as 3D spheroids can recapitulate these physiologically relevant cell-cell interactions. The heterogeneity in primary tumor is attributed to cell subpopulations with varying degree of invasiveness. Co-culturing cancer cells with different phenotypes as 3D spheroids can mimic this heterogeneity. Here we report, the effect of homotypic and heterotypic interactions in breast cancer cells cultured as 3D spheroids on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the adhesion phenotype to E-selectin. We show that breast cancer cell lines (BT20 and MCF7) propagating as 3D spheroids on PDMS exhibit a stronger interaction with human recombinant E-selectin when compared to their respective monolayer grown counterparts on tissue culture plate (TCP). Matrigel invasion assay also indicated that BT20 and MCF7 spheroids were more invasive than BT20 and MCF7 cells grown as monolayers. To mimic tumor heterogeneity in vitro, a co-culture model included tumorigenic cell lines BT20, MCF7 and a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A. These cell lines were cultured together in equal seeding ratio on PDMS to generate co-culture spheroids. The heterotypic interactions in the co-culture model resulted in enhancement of the adhesion of the most invasive BT20 cell line to E-selectin. BT20 cells in co-culture bound to the greatest degree to soluble E-selectin compared to MCF7 and MCF10A cells in co-culture. Co-invasion assay with co-culture spheroids indicated that BT20 cells in co-culture were more invasive than MCF7 and MCF10A cells. The

  17. Rap GTPase-mediated adhesion and migration: A target for limiting the dissemination of B-cell lymphomas?

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Gold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas, which arise in lymphoid organs, can spread rapidly via the circulatory system and form solid tumors within multiple organs. Rate-limiting steps in this metastatic process may be the adhesion of lymphoma cells to vascular endothelial cells, their exit from the vasculature and their migration to tissue sites that will support tumor growth. Thus proteins that control B cell adhesion and migration are likely to be key factors in lymphoma dissemination, and hence potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The Rap GTPases are master regulators of integrin activation, cell motility and the underlying cytoskeletal, adhesion and membrane dynamics. We have recently shown that Rap activation is critical for B-lymphoma cells to undergo transendothelial migration in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, suppressing Rap activation impairs the ability of intravenously injected B-lymphoma cells to form solid tumors in the liver and other organs. We discuss this work in the context of targeting Rap, its downstream effectors, or other regulators of B cell adhesion and migration as an approach for limiting the dissemination of B-lymphoma cells and the development of secondary tumors.

  18. JAM-L-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is regulated in cis by alpha4beta1 integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Lutz, Pierre G; Calderwood, David A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdoulous, Sandrine

    2008-12-15

    Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are endothelial and epithelial adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of circulating leukocytes to inflammatory sites. We show here that JAM-L, a protein related to the JAM family, is restricted to leukocytes and promotes their adhesion to endothelial cells. Cis dimerization of JAM-L is required to engage in heterophilic interactions with its cognate counter-receptor CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor). Interestingly, JAM-L expressed on neutrophils binds CAR independently of integrin activation. However, on resting monocytes and T lymphocytes, which express the integrin VLA-4, JAM-L molecules engage in complexes with VLA-4 and mainly accumulate in their monomeric form. Integrin activation is required for the dissociation of JAM-L-VLA-4 complexes and the accumulation of functional JAM-L dimers, which indicates that the leukocyte integrin VLA-4 controls JAM-L function in cis by controlling its dimerization state. This provides a mechanism through which VLA-4 and JAM-L functions are coordinately regulated, allowing JAM-L to strengthen integrin-dependent adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells.

  19. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  20. Syndecan-2 is a key regulator of transforming growth factor beta 2/Smad2-mediated adhesion in fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mytilinaiou, Maria; Bano, Artan; Nikitovic, Dragana; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Voudouri, Kallirroi; Kalogeraki, Alexandra; Karamanos, Nikos K; Tzanakakis, George N

    2013-02-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor originating from fibroblasts. Transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2) has been established to regulate processes correlated to fibrosarcoma tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the possible participation of syndecan-2 (SDC-2), a cell membrane heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan on these TGFβ2 functions. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition of SDC-2 expression by short interfering RNA (siSDC2) abolished TGFβ2-dependent HT1080 cell adhesion (P ≤ 0.01). In parallel, the downregulation of SDC-2 significantly inhibited TGFβ2-induced Smad2 phosphorylation (P ≤ 0.01). The immunoflourescence signal of TGF receptor III as well as its protein expression was decreased in SDC-2-deficient cells. The enhancement of adhesion molecules integrin β1 (P ≤ 0.01) and focal adhesion kinase expression, induced by TGFβ2 treatment (P ≤ 0.001), was markedly inhibited in SDC-2-defficient cells (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusively, the obtained data suggest that SDC-2 modulates TGFβ2 transcriptional regulation via Smad signaling to facilitate fibrosarcoma cell adhesion. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Oligosaccharide-mediated inhibition of the adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to human gut epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, J; Manderson, K; Wells, A; Hotchkiss, A T; Gibson, G R; Formentin, K; Beer, M; Rastall, R A

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of pectic oligosaccharides (POS) to inhibit adhesion of three strains of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli, three strains of enteropathogenic E. coli, and one nonclinical strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to human intestinal epithelial cell cultures. Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus gasseri were included for comparison. Attachment was determined in the human HT29 cell line by viable count of adherent bacteria. POS in buffer at pH 7.2 were antiadhesive at a dose of 2.5 mg ml(-1), reducing adhesion of enteropathogenic E. coil and verotoxigenic E. coli strains to less than 30% of control values. Concentrations resulting in 50% inhibition ranged from 0.15 to 0.46 mg ml(-1). L. acidophilus was not significantly affected, but adhesion of L. gasseri was reduced to 29% of the control value. POS reduced the adhesion of D. desulfuricans to 0.33% of the control value. POS also had a protective effect against E. coli verocytotoxins VT1 and VT2 at concentrations of 0.01 and 1 microg ml(-1), respectively.

  2. Flavobacterium columnare: Chemotaxis and adhesion to channel catfish mucus is mediated by lectin-like capsular substances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flavobacterium columnare is an important Gram-negative pathogen of fresh water fish that may cause chronic skin lesions and severe mortality. Isolates of F. columnare belong to either the virulent genomovar II or the less virulent genomovar I. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were conducted in vitro...

  3. Integrin-mediated osteoblastic adhesion on a porous manganese-incorporated TiO2 coating prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxiang; Gu, Beibei; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Lixian

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the bioactivity of manganese-incorporated TiO2 (Mn-TiO2) coating prepared on titanium (Ti) plate by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in Ca-, P- and Mn-containing electrolytes. The surface topography, phase and element compositions of the coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), respectively. The adhesion of osteoblast-like MG63 cells onto Ti, TiO2 and Mn-TiO2 surfaces was evaluated, and the signal transduction pathway involved was confirmed by the sequential expression of the genes for integrins β1, β3, α1 and α3, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), including ERK1 and ERK2. The results obtained indicated that Mn was successfully incorporated into the porous nanostructured TiO2 coating, and did not alter the surface topography or the phase composition of the coating. The adhesion of the MG63 cells onto the Mn-incorporated TiO2 coating was significantly enhanced compared with that on the Mn-free TiO2 coating and the pure Ti plates. In addition, the enhanced cell adhesion on the Mn-TiO2 coatings may have been mediated by the binding of the integrin subunits, β1 and α1, and the subsequent signal transduction pathway, involving FAK and ERK2. The study indicated that the novel Mn-TiO2 coating has potential for orthopedic implant applications, and that further investigations are required.

  4. Integrin-mediated osteoblastic adhesion on a porous manganese-incorporated TiO2 coating prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHENXIANG; GU, BEIBEI; ZHU, WEI; ZHU, LIXIAN

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the bioactivity of manganese-incorporated TiO2 (Mn-TiO2) coating prepared on titanium (Ti) plate by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in Ca-, P- and Mn-containing electrolytes. The surface topography, phase and element compositions of the coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), respectively. The adhesion of osteoblast-like MG63 cells onto Ti, TiO2 and Mn-TiO2 surfaces was evaluated, and the signal transduction pathway involved was confirmed by the sequential expression of the genes for integrins β1, β3, α1 and α3, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), including ERK1 and ERK2. The results obtained indicated that Mn was successfully incorporated into the porous nanostructured TiO2 coating, and did not alter the surface topography or the phase composition of the coating. The adhesion of the MG63 cells onto the Mn-incorporated TiO2 coating was significantly enhanced compared with that on the Mn-free TiO2 coating and the pure Ti plates. In addition, the enhanced cell adhesion on the Mn-TiO2 coatings may have been mediated by the binding of the integrin subunits, β1 and α1, and the subsequent signal transduction pathway, involving FAK and ERK2. The study indicated that the novel Mn-TiO2 coating has potential for orthopedic implant applications, and that further investigations are required. PMID:24137252

  5. Metabolic inhibition of sialyl-Lewis X biosynthesis by 5-thiofucose remodels the cell surface and impairs selectin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zandberg, Wesley F; Kumarasamy, Jayakanthan; Pinto, B Mario; Vocadlo, David J

    2012-11-16

    Sialyl-Lewis X (sLe(X)) is a tetrasaccharide that serves as a ligand for the set of cell adhesion proteins known as selectins. This interaction enables adhesion of leukocytes and cancer cells to endothelial cells within capillaries, resulting in their extravasation into tissues. The last step in sLe(X) biosynthesis is the α1,3-fucosyltrasferase (FUT)-catalyzed transfer of an L-fucose residue to carbohydrate acceptors. Impairing FUT activity compromises leukocyte homing to sites of inflammation and renders cancer cells less malignant. Inhibition of FUTs is, consequently, of great interest, but efforts to generate glycosyltransferase inhibitors, including FUT inhibitors, has proven challenging. Here we describe a metabolic engineering strategy to inhibit the biosynthesis of sLe(X) in cancer cells using peracetylated 5-thio-L-fucose (5T-Fuc). We show that 5T-Fuc is taken up by cancer cells and then converted into a sugar nucleotide analog, GDP-5T-Fuc, that blocks FUT activity and limits sLe(X) presentation on HepG2 cells with an EC(50) in the low micromolar range. GDP-5T-Fuc itself does not get transferred by either FUT3 or FUT7 at a measurable rate. We further demonstrate that treatment of cells with 5T-Fuc impaired their adhesive properties to immobilized adhesion molecules and human endothelial cells. 5T-Fuc, therefore, is a useful probe that can be used to modulate sLe(X) levels in cells to evaluate the consequences of inhibiting FUT-mediated sLe(X) formation. These data also reveal the utility of using sugar analogues that lead to formation of donor substrate analogues within cells as a general approach to blocking glycosyltransferases in cells.

  6. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  7. Ovarian carcinoma cells synthesize both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate cell surface proteoglycans that mediate cell adhesion to interstitial matrix.

    PubMed

    Kokenyesi, R

    Metastatic ovarian carcinoma metastasizes by intra-peritoneal, non-hematogenous dissemination. The adhesion of the ovarian carcinoma cells to extracellular matrix components, such as types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, is essential for intra-peritoneal dissemination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cell surface proteoglycans (a class of matrix receptors) are produced by ovarian carcinoma cells, and whether these proteoglycans have a role in the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to types I and III collagen and fibronectin. Proteoglycans were metabolically labeled for biochemical studies. Both phosphatidylinositol-anchored and integral membrane-type cell surface proteoglycans were found to be present on the SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cell lines. Three proteoglycan populations of differing hydrodynamic size were detected in both SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. Digestions with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC showed that cell surface proteoglycans of SK-OV-3 cells had higher proportion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (75:25 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio), while NIH:OVCAR-3 cells had higher proportion of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (10:90 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio). RT-PCR indicated the synthesis of a unique assortment of syndecans, glypicans, and CD44 by the two cell lines. In adhesion assays performed on matrix-coated titer plates both cell lines adhered to types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, and cell adhesion was inhibited by preincubation of the matrix with heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, or chondroitin glycosaminoglycans. Treatment of the cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, or methylumbelliferyl xyloside also interfered with adhesion confirming the role of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface proteoglycans as matrix receptors on ovarian carcinoma cells.

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene induces intercellular adhesion molecule-1 through a caveolae and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterling, Elizabeth; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-10-15

    Toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have linked benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure with cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of action leading to these diseases have not been fully understood. One key step in the development of atherosclerosis is vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by increased adhesiveness. To determine if B[a]P could lead to increased endothelial adhesiveness, the effects of B[a]P on human endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was investigated. B[a]P was able to increase ICAM-1 protein only after pretreatment with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF). Knockdown of AhR by siRNA or treatment with AhR antagonist {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}-NF) eliminated the induction of ICAM-1 from B[a]P, confirming the necessity of AhR in this process. Likewise, B[a]P only increased monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium when cells were pretreated with {beta}-NF. Experiments were done to define a signaling mechanism. B[a]P increased phosphorylation of MEK and p38-MAPK, and inhibitors to these proteins blunted the ICAM-1 induction. B[a]P was also able to increase AP-1 DNA binding and phosphorylation of cJun. Phosphorylation of cJun was disrupted by MEK and p38-MAPK inhibitors linking the signaling cascade. Finally, the importance of membrane microdomains, caveolae, was demonstrated by knockdown of the structural protein caveolin-1. Disruption of caveolae eliminated the B[a]P-induced ICAM-1 expression. These data suggest a possible pro-inflammatory mechanism of action of B[a]P involving caveolae, leading to increased vascular endothelial adhesiveness, and this inflammation may be a critical step in the development of B[a]P-induced atherosclerosis.

  9. ETA receptor mediates altered leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and adhesion molecules expression in DOCA-salt rats.

    PubMed

    Callera, Glaucia E; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M; Zorn, Telma M T; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B; Nigro, Dorothy; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Tostes, Rita C

    2004-04-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells plays a key role in inflammatory processes associated with end-organ injury. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which stimulates inflammatory processes, contributes to cardiovascular damage in deoxycorticosterone (DOCA)-salt hypertension. We investigated whether ETA receptor blockade modulates in vivo leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) involved in these processes. DOCA-salt and control uninephrectomized rats were treated with the ETA antagonist BMS182874 (40 mg/kg per day) or vehicle. Analysis of CAMs expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry showed increased cardiac platelet selectin (P-selectin), detected mainly in endothelial cells, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in DOCA-salt rats. Cardiac expression of endothelial selectin (E-selectin) was decreased, whereas immunoreactivity to ED-1 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, markers of macrophage and leukocyte infiltration, respectively, were increased in DOCA-salt. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, functionally assessed in venules of internal spermatic fascia by intravital microscopy, was significantly altered in DOCA-salt rats as evidenced by increased leukocyte adhesion and decreased rolling. BMS182874 treatment normalized leukocyte-endothelium interactions, decreased cardiac VCAM-1 expression in DOCA and control groups, and had no effects on ICAM-1 expression. BMS182874 also increased E-selectin and abolished P-selectin expression in DOCA-salt, but not in control rats. The ETA antagonist reduced cardiac ED-1 content and MPO activity and prevented cardiac damage in DOCA-salt rats. These data indicate that ET-1 participates, via activation of ETA receptors, in altered leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in DOCA-salt rats, possibly by modulating expression of CAMs, and that the inflammatory status is associated with

  10. The Adh adhesin domain is required for trimeric autotransporter Apa1-mediated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae adhesion, autoaggregation, biofilm formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Yang, Shuxin; Zhai, Ruidong; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Pan, Fengguang; Ji, Qun; Wang, Yu; Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-05-15

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which is a highly contagious endemic disease of pigs. Adhesion is a critical first step in the infection process. Trimeric autotransporter adhesions (TAAs) have been identified as novel virulence factors; however, little is known on their roles in A. pleuropneumoniae pathogenicity. Here, our data show that YadA-like head region (Adh) of Apa1 was the optimal adhesion functional domain via segment expression and adhesion assays in vitro. Additionally, Adh induced partial protection against A. pleuropneumoniae 5b L20 and serotypes 1, 3, and 5a in mice. The deletion of Adh gene significantly decreased autoaggregation, biofilm formation and adherence to host cells in vitro. Furthermore, with delaying of clinical symptoms, reducing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lessening the lung injury after infection, Adh deletion strain (5bϕAdh) significantly reduced the pathogenicity to piglets. To elucidate the mechanism of lung injury, the differentially expressed genes in the lung tissues of piglets infected with the 5b L20 or 5bϕAdh strains were investigated using microarray analysis and validated by qRT-PCR. Compared with the 5b L20 infected piglets, 495 genes were differentially expressed in 5bϕAdh infected lung tissue (221 upregulated and 274 downregulated). Especially, the antigen processing and presentation gene IFI30 was increased following infection with the 5bϕAdh strain. Thus, Adh may enhance pathogenicity by depressing host immune recognition. We conclude that the head domain of the A. pleuropneumoniae trimeric autotransporter Apa1 regulates autoagglutination, biofilm formation, adhesion to host cells and pathogenicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  12. Structural characterization and in vitro inhibitory activities in P-selectin-mediated leukocyte adhesion of polysaccharide fractions isolated from the roots of Physalis alkekengi.

    PubMed

    Tong, Haibin; Wang, Ruifei; Liu, Ximing; Wang, Guiyun; Du, Fengguo; Zeng, Xianlu

    2011-08-01

    Selectin-mediated leukocyte initial attachment and rolling over vessel endothelial surface are crucial steps for inflammatory responses. As P-selectin is a promising target for anti-inflammation therapeutic strategy, recent works have focused on searching for more potent and non-toxic P-selectin antagonists among various natural carbohydrate products. Here, we isolated three water-soluble polysaccharide fractions (PPS-1, PPS-2 and PPS-3) from the roots of Physalis alkekengi by DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Their physicochemical and structural characterizations were determined by chemical methods, GC (gas chromatography), HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography), FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectrometry), partial acid hydrolysis, methylation and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) analyses. The inhibitory capacity of the polysaccharide fractions in P-selectin-mediated leukocyte adhesion was evaluated by flow cytometric, static adhesion and laminar flow assays. Results showed that different polysaccharide fractions possess distinct physicochemical and structural properties, including carbohydrate, protein and uronic acid contents, molecular weight, monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage type. Among the polysaccharide fractions, PPS-2 could effectively block the interaction between P-selectin and its native ligand.

  13. Interaction with glycosaminoglycans is required for cyclophilin B to trigger integrin-mediated adhesion of peripheral blood T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Fabrice; Vanpouille, Christophe; Carpentier, Mathieu; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Durieux, Sandrine; Spik, Geneviève

    2002-01-01

    Cyclophilins A and B (CyPA and CyPB) are cyclosporin A-binding proteins that are involved in inflammatory events. We have reported that CyPB interacts with two types of cell-surface-binding sites. The first site corresponds to a functional receptor and requires interaction with the central core of CyPB. This region is highly conserved in cyclophilins, suggesting that CyPA and CyPB might share biological activities mediated by interaction with this receptor. The second site is identified with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), the binding region located in the N terminus of CyPB. The difference in the N-terminal extensions of CyPA and CyPB suggests that a unique interaction with GAGs might account for selective activity of CyPB. To explore this hypothesis, we analyzed the lymphocyte responses triggered by CyPA, CyPB, and CyPBKKK−, a mutant unable to interact with GAGs. The three ligands seemed capable enough to elicit calcium signal and chemotaxis by binding to the same signaling receptor. In contrast, only CyPB enhanced firm adhesion of T cells to the extracellular matrix. This activity depended on the interactions with GAGs and signaling receptor. CyPB-mediated adhesion required CD147 presumably because it was a costimulatory molecule and was related to an activation of α4β1 and α4β7 integrins. Finally, we showed that CyPB was capable mainly to enhance T cell adhesion of the CD4+CD45RO+ subset. The present data indicate that CyPB rather than CyPA is a proinflammatory factor for T lymphocytes and highlight the crucial role of CyPB–GAG interaction in the chemokine-like activity of this protein. PMID:11867726

  14. TNF-α mediates PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun-dependent monocyte adhesion via ICAM-1 induction in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Ta; Liu, Shiau-Wen; Chi, Pei-Ling; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Retinal inflammatory diseases induced by cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are associated with an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs). Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of epithelial cells that forms the outer blood-retinal barrier in the posterior segment of the eye, and is also implicated in the pathology of, such as neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the detailed mechanisms of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression are largely unclear in human RPECs. We demonstrated that in RPECs, TNF-α could induce ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity, and monocyte adhesion. TNF-α-mediated responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of PKCs (Ro318220), PKCδ (Rottlerin), MEK1/2 (U0126), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of TNFR1, TRAF2, JNK2, p42, or c-Jun. We showed that TNF-α could stimulate the TNFR1 and TRAF2 complex formation. TNF-α-stimulated JNK1/2 was also reduced by Rottlerin or SP600125. However, Rottlerin had no effect on TNF-α-induced p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. We observed that TNF-α induced c-Jun phosphorylation which was inhibited by Rottlerin or SP600125. On the other hand, TNF-α-stimulated ICAM-1 promoter activity was prominently lost in RPECs transfected with the point-mutated AP-1 ICAM-1 promoter plasmid. These results suggest that TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion is mediated through a TNFR1/TRAF2/PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun pathway in RPECs. These findings concerning TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPECs imply that TNF-α might play an important role in ocular inflammation and diseases.

  15. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  16. Attenuation of adhesion, quorum sensing and biofilm mediated virulence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli by selected natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Tanwar, Ankit; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria) against third line antibiotics can be attributed towards its ability to develop biofilm. Such process involves adhesion and quorum-sensing induced colonization leading to biomass development. The present study explored the anti-adhesion, anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm potential of 05 pre-standardized potent herbals. Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) exhibited maximum potential in all these activities i.e. 91.3% ± 0.05% (Anti-adhesion), 96.06% ± 0.05% (Anti-Quorum sensing) and 51.3% ± 0.07% (Anti-Biofilm formation) respectively. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) showed both anti-adhesion (84.1% ± 0.03%) and anti-quorum sensing (90.0%) potential while Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) showed only anti-quorum sensing potential as compared to standards/antibiotics. These findings were in line with the molecular docking analysis of phytoligands against Lux S and Pilin receptors. Furthermore, the pairwise correlation analysis of the tested activities with qualitative, quantitative and bioactivity functional descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid, moderate content of flavonoids and decreased content of tannins supported all the three activities. In addition, nitric oxide and superoxide scavenging activity were found to be correlated with anti-quorum sensing activity. The findings indicated clearly that B. aristata (Family: Berberidaceae) and C. sinensis (Family: Theaceae) were potent herbal leads with significant therapeutic potential which further needs to be explored at pre-clinical level in the future.

  17. Enhanced Adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni to Abiotic Surfaces Is Mediated by Membrane Proteins in Oxygen-Enriched Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sulaeman, Sheiam; Hernould, Mathieu; Schaumann, Annick; Coquet, Laurent; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Dé, Emmanuelle; Tresse, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the major foodborne bacterial enteritis in humans. In contradiction with its fastidious growth requirements, this microaerobic pathogen can survive in aerobic food environments, suggesting that it must employ a variety of protection mechanisms to resist oxidative stress. For the first time, C. jejuni 81–176 inner and outer membrane subproteomes were analyzed separately using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis (2-DE) of oxygen-acclimated cells and microaerobically grown cells. LC-MS/MS analyses successfully identified 42 and 25 spots which exhibited a significantly altered abundance in the IMP-enriched fraction and in the OMP-enriched fraction, respectively, in response to oxidative conditions. These spots corresponded to 38 membrane proteins that could be grouped into different functional classes: (i) transporters, (ii) chaperones, (iii) fatty acid metabolism, (iv) adhesion/virulence and (v) other metabolisms. Some of these proteins were up-regulated at the transcriptional level in oxygen-acclimated cells as confirmed by qRT-PCR. Downstream analyses revealed that adhesion of C. jejuni to inert surfaces and swarming motility were enhanced in oxygen-acclimated cells or paraquat-stressed cells, which could be explained by the higher abundance of membrane proteins involved in adhesion and biofilm formation. The virulence factor CadF, over-expressed in the outer membrane of oxygen-acclimated cells, contributes to the complex process of C. jejuni adhesion to inert surfaces as revealed by a reduction in the capability of C. jejuni 81–176 ΔCadF cells compared to the isogenic strain. Taken together, these data demonstrate that oxygen-enriched conditions promote the over-expression of membrane proteins involved in both the biofilm initiation and virulence of C. jejuni. PMID:23029510

  18. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. UVB-irradiation regulates VLA-4-mediated melanoma cell adhesion to endothelial VCAM-1 under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shirure, Venktesh S; Burdick, Monica M; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-01-01

    The major aspect contributing to the mortality of melanoma is its ability to spread, or metastasize. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) is considered an indirect cause of melanoma formation. However, little is known about the potential effects of UVB to melanoma metastasis. Integrins, a large family of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) expressed on the melanoma cell surface, are important for cell signaling, growth, and migration during metastasis. Most critically, tumor cell tissue invasion is dependent on the initial interaction of tumor cells with vascular endothelium at the target organ, and there is increasing evidence for a prominent role of melanoma very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin binding to its endothelial ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in this process. This research focuses on the quantitative modulation of VLA-4 integrin expression and function on melanoma cells after UVB irradiation. The present data show that at 3, 12, and 18 h post-UVB irradiation, VLA-4 expression was unchanged relative to untreated cells, but adhesion to VCAM-1 decreased significantly. Immunofluorescence studies implied that the spatial organization of VLA-4 on the melanoma cell surface contributed to the changes in avidity for VCAM-1 upon UVB irradiation. With increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma-endothelial interactions upon UVB irradiation, clinical advances for melanoma may be developed.

  20. IKAP/hELP1 downregulation in neuroblastoma cells causes enhanced cell adhesion mediated by contactin overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kupiec, Rachel; Weinstein, Shiri; Kantor, Gal; Peer, Dan

    2010-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene encoding the IKAP/hELP1 (IKAP) protein was found to be the major cause of Familial Dysautonomia (FD). This mutation affects both the normal development and survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). To understand the FD phenotype it is important to study the specific role played by IKAP in developing and mature PNS neurons. We used the neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell line, originated from neural crest adrenal tumor and simulated the FD phenotype by reducing IKAP expression with retroviral constructs. We observed that IKAP-downregulated cells formed cell clusters compared to control cells under regular culture conditions. We examined the ability of these cells to differentiate into mature neurons in the presence of laminin, an essential extracellular matrix for developing PNS neurons. We found that the cells showed reduced attachment to laminin, morphological changes and increased cell-to-cell adhesion resulting in cell aggregates. We identified Contactin as the adhesion molecule responsible for this phenotype. We show that Contactin expression is related to IKAP expression, suggesting that IKAP regulates Contactin levels for appropriate cell-cell adhesion that could modulate neuronal growth of PNS neurons during development. PMID:20671422

  1. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  2. IKAP/hELP1 down-regulation in neuroblastoma cells causes enhanced cell adhesion mediated by contactin overexpression.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kupiec, Rachel; Weinstein, Shiri; Kantor, Gal; Peer, Dan; Weil, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene encoding the IKAP/hELP1 (IKAP) protein was found to be the major cause of Familial Dysautonomia (FD). This mutation affects both the normal development and survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). To understand the FD phenotype it is important to study the specific role played by IKAP in developing and mature PNS neurons. We used the neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell line, originated from neural crest adrenal tumor, and simulated the FD phenotype by reducing IKAP expression with retroviral constructs. We observed that IKAP – down - regulated cells formed cell clusters compared to control cells under regular culture conditions. We examined the ability of these cells to differentiate into mature neurons in the presence of laminin, an essential extracellular matrix for developing PNS neurons. We found that the cells showed reduced attachment to laminin, morphological changes and increased cell-to-cell adhesion resulting in cell aggregates. We identified Contactin as the adhesion molecule responsible for this phenotype. We show that Contactin expression is related to IKAP expression, suggesting that IKAP regulates Contactin levels for appropriate cell-cell adhesion that could modulate neuronal growth of PNS neurons during development.

  3. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Omrani, Shahin; Ishikawa, Taichi; Javed, Fawad; Oikawa, Yuko; Virtanen, Ismo; Juronen, Erkki; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα) chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1) and 521 (α5β2γ1). As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  4. A Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Human Laminin α5 Chain Strongly Inhibits Integrin-Mediated Cell Adhesion and Migration on Laminins 511 and 521

    PubMed Central

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Omrani, Shahin; Ishikawa, Taichi; Javed, Fawad; Oikawa, Yuko; Juronen, Erkki; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα) chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1) and 521 (α5β2γ1). As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23308268

  5. Glyconectin glycans as the self-assembling nano-molecular-velcrosystem mediating self-nonself recognition and adhesion implicated in evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Misevic, Nikola; Popescu, Octavian

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to make a specific contribution about glyconectin glycan as the self-assembling nano-molecular-velcro system mediating initial steps of self-nonself recognition and cell adhesion in Porifera, the first descendants of the most simple primordial multicellular organisms. Two original findings will be described: (i) Velcro like concept based on highly polyvalent and specific intermolecular glycan to glycan associations with extremely low affinity of the single binding site and (ii) novel structures of the large and newly emerging family of glyconectin like glycan molecules. The emphasis will be put on the interdisciplinary approach for studying structure to function relationship at the different size scale levels by combining the knowledge and technologies (instrumentation and methods) of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics. Applying such strategy which is crossing the boundaries of different science disciplines enabled us to develop a new Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nano-bio-technology and perform the first quantitative measurements of intermolecular binding forces at the single molecular level under physiological conditions. We propose that nano-velcro systems of the glyconectin glycans, which are the constituents on the cell surface that are the most exposed to the environment, were responsible for the molecular self-nonself recognition and adhesion processes that underpinned the emergence of multicellular life forms.

  6. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1.

  7. Cigarette smoke causes lung vascular barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Grinnell, Katie; Newton, Julie; Ortiz, Melanie; Wang, Yulian; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Rounds, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major cause of chronic lung and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies indicate that tobacco use is also a risk factor for acute lung injury (ALI) associated with blunt trauma. Increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability is a hallmark of ALI. CS increases EC permeability in vitro and in vivo; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we found that only 6 h of exposure to CS impaired endothelial barrier function in vivo, an effect associated with increased oxidative stress in the lungs and attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). CS also exacerbated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in vascular permeability in vivo. Similar additive effects were also seen in cultured lung EC exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and LPS. We further demonstrated that CSE caused disruption of focal adhesion complexes (FAC), F-actin fibers, and adherens junctions (AJ) and decreased activities of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cultured lung EC. CSE-induced inhibition of RhoA and FAK, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and disassembly of FAC, F-actin, and AJ were prevented by NAC. In addition, the deleterious effects of CSE on FAC, F-actin fibers, and AJ were blunted by overexpression of constitutively active RhoA and of FAK. Our data indicate that CS causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and FAK. PMID:21984567

  8. CEACAM6 cross-linking induces caveolin-1-dependent, Src-mediated focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation in BxPC3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Mark S; Ito, Hiromichi; Ashley, Stanley W; Whang, Edward E

    2004-05-28

    Despite lacking transmembrane or intracellular domains, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins can modulate intracellular signaling events, in many cases through aggregation within membrane "lipid raft" microdomains. CEACAM6 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked cell surface protein of importance in the anchorage-independent survival and metastasis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. We examined the effects of antibody-mediated cross-linking of CEACAM6 on intracellular signaling events and anchorage-independent survival of the CEACAM6-overexpressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line, BxPC3. CEACAM6 cross-linking increased c-Src activation and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p125(FAK) focal adhesion kinase. Focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation was dependent on c-Src kinase activation, for which caveolin-1 was required. CEACAM6 cross-linking induced a significant increase in cellular resistance to anoikis. These observations represent the first characterization of the mechanism through which this important cell surface oncoprotein influences intracellular signaling events and hence malignant cellular behavior.

  9. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  10. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer. PMID:24147211

  11. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  12. Cell adhesion-mediated transformation of a human SCLC cell line is associated with the development of a normal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Anita J; Meuser, Renate; Turchinsky, Joan; Shaw, Andrew R E; Pasdar, Manijeh; Dixon, Walter T

    2002-05-15

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is a highly metastatic disease with a poor prognosis due to its resistance to current modes of therapy. SCLC cells appear to arise by oncogenic transformation of self-renewing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, which have the potential to differentiate into a variety of lung epithelial cell lineages. Epithelial-mesenchymal conversion involved in such cell type transitions leads to the acquisition of an invasive and metastatic phenotype and may be critical for neoplastic progression and its eventual resistance to therapy. In order to investigate mechanisms involved in such transitions, a SCLC cell line was exposed to 5-bromodeoxyuridine. This treatment induced a dramatic conversion from non-substrate-adherent aggregates to monolayers of cells exhibiting an epithelioid phenotype. The phenotypic transition was concomitant with downregulation of vimentin, upregulation of cytokeratins, and cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules as well as redistribution of the actin cytoskeleton. The changes in the levels and organization of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules were correlated with an in vivo loss of tumorigenicity.

  13. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates. PMID:21062373

  14. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    PubMed

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  16. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  17. Understanding the Mechanism of Solvent-Mediated Adhesion of Vacuum Deposited Au and Pt Thin Films onto PMMA Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Alan K; Brown, Victoria L.; Rugg, Brandon K.; Devore, Prof. Thomas C.; Meyer III, Harry M; Hu, Dr. Xiaofeng; Hughes, Prof. W. Christopher; Augustine, Prof. Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of 100 nm thick electron-beam deposited Au and Pt and magnetron sputtered Au thin films onto poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates can be significantly enhanced to over 90% adhesion by either spin-casting or vapor-exposure to hydrohalocarbon solvents prior to metal deposition compared to samples that are either cleaned in isopropyl alcohol or pre-treated with a remote O2 plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and evolved gas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (EGA-FTIR) reveal the presence of residual halogenated solvent molecules at the PMMA surface which chemically activates the surface to produce a stable chemical interaction between the noble metal film and the PMMA. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the halogenated solvent molecules preferentially form a Lewis acid-base adduct with the oxygen atoms in the ester group in PMMA which is consistent with the measured enthalpy of desorption of chloroform (CHCl3) on PMMA determined by EGA-FTIR to be 36 kJ mol-1. The DFT model also supports the experimentally observed change in the high resolution XPS O 1s peak at 533.77 eV after metallization attributed to a change in the local bonding environment of the bridging O in the PMMA ester group. DFT also predicts that the deposited metal atom (M) inserts into the C-X bond where X is the halogen atom on either CHCl3 or bromoform (CHBr3) to form a O M X interaction that is observed by a M-X bond in the high resolution XPS Cl 2p3/2 peak at 198.03 eV and Br 3p3/2 peak at 182.06 eV. A range of solvents with differing polarities for PMMA pre-treatment have been used and it is proposed that non-complexing solvents result in significant metal adhesion improvement. The Gutmann acceptor number can be used to predict the effectiveness of solvent treatment for noble metal adhesion. A model is proposed in which the bond energy of the C-X bond of the solvent must be sufficiently low so that the C-X bond can be cleaved to form the M

  18. Sam68 regulates cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) via the AKT pathway in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaxun; Xu, Xiaohong; Miao, Xiaobing; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-12-01

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis 68 kDa), a substrate for tyrosine kinase c-Src during mitosis, is up-regulated in a variety of human cancers and acts oncogenically promoting tumour progression. This study has explored biological function and clinical significance of Sam68 in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To examine Sam68 expression in NHL, clinically, eight diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and four reactive lymphoid hyperplasia fresh-frozen tissues were obtained for western blot and quantitative real-time PCR analyses. Using immunohistochemical staining, paraffin wax embedded sections from 164 cases of NHL patients were used to evaluate prognostic value of Sam68. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and soft agar colony assays were conducted to investigate the role of Sam68 in cell viability and cell proliferation respectively. Furthermore, effects of Sam68 on cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) was determined by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. Expression status of Sam68 inversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHL, and it was also an independent prognostic factor for the outcomes. In addition, Sam68 was associated with proliferation of NHL cells. Knock-down of its gene inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation by delaying cell cycle progression. Furthermore, OCI-Ly8 and Jeko-1 cells adhering to FN and HS-5 expressed higher Sam68 protein, compared to their suspension counterparts. Sam68 promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) via the AKT pathway. Increased Sam68 expression in NHL resulted in poor prognosis, and it promoted CAM-DR in NHL via AKT. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Biogenesis of polarized epithelial cells during kidney development in situ: roles of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and membrane cytoskeleton organization.

    PubMed

    Piepenhagen, P A; Nelson, W J

    1998-11-01

    Organization of proteins into structurally and functionally distinct plasma membrane domains is an essential characteristic of polarized epithelial cells. Based on studies with cultured kidney cells, we have hypothesized that a mechanism for restricting Na/K-ATPase to the basal-lateral membrane involves E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and integration of Na/K-ATPase into the Triton X-100-insoluble ankyrin- and spectrin-based membrane cytoskeleton. In this study, we examined the relevance of these in vitro observations to the generation of epithelial cell polarity in vivo during mouse kidney development. Using differential detergent extraction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence histochemistry, we demonstrate the following. First, expression of the 220-kDa splice variant of ankyrin-3 correlates with the development of resistance to Triton X-100 extraction for Na/K-ATPase, E-cadherin, and catenins and precedes maximal accumulation of Na/K-ATPase. Second, expression of the 190-kDa slice variant of ankyrin-3 correlates with maximal accumulation of Na/K-ATPase. Third, Na/K-ATPase, ankyrin-3, and fodrin specifically colocalize at the basal-lateral plasma membrane of all epithelial cells in which they are expressed and during all stages of nephrogenesis. Fourth, the relative immunofluorescence staining intensities of Na/K-ATPase, ankyrin-3, and fodrin become more similar during development until they are essentially identical in adult kidney. Thus, renal epithelial cells in vivo regulate the accumulation of E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions, the membrane cytoskeleton, and Na/K-ATPase through sequential protein expression and assembly on the basal-lateral membrane. These results are consistent with a mechanism in which generation and maintenance of polarized distributions of these proteins in vivo and in vitro involve cell-cell adhesion, assembly of the membrane cytoskeleton complex, and concomitant integration and retention of Na/K-ATPase in this complex.

  20. Notch signaling-mediated cell-to-cell interaction is dependent on E-cadherin adhesion in adult rat anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Azuma, Morio; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rat anterior pituitary is composed of hormone-producing cells, non-hormone-producing cells (referred to as folliculostellate cells) and marginal layer cells. In the adult rat, progenitor cells of hormone-producing cells have recently been reported to be maintained within this non-hormone-producing cell population. In tissue, non-hormone-producing cells construct homophilic cell aggregates by the differential expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. We have previously shown that Notch signaling, a known regulator of progenitor cells in a number of organs, is activated in the cell aggregates. We now investigate the relationship between Notch signaling and E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in the pituitary gland. Immunohistochemically, Notch signaling receptor Notch2 and the ligand Jagged1 were localized within E-cadherin-positive cells in the marginal cell layer and in the main part of the anterior lobe, whereas Notch1 was localized in E-cadherin-positive and -negative cells. Activation of Notch signaling within E-cadherin-positive cells was confirmed by immunostaining of the Notch target HES1. Notch2 and Jagged1 were always co-localized within the same cells suggesting that homologous cells have reciprocal effects in activating Notch signaling. When the E-cadherin function was inhibited by exposure to a monoclonal antibody (DECMA-1) in primary monolayer cell culture, the percentage of HES1-positive cells among Notch2-positive cells was less than half that of the control. The present results suggest that E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment is necessary for the activation of Notch signaling in the anterior pituitary gland but not for the expression of the Notch2 molecule.

  1. Expression of the 67-kDa laminin receptor in acute myeloid leukemia cells mediates adhesion to laminin and is frequently associated with monocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Montuori, N; Selleri, C; Risitano, A M; Raiola, A M; Ragno, P; Del Vecchio, L; Rotoli, B; Rossi, G

    1999-06-01

    measured by complete remission rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that 67LR expression mediates specific adhesion to laminin and that the detection of this molecule may be a valuable addition to other lineage-associated antigens in identifying monocytic-oriented AML.

  2. 17β-Estradiol Protects Rat Annulus Fibrosus Cells Against Apoptosis via α1 Integrin-Mediated Adhesion to Type I Collagen: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Ming; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Huang, Ai-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background 17β-Estradiol (E2) has been reported to protect annulus fibrosus (AF) cells in vitro against interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. However, its time-response effect remains unexplored. In addition, integrin α2/collagen II interaction has been reported to influence the apoptosis of nucleus pulposus cells in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that integrin α1/collagen II might play a role in exerting the anti-apoptosis effect by E2. The aim of the current study was to further investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of E2 and determine the role of integrin α1/collagen II interaction. Material/Methods Rat AF cells were primary cultured and used for the following experiments. AF cells were identified by immunocytochemistry of type I collagen. Cell apoptosis was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. The activity of active caspase-3 was determined by use of a caspase-3 detection kit. AF cell adhesion to type I collagen was determined by cell adhesion assay. Protein level of integrin subunit α1 was quantified by Western blot and mRNA expression was determined by real-time qPCR. Results The immunocytochemistry of type I collagen revealed that cell purity was eligible for the following experiments with 98% of purity. FACS analysis indicated time-dependent anti-apoptosis effect of E2 at time points of 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, which was confirmed by Caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, cell adhesion assay showed that E2 significantly increased cell binding to 95% of control, and qPCR and Western blot analysis showed that E2 effectively upregulated integrin α1. However, estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182780 prohibited the effect of E2. Conclusions This study shows that E2 protects against apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, and α1 integrin-mediated adhesion to collagen II is essential for estrogen-dependent anti-apoptosis in rat annulus fibrosus cells in vitro. PMID:27108411

  3. Induction of tyrosine phosphorylation during ICAM-3 and LFA-1-mediated intercellular adhesion, and its regulation by the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3, a recently described counter- receptor for the lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 integrin, appears to play an important role in the initial phase of immune response. We have previously described the involvement of ICAM-3 in the regulation of LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent cell-cell interaction of T lymphoblasts. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of ICAM-3 in other leukocyte cell-cell interactions as well as the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. We have found that ICAM-3 is also able to mediate LFA-1/ICAM-1-independent cell aggregation of the leukemic JM T cell line and the LFA-1/CD18-deficient HAFSA B cell line. The ICAM-3-induced cell aggregation of JM and HAFSA cells was not affected by the addition of blocking mAb specific for a number of cell adhesion molecules such as CD1 1a/CD18, ICAM-1 (CD54), CD2, LFA-3 (CD58), very late antigen alpha 4 (CD49d), and very late antigen beta 1 (CD29). Interestingly, some mAb against the leukocyte tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were able to inhibit this interaction. Moreover, they also prevented the aggregation induced on JM T cells by the proaggregatory anti-LFA-1 alpha NKI-L16 mAb. In addition, inhibitors of tyrosine kinase activity also abolished ICAM-3 and LFA-1- mediated cell aggregation. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation through ICAM-3 and LFA-1 antigens was studied by immunofluorescence, and it was found that tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were preferentially located at intercellular boundaries upon the induction of cell aggregation by either anti-ICAM-3 or anti-LFA-1 alpha mAb. Western blot analysis revealed that the engagement of ICAM-3 or LFA-1 with activating mAb enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of polypeptides of 125, 70, and 38 kD on JM cells. This phenomenon was inhibited by preincubation of JM cells with those anti-CD45 mAb that prevented cell aggregation. Altogether these results indicate that CD45 tyrosine phosphatase

  4. Dileucine and PDZ-binding Motifs Mediate Synaptic Adhesion-like Molecule 1 (SALM1) Trafficking in Hippocampal Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Seabold, Gail K.; Wang, Philip Y.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Chang, Kai; Zhou, Arthur; McDermott, Mark I.; Wang, Ya-Xian; Milgram, Sharon L.; Wenthold, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion-like molecules (SALMs) are a family of cell adhesion molecules involved in neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Of the five family members, only SALM1, -2, and -3 contain a cytoplasmic C-terminal PDZ-binding motif. We have found that SALM1 is unique among the SALMs because deletion of its PDZ-binding motif (SALM1ΔPDZ) blocks its surface expression in heterologous cells. When expressed in hippocampal neurons, SALM1ΔPDZ had decreased surface expression in dendrites and the cell soma but not in axons, suggesting that the PDZ-binding domain may influence cellular trafficking of SALMs to specific neuronal locations. Endoglycosidase H digestion assays indicated that SALM1ΔPDZ is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in heterologous cells. However, when the entire C-terminal tail of SALM1 was deleted, SALM1 was detected on the cell surface. Using serial deletions, we identified a region of SALM1 that contains a putative dileucine ER retention motif, which is not present in the other SALMs. Mutation of this DXXXLL motif allowed SALM1 to leave the ER and enhanced its surface expression in heterologous cells and neurons. An increase in the number of protrusions at the dendrites and cell body was observed when this SALM1 mutant was expressed in hippocampal neurons. With electron microscopy, these protrusions appeared to be irregular, enlarged spines and filopodia. Thus, enrichment of SALM1 on the cell surface affects dendritic arborization, and intracellular motifs regulate its dendritic versus axonal localization. PMID:22174418

  5. Stonin1 mediates endocytosis of the proteoglycan NG2 and regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Feutlinske, Fabian; Browarski, Marietta; Ku, Min-Chi; Trnka, Philipp; Waiczies, Sonia; Niendorf, Thoralf; Stallcup, William B.; Glass, Rainer; Krause, Eberhard; Maritzen, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular functions, ranging from focal adhesion (FA) dynamics and cell motility to tumour growth, are orchestrated by signals cells receive from outside via cell surface receptors. Signalling is fine-tuned by the exo–endocytic cycling of these receptors to control cellular responses such as FA dynamics, which determine cell motility. How precisely endocytosis regulates turnover of the various cell surface receptors remains unclear. Here we identify Stonin1, an endocytic adaptor of unknown function, as a regulator of FA dynamics and cell motility, and demonstrate that it facilitates the internalization of the oncogenic proteoglycan NG2, a co-receptor of integrins and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Embryonic fibroblasts obtained from Stonin1-deficient mice display a marked surface accumulation of NG2, increased cellular signalling and defective FA disassembly as well as altered cellular motility. These data establish Stonin1 as a specific adaptor for the endocytosis of NG2 and as an important factor for FA dynamics and cell migration. PMID:26437238

  6. Inhibition of osteopontin reduce the cardiac myofibrosis in dilated cardiomyopathy via focal adhesion kinase mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Tuo; Fan, Guang-Pu; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Pei-De; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which has been shown to a close relationship with cardiac fibrosis. Overexpression of OPN in cardiomyocytes induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This research is to study whether inhibition of OPN could reduce myocardial remodelling in DCM, and if this process is focal adhesion kinase (FAK) dependent, which is recently found an important signal molecule in fibrosis. Method: Eight-week-old cTnTR141W transgenic mouse of DCM were injected with OPN-shRNA in left ventricular free wall, which could inhibit the OPN expression. Six weeks later, echocardiographic examinations were performed to test left ventricle function and heart tissues were harvested to test the quality of FAK by western blot and severity of fibrosis by masson staining. Human cardiac fibroblast was administrated with OPN, and FAK inhibition by PP2 was treated 2 h before OPN was given. Expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were tested by western blot and real-time PCR assay. Results: OPN-shRNA group has a relatively high ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), LV free wall thickness and a less sever cardiac fibrosis. In vitro, OPN could increase collagen-I and α-SMA expression, and this process can be inhibited by FAK inhibitor. Conclusion: Inhibition of OPN could reduce the LV remodeling and dysfunction in DCM mice, which may attribute to the suppression of collagen-I secretion in fibroblast through a FAK/Akt dependent pathway. PMID:27725847

  7. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on the human oviductal epithelium and mediation of lymphoid cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Utreras, E; Ossandon, P; Acuña-Castillo, C; Varela-Nallar, L; Müller, C; Arraztoa, J A; Cardenas, H; Imarai, M

    2000-09-01

    The epithelium of the human oviduct expresses the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and shows endocytic properties towards luminal antigens. Therefore, the epithelial cells might behave as antigen-presenting cells, inducing a local immune response. The activation of antigen-specific T cells not only requires presentation of the peptide antigen by MHC class II, but also the presence of co-stimulatory molecules in the antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, the expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was examined in the epithelium of the human oviduct. Most oviducts showed epithelial ICAM-1 expression, as assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot analysis and RT-PCR assay, and the expression was restricted to the luminal border of ciliated and secretory cells. Interferon gamma, interleukin 1 and lipopolysaccharide treatments increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive cells in primary cultures, indicating that the expression of ICAM-1 in the oviduct might be upregulated in vivo by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial infections. Binding assays between allogenic phytohaemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes and epithelial monolayers expressing ICAM-1 demonstrated that this molecule stimulated lymphocyte adherence. The presence of ICAM-1, in addition to MHC class II, supports the putative role of the oviductal epithelium in antigen presentation. The exclusive apical distribution of ICAM-1 indicates that T-cell activation would occur in a polarized manner. Binding of lymphoid cells to the surface of the oviductal epithelium may help to retain these immune cells that are required for the clearance of pathogens.

  8. Aβ-dependent reduction of NCAM2-mediated synaptic adhesion contributes to synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Liew, Heng Tai; Shepherd, Claire; Halliday, Glenda M; Stevens, Claire H; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-11-27

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synapse loss due to mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We show that the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) is enriched in synapses in the human hippocampus. This enrichment is abolished in the hippocampus of AD patients and in brains of mice overexpressing the human amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein carrying the pathogenic Swedish mutation. Aβ binds to NCAM2 at the cell surface of cultured hippocampal neurons and induces removal of NCAM2 from synapses. In AD hippocampus, cleavage of the membrane proximal external region of NCAM2 is increased and soluble extracellular fragments of NCAM2 (NCAM2-ED) accumulate. Knockdown of NCAM2 expression or incubation with NCAM2-ED induces disassembly of GluR1-containing glutamatergic synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. Aβ-dependent disassembly of GluR1-containing synapses is inhibited in neurons overexpressing a cleavage-resistant mutant of NCAM2. Our data indicate that Aβ-dependent disruption of NCAM2 functions in AD hippocampus contributes to synapse loss.

  9. Cell-cell communication mediated by the CAR subgroup of immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecules in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Claudia; Langhorst, Hanna; Schütz, Laura; Jüttner, René; Rathjen, Fritz G

    2016-11-18

    The immunoglobulin superfamily represents a diverse set of cell-cell contact proteins and includes well-studied members such as NCAM1, DSCAM, L1 or the contactins which are strongly expressed in the nervous system. In this review we put our focus on the biological function of a less understood subgroup of Ig-like proteins composed of CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor), CLMP (CAR-like membrane protein) and BT-IgSF (brain and testis specific immunoglobulin superfamily). The CAR-related proteins are type I transmembrane proteins containing an N-terminal variable (V-type) and a membrane proximal constant (C2-type) Ig domain in their extracellular region which are implicated in homotypic adhesion. They are highly expressed during embryonic development in a variety of tissues including the nervous system whereby in adult stages the protein level of CAR and CLMP decreases, only BT-IgSF expression increases within age. CAR-related proteins are concentrated at specialized cell-cell communication sites such as gap or tight junctions and are present at the plasma membrane in larger protein complexes. Considerable progress has been made on the molecular structure and interactions of CAR while research on CLMP and BT-IgSF is at an early stage. Studies on mouse mutants revealed biological functions of CAR in the heart and for CLMP in the gastrointestinal and urogenital systems. Furthermore, CAR and BT-IgSF appear to regulate synaptic function in the hippocampus.

  10. Gαs proteins activate p72(Syk) and p60-c-Src tyrosine kinases to mediate sickle red blood cell adhesion to endothelium via LW-αvβ3 and CD44-CD44 interactions.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Edward; Zennadi, Rahima

    2015-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been suggested as new drug targets to treat a variety of diseases. In sickle cell disease (SCD), the LW erythrocyte adhesion receptor can be activated by stimulation of β2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs), to mediate sickle erythrocyte (SSRBC) adhesion to endothelium. However, the involvement of tyrosine protein kinases in β2AR signaling to activate SSRBC adhesion to endothelium has not been thoroughly elucidated. Either direct activation with Cholera toxin of Gαs protein, which acts downstream of β2ARs, or inhibition with Pertussis toxin of Gαi, mediating suppression of adenylyl cyclase, increased SSRBC adhesion to endothelium over baseline adhesion. This effect involved the non-receptor tyrosine kinases, p72(Syk) and p60-c-Src, which were more abundant in SSRBCs than in normal erythrocytes. In contrast, Pertussis toxin and Cholera toxin failed to increase adhesion of normal erythrocytes. SSRBC Gαi inhibition also increased phosphorylation of p72(Syk) and p60-c-Src. Further, we investigated the relevance of activation of p72(Syk) and p60-c-Src, and identified LW (ICAM-4, CD242) and CD44 as the erythroid adhesion molecules both physically interacting with activated p60-c-Src. As a result, SSRBC LW underwent increased tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to SSRBC LW and CD44 binding to endothelial αvβ3 integrin and CD44, respectively. These data provide in vitro mechanistic evidence that p60-c-Src, which could act downstream of Gαs/p72(Syk), associates with LW and CD44 on SSRBCs leading to their interactions with endothelial αvβ3 and CD44, respectively. Thus, increased activation of these signaling mechanisms in SSRBCs could initiate or exacerbate vascular occlusion, the hallmark of SCD.

  11. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  12. Beta-1 integrin-mediated adhesion may be initiated by multiple incomplete bonds, thus accounting for the functional importance of receptor clustering.

    PubMed

    Vitte, Joana; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Eymeric, Philippe; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne

    2004-06-01

    The regulation of cell integrin receptors involves modulation of membrane expression, shift between different affinity states, and topographical redistribution on the cell membrane. Here we attempted to assess quantitatively the functional importance of receptor clustering. We studied beta-1 integrin-mediated attachment of THP-1 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces under low shear flow. Cells displayed multiple binding events with a half-life of the order of 1 s. The duration of binding events after the first second after arrest was quantitatively accounted for by a model assuming the existence of a short-time intermediate binding state with 3.6 s(-1) dissociation rate and 1.3 s(-1) transition frequency toward a more stable state. Cell binding to surfaces coated with lower fibronectin densities was concluded to be mediated by single molecular interactions, whereas multiple bonds were formed <1 s after contact with higher fibronectin surface densities. Cell treatment with microfilament inhibitors or a neutral antiintegrin antibody decreased bond number without changing aforementioned kinetic parameters whereas a function enhancing antibody increased the rate of bond formation and/or the lifetime of intermediate state. Receptor aggregation was induced by treating cells with neutral antiintegrin antibody and antiimmunoglobulin antibodies. A semiquantitative confocal microscopy study suggested that this treatment increased between 40% and 100% the average number of integrin receptors located in a volume of approximately 0.045 microm(3) surrounding each integrin. This aggregation induced up to 2.7-fold increase of the average number of bonds. Flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent ligand binding showed that THP-1 cells displayed low-affinity beta-1 integrins with a dissociation constant in the micromolar range. It is concluded that the initial step of cell adhesion was mediated by multiple incomplete bonds rather than a single equilibrium-state ligand receptor

  13. Geraniin-mediated apoptosis by cleavage of focal adhesion kinase through up-regulation of Fas ligand expression in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Chang; Tsai, Chih-Yen; Kao, Jung-Yie; Kao, Ming-Ching; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lin, Jen-Kun; Way, Tzong-Der

    2008-06-01

    Geraniin, a form of tannin separated from geranium, causes cell death through induction of apoptosis; however, cell death characteristics for geraniin have not yet been elucidated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of geraniin-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells and demonstrated that geraniin was able to induce cell apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. We also examined the signaling pathway related to geraniin-induced apoptosis. To clarify the relationship between focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and geraniin-induced apoptosis, we treated human melanoma cells with geraniin and found that this resulted dose- and time-dependent degradation in FAK. However, FAK cleavage was significantly inhibited when cells were pretreated with a selective inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-CHO). Here, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin triggered cell death by caspase-3-mediated cleavage of FAK. There were two possible mechanisms for activating caspase-3, mitochondria-mediated and receptor-mediated apoptosis. To confirm the geraniin-relevant signaling pathway, using immunoblot analysis we found that geraniin-induced apoptosis was associated with the up-regulation of Fas ligand expression, the activation of caspase-8, the cleavage of Bid, and the induction of cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol. Treatment with geraniin caused induction of caspase-3 activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner followed by proteolytic cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and DNA fragmentation factor 45. The geraniin-induced apoptosis may provide a pivotal mechanism for its cancer-chemopreventive action.

  14. Nrk2b-mediated NAD+ production regulates cell adhesion and is required for muscle morphogenesis in vivo: Nrk2b and NAD+ in muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Lessard, Kevin N; Khalil, Andre; Henry, Clarissa A

    2010-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) play fundamental roles during morphogenesis. Given the ubiquitous nature of CMACs and their roles in many cellular processes, one question is how specificity of CMAC function is modulated. The clearly defined cell behaviors that generate segmentally reiterated axial skeletal muscle during zebrafish development comprise an ideal system with which to investigate CMAC function during morphogenesis. We found that Nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b (Nrk2b) cell autonomously modulates the molecular composition of CMACs in vivo. Nrk2b is required for normal Laminin polymerization at the myotendinous junction (MTJ). In Nrk2b-deficient embryos, at MTJ loci where Laminin is not properly polymerized, muscle fibers elongate into adjacent myotomes and are abnormally long. In yeast and human cells, Nrk2 phosphorylates Nicotinamide Riboside and generates NAD+ through an alternative salvage pathway. Exogenous NAD+ treatment rescues MTJ development in Nrk2b-deficient embryos, but not in laminin mutant embryos. Both Nrk2b and Laminin are required for localization of Paxillin, but not beta-Dystroglycan, to CMACs at the MTJ. Overexpression of Paxillin in Nrk2b-deficient embryos is sufficient to rescue MTJ integrity. Taken together, these data show that Nrk2b plays a specific role in modulating subcellular localization of discrete CMAC components that in turn plays roles in musculoskeletal development. Furthermore, these data suggest that Nrk2b-mediated synthesis of NAD+ is functionally upstream of Laminin adhesion and Paxillin subcellular localization during MTJ development. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity to CMAC assembly in vivo and also elucidate a novel role for NAD+ during morphogenesis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Silencing α1,3-Fucosyltransferases in Human Leukocytes Reveals a Role for FUT9 Enzyme during E-selectin-mediated Cell Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Alexander; Mondal, Nandini; Gupta, Rohitesh; McHugh, Kyle P.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion during inflammation is initiated by the binding of sialofucosylated carbohydrates expressed on leukocytes to endothelial E/P-selectin. Although the glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) constructing selectin-ligands have largely been identified using knock-out mice, important differences may exist between humans and mice. To address this, we developed a systematic lentivirus-based shRNA delivery workflow to create human leukocytic HL-60 cell lines that lack up to three glycoTs. Using this, the contributions of all three myeloid α1,3-fucosyltransferases (FUT4, FUT7, and FUT9) to selectin-ligand biosynthesis were evaluated. The cell adhesion properties of these modified cells to L-, E-, and P-selectin under hydrodynamic shear were compared with bone marrow-derived neutrophils from Fut4−/−Fut7−/− dual knock-out mice. Results demonstrate that predominantly FUT7, and to a lesser extent FUT4, forms the selectin-ligand at the N terminus of leukocyte P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) in humans and mice. Here, 85% reduction in leukocyte interaction was observed in human FUT4−7− dual knockdowns on P/L-selectin substrates. Unlike Fut4−/−Fut7−/− mouse neutrophils, however, human knockdowns lacking FUT4 and FUT7 only exhibited partial reduction in rolling interaction on E-selectin. In this case, the third α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT9 played an important role because leukocyte adhesion was reduced by 50–60% in FUT9-HL-60, 70–80% in dual knockdown FUT7−9− cells, and ∼85% in FUT4−7−9− triple knockdowns. Gene silencing results are in agreement with gain-of-function experiments where all three fucosyltransferases conferred E-selectin-mediated rolling in HEK293T cells. This study advances new tools to study human glycoT function. It suggests a species-specific role for FUT9 during the biosynthesis of human E-selectin ligands. PMID:23192350

  16. Silencing α1,3-fucosyltransferases in human leukocytes reveals a role for FUT9 enzyme during E-selectin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Buffone, Alexander; Mondal, Nandini; Gupta, Rohitesh; McHugh, Kyle P; Lau, Joseph T Y; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2013-01-18

    Leukocyte adhesion during inflammation is initiated by the binding of sialofucosylated carbohydrates expressed on leukocytes to endothelial E/P-selectin. Although the glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) constructing selectin-ligands have largely been identified using knock-out mice, important differences may exist between humans and mice. To address this, we developed a systematic lentivirus-based shRNA delivery workflow to create human leukocytic HL-60 cell lines that lack up to three glycoTs. Using this, the contributions of all three myeloid α1,3-fucosyltransferases (FUT4, FUT7, and FUT9) to selectin-ligand biosynthesis were evaluated. The cell adhesion properties of these modified cells to L-, E-, and P-selectin under hydrodynamic shear were compared with bone marrow-derived neutrophils from Fut4(-/-)Fut7(-/-) dual knock-out mice. Results demonstrate that predominantly FUT7, and to a lesser extent FUT4, forms the selectin-ligand at the N terminus of leukocyte P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) in humans and mice. Here, 85% reduction in leukocyte interaction was observed in human FUT4(-)7(-) dual knockdowns on P/L-selectin substrates. Unlike Fut4(-/-)Fut7(-/-) mouse neutrophils, however, human knockdowns lacking FUT4 and FUT7 only exhibited partial reduction in rolling interaction on E-selectin. In this case, the third α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT9 played an important role because leukocyte adhesion was reduced by 50-60% in FUT9-HL-60, 70-80% in dual knockdown FUT7(-)9(-) cells, and ∼85% in FUT4(-)7(-)9(-) triple knockdowns. Gene silencing results are in agreement with gain-of-function experiments where all three fucosyltransferases conferred E-selectin-mediated rolling in HEK293T cells. This study advances new tools to study human glycoT function. It suggests a species-specific role for FUT9 during the biosynthesis of human E-selectin ligands.

  17. Adhesive Fiber Stratification in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Biofilms Unveils Oxygen-Mediated Control of Type 1 Pili

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Kyle A.; Moore, Jessica L.; Eberly, Allison R.; Good, James A. D.; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zaver, Himesh; Almqvist, Fredrik; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major causative agent of community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to analyze the spatial proteome of intact biofilms in situ. MALDI-TOF IMS revealed protein species exhibiting distinct localizations within surface-associated UPEC biofilms, including two adhesive fibers critical for UPEC biofilm formation and virulence: type 1 pili (Fim) localized exclusively to the air-exposed region, while curli amyloid fibers localized to the air-liquid interface. Comparison of cells grown aerobically, fermentatively, or utilizing an alternative terminal electron acceptor showed that the phase-variable fim promoter switched to the “OFF” orientation under oxygen-deplete conditions, leading to marked reduction of type 1 pili on the bacterial cell surface. Conversely, S pili whose expression is inversely related to fim expression were up-regulated under anoxic conditions. Tethering the fim promoter in the “ON” orientation in anaerobically grown cells only restored type 1 pili production in the presence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor beyond oxygen. Together these data support the presence of at least two regulatory mechanisms controlling fim expression in response to oxygen availability and may contribute to the stratification of extracellular matrix components within the biofilm. MALDI IMS facilitated the discovery of these mechanisms

  18. The Ig Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecule, apCAM, Mediates Growth Cone Steering by Substrate–Cytoskeletal Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.; Errante, Laura D.; Belotserkovsky, Victoria; Forscher, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic cytoskeletal rearrangements are involved in neuronal growth cone motility and guidance. To investigate how cell surface receptors translate guidance cue recognition into these cytoskeletal changes, we developed a novel in vitro assay where beads, coated with antibodies to the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule apCAM or with purified native apCAM, replaced cellular substrates. These beads associated with retrograde F-actin flow, but in contrast to previous studies, were then physically restrained with a microneedle to simulate interactions with noncompliant cellular substrates. After a latency period of ∼10 min, we observed an abrupt increase in bead-restraining tension accompanied by direct extension of the microtubule-rich central domain toward sites of apCAM bead binding. Most importantly, we found that retrograde F-actin flow was attenuated only after restraining tension had increased and only in the bead interaction axis where preferential microtubule extension occurred. These cytoskeletal and structural changes are very similar to those reported for growth cone interactions with physiological targets. Immunolocalization using an antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of apCAM revealed accumulation of the transmembrane isoform of apCAM around bead-binding sites. Our results provide direct evidence for a mechanical continuum from apCAM bead substrates through the peripheral domain to the central cytoplasmic domain. By modulating functional linkage to the underlying actin cytoskeleton, cell surface receptors such as apCAM appear to enable the application of tensioning forces to extracellular substrates, providing a mechanism for transducing retrograde flow into guided growth cone movement. PMID:9531561

  19. Isolation of a laminin-binding protein from the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani that may mediate cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, A; Bandyopadhyay, K; Kole, L; Das, P K

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding proteins on the surface of Leishmania are thought to play a crucial role in the onset of leishmaniasis, as these parasites invade mononuclear phagocytes in various organs after migrating through the ECM. In a previous report, we presented several lines of evidence suggesting that Leishmania has a specific receptor for laminin, a major ECM protein, with a Kd in the nanomolar range. Here we describe the identification, purification and biochemical characterization of the Leishmania laminin receptor. When the outer membrane proteins of L. donovani were blotted on to nitrocellulose paper and probed with laminin, a prominent laminin-binding protein of 67 kDa was identified. The purified protein was isolated by a three-step process involving DEAE-cellulose, Con A (concanavalin A)-Sepharose and laminin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and was used to raise a monospecific antibody. The same protein was obtained when parasite membrane extracts were adsorbed to antibody affinity matrix and eluted with glycine. The affinity-purified protein bound to laminin in a detergent-solubilized form as well as after integration into artificial bilayers, and was subsequently characterized as an integral membrane protein. Metaperiodate oxidation and metabolic inhibition of glycosylation studies indicate the binding protein to be glycoprotein in nature and that N-linked oligosaccharides play a part in the interaction of laminin with the binding protein. Surface-labelled parasites attached to microtitre wells coated with laminin and the 67 kDa protein blocked the adhesion to laminin substrate. We propose that the 67 kDa protein is an adhesin involved in the attachment of Leishmania to host tissues. PMID:9895301

  20. Ectodomain shedding of the cell adhesion molecule Nectin-4 in ovarian cancer is mediated by ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Petra C; Boylan, Kristin L M; Walcheck, Bruce; Heinze, Rachel; Geller, Melissa A; Argenta, Peter A; Skubitz, Amy P N

    2017-04-14

    We previously showed that the cell adhesion molecule Nectin-4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer tumors, and its cleaved extracellular domain can be detected in the serum of ovarian cancer patients. The ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloproteinase) proteases are involved in ectodomain cleavage of transmembrane proteins, and ADAM17 is known to cleave Nectin-4 in breast cancer. However, the mechanism of Nectin-4 cleavage in ovarian cancer has not yet been determined. Analysis of ovarian cancer gene microarray data showed that higher expression of Nectin-4, ADAM10, and ADAM17 is associated with significantly decreased progression-free survival. We quantified Nectin-4 shedding from the surface of ovarian cancer cells after stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. We report that ADAM17 and ADAM10 cleave Nectin-4 and release soluble Nectin-4 (sN4). Small molecule inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of both ADAM proteases confirmed these results. In matched samples from 11 high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients, we detected 2-20-fold more sN4 in ascites fluid than serum. Co-incubation of ovarian cancer cells with ascites fluid significantly increased sN4 shedding, which could be blocked using a dual inhibitor of ADAM10 and ADAM17. Furthermore, we detected RNA for Nectin-4, ADAM10, and ADAM17 in primary ovarian carcinoma tumors, secondary omental metastases, and ascites cells isolated from serous ovarian cancer patients. In a signaling pathway screen, lysophosphatidic acid increased phosphorylation of AKT, EGF receptor, ERK1/2, JNK1/2/3, and c-Jun. Understanding the function of Nectin-4 shedding in ovarian cancer progression is critical to facilitate its development as both a serum biomarker and a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The Effect of Cellular Receptor Diffusion on Receptor-Mediated Viral Binding Using Brownian Adhesive Dynamics (BRAD) Simulations

    PubMed Central

    English, Thomas J.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Brownian adhesive dynamics (BRAD) is a new method for simulating the attachment of viruses to cell surfaces. In BRAD, the motion of the virus is subject to stochastic bond formation and breakage, and thermal motion owing to collisions from the solvent. In the model, the virus is approximated as a rigid sphere and the cell surface is approximated as a rigid plane coated with receptors. In this article, we extend BRAD to allow for the mobility of receptors in the plane of the membrane, both before and after they are ligated by viral attachment proteins. Allowing the proteins to move within the membrane produced several differences in behavior from when the receptors are immobilized. First, the mean steady-state bond number is unaffected by changes in cellular receptor density because proteins are now free to diffuse into the contact area, and the extent of binding is dictated by the availability of viral attachment proteins. Second, the time required to reach steady-state binding increases as both the cellular receptor number decreases and the receptor mobility decreases. This is because receptor diffusion is a slower process than the binding kinetics of the proteins. Decreasing the rate of protein binding was found to decrease the fraction of viruses bound to steady state, but not the extent of binding for those viruses that were bound. Increasing the binding rate increased the fraction of viruses bound, until no further viruses could bind. Alterations in receptor binding kinetics had no discernable effect on the mean steady-state bond number between virus and cell, because interactions were of sufficiently high affinity that all available receptor-viral attachment proteins were destined to bind at steady state. PMID:15556985

  2. TIM-1 glycoprotein binds the adhesion receptor P-selectin and mediates T cell trafficking during inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Angiari, Stefano; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Rossi, Barbara; Dusi, Silvia; Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Toffali, Lara; Piacentino, Gennj; Budui, Simona; Rennert, Paul; Xiao, Sheng; Laudanna, Carlo; Casasnovas, Jose M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Constantin, Gabriela

    2014-04-17

    Selectins play a central role in leukocyte trafficking by mediating tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces. Here we have reported that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a P-selectin ligand. We have shown that human and murine TIM-1 binds to P-selectin, and that TIM-1 mediates tethering and rolling of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17, but not Th2 and regulatory T cells on P-selectin. Th1 and Th17 cells lacking the TIM-1 mucin domain showed reduced rolling in thrombin-activated mesenteric venules and inflamed brain microcirculation. Inhibition of TIM-1 had no effect on naive T cell homing, but it reduced T cell recruitment in a skin hypersensitivity model and blocked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Uniquely, the TIM-1 immunoglobulin variable domain was also required for P-selectin binding. Our data demonstrate that TIM-1 is a major P-selectin ligand with a specialized role in T cell trafficking during inflammatory responses and the induction of autoimmune disease.

  3. Flagella-Mediated Adhesion and Extracellular DNA Release Contribute to Biofilm Formation and Stress Tolerance of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Sarah L.; Pryjma, Mark; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodbourne gastroenteritis, despite fragile behaviour under standard laboratory conditions. In the environment, C. jejuni may survive within biofilms, which can impart resident bacteria with enhanced stress tolerance compared to their planktonic counterparts. While C. jejuni forms biofilms in vitro and in the wild, it had not been confirmed that this lifestyle confers stress tolerance. Moreover, little is understood about molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation in this pathogen. We previously found that a ΔcprS mutant, which carries a deletion in the sensor kinase of the CprRS two-component system, forms enhanced biofilms. Biofilms were also enhanced by the bile salt deoxycholate and contained extracellular DNA. Through more in-depth analysis of ΔcprS and WT under conditions that promote or inhibit biofilms, we sought to further define this lifestyle for C. jejuni. Epistasis experiments with ΔcprS and flagellar mutations (ΔflhA, ΔpflA) suggested that initiation is mediated by flagellum-mediated adherence, a process which was kinetically enhanced by motility. Lysis was also observed, especially under biofilm-enhancing conditions. Microscopy suggested adherence was followed by release of eDNA, which was required for biofilm maturation. Importantly, inhibiting biofilm formation by removal of eDNA with DNase decreased stress tolerance. This work suggests the biofilm lifestyle provides C. jejuni with resilience that has not been apparent from observation of planktonic bacteria during routine laboratory culture, and provides a framework for subsequent molecular studies of C. jejuni biofilms. PMID:25166748

  4. Flagella-mediated adhesion and extracellular DNA release contribute to biofilm formation and stress tolerance of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Sarah L; Pryjma, Mark; Gaynor, Erin C

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodbourne gastroenteritis, despite fragile behaviour under standard laboratory conditions. In the environment, C. jejuni may survive within biofilms, which can impart resident bacteria with enhanced stress tolerance compared to their planktonic counterparts. While C. jejuni forms biofilms in vitro and in the wild, it had not been confirmed that this lifestyle confers stress tolerance. Moreover, little is understood about molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation in this pathogen. We previously found that a ΔcprS mutant, which carries a deletion in the sensor kinase of the CprRS two-component system, forms enhanced biofilms. Biofilms were also enhanced by the bile salt deoxycholate and contained extracellular DNA. Through more in-depth analysis of ΔcprS and WT under conditions that promote or inhibit biofilms, we sought to further define this lifestyle for C. jejuni. Epistasis experiments with ΔcprS and flagellar mutations (ΔflhA, ΔpflA) suggested that initiation is mediated by flagellum-mediated adherence, a process which was kinetically enhanced by motility. Lysis was also observed, especially under biofilm-enhancing conditions. Microscopy suggested adherence was followed by release of eDNA, which was required for biofilm maturation. Importantly, inhibiting biofilm formation by removal of eDNA with DNase decreased stress tolerance. This work suggests the biofilm lifestyle provides C. jejuni with resilience that has not been apparent from observation of planktonic bacteria during routine laboratory culture, and provides a framework for subsequent molecular studies of C. jejuni biofilms.

  5. Focal adhesion kinase mediates atrial fibrosis via the AKT/S6K signaling pathway in chronic atrial fibrillation patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peide; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xu; Song, Yunhu; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Hui

    2013-10-09

    Atrial fibrosis, as a hallmark of atrial structural remodeling, plays a critical role in the maintenance of chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the mechanisms responsible for atrial fibrosis are still uncertain. Fibrogenesis represents a complex process in which focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role. Therefore, we investigated the role of FAK-mediated signaling in atrial fibrosis in patients with chronic AF related to rheumatic mitral valve disease (RMVD). Atrial appendages were excised from 45 patients with RMVD and either chronic AF (n=25, AF >6 months) or sinus rhythm (n=20). Fibrosis was assessed by histology, and FAK and its two downstream pathways (AKT/S6K and ERK1/2) were evaluated by western blotting. We further evaluated the role of FAK in fibrogenesis by culturing neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts to determine the importance of FAK-regulated signaling in cardiac myofibroblast differentiation induced by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1). Our study revealed that FAK can regulate its downstream signaling to cause fibrosis in atrial tissue and activate isolated fibroblasts. Histology revealed a significant increase in atrial fibrosis in AF patients. The phosphorylation of FAK and its downstream AKT/S6K signaling was increased secondary to TGFβ1-induced high expression of α-SMA, a marker of myofibroblast activity. FAK and AKT inhibitors suppressed α-SMA expression in TGFβ1-induced fibroblasts. However, ERK1/2 signaling seemed to be unrelated to the fibrotic process in AF patients. The FAK-mediated AKT/S6K signaling pathway participated in atrial fibrogenesis and this finding may contribute to the prevention of atrial fibrosis associated with chronic AF in patients with underlying cardiac disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning-related synaptic growth mediated by internalization of Aplysia cell adhesion molecule is controlled by membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Shim, Jaehoon; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Bailey, Craig H; Kandel, Eric R; Jang, Deok-Jin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-11-14

    Long-term facilitation in Aplysia is accompanied by the growth of new synaptic connections between the sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. One of the initial steps leading to the growth of these synapses is the internalization, induced by 5-HT, of the transmembrane isoform of Aplysia cell-adhesion molecule (TM-apCAM) from the plasma membrane of sensory neurons (Bailey et al., 1992). However, the mechanisms that govern the internalization of TM-apCAM and how this internalization is coupled to the molecular events that initiate the structural changes are not fully understood. Here, we report that the synthesis of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)], which is known to be mediated by a signaling cascade through Aplysia Sec7 protein (ApSec7) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type I α (PIP5KIα) is required for both the internalization of TM-apCAM and the initiation of synaptic growth during 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation. Pharmacological blockade of PI(4,5)P(2) synthesis by the application of the inhibitor phenylarsine oxide blocked the internalization of apCAM. Furthermore, perturbation of the endogenous activation of ApSec7 and its downstream target PIP5KIα also blocked 5-HT-mediated internalization of TM-apCAM and synaptic growth. Finally, long-term facilitation was specifically impaired by blocking the ApSec7 signaling pathway at sensory-to-motor neuron synapses. These data indicate that the ApSec7/PIP5KIα signaling pathway is actively recruited during learning-related 5-HT signaling and acts as a key regulator of apCAM internalization associated with the formation of new synaptic connections during long-term facilitation.

  7. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Stimulation of human monocytes with macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces a Grb2-mediated association of the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK and dynamin.

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, S; Saleem, A; Yuan, Z; Emoto, Y; Prasad, K V; Kufe, D

    1995-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is required for the growth and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes. In the present studies using human monocytes, we show that M-CSF induces interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK. The results demonstrate that tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK directly interacts with the SH2 domain of Grb2. The findings indicate that a pYENV site at Tyr-925 in pp125FAK is responsible for this interaction. We also demonstrate that the Grb2-FAK complex associates with the GTPase dynamin. Dynamin interacts with the SH3 domains of Grb2 and exhibits M-CSF-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation in association with pp125FAK. These findings suggest that M-CSF-induced signaling involves independent Grb2-mediated pathways, one leading to Ras activation and another involving pp125FAK and a GTPase implicated in receptor internalization. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7597091

  9. The adhesion GPCR GPR126 has distinct, domain-dependent functions in Schwann cell development mediated by interaction with Laminin-211

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Sarah C.; Luo, Rong; Liebscher, Ines; Giera, Stefanie; Jeong, Sung-jin; Mogha, Amit; Ghidinelli, Monica; Feltri, M. Laura; Schöneberg, Torsten; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Myelin ensheathes axons to allow rapid propagation of action potentials and proper nervous system function. In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) radially sort axons into a 1:1 relationship before wrapping an axonal segment to form myelin. SC myelination requires the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126, which undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage into an N-terminal fragment (NTF) and a 7-transmembrane-containing C-terminal fragment (CTF). Here, we show that GPR126 has domain-specific functions in SC development whereby the NTF is necessary and sufficient for axon sorting while the CTF promotes wrapping through cAMP elevation. These biphasic roles of GPR126 are governed by interactions with Laminin-211, which we define as a novel ligand for GPR126 that modulates receptor signaling via a tethered agonist. Our work suggests a model in which Laminin-211 mediates GPR126-induced cAMP levels to control early and late stages of SC development. PMID:25695270

  10. Sialylated, fucosylated ligands for L-selectin expressed on leukocytes mediate tethering and rolling adhesions in physiologic flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of leukocytes in flow with adherent leukocytes may contribute to their accumulation at sites of inflammation. Using L- selectin immobilized in a flow chamber, a model system that mimics presentation of L-selectin by adherent leukocytes, we characterize ligands for L-selectin on leukocytes and show that they mediate tethering and rolling in shear flow. We demonstrate the presence of L- selectin ligands on granulocytes, monocytes, and myeloid and lymphoid cell lines, and not on peripheral blood T lymphocytes. These ligands are calcium dependent, sensitive to protease and neuraminidase, and structurally distinct from previously described ligands for L-selectin on high endothelial venules (HEV). Differential sensitivity to O-sialo- glycoprotease provides evidence for ligand activity on both mucin-like and nonmucin-like structures. Transfection with fucosyltransferase induces expression of functional L-selectin ligands on both a lymphoid cell line and a nonhematopoietic cell line. L-selectin presented on adherent cells is also capable of supporting tethering and rolling interactions in physiologic shear flow. L-selectin ligands on leukocytes may be important in promoting leukocyte-leukocyte and subsequent leukocyte endothelial interactions in vivo, thereby enhancing leukocyte localization at sites of inflammation. PMID:8909555

  11. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins. PMID:26863924

  12. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins.

  13. Escherichia coli common pilus (ECP) targets arabinosyl residues in plant cell walls to mediate adhesion to fresh produce plants.

    PubMed

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-12-05

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR-GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells.

  14. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  15. Effect of Hyperketonemia (Acetoacetate) on Nuclear Factor-κB and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation Mediated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Upregulation in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rains, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hyperketonemia is a pathological condition observed in patients with type 1 diabetes and ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD), which results in increased blood levels of acetoacetate (AA) and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. We examined the hypothesis that hyperketonemia activates the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in endothelial cells. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with AA (0–8 mM) or BHB (0–10 mM) for 0–24 hr. Western blotting was used to determine NF-κB activation in whole-cell lysates. ICAM-1 expression was measured using flow cytometry. Results: Results show a 2.4-fold increase in NF-κB activation in cells treated with 8 mM AA compared to the control. BHB had little or no effect on NF-κB activation. Pretreatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor [N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC)] reduced NF-κB to near-control levels. The expression of AA-induced ICAM-1 was significantly reduced when cells were pretreated with either NAC or p38 MAPK inhibitor. Conclusions: These results suggest that NF-κB and p38 MAPK mediate upregulation of ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells exposed to elevated levels of AA, which may contribute to the development of vascular disease in diabetes. PMID:25489974

  16. Active immunization against tumor necrosis factor-alpha decreases proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress mediators and adhesion molecules risk factors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J; Abdul-Aziz, Karolin K; Zidan, Abdel-Aziz A

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes is now one of the most common un-communicable diseases worldwide. Few studies have dealt specifically with the potential therapeutic effect of TNF-α suppressor to decrease oxidative stress markers in patients with diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential therapeutic and toxic effect of the direct injection of the anti-TNF-α on oxidative stress mediators, proinflammatory cytokines and vascular risk factors associated with diabetes on diabetic rats. diabetes was induced by streptozotocin, three weeks after the - induction of diabetes, a polyclonal anti-mouse/rat TNF-α rabbit serum was injected in the treated group and sacrificed after 4 weeks. The expression of TNF-α mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. The levels of TNF-α, VEGF, IL-2, IL- 6, HSP-70, troponin-t, 8-OHdG, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were evaluated using ELISA. Myeloperoxiase (MPO) and total peroxides (TPs) levels were estimated by biochemical reactions. the treatment of diabetic rats with the anti-TNF-α caused a significant decrease in the TNF-α mRNA expression, which were paralleled with the decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-6, MOP, HSP-70, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, troponin-t and 8-OHdG in the blood serum. On the contrary, all were highly expressed in the diabetic group that may be the leading reasons for the DNA damage and cell loss. Data revealed that TNF-α, HSP-70, IL-6, MPO and adhesion molecules when expressed in diabetic rats, collectively induce dramatic changes. these new findings suggested that targeting TNF-α could effectively reduce expressions of MCP-1, HSP-70, troponin-t, 8-OHdG and VCAM- 1, along with prominent reduction in MPO and IL-6 levels.

  17. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  18. Caspase-1-independent IL-1 release mediates blister formation in autoantibody-induced tissue injury through modulation of endothelial adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hengameh; Lockmann, Anike; Hund, Anna-Carina; Samavedam, Unni K S R L; Pipi, Elena; Vafia, Katerina; Hauenschild, Eva; Kalies, Kathrin; Pas, Hendri H; Jonkman, Marcel F; Iwata, Hiroaki; Recke, Andreas; Schön, Michael P; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-04-15

    Although reports documented aberrant cytokine expression in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs), cytokine-targeting therapies have not been established in these disorders. We showed previously that IL-6 treatment protected against tissue destruction in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an AIBD caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen (COL7). The anti-inflammatory effects of IL-6 were mediated by induction of IL-1ra, and prophylactic IL-1ra administration prevented blistering. In this article, we demonstrate elevated serum concentrations of IL-1β in both mice with experimental EBA induced by injection of anti-COL7 IgG and in EBA patients. Increased IL-1α and IL-1β expression also was observed in the skin of anti-COL7 IgG-injected wild-type mice compared with the significantly less diseased IL-1R-deficient or wild-type mice treated with the IL-1R antagonist anakinra or anti-IL-1β. These findings suggested that IL-1 contributed to recruitment of inflammatory cells into the skin. Accordingly, the expression of ICAM-1 was decreased in IL-1R-deficient and anakinra-treated mice injected with anti-COL7. This effect appeared to be specifically attributable to IL-1 because anakinra blocked the upregulation of different endothelial adhesion molecules on IL-1-stimulated, but not on TNF-α-stimulated, cultured endothelial cells. Interestingly, injection of caspase-1/11-deficient mice with anti-COL7 IgG led to the same extent of skin lesions as in wild-type mice. Collectively, our data suggest that IL-1, independently of caspase-1, contributes to the pathogenesis of EBA. Because anti-IL-1β in a prophylactic setting and anakinra in a quasi-therapeutic setting (i.e., when skin lesions had already developed) improved experimental EBA, IL-1 appears to be a potential therapeutic target for EBA and related AIBDs.

  19. Hyaluronan mediates the adhesion of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to poly (I:C)-treated intestinal cells and modulates their cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Docampo, María José; Cabrera, Jennifer; Bassols, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), has been increasingly recognized as a regulator of inflammation. Its role is complex since it has pro- and anti-inflammatory actions by modulating the expression of inflammatory genes, the recruitment of inflammatory cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines, but also by attenuating the course of inflammation and providing protection against tissue damage. Certain viruses and other inflammatory stimuli induce organization of HA into cable-like structures, which may be responsible for leukocyte recruitment and, on the other hand, low molecular weight fragments of HA have been shown to activate various inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of a simulated infection with the viral mimetic Poly (I:C) on HA deposition on different porcine intestinal cells (primary colonic muscular smooth muscle cells (SMC), and epithelial IPEC-J2 and IPI-2I cell lines) and on the recruitment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to intestinal cell layers. We show that Poly (I:C) treatment induces the formation of an HA-based pericellular matrix coat in muscular SMC and in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that, on differentiated IPEC-J2 cells, HA accumulates in the basolateral membrane. Porcine PBMCs bind to Poly (I:C)-treated cells and this binding is dependent on HA, since the increase in adhesion is abolished by hyaluronidase treatment of the cell layers. A second goal was to study the effect of different molecular weight HA forms on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8) by porcine PBMCs. Low molecular weight HA fragments (100-150kDa), in contrast to high molecular weight HA (2500kDa), stimulate the release of these pro-inflammatory mediators by porcine PBMCs. Our results suggest that HA is involved in the inflammatory response against pathogenic insults to the porcine gut.

  20. Oestradiol decreases colonic permeability through oestrogen receptor β-mediated up-regulation of occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-A in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Braniste, Viorica; Leveque, Mathilde; Buisson-Brenac, Claire; Bueno, Lionel; Fioramonti, Jean; Houdeau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Oestradiol modulates paracellular permeability and tight junction (TJ) function in endothelia and reproductive tissues, but whether the ovarian hormones and cycle affect the paracellular pathway in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. Oestrogen receptors (ERs) are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, and oestradiol regulates epithelium formation. We examined the effects of oestrous cycle stage, oestradiol benzoate (EB), and progesterone (P) on colonic paracellular permeability (CPP) in the female rat, and whether EB affects expression of the TJ proteins in the rat colon and the human colon cell line Caco-2. In cyclic rats, CPP was determined through lumen-to-blood 51Cr-labelled EDTA clearance, and in Ussing chambers for dextran permeability. CPP was also examined in ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated with P or EB, with and without the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, or with the selective agonists for ERα (propyl pyrazole triol; PPT) or ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). In oestrus rats, CPP was reduced (P < 0.01) relative to dioestrus. In OVX rats, EB dose-dependently decreased CPP, an effect mimicked by DPN and blocked by ICI 182,780, whereas P had no effect. Oestradiol increased occludin mRNA and protein in the colon (P < 0.05), but not zona occludens (ZO)-1. Further, EB and DPN enhanced occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A expression in Caco-2 cells without change in ZO-1, an effect blocked by ICI 182,780. These data show that oestrogen reinforces intestinal epithelial barrier through ERβ-mediated up-regulation of the transmembrane proteins occludin and JAM-A determining paracellular spaces. These findings highlight the importance of the ERβ pathway in the control of colonic paracellular transport and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:19433574

  1. The adhesive and migratory effects of osteopontin are mediated via distinct cell surface integrins. Role of alpha v beta 3 in smooth muscle cell migration to osteopontin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, L; Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Cheresh, D A; Schwartz, S M; Giachelli, C M

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin is an arginine-glycine-aspartate containing acidic glycoprotein postulated to mediate adhesion, migration, and biomineralization in diverse tissues. The mechanisms explaining this multifunctionality are not well understood, although it is known that one osteopontin receptor is the alpha v beta 3 integrin. In this work, we studied human smooth muscle cells varying in alpha v beta 3 levels to identify additional osteopontin receptors. We report that, in addition to alpha v beta 3, both alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 are osteopontin receptors. Moreover, the presence or absence of alpha v beta 3 on the cell surface altered the adhesive and migratory responses of smooth muscle cells to osteopontin. Adhesion of alpha v beta 3-deficient cell populations to osteopontin was only half that of cells containing alpha v beta 3, and migration toward an osteopontin gradient in the Boyden chamber was dependent on cell surface alpha v beta 3. Although alpha v beta 3-deficient smooth muscle cells were unable to migrate to osteopontin, they did migrate significantly in response to vitronectin and fibronectin. These findings represent the first description of alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 as osteopontin receptors and suggest that, while adhesion to osteopontin is supported by integrins containing beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5, migration in response to osteopontin appears to depend on alpha v beta 3. Thus, interaction with distinct receptors is one mechanism by which osteopontin may initiate multiple functions. Images PMID:7532190

  2. Nucleation theory with delayed interactions: An application to the early stages of the receptor-mediated adhesion/fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudino, Antonio; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2010-01-01

    A semiquantitative theory aimed to describe the adhesion kinetics between soft objects, such as living cells or vesicles, has been developed. When rigid bodies are considered, the adhesion kinetics is successfully described by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) picture, where the energy profile of two approaching bodies is given by a two asymmetrical potential wells separated by a barrier. The transition probability from the long-distance to the short-distance minimum defines the adhesion rate. Conversely, soft bodies might follow a different pathway to reach the short-distance minimum: thermally excited fluctuations give rise to local protrusions connecting the approaching bodies. These transient adhesion sites are stabilized by short-range adhesion forces (e.g., ligand-receptor interactions between membranes brought at contact distance), while they are destabilized both by repulsive forces and by the elastic deformation energy. Above a critical area of the contact site, the adhesion forces prevail: the contact site grows in size until the complete adhesion of the two bodies inside a short-distance minimum is attained. This nucleation mechanism has been developed in the framework of a nonequilibrium Fokker-Planck picture by considering both the adhesive patch growth and dissolution processes. In addition, we also investigated the effect of the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics at the adhesion site in the time course of the patch expansion. The ratio between the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics and the expansion rate of the adhesion site is of paramount relevance in determining the overall nucleation rate. The theory enables one to self-consistently include both thermodynamics (energy barrier height) and dynamic (viscosity) parameters, giving rise in some limiting cases to simple analytical formulas. The model could be employed to rationalize fusion kinetics between vesicles, provided the short-range adhesion transition is the rate

  3. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC.

  4. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  5. Functional Hierarchy of Simultaneously Expressed Adhesion Receptors: Integrin α2β1 but Not CD44 Mediates MV3 Melanoma Cell Migration and Matrix Reorganization within Three-dimensional Hyaluronan-containing Collagen MatricesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maaser, Kerstin; Wolf, Katarina; Klein, C. Eberhard; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Bröcker, Eva-B.; Friedl, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Haptokinetic cell migration across surfaces is mediated by adhesion receptors including β1 integrins and CD44 providing adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands such as collagen and hyaluronan (HA), respectively. Little is known, however, about how such different receptor systems synergize for cell migration through three-dimensionally (3-D) interconnected ECM ligands. In highly motile human MV3 melanoma cells, both β1 integrins and CD44 are abundantly expressed, support migration across collagen and HA, respectively, and are deposited upon migration, whereas only β1 integrins but not CD44 redistribute to focal adhesions. In 3-D collagen lattices in the presence or absence of HA and cross-linking chondroitin sulfate, MV3 cell migration and associated functions such as polarization and matrix reorganization were blocked by anti-β1 and anti-α2 integrin mAbs, whereas mAbs blocking CD44, α3, α5, α6, or αv integrins showed no effect. With use of highly sensitive time-lapse videomicroscopy and computer-assisted cell tracking techniques, promigratory functions of CD44 were excluded. 1) Addition of HA did not increase the migratory cell population or its migration velocity, 2) blocking of the HA-binding Hermes-1 epitope did not affect migration, and 3) impaired migration after blocking or activation of β1 integrins was not restored via CD44. Because α2β1-mediated migration was neither synergized nor replaced by CD44–HA interactions, we conclude that the biophysical properties of 3-D multicomponent ECM impose more restricted molecular functions of adhesion receptors, thereby differing from haptokinetic migration across surfaces. PMID:10512851

  6. Inhibition of selectin-mediated cell adhesion and prevention of acute inflammation by nonanticoagulant sulfated saccharides. Studies with carboxyl-reduced and sulfated heparin and with trestatin a sulfate.

    PubMed

    Xie, X; Rivier, A S; Zakrzewicz, A; Bernimoulin, M; Zeng, X L; Wessel, H P; Schapira, M; Spertini, O

    2000-11-03

    Selectins play a major role in the inflammatory reaction by initiating neutrophil attachment to activated vascular endothelium. Some heparin preparations can interact with L- and P-selectin; however, the determinants required for inhibiting selectin-mediated cell adhesion have not yet been characterized. We now report that carboxyl-reduced and sulfated heparin (prepared by chemical modifications of porcine intestinal mucosal heparin leading to the replacement of carboxylates by O-sulfate groups) and trestatin A sulfate (obtained by sulfation of trestatin A, a non-uronic pseudo-nonasaccharide extracted from Streptomyces dimorphogenes) exhibit strong anti-P-selectin and anti-L-selectin activity while lacking antithrombin-mediated anticoagulant activity. In vitro experiments revealed that both compounds inhibited P-selectin- and L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion under laminar flow conditions. Moreover, carboxyl-reduced and sulfated heparin and trestatin A sulfate were also active in vivo, as assessed by experiments showing 1) that microinfusion of trestatin A sulfate reduced by 96% leukocyte rolling along rat mesenteric postcapillary venules and 2) that both compounds inhibited (by 58-81%) neutrophil migration into thioglycollate-inflamed peritoneum of BALB/c mice. These results indicate that nonanticoagulant sulfated saccharides targeted at P-selectin and L-selectin may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory disorders.

  7. Integrin β4 Signaling Promotes Mammary Tumor Cell Adhesion to Brain Microvascular Endothelium by Inducing ErbB2-mediated Secretion of VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Cai, Bin; Zeng, Min; Hao, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have indicated that the β4 integrin promotes mammary tumor invasion and metastasis by combining with ErbB2 and amplifying its signaling capacity. However, the effector pathways and cellular functions by which the β4 integrin exerts these effects are incompletely understood. To examine if β4 signaling plays a role during mammary tumor cell adhesion to microvascular endothelium, we have examined ErbB2-transformed mammary tumor cells expressing either a wild-type (WT) or a signaling-defective form of β4 (1355T). We report that WT cells adhere to brain microvascular endothelium in vitro to a significantly larger extent as compared to 1355T cells. Interestingly, integrin β4 signaling does not exert a direct effect on adhesion to the endothelium or the underlying basement membrane. Rather, it enhances ErbB2-dependent expression of VEGF by tumor cells. VEGF in turn disrupts the tight and adherens junctions of endothelial monolayers, enabling the exposure of underlying basement membrane and increasing the adhesion of tumor cells to the intercellular junctions of endothelium. Inhibition of ErbB2 on tumor cells or the VEGFR-2 on endothelial cells suppresses mammary tumor cell adhesion to microvascular endothelium. Our results indicate that β4 signaling regulates VEGF expression by the mammary tumor cells thereby enhancing their adhesion to microvascular endothelium. PMID:21556948

  8. CD147 up-regulates calcium-induced chemotaxis, adhesion ability and invasiveness of human neutrophils via a TRPM-7-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Hua; Rong, Meng-Yao; Wang, Li; Ren, Zhen; Chen, Li-Na; Jia, Jun-Feng; Li, Xue-Yi; Wu, Zhen-Biao; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether CD147 can up-regulate the chemotactic, adhesive and invasive properties of human neutrophils and to determine the mechanism underlying this process. Human promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) cells and peripheral blood or synovial fluid neutrophils were isolated from RA patients. Under cyclophilin A (CypA) stimulation, chemotaxis, adhesion potential and invasion ability were assessed using chemotaxis, adhesion and invasiveness assays. Lipid raft isolation and western blot were used to determine the mechanism underlying the effects of CypA stimulation. CD147 up-regulates the calcium-induced chemotaxis, adhesion ability and invasiveness of human neutrophils in RA patients. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 may be responsible for this phenomenon. These findings suggest that in RA patients, abundant CypA up-regulates the calcium-induced chemotactic, adhesive and invasive properties of neutrophils via direct binding to CD147. Cyclophilin-CD147 interactions might contribute to the destruction of cartilage and bone in RA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Pro-adhesive phenotype of normal endothelial cells responding to metastatic breast cancer cell conditioned medium is linked to NFκB-mediated transcriptomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rangel, Janini; Córdova, Emilio; Orozco, Lorena; Ventura-Gallegos, José Luis; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma; Escalona-Guzmán, Alma; Vadillo, Felipe; Vázquez-Prado, José; Gariglio, Patricio; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment is an important promoter of tumorigenesis in all forms of breast cancer and has been associated with the risk of metastasis in the different breast cancer subtypes including the more frequent luminal subtypes that encompass 60% of cancer patients. Adhesive properties of endothelial cells (ECs) are strikingly affected during cancer cell dissemination and are related to functional changes of adhesion receptors. The contribution of tumor secreted factors to tumor‑EC adhesion represents a therapeutic opportunity for breast cancer metastasis. Conditioned medium (CM) of tumor cells can be used as a model to study the role of the secreted molecules to the tumor microenvironment. We explored transcriptomic changes associated to a pro‑adhesive phenotype in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with CM of the breast cancer cell line ZR75.30 or with TNF for 3 h. Selected genes were used to validate the microarray through RT‑qPCR. The bioinformatic analysis identified NFκB as the main regulator of the pro-adhesive phenotype and this was confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of NFκB pathway with BAY 11‑7085. The changes induced by ZR75.30‑CM mimic those promoted by TNF and display changes in the expression of genes related to inflammatory response, wound healing, extracellular matrix, cytokines, metabolism and cell communication. Despite the abundance of G‑CSF, IL‑8, IL‑6 and VEGF in the ZR75.30‑CM and the confirmed activation of STAT3 and VEGFR2 pathways, our results suggest dominance of NFκB as a central controller of the transcriptomic response of ECs to breast cancer cells leading to expression of cell adhesion receptors.

  10. A novel region of the alpha4 integrin subunit with a modulatory role in VLA-4-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, M; Serrador, J; Nieto, M; Luque, A; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Teixidó, J

    1997-01-01

    The integrin VLA-4 (alpha4 beta1) is a receptor for fibronectin and vascular cell-adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Four functionally different epitopes, designated A, B1, B2 and C, have previously been defined on the alpha4 subunit. Using K562 alpha4 mutant transfectants we found that alpha4 amino acids Tyr151, Gln152, Asp153, Tyr154 and Val155 are important for the structure of the epitope B2. Mutations at alpha4 Gln152 substantially impaired the transfectant adhesion to a CS-1-containing fragment of fibronectin (FN-H89), whereas this adhesion was not affected on the other alpha4 mutant transfectants. None of the alpha4 mutations significantly altered the adhesion of the different alpha4 transfectants to VCAM-1. In addition, we have identified residues Gln152, Asp153 and Tyr154 as part of the alpha4 epitope B2 involved in homotypic cell aggregation. The decrease in adhesion to FN-H89 shown by Gln152 alpha4 mutant transfectants was the result of an inefficient binding of FN-H89 by VLA-4 mutated at this residue. Also, mutant VLA-4 displayed an altered reactivity with HUTS-21, an anti-beta1 monoclonal antibody that reacts with functionally active VLA integrins. Adhesion to FN-H89 was not restored unless stimuli that increase the ligand-binding affinity of VLA heterodimers were added, suggesting that cell adhesion was affected in the initial phases. These results indicate that alpha4 Gln152 modulates cell adhesion to FN-H89 by playing important roles in the maintenance and/or the acquisition of an active state of VLA-4, an integrin that is normally expressed on the cell surface in a range of multiple activation states. The location of the alpha4 Gln152 residue on a loop of the upper surface of the proposed beta-propeller structure suggests a close association with potential ligand-binding sites. PMID:9581549

  11. A novel region of the alpha4 integrin subunit with a modulatory role in VLA-4-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Serrador, J; Nieto, M; Luque, A; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Teixidó, J

    1997-11-01

    The integrin VLA-4 (alpha4 beta1) is a receptor for fibronectin and vascular cell-adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Four functionally different epitopes, designated A, B1, B2 and C, have previously been defined on the alpha4 subunit. Using K562 alpha4 mutant transfectants we found that alpha4 amino acids Tyr151, Gln152, Asp153, Tyr154 and Val155 are important for the structure of the epitope B2. Mutations at alpha4 Gln152 substantially impaired the transfectant adhesion to a CS-1-containing fragment of fibronectin (FN-H89), whereas this adhesion was not affected on the other alpha4 mutant transfectants. None of the alpha4 mutations significantly altered the adhesion of the different alpha4 transfectants to VCAM-1. In addition, we have identified residues Gln152, Asp153 and Tyr154 as part of the alpha4 epitope B2 involved in homotypic cell aggregation. The decrease in adhesion to FN-H89 shown by Gln152 alpha4 mutant transfectants was the result of an inefficient binding of FN-H89 by VLA-4 mutated at this residue. Also, mutant VLA-4 displayed an altered reactivity with HUTS-21, an anti-beta1 monoclonal antibody that reacts with functionally active VLA integrins. Adhesion to FN-H89 was not restored unless stimuli that increase the ligand-binding affinity of VLA heterodimers were added, suggesting that cell adhesion was affected in the initial phases. These results indicate that alpha4 Gln152 modulates cell adhesion to FN-H89 by playing important roles in the maintenance and/or the acquisition of an active state of VLA-4, an integrin that is normally expressed on the cell surface in a range of multiple activation states. The location of the alpha4 Gln152 residue on a loop of the upper surface of the proposed beta-propeller structure suggests a close association with potential ligand-binding sites.

  12. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications.

  13. PAK is regulated by PI3K, PIX, CDC42, and PP2Calpha and mediates focal adhesion turnover in the hyperosmotic stress-induced p38 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chan, Perry M; Lim, Louis; Manser, Edward

    2008-09-05

    Fractionation of brain extracts and functional biochemical assays identified PP2Calpha, a serine/threonine phosphatase, as the major biochemical activity inhibiting PAK1. PP2Calpha dephosphorylated PAK1 and p38, both of which were activated upon hyperosmotic shock with the same kinetics. In comparison to growth factors, hyperosmolality was a more potent activator of PAK1. Therefore we characterize the PAK signaling pathway in the hyperosmotic shock response. Endogenous PAKs were recruited to the p38 kinase complex in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Overexpression of a PAK inhibitory peptide or dominant negative Cdc42 revealed that p38 activation was dependent on PAK and Cdc42 activities. PAK mutants deficient in binding to Cdc42 or PAK-interacting exchange factor were not activated. Using a panel of kinase inhibitors, we identified PI3K acting upstream of PAK, which correlated with PAK repression by pTEN overexpression. RNA interference knockdown of PAK expression reduced stress-induced p38 activation and conversely, PP2Calpha knockdown increased its activation. Hyperosmotic stress-induced PAK translocation away from focal adhesions to the perinuclear compartment and resulted in disassembly of focal adhesions, which are hallmarks of PAK activation. Inhibition of PAK by overexpression of PP2Calpha or the kinase inhibitory domain prevented sorbitol-induced focal adhesion dissolution. Inhibition of MAPK pathways showed that MEK-ERK signaling but not p38 is required for full PAK activation and focal adhesion turnover. We conclude that 1) PAK plays a required role in hyperosmotic signaling through the PI3K/pTEN/Cdc42/PP2Calpha/p38 pathway, and 2) PAK and PP2Calpha modulate the effects of this pathway on focal adhesion dynamics.

  14. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-06-10

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion.

  15. The soluble form of LR11 protein is a regulator of hypoxia-induced, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated adhesion of immature hematological cells.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-04-26

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells of lr11(-/-) mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11(+/+) animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche.

  16. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Stclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A process was developed for preparing aromatic polyamide acids for use as adhesives by reacting an aromatic dianhydride to an approximately equimolar amount of an aromatic diamine in a water or lower alkanol miscible ether solvent. The polyamide acids are converted to polyimides by heating to the temperature range of 200 - 300 C. The polyimides are thermally stable and insoluble in ethers and other organic solvents.

  17. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  18. Adeno-associated virus-2-mediated TGF-β1 microRNA transfection inhibits adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y F; Mao, W F; Zhou, Y L; Wang, X T; Liu, P Y; Tang, J B

    2016-02-01

    Adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury greatly affects gliding function of the tendon, which is a major clinical complication after hand surgery. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has a critical role in adhesion formation during tendon healing. Persistent regulation of TGF-β1 through application of microRNA (miRNA) specifically inhibiting the function of TGF-β1 (TGF-β1-miRNA) holds promise for treatment of such a complication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) was used to transfer TGF-β1-miRNA to the chicken digital flexor tendons, which had been injured and surgically repaired. Four doses of AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA (2 × 10¹¹, 2 × 10¹⁰, 2 × 10⁹ and 2 × 10⁸ vector genomes (vg)) were used to determine the transfection efficiency. At postoperative 3 weeks, we found a positive correlation between the administered AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA doses and transfection efficiency. The transfection rate ranged from 10% to 77% as the doses increased. Production of TGF-β1 protein in the tendons decreased on increasing vector dosage. When 2 × 10¹¹ and 2 × 10¹⁰) vg were injected into the tendon, gliding excursion of the repaired tendon and work of flexion of chicken toes were significantly increased and adhesion score decreased 6 and 8 weeks later, indicating the improvement of tendon gliding and decreases in adhesion formations. However, the ultimate strength of the tendons transfected at the dose of 2 × 10¹⁰ vg was 12-24% lower than that of the control tendons. The results of this study demonstrate that application of TGF-β1-miRNA had a mixed impact on tendon healing: adhesion around the tendon is reduced but strength of the tendon healing is adversely affected. Future studies should aim at maintaining the beneficial effects of reducing tendon adhesions, while eliminating the adverse effects of decreasing the healing strength.

  19. The interaction between cell adhesion molecule L1, matrix metalloproteinase 14, and adenine nucleotide translocator at the plasma membrane regulates L1-mediated neurite outgrowth of murine cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Makhina, Tatjana; Bork, Ute; Dörner, Andrea; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2012-03-14

    We have identified the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoforms ANT1 and ANT2 that are present in the plasma membrane of mouse cerebellar neurons as novel binding partners of the cell adhesion molecule L1. The direct interaction between ANT and L1 is mediated by sites within the fibronectin type III domains of L1 and the first and third extracellular loops of the ANT proteins. We also show that L1 interacts with the ANT binding partner matrix metalloprotease 14 (MMP14) and that the ANT proteins bind directly to the L1 interaction partner glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Moreover, we provide evidence that the functional interplay between L1, ANT proteins, MMP14, and GAPDH at the plasma membrane mediates L1-induced neurite outgrowth of cerebellar neurons. Disruption of this interplay by ANT inhibitors, ANT-derived synthetic peptides, and/or function-blocking MMP14 and ANT antibodies leads to alterations in L1-dependent neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of L1-mediated signaling in cerebellar neurons triggers transient ATP secretion via ANT proteins and leads to transient src family-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of L1, ANT1, ANT2, and MMP14. Thus, our results indicate that plasma membrane-localized ANT1 and ANT2 regulate L1-mediated neurite outgrowth in conjunction with MMP14.

  20. RGD-dependent binding of TP508 to integrin αvβ3 mediates cell adhesion and induction of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Derkach, Dmitry N.; Wadekar, Subhagya A.; Perkins, Kim B.; Rousseau, Emma; Dreiza, Catherine M.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Ramos, Heidi C.; Ugarova, Tatiana P.; Sheller, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary TP508, a 23-amino acid RGD-containing synthetic peptide representing residues 508 to 530 of human prothrombin, mitigates the effects of endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic reperfusion injury. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TP508 binds to members of the integrin family of transmembrane receptors leading to nitric oxide synthesis. Immobilised TP508 supported adhesion of endothelial cells and αvβ3-expressing human embryonic kidney cells in a dose- and RGD-dependent manner. Soluble TP508 also inhibited cell adhesion to immobilised fibrinogen. The involvement of αvβ3 was verified with function-blocking antibodies and surface plasmon resonance studies. Adhesion of the cells to immobilised TP508 resulted in an induction of phosphorylated FAK and ERK1/2. In endothelial cells, TP508 treatment resulted in an induction of nitric oxide that could be inhibited by LM609, an αvβ3-specific, function-blocking monoclonal antibody. Finally, TP508 treatment of isolated rat aorta segments enhanced carbachol-induced vasorelaxation. These results suggest that TP508 elicits a potentially therapeutic effect through an RGD-dependent interaction with integrin αvβ3. PMID:20508901

  1. Resveratrol attenuates ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesiveness to TNF-α-treated endothelial cells: evidence for an anti-inflammatory cascade mediated by the miR-221/222/AMPK/p38/NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Wei; Sung, Hsin-Ching; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, Chun-Wei; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lee, I.-Ta; Yang, Yi-Fan; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chiang, Ming-Hsien; Liang, Chan-Jung; Chen, Yuh-Lien

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol, an edible polyphenolic phytoalexin, improves endothelial dysfunction and attenuates inflammation. However, the mechanisms have not been thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of the effects of resveratrol on TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in HUVECs. The resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression. The inhibition of p38 phosphorylation mediated the reduction in ICAM-1 expression caused by resveratrol. Resveratrol also decreased TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation and the phosphorylation, acetylation, and translocation of NF-κB p65. Moreover, resveratrol induced the AMPK phosphorylation and the SIRT1 expression in TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Furthermore, TNF-α significantly suppressed miR-221/-222 expression, which was reversed by resveratrol. miR-221/-222 overexpression decreased p38/NF-κB and ICAM-1 expression, which resulted in reduced monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-treated ECs. In a mouse model of acute TNF-α-induced inflammation, resveratrol effectively attenuated ICAM-1 expression in the aortic ECs of TNF-α-treated wild-type mice. These beneficial effects of resveratrol were lost in miR-221/222 knockout mice. Our data showed that resveratrol counteracted the TNF-α-mediated reduction in miR-221/222 expression and decreased the TNF-α-induced activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB, thereby suppressing ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion. Collectively, our results show that resveratrol attenuates endothelial inflammation by reducing ICAM-1 expression and that the protective effect was mediated partly through the miR-221/222/AMPK/p38/NF-κB pathway. PMID:28338009

  2. P-glycoprotein regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on the occludin/zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) protein complex mediated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK).

    PubMed

    Su, Linlin; Mruk, Dolores D; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2011-12-06

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB), one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers in the mammalian body, creates an immune-privileged site for postmeiotic spermatid development to avoid the production of antibodies against spermatid-specific antigens, many of which express transiently during spermiogenesis and spermiation. However, the BTB undergoes extensive restructuring at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes and to prepare for meiosis. This action thus prompted us to investigate whether this stage can be a physiological window for the delivery of therapeutic and/or contraceptive drugs across the BTB to exert their effects at the immune-privileged site. Herein, we report findings that P-glycoprotein, an ATP-dependent efflux drug transporter and an integrated component of the occludin/zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) adhesion complex at the BTB, structurally interacted with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), creating the occludin/ZO-1/FAK/P-glycoprotein regulatory complex. Interestingly, a knockdown of P-glycoprotein by RNAi was found to impede Sertoli cell BTB function, making the tight junction (TJ) barrier "leaky." This effect was mediated by changes in the protein phosphorylation status of occludin via the action of FAK, thereby affecting the endocytic vesicle-mediated protein trafficking events that destabilized the TJ barrier. However, the silencing of P-glycoprotein, although capable of impeding drug transport across the BTB and TJ permeability barrier function, was not able to induce the BTB to be "freely" permeable to adjudin. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is involved in BTB restructuring during spermatogenesis but that P-glycoprotein-mediated restructuring does not "open up" the BTB to make it freely permeable to drugs.

  3. CD44 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in lipid rafts promotes hyaluronan-mediated Ca2+ signaling leading to nitric oxide production and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2004-04-15

    In this study, we have showed that aortic endothelial cells (GM7372A cell line) express CD44v10 [a hyaluronan (HA) receptor], which is significantly enriched in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts (characterized as caveolin-rich plasma membrane microdomains). HA binding to CD44v10 promotes recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor into cholesterol-containing lipid rafts. The ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ankyrin is responsible for binding IP3 receptor to CD44v10 at lipid rafts and subsequently triggering HA/CD44v10-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilization leading to a variety of endothelial cell functions such as nitric oxide (NO) production, cell adhesion and proliferation. Further analyses indicate (i) disruption of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol from the membranes of GM7372A cells (using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin treatment) or (ii) interference of endogenous ankyrin binding to CD44 and IP3 receptor using overexpression of ARD fragments (by transfecting cells with ARDcDNA) not only abolishes ankyrin/IP3 receptor accumulation into CD44v10/cholesterol-containing lipid rafts, but also blocks HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD44v10 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts plays an important role in regulating HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions such as NO production, cell adhesion and proliferation.

  4. CD151 supports VCAM-1-mediated lymphocyte adhesion to liver endothelium and is upregulated in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wadkin, James C R; Patten, Daniel A; Kamarajah, Sivesh K; Shepherd, Emma L; Novitskaya, Vera; Berditchevski, Fedor; Adams, David H; Weston, Chris J; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-08-01

    CD151, a member of the tetraspanin family of receptors, is a lateral organizer and modulator of activity of several families of transmembrane proteins. It has been implicated in the development and progression of several cancers, but its role in chronic inflammatory disease is less well understood. Here we show that CD151 is upregulated by distinct microenvironmental signals in a range of chronic inflammatory liver diseases and in primary liver cancer, in which it supports lymphocyte recruitment. CD151 was highly expressed in endothelial cells of the hepatic sinusoids and neovessels developing in fibrotic septa and tumor margins. Primary cultures of human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs) expressed CD151 at the cell membrane and in intracellular vesicles. CD151 was upregulated by VEGF and HepG2 conditioned media but not by proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy confirmed that CD151 colocalized with the endothelial adhesion molecule/immunoglobulin superfamily member, VCAM-1. Functional flow-based adhesion assays with primary human lymphocytes and HSECs demonstrated a 40% reduction of lymphocyte adhesion with CD151 blockade. Inhibition of lymphocyte adhesion was similar between VCAM-1 blockade and a combination of CD151/VCAM-1 blockade, suggesting a collaborative role between the two receptors. These studies demonstrate that CD151 is upregulated within the liver during chronic inflammation, where it supports lymphocyte recruitment via liver endothelium. We propose that CD151 regulates the activity of VCAM-1 during lymphocyte recruitment to the human liver and could be a novel anti-inflammatory target in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular cancer prevention.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Chronic hepatitis is characterized by lymphocyte accumulation in liver tissue, which drives fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the tetraspanin CD151 supports lymphocyte adhesion to liver endothelium. We show that CD151 is upregulated in

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  6. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  7. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  8. Soma influences GSC progeny differentiation via the cell adhesion-mediated steroid-let-7-Wingless signaling cascade that regulates chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    König, Annekatrin; Shcherbata, Halyna R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is known that signaling from the germline stem cell niche is required to maintain germline stem cell identity in Drosophila. However, it is not clear whether the germline stem-cell daughters differentiate by default (because they are physically distant from the niche) or whether additional signaling is necessary to initiate the differentiation program. Previously, we showed that ecdysteroid signaling cell non-autonomously regulates early germline differentiation via its soma-specific co-activator and co-repressor, Taiman and Abrupt. Now, we demonstrate that this regulation is modulated by the miRNA let-7, which acts in a positive feedback loop to confer ecdysone signaling robustness via targeting its repressor, the transcription factor Abrupt. This feedback loop adjusts ecdysteroid signaling in response to some stressful alterations in the external and internal conditions, which include temperature stress and aging, but not nutritional deprivation. Upon let-7 deficit, escort cells fail to properly differentiate: their shape, division, and cell adhesive characteristics are perturbed. These cells have confused cellular identity and form columnar-like rather than squamous epithelium and fail to send protrusions in between differentiating germline cysts, affecting soma-germline communication. Particularly, levels of the homophilic cell adhesion protein Cadherin, which recruits Wg signaling transducer β-catenin, are increased in mutant escort cells and, correspondingly, in the adjacent germline cells. Readjustment of heterotypic (soma-germline) cell adhesion modulates Wg signaling intensity in the germline, which in turn regulates histone modifications that promote expression of the genes necessary to trigger early germline differentiation. Thus, our data first show the intrinsic role for Wg signaling in the germline and support a model where the soma influences the tempo of germline differentiation in response to external conditions. PMID:25661868

  9. Transfection of IL-10 expression vectors into endothelial cultures attenuates α4β7-dependent lymphocyte adhesion mediated by MAdCAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Makoto; Jordan, Paul; Houghton, Jeff; Meng, Xianmin; Itoh, Makoto; Joh, Takashi; Alexander, J Steven

    2003-01-01

    Background Enhanced expression of MAdCAM-1 (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1) is associated with the onset and progression of inflammatory bowel disease. The clinical significance of elevated MAdCAM-1 expression is supported by studies showing that immunoneutralization of MAdCAM-1, or its ligands reduce inflammation and mucosal damage in models of colitis. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokine that has been shown to prevent inflammation and injury in several animal studies, however clinical IL-10 treatment remains insufficient because of difficulties in the route of IL-10 administration and its biological half-life. Here, we examined the ability of introducing an IL-10 expression vector into endothelial cultures to reduce responses to a proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α Methods A human IL-10 expression vector was transfected into high endothelial venular ('HEV') cells (SVEC4-10); we then examined TNF-α induced lymphocyte adhesion to lymphatic endothelial cells and TNF-α induced expression of MAdCAM-1 and compared these responses to control monolayers. Results Transfection of the IL-10 vector into endothelial cultures significantly reduced TNF-α induced, MAdCAM-1 dependent lymphocyte adhesion (compared to non-transfected cells). IL-10 transfected endothelial cells expressed less than half (46 ± 6.6%) of the MAdCAM-1 induced by TNF-α (set as 100%) in non-transfected (control) cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that gene therapy of the gut microvasculature with IL-10 vectors may be useful in the clinical treatment of IBD. PMID:12625840

  10. MiR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianhao; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W

    2016-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2), and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1), respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively.

  11. Assembly of focal adhesions: progress, paradigms, and portents.

    PubMed

    Craig, S W; Johnson, R P

    1996-02-01

    Receptor-mediated assembly of an adhesion plaque occurs through an ordered series of steps, and intermediate assemblies can be identified. The recent demonstration of some of these partial reactions in permeabilized cells predicts that cell-free reconstitution of adhesion plaque assembly is an attainable goal. Newly discovered cryptic actin-binding sites in vinculin and ezrin, two proteins recruited to adhesion sites, suggest that actin-binding proteins are targets for the signals generated by adhesion receptors.

  12. Adhesion to and invasion of HeLa cells by pathogenic Escherichia coli carrying the afa-3 gene cluster are mediated by the AfaE and AfaD proteins, respectively.

    PubMed

    Jouve, M; Garcia, M I; Courcoux, P; Labigne, A; Gounon, P; Le Bouguénec, C

    1997-10-01

    The afa-3 gene cluster, expressed by uropathogenic and diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli strains, determines the formation of an afimbrial adhesive sheath composed of the AfaD and AfaE-III adhesins. The adherence to HeLa cells by recombinant HB101 strains producing both or only one of these two adhesins was investigated. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction and gentamicin protection assays showed adherence to HeLa cells by HB101 producing both the AfaD and AfaE-III proteins and internalization of a subpopulation of the bacteria into the cells. The interactions of HeLa cells either with HB101 mutants producing AfaD or AfaE-III or with polystyrene beads coated with purified His6-tagged AfaD or His6-tagged AfaE-III proteins were studied. These experiments demonstrated that AfaE-III allows binding to HeLa cells and that AfaD mediates the internalization of the adherent bacteria. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction of His6-AfaD-gold complexes with HeLa cells confirmed that AfaD is able to bind to the HeLa cell surface and indicated that it penetrates the cells via clathrin vesicles. These data demonstrate that the afa gene cluster is unique among bacteria, as alone it encodes both adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells.

  13. Binding of a Sialic Acid-recognizing Lectin Siglec-9 Modulates Adhesion Dynamics of Cancer Cells via Calpain-mediated Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Sabit, Ilhamjan; Hashimoto, Noboru; Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Although regulatory mechanisms for immune cells with inhibitory signals via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs are well known, signals transduced via interaction between Siglecs and sialyl compounds on their counterreceptors into target cells have not been reported to date. In this study, we found that an astrocytoma cell line, AS, showed detachment from culture plates when co-cultured with Siglec-9-expressing cells and/or soluble Siglec-9. Moreover, detached AS cells regrew as co-cultured cells with Siglec-9-deficient cells. They also showed increased motility and invasiveness upon Siglec-9 binding. In immunoblotting, rapid degradation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and related signaling molecules such as Akt, paxillin, and p130Cas was observed immediately after the co-culture. Despite degradation of these molecules, increased p-Akt was found at the front region of the cytoplasm, probably reflecting increased cell motility. Calpain was considered to be a responsible protease for the protein degradation by the inhibition experiments. These results suggest that protein degradation of FAK and related molecules was induced by Siglec-9 binding to its counterreceptors via sialylglycoconjugates, leading to the modulation of adhesion kinetics of cancer cells. Thus, this might be a mechanism by which cancer cells utilize Siglec-9-derived signals to escape from immunosurveillance. PMID:24145038

  14. Syk and Src Family Kinases Regulate C-type Lectin Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)-mediated Clustering of Podoplanin and Platelet Adhesion to Lymphatic Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Poulter, Natalie S.; Gitz, Eelo; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Wang, Ying-Jie; Hughes, Craig E.; Thomas, Steven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Owen, Dylan M.; Jackson, David G.; Dustin, Michael L.; Watson, Steve P.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of C-type lectin receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets with Podoplanin on lymphatic endothelial cells initiates platelet signaling events that are necessary for prevention of blood-lymph mixing during development. In the present study, we show that CLEC-2 signaling via Src family and Syk tyrosine kinases promotes platelet adhesion to primary mouse lymphatic endothelial cells at low shear. Using supported lipid bilayers containing mobile Podoplanin, we further show that activation of Src and Syk in platelets promotes clustering of CLEC-2 and Podoplanin. Clusters of CLEC-2-bound Podoplanin migrate rapidly to the center of the platelet to form a single structure. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that molecules within these clusters are within 10 nm of one another and that the clusters are disrupted by inhibition of Src and Syk family kinases. CLEC-2 clusters are also seen in platelets adhered to immobilized Podoplanin using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. These findings provide mechanistic insight by which CLEC-2 signaling promotes adhesion to Podoplanin and regulation of Podoplanin signaling, thereby contributing to lymphatic vasculature development. PMID:25368330

  15. PAR1b Promotes Cell–Cell Adhesion and Inhibits Dishevelled-mediated Transformation of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Maya; Cohen, David

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian Par1 is a family of serine/threonine kinases comprised of four homologous isoforms that have been associated with tumor suppression and differentiation of epithelial and neuronal cells, yet little is known about their cellular functions. In polarizing kidney epithelial (Madin-Darby canine kidney [MDCK]) cells, the Par1 isoform Par1b/MARK2/EMK1 promotes the E-cadherin–dependent compaction, columnarization, and cytoskeletal organization characteristic of differentiated columnar epithelia. Here, we identify two functions of Par1b that likely contribute to its role as a tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. 1) The kinase promotes cell–cell adhesion and resistance of E-cadherin to extraction by nonionic detergents, a measure for the association of the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain with the actin cytoskeleton, which is critical for E-cadherin function. 2) Par1b attenuates the effect of Dishevelled (Dvl) expression, an inducer of wnt signaling that causes transformation of epithelial cells. Although Dvl is a known Par1 substrate in vitro, we determined, after mapping the PAR1b-phosphorylation sites in Dvl, that PAR1b did not antagonize Dvl signaling by phosphorylating the wnt-signaling molecule. Instead, our data suggest that both proteins function antagonistically to regulate the assembly of functional E-cadherin–dependent adhesion complexes. PMID:16707567

  16. The disintegrin-like metalloproteinase ADAM10 is involved in constitutive cleavage of CX3CL1 (fractalkine) and regulates CX3CL1-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hundhausen, Christian; Misztela, Dominika; Berkhout, Theo A; Broadway, Neil; Saftig, Paul; Reiss, Karina; Hartmann, Dieter; Fahrenholz, Falk; Postina, Rolf; Matthews, Vance; Kallen, Karl-Josef; Rose-John, Stefan; Ludwig, Andreas

    2003-08-15

    The CX3C chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) exists as a membrane-expressed protein promoting cell-cell adhesion and as a soluble molecule inducing chemotaxis. Transmembrane CX3CL1 is converted into its soluble form by defined proteolytic cleavage (shedding), which can be enhanced by stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). PMA-induced CX3CL1 shedding has been shown to involve the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE), whereas the constitutive cleavage in unstimulated cells remains elusive. Here we demonstrate a role of the closely related disintegrin-like metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) in the constitutive CX3CL1 cleavage. The hydroxamate GW280264X, capable of blocking TACE as well as ADAM10, proved to be an effective inhibitor of the constitutive and the PMA-inducible CX3CL1 cleavage in CX3CL1-expressing ECV-304 cells (CX3CL1-ECV-304), whereas GI254023X, preferentially blocking ADAM10 but not TACE, reduced the constitutive cleavage only. Overexpression of ADAM10 in COS-7 cells enhanced constitutive cleavage of CX3CL1 and, more importantly, in murine fibroblasts deficient of ADAM10 constitutive CX3CL1 cleavage was markedly reduced. Thus, ADAM10 contributes to the constitutive shedding of CX3CL1 in unstimulated cells. Addressing the functional role of CX3CL1 shedding for the adhesion of monocytic cells via membrane-expressed CX3CL1, we found that THP-1 cells adhere to CX3CL1-ECV-304 cells but detach in the course of vigorous washing. Inhibition of ADAM10-mediated CX3CL1 shedding not only increased adhesive properties of CX3CL1-ECV-304 cells but also prevented de-adhesion of bound THP-1 cells. Our data demonstrate that ADAM10 is involved in the constitutive cleavage of CX3CL1 and thereby may regulate the recruitment of monocytic cells to CX3CL1-expressing cell layers.

  17. Prostaglandin E₂-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression is mediated by cAMP/Epac signalling modules in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Yeop; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2013-06-01

    Prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion molecules, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into inflamed site. However, the underlying mechanism therein involved remains ill-defined. In this study, we explored its cellular mechanism of action in the regulation of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in the brain endothelial cells. bEnd.3 cells, the murine cerebrovascular endothelial cell line and primary mouse brain endothelial cells were treated with PGE₂ with or without agonists/antagonists of PGE₂ receptors and associated signalling molecules. ICAM-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation and activity of NF-κB were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblot analysis, luciferase assay and immunocytochemistry. PGE₂ significantly up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1, which was blocked by EP4 antagonist (ONO-AE2-227) and knock-down of EP4. PGE₂ effects were mimicked by forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activator (8-Cpt-cAMP) but not a protein kinase A activator (N⁶-Bnz-cAMP). PGE₂-induced ICAM-1 expression was reduced by knock-down of Epac1. A PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002), Akt inhibitor VIII (Akti) and NF-κB inhibitors (Bay-11-7082 and MG-132) attenuated the induction of ICAM-1 by PGE₂. PGE₂, dbcAMP and 8-Cpt-cAMP induced the phosphorylation of Akt, IκB kinase and IκBα and the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and increased NF-κB dependent reporter gene activity, which was diminished by Akti. Our findings suggest that PGE₂ induces ICAM-1 expression via EP4 receptor and Epac/Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells, supporting its pathophysiological role in brain inflammation. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Prostaglandin E2-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression is mediated by cAMP/Epac signalling modules in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Yeop; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion molecules, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into inflamed site. However, the underlying mechanism therein involved remains ill-defined. In this study, we explored its cellular mechanism of action in the regulation of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in the brain endothelial cells. Experimental Approach bEnd.3 cells, the murine cerebrovascular endothelial cell line and primary mouse brain endothelial cells were treated with PGE2 with or without agonists/antagonists of PGE2 receptors and associated signalling molecules. ICAM-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation and activity of NF-κB were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblot analysis, luciferase assay and immunocytochemistry. Key Results PGE2 significantly up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1, which was blocked by EP4 antagonist (ONO-AE2-227) and knock-down of EP4. PGE2 effects were mimicked by forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activator (8-Cpt-cAMP) but not a protein kinase A activator (N6-Bnz-cAMP). PGE2-induced ICAM-1 expression was reduced by knock-down of Epac1. A PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002), Akt inhibitor VIII (Akti) and NF-κB inhibitors (Bay-11–7082 and MG-132) attenuated the induction of ICAM-1 by PGE2. PGE2, dbcAMP and 8-Cpt-cAMP induced the phosphorylation of Akt, IκB kinase and IκBα and the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and increased NF-κB dependent reporter gene activity, which was diminished by Akti. Conclusion and Implications Our findings suggest that PGE2 induces ICAM-1 expression via EP4 receptor and Epac/Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells, supporting its pathophysiological role in brain inflammation. PMID:23317035

  19. Expression and polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human intestinal epithelia: consequences for CD11b/CD18-mediated interactions with neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C. A.; Colgan, S. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Nusrat, A.; Liang, T. W.; Springer, T. A.; Madara, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epithelial dysfunction and patient symptoms in inflammatory intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease correlate with migration of neutrophils (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In vitro modeling of PMN transepithelial migration has revealed distinct differences from transendothelial migration. By using polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), PMN transepithelial migration has been shown to be dependent on the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), but not on CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1). Since intercellular adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-1) is an important endothelial counterreceptor for these integrins, its expression in intestinal epithelia and role in PMN-intestinal epithelial interactions was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A panel of antibodies against different domains of ICAM-1, polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), and natural human colonic epithelia were used to examine the polarity of epithelial ICAM-1 surface expression and the functional role of ICAM-1 in neutrophil-intestinal epithelial adhesive interactions. RESULTS: While no surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected on unstimulated T84 cells, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) elicited a marked expression of ICAM-1 that selectively polarized to the apical epithelial membrane. Similarly, apically restricted surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected in natural human colonic epithelium only in association with active inflammation. With or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, physiologically directed (basolateral-to-apical) transepithelial migration of PMN was unaffected by blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to ICAM-1. In contrast, PMN migration across IFN gamma-stimulated monolayers in the reverse (apical-to-basolateral) direction was inhibited by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Adhesion studies revealed that T84 cells adhered selectively to purified CD11b/CD18 and such adherence, with or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, was unaffected by ICAM-1 m

  20. The Soluble Form of LR11 Protein Is a Regulator of Hypoxia-induced, Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR)-mediated Adhesion of Immature Hematological Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit+ Lin− cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit+ Lin− cells of lr11−/− mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11+/+ animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit+ Lin− cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche. PMID:23486467

  1. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  2. Integrated proteomics identified up-regulated focal adhesion-mediated proteins in human squamous cell carcinoma in an orthotopic murine model.

    PubMed

    Granato, Daniela C; Zanetti, Mariana R; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R; Aragão, Annelize Z; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Vidal, Ramon O; Flores, Isadora L; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K; Silva, Alan R S; Coletta, Ricardo D; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules.

  3. Integrated Proteomics Identified Up-Regulated Focal Adhesion-Mediated Proteins in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Daniela C.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Aragão, Annelize Z.; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Flores, Isadora L.; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Silva, Alan R. S.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules. PMID:24858105

  4. TgrC1 mediates cell-cell adhesion by interacting with TgrB1 via mutual IPT/TIG domains during development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoqun; Wu, Xiangfu; Piao, Ruihan; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2013-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays crucial roles in cell differentiation and morphogenesis during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The heterophilic adhesion protein TgrC1 (Tgr is transmembrane, IPT, IG, E-set, repeat protein) is expressed during cell aggregation, and disruption of the tgrC1