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Sample records for eucalyptus nitens wood

  1. Eucalyptus nitens: nanomechanical properties of bark and wood fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Freddy; Valenzuela, Paulina; Gacitúa, William

    2012-09-01

    In this study, Eucalyptus nitens species was nano-characterized to determine variability in nanomechanical properties within the cellular ultra-structure between the bark and wood fibers. Three factors, including site (2 levels), family (2 levels) and fiber type (bark and wood) were analyzed using three response variables, including the elastic modulus ( E), hardness ( H) and ductility ratio ( E/ H) in the middle lamella ( ML) and the cell wall within the S2 layer. The results indicated significant differences for E S2 and H S2 when comparing fiber types: E S2≈12.52 GPa and H S2≈0.31 GPa for wood fiber and E S2≈10.81 GPa and H S2≈0.26 GPa for bark fiber. There is not statistically significant difference in ductility ratio ( E/ H) in S2 and ML between fiber types. These results indicate that bark and wood fibers can be used together or separately in the development of new composite materials and engineering products.

  2. Novel detection of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs) in the wound wood of Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Davies, Noel W; Mohammed, Caroline

    2003-04-01

    This study characterized the chemical responses of Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus nitens to artificial inoculation with a basidiomycete decay fungus. Nine-year-old trees responded to mechanical wounding or inoculation with the decay fungus by producing new wound wood characterized by the presence of dark extractives 17 months after wounding. Analysis of crude wound wood extracts by HPLC coupled to negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a complex mixture of many unidentified formylated phlorglucinol compounds (FPCs), in addition to a diverse range of other polyphenolic compounds (hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, flavanone glycoside, stilbene glycosides). Prior to this study, FPCs have only been reported from leaves and buds of Eucalyptus spp. Unequivocal evidence for the presence of macrocarpal A and B, and sideroxylonal A and B in the crude extracts was obtained, as well as evidence for a wide range of as yet unreported FPCs. Subsequent preliminary in vitro fungal and bacterial bioassays did not support an antimicrobial role for FPCs in host-pathogen interactions in eucalypts.

  3. RNA-Seq Using Two Populations Reveals Genes and Alleles Controlling Wood Traits and Growth in Eucalyptus nitens

    PubMed Central

    Thavamanikumar, Saravanan; Southerton, Simon; Thumma, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY) is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and alleles whose expression correlated with KPY. KPY is positively correlated with growth measured as diameter at breast height (DBH) in both trials. In total, six RNA bulks from two treatments were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq platform. At 5% false discovery rate level, 3953 transcripts showed differential expression in the same direction in both trials; 2551 (65%) were down-regulated and 1402 (35%) were up-regulated in low KPY samples. The genes up-regulated in low KPY trees were largely involved in biotic and abiotic stress response reflecting the low growth among low KPY trees. Genes down-regulated in low KPY trees mainly belonged to gene categories involved in wood formation and growth. Differential allelic expression was observed in 2103 SNPs (in 1068 genes) and of these 640 SNPs (30%) occurred in 313 unique genes that were also differentially expressed. These SNPs may represent the cis-acting regulatory variants that influence total gene expression. In addition we also identified 196 genes which had Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1.5, suggesting that these genes are under positive selection. Candidate genes and alleles identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at identifying molecular markers for KPY and growth. PMID:24967893

  4. Identification of hydrolysable tannins in the reaction zone of Eucalyptus nitens wood by high performance liquid chromatography--electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barry, K M; Davies, N W; Mohammed, C L

    2001-01-01

    The first detailed analysis of the phenolic constituents of the reaction zones (tissue of antimicrobial defence) from the sapwood of a Eucalyptus spp. is presented. Plantation-grown Eucalyptus nitens trees with stem decay resulting from pruning wounds were sampled and extracts were prepared from healthy sapwood and from reaction zone tissue. Analysis by HPLC with ESI-MS revealed that a diverse range of hydrolysable tannins are present in both healthy sapwood and in reaction zone extracts, including over 30 gallotannins, ellagitannins and phenols. Eight tannins were unequivocally identified, including the gallotannins tri-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose, tetra-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose and penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose, and the ellagitannins pedunculagin, tellimagrandin I, casuarinin, casuarictin and tellimagrandin II. The phenols gallic acid, ellagic acid and catechin were also identified. The ellagitannins (particularly pedunculagin) are considerably more abundant in the reaction zone than in the healthy sapwood and may contribute to the effectiveness of the reaction zone as an antimicrobial barrier.

  5. [Characterization of growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Eucalyptus nitens seedlings].

    PubMed

    Angulo, Violeta C; Sanfuentes, Eugenio A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Sossa, Katherine E

    2014-01-01

    Rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria were isolated from the rizosphere and root tissue of Eucalyptus nitens. The objective of this work was to evaluate their capacity to promote growth in seedlings of the same species under greenhouse conditions. The isolates that improved seedling growth were identified and characterized by their capacity to produce indoleacetic acid (IAA), solubilize phosphates and increase 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. One hundred and five morphologically different strains were isolated, 15 of which promoted E. nitens seedling growth, significantly increasing the height (50%), root length (45%) as well as the aerial and root dry weight (142% and 135% respectively) of the plants. Bacteria belonged to the genus Arthrobacter, Lysinibacillus, Rahnella and Bacillus. Isolates A. phenanthrenivorans 21 and B. cereus 113 improved 3.15 times the emergence of E. nitens after 12 days, compared to control samples. Among isolated R. aquatilis, 78 showed the highest production of IAA (97.5±2.87 μg/ml) in the presence of tryptophan and the highest solubilizer index (2.4) for phosphorus, while B. amyloliquefaciens 60 isolate was positive for ACC deaminase activity. Our results reveal the potential of the studied rhizobacteria as promoters of emergence and seedling growth of E. nitens, and their possible use as PGPR inoculants, since they have more than one mechanism associated with plant growth promotion. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Physiology and anatomy of lenticel-like structures on leaves of Eucalyptus nitens and Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, Elizabeth; Gill, Warwick; Mohammed, Caroline

    2006-08-01

    Intumescences or abnormal, non-pathogenic, blister-like protuberant growths, form on Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and, to a much lesser extent, Eucalyptus nitens (Deane and Maiden) Maiden leaves when plants are grown in a high relative humidity environment. We examined the histology of intumescences and their effects on leaf photosynthetic processes. Intumescences were induced by placing E. globulus and E. nitens seedlings in a relative humidity of 80% in a greenhouse for 5 days. Symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves of plants with intumescence development were compared with leaves of control plants. Light-saturated carbon dioxide (CO(2)) assimilation (A(max)) and responses of CO(2) assimilation (A) to varying intercellular CO(2) partial pressure (C(i)) were measured. Symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf samples were fixed and sectioned and cellular structure was examined. Intumescences greatly reduced the photosynthetic capacity of E. globulus leaves and were associated with reduced electron transport rate and ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration capacity. Tissue necrotization and cellular collapse of the palisade mesophyll and deposition of phenolic compounds in the affected areas, probably reduced light penetration to photosynthesizing cells as well as reducing the amount of photosynthesizing tissue. Photosynthetic capacity of E. nitens was unaffected. The intumescences resembled simple lenticels, both morphologically and developmentally. To our knowledge, this is the first time that lenticel-like structures developed in response to environmental conditions have been described on leaves.

  7. Spectral characterization of eucalyptus wood.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Singurel, Ghita; Vasile, Cornelia; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S; Willfor, Stefan

    2007-11-01

    The main difficulties in wood and pulp analyses arise principally from their numerous components with different chemical structures. Therefore, the basic problem in a specific analytical procedure may be the selective separation of the main carbohydrate-derived components from lignin due to their chemical association and structural coexistence. The processing of the wood determines some structural modification in its components depending on the type of wood and the applied procedure. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry and X-ray diffraction have been applied to analyze Eucalyptus g. wood chips and unbleached and chlorite-bleached pulp. The differences between samples have been established by examination of the spectra of the fractions obtained by successive extraction (acetone extractives, acetone free extractive samples, hemicelluloses, and lignins) by evaluating the derivative spectra, band deconvolution, etc. The energy and the hydrogen bonding distance have been evaluated. The relationship between spectral characteristics and sample composition has been established, as well as the variation of the degree of crystallinity after pulping and bleaching. The integral absorption and lignin/carbohydrate ratios calculated from FT-IR spectra of the IR bands assigned to different bending or stretching in lignin groups are stronger in the spectrum of eucalyptus chips than those from brown stock (BS) pulp spectra because of the smaller total amount of lignin in the latter. FT-IR spectra clearly show that after chlorite bleaching the structure of the wood components is partially modified or removed. Along with FT-IR data, the X-ray results confirmed the low content of lignin in the pulp samples by increasing the calculated values of the crystalline parameters. It was concluded that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a quick method to differentiate Eucalyptus globulus samples.

  8. How do soil nutrients affect within-plant patterns of herbivory in seedlings of Eucalyptus nitens?

    PubMed

    Loney, Prue E; McArthur, Clare; Sanson, Gordon D; Davies, Noel W; Close, Dugald C; Jordan, Gregory J

    2006-12-01

    This study assessed how the palatability of leaves of different age classes (young, intermediate and older) of Eucalyptus nitens seedlings varied with plant nutrient status, based on captive feeding trials with two mammalian herbivores, red-bellied pademelons (Thylogale billardierii), and common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). Seedlings were grown under three nutrient treatments (low, medium and high), and we determined how palatability was related to chemical and physical characteristics of the leaves. Pademelons ate more older leaves than young and intermediate leaves for all treatments. This pattern was best explained by sideroxylonals (formylated phloroglucinol compounds known to deter herbivory by other marsupials), and/or essential oil compounds that were present in lower concentrations in older leaves. In the low-nutrient treatment, possums also ate more of the older leaves. However, in the medium- and high-nutrient treatments, possums ate more intermediate leaves than older leaves and showed a behavioural preference for young leaves (consuming younger leaves first) over intermediate and older leaves, in spite of high levels of sideroxylonals and essential oils. The young leaves did, however, have the highest nitrogen concentration of all the leaf age classes. Thus, either sideroxylonals and essential oils provided little or no deterrent to possums, or the deterrent was outweighed by other factors such as high nitrogen. This study indicates that mammalian herbivores show different levels of relative use and damage to leaf age classes at varying levels of plant nutrient status and, therefore, their impact on plant fitness may vary with environment.

  9. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Febé E.; Shuey, Louise S.; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K.; Myburg, Alexander A.; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  10. Repellent and Larvicidal Activity of the Essential Oil From Eucalyptus nitens Against Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Alvarez Costa, Agustín; Naspi, Cecilia V; Lucia, Alejandro; Masuh, Héctor M

    2017-05-01

    Dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever are important vector-borne diseases transmitted by female mosquitoes when they feed on humans. The use of repellents based on natural products is an alternative for personal protection against these diseases. Application of chemicals with larvicidal activity is another strategy for controlling the mosquito population. The repellent and larvicidal activities of the essential oil from Eucalyptus nitens were tested against Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, the main vectors of these arboviruses. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main components of Eucalyptus nitens essential oil were found to be terpenes such as 1,8-cineole and p-cymene, followed by β-triketones and alkyl esters. The repellent activity of the essential oil against both species was significantly higher when compared with the main component, 1,8-cineole, alone. These results indicate that the repellent effect of E. nitens is not due only to the main component, 1,8-cineole, but also that other compounds may be responsible. Aedes aegypti was found to be more tolerant to the essential oil larvicidal effects than Ae. albopictus (Ae. aegypti LC50 = 52.83 ppm, Ae. albopictus LC 50 = 28.19 ppm). The repellent and larvicidal activity could be associated to the presence of cyclic β-triketones such as flavesone, leptospermone, and isoleptospermone. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Modeling the effect of physiological responses to green pruning on net biomass production of Eucalyptus nitens.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, E. A.; Battaglia, M.; Beadle, C. L.; Sands, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Green pruning of Eucalyptus nitens (Deane and Maiden) Maiden increases instantaneous rates of light-saturated CO(2) assimilation (A), and changes patterns of total leaf area and foliage distribution. We investigated the importance of such changes on the rate of recovery of growth following pruning. A simple process-based model was developed to estimate daily net biomass production (G(d)) of three-year-old plantation-grown trees over a 20-month period. The trees had been pruned by removal of 0, 50 or 70% of the length of green crown, equivalent to removal of 0, 55 or 88% of leaf area, respectively, when the plantation verged on canopy closure. Total G(d) was reduced by only 20% immediately following the 50%-pruning treatment, as a result of both the high leaf dark respiration and low A in the portion of the crown removed compared to the top of the crown. Pruning at the time of canopy closure preempted a natural and rapid decline in G(d) of the lower crown. Although leaf area index (L) was approximately 6.0 at the time of pruning, high light interception (95%) occurred with an L of 4.0. The 50%-pruning treatment reduced L to 3.5, but the physiological responses to pruning were sufficient to compensate fully for the reduction in intercepted radiation within 110 days of pruning. The 70%-pruning treatment reduced L to 1.9, and reduced G(d) by 77%, reflecting the removal of branches with high A in the mid and upper crown. Physiological responses to the 70%-pruning treatment were insufficient to increase G(d) to the value of unpruned trees during the study. Model sensitivity analysis showed that increases in A following pruning increased G(d) by 20 and 25% in the 50- and 70%-pruned trees, respectively, 20 months after pruning. Changes in leaf area/foliage distribution had a greater effect on G(d) of 50%-pruned trees (47% increase) than did changes in A. However, the reduction in photosynthetic potential associated with the 70%-pruning treatment resulted in only small

  12. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Emily J.; Stovold, Grahame T.; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Grattapaglia, Dario G.; Dungey, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource

  13. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Emily J; Stovold, Grahame T; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Grattapaglia, Dario G; Dungey, Heidi S

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource

  14. Identification of quantitative trait loci influencing foliar concentrations of terpenes and formylated phloroglucinol compounds in Eucalyptus nitens.

    PubMed

    Henery, Martin L; Moran, Gavin F; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2007-01-01

    Leaves of eucalypt species contain a variety of plant secondary metabolites, including terpenoids and formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs). Both terpene and FPC concentrations are quantitative traits that can show large variation within a population and have been shown to be heritable. The molecular genetic basis of this variation is currently unknown. Progeny from a field trial of a three-generation mapping pedigree of Eucalyptus nitens were assayed for terpenes and FPCs. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses were conducted using a map constructed from 296 markers to locate regions of the genome influencing foliar concentrations of these plant secondary compounds. A large number of significant QTL for 14 traits were located across nine linkage groups, with significant clustering of QTL on linkage groups 7, 8 and 9. As expected, QTL for biosynthetically related compounds commonly colocated, but QTL for unrelated monterpenes and FPCs also mapped closely together. Colocation of these QTL with mapped candidate genes from the various biosynthetic pathways, and subsequent use of these genes in association mapping, will assist in determining the causes of variation in plant secondary metabolites in eucalypts.

  15. Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Dhamodaran, T K; Gnanaharan, R

    2007-08-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid and borax in the ratio 1:1.5 under different treatment schedules. It was found that E. grandis wood, even in green condition, could be pressure treated to desired chemical dry salt retention (DSR) and penetration levels using 6% BAE solution. Up to a thickness of 50mm, in order to achieve a DSR of 5 kg/m(3) boron compounds, the desired DSR level as per the Indian Standard for perishable timbers for indoor use, it was found that neither the moisture content of wood nor the treatment schedule posed any problem as far as the treatability of E. grandis wood was concerned.

  16. Acaricidal activity of the essential oils from Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus on larvae of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae) and Anocentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Clemente, Mateus Aparecido; de Oliveira Monteiro, Caio Márcio; Scoralik, Márcio Goldner; Gomes, Fernando Teixeira; de Azevedo Prata, Márcia Cristina; Daemon, Erik

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acaricidal activity of essential oils from Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus on non-engorged larvae of Amblyomma cajennense and Anocentor nitens. In order to carry out the study, six groups were formed, each concentration being a treatment (6.25%, 12.5%, 25%, and 50%, respectively) and also with the creation of a control group (distilled water) and a positive control (Deltametrine). For each treatment, approximately 100 larvae of these ticks were placed onto filter papers (2 x 2 cm) impregnated with the concentrations used to test. Next, the envelopes were closed bearing inside the filter paper with measurements of 6 x 6 cm. For each group, six repetitions were performed, and after 24 h live and dead larvae were counted. This procedure was carried out for two essential oils on the two species of ticks. For A. cajennense, the acaricide efficacy of E. citriodora oil was of 10.8%, 35.3%, 34.5%, and 53.1%, whereas the efficacy of C. nardus was of 0.0%, 0.0%, 0.0%, and 61.1% at concentrations of 6.25%, 12.5%, 25.0%, and 50.0%, respectively. In relation to A. nitens, the acaricide efficacy of E. citriodora oil was of 20.1%, 84.5%, 89.2%, and 100.0%, whereas the efficacy of C. nardus was of 0.0%, 90.8%, 100.0%, and 100.0% at concentrations of 6.25%, 12.5%, 25.0%, and 50.0%, respectively. The results indicate that the essential oils tested showed a promising acaricidal activity mainly on A. nitens larvae.

  17. Whole-tree transpiration and water-use partitioning between Eucalyptus nitens and Acacia dealbata weeds in a short-rotation plantation in northeastern Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Mark A.; Beadle, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    Whole-tree water use in 4- and 8-year-old plantations of Eucalyptus nitens Deane and Maiden (ex Maiden) in the presence and absence of Acacia dealbata Link. weeds was estimated by the heat pulse velocity technique during a six-week summer period. Maximum sap velocities were recorded between 5 and 15 mm under the cambium for both eucalypt and acacia trees, and marked radial and axial variations in sap velocity were observed. The latter source of variation was most pronounced in mixed stands where crowns were asymmetrical. Mean daily sap flux ranged from 1.4 to 103.6 l day(-1) for eucalypts and from < 0.1 to 8.4 l day(-1) for acacias. Stem diameter explained 98% of the variation in sapwood area for E. nitens and 89% for A. dealbata, and was determined to be a suitable parameter for scaling water use from the tree to stand level. Plot transpiration varied from 1.4 to 2.8 mm day(-1) in mixed 8-year-old plots and was 0.85 mm day(-1) in a mixed 4-year-old plot. The degree of A. dealbata infestation was associated with absolute plot water use and regression models predicted that, in the absence of acacia competition, plot water use for the 8-year-old stand would approach 5-6 mm day(-1) during the growing season.

  18. Measured and predicted changes in tree and stand water use following high-intensity thinning of an 8-year-old Eucalyptus nitens plantation.

    PubMed

    Medhurst, Jane L; Battaglia, Michael; Beadle, Christopher L

    2002-08-01

    We investigated changes in the pattern of water use of an 8-year-old Eucalyptus nitens (Deane and Maiden) Maiden plantation soon after thinning. Sap flow sensors using heat pulse technology were deployed across three stands thinned to a final density of 100, 250 or 600 trees ha-1 plus an unthinned control (1250 trees ha-1). Changes in the relationship between tree size and daily water use were measured for 4 to 7 months after thinning. Thinning had no effect on sapwood water content. The increase in tree water use as a result of thinning was driven largely by significant changes in the radial pattern of sap velocity through the sapwood. The use of a canopy fraction factor in the Penman-Monteith equation to account for discontinuous canopies showed promise as a simple and effective method of scaling the model to predict transpiration from thinned plantations.

  19. Transcript profiling of Eucalyptus xylem genes during tension wood formation.

    PubMed

    Paux, Etienne; Carocha, Víctor; Marques, Cristina; Mendes de Sousa, António; Borralho, Nuno; Sivadon, Pierre; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2005-07-01

    Tension wood formed in response to gravitational force is a striking example of the plasticity of angiosperm wood. In this study our goal was to characterize the early changes in gene expression during tension wood formation in Eucalyptus. Using cDNA array technology, transcript profiling of 231 genes preferentially expressed in differentiating Eucalyptus xylem was followed from 6 h to 1 wk of a tension time course of artificially bent Eucalyptus trees. 196 genes were differentially regulated between control and bent trees, some exhibiting distinctive expression patterns related to changes in secondary cell wall structure and composition. For instance, expression of a cellulose synthase gene was well correlated with the appearance of the G-layers. Cluster correlation analysis revealed differential regulation of lignin biosynthetic genes and may also be used to help infer the function of unknown gene products. Eucalyptus wood transcriptome analysis during tension wood formation not only provided new clues into the transcriptional regulatory network of genes preferentially expressed in xylem, but also highlighted candidate genes responsible for the genetic and environmentally induced variation of wood quality traits.

  20. Mechanical properties of acacia and eucalyptus wood chars

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Verma, B.B.; Gupta, R.C.

    1999-10-01

    In the present investigation the effects of carbonization conditions (temperature and heating rate) on the mechanical properties (such as crushing and impact strengths and shatter index) of acacia and eucalyptus wood chars have been determined. The crushing and impact strengths of both the acacia and eucalyptus wood chars (made by slow carbonization) decreased with increase of preparation temperature up to 600 C, followed by an increase thereafter. These wood chars showed a continuous increase in shatter index values with carbonization temperature. In contrast to slow carbonization (heating rate 4 C min{sup {minus}1}), rapid carbonization (heating rate 30 C min{sup {minus}1}) yielded chars of lower crushing strengths. Slowly carbonized eucalyptus wood gave chars of superior crushing and impact strengths than those produced from acacia wood under the same carbonization conditions. The crushing and impact strengths of these wood chars, in general, have shown an increase with increase in their apparent density. The crushing strength of cubic-shaped wood char decreased with increase in size.

  1. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of lipids from Eucalyptus globulus wood.

    PubMed

    González-Vila, F J; Bautista, J M; Gutiérrez, A; Del Rio, J C; González, A G

    2000-07-05

    Various typical lipid components of wood extractives have been isolated from Eucalyptus globulus wood by supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol. The influence of various extraction parameters on the yield and qualitative composition of the extracts have been studied. The extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared with those obtained by Soxhlet extraction with acetone, the standard method for the determination of wood extractives. The qualitative and quantitative results obtained by both methods were in good agreement. The experimental planning to asses the influence of pressure, temperature and percentage of methanol and their interactions on the extraction efficiency was carried out with a factorial design, followed by multiple linear regression algorithm.

  2. Genetic Variation in the Chemical Components of Eucalyptus globulus Wood

    PubMed Central

    Stackpole, Desmond J.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Alves, Ana; Rodrigues, José; Potts, Brad M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of lignin and other wood chemical components, there are few studies of the natural genetic variation that exists within plant species and its adaptive significance. We used models developed from near infra-red spectroscopy to study natural genetic variation in lignin content and monomer composition (syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio [S/G]) as well as cellulose and extractives content, using a 16-year-old field trial of an Australian tree species, Eucalyptus globulus. We sampled 2163 progenies of 467 native trees from throughout the native geographic range of the species. The narrow-sense heritability of wood chemical traits (0.25–0.44) was higher than that of growth (0.15), but less than wood density (0.51). All wood chemical traits exhibited significant broad-scale genetic differentiation (QST = 0.34–0.43) across the species range. This differentiation exceeded that detected with putatively neutral microsatellite markers (FST = 0.09), arguing that diversifying selection has shaped population differentiation in wood chemistry. There were significant genetic correlations among these wood chemical traits at the population and additive genetic levels. However, population differentiation in the S/G ratio of lignin in particular was positively correlated with latitude (R2 = 76%), which may be driven by either adaptation to climate or associated biotic factors. PMID:22384327

  3. Eucalyptus

    MedlinePlus

    Eucalyptus is a tree. The dried leaves and oil are used to make medicine. Though eucalyptus is used medicinally for many purposes, there ... odorata, Eucalyptus Oil, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus smithii, Fever Tree, Fieberbaumblatter, Gully Gum, Gully Gum Oil, Gum Tree, ...

  4. Wood CO2 efflux and foliar respiration for Eucalyptus in Hawaii and Brazil

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan; Molly A. Cavaleri; Auro C. Almeida; Ricardo Penchel; Randy S. Senock; Jose Luiz Stape

    2009-01-01

    We measured CO2 efflux from wood for Eucalyptus in Hawaii for 7 years and compared these measurements with those on three- and four-and-a-halfyear- old Eucalyptus in Brazil. In Hawaii, CO2 efflux from wood per unit biomass declined ~10x from age two to age five, twice as much as the decline in tree growth. The CO2 efflux from wood in Brazil was 8-10· lower than that...

  5. Study on antibacterial molecular drugs in Eucalyptus granlla wood extractives by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shengbo; Peng, Wanxi; Li, Dongli; Mo, Bo; Zhang, Minglong; Qin, Daochun

    2015-07-01

    Eucalyptus granlla, which was one of dominant plantations in south China, was deemed as the important wood bio resources. However, the small molecules of Eucalyptus granlla wood weren't effectively reused. Thus the molecules of wood extractives in Eucalyptus granlla were extracted and studied so as to further utilize the resources. The result suggested that the optimal extraction time of ethanol/methanol extraction, petroleum ether/acetic ether extraction, and benzene/alcohol extraction were 5h, 7h and 4h, respectively. The wood extractives included hexanedioic acid, bis (2-ethylhexyl) ester, 3,3,7,11-tetramethyltricyclo[5.4.0.0(4,11)] undecan-1-ol, squalene, etc. and wood extractives of Eucalyptus granlla was suitable for extraction of 1,5-hexadien-3-yne and squalene.

  6. Influence of carbonization conditions on the pyrolytic carbon deposition in acacia and eucalyptus wood chars

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.C.

    1997-04-01

    The amount of deposited pyrolytic carbon (resulting from the cracking of volatile matter) was found to depend on wood species and carbonization conditions, such as temperature and heating rate. Maximum pyrolytic carbon deposition in both the acacia and eucalyptus wood chars has been observed at a carbonization temperature of 800 C. Rapid carbonization (higher heating rate) of wood significantly reduces the amount of deposited pyrolytic carbon in resulting chars. Results also indicate that the amount of deposited pyrolytic carbon in acacia wood char is less than that in eucalyptus wood char.

  7. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working document I. The Florida Eucalyptus energy farm: silvicultural methods and considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    The silvicultural matrix within which the nation's first large scale wood energy plantation will develop is described in detail. The relevant literature reviewed is identified and distilled. The plantation history, site preparation, planting, species selection, maintenance and management, harvesting, and the Eucalyptus biomass production estimates are presented.

  8. Temperature effects on wood anatomy, wood density, photosynthesis and biomass partitioning of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D S; Montagu, K D; Conroy, J P

    2007-02-01

    Wood density, a gross measure of wood mass relative to wood volume, is important in our understanding of stem volume growth, carbon sequestration and leaf water supply. Disproportionate changes in the ratio of wood mass to volume may occur at the level of the whole stem or the individual cell. In general, there is a positive relationship between temperature and wood density of eucalypts, although this relationship has broken down in recent years with wood density decreasing as global temperatures have risen. To determine the anatomical causes of the effects of temperature on wood density, Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden seedlings were grown in controlled-environment cabinets at constant temperatures from 10 to 35 degrees C. The 20% increase in wood density of E. grandis seedlings grown at the higher temperatures was variously related to a 40% reduction in lumen area of xylem vessels, a 10% reduction in the lumen area of fiber cells and a 10% increase in fiber cell wall thickness. The changes in cell wall characteristics could be considered analogous to changes in carbon supply. Lumen area of fiber cells declined because of reduced fiber cell expansion and increased fiber cell wall thickening. Fiber cell wall thickness was positively related to canopy CO2 assimilation rate (Ac), which increased 26-fold because of a 24-fold increase in leaf area and a doubling in leaf CO2 assimilation rate from minima at 10 and 35 degrees C to maxima at 25 and 30 degrees C. Increased Ac increased seedling volume, biomass and wood density; but increased wood density was also related to a shift in partitioning of seedling biomass from roots to stems as temperature increased.

  9. Path analysis of the energy density of wood in eucalyptus clones.

    PubMed

    Couto, A M; Teodoro, P E; Trugilho, P F

    2017-03-16

    Path analysis has been used for establishing selection criteria in genetic breeding programs for several crops. However, it has not been used in eucalyptus breeding programs yet. In the present study, we aimed to identify the wood technology traits that could be used as the criteria for direct and indirect selection of eucalyptus genotypes with high energy density of wood. Twenty-four eucalyptus clones were evaluated in a completely randomized design with five replications. The following traits were assessed: basic wood density, total extractives, lignin content, ash content, nitrogen content, carbon content, hydrogen content, sulfur content, oxygen content, higher calorific power, holocellulose, and energy density. After verifying the variability of all evaluated traits among the clones, a two-dimensional correlation network was used to determine the phenotypic patterns among them. The obtained coefficient of determination (0.94) presented a higher magnitude in relation to the effect of the residual variable, and it served as an excellent model for explaining the genetic effects related to the variations observed in the energy density of wood in all eucalyptus clones. However, for future studies, we recommend evaluating other traits, especially the morphological traits, because of the greater ease in their measurement. Selecting clones with high basic density is the most promising strategy for eucalyptus breeding programs that aim to increase the energy density of wood because of its high heritability and magnitude of the cause-and-effect relationship with this trait.

  10. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  11. The Brazil Eucalyptus Potential Productivity Project: Influence of water, nutrients and stand uniformity on wood production

    Treesearch

    Jose Luiz Stape; Dan Binkley; Michael G. Ryan; Sebastiao Fonseca; Rodolfo A. Loos; Ernesto N. Takahashi; Claudio R. Silva; Sergio R. Silva; Rodrigo E. Hakamada; Jose Mario de A. Ferreira; Augusto M. N. Lima; Jose Luiz Gava; Fernado P. Leite; Helder B. Andrade; Jacyr M. Alves; Gualter G. C. Silva; Moises R. Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    We examined the potential growth of clonal Eucalyptus plantations at eight locations across a 1000+ km gradient in Brazil by manipulating the supplies of nutrients and water, and altering the uniformity of tree sizes within plots. With no fertilization or irrigation, mean annual increments of stem wood were about 28% lower (16.2 Mg...

  12. Managing for water-use efficient wood production in Eucalyptus globulus plantations

    Treesearch

    Donald A. White; John F. McGrath; Michael G. Ryan; Michael Battaglia; Daniel S. Mendham; Joe Kinal; Geoffrey M. Downes; D. Stuart Crombie; Mark E. Hunt

    2014-01-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that thinning and nitrogen fertiliser can increase the mass of wood produced per volume of water used (evapotranspiration) by plantations of Eucalyptus globulus. We have called this plantation water productivity (PWPWOOD) and argue that, for a given genotype, this term integrates the effects of management, site and climate on both...

  13. Moisture content of wood for interior use...Douglas-fir and robusta eucalyptus samples studied

    Treesearch

    R. Sidney Boone

    1967-01-01

    Panels of Douglas-fir and robusta eucalyptus blocks showed little seasonal variation in Equilibrium Moisture Content (EMC) of wood at 19 indoor locations on Oahu, Hawaii. Differences in EMC between locations were more variable. Minimum EMC at nonair-conditioned locations was 10 percent;at air-conditioned locations. 8 percent. Maximum EMC at nonairconditioned locations...

  14. Chemical composition changes in eucalyptus and pinus woods submitted to heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Brito, J O; Silva, F G; Leão, M M; Almeida, G

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of heat treatment on the chemical composition of Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis woods to understand its role in wood processing. E. saligna and P. caribaea var. hondurensis woods were treated in a laboratorial electric furnace at 120, 140, 160 and 180 degrees C to induce their heat treatment. The chemical composition of the resulting products and those from original wood were determined by gas chromatography. Eucalyptus and Pinus showed a significant reduction in arabinose, manose, galactose and xylose contents when submitted to increasing temperatures. No significant alteration in glucose content was observed. Lignin content, however, increased during the heat process. There was a significant reduction in extractive content for Eucalyptus. On the other hand, a slight increase in extractive content has been determined for the Pinus wood, and that only for the highest temperature. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in chemical constituents between softwoods and hardwoods. The results obtained in this study provide important information for future research and utilization of thermally modified wood.

  15. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment V. The Florida eucalyptus energy farm: environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    The overall environmental impact of the eucalyptus to methanol energy system in Florida is assessed. The environmental impacts associated with the following steps of the process are considered: (1) the greenhouse and laboratory; (2) the eucalyptus plantation; (3) transporting the mature logs; (4) the hammermill; and (5) the methanol synthesis plant. Next, the environmental effects of methanol as an undiluted motor fuel, methanol as a gasoline blend, and gasoline as motor fuels are compared. Finally, the environmental effects of the eucalypt gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to the coal liquefaction and conversion system.

  16. [Estimation of modulus of elasticity of Eucalyptus pellita wood by near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong-jun; Huo, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Li

    2009-09-01

    In the present study, the rapid prediction of wood modulus of elasticity (MOE) of Eucalyptus pellita by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is described. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and conventional mechanical testing methods were used to measure modulus of elasticity of small clear wood samples of Eucalyptus pellita. After collecting the near-infrared reflectance spectra of each sample from radial and tangential faces, the NIR spectra were preprocessed with the second-derivative methods, and regression models were built between 410 to 2 480 nm. The calibration models were established using two thirds of whole samples with the partial least squares method, and validation models were developed on an independent set (one third of whole samples). The analysis results showed that high correlation coefficients were obtained between the laboratory-determined MOE values and NIR prediction values of Eucalyptus pellita. The correlation coefficients of prediction model for MOE were 0.93 and 0.81, and RPD were 2.70 and 1.71. NIR analysis technique can realize the rapid prediction of the MOE of small clear wood samples of Eucalyptus pellita.

  17. Investigating the molecular underpinnings underlying morphology and changes in carbon partitioning during tension wood formation in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi, Eshchar; Maloney, Victoria J; Silberbauer, Janine; Hefer, Charles A; Berger, Dave K; Mansfield, Shawn D; Myburg, Alexander A

    2015-06-01

    Tension wood has distinct physical and chemical properties, including altered fibre properties, cell wall composition and ultrastructure. It serves as a good system for investigating the genetic regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis and wood formation. The reference genome sequence for Eucalyptus grandis allows investigation of the global transcriptional reprogramming that accompanies tension wood formation in this global wood fibre crop. We report the first comprehensive analysis of physicochemical wood property changes in tension wood of Eucalyptus measured in a hybrid (E. grandis × Eucalyptus urophylla) clone, as well as genome-wide gene expression changes in xylem tissues 3 wk post-induction using RNA sequencing. We found that Eucalyptus tension wood in field-grown trees is characterized by an increase in cellulose, a reduction in lignin, xylose and mannose, and a marked increase in galactose. Gene expression profiling in tension wood-forming tissue showed corresponding down-regulation of monolignol biosynthetic genes, and differential expression of several carbohydrate active enzymes. We conclude that alterations of cell wall traits induced by tension wood formation in Eucalyptus are a consequence of a combination of down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis and hemicellulose remodelling, rather than the often proposed up-regulation of the cellulose biosynthetic pathway. © 2014 University of Pretoria New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Wood CO(2) efflux and foliar respiration for Eucalyptus in Hawaii and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael G; Cavaleri, Molly A; Almeida, Auro C; Penchel, Ricardo; Senock, Randy S; Luiz Stape, José

    2009-10-01

    We measured CO(2) efflux from wood for Eucalyptus in Hawaii for 7 years and compared these measurements with those on three- and four-and-a-half-year-old Eucalyptus in Brazil. In Hawaii, CO(2) efflux from wood per unit biomass declined approximately 10x from age two to age five, twice as much as the decline in tree growth. The CO(2) efflux from wood in Brazil was 8-10x lower than that for comparable Hawaii trees with similar growth rates. Growth and maintenance respiration coefficients calculated from Hawaii wood CO(2) efflux declined with tree age and size (the growth coefficient declined from 0.4 mol C efflux mol C(-1) wood growth at age one to 0.1 mol C efflux mol C(-1) wood growth at age six; the maintenance coefficient from 0.006 to 0.001 micromol C (mol C biomass)(-1) s(-1) at 20 degrees C over the same time period). These results suggest interference with CO(2) efflux through bark that decouples CO(2) efflux from respiration. We also compared the biomass fractions and wood CO(2) efflux for the aboveground woody parts for 3- and 7-year-old trees in Hawaii to estimate how focusing measurements near the ground might bias the stand-level estimates of wood CO(2) efflux. Three-year-old Eucalyptus in Hawaii had a higher proportion of branches < 0.5 cm in diameter and a lower proportion of stem biomass than did 7-year-old trees. Biomass-specific CO(2) efflux measured at 1.4 m extrapolated to the tree could bias tree level estimates by approximately 50%, assuming no refixation from bark photosynthesis. However, the bias did not differ for the two tree sizes. Foliar respiration was identical per unit nitrogen for comparable treatments in Brazil and Hawaii (4.2 micromol C mol N(-1) s(-1) at 20 degrees C).

  19. Pectin Methylesterase Genes Influence Solid Wood Properties of Eucalyptus pilularis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Timothy R.; Henry, Robert J.; Harwood, Chris E.; Thomas, Dane S.; McManus, Luke J.; Raymond, Carolyn; Henson, Michael; Shepherd, Mervyn

    2012-01-01

    This association study of Eucalyptus pilularis populations provides empirical evidence for the role of Pectin Methylesterase (PME) in influencing solid wood characteristics of Eucalyptus. PME6 was primarily associated with the shrinkage and collapse of drying timber, which are phenotypic traits consistent with the role of pectin as a hydrophilic polysaccharide. PME7 was primarily associated with cellulose and pulp yield traits and had an inverse correlation with lignin content. Selection of specific alleles in these genes may be important for improving trees as sources of high-quality wood products. A heterozygote advantage was postulated for the PME7 loci and, in combination with haplotype blocks, may explain the absence of a homozygous class at all single-nucleotide polymorphisms investigated in this gene. PMID:22052017

  20. Comprehensive genetic dissection of wood properties in a widely-grown tropical tree: Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus is an important genus in industrial plantations throughout the world and is grown for use as timber, pulp, paper and charcoal. Several breeding programmes have been launched worldwide to concomitantly improve growth performance and wood properties (WPs). In this study, an interspecific cross between Eucalyptus urophylla and E. grandis was used to identify major genomic regions (Quantitative Trait Loci, QTL) controlling the variability of WPs. Results Linkage maps were generated for both parent species. A total of 117 QTLs were detected for a series of wood and end-use related traits, including chemical, technological, physical, mechanical and anatomical properties. The QTLs were mainly clustered into five linkage groups. In terms of distribution of QTL effects, our result agrees with the typical L-shape reported in most QTL studies, i.e. most WP QTLs had limited effects and only a few (13) had major effects (phenotypic variance explained > 15%). The co-locations of QTLs for different WPs as well as QTLs and candidate genes are discussed in terms of phenotypic correlations between traits, and of the function of the candidate genes. The major wood property QTL harbours a gene encoding a Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR), a structural enzyme of the monolignol-specific biosynthesis pathway. Conclusions Given the number of traits analysed, this study provides a comprehensive understanding of the genetic architecture of wood properties in this Eucalyptus full-sib pedigree. At the dawn of Eucalyptus genome sequence, it will provide a framework to identify the nature of genes underlying these important quantitative traits. PMID:21651758

  1. Determination of Thermal Properties and Morphology of Eucalyptus Wood Residue Filled High Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Kabakci, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of eucalyptus wood residue (EWR) filled recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites have been measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Morphology of the materials was also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Addition of the EWR into the recycled HDPE matrix reduced the starting of degradation temperature. EWR filled recycled HDPE had two main decomposition peaks, one for EWR around 350 °C and one for recycled HDPE around 460 °C. Addition of EWR did not affect the melting temperature of the recycled HDPE. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between wood residue and recycled HDPE. PMID:19325736

  2. Fungal Degradation of Lipophilic Extractives in Eucalyptus globulus Wood

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ana; del Río, José C.; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T.

    1999-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation of eucalypt wood with several fungal strains was investigated as a possible biological pretreatment for decreasing the content of compounds responsible for pitch deposition during Cl2-free manufacture of paper pulp. First, different pitch deposits were characterized by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The chemical species identified arose from lipophilic wood extractives that survived the pulping and bleaching processes. Second, a detailed GC-MS analysis of the lipophilic fraction after fungal treatment of wood was carried out, and different degradation patterns were observed. The results showed that some basidiomycetes that decreased the lipophilic fraction also released significant amounts of polar extractives, which were identified by thermochemolysis as originating from lignin depolymerization. Therefore, the abilities of fungi to control pitch should be evaluated after analysis of compounds involved in deposit formation and not simply by estimating the decrease in the total extractive content. In this way, Phlebia radiata, Funalia trogii, Bjerkandera adusta, and Poria subvermispora strains were identified as the most promising organisms for pitch biocontrol, since they degraded 75 to 100% of both free and esterified sterols, as well as other lipophilic components of the eucalypt wood extractives. Ophiostoma piliferum, a fungus used commercially for pitch control, hydrolyzed the sterol esters and triglycerides, but it did not appear to be suitable for eucalypt wood treatment because it increased the content of free sitosterol, a major compound in pitch deposits. PMID:10103223

  3. Decontamination of CCA-treated eucalyptus wood waste by acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, Suzana Frighetto; dos Santos, Heldiane Souza; Miranda, Luciana Gampert; Azevedo, Carla Maria Nunes; Maia, Sandra Maria; Pires, Marçal

    2016-03-01

    Preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) are used to increase the resistance of wood to deterioration. The components of CCA are highly toxic, resulting in growing concern over the disposal of the waste generated. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of Cu, Cr and As present in CCA-treated eucalyptus wood from utility poles removed from service in southern Brazil, in order to render them non-hazardous waste. The removal was carried out by acid leaching in bench-scale and applying optimal extractor concentration, total solid content, reactor volume, temperature and reaction time obtained by factorial experiments. The best working conditions were achieved using three extraction steps with 0.1 mol L(-1) H2SO4 at 75°C for 2h each (total solid content of 15%), and 3 additional 1h-long washing steps using water at ambient temperature. Under these conditions, removal of 97%, 85% and 98% were obtained for Cu, Cr and As, respectively, rendering the decontaminated wood non-hazardous waste. The wastewater produced by extraction showed acid pH, high organic loading as well as high concentrations of the elements, needing prior treatment to be discarded. However, rinsing water can be recycled in the extraction process without compromising its efficiency. The acid extraction is a promising alternative for CCA removal from eucalyptus wood waste in industrial scale.

  4. More wood of better quality through intensive silviculture with rapid-growth improved Brazilian eucalyptus

    SciTech Connect

    Campinhos, E. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    The early forests planted using Brazilian Eucalyptus seeds produced great variability in the volume of wood. In the specific case of E. saligna, the species was unable to adapt itself to the local ecological system. It was obvious that a new silviculture technique should be developed and also that new species and provenances, capable of adapting to the region, should be identified. The objective was to improve wood volume yields as well as to produce better pulp quality. The research and development work has been more successful than anticipated, mainly because a new technique of rooting cuttings which allows propagation of vigorous parent trees, including hybrids, was developed. The production of improved seeds has also been developed. A good genetic base has been established to guarantee continuous improvement for production of seedlings to be used in routine plantings. The first results have already shown good gains in volume, wood density, cellulose content, and resistance to disease.

  5. Controlling the release of wood extractives into water bodies by selecting suitable eucalyptus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilulya, K. F.; Msagati, T. A. M.; Mamba, B. B.; Ngila, J. C.; Bush, T.

    Pulping industries are increasing worldwide as a result of the increase in the demand for pulp for cellulose derivatives and paper manufacturing. Due to the activities involved in pulping processes, different chemicals from raw materials (wood) and bleaching agents are released in pulp-mill effluent streams discharged into the environment and find their way into water bodies. Large quantities of water and chemicals used in pulping result in large amounts of wastewater with high concentrations of extractives such as unsaturated fatty acids, which are known to be toxic, and plant sterols which affect the development, growth and reproduction of aquatic organisms. This study was aimed at assessing the composition of extractives in two eucalyptus species used for pulp production in South Africa, in order to identify the suitable species with regard to extractive content. Samples from two eucalyptus plant species (Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus dunnii) were collected from three sites and analysed for extractives by first extracting with water, followed by Soxhlet extraction using acetone. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Major classes of extractives identified were fatty acids (mainly hexadecanoic acid, 9,12-octadecadienoic, 9-octadecenoic and octadecanoic acids) and sterols (mainly β-sitosterol and stigmastanol). E. dunnii was found to contain higher amounts of the compounds compared to those found in E. grandis in all sampled sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and explained 92.9% of the total variation using three principal components. It was revealed that the percentage of fatty acids, which has a negative influence on both principal components 2 and 3, was responsible for the difference between the species. E. grandis, which was found to contain low amounts of extractives, was therefore found suitable for pulping with regard to minimal water usage and environment pollution.

  6. Lignin isolated from steam-exploded eucalyptus wood chips by phase separation and its affinity to Trichoderma reesei cellulase.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ai; Funaoka, Masamitsu

    2013-07-01

    Steam-exploded eucalyptus wood chips were treated with p-cresol and 72% sulfuric acid at ambient temperature. Steam-exploded lignin was isolated as acetone-soluble and diethyl ether-insoluble compounds from the cresol layer. The lignin extraction yield was only 47%, and the amount of cresol grafted to lignin was much less than that in the case of eucalyptus lignin without steam explosion. Clearly, the steam explosion process depolymerized native lignin, and simultaneously, promoted polymerization via labile benzyl positions. The steam-exploded eucalyptus lignin adsorbed more Trichoderma reesei cellulase; however, its enzymatic activity was less than that of eucalyptus lignin that did not undergo steam explosion. It is evident that pretreatment potentially affects the affinity between lignin and cellulase and the resultant saccharification efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional Profiles of Hybrid Eucalyptus Genotypes with Contrasting Lignin Content Reveal That Monolignol Biosynthesis-related Genes Regulate Wood Composition

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Tomotaka; Iwata, Eiji; Nakahama, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Yujiroh; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nanto, Kazuya; Rosa, Antonio C.; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected 3-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis) genotypes (AM063 and AM380) that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0 and 48.2%, α-cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA) and sucrose synthase (SUSY) were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis-related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL). Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF, and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents in Eucalyptus plants. PMID

  8. Fertilization using sewage sludge in unfertile tropical soils increased wood production in Eucalyptus plantations.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Junior, Cassio Hamilton; Firme, Lucia Pitol; Maldonado, Carlos Alberto Baca; de Moraes Neto, Sebastião Pires; Alves, Marcelo Corrêa; Muraoka, Takashi; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Gava, José Luís; He, Zhenli; Nogueira, Thiago Assis Rodrigues; Capra, Gian Franco

    2017-12-01

    Fertilization of Eucalyptus plantations using sewage sludge on unfertile tropical soils represents an alternative to using mineral N and P fertilizers. A 44-month field experiment was conducted to study the effects of increasing application of sludge, and its interactions with mineral N and P fertilizers, on wood volume. Four rates of sludge (0, 8, 15 and 23 Mg ha(-1), dry base), N (0, 47, 95 and 142 kg ha(-1)) and P (0, 28, 56 and 84 kg ha(-1) of P2O5) were combined in a 4 × 4 × 4 factorial scheme in a totally randomized block design. Response surface and age-shift modeling was used to establish an initial recommendation for mineral fertilization of the Eucalyptus plantations treated with sludge and to analyze the implications of increased growth on the duration of the forest cycle in a tropical climate. The results showed that from 8 to 44 months after planting, the sludge application (with or without N and P) yielded a statistically larger wood volume (P < 0.05), compared to application of N and P fertilizers only. The response surface modeling showed the following outcomes: i) application of sludge based on N criterion reduced the need for N and P fertilizers by 100%; and ii) an increase in wood volume by 7% could be achieved, compared to NPK fertilizers only, if 2/3 of the recommended P was applied. The cultivation time to produce 150 m(3) ha(-1) of wood volume was 45 months for the control and was reduced by two, three, four, or five months, respectively, through application of recommended P, sludge dose, sludge plus one third of P, and sludge plus two thirds of P. On the whole, sewage sludge could represent an excellent unconventional N and P fertilizer source for wood production on unfertile tropical soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lignin changes after steam explosion and laccase-mediator treatment of eucalyptus wood chips.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sampedro, Raquel; Capanema, Ewellyn A; Hoeger, Ingrid; Villar, Juan C; Rojas, Orlando J

    2011-08-24

    Eucalyptus globulus chips were steam exploded followed by treatment with a laccase-mediator system (LMS) under different experimental conditions. Removal of hemicelluloses and, to a lesser extent, lignin was observed. Thermogravimetic analyses of whole meal obtained from chips before and after steam explosion indicated an increase in lignin degradation temperature due to lignin condensation. In contrast, application of LMS treatment caused a reduction in lignin and polysaccharide degradation temperatures. Lignins were isolated from wood samples before and after each treatment and analyzed by 2D NMR and (13)C NMR. An increase in carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups and a significant decrease in β-O-4 structures were found in steam-exploded samples. The most relevant changes observed after laccase treatment were increased secondary OH and degree of condensation.

  10. Effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on properties of bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng; Zhao, Zengli; Zheng, Anqing; Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Zhen; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Eucalyptus wood powder was first subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment in a high-pressure reactor at 160-190°C, and subsequently fast pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor at 500°C to obtain high quality bio-oil. This study focused on investigating effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on bio-oil properties. Hemicellulose and some metals were effectively removed from eucalyptus wood, while cellulose content was enhanced. No significant charring and carbonization of constituents was observed during hydrothermal pretreatment. Thus pretreated eucalyptus wood gave higher bio-oil yield than original eucalyptus wood. Chemical composition of bio-oil was examined by GC/MS and (13)C NMR analyses. Bio-oil produced from pretreated eucalyptus wood exhibited lower contents of ketones and acids, while much higher levoglucosan content than bio-oil produced from original eucalyptus wood, which would help to improve thermal stability of bio-oil and extract levoglucosan from bio-oil. Hydrothermal pretreatment also improved bio-oil fuel quality through lowering water content and enhancing heating value.

  11. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment IV. Health and safety aspects of the eucalypt biomass to methanol energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    The basic eucalyptus-to-methanol energy process is described and possible health and safety risks are identified at all steps of the process. The toxicology and treatment for exposure to these substances are described and mitigating measures are proposed. The health and safety impacts and risks of the wood gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to those of the coal liquefaction and conversion system. The scope of this report includes the health and safety risks of workers (1) in the laboratory and greenhouse, where eucalyptus seedlings are developed, (2) at the biomass plantation, where these seedlings are planted and mature trees harvested, (3) transporting these logs and chips to the refinery, (4) in the hammermill, where the logs and chips will be reduced to small particles, (5) in the methanol synthesis plant, where the wood particles will be converted to methanol, and (6) transporting and dispensing the methanol. Finally, the health and safety risks of consumers using methanol is discussed.

  12. [Microfibril angle prediction of Eucalyptus pellita wood samples based on radial and tangential section by near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong-jun; Zhang, Li; Huo, Xiao-mei; Ren, Hai-qing

    2010-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) technique was applied to predict wood microfibril angle (MFA) of eucalyptus pellita in radial/tangential section. The MFA of small clear increment core samples were measured by X-ray diffractometry. After collecting the near infrared reflectance spectra of each sample, the NIR spectra were preprocessed with the second-derivative and the regression models were built for certain spectra. The calibration models were established using at least 159 samples with the partial least squares method and validated with full cross validation method. The results showed that high correlation coefficients were obtained between the laboratory-determined data and NIR fitted data. The finding suggests that an NIR instrument could be calibrated to estimate the limited MFA range of the increment core samples of eucalyptus pellita in radial/tangential section rapidly. Further work is required using different species wood sample sets that display a wide range of MFA variation.

  13. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 9. Economics of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    A detailed feasibility study of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida encompasses all phases of production - from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The project includes the following components: (1) production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; (2) establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; and (3) engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-year methanol production facility. In addition, the potential environmental impacts of the whole project were examined, safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol were analyzed, and site specific cost estimates were made. The economics of the project are presented here. Each of the three major components of the project - tissue culture lab, energy plantation, and methanol refinery - are examined individually. In each case a site specific analysis of the potential return on investment was conducted.

  14. Phenol adsorption onto powdered and granular activated carbon, prepared from Eucalyptus wood.

    PubMed

    Tancredi, Nestor; Medero, Natalia; Möller, Fabiana; Píriz, Javier; Plada, Carina; Cordero, Tomás

    2004-11-15

    Eucalyptus grandis sawdust, a major waste from the growing Uruguayan wood industry, was used in previous work to prepare powdered activated carbon (PAC). In the present work, granular activated carbon (GAC) was prepared by mixing PAC, carboxymethyl cellulose as a binder, and kaolin as reinforcer. Ultimate analysis and surface characterization of GAC and PAC were performed. Phenol adsorption was used as a way to compare the characteristics of different PAC and GAC preparations. Kinetics and isotherms of the different GAC and PAC were performed in a shaking bath at 100 rpm and 298 K. Phenol concentrations were determined by UV spectroscopy. Some kinetics parameters were calculated; from kinetics results, external resistance to mass transfer from the bulk liquid can be neglected as the controlling step. Isotherms were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models, and corresponding parameters were determined. Maximum phenol uptakes for all carbons were determined and correlated with carbon characteristics. Thermogravimertic analysis (TGA) determinations were performed in order to study adsorption characteristics and conditions for GAC regeneration after its use. The results showed that phenol is preferentially physisorbed on the carbon of the granules, though some chemisorption was detected. No adsorption was detected in the kaolin-carboxymethyl cellulose mixture.

  15. Characterization of Cellulose regenerated from solutions of pine and eucalyptus woods in 1-allyl-3-methilimidazolium chloride.

    PubMed

    Casas, A; Alonso, M V; Oliet, M; Santos, T M; Rodriguez, F

    2013-02-15

    Cellulose is currently separated from lignocellulosic materials using non-environmentally friendly processes. The development of new methods for treating biomass and separating cellulose remains a challenge and would be very useful in the context of the biorefinery philosophy. In this work, cellulose has been regenerated from solutions of Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus woods in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Wood dissolution was performed in a microwave oven at 120 °C for 20 min. Cellulose was characterized and compared to the reference material, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Regenerated celluloses showed lower crystallinity and thermal stability than MCC, although the ash contents at 400 °C were higher than in MCC. The regenerated celluloses were obtained without lignin and almost free from hemicellulose. Furthermore, cellulose was not significantly degraded in the dissolution process of both woods. The insoluble solids showed higher content of lignin and hemicellulose than the raw materials.

  16. Genetic dissection of growth, wood basic density and gene expression in interspecific backcrosses of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background F1 hybrid clones of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla are widely grown for pulp and paper production in tropical and subtropical regions. Volume growth and wood quality are priority objectives in Eucalyptus tree improvement. The molecular basis of quantitative variation and trait expression in eucalypt hybrids, however, remains largely unknown. The recent availability of a draft genome sequence (http://www.phytozome.net) and genome-wide genotyping platforms, combined with high levels of genetic variation and high linkage disequilibrium in hybrid crosses, greatly facilitate the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) as well as underlying candidate genes for growth and wood property traits. In this study, we used Diversity Arrays Technology markers to assess the genetic architecture of volume growth (diameter at breast height, DBH) and wood basic density in four-year-old progeny of an interspecific backcross pedigree of E. grandis and E. urophylla. In addition, we used Illumina RNA-Seq expression profiling in the E. urophylla backcross family to identify cis- and trans-acting polymorphisms (eQTLs) affecting transcript abundance of genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density. Results A total of five QTLs for DBH and 12 for wood basic density were identified in the two backcross families. Individual QTLs for DBH and wood basic density explained 3.1 to 12.2% of phenotypic variation. Candidate genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density on linkage groups 8 and 9 were found to share trans-acting eQTLs located on linkage groups 4 and 10, which in turn coincided with QTLs for wood basic density suggesting that these QTLs represent segregating components of an underlying transcriptional network. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of the use of next-generation expression profiling to quantify transcript abundance in a segregating tree population and identify candidate genes potentially affecting wood property variation. The QTLs identified in this

  17. Evaluation of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of liquid products from pyrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A S; Bayona, J M; García, M T; Solanas, A M

    2000-02-01

    Slow pyrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis wood was performed in an oven laboratory, and smoke was trapped and condensed to yield liquid products. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenolic fractions were isolated from the former liquid products using adsorption column chromatography (ACC) and identified by GC/MS. Concentrations of PAH and phenolic fractions in total pyrolysis liquids were respectively 48.9 microg/g and 8.59% (w/w). Acute toxicity of total samples of pyrolysis liquids and the phenolic fraction was evaluated by means of two bioassays, namely, 24-h immobilization bioassay with Daphnia magna and Microtox bioassays, the latter employing the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum. Total pyrolysis liquids and the PAH fraction were evaluated for genotoxicity by the Microtox bioassay conducted using rehydrated freeze-dried dark mutant of the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fisheri strain M169. Total pyrolysis liquids and the phenolic fraction, respectively, in concentrations of 170 and 68 mg/L were able to immobilize 50% (EC(50)) of the D. magna population following 24-h exposure. Concentrations of 19 and 6 mg/L, respectively, for total pyrolysis liquids and phenolic fraction were the effective concentrations that resulted in a 50% (EC(50)) reduction in light produced by bacteria in the Microtox bioassay. Accordingly, the Microtox bioassay was more sensitive to toxic effects of both kind of samples than the D. magna bioassay, particularly for the phenolic fraction. Regarding to the genotoxicity evaluation, the results achieved by Microtox bioassay showed that total pyrolysis liquids had no genotoxic effects with and without exogenous metabolic activation using rat liver homogenate (S9). However, the PAH fraction showed toxic effects with rat liver activation and had a dose-response number (DRN) equal to 1.6, being in this way suspected genotoxic. The lowest detected concentration (LDC) of the PAH fraction able to cause genotoxic effects was 375

  18. Comparative interrogation of the developing xylem transcriptomes of two wood-forming species: Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2015-06-01

    Wood formation is a complex developmental process governed by genetic and environmental stimuli. Populus and Eucalyptus are fast-growing, high-yielding tree genera that represent ecologically and economically important species suitable for generating significant lignocellulosic biomass. Comparative analysis of the developing xylem and leaf transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis together with phylogenetic analyses identified clusters of homologous genes preferentially expressed during xylem formation in both species. A conserved set of 336 single gene pairs showed highly similar xylem preferential expression patterns, as well as evidence of high functional constraint. Individual members of multi-gene orthologous clusters known to be involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis also showed conserved xylem expression profiles. However, species-specific expression as well as opposite (xylem versus leaf) expression patterns observed for a subset of genes suggest subtle differences in the transcriptional regulation important for xylem development in each species. Using sequence similarity and gene expression status, we identified functional homologs likely to be involved in xylem developmental and biosynthetic processes in Populus and Eucalyptus. Our study suggests that, while genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis show high levels of gene expression conservation, differential regulation of some xylem development genes may give rise to unique xylem properties.

  19. Eucalyptus hairy roots, a fast, efficient and versatile tool to explore function and expression of genes involved in wood formation.

    PubMed

    Plasencia, Anna; Soler, Marçal; Dupas, Annabelle; Ladouce, Nathalie; Silva-Martins, Guilherme; Martinez, Yves; Lapierre, Catherine; Franche, Claudine; Truchet, Isabelle; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Eucalyptus are of tremendous economic importance being the most planted hardwoods worldwide for pulp and paper, timber and bioenergy. The recent release of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence pointed out many new candidate genes potentially involved in secondary growth, wood formation or lineage-specific biosynthetic pathways. Their functional characterization is, however, hindered by the tedious, time-consuming and inefficient transformation systems available hitherto for eucalypts. To overcome this limitation, we developed a fast, reliable and efficient protocol to obtain and easily detect co-transformed E. grandis hairy roots using fluorescent markers, with an average efficiency of 62%. We set up conditions both to cultivate excised roots in vitro and to harden composite plants and verified that hairy root morphology and vascular system anatomy were similar to wild-type ones. We further demonstrated that co-transformed hairy roots are suitable for medium-throughput functional studies enabling, for instance, protein subcellular localization, gene expression patterns through RT-qPCR and promoter expression, as well as the modulation of endogenous gene expression. Down-regulation of the Eucalyptus cinnamoyl-CoA reductase1 (EgCCR1) gene, encoding a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, led to transgenic roots with reduced lignin levels and thinner cell walls. This gene was used as a proof of concept to demonstrate that the function of genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis and wood formation can be elucidated in transgenic hairy roots using histochemical, transcriptomic and biochemical approaches. The method described here is timely because it will accelerate gene mining of the genome for both basic research and industry purposes.

  20. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  1. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry applied to the identification of valuable phenolic compounds from Eucalyptus wood.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sónia A O; Vilela, Carla; Freire, Carmen S R; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D

    2013-11-01

    Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) was applied for the first time in the analysis of wood extracts. The potential of this technique coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry in the rapid and effective detection and identification of bioactive components in complex vegetal samples was demonstrated. Several dozens of compounds were detected in less than 30min of analysis time, corresponding to more than 3-fold reduction in time, when compared to conventional HPLC analysis of similar extracts. The phenolic chemical composition of Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus urograndis (E. grandis×E. urophylla) and Eucalyptus maidenii wood extracts was assessed for the first time, with the identification of 51 phenolic compounds in the three wood extracts. Twenty of these compounds are reported for the first time as Eucalyptus genus components. Ellagic acid and ellagic acid-pentoside are the major components in all extracts, followed by gallic and quinic acids in E. grandis and E. urograndis and ellagic acid-pentoside isomer, isorhamnetin-hexoside and gallic acid in E. maidenii. The antioxidant scavenging activity of the extracts was evaluated, with E. grandis wood extract showing the lowest IC50 value. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of these extracts was higher than that of the commercial antioxidant BHT and of those of the corresponding bark extracts. These results, together with the phenolic content values, open good perspectives for the exploitation of these renewable resources as a source of valuable phenolic compounds.

  2. Pretreatment of eucalyptus wood chips for enzymatic saccharification using combined sulfuric acid-free ethanol cooking and ball milling.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Noriko; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A combined sulfuric acid-free ethanol cooking and pulverization process was developed in order to achieve the complete saccharification of the cellulosic component of woody biomass, thereby avoiding the problems associated with the use of strong acid catalysts. Eucalyptus wood chips were used as a raw material and exposed to an ethanol/water/acetic acid mixed solvent in an autoclave. This process can cause the fibrillation of wood chips. During the process, the production of furfural due to an excessive degradation of polysaccharide components was extremely low and delignification was insignificant. Therefore, the cooking process is regarded not as a delignification but as an activation of the original wood. Subsequently, the activated solid products were pulverized by ball-milling in order to improve their enzymatic digestibility. Enzymatic hydrolysis experiments demonstrated that the conversion of the cellulosic components into glucose attained 100% under optimal conditions. Wide-angle X-ray diffractometry and particle size distribution analysis revealed that the scale affecting the improvement of enzymatic digestibility ranged from 10 nm to 1 microm. Field emission scanning electron microscopy depicted that the sulfuric acid-free ethanol cooking induced a pore formation by the removal of part of the lignin and hemicellulose fractions in the size range from a few of tens nanometers to several hundred nanometers.

  3. Bark and leaf chlorophyll fluorescence are linked to wood structural changes in Eucalyptus saligna

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Denise; Tausz, Michael; Moore, Gregory; Nicolas, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Wood structure and wood anatomy are usually considered to be largely independent of the physiological processes that govern tree growth. This paper reports a statistical relationship between leaf and bark chlorophyll fluorescence and wood density. A relationship between leaf and bark chlorophyll fluorescence and the quantity of wood decay in a tree is also described. There was a statistically significant relationship between the leaf chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and wood density and the quantity of wood decay in summer, but not in spring or autumn. Leaf chlorophyll fluorescence at 0.05 ms (the O step) could predict the quantity of wood decay in trees in spring. Bark chlorophyll fluorescence could predict wood density in spring using the Fv/Fm parameter, but not in summer or autumn. There was a consistent statistical relationship in spring, summer and autumn between the bark chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and wood decay. This study indicates a relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence and wood structural changes, particularly with bark chlorenchyma. PMID:24790120

  4. The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein family of Eucalyptus grandis contains members that impact wood biology and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Colleen P; Taylor, Lynette; Bi, Yingdong; Southerton, Simon G; Evans, Rob; Spokevicius, Antanas

    2015-06-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein (FLA) families have been identified and characterised in key plant species, with some members exhibiting functional specialization. Here we identify the FLA family of Eucalyptus grandis, and investigate the roles of three single-FAS domain FLAs, with particular focus on secondary cell-wall formation and wood properties. We use various in-silico approaches to identify and characterise E. grandis genome FLAs, and perform phylogenetic comparisons with other species. For three key FLAs, we perform functional testing including promoter-reporter and overexpression transgenic approaches using eucalypts, poplar and tobacco. Of the 18 eucalypt FLAs identified, several were specifically and highly expressed in stems. The specificity to stem xylem vessel and fibre development was demonstrated with EniFLA1promoter:GUS studies in several species. Testing of select eucalypt FLAs resulted in altered wood development and properties, for example 35S:EgrFLA2 led to a 3 degree reduction in cellulose microfibril angle in eucalypt xylem fibres, and 35S:EgrFLA3 to a reduction in tobacco stem flexural strength. These results indicate that the eucalypt FLA family contains diverse members, and particular members with single FAS domains that are functionally specialized for secondary cell wall growth and properties. © 2015 CSIRO. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Production of carotenoids by phaffia rhodozyma growing on media made from hemicellulosic hydrolysates of eucalyptus globulus wood

    PubMed

    Parajo; Santos; Vazquez

    1998-08-20

    Phaffia rhodozyma NRRL Y-17268 cells were proliferated in xylose-containing media made from Eucalyptus wood. Wood samples were subjected to acid hydrolysis under mild operational conditions, and hydrolysates were neutralized with lime. Neutralized hydrolysates were treated with charcoal for removing inhibitors and then supplemented with nutrients to obtain culture media useful for proliferation of the red yeast P. rhodozyma. A set of experiments carried out in orbital shakers proved that hydrolysates containing 16.6 g xylose/L supplemented only with 3 g peptone/L performed well as fermentation media. At the end of experiments, xylose was depleted and 10.5 g cells/L were obtained. Biomass was highly pigmented and volumetric carotenoid concentrations up to 5.8 mg carotenoids/L (with 4.6 mg astaxanthin/L) were reached. Further experiments in batch fermentors using concentrated hydrolysates (initial xylose concentrations within 16.6 and 40.8 g/L) led to good biomass concentrations (up to 23.2 g cells/L) with increased pigment concentration (up to 12.9 mg total carotenoids/L, with 10.4 mg astaxanthin/L) and high volumetric rates of carotenoid production (up to 0.079 mg/L.h). Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment VIII. The wood-fueled gasification system, Evergreen Energy Corporation's final engineering report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    Evergreen Energy Corporation provided projected cost and operating data on the Evergreen/Texaco entrained-bed wood gasification system currently under development as an alternative to the state-of-the-art fixed-bed wood gasification system proposed by Davy McKee. Overall capital costs for the total plant remain about the same at approx. $250 million. The Evergreen/Texaco system will provide significant capital cost savings in the gasifiers, gas cleanup, and waste water treatment sections, and eliminate the need for a large off-site wood-fired power boiler. These reductions are offset by higher investments in the feedstock preparation, drying, and feeding section plus the need for a larger air separation plant and compressor to supply oxygen at high pressure to the gasifier.

  7. Dry mass allocation, water use efficiency and delta(13)C in clones of Eucalyptus grandis, E. grandis x camaldulensis and E. grandis x nitens grown under two irrigation regimes.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, D; Stock, W D; Bond, W J; Maphanga, D

    1996-05-01

    Clonal variation in water use efficiency (WUE), dry mass accumulation and allocation, and stable carbon isotope ratio (delta(13)C) of crude leaf fiber extracts was determined in six clones of Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden. grown for 16 months in field lysimeters in two soil water regimes. The relationships between delta(13)C and WUE calculated on the basis of leaf, harvestable stem, shoot and whole-plant dry mass accumulation were investigated. There was no clonal variation in dry mass accumulation but clonal allocation to roots, harvestable stems, branches and leaves varied. Water use efficiencies (mass of plant or plant part/water used over 16 months) differed significantly between clones. The clonal ranking of WUE varied depending on the units of dry mass accumulation used. Significant relationships between delta(13)C values and instantaneous water use efficiencies and ratios of internal leaf to ambient CO(2) concentrations were found only in the high soil water treatment. There were no relationships between delta(13)C values and whole-plant, shoot and harvestable stem water use efficiencies and soil water availability. Values of delta(13)C were negatively correlated with dry mass accumulation in the low soil water treatment. At the whole-plant level, WUE was positively correlated with dry mass accumulation in the high soil water treatment. We found significant differences in delta(13)C values between clones and the clonal rankings in delta(13)C and WUE were maintained in both soil water treatments.

  8. Leaf and wood carbon isotope ratios, specific leaf areas and wood growth of Eucalyptus species across a rainfall gradient in Australia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Turner, Neil C; Nicolle, Dean; Schumacher, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Leaves and samples of recent wood of Eucalyptus species were collected along a rainfall gradient parallel to the coast of Western Australia between Perth in the north and Walpole in the south and along a southwest to northeast transect from Walpole in southwestern Australia, to near Mount Olga in central Australia. The collection included 65 species of Eucalyptus sampled at 73 sites and many of the species were collected at several sites along the rainfall gradient. Specific leaf area (SLA) and isotopic ratio of 13C to 12C (delta 13C) of leaves that grew in 2002, and tree ring growth and delta 13C of individual cell layers of the wood were measured. Rainfall data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for 29 locations that represented one or a few closely located collection sites. Site-averaged data and species-specific values of delta 13C decreased with decreasing annual rainfall between 1200 and 300 mm at a rate of 1.63 per thousand per 1000 mm decrease in rainfall. Responses became variable in the low rainfall region (< 300 mm), with some species showing decreasing delta 13C with rainfall, whereas delta 13C increased or remained constant in other species. The range of delta 13C values in the low rainfall region was as large as the range observed at sites receiving > 300 mm of annual rainfall. Specific leaf area varied between 2 and 6 m2 kg(-1) and tended to increase with decreasing annual rainfall in some species, but not all, whereas delta 13C decreased with SLA. The relationship between delta 13C and SLA was highly species and soil-type specific. Leaf-area-based nitrogen (N) content varied between 2 and almost 6 g m(-2) and decreased with rainfall. Thus, thicker leaves were associated with higher N content and this compensated for the effect of drought on delta 13C. Nitrogen content was also related to soil type and species identity. Based on a linear mixed model, statistical analysis of the whole data set showed that 27% of the variation in

  9. Effect of thermal treatments on technological properties of wood from two Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Cademartori, Pedro Henrique G; Missio, André L; Mattos, Bruno D; Gatto, Darci A

    2015-03-01

    The effect of thermal treatments on physical and mechanical properties of rose gum and Sydney blue gum wood was evaluated. Wood samples were thermally modified in a combination: pre-treatment in an autoclave (127°C - 1h) and treatment in an oven (180-240°C - 4h); and only treatment in an oven at 180-240°C for 4h. Chemical changes in the structure of woods were evaluated through infrared spectroscopy. Evaluation of physical properties was performed through mass loss, specific gravity, equilibrium moisture content and dimensional stability tests. Surface changes were analyzed through apparent contact angle technique and static bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical behavior. Use of pre-treatment in autoclave affected the properties analyzed, however oven, resulted in the highest changes on wood from both species. Chemical changes were related to the degradation of hemicelluloses. Moreover, a significant decrease of hygroscopicity and mechanical strength of thermally modified woods was observed, while specific gravity did not significantly change for either of the species studied. The best results of decrease of wettability were found in low temperatures, while dimensional stability increased as a function of temperature of exposure in oven. The highest loss of mechanical strength was observed at 240°C for both species.

  10. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 2. Vegetative propagation of Eucalypts

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    The feasibility of large-scale plantation establishment by various methods was examined, and the following conclusions were reached: seedling plantations are limited in potential yield due to genetic variation among the planting stock and often inadequate supplies of appropriate seed; vegetative propagation by rooted cuttings can provide good genetic uniformity of select hybrid planting stock; however, large-scale production requires establishment and maintenance of extensive cutting orchards. The collection of shoots and preparation of cuttings, although successfully implemented in the Congo and Brazil, would not be economically feasible in Florida for large-scale plantations; tissue culture propagation of select hybrid eucalypts offers the only opportunity to produce the very large number of trees required to establish the energy plantation. The cost of tissue culture propagation, although higher than seedling production, is more than off-set by the increased productivity of vegetative plantations established from select hybrid Eucalyptus.

  11. Regional heritability mapping and genome-wide association identify loci for complex growth, wood and disease resistance traits in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Azevedo, Camila Ferreira; Takahashi, Elizabete Keiko; Silva-Junior, Orzenil Bonfim; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the decoding of the relationships between sequence variation and complex phenotypes, they have explained little heritability. Regional heritability mapping (RHM) provides heritability estimates for genomic segments containing both common and rare allelic effects that individually contribute too little variance to be detected by GWAS. We carried out GWAS and RHM for seven growth, wood and disease resistance traits in a breeding population of 768 Eucalyptus hybrid trees using EuCHIP60K. Total genomic heritabilities accounted for large proportions (64-89%) of pedigree-based trait heritabilities, providing additional evidence that complex traits in eucalypts are controlled by many sequence variants across the frequency spectrum, each with small contributions to the phenotypic variance. RHM detected 26 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encompassing 2191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whereas GWAS detected 13 single SNP-trait associations. RHM and GWAS QTLs individually explained 5-15% and 4-6% of the genomic heritability, respectively. RHM was superior to GWAS in capturing larger proportions of genomic heritability. Equated to previously mapped QTLs, our results highlighted genomic regions for further examination towards gene discovery. RHM-QTLs bearing a combination of common and rare variants could be useful enhancements to incorporate prior knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture in genomic prediction models.

  12. Identification of lipolytic enzymes isolated from bacteria indigenous to Eucalyptus wood species for application in the pulping industry.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, L; Sithole, B; Govinden, R

    2017-09-01

    This study highlights the importance of determining substrate specificity at variable experimental conditions. Lipases and esterases were isolated from microorganisms cultivated from Eucalyptus wood species and then concentrated (cellulases removed) and characterized. Phenol red agar plates supplemented with 1% olive oil or tributyrin was ascertained to be the most favourable method of screening for lipolytic activity. Lipolytic activity of the various enzymes were highest at 45-61 U/ml at the optimum temperature and pH of between at 30-35 °C and pH 4-5, respectively. Change in pH influenced the substrate specificity of the enzymes tested. The majority of enzymes tested displayed a propensity for longer aliphatic acyl chains such as dodecanoate (C12), myristate (C14), palmitate (C16) and stearate (C18) indicating that they could be characterised as potential lipases. Prospective esterases were also detected with specificity towards acetate (C2), butyrate (C4) and valerate (C5). Enzymes maintained up to 95% activity at the optimal pH and temperature for 2-3 h. It is essential to test substrates at various pH and temperature when determining optimum activity of lipolytic enzymes, a method rarely employed. The stability of the enzymes at acidic pH and moderate temperatures makes them excellent candidates for application in the treatment of pitch during acid bi-sulphite pulping, which would greatly benefit the pulp and paper industry.

  13. Decay resistance of thermally-modified Eucalyptus grandis wood at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Calonego, Fred Willians; Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Furtado, Edson Luiz

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on the biological resistance of Eucalyptus grandis wood to the decay fungus Picnoporus sanguineus. Boards from 5 years and 11 months old E. grandis trees, taken from the stock possessed by the Duratex-SA company, were thermally-modified at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C in the Laboratory of Wood Drying and Preservation from UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Samples of each treatment were treated according to ASTM D-2017 (1994). The experiment tested the accelerated decay caused by the decay fungus P. sanguineus on a system of soil-block wood. The results of thermal treatment showed that an increase of temperature of 180-220 degrees C caused reductions of between 15.7% and 82.4% in the weight loss in the samples from E. grandis incubated with P. sanguineus.

  14. Heat capacity of Bio-SiC and SiC/Si ecoceramics prepared from white eucalyptus, beech, and sapele tree wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. A.; Smirnov, B. I.; Orlova, T. S.; Wlosewicz, D.; Hackemer, A.; Misiorek, H.; Mucha, J.; Jezowski, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports on measurement of the heat capacity at constant pressure C p of silicon bio-carbide prepared within the 5-300 K temperature interval from beech tree wood (bio-SiC(BE)), and within 80-300 K, from tree wood of sapele (bio-SiC(SA)), as well as SiC/Si ecoceramics of beech, sapele, and white eucalyptus wood. It has been shown that in bio-SiC(BE) the measured heat capacity contains a significant contribution of surface heat capacity, whose magnitude decreases with increasing temperature. Of the ecoceramics, only SiC/Si(SA) characterized by a high enough porosity has revealed a small contribution to the heat capacity coming from its surface component. The experimental results obtained are discussed.

  15. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using pre-hydrolysis liquor of Eucalyptus wood and its effective antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, M; Nagashree, K L; Yallappa, S; Manjappa, S; Manjunath, K S; Dharmaprakash, M S

    2017-02-01

    Herein, we described for the first time, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using pre-hydrolyzed liquor of Eucalyptus wood under ambient conditions. The pre-hydrolyzed liquor containing a high amount of metabolites such as polyphenols, hemicelluloses and its derivatives are mainly assisted for the reduction and stabilization process of Ag+ ions to AgNPs. The formation of AgNPs is monitored by recording the UV-vis spectrophotometer for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak observed at ∼415nm. The intensity of SPR increased linearly with increasing the reaction time at ambient condition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of AgNPs reveals the formation of face-centered cubic structure. Field emission electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show the spherical shaped particles and narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 25-30nm. The elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis confirms the presence of Ag as the major amount and is found to be 82%. Analysis of the fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the NPs revealed the presence of phytoconstituents from pre-hydrolyzed liquor adsorbed on the surface of AgNPs. Moreover, in vitro, antimicrobial activity is found to be effective for as-synthesized AgNPs on tested bacteria (viz., P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and E. coli) followed by fungus (C. oxysporum, P. chrysogenum, C. albicans and A.niger). Thus, these results suggest the use of biosynthesized AgNPs as effective growth inhibitors for various biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical composition and fumigant toxicity of the essential oils from 16 species of Eucalyptus against Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Juan, Laura W; Lucia, Alejandro; Zerba, Eduardo N; Harrand, Leonel; Marco, Martin; Masuh, Hector M

    2011-06-01

    Oils extracted from various species of Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus badjensis Beuzev & Welch, Eucalyptus badjensis x Eucalyptus nitens, Eucalyptus benthamii variety dorrigoensis Maiden & Cambage, Eucalyptus botryoides Smith, Eucalyptus dalrympleana Maiden, Eucalyptus fastigata Deane & Maiden, Eucalyptus nobilis L.A.S. Johnson & K. D. Hill, Eucalyptus polybractea R. Baker, Eucalyptus radiata ssp. radiata Sieber ex Spreng, Eucalyptus resinifera Smith, Eucalyptus robertsonii Blakely, Eucalyptus rubida Deane & Maiden, Eucalyptus smithii R. Baker, Eucalyptus elata Dehnh, Eucalyptus fraxinoides Deane & Maiden, E. obliqua L'Hér) were obtained by hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of essential oils was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Essential oils were mainly composed of 1,8-cineole, alpha-pinene, alpha-terpineol, 4-terpineol, and p-cymene. Vapors from these essential oils and their major components were found to be toxic to Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) adults. An aliquot of each oil was placed in a cylindrical test chamber, and the number of knocked down flies was recorded as a function of time. Knockdown time 50% was then calculated. Results showed that essential oil of E. polybractea had the highest knockdown activity of 3.44 min. A correlation was observed between the content of 1,8-cineole in the Eucalyptus essential oils and the corresponding toxic effect.

  17. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling growth and wood quality traits in Eucalyptus grandis using a maternal half-sib family and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Bertolucci, F L; Penchel, R; Sederoff, R R

    1996-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping, BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding.

  18. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  19. Two new coumarin glycosides from Chimonanthus nitens.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Ji; Wang, Ming-Li; Yang, Xiao-Sheng; Ma, Lin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Two new coumarin glycosides, namely nitensosides A-B (1-2), together with six known compounds, scopolin (3), 5,6,7-trimethoxycoumarin (4), d-calycanthine (5), calycanthoside (6), xeroboside (7), and scopoletin (8), were isolated from Chimonanthus nitens. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by comprehensive analysis of IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compounds 3, 4, 7, and 8 showed moderate inhibitory activity against Micrococcus luteus.

  20. Alterations in energy properties of eucalyptus wood and bark subjected to torrefaction: the potential of mass loss as a synthetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Almeida, G; Brito, J O; Perré, P

    2010-12-01

    Torrefaction is a mild pyrolysis process (usually up to 300 degrees C) that changes the chemical and physical properties of biomass. This process is a possible pre-treatment prior to further processes (transport, grinding, combustion, gasification, etc) to generate energy or biofuels. In this study, three eucalyptus wood species and bark were subjected to different torrefaction conditions to determine the alterations in their structural and energy properties. The most severe treatment (280 degrees C, 5h) causes mass losses of more than 35%, with severe damage to anatomical structure, and an increase of about 27% in the specific energy content. Bark is more sensitive to heat than wood. Energy yields are always higher than mass yields, thereby demonstrating the benefits of torrefaction in concentrating biomass energy. The overall mass loss is proposed as a relevant parameter to synthesize the effect of torrefaction conditions (temperature and duration). Accordingly, all results are summarised by analytical expressions able to predict the energy properties as a function of the overall mass loss. These expressions are intended to be used in any optimization procedure, from production in the field to the final use.

  1. Cytotoxic guanidine alkaloids from Pterogyne nitens.

    PubMed

    Regasini, Luis Octávio; Castro-Gamboa, Ian; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Furlan, Maysa; Barreiro, Eliezer Jesus; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Pessoa, Cláudia; Lotufo, Letícia Veras Costa; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Young, Maria Claudia Marx; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva

    2009-03-27

    As part of a bioprospecting program aimed at the discovery of potential anticancer drugs, two new guanidine-type alkaloids, nitensidines D and E (1, 2), and the known pterogynine (3), pterogynidine (4), and galegine (5), were isolated from the leaves of Pterogyne nitens. The structures of 1 and 2 were established on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. These compounds were tested against a small panel of human cancer cell lines. Compound 2 exhibited cytotoxicity for HL-60 (human myeloblastic leukemia) and SF-245 (human glioblastoma) cells.

  2. Comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the Aux/IAA gene family in Eucalyptus: evidence for the role of EgrIAA4 in wood formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Soler, Marçal; San Clemente, Hélène; Mila, Isabelle; Paiva, Jorge A P; Myburg, Alexander A; Bouzayen, Mondher; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Cassan-Wang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Auxin plays a pivotal role in various plant growth and development processes, including vascular differentiation. The modulation of auxin responsiveness through the auxin perception and signaling machinery is believed to be a major regulatory mechanism controlling cambium activity and wood formation. To gain more insights into the roles of key Aux/IAA gene regulators of the auxin response in these processes, we identified and characterized members of the Aux/IAA family in the genome of Eucalyptus grandis, a tree of worldwide economic importance. We found that the gene family in Eucalyptus is slightly smaller than that in Populus and Arabidopsis, but all phylogenetic groups are represented. High-throughput expression profiling of different organs and tissues highlighted several Aux/IAA genes expressed in vascular cambium and/or developing xylem, some showing differential expression in response to developmental (juvenile vs. mature) and/or to environmental (tension stress) cues. Based on the expression profiles, we selected a promising candidate gene, EgrIAA4, for functional characterization. We showed that EgrIAA4 protein is localized in the nucleus and functions as an auxin-responsive repressor. Overexpressing a stabilized version of EgrIAA4 in Arabidopsis dramatically impeded plant growth and fertility and induced auxin-insensitive phenotypes such as inhibition of primary root elongation, lateral root emergence and agravitropism. Interestingly, the lignified secondary walls of the interfascicular fibers appeared very late, whereas those of the xylary fibers were virtually undetectable, suggesting that EgrIAA4 may play crucial roles in fiber development and secondary cell wall deposition.

  3. Diet analysis by next-generation sequencing indicates the frequent consumption of introduced plants by the critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon (Columba janthina nitens) in oceanic island habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Haruko; Setsuko, Suzuki; Horikoshi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hajime; Umehara, Shoko; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Isagi, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic island ecosystems are vulnerable to the introduction of alien species, and they provide a habitat for many endangered species. Knowing the diet of an endangered animal is important for appropriate nature restoration efforts on oceanic islands because introduced species may be a major component of the diets of some endangered species. DNA barcoding techniques together with next-generation sequencing may provide more detailed information on animal diets than other traditional methods. We performed a diet analysis using 48 fecal samples from the critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon that is endemic to the Ogasawara Islands based on chloroplast trnL P6 loop sequences. The frequency of each detected plant taxa was compared with a microhistological analysis of the same sample set. The DNA barcoding approach detected a much larger number of plants than the microhistological analysis. Plants that were difficult to identify by microhistological analysis after being digested in the pigeon stomachs were frequently identified only by DNA barcoding. The results of the barcoding analysis indicated the frequent consumption of introduced species, in addition to several native species, by the red-headed wood pigeon. The rapid eradication of specific introduced species may reduce the food resources available to this endangered bird; thus, balancing eradication efforts with the restoration of native food plants should be considered. Although some technical problems still exist, the trnL approach to next-generation sequencing may contribute to a better understanding of oceanic island ecosystems and their conservation. PMID:24324859

  4. Diet analysis by next-generation sequencing indicates the frequent consumption of introduced plants by the critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon (Columba janthina nitens) in oceanic island habitats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Haruko; Setsuko, Suzuki; Horikoshi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hajime; Umehara, Shoko; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Isagi, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Oceanic island ecosystems are vulnerable to the introduction of alien species, and they provide a habitat for many endangered species. Knowing the diet of an endangered animal is important for appropriate nature restoration efforts on oceanic islands because introduced species may be a major component of the diets of some endangered species. DNA barcoding techniques together with next-generation sequencing may provide more detailed information on animal diets than other traditional methods. We performed a diet analysis using 48 fecal samples from the critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon that is endemic to the Ogasawara Islands based on chloroplast trnL P6 loop sequences. The frequency of each detected plant taxa was compared with a microhistological analysis of the same sample set. The DNA barcoding approach detected a much larger number of plants than the microhistological analysis. Plants that were difficult to identify by microhistological analysis after being digested in the pigeon stomachs were frequently identified only by DNA barcoding. The results of the barcoding analysis indicated the frequent consumption of introduced species, in addition to several native species, by the red-headed wood pigeon. The rapid eradication of specific introduced species may reduce the food resources available to this endangered bird; thus, balancing eradication efforts with the restoration of native food plants should be considered. Although some technical problems still exist, the trnL approach to next-generation sequencing may contribute to a better understanding of oceanic island ecosystems and their conservation.

  5. Physical and mechanical properties of saligna eucalyptus grown in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    C.C. Gerhards

    1965-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties were determined for saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus saligna, Smith) grown in Hawaii. In comparison with wood of the same species grown in Australia, saligna eucalyptus grown in Hawaii was lower in density, shrinkage, and compressive strength parallel to grain; it was about equal in strength in bending and shear; and it was stiffer....

  6. The Eucalyptus linker histone variant EgH1.3 cooperates with the transcription factor EgMYB1 to control lignin biosynthesis during wood formation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Marçal; Plasencia, Anna; Larbat, Romain; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana; Pesquet, Edouard; Lapierre, Catherine; Truchet, Isabelle; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Wood, also called secondary xylem, is a specialized vascular tissue constituted by different cell types that undergo a differentiation process involving deposition of thick, lignified secondary cell walls. The mechanisms needed to control the extent of lignin deposition depending on the cell type and the differentiation stage are far from being fully understood. We found that the Eucalyptus transcription factor EgMYB1, which is known to repress lignin biosynthesis, interacts specifically with a linker histone variant, EgH1.3. This interaction enhances the repression of EgMYB1's target genes, strongly limiting the amount of lignin deposited in xylem cell walls. The expression profiles of EgMYB1 and EgH1.3 overlap in xylem cells at early stages of their differentiation as well as in mature parenchymatous xylem cells, which have no or only thin lignified secondary cell walls. This suggests that a complex between EgMYB1 and EgH1.3 integrates developmental signals to prevent premature or inappropriate lignification of secondary cell walls, providing a mechanism to fine-tune the differentiation of xylem cells in time and space. We also demonstrate a role for a linker histone variant in the regulation of a specific developmental process through interaction with a transcription factor, illustrating that plant linker histones have other functions beyond chromatin organization. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Reactivity of syringyl and guaiacyl lignin units and delignification kinetics in the kraft pulping of Eucalyptus globulus wood using Py-GC-MS/FID.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Ana; Gominho, Jorge; Marques, António Velez; Pereira, Helena

    2012-11-01

    Eucalyptus globulus sapwood and heartwood showed no differences in lignin content (23.0% vs. 23.7%) and composition: syringyl-lignin (17.9% vs. 18.0%) and guaiacyl-lignin (4.8% vs. 5.2%). Delignification kinetics of S- and G-units in heartwood and sapwood was investigated by Py-GC-MS/FID at 130, 150 and 170°C and modeled as double first-order reactions. Reactivity differences between S and G-units were small during the main pulping phase and the higher reactivity of S over G units was better expressed in the later pulping stage. The residual lignin composition in pulps was different from wood or from samples in the initial delignification stages, with more G and H-units. S/G ratio ranged from 3 to 4.5 when pulp residual lignin was higher than 10%, decreasing rapidly to less than 1. The S/H was initially around 20 (until 15% residual lignin), decreasing to 4 when residual lignin was about 3%.

  8. Evaluating the accuracy of genomic prediction of growth and wood traits in two Eucalyptus species and their F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Biyue; Grattapaglia, Dario; Martins, Gustavo Salgado; Ferreira, Karina Zamprogno; Sundberg, Björn; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2017-06-29

    Genomic prediction is a genomics assisted breeding methodology that can increase genetic gains by accelerating the breeding cycle and potentially improving the accuracy of breeding values. In this study, we use 41,304 informative SNPs genotyped in a Eucalyptus breeding population involving 90 E.grandis and 78 E.urophylla parents and their 949 F1 hybrids to develop genomic prediction models for eight phenotypic traits - basic density and pulp yield, circumference at breast height and height and tree volume scored at age three and six years. We assessed the impact of different genomic prediction methods, the composition and size of the training and validation set and the number and genomic location of SNPs on the predictive ability (PA). Heritabilities estimated using the realized genomic relationship matrix (GRM) were considerably higher than estimates based on the expected pedigree, mainly due to inconsistencies in the expected pedigree that were readily corrected by the GRM. Moreover, the GRM more precisely capture Mendelian sampling among related individuals, such that the genetic covariance was based on the true proportion of the genome shared between individuals. PA improved considerably when increasing the size of the training set and by enhancing relatedness to the validation set. Prediction models trained on pure species parents could not predict well in F1 hybrids, indicating that model training has to be carried out in hybrid populations if one is to predict in hybrid selection candidates. The different genomic prediction methods provided similar results for all traits, therefore either GBLUP or rrBLUP represents better compromises between computational time and prediction efficiency. Only slight improvement was observed in PA when more than 5000 SNPs were used for all traits. Using SNPs in intergenic regions provided slightly better PA than using SNPs sampled exclusively in genic regions. The size and composition of the training set and number of SNPs

  9. Characterization of residual lignin after SO(2)-catalyzed steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis of Eucalyptus viminalis wood chips.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L P; Mathias, A L; Silva, F T; Cotrim, A R; Ferraz, A L; Chen, C L

    1999-06-01

    The lignin component found in both water insoluble (WI) and water and alkali insoluble (WIA) fractions derived from SO(2)-impregnated steam-exploded eucalyptus chips (SEE) was isolated and characterized. Dioxane lignins with a sugar content lower than 2% (w/w) were obtained after each material was treated with commercial cellulases. The C9 formulas of both SEE-WI and SEE-WIA dioxane lignins were C(9)H(6.83)N(0.04)O(2.24)(OCH(3))(1.21)(OH(aro))(0.56)(OH(ali))(0. 77) and C(9)H(8.65)N(0.29)O(1.97)(OCH(3))(0.90)(OH(aro))(0. 46)(OH(ali))(1.02), respectively. The weight-average molecular weight (M(w)) of the SEE-WI lignin corresponded to 3.85 kDa, whereas the SEE-WIA lignin had an M(w) of 3.66 kDa for the same polydispersity of 2.4. The SEE-WIA lignin was shown to be more thermally stable than the SEE-WI lignin, requiring temperatures in the range of 520 degrees C for complete degradation. FTIR and (1)H NMR analyses of both untreated and peracetylated lignin fractions showed that (a) the alkali insoluble lignin contained a relatively higher degree of substitution in aromatic rings per C9 unit and that (b) alkaline extraction removed lignin fragments containing appreciable amounts of phenolic hydroxyl groups.

  10. Effects of autohydrolysis of Eucalyptus urograndis and Eucalyptus grandis on influence of chemical components and crystallinity index.

    PubMed

    da Silva Morais, Alaine Patrícia; Sansígolo, Cláudio Angeli; de Oliveira Neto, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Samples of Eucalyptus urograndis and Eucalyptus grandis sawdust were autohydrolyzed in aqueous conditions to reach temperatures in the range 110-190°C and reaction times of 0-150min in a minireactor. In each minireactor were used a liquor:wood ratio (10:1 L:kg dry wood), in order to assess the effects of the autohydrolysis severity and the crystalline properties of cellulose. The content of extractives, lignin, holocellulose, cellulose, hemicelluloses and crystallinity index obtained from the solid fraction after autohydrolysis of sawdust were determined. This study demonstrated that the hemicelluloses were extensively removed at 170 and 190°C, whereas cellulose was partly degraded to Eucalyptus urograndis and Eucalyptus grandis sawdust. The lignin content decreased, while the extractives content increased. It was defined that during autohydrolysis, had a slight decreased on crystalline structure of cellulose of Eucalyptus urogandis and Eucalyptus grandis.

  11. Wood

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  12. Genetic basis of resistance in eucalyptus spp. pathosystems

    Treesearch

    Acelino Couto Alfenas; Lucio Mauro da Silva Guimaraes; Marcos Deon Vilela Resende

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus is the most widely planted hardwood crop in world-wide tropical and subtropical regions because of its high growth rate, broad adaptability, and multipurpose wood properties. Until the 1970s, the Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil were practically disease free. However, plantations have continued to expand into warmer...

  13. Breeding Eucalyptus for disease resistance

    Treesearch

    Edival A.V. Zauza; Acelino Couto Alfenas; Lúcio Mauro da Silva Guimarães; João Flávio da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus plantations cover about 1.5 percent of the agricultural area in Brazil, and contribute to 4 percent of GDP and 3 percent in exports of forest products. Technological and research advances in silviculture and genetic improvement have increased productivity up to 80 m³ of wood/ha/year, with an average of 35 to 45 m³/ha/year. The greatest...

  14. [Desiccation tolerance in seeds of Prosopisferox and Pterogyne nitens (Fabaceae)].

    PubMed

    Morandini, Marcelo Nahuel; Giamminola, Eugenia Mabel; de Viana, Marta Leonor

    2013-03-01

    The high number of endemisms and species diversity together with the accelerated biodiversity loss by deforestation, especially in North Western Argentina, points out the need to work on species conservation combining ex situ and in situ strategies. The aim of this work was to study the desiccation tolerance in seeds of P ferox and P nitens for long term ex situ conservation at the Germplasm Bank of Native Species (BGEN) of the National University of Salta (Argentina). The fruits were collected from ten individuals in P ferox at the National Park Los Cardones and from two sites (Orán and Rivadavia) for P nitens. Desiccation tolerance was assessed following previous established methodologies. The moisture content (MC) of the seeds was determined by keeping them in oven at 103 degreeC and weighting the samples at different intervals till constant weight. Germination essays were carried out with two treatments (control and scarification), with different seed MC (fresh, 10-12%, 3-5%) and in desiccated seeds (3-5% MC) stored six months at -20 degreeC. The MC in P ferox seeds was 14.2% and 10% in P nitens, for both populations studied. Percentage germination in P ferox was higher in the scarification treatments (<82%). The difference between treatments increased with the reduction in MC and the storage for six months at -20 degreeC. Fresh seeds of P nitens do not need scarification treatment, but it is required with the reduction in MC and storage. Mean germination percentage of desiccated seeds stored six months at -20 degreeC was similar in both populations and greater than 82%.We concluded that both species are probably orthodox because seeds tolerated desiccation to 3-5% and storage for six months at -20 degree C.

  15. Integrating genomics into Eucalyptus breeding.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, Dario

    2004-09-30

    The advent of high throughput genomic technologies has opened new perspectives in the speed, scale and detail with which one can investigate genes, genomes and complex traits in Eucalyptus species. A genomic approach to a more detailed understanding of important metabolic and physiological processes, which affect tree growth and stress resistance, and the identification of genes and their allelic variants, which determine the major chemical and physical features of wood properties, should eventually lead to new opportunities for directed genetic modifications of far-reaching economic impact in forest industry. It should be kept in mind, however, that basic breeding strategies, coupled with sophisticated quantitative methods, breeder's experience and breeder's intuition, will continue to generate significant genetic gains and have a clear measurable impact on production forestry. Even with a much more global view of genetic processes, genomics will only succeed in contributing to the development of improved industrial forests if it is strongly interconnected with intensive fieldwork and creative breeding. Integrated genomic projects involving multi-species expressed sequence tag sequencing and quantitative trait locus detection, single nucleotide polymorphism discovery for association mapping, and the development of a gene-rich physical map for the Eucalyptus genome will quickly move toward linking phenotypes to genes that control the wood formation processes that define industrial-level traits. Exploiting the full power of the superior natural phenotypic variation in wood properties found in Eucalyptus genetic resources will undoubtedly be a key factor to reach this goal.

  16. Assessment of Cryptococcus albidus for biopulping of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anjali; Jaiswal, Prashant Kumar; Jha, Pawan Kumar; Thapliyal, Alka; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus albidus shows delignification activity in nature. It was used for the biopulping of eucalyptus wood (Eucalyptus grandis) to access its potential for industrial application in the pulp and paper industry. Enzyme analysis on days 15, 30, and 60 showed the presence of laccase and xylanase as key enzymes. The production of endo-glucanase (CMCase) and exo-glucanase (FPase) was very low. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the surface colonization of wood and loosening of wood fibers in C. albidus-treated samples. Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) indicated the chemical modification of eucalyptus wood. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis on days 15, 30, and 60 confirmed the presence of C. albidus throughout the experiments. Cryptococcu albidus was able to suppress the growth of a native population. Further, after 60 days both the control and treated eucalyptus wood chips were given kraft pulping treatment. The kappa number of pulp of control wood was 21 and for treated wood was 17. Kappa number is considered a measure of lignin content in wood; hence the treatment of eucalyptus by C. albidus (biopulping) was effective in reducing its lignin content and can be used for biopulping in the pulp and paper industry.

  17. Validation of models to estimate the fumigant and larvicidal activity of Eucalyptus essential oils against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Juan, Laura W; Zerba, Eduardo N; Harrand, Leonel; Marcó, Martín; Masuh, Hector M

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to validate the pre-existing models that relate the larvicidal and adulticidal activities of the Eucalyptus essential oils on Aedes aegypti. Previous works at our laboratory described that the larvicidal activity of Eucalyptus essential oils can be estimated from the relative concentration of two main components (p-cymene and 1,8-cineole) and that the adulticidal effectiveness can be explained, to a great extent, by the presence of large amounts of the component 1,8-cineole in it. In general, the results show that the higher adulticidal effect of essential oils the lower their larvicidal activity. Fresh leaves was harvested and distilled. Once the essential oil was obtained, the chemical composition was analysed, evaluating the biological activity of 15 species of the genus Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus badjensis Beuzev and Welch, Eucalyptus badjensis × nitens, Eucalyptus benthamii var Benthamii Maiden and Cambage, Eucalyptus benthamii var dorrigoensis Maiden and Cambage, Eucalyptus botryoides Smith, Eucalyptus dalrympleana Maiden, Eucalyptus fastigata Deane and Maiden, Eucalyptus nobilis L.A.S. Johnson and K.D.Hill, Eucalyptus polybractea R. Baker, Eucalyptus radiata ssp radiata Sieber ex Spreng, Eucalyptus resinifera Smith, Eucalyptus robertsonii Blakely, Eucalyptus robusta Smith, Eucalyptus rubida Deane and Maiden, Eucalyptus smithii R. Baker). Essential oils of these plant species were used for the validation of equations from preexistent models, in which observed and estimated values of the biological activity were compared. The regression analysis showed a strong validation of the models, re-stating the trends previously observed. The models were expressed as follows: A, fumigant activity [KT(50(min)) = 10.65-0.076 × 1,8-cineole (%)](p < 0.01; F, 397; R (2), 0.79); B, larval mortality (%)((40 ppm)) = 103.85 + 0.482 × p-cymene (%) - 0.363 × α-pinene (%) - 1.07 × 1,8-cineole (%) (p < 0.01; F, 300; R (2), 0.90). These results confirmed the

  18. [Control of Anocentor nitens (Neumann, 1897) (Acari: Ixodidae) on equines].

    PubMed

    Bello, Ana Cristina P De P; Da Cunha, Arildo P; Leite, Romário C; Oliveira, Paulo R; Ribeiro, Antônio Cândido C L; Domingues, Luisa N; De Freitas, Carolina Maria V; Bastianetto, Eduardo; Dalla Rosa, Ricardo C

    2008-09-01

    This trial evaluated control practices of Anocentor nitens on equines, using spraying devices and application of acaricide paste formulation in the auricular pavilion and nasal diverticulum. The study was carried out from October 2003 to March of 2008 and the evaluations had been divided in the following stages: Phase 1--out/03 mar/04 and Phases 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively, correspondents to the month's periods until março/08. It was used score of 0 to 3 to classify infestation levels. From abr/04 to mar/06 was implanted a schedule of acaricide sprayings every seven days and divided in two series. The first one beginning in April 2004 and the second beginning in July, both using six sprayings treatments with pyrethroid chemical base--cypermethrin 0,015%, plus topical treatments applied monthly in the auricular pavilions (powder acaricide). From abril/06 to março/08 was carried out similar schedule treatments, each two months, using an experimental acaricide paste in the auricular pavilion and nasal diverticulum. Phases 2 and 3 did not showed reduction of the parasitic loads of A. nitens compared to the control period. Whereas in Phases 4 and 5 registered significant reduction compared control period and also with the results of Phases 2 and 3, characterizing the effectiveness of the treatment with the acaricide paste formulation. Results demonstrated of A. nitens populations present in the nasal diverticulum are important in the maintenance of the infestations on equines, and necessary attention to this anatomical structure when controlling ticks.

  19. Pre-Drying Eucalyptus Saligna for Carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourao, Marcelo Breda; Varon, Lina Maria; Takano, Cyro

    The growing search for forms of clean renewable energy has placed wood charcoal as a possible alternative to coal in the Brazilian steel industry. The carbonization of Eucalyptus Saligna is an important step in the production of charcoal. The aim of this study is to analyze the behavior of the endothermic and exothermic reactions involved in the carbonization process. The carbonization of logs of Eucalyptus Saligna has been performed in a stainless steel reactor at different temperatures (300 ° C, 400 ° C and 500 ° C) and the results were compared with the ones obtained through thermal analysis (TG / DSC) of small samples (36 mg and 54 mg) of the same wood. The TG/DSC results indicated that the process presents both endothermic and exothermic features, at different ranges of temperature and time, in connection with the degradation of the three major macromolecules contained in the wood: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin.

  20. Variation in natural durability of seven Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid clones

    Treesearch

    F.J.N. Franca; T.S.F.A. Franca; R.A Arango; B.M. Woodward; G.B. Vidaurre

    2017-01-01

    Programs aimed at developing clones of hybrid trees are commonly established in Brazil to meet the demands of various forest-based industries. These programs have continually improved the quality of eucalyptus wood, which has the potential to reduce deforestation by lowering demand for other high-value species. This is particularly true in the lumber market, but little...

  1. Gonadal Development, Spawning and Plasma Sex Steroid Levels of the Indoor Cultured Grunt, Hapalogenys nitens

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Woong; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Park, Jong Youn; Hong, Chang Gi; Chung, Jae Seung; Chung, Ee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The gonadosomatic index (GSI), gonadal development and changes in hormones in plasma level of the indoor cultured grunt (Hapalogenys nitens) were investigated by histological study from August 2011 to October 2012. The GSI showed similar trends with gonad developmental stages during the culture periods. Changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β of female H. nitens reached the highest value before the spawning period, and seasonal changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β were similar in trends of oocyte developments and GSI changes. Testosterone levels of male H. nitens reached the highest value before and after the spent stage. Ovarian developmental stages of H. nitens could be classified into early growing stage, late growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spawning stage, recovery and resting stage. The testicular developmental stages could be divided into growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spent stage, and recovery and resting stage. PMID:25949208

  2. Eucalyptus oil poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S; Wiggins, J

    1980-01-01

    Accidental ingestion of eucalyptus oil by a 3-year-old boy caused profound central nervous system depression within 30 minutes, but he recovered rapidly after gastric lavage. The extreme toxicity of eucalyptus oil is emphasised. PMID:7436478

  3. Evaluation of organosolv pretreatment on the structural characteristics of lignin polymers and follow-up enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrates from Eucalyptus wood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Shen, Xiao-Jun; Wen, Jia-Long; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Run-Cang

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, Eucalyptus was subjected to organosolv pretreatment processes with aqueous 2-propanol at 200-220°C to obtain lignin with benign characters for its valorization and digestible substrates for bioethanol production. Results showed that different delignification ratios (64.00%-81.26%) and molecular weights (Mw=610-2680g/mol) of lignin fractions were dissociated from various pretreatment conditions, and the glucose yields of all the pretreated substrates significantly increased to 54.65-88.59% as compared to that of raw material (9.20%). Additionally, the amounts of β-O-4, β-β, and β-5 substructures were regularly decreased with the increased temperature and time. By contrast, the structural characteristics of the lignin fractions obtained with 70% 2-PrOH/water were less-altered than those with 50% 2-PrOH/water pretreatment. Remarkably, lignin with the lowest molecular weight (Mw=610g/mol) and less-altered chemical structure was achieved at 200°C for 120min, which is beneficial to subsequent catalytic degradation of lignin.

  4. Comparative SNP diversity among four Eucalyptus species for genes from secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Külheim, Carsten; Hui Yeoh, Suat; Maintz, Jens; Foley, William J; Moran, Gavin F

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little information about the DNA sequence variation within and between closely related plant species. The combination of re-sequencing technologies, large-scale DNA pools and availability of reference gene sequences allowed the extensive characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of ecologically relevant secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus. With this approach the occurrence and patterns of SNP variation for a set of genes can be compared across different species from the same genus. Results In a single GS-FLX run, we sequenced over 103 Mbp and assembled them to approximately 50 kbp of reference sequences. An average sequencing depth of 315 reads per nucleotide site was achieved for all four eucalypt species, Eucalyptus globulus, E. nitens, E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba. We sequenced 23 genes from 1,764 individuals and discovered 8,631 SNPs across the species, with about 1.5 times as many SNPs per kbp in the introns compared to exons. The exons of the two closely related species (E. globulus and E. nitens) had similar numbers of SNPs at synonymous and non-synonymous sites. These species also had similar levels of SNP diversity, whereas E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba had much higher SNP diversity. Neither the pathway nor the position in the pathway influenced gene diversity. The four species share between 20 and 43% of the SNPs in these genes. Conclusion By using conservative statistical detection methods, we were confident about the validity of each SNP. With numerous individuals sampled over the geographical range of each species, we discovered one SNP in every 33 bp for E. nitens and one in every 31 bp in E. globulus. In contrast, the more distantly related species contained more SNPs: one in every 16 bp for E. camaldulensis and one in 17 bp for E. loxophleba, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest frequency of SNPs described in woody plant

  5. Genomic patterns of species diversity and divergence in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey J; Freeman, Jules S; Myburg, Alexander A; Potts, Brad M; Vaillancourt, René E

    2015-06-01

    We examined genome-wide patterns of DNA sequence diversity and divergence among six species of the important tree genus Eucalyptus and investigated their relationship with genomic architecture. Using c. 90 range-wide individuals of each Eucalyptus species (E. grandis, E. urophylla, E. globulus, E. nitens, E. dunnii and E. camaldulensis), genetic diversity and divergence were estimated from 2840 polymorphic diversity arrays technology markers covering the 11 chromosomes. Species differentiating markers (SDMs) identified in each of 15 pairwise species comparisons, along with species diversity (HHW ) and divergence (FST ), were projected onto the E. grandis reference genome. Across all species comparisons, SDMs totalled 1.1-5.3% of markers and were widely distributed throughout the genome. Marker divergence (FST and SDMs) and diversity differed among and within chromosomes. Patterns of diversity and divergence were broadly conserved across species and significantly associated with genomic features, including the proximity of markers to genes, the relative number of clusters of tandem duplications, and gene density within or among chromosomes. These results suggest that genomic architecture influences patterns of species diversity and divergence in the genus. This influence is evident across the six species, encompassing diverse phylogenetic lineages, geography and ecology. © 2015 University of Tasmania New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Acaricidal activity of eugenol on Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    de Monteiro, Caio Márcio; Maturano, Ralph; Daemon, Erik; Catunda-Junior, Francisco Eduardo Aragão; Calmon, Fernanda; Senra, Tatiane de Souza; Faza, Aline; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity of eugenol, with different solubilizations and concentrations, on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens larvae and to determine the lethal time. The study consisted of four experiments, and the mortality was assessed using the larval packet test with adaptations. The mortality observed in the first experiment was 100 % for all the groups treated with eugenol solubilized in different solvents. In the second, the hydroethanolic formulation of eugenol was used, and the mortality rates for R. microplus and D. nitens was 100 % starting from the concentration of 5.0 μl/ml. In the third experiment, the mortality was 100 % for larvae of both R. microplus and D. nitens after 1 h of contact. And in the fourth experiment, the mortality was above 90 % and statistically similar (p > 0.05) for the four methods the test evaluated.

  7. Larval survival of Anocentor nitens under simulated natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Díaz, G; de la Vega, R

    2000-01-01

    Basic knowledge about the survival of free living stages of ticks is of great importance as a practical tool to improve control methods. For Anocentor nitens there is little information on this subject. Eighty-four engorged females were incubated at 30 degrees C and 100% relative humidity. After 17 days, groups of 5,500 eggs each were collected and isolated in vials. Age zero was defined as 10 days after eclosion had begun. At this time vials with larvae were attached to 40 Sorghum halepense plants sowed in clay pots, under outdoor conditions, and separated from one another by 30 cm in order to prevent the larvae from mixing. Four hours later vials were retired and the larvae remaining in the vials were counted. The next day four plants were sampled and this survival considered as 100%. Each week for eight weeks the same sampling procedure was performed. The remaining four plants were used to determine the maximum larval survival (MLS). Four repetitions of the procedure were performed, two in March 1989 and two in September 1989.

  8. Use of plastic tips in artificial feeding of Dermacentor (Anocentor) nitens females Neumann, 1897 (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla Carolina Dias Uzedo; Baêta, Bruna de Azevedo; Valim, Jaqueline Rodrigues de Almeida; Teixeira, Rafaella Câmara; Cepeda, Patrícia Barizon; da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique

    2014-10-01

    The establishment of laboratory colonies of ticks is often hampered by their lack of adaptation to alternative hosts. The aim of this study was to artificially feed partially engorged Dermacentor (Anocentor) nitens females through plastic tips, and to identify what are the optimal conditions of application of this technique to get as much as possible close to the natural conditions. The technique of artificial feeding through plastic tips allowed the engorgement of D. nitens ticks to a final weight within the normal range for the species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing clones of Eucalyptus cloeziana resistant to rust (Puccinia psidii)

    Treesearch

    Rafael F. Alfenas; Marcelo M. Coutinho; Camila S. Freitas; Rodrigo G. Freitas; Acelino C. Alfenas

    2012-01-01

    Besides its high resistance to Chrysoporthe cubensis canker, Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell. is a highly valuable tree species for wood production. It can be used for furniture, electric poles, fence posts, and charcoal. Nevertheless, it is highly susceptible to the rust caused by Puccinia psidii, which...

  10. Influence of nutrient availability, stand age, and canopy structure on isoprene flux in a Eucalyptus saligna experimental forest

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Funk; Christian P. Giardina; Alexander Knohl; Manuel T. Lerdau

    2006-01-01

    Eucalyptus plantations occupy approximately 10 million ha of land in the tropics and, increasingly, afforestation and reforestation projects are relying on this genus to provide rapid occupation of degraded sites, large quantities of high-quality wood products, and high rates of carbon sequestration. Members of the genus Eucalyptus...

  11. Primitive Auxin Response without TIR1 and Aux/IAA in the Charophyte Alga Klebsormidium nitens1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yuri; Seo, Mitsunori

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates many aspects of growth and development in land plants, but the origin and evolution of auxin signaling and response mechanisms remain largely unknown. Indeed, it remains to be investigated whether auxin-related pathways diverged before the emergence of land plants. To address this knowledge deficit, we analyzed auxin responses in the charophyte alga Klebsormidium nitens NIES-2285, whose ancestor diverged from a green algal ancestor during the evolution of land plants. This strain is the same as Klebsormidium flaccidum NIES-2285, for which the draft genome was sequenced in 2014, and was taxonomically reclassified as K. nitens. This genome sequence revealed genes involved in auxin responses. Furthermore, the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was detected in cultures of K. nitens, but K. nitens lacks the central regulators of the canonical auxin-signaling pathway found in land plants. Exogenous IAA inhibited cell division and cell elongation in K. nitens. Inhibitors of auxin biosynthesis and of polar auxin transport also inhibited cell division and elongation. Moreover, exogenous IAA rapidly induced expression of a LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES-DOMAIN transcription factor. These results suggest that K. nitens has acquired the part of the auxin system that regulates transcription and cell growth without the requirement for the central players that govern auxin signaling in land plants. PMID:28533212

  12. On the persistence of reproductive barriers in Eucalyptus: the bridging of mechanical barriers to zygote formation by F1 hybrids is counteracted by intrinsic post-zygotic incompatibilities.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Matthew J; Costa E Silva, João; Tilyard, Paul; Gore, Peter; Potts, Brad M

    2016-09-01

    Many previous studies conclude that pre-zygotic barriers such as mechanical isolation account for most reproductive isolation between pairs of taxa. However, the inheritance and persistence of barriers such as these after the first generation of hybridization is rarely quantified, even though it is a vital consideration in understanding gene flow potential. There is an asymmetrical pre-zygotic mechanical barrier to hybridization between Eucalyptus nitens and Eucalyptus globulus, which completely prevents small-flowered E. nitens pollen from mating with large E. globulus flowers, while the reverse cross is possible. We aimed to determine the relative importance of pre- and post-zygotic barriers in preventing gene flow following secondary contact between E. nitens and E. globulus, including the inheritance of barriers in advanced-generation hybrids. Experimental crossing was used to produce outcrossed E. nitens, E. globulus and their F1, F2, BCg and BCn hybrids. The strength and inheritance of a suite of pre- and post-zygotic barriers were assessed, including 20-year survival, growth and reproductive capacity. The mechanical barrier to hybridization was lost or greatly reduced in the F1 hybrid. In contrast, intrinsic post-zygotic barriers were strong and persistent. Line-cross analysis indicated that the outbreeding depression in the hybrids was best explained by epistatic loss. The removal of strong mechanical barriers between E. nitens and E. globulus allows F1 hybrids to act as a bridge for bi-directional gene flow between these species. However, strong and persistent post-zygotic barriers exist, meaning that wherever F1 hybridization does occur, intrinsic post-zygotic barriers will be responsible for most reproductive isolation in this system. This potential transient nature of mechanical barriers to zygote formation due to additive inheritance in hybrids appears under-appreciated, and highlights the often important role that intrinsic post-mating barriers play

  13. Syngonanthus nitens Bong. (Rhul.)-Loaded Nanostructured System for Vulvovaginal Candidiasis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; de Toledo, Luciani Gaspar; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; de Freitas Araújo, Marcelo Gonzaga; Dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2016-08-22

    Herbal-loaded drug delivery nanotechnological systems have been extensively studied recently. The antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants has shown better pharmacological action when such plants are loaded into a drug delivery system than when they are not loaded. Syngonanthus nitens Bong. (Rhul.) belongs to the Eriocaulaceae family and presents antiulcerogenic, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of Syngonanthus nitens (S. nitens) extract that was not loaded (E) or loaded (SE) into a liquid crystal precursor system (S) for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) with Candida albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the microdilution technique. Additionally, we performed hyphae inhibition and biofilm tests. Finally, experimental candidiasis was evaluated in in vivo models with Wistar female rats. The results showed effective antifungal activity after incorporation into S for all strains tested, with MICs ranging from 31.2 to 62.5 μg/mL. Microscopic observation of SE revealed an absence of filamentous cells 24 h of exposure to a concentration of 31.2 μg/mL. E demonstrated no effective action against biofilms, though SE showed inhibition against biofilms of all strains. In the in vivo experiment, SE was effective in the treatment of infection after only two days of treatment and was more effective than E and amphotericin B. The S. nitens is active against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and the antifungal potential is being enhanced after incorporation into liquid crystal precursor systems (LCPS). These findings represent a promising application of SE in the treatment of VVC.

  14. Syngonanthus nitens Bong. (Rhul.)-Loaded Nanostructured System for Vulvovaginal Candidiasis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; de Toledo, Luciani Gaspar; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; de Freitas Araújo, Marcelo Gonzaga; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2016-01-01

    Herbal-loaded drug delivery nanotechnological systems have been extensively studied recently. The antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants has shown better pharmacological action when such plants are loaded into a drug delivery system than when they are not loaded. Syngonanthus nitens Bong. (Rhul.) belongs to the Eriocaulaceae family and presents antiulcerogenic, antioxidant, antibacterial, and antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of Syngonanthus nitens (S. nitens) extract that was not loaded (E) or loaded (SE) into a liquid crystal precursor system (S) for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) with Candida albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the microdilution technique. Additionally, we performed hyphae inhibition and biofilm tests. Finally, experimental candidiasis was evaluated in in vivo models with Wistar female rats. The results showed effective antifungal activity after incorporation into S for all strains tested, with MICs ranging from 31.2 to 62.5 μg/mL. Microscopic observation of SE revealed an absence of filamentous cells 24 h of exposure to a concentration of 31.2 μg/mL. E demonstrated no effective action against biofilms, though SE showed inhibition against biofilms of all strains. In the in vivo experiment, SE was effective in the treatment of infection after only two days of treatment and was more effective than E and amphotericin B. The S. nitens is active against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and the antifungal potential is being enhanced after incorporation into liquid crystal precursor systems (LCPS). These findings represent a promising application of SE in the treatment of VVC. PMID:27556451

  15. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  16. Vegetation management in Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Clyde L. Elmore

    1983-01-01

    Weeds and weed control are a major problem in the growth and management of Eucalyptus trees. Annual, biennial and perennial weed species are common in sites to be planted. These weeds should be controlled before planting. Preplant, preemergence and postemergence herbicides are discussed. Safe preemergence herbicides include oryzalin, napropamide, oxadiazon, linuron and...

  17. Specific gravity variation in robusta eucalyptus grown in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1972-01-01

    The specific gravity (air-dry volume, ovendry weight) of Eucalyptus robusta wood was tested within and between trees from 10 stands. Mean specific gravity was 0.603, but the range in individual samples for 50 trees was 0.331 to 0.869, and was 0.357 to 0.755 within one cross section. A consistent increase was recorded in all trees from pith to cambium and from butt to...

  18. The genome of Eucalyptus grandis

    SciTech Connect

    Myburg, Alexander A.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Hellsten, Uffe; Hayes, Richard D.; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Lindquist, Erika; Tice, Hope; Bauer, Diane; Goodstein, David M.; Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexandre; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Kullan, Anand R. K.; Hussey, Steven G.; Pinard, Desre; van der Merwe, Karen; Singh, Pooja; van Jaarsveld, Ida; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Togawa, Roberto C.; Pappas, Marilia R.; Faria, Danielle A.; Sansaloni, Carolina P.; Petroli, Cesar D.; Yang, Xiaohan; Ranjan, Priya; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ye, Chu-Yu; Li, Ting; Sterck, Lieven; Vanneste, Kevin; Murat, Florent; Soler, Marçal; Clemente, Hélène San; Saidi, Naijib; Cassan-Wang, Hua; Dunand, Christophe; Hefer, Charles A.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kersting, Anna R.; Vining, Kelly; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Ranik, Martin; Naithani, Sushma; Elser, Justin; Boyd, Alexander E.; Liston, Aaron; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Dharmwardhana, Palitha; Raja, Rajani; Sullivan, Christopher; Romanel, Elisson; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William; Carocha, Victor; Paiva, Jorge; Kudrna, David; Brommonschenkel, Sergio H.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Byrne, Margaret; Rigault, Philippe; Tibbits, Josquin; Spokevicius, Antanas; Jones, Rebecca C.; Steane, Dorothy A.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Potts, Brad M.; Joubert, Fourie; Barry, Kerrie; Pappas, Georgios J.; Strauss, Steven H.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Salse, Jérôme; Van de Peer, Yves; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schmutz, Jeremy

    2014-06-11

    Eucalypts are the world s most widely planted hardwood trees. Their broad adaptability, rich species diversity, fast growth and superior multipurpose wood, have made them a global renewable resource of fiber and energy that mitigates human pressures on natural forests. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640 Mbp genome of Eucalyptus grandis into its 11 chromosomes. A set of 36,376 protein coding genes were predicted revealing that 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion found thus far in any plant genome. Eucalypts also show the highest diversity of genes for plant specialized metabolism that act as chemical defence against biotic agents and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Resequencing of a set of inbred tree genomes revealed regions of strongly conserved heterozygosity, likely hotspots of inbreeding depression. The resequenced genome of the sister species E. globulus underscored the high inter-specific genome colinearity despite substantial genome size variation in the genus. The genome of E. grandis is the first reference for the early diverging Rosid order Myrtales and is placed here basal to the Eurosids. This resource expands knowledge on the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology.

  19. Lumber potential of 12-year-old Saligna eucalyptus trees in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1974-01-01

    The sawtimber potential of 12-year-old Eucalyptus saligna Sm. trees grown in Maui, Hawaii, was studied by using simple field techniques. Lumber manufactured from the trees was predominantly of low grade, but had lower average density than wood from older trees, and therefore was more desirable. Logs end-split badly, and sawed with the usually...

  20. The Effect of Fertilization on Sap flux and Canopy Conductance in a Eucalyptus saligna Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    R. Hubbard; M. Ryan; C. Giardina; H. Barnard

    2004-01-01

    Land devoted to plantation forestry (50 million ha) has been increasing worldwide the genus Eucalyptus is a popular plantation species (14 million ha) for its rapid growth and ability to grow well on a wide range of sites. Fertilization is a common silvicultural tool to improve tree growth with potential effects on stand water use, but relationship between wood growth...

  1. Alkaloids extracted from Pterogyne nitens induce apoptosis in malignant breast cell line.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; Mello, Elaine Rodrigues; Araki, Camila; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Siqueira e Silva, Dulce Helena; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Silva, Tarsia Giabardo Alves; de Morais, Mauro César Cafundó; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Soares, Christiane Pienna

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, two alkaloids isolated from Pterogyne nitens, a plant native to Brazil, have been shown to induce apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. These compounds, pterogynine (PGN) and pterogynidine (PGD), were tested for their effect on a human infiltrating ductal carcinoma cell line (ZR-7531). The cell line was treated with each alkaloid at several concentrations. Time-dependence (with or without recuperation time) and concentration-dependence (in the range 0.25-10 mM) were investigated in cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays. The annexin assay indicated an apparently higher percentage of death by necrosis of malignant cells after 24 h exposure to both P. nitens extracts than the Hoechst assay. Thus, our results in the two tests demonstrated that the Hoechst assay can discriminate between late apoptotic cells and necrosis, whereas the flow cytometry-based annexin V assay cannot. We concluded that PGN and PGD have effective antineoplastic activity against human breast cancer cells in vitro, by inducing programmed cell death.

  2. Vasorelaxant effects of Brillantaisia nitens Lindau (Acanthaceae) extracts on isolated rat vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dimo, T; Mtopi, O-S Bopda; Nguelefack, T B; Kamtchouing, P; Zapfack, L; Asongalem, E A; Dongo, E

    2007-04-20

    Brillantaisia nitens Lindau (Acanthaceae) is traditionally used in Cameroon for the treatment of many diseases including cardiovascular disorders. We have studied its vasorelaxant effects in rat vascular smooth muscle. In this study, aqueous, methylene chloride, methanol, and methylene chloride/methanol leaves extracts of Brillantaisia nitens were tested for their relaxing ability in vitro. Strips of rat aorta, with or without intact endothelium, were mounted in tissue baths, contracted with KCl (60mM) or norepinephrine (10(-4)M), and then exposed to the plant extracts. These extracts exhibited concentration-dependent vasorelaxations of norepinephrine-induced contractions of intact aortic strips. The EC(50) were 0.42+/-0.01mg/ml (aqueous extract), 0.63+/-0.02mg/ml (methylene chloride extract), 0.73+/-0.02mg/ml (methanol extract) and 0.36+/-0.02mg/ml (methylene chloride/methanol extract). The methylene chloride/methanol (CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH) extract was the most potent relaxing extract. It caused a concentration-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of the rat aortic strips contracted by KCl or norepinephrine. On the NE-induced contraction, its maximal relaxant activity (109%) due to the dose of 1.5mg/ml, was not significantly modified by the pretreatment of aortic strips with indomethacin (89%, P>0.05) or with l-NAME (103%, P>0.05). This suggests that the vasorelaxation elicited by CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract was not mediated via endothelium-derived prostacyclin or nitric oxide. In contrast, this relaxation was markedly reduced by tetraethylammonium, a blocker of non-selective K(+) channels and glibenclamide, a blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. The CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-induced concentration-contraction and the Ca(2+) influx in aortic strips incubated with 60mM KCl. These results indicate that the vasorelaxant effect of the CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract of Brillantaisia nitens is due to an inhibition of Ca(2+) influx

  3. Mixed plantations of eucalyptus and leguminous trees enhance biomass production. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    DeBell, D.S.; Whitesell, C.D.; Schubert, T.H.

    1985-07-01

    Two Eucalyptus species--E. Saligna and E. grandis--are especially favored in Hawaii for wood, fiber, and fuel production because of their quick growth and high yields. Their growth is limited, however, on many sites by low levels of available nitrogen. Supplemental nitrogen can be provided by nitrogen-fixing plants, such as legumes. A test was conducted to determine whether planting two leguminous species--Acacia melanoxylon and Albizia falcataria Fosberg--could increase biomass production. Total biomass production was much greater in the mixed-species plantations than in the pure Eucalyptus plantation.

  4. Nitensidine A, a guanidine alkaloid from Pterogyne nitens, induces osteoclastic cell death.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasuhiro; Murase, Hayato; Satake, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Yuji; Regasini, Luis Octavio; da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan; Efferth, Thomas; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Nitensidine A is a guanidine alkaloid isolated from Pterogyne nitens, a common plant in South America. To gain insight into the biological activity of P. nitens-produced compounds, we examined herein their biological effects on osteoclasts, multinucleated giant cells that regulate bone metabolism by resorbing bone. Among four guanidine alkaloids (i.e., galegine, nitensidine A, pterogynidine, and pterogynine), nitensidine A and pterogynine exhibited anti-osteoclastic effects at 10 μM by reducing the number of osteoclasts on the culture plate whereas galegine and pterogynidine did not. The anti-osteoclastic activities of nitensidine A and pterogynine were exerted in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas nitensidine A exhibited an approximate threefold stronger effect than pterogynine (IC50 values: nitensidine A, 0.93 ± 0.024 μM; pterogynine, 2.7 ± 0.40 μM). In the present study, the anti-osteoclastic effects of two synthetic nitensidine A derivatives (nitensidine AT and AU) were also examined to gain insight into the structural features of nitensidine A that exert an anti-osteoclastic effect. The anti-osteoclastic effect of nitensidine A was greatly reduced by substituting the imino nitrogen atom in nitensidine A with sulfur or oxygen. According to the differences in chemical structures and anti-osteoclastic effects of the four guanidine alkaloids and the two synthetic nitensidine A derivatives, it is suggested that the number, binding site, and polymerization degree of isoprenyl moiety in the guanidine alkaloids and the imino nitrogen atom cooperatively contribute to their anti-osteoclastic effects.

  5. Toxicokinetics and time-variable toxicity of cadmium in Oppia nitens Koch (Acari: Oribatida).

    PubMed

    Keshavarz Jamshidian, Maryam; Verweij, Rudo A; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Van Straalen, Nico M

    2017-02-01

    The soil-living mite Oppia nitens Koch has recently been proposed as a promising test species for the ecotoxicological risk assessment of contaminated boreal soils. Adding oribatid mites to the assemblage of test species for soil is highly desirable given the enormous diversity and ecological significance of these microarthropods. The authors aimed at revealing how toxicity, lethal body concentration, and bioaccumulation of cadmium (Cd) changed over a period of 7 wk when mites were exposed to Cd-spiked natural soils. The estimated median lethal concentration (LC50) values showed a gradual decrease with time, but a steady state was not reached within 7 wk. Estimates for lethal body concentration varied from 44 μg Cd/g to 91 μg Cd/g dry body weight, with a tendency to increase with time. The estimated 50% effective concentration (EC50) for effects on reproduction after 7-wk exposure was 345 μg Cd/g dry soil. Accumulation of Cd in mites was extremely variable but overall showed a nonsaturating increase. A simple 1-compartment toxicokinetic model did not describe the data well. The analysis suggests that O. nitens has a storage-detoxification strategy that is not at equilibrium under chronic exposure. Considering the tiny body size of the animal, it is remarkable that long exposure times are necessary to reveal chronic toxicity. The use of oribatids provides a clear added value to soil risk assessment but trades off with exposure length. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:408-413. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  6. Life cycle and parasitic competence of Dermacentor nitens Neumann, 1897 (Acari: Ixodidae) on different animal species.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vinicius da Silva; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Zimmermann, Namor Pinheiro; Koller, Wilson Werner; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalcante; Andreotti, Renato

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the life cycle and parasitic competence of Dermacentor nitens (Neumann, 1897) on different animal species. Experimental infestations were induced in five specimens each of seven species of possible hosts: rabbits, horses, sheep, cows, guinea pigs, birds and dogs. Rabbits were infested in the ear using artificial feeding chambers, and the horses, sheep, cows and dogs were infested in the ear without feeding chambers. For the infestation of guinea pigs, artificial feeding chambers were fixed on the back. Birds were infested by placing larvae on the back and under the wings without the use of chambers. All animals were inspected daily until the end of the parasitic phase (when the engorged females detached). The average period of engorgement was 25.1days on a horse, with larvae requiring 8days and nymphs 9days to reach engorgement; the average weight of engorged females was 271.4mg; the average weight of egg batches produced was 159.3mg, and the feed conversion rate was 56.8%. On rabbits, the average engorgement period was 27.6days, larvae and nymphs reached engorgement after 7.4 and 11days, respectively, the average weight of an engorged female was 108.4mg and the egg mass was 30.6mg. The feed conversion rate on rabbits was 30%. Cows, sheep, guinea pigs, dogs and birds were not competent hosts, since no engorged females were recovered. Rabbits, when artificially infested, can be used as an alternative host for the maintenance of these ticks in the laboratory. The parasitic specificity of D. nitens for horses was demonstrated in this study.

  7. Isolation and characterization of lignins from Eucalyptus tereticornis (12ABL).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiping; Lu, Fachuang; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2010-11-10

    A three-step sequential extraction-precipitation method was used to isolate lignin from Eucalyptus tereticornis. The ball-milled eucalyptus was extracted with 96% dioxane, 50% dioxane, and 80% dioxane containing 1% NaOH at boiling temperature, consecutively resulting in solubilization of lignin and hemicelluloses. By precipitating such solutions into 70% aqueous ethanol, the hemicelluloses were removed substantially although there were still some carbohydrates left over, especially for lignin fraction extracted by 50% dioxane. Lignins dissolved in the 70% ethanol solutions were recovered via concentration and precipitation into acidified water. About 37% of the original lignin was released following such procedure whereas only 13.5% can be isolated by traditional milled wood lignin (MWL) method. The obtained lignin fractions were analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) following acid hydrolysis for sugar composition of the contaminating carbohydrates and characterized by quantitative (31)P NMR as well as two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence ((13)C-(1)H) NMR. The results showed that 96% aqueous dioxane extraction of ball-milled wood under conditions used in this study resulted in lignin preparation with very similar structures and sugar composition as traditional MWL. Therefore extracting ball-milled wood with 96% aqueous dioxane produced lignin in 33.6% yield, which makes it very attractive as an alternative to the traditional MWL method. However further extraction with 50% aqueous dioxane or 80% aqueous dioxane containing 1% NaOH gave just a little more lignins with different carbohydrate compositions from those in MWL. The eucalyptus lignins obtained were syringyl and guaiacyl type units. Lignin fraction obtained from 96% dioxane extraction was found to have more phenolic hydroxyl and less aliphatic hydroxyl than the other two preparations.

  8. Phytophthora captiosa sp. nov. and P. fallax sp. nov. causing crown dieback of Eucalyptus in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dick, Margaret A; Dobbie, Kiryn; Cooke, David E L; Brasier, Clive M

    2006-04-01

    A locally severe crown disease of exotic plantation Eucalyptus trees has been recorded periodically in New Zealand since 1986. Symptoms include leaf spots, petiole infection and twig and small branch lesions. Outbreaks of disease are episodic and individual trees may show marked variation in crown symptoms ranging from unaffected to total defoliation. Two previously unknown species of Phytophthora are associated with the disease. These are described and formally designated here as P. captiosa, from Eucalyptus botryoides and E. saligna; and P. fallax, from E. delegatensis, E. fastigata, E. nitens and E. regnans. Both P. captiosa and P. fallax have non-papillate, non-caducous sporangia and both are self-fertile. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of ITS rDNA sequence data indicates they are closely related to each other but evolutionarily distant from the majority of described Phytophthora taxa. They share a common ancestor with another assemblage of Phytophthora lineages that includes P. insolita, P. macrochlamydospora and P. richardiae. Sporulation of P. captiosa and P. fallax has not been observed in the field. The mode of infection and spread of these non-caducous Phytophthora species in the eucalypt tree canopy remains unknown. This issue, and the possible geographic origins of these two Phytophthora species are discussed.

  9. Wood and Wood Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Raymond A.

    Wood has been utilized by humans since antiquity. Trees provided a source of many products required by early humans such as food, medicine, fuel, and tools. For example, the bark of the willow tree, when chewed, was used as a painkiller in early Greece and was the precursor of the present-day aspirin. Wood served as the primary fuel in the United States until about the turn of the 19th century, and even today over one-half of the wood now harvested in the world is used for heating fuel.

  10. Acaricidal activity of hydroethanolic formulations of thymol against Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Daemon, Erik; Maturano, Ralph; Monteiro, Caio Márcio de Oliveira; Goldner, Márcio Scoralik; Massoni, Tainara

    2012-05-25

    The aim of this study was to assess the acaricidal activity of hydroethanolic formulations of thymol at varying concentrations on Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Dermacentor nitens larvae. The larval packet test was used and the thymol concentrations tested were 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 mg/ml. The control group was exposed only to water and ethanol (50/50%) and there were 10 repetitions for each treatment. The mortality was evaluated after 24 h. For the R. sanguineus larvae, the mortality rates were 47.5, 50.2, 96.7, 95.9 and 98.1%, while for D. nitens the rates were 14.1, 75.0, 90.2, 90.3 and 99.5%, at respective thymol concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 mg/ml. The results indicate that the hydroethanolic formulations of thymol tested have acaricidal activity on R. sanguineus and D. nitens larvae exposed topically, causing mortality greater than 90% 24 h post-treatment starting at the concentration of 10 mg/ml.

  11. Biological, medicinal and toxicological significance of Eucalyptus leaf essential oil: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Ashok K; Pandey, Vijay V; Beg, Sobia; Rawat, Janhvi M; Singh, Avtar

    2017-07-31

    The genus Eucalyptus L'Heritier comprises about 900 species, of which more than 300 species contain volatile essential oil in their leaves. About 20 species, within these, have a high content of 1,8-cineole (more than 70%), commercially used for the production of essential oils in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. However, Eucalyptus is extensively planted for pulp, plywood and solid wood production, but its leaf aromatic oil has astounding widespread biological activities, including antimicrobial, antiseptic, antioxidant, chemotherapeutic, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorder treatment, wound healing, and insecticidal/insect repellent, herbicidal, acaricidal, nematicidal, and perfumes, soap making and grease remover. In the present review, we have made an attempt to congregate the biological ingredients of leaf essential oil, leaf oil as a natural medicine, and pharmacological and toxicological values of the leaf oil of different Eucalyptus species worldwide. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Fundamental characteristics of microwave explosion pretreatment of wood. I, Properties of temperature development

    Treesearch

    Xian-jun Li; Ke-yang Lu; Lan-ying Lin; Yong-dong Zhou; Zhi-yong Cai; Feng Fu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of microwave radiation intensity, radiation time and initial wood moisture content (MC) on the properties of temperature development in Eucalyptus urophylla wood samples during the microwave explosion pretreatment have been investigated using a new microwave pretreatment equipment. The results show that 1) with the increase of microwave...

  13. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  14. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture.” Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  15. Xylem transcription profiles indicate potential metabolic responses for economically relevant characteristics of Eucalyptus species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. Results Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. Conclusions The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity. PMID:23521840

  16. Xylem transcription profiles indicate potential metabolic responses for economically relevant characteristics of Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marcela Mendes; Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Camargo, Eduardo Leal Oliveira; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Lepikson Neto, Jorge; Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Deckmann, Ana Carolina; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2013-03-22

    Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity.

  17. Global timber investments, wood costs, regulation, and risk

    Treesearch

    F. Cubbage; S. Koesbandana; P Mac Donagh; R. Rubilar; G Balmelli; V. Morales Olmos; R. De La Torre; M. Murara; V.A. Hoeflich; H. Kotze; R Gonzalez; O. Carrero; G. Frey; T. Adams; J. Turner; R. Lord; J. Huang; C. MacIntyre; Kathleen McGinley; R. Abt; R. Phillips

    2010-01-01

    We estimated financial returns and wood production costs in 2008 for the primary timber plantation species. Excluding land costs, returns for exotic plantations in almost all of South America e Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Colombia, Venezuela, and Paraguay e were substantial. Eucalyptus species returns were generally greater than those for Pinus species in each...

  18. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow

    2010-01-01

    Many commonly used wood species can deteriorate if exposed to conditions that support growth of wood-degrading organisms (see Chap. 14). Wood products can be protected from the attack of decay fungi, harmful insects, or marine borers by applying chemical preservatives. Preservative treatments greatly increase the life of wood structures, thus reducing replacement costs...

  19. Use of new endophytic fungi as pretreatment to enhance enzymatic saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sampedro, Raquel; Fillat, Úrsula; Ibarra, David; Eugenio, María E

    2015-11-01

    New endophytic fungi are assessed for the first time as pretreatment to enhance saccharification of Eucalyptus globulus wood. The fungi are all laccase-producing ascomycetes and were isolated from eucalyptus trees in Spain. After five endophytes had been assayed alone or in combination with white-rot fungus Trametes sp. I-62, three were pre-selected. To improve sugar production, an autohydrolysis pretreatment was performed before or after fungal treatment. Pretreatment increased sugar production 2.7 times compared to non-pretreated wood. When fungal and autohydrolysis pretreatments were combined, a synergistic increase in saccharification was observed in all cases. Endophytic fungi Ulocladium sp. and Hormonema sp. produced greater enhancements in saccharification than Trametes sp. I-62 (increase in sugar yields of 8.5, 8.0 and 6.0 times, respectively), demonstrating the high potential of these new endophytic fungi for saccharification enhancement.

  20. Eucalyptus as a landscape tree

    Treesearch

    W. Douglas Hamilton

    1983-01-01

    Ninety-two species of Eucalyptus were evaluated at the University of California re- search station in San Jose. The purpose: to find acceptable new street and park trees. Growth rates and horticultural characteristics were noted. Forty-three species were studied in locations statewide to evaluate site adaptation and landscape usefulness; flooded, cold, dry, saline....

  1. Human ABCB1 confers cells resistance to cytotoxic guanidine alkaloids from Pterogyne nitens.

    PubMed

    Satake, Kazuhiro; Tsukamoto, Megumi; Mitani, Yuji; Regasini, Luis Octavio; da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan; Efferth, Thomas; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by human ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein/MDR1) is one of the major obstacles in chemotherapy. To understand the mechanism of MDR by ABCB1 and circumvent the MDR, in the present study, we established human ABCB1-expressing cells (Flp-In-293/ABCB1 cells) and examined the cytotoxic effects of four guanidine alkaloids from Pterogyne nitens (galegine, nitensidine A, pterogynidine and pterogynine) using Flp-In-293/Mock and Flp-In-293/ABCB1 cells. The activity of ABCB1 in Flp-In-293/ABCB1 cells were confirmed by typical substrates for ABCB1 (taxol and vinblastine) in MTT assay. Flp-In-293/ABCB1 cells were also resistant to the four guanidine alkaloids as well as taxol and vinblastine compared to Flp-In-293/Mock cells although the four guanidine alkaloids exhibited cytotoxicity against the two Flp-In-293 cells. Furthermore, the four guanidine alkaloids were also found to stimulate the ATPase activity of ABCB1 in ATPase assays. These results suggest that ABCB1 can confer the resistance to the cytotoxic guanidine alkaloids by transporting them.

  2. Wood Smoke

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine, microscopic particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn. The biggest health threat from wood smoke comes from fine particles (also called particulate matter).

  3. The genome of Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Myburg, Alexander A; Grattapaglia, Dario; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hellsten, Uffe; Hayes, Richard D; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Lindquist, Erika; Tice, Hope; Bauer, Diane; Goodstein, David M; Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexandre; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Kullan, Anand R K; Hussey, Steven G; Pinard, Desre; van der Merwe, Karen; Singh, Pooja; van Jaarsveld, Ida; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Togawa, Roberto C; Pappas, Marilia R; Faria, Danielle A; Sansaloni, Carolina P; Petroli, Cesar D; Yang, Xiaohan; Ranjan, Priya; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Ye, Chu-Yu; Li, Ting; Sterck, Lieven; Vanneste, Kevin; Murat, Florent; Soler, Marçal; Clemente, Hélène San; Saidi, Naijib; Cassan-Wang, Hua; Dunand, Christophe; Hefer, Charles A; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kersting, Anna R; Vining, Kelly; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Ranik, Martin; Naithani, Sushma; Elser, Justin; Boyd, Alexander E; Liston, Aaron; Spatafora, Joseph W; Dharmwardhana, Palitha; Raja, Rajani; Sullivan, Christopher; Romanel, Elisson; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William; Carocha, Victor; Paiva, Jorge; Kudrna, David; Brommonschenkel, Sergio H; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Byrne, Margaret; Rigault, Philippe; Tibbits, Josquin; Spokevicius, Antanas; Jones, Rebecca C; Steane, Dorothy A; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Joubert, Fourie; Barry, Kerrie; Pappas, Georgios J; Strauss, Steven H; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Salse, Jérôme; Van de Peer, Yves; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Schmutz, Jeremy

    2014-06-19

    Eucalypts are the world's most widely planted hardwood trees. Their outstanding diversity, adaptability and growth have made them a global renewable resource of fibre and energy. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640-megabase genome of Eucalyptus grandis. Of 36,376 predicted protein-coding genes, 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion thus far in plant genomes. Eucalyptus also shows the highest diversity of genes for specialized metabolites such as terpenes that act as chemical defence and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Genome sequencing of the E. grandis sister species E. globulus and a set of inbred E. grandis tree genomes reveals dynamic genome evolution and hotspots of inbreeding depression. The E. grandis genome is the first reference for the eudicot order Myrtales and is placed here sister to the eurosids. This resource expands our understanding of the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology.

  4. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2003-01-01

    When wood is exposed to various environmental conditions, many degradation reactions (biological, ultraviolet, mechanical, moisture, and chemical) can occur. To protect wood from biological degradation, chemical preservatives are applied by nonpressure or pressure treatment. Penetration and retention of a chemical depend upon the wood species and the amount of...

  5. Transmission of Babesia caballi by Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) Is Restricted to One Generation in the Absense of Alimentary Reinfection on a Susceptible Equine Host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tropical horse tick, Dermacentor nitens, is the natural vector of Babesia caballi in the Americas; the distribution of this tick in the United States is limited to the southernmost parts of Florida and Texas. Babesia caballi, one of the etiologic agents of equine babesiosis, occurs widely throug...

  6. Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) Coparasitize White-Tailed Deer on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Suzanne L; Durden, Lance A; Reuter, Jon D

    2017-09-01

    Ticks parasitizing introduced white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, were recorded during and after drought conditions. Tick infestation prevalences were 22% at the start of the drought (July 2015), 66% at the height of the drought (March 2016), and 35% after the drought had ended (July 2016; n = 67 deer). Samples of ticks from 22 tranquilized deer in July 2016 revealed the presence of two species, the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini), and the tropical horse tick, Dermacentor (Anocentor) nitens Neumann. Both tick species have considerable veterinary importance, especially for cattle and horses, respectively, as nuisance biters and also as vectors of parasitic piroplasms or of Anaplasma marginale Theiler. All 22 deer examined were infested by R. microplus, whereas 14 (64%) of the samples also included specimens of D. nitens. Because of the large numbers of ticks recorded, wild deer on St. John could develop associated health problems (pruritis, alopecia, anemia, low weight gain, tick-borne pathogens and parasites) and could also serve as a source of these ticks for cattle and horses. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. First record of Borrelia burgdorferi B31 strain in Dermacentor nitens ticks in the northern region of Parana (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Daniela Dib; Carreira, Teresa; Nunes, Mónica; Benitez, Aline; Lopes-Mori, Fabiana Maria Ruiz; Vidotto, Odilon; de Freitas, Julio Cesar; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) in ticks that feed on horses used for animal traction in rural Jataizinho, Parana, Brazil. Between February and June 2008, a total of 224 ticks was collected of which 75% were identified as Dermacentor nitens and 25% as Amblyomma cajenense. To amplify B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA, the intergenic space region (ISR) between the 5S (rrf) 23S (rrl) rRNA genes was used as targets for nested-PCR. Two ticks of the D. nitens species were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. Both species showed a fragment of 184 bp, but the sequencing revealed 99.9% homology with the B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) strain B31. These results showed, for the first time, the presence of spirochete DNA infecting ticks that parasitize horses used for animal traction, in the rural municipality mentioned. In conclusion, this study opens up promising prospects for determining the infection rate of B. burgdorferi s.s. genospecies or other species in the equine population, as well as the impact of the infection rate on Lyme disease in the state of Parana.

  8. First record of Borrelia burgdorferi B31 strain in Dermacentor nitens ticks in the northern region of Parana (Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Daniela Dib; Carreira, Teresa; Nunes, Mónica; Benitez, Aline; Lopes-Mori, Fabiana Maria Ruiz; Vidotto, Odilon; de Freitas, Julio Cesar; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) in ticks that feed on horses used for animal traction in rural Jataizinho, Parana, Brazil. Between February and June 2008, a total of 224 ticks was collected of which 75% were identified as Dermacentor nitens and 25% as Amblyomma cajenense. To amplify B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA, the intergenic space region (ISR) between the 5S (rrf) 23S (rrl) rRNA genes was used as targets for nested-PCR. Two ticks of the D. nitens species were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. Both species showed a fragment of 184 bp, but the sequencing revealed 99.9% homology with the B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) strain B31. These results showed, for the first time, the presence of spirochete DNA infecting ticks that parasitize horses used for animal traction, in the rural municipality mentioned. In conclusion, this study opens up promising prospects for determining the infection rate of B. burgdorferi s.s. genospecies or other species in the equine population, as well as the impact of the infection rate on Lyme disease in the state of Parana. PMID:24516456

  9. Constituent analysis of the ethanol extracts of Chimonanthus nitens Oliv. leaves and their inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Ouyang, Kehui; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Zhanwei; Hu, Wenbing; Xiong, Lei; Wang, Ning; Liu, Xin; Wang, Wenjun

    2017-05-01

    The ethanol extracts of Chimonanthus nitens Oliv. leaves were prepared sequentially by ethanol gradient elution and tested for their α-glucosidase inhibitory. The fraction of 50% ethanol eluate (EE) exhibited the notable inhibition with IC50 of 0.376mg/mL. Also, 50% EE was chemically characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Eight compounds including rutin (1), hyperin (2), isoquercitrin (3), luteoloside (4), astragalin (6), quercetin (13), naringenin (14), kaempferol (15) were identified by compared with standard substances as well as proper luteolin-5-O-glucoside (5), kaempferol-7-O-rhamnoside (9), 5,7,8-trihydroxy-2-methoxyl-flavone-7-O-glucoside (10), kaempferol-7-O-acetyl-galactoside (11). The experiments of ultra-filtration combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UF-LC-MS) guided quercetin and kaempferol as the key factors for 50% EE showing highly inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase. Quercetin and kaempferol inhibited yeast α-glucosidase in a mixed-type manner with IC50 of 66.8 and 109μg/mL, respectively. These results would provide theoretical underpinning for the C. nitens Oliv. leaves ethanol extracts used as nutraceutical health supplement in the management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Creating a database on Eucalyptus for California

    Treesearch

    Miles L. Merwin

    1983-01-01

    While public agencies, nurserymen and landscapers are receiving more inquiries about individual eucalyptus species for California plantings, little information is readily available to them on the potential usefulness or adaptability of these species. A survey of eucalyptus species was undertaken to collect information on their performance both in California trials,...

  11. Aggregate stability in soils cultivated with eucalyptus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eucalyptus cultivation has increased in many Brazilian regions. In order to recommend good management practices, it is necessary to understand changes in soil properties where eucalyptus is planted. Aggregate stability analyses have proved to be a useful tool to measure soil effects caused by change...

  12. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment VI. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm: the natural system interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-05-01

    A review of pertinent literature covered the following: eucalypt background, the candidate species, biomass plantation considerations, effects of site production, leachate and allelopathy, and some exotic flora considerations. The comparative eucalypt field survey covers mined land stands, unmined south Florida stands, and Glade County eucalypt stands. The problem of eucalypt naturalization is discussed.

  13. Eucalyptus production and the supply, use and efficiency of use of water, light and nitrogen across a geographic gradient in Brazil

    Treesearch

    Jose Luiz Stape; Dan Binkley; Michael G. Ryan

    Millions of hectares of Eucalyptus are intensively managed for wood production in the tropics, but little is known about the physiological processes that control growth and their regulation. We examined the main environmental factors controlling growth and resource use across a geographic gradient with clonal E. grandis x urophylla in north-eastern Brazil. Rates of...

  14. First insights into the functional role of vasicentric tracheids and parenchyma in eucalyptus species with solitary vessels: do they contribute to xylem efficiency or safety?

    PubMed

    Barotto, Antonio José; Fernandez, María Elena; Gyenge, Javier; Meyra, Ariel; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Monteoliva, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between hydraulic specific conductivity (ks) and vulnerability to cavitation (VC) with size and number of vessels has been studied in many angiosperms. However, few of the studies link other cell types (vasicentric tracheids (VT), fibre-tracheids, parenchyma) with these hydraulic functions. Eucalyptus is one of the most important genera in forestry worldwide. It exhibits a complex wood anatomy, with solitary vessels surrounded by VT and parenchyma, which could serve as a good model to investigate the functional role of the different cell types in xylem functioning. Wood anatomy (several traits of vessels, VT, fibres and parenchyma) in conjunction with maximum ks and VC was studied in adult trees of commercial species with medium-to-high wood density (Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Eucalyptus viminalis Labill. and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.). Traits of cells accompanying vessels presented correlations with functional variables suggesting that they contribute to both increasing connectivity between adjacent vessels-and, therefore, to xylem conduction efficiency-and decreasing the probability of embolism propagation into the tissue, i.e., xylem safety. All three species presented moderate-to-high resistance to cavitation (mean P50 values = -2.4 to -4.2 MPa) with no general trade-off between efficiency and safety at the interspecific level. The results in these species do not support some well-established hypotheses of the functional meaning of wood anatomy.

  15. Essential oil composition of Eucalyptus microtheca and Eucalyptus viminalis

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodlou, Malek Taher; Kazemipoor, Nasrin; Valizadeh, Jafar; Falak Nezhad Seifi, Mohsen; Rahneshan, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eucalyptus (Fam. Myrtaceae) is a medicinal plant and various Eucalyptus species possess potent pharmacological actions against diabetes, hepatotoxicity, and inflammation. This study aims to investigate essential oil composition from leaves and flowers of E. microtheca and E. viminalis leaves growing in the Southeast of Iran. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of these plants were collected from Zahedan, Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran in 2013. After drying the plant materials in the shade, the chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by hydro-distillation method using a Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by GC/MS. Results: In the essential oil of E. microtheca leaves, 101 compounds representing 100%, were identified. Among them, α-phellandrene (16.487%), aromadendrene (12.773%), α-pinene (6.752%), globulol (5.997%), ledene (5.665%), P-cymen (5.251%), and β-pinene (5.006%) were the major constituents. In the oil of E. microtheca flowers, 88 compounds representing 100%, were identified in which α-pinene (16.246%), O-cymen (13.522%), β-pinene (11.082%), aromadendrene (7.444%), α-phellandrene (7.006%), globulol (5.419%), and 9-octadecenamide (5.414%) were the major components. Sixty six compounds representing 100% were identified in the oil of E. viminalis leaves. The major compounds were 1, 8-cineole (57.757%), α-pinene (13.379%), limonene (5.443%), and globulol (3.054%). Conclusion: The results showed the essential oils from the aerial parts of Eucalyptus species are a cheap source for the commercial isolation of α-phellandrene, α-pinene, and 1, 8-cineole compounds to be used in medicinal and food products. Furthermore, these plants could be an alternative source of insecticide agents. PMID:26693411

  16. Advancing Eucalyptus Genomics: Cytogenomics Reveals Conservation of Eucalyptus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Teresa; Barrela, Ricardo M.; Bergès, Hélène; Marques, Cristina; Loureiro, João; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor; Paiva, Jorge A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Eucalyptus encloses several species with high ecological and economic value, being the subgenus Symphyomyrtus one of the most important. Species such as E. grandis and E. globulus are well characterized at the molecular level but knowledge regarding genome and chromosome organization is very scarce. Here we characterized and compared the karyotypes of three economically important species, E. grandis, E. globulus, and E. calmadulensis, and three with ecological relevance, E. pulverulenta, E. cornuta, and E. occidentalis, through an integrative approach including genome size estimation, fluorochrome banding, rDNA FISH, and BAC landing comprising genes involved in lignin biosynthesis. All karyotypes show a high degree of conservation with pericentromeric 35S and 5S rDNA loci in the first and third pairs, respectively. GC-rich heterochromatin was restricted to the 35S rDNA locus while the AT-rich heterochromatin pattern was species-specific. The slight differences in karyotype formulas and distribution of AT-rich heterochromatin, along with genome sizes estimations, support the idea of Eucalyptus genome evolution by local expansions of heterochromatin clusters. The unusual co-localization of both rDNA with AT-rich heterochromatin was attributed mainly to the presence of silent transposable elements in those loci. The cinnamoyl CoA reductase gene (CCR1) previously assessed to linkage group 10 (LG10) was clearly localized distally at the long arm of chromosome 9 establishing an unexpected correlation between the cytogenetic chromosome 9 and the LG10. Our work is novel and contributes to the understanding of Eucalyptus genome organization which is essential to develop successful advanced breeding strategies for this genus. PMID:27148332

  17. Carbon isotope fractionation in wood during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, C. S. M.; Wheeler, D.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2006-02-01

    A significant uncertainty exists as to whether δ 13C values in charcoal meaningfully represent the stable isotopic content of the original material, with studies suggesting variable responses to both natural and laboratory heating. An extensive study was undertaken using fully homogenised samples of wood taken from Eucalyptus spp., Quercus robur and Pinus radiata. The results demonstrate that the duration of heating had no tangible effect on the final composition of the charred material, with the δ 13C and carbon content of wood fixed after 30 min of heating. Furthermore, all three wood types become progressively depleted in 13C with increasing temperature. The results demonstrate that even at temperatures commonly reached in natural fires (<450 °C) isotopic fractionation of up to 1.3‰ can take place indicating that the absolute values obtained from charcoal extracted for paleoenvironmental reconstruction must be interpreted with caution.

  18. Species Discrimination, Population Structure and Linkage Disequilibrium in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus tereticornis Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Arumugasundaram, Shanmugapriya; Ghosh, Modhumita; Veerasamy, Sivakumar; Ramasamy, Yasodha

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. tereticornis are closely related species commonly cultivated for pulp wood in many tropical countries including India. Understanding the genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) existing in these species is essential for the improvement of industrially important traits. Our goal was to evaluate the use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci for species discrimination, population structure and LD analysis in these species. Investigations were carried out with the most common alleles in 93 accessions belonging to these two species using 62 SSR markers through cross amplification. The polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.44 to 0.93 and 0.36 to 0.93 in E. camaldulensis and E. tereticornis respectively. A clear delineation between the two species was evident based on the analysis of population structure and species-specific alleles. Significant genotypic LD was found in E. camaldulensis, wherein out of 135 significant pairs, 17 pairs showed r2≥0.1. Similarly, in E. tereticornis, out of 136 significant pairs, 18 pairs showed r2≥0.1. The extent of LD decayed rapidly showing the significance of association analyses in eucalypts with higher resolution markers. The availability of whole genome sequence for E. grandis and the synteny and co-linearity in the genome of eucalypts, will allow genome-wide genotyping using microsatellites or single nucleotide polymorphims. PMID:22163287

  19. Microwave Characterization of Typical Australian Wood-Based Biomass Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Shanmuganathan; Moghtaderi, Behdad

    2009-03-01

    Many applications of microwave energy to wood-based materials require a reliable estimation of permittivity, which is the physical parameter of crucial importance in the absorption of electromagnetic energy. Wood-based materials are of significant importance in a number of application areas particularly in: (i) power generation, (ii) fire safety, and (iii) manufacturing. In the present study, dielectric measurements were carried out for typical Australian wood species such as slash pine (Pinus elliottii, soft wood), and spotted gum (Eucalyptus maculata, hard wood), based on Von Hippel's transmission line method. The influence of extractive removal is also studied and compared with the virgin wood samples. Measurements were performed at 9.5 GHz for virgin wood samples and extractive-free wood samples. Experiments were carried out at room temperatures and atmospheric pressure. The dielectric properties of wood species were determined for three principle structural directions (i.e. longitudinal, tangential and radial) and different moisture contents. Moisture content varied from 0% to 15% for virgin wood samples and from 3-6.6% for extractive-free wood samples at atmospheric equilibrium condition. Results indicated that for both wood species the dielectric constant was affected by moisture content, structural direction and density. The dielectric properties of both wood species were found to be quantitatively similar. In general, for virgin wood samples the dielectric constant was found to increase with moisture content and density. The values of dielectric constant in the longitudinal direction were generally higher than those in the transverse direction for both types of wood species. An abnormal trend was obtained for extractive—free wood samples.

  20. Wood composites

    Treesearch

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  1. Nitensidine A, a guanidine alkaloid from Pterogyne nitens, is a novel substrate for human ABC transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Ai; Kadioglu, Onat; Satake, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Yuji; Murase, Hayato; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Fricker, Gert; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-02-15

    The Pterogyne nitens (Fabaceae) tree, native to South America, has been found to produce guanidine alkaloids as well as bioactive flavonols such as kaempferol, quercetin, and rutin. In the present study, we examined the possibility of interaction between human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 and four guanidine alkaloids isolated from P. nitens (i.e., galegine, nitensidine A, pterogynidine, and pterogynine) using human T cell lymphoblast-like leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM and its multi-drug resistant (MDR) counterpart CEM/ADR5000. In XTT assays, CEM/ADR5000 cells were resistant to the four guanidine alkaloids compared to CCRF-CEM cells, although the four guanidine alkaloids exhibited some level of cytotoxicity against both CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 cells. In ATPase assays, three of the four guanidine alkaloids were found to stimulate the ATPase activity of ABCB1. Notably, nitensidine A was clearly found to stimulate the ATPase activity of ABCB1 as strongly as the control drug, verapamil. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of nitensidine A on CEM/ADR5000 cells was synergistically enhanced by verapamil. Nitensidine A inhibited the extrusion of calcein by ABCB1. In the present study, the possibility of interaction between ABCB1 and two synthetic nitensidine A analogs (nitensidine AT and AU) were examined to gain insight into the mechanism by which nitensidine A stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1. The ABCB1-dependent ATPase activity stimulated by nitensidine A was greatly reduced by substituting sulfur (S) or oxygen (O) for the imino nitrogen atom (N) in nitensidine A. Molecular docking studies on human ABCB1 showed that, guanidine alkaloids from P. nitens dock to the same binding pocket as verapamil. Nitensidine A and its analogs exhibit similar binding energies to verapamil. Taken together, this research clearly indicates that nitensidine A is a novel substrate for ABCB1. The present results also suggest that the number, binding site, and polymerization

  2. Electrophysiological responses of Atta sexdens rubropilosa workers to essential oils of eucalyptus and its chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Fernandes, João B; da Silva, M Fátima G E; Vieira, Paulo C; Bueno, Odair C; Corrêa, Arlene G

    2006-01-01

    The leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel, 1908 is the most harmful of the Eucalyptus pests, causing severe losses in wood production through defoliation. Various strategies have been tried and effort spent on the development of methods to control this pest, however no practical and environmentally acceptable one currently exists. In this work the chemical composition of the essential oil of seven Eucalyptus species was identified and the selectivity and sensitivity of antennal receptors of A. sexdens rubropilosa workers to the volatile compounds were determined using the electroantennographic technique (EAG and GC-EAD). Analysis by GC-EAD showed in E. cloesiana and E. maculata, respectively, seventeen and sixteen terpenes that elicited responses in ant workers' antennae, indicating the potential role of the essential oils as allelochemicals that determine the choice of the foraging material.

  3. Eucalyptus globulus (Eucalyptus) Treatment of Candidiasis in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bokaeian, Mohammad; Nakhaee, Alireza; Moodi, Bita; Ali Khazaei, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Background: The leaves of Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus) are used for treatment of diabetes mellitus in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of eucalyptus in treatment of established systemic infection with Candida albicans in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Sixty normoglycemic male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 g, were selected and randomly divided into six groups (n= 10): normal control, control + C. albicans, control + eucalyptus + C. albicans, diabetic control, diabetic + C. albicans, diabetic + eucalyptus + C. albicans. Diabetes was induced after a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight) and eucalyptus was added to the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/L) of treated animals for 4 weeks. The concerned groups were inoculated with C. albicans 15 days after diabetes induction. At the end of one month experiment, fasted rats were killed by cervical decapitation. Blood was collected from neck vein for estimation of glucose. C. albicans concentrations were estimated in liver and kidneys using serial dilution culture of tissue homogenates. Results: Eucalyptus administration significantly improved the hyperglycemia, polydipsia, polyphagia, and it also compensated weight loss of diabetic rats (P<0.05). Moreover, eucalyptus caused a significant reduction in C. albicans concentration in liver and kidney homogenates (P<0.01). Conclusion: The results revealed that eucalyptus improves Candidia infection in normal and diabetic rats that in some ways validates the traditional use of this plant in treatment of diabetic patients. PMID:21079663

  4. Acaricidal activity of methanol extract of Acmella oleracea L. (Asteraceae) and spilanthol on Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Cruz, Paula Barroso; Barbosa, Alan Franco; Zeringóta, Viviane; Melo, Diego; Novato, Tatiane; Fidelis, Queli Cristina; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo; Oliveira Sabaa-Srur, Armando Ubirajara; Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira

    2016-09-15

    We evaluated the acaricidal activity of Acmella oleracea methanol extract and spilanthol on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens. The extract was made through maceration with methanol. From this extract, a dichloromethane fraction with 99% spilanthol was obtained and tested on R. microplus larvae and engorged females and D. nitens larvae. For evaluation against larvae, the modified larval packet test was used, and both the methanol extract and dichloromethane fraction were tested at concentrations of 0.2-50mg/mL. The modified larval packet test was also used in the lethal time (LT) test, with the methanol extract at a concentration of 12.5mg/mL and the percentage mortality was assessed after 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120min and 24h. The 50% lethal time calculation (LT50) was performed in this test. The engorged female test was performed with R. microplus only, at concentrations of 25-200mg/mL for methanol extract and 2.5-20.0mg/mL for spilanthol. The methanol extract caused 100% mortality of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae at concentrations of 3.1 and 12.5mg/mL, respectively. Spilanthol resulted in 100% mortality of R. microplus larvae at concentration of 1.6mg/mL and of D. nitens at 12.5mg/mL. In the lethal time assay using the methanol extract, the mortality rate was 100% for R. microplus and D. nitens larvae after 120min and 24h, with LT50 values of 38 and 57min, respectively. In the test of females, the egg mass weight and the hatching percentage of the groups treated with concentrations equal to or higher than 50.0mg/mL of methanol extract were significantly reduced (p<0.05), while for spilanthol, the reduction of the egg mass weight and hatching percentage occurred from concentrations of 10.0mg/mL and 2.5mg/mL, respectively. Females treated with 200.0mg/mL of extract died before starting oviposition, resulting in 100% effectiveness, while the best efficacy for spilanthol was 92.9% at a concentration of 20.0mg/mL. Thus we conclude that the

  5. Wood biodegradation in laboratory-scale landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M; De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this research was to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of major wood products in municipal waste by measuring methane yields, decay rates, the extent of carbohydrate decomposition, carbon storage, and leachate toxicity. Tests were conducted in triplicate 8 L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane yields for red oak, eucalyptus, spruce, radiata pine, plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB) from hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW), particleboard (PB) and medium-density fiberboard (MDF) were 32.5, 0, 7.5, 0.5, 6.3, 84.5, 0, 5.6, and 4.6 mL CH(4) dry g(-1), respectively. The red oak, a HW, exhibited greater decomposition than either SW (spruce and radiata), a trend that was also measured for the OSB-HW relative to OSB-SW. However, the eucalyptus (HW) exhibited toxicity. Thus, wood species have unique methane yields that should be considered in the development of national inventories of methane production and carbon storage. The current assumption of uniform biodegradability is not appropriate. The ammonia release from urea formaldehyde as present in PB and MDF could contribute to ammonia in landfill leachate. Using the extent of carbon conversion measured in this research, 0-19.9%, predicted methane production from a wood mixture using the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change waste model is only 7.9% of that predicted using the 50% carbon conversion default.

  6. Demonstration of laccase-based removal of lignin from wood and non-wood plant feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ana; Rencoret, Jorge; Cadena, Edith M; Rico, Alejandro; Barth, Dorothee; del Río, José C; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-09-01

    The ability of Trametes villosa laccase, in conjuction with 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) as mediator and alkaline extraction, to remove lignin was demonstrated during treatment of wood (Eucalyptus globulus) and non-wood (Pennisetum purpureum) feedstocks. At 50 Ug(-1) laccase and 2.5% HBT concentration, 48% and 32% of the Eucalyptus and Pennisetum lignin were removed, respectively. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of the feedstocks, swollen in dimethylsulfoxide-d(6), revealed the removal of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl and syringyl lignin units and aliphatic (mainly β-O-4'-linked) side-chains of lignin, and a moderate removal of p-coumaric acid (present in Pennisetum) without a substantial change in polysaccharide cross-signals. The enzymatic pretreatment (at 25 Ug(-1)) of Eucalyptus and Pennisetum feedstocks increased the glucose (by 61% and 12% in 72 h) and ethanol (by 4 and 2 g L(-1) in 17 h) yields from both lignocellulosic materials, respectively, as compared to those without enzyme treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    1999-01-01

    When left untreated in many outdoor applications, wood becomes subject to degradation by a variety of natural causes. Although some trees possess naturally occurring resistance to decay (Ch. 3, Decay Resistance), many are in short supply or are not grown in ready proximity to markets. Because most commonly used wood species, such as Southern Pine, ponderosa pine, and...

  8. Southern California trial plantings of Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Paul W. Moore

    1983-01-01

    A trial planting to compare the biomass production of 9 tree species was established in May 1979. Species compared were Acacia melanoxylon, Casuarina cunninghamiana, Casuarina equisitifolia, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, E. dalrympleana, E...

  9. A single cell model for pretreatment of wood by microwave explosion

    Treesearch

    Xianjun Li; Yongdong Zhou; Yonglin Yan; Zhiyong Cai; Fu Feng

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to better understand the process of microwave explosion treatment of wood cells. The cell expansion and critical conditions concerning pressure and temperature of ray parenchyma cells in Eucalyptus urophylla were simulated during microwave pretreatment. The results indicate that longitudinal and circumferential stresses were generated...

  10. The Eucalyptus terpene synthase gene family.

    PubMed

    Külheim, Carsten; Padovan, Amanda; Hefer, Charles; Krause, Sandra T; Köllner, Tobias G; Myburg, Alexander A; Degenhardt, Jörg; Foley, William J

    2015-06-11

    Terpenoids are abundant in the foliage of Eucalyptus, providing the characteristic smell as well as being valuable economically and influencing ecological interactions. Quantitative and qualitative inter- and intra- specific variation of terpenes is common in eucalypts. The genome sequences of Eucalyptus grandis and E. globulus were mined for terpene synthase genes (TPS) and compared to other plant species. We investigated the relative expression of TPS in seven plant tissues and functionally characterized five TPS genes from E. grandis. Compared to other sequenced plant genomes, Eucalyptus grandis has the largest number of putative functional TPS genes of any sequenced plant. We discovered 113 and 106 putative functional TPS genes in E. grandis and E. globulus, respectively. All but one TPS from E. grandis were expressed in at least one of seven plant tissues examined. Genomic clusters of up to 20 genes were identified. Many TPS are expressed in tissues other than leaves which invites a re-evaluation of the function of terpenes in Eucalyptus. Our data indicate that terpenes in Eucalyptus may play a wider role in biotic and abiotic interactions than previously thought. Tissue specific expression is common and the possibility of stress induction needs further investigation. Phylogenetic comparison of the two investigated Eucalyptus species gives insight about recent evolution of different clades within the TPS gene family. While the majority of TPS genes occur in orthologous pairs some clades show evidence of recent gene duplication, as well as loss of function.

  11. Kinetic modeling of kraft delignification of Eucalyptus globulus

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A.; Rodriguez, F.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Moreno, D.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.

    1997-10-01

    A kinetic model for the kraft pulping delignification of Eucalyptus globulus is proposed. This model is discriminated among some kinetic expressions often used in the literature, and the kinetic parameters are determined by fitting of experimental results. A total of 25 isothermal experiments at liquor-to-wood ratios of 50 and 5 L/kg have been carried out. Initial, bulk, and residual delignification stages have been observed during the lignin removal, the transitions being, referring to the lignin initial content, about 82 and 3%. Carbohydrate removal and effective alkali-metal and hydrosulfide consumption have been related with the lignin removal by means of effective stoichiometric coefficients for each stage, coefficients also being calculated by fitting of the experimental data. The kinetic model chosen has been used to simulate typical kraft pulping experiments carried out at nonisothermal conditions, using a temperature ramp. The model yields simulated values close to those obtained experimentally for the wood studied and also ably reproduces the trends of the literature data.

  12. Wood colors and their coloring matters: a review.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-03-01

    A number of colored specialty woods, such as ebony, rosewood, mahogany and amboyna, and commercially important woods, such as morus, logwood, Brazilwood, Japanese yellowwood, blackwood, kwila, red beech and myrtle beech, exhibit a wide range of colors from black, violet, dark red, reddish brown, to pale yellow. These colors are not only due to colored pigments contained in extractives from those woods but also to insoluble polymers. Wood and bark from many species of both hardwood and softwood trees contain many types of flavonoid compounds. Research on flavonoids has been conducted mainly from two points of view. The first is chemotaxonomy with flavonoid compounds as taxonomic markers, and the second relates to the utilization of woods for pulp and paper and the use of tannins from bark for wood adhesives. Most chemotaxonomic studies have been conducted on flavonoids in the extracts from softwoods such as Podocarpus, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Larix, Taxus, Libocedrus, Tsuja, Taxodium, Sequoia, Cedrus, Tsuga, Abies and Picea. Hardwood chemotaxonomic studies include those on Prunus and Eucalyptus species. Studies on flavonoids in pulp and paper production were conducted on Eucalyptus woods in Australia and woods from Douglas fir in the USA and larch in Japan. Flavonoids as tannin resources from black wattle tannin and quebracho tannin have been used commercially as wood adhesives. Flavonoids in the bark from radiata pine and southern pine, from western and eastern hemlock, southern red oak and Quercus dentata are also discussed. In addition, the distribution of flavonoids among tree species is described, as is the first isolation of rare procyanidin glycosides in nature.

  13. Chemical composition of particles from traditional burning of Pakistani wood species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Total particulate matter (TPM) emitted during burning of three types of Pakistani wood (eucalyptus camaldulensis, local name Safeeda; acacia nilotica, local name Kikar, Babul; dalbergia sissoo, Shisham, Tali) in a traditional brick stove were collected and analyzed for anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, trace metals, soluble ions and carbonaceous species. This is a first study reporting anhydrosugars in wood smoke particles emitted during traditional burning of common wood types in Pakistan. Carbonaceous species showed the highest contribution to the particulate matter. Although the total carbon (TC) contribution was similar for all burnings (64.8-70.2%), the EC/OC ratio varied significantly, from 0.2 to 0.3 for Accacia and Dalbergia to 0.7-0.8 for Eucalyptus and Wood-mix. Among inorganic constituents potassium chloride and silicon were found at levels higher than 1%. The levoglucosan concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 6.6% (average 5.6%) with the highest value for Accacia and lowest value for the wood-mix. The high levoglucosan/mannosan ratios of 20-28 were typical for hardwood. The ratio between levoglucosan and galactosan varied stronger and was found to be around 13-20 for Accacia, Eucalyptus and Wood mix, and 43 for Dalbergia. The determined levoglucosan concentrations allowed assessing the conversion factor for calculation of biomass smoke contribution to ambient particulate matter levels in Pakistan.

  14. Evaluation of the combined effect of thymol, carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde on Amblyomma sculptum (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Novato, Tatiane Pinheiro Lopes; Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; de Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Maturano, Ralph; Senra, Tatiane de Oliveira Souza; da Silva Matos, Renata; Gomes, Geovany Amorim; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo; Daemon, Erik

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of thymol, carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde on Amblyomma sculptum and Dermacentor nitens larvae. The effects resulting from treatments were evaluated by means of the modified larval packet test. In order to determine the LC50, components of essential oils, the monoterpenes thymol, carvacrol and phenylpropanoid (E)-cinnamaldehyde were individually tested at different concentrations. After determining the LC50, each essential oil component was separately evaluated and then combined with another substance at a 1:1 proportion at the LC50 concentration and at 1/2 and 1/4 of the LC50. For A. sculptum, the lowest LC50 value was obtained for (E)-cinnamaldehyde (1.40 mg/ml), followed by thymol (2.04 mg/ml) and carvacrol (3.49 mg/ml). The same order of effectiveness was observed for D. nitens, with values of 1.68, 2.17 and 3.33 mg/ml, respectively. In the evaluation of component associations of essential oils against A. sculptum larvae, only the combinations between carvacrol and thymol (LC50) and carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde (1/4 LC50) presented a moderate synergetic effect. In turn, for D. nitens larvae, the combinations between thymol and carvacrol (LC50 and 1/2 LC50) presented a synergetic effect, while the others presented an additive or antagonistic effect. Therefore, it can be concluded that the combination of thymol and carvacrol (LC50) has a moderate synergetic effect against A. sculptum larvae, while thymol, combined with carvacrol (LC50 and 1/2 LC50), has a synergetic effect against D. nitens larvae.

  15. Assessment of the acaricidal activity of carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, trans-anethole, and linalool on larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Souza Senra, Tatiane; Zeringóta, Viviane; de Oliveira Monteiro, Caio Márcio; Calmon, Fernanda; Maturano, Ralph; Gomes, Geovany Amorim; Faza, Aline; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo; Daemon, Erik

    2013-04-01

    The acaricidal activity of carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, trans-anethole, and linalool was studied on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens larvae. All the substances were tested at concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 μl/ml, with 10 repetitions per treatment. The modified larval packet technique was employed in the tests and the mortality was evaluated after 24 h. In the groups treated with carvacrol, the lowest concentration (2.5 μl/ml) was sufficient to cause 100% death of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae. The same concentration of (E)-cinnamaldehyde resulted in death of approximately 99% of the larvae of both tick species and reached 100% at the other concentrations. For trans-anethole, mortality rates above 90% of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae were only observed starting at the concentration of 15.0 μl/ml and reached 100% at the highest concentration (20.0 μl/ml). Finally, the mortality rates of the groups treated with linalool were low, only reaching 8.4 and 14.5% at the highest concentration (20.0 μl/ml) for larvae of D. nitens and R. microplus, respectively. These results show that carvacrol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, and trans-anethole have acaricidal activity, particularly carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde, both of which resulted in high mortality rates for the larvae of these two tick species even at the lowest concentration.

  16. Wood stains

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in wood stains are hydrocarbons, or substances that contain only carbon and hydrogen. Other harmful ingredients may include: Alcohol Alkanes Cyclo alkanes Glycol ether Corrosives, such as sodium ...

  17. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Kevin Archer; Stan Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood preservation can be interpreted to mean protection from fire, chemical degradation, mechanical wear, weathering, as well as biological attack. In this chapter, the term preservation is applied more restrictively to protection from biological hazards.

  18. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Ye, Duo; Liang, Hongwen; Zhu, Hongguang; Qin, Lin; Zhu, Yuling; Wen, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR) and a second rotation (SR) stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC) did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC) and soil organic matter (SOC) stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha(-1) and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha(-1), respectively) and forest floor carbon (FFC) conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha(-1)). The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool) of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential.

  19. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Ye, Duo; Liang, Hongwen; Zhu, Hongguang; Qin, Lin; Zhu, Yuling; Wen, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR) and a second rotation (SR) stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC) did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC) and soil organic matter (SOC) stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha-1 and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha-1, respectively) and forest floor carbon (FFC) conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha-1). The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool) of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential. PMID:26186367

  20. Flavonoid supplementation affects the expression of genes involved in cell wall formation and lignification metabolism and increases sugar content and saccharification in the fast-growing eucalyptus hybrid E. urophylla x E. grandis.

    PubMed

    Lepikson-Neto, Jorge; Nascimento, Leandro C; Salazar, Marcela M; Camargo, Eduardo L O; Cairo, João P F; Teixeira, Paulo J; Marques, Wesley L; Squina, Fabio M; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Deckmann, Ana C; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2014-11-19

    Eucalyptus species are the most widely planted hardwood species in the world and are renowned for their rapid growth and adaptability. In Brazil, one of the most widely grown Eucalyptus cultivars is the fast-growing Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis hybrid. In a previous study, we described a chemical characterization of these hybrids when subjected to flavonoid supplementation on 2 distinct timetables, and our results revealed marked differences between the wood composition of the treated and untreated trees. In this work, we report the transcriptional responses occurring in these trees that may be related to the observed chemical differences. Gene expression was analysed through mRNA-sequencing, and notably, compared to control trees, the treated trees display differential down-regulation of cell wall formation pathways such as phenylpropanoid metabolism as well as differential expression of genes involved in sucrose, starch and minor CHO metabolism and genes that play a role in several stress and environmental responses. We also performed enzymatic hydrolysis of wood samples from the different treatments, and the results indicated higher sugar contents and glucose yields in the flavonoid-treated plants. Our results further illustrate the potential use of flavonoids as a nutritional complement for modifying Eucalyptus wood, since, supplementation with flavonoids alters its chemical composition, gene expression and increases saccharification probably as part of a stress response.

  1. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential wood combustion in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, Mário; Gomes, Luís; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to characterize formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential combustion of common wood species growing in Portugal. Five types of wood were investigated: maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), cork oak (Quercus suber), holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) and pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica). Laboratory experiments were performed with a typical wood stove used for domestic heating in Portugal and operating under realistic home conditions. Aldehydes were sampled from diluted combustion flue gas using silica cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The average formaldehyde to acetaldehyde concentration ratio (molar basis) in the stove flue gas was in the range of 2.1-2.9. Among the tested wood types, pyrenean oak produced the highest emissions for both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde: 1772 ± 649 and 1110 ± 454 mg kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. By contrast, maritime pine produced the lowest emissions: 653 ± 151 and 371 ± 162 mg kg-1 biomass (dry basis) burned, respectively. Aldehydes were sampled separately during distinct periods of the holm oak wood combustion cycles. Significant variations in the flue gas concentrations were found, with higher values measured during the devolatilization stage than in the flaming and smoldering stages.

  2. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material.

    Treesearch

    Forest Products Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  3. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Forest Products Laboratory. USDA Forest Service.

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  4. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  5. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  6. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  7. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  8. Propagation and planting of containerized Eucalyptus seedlings in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gerald A. Walters

    1983-01-01

    A container reforestation system has been researched and developed in Hawaii which results in consistently high survival and growth rates for eucalyptus seedlings. Mean survival of containerized saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus saligna Smith) seedlings is 90 percent with a standard deviation of 4. Because transplant shock is minimal, seedlings begin to...

  9. A model system to study the lignification process in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Pedro; Cesarino, Igor; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Ferrari, Ilse Fernanda; Kiyota, Eduardo; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Recalcitrance of plant biomass is closely related to the presence of the phenolic heteropolymer lignin in secondary cell walls, which has a negative effect on forage digestibility, biomass-to-biofuels conversion and chemical pulping. The genus Eucalyptus is the main source of wood for pulp and paper industry. However, when compared to model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar, relatively little is known about lignin biosynthesis in Eucalyptus and only a few genes were functionally characterized. An efficient, fast and inexpensive in vitro system was developed to study lignification in Eucalyptus globulus and to evaluate the potential role of candidate genes in this biological process. Seedlings were grown in four different conditions, in the presence or absence of light and with or without sucrose in the growth medium, and several aspects of lignin metabolism were evaluated. Our results showed that light and, to a lesser extent, sucrose induced lignin biosynthesis, which was followed by changes in S/G ratio, lignin oligomers accumulation and gene expression. In addition, higher total peroxidase activity and differential isoperoxidase profile were observed when seedlings were grown in the presence of light and sucrose. Peptide sequencing allowed the identification of differentially expressed peroxidases, which can be considered potential candidate class III peroxidases involved in lignin polymerization in E. globulus.

  10. Eucalyptus growth promotion by endophytic Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Paz, I C P; Santin, R C M; Guimarães, A M; Rosa, O P P; Dias, A C F; Quecine, M C; Azevedo, J L; Matsumura, A T S

    2012-10-11

    Clonal eucalyptus plantings have increased in recent years; however, some clones with high production characteristics have vegetative propagation problems because of weak root and aerial development. Endophytic microorganisms live inside healthy plants without causing any damage to their hosts and can be beneficial, acting as plant growth promoters. We isolated endophytic bacteria from eucalyptus plants and evaluated their potential in plant growth promotion of clonal plantlets of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis, known as the hybrid, E. urograndis. Eighteen isolates of E. urograndis, clone 4622, were tested for plant growth promotion using the same clone. These isolates were also evaluated for indole acetic acid production and their potential for nitrogen fixation and phosphate solubilization. The isolates were identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA. Bacillus subtilis was the most prevalent species. Several Bacillus species, including B. licheniformis and B. subtilis, were found for the first time as endophytes of eucalyptus. Bacillus sp strain EUCB 10 significantly increased the growth of the root and aerial parts of eucalyptus plantlets under greenhouse conditions, during the summer and winter seasons.

  11. California wood energy program

    Treesearch

    Gary Brittner

    1983-01-01

    Many varieties of eucalyptus adapt well to growing conditions in the coastal and central valley regions of California. The California Department of Forestry is conducting growth research on a variety of sites throughout the state with many species. Eucalyptus is an excellent fuelwood and has potential for other uses, including chemical feedstocks. Plantations...

  12. [Influence factor for prediction of air-dry density of Eucalyptus pellita by near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong-Jun; Huo, Xiao-Mei; Shangguan, Wei-Wei; Wang, Yu-Rong

    2011-11-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy(NIR)technique was applied to compare the influence factors of Eucalyptus pellita's air-dry density. Air-dry density of eucalypt wood was tested by direct measurement After collecting the near infrared reflectance spectra of samples in different section and with different thickness, moisture content and roughness, the NIR spectra were preprocessed with the second-derivative and the regression models were built in certain spectra. The calibration models were established using 50-140 samples with the partial least squares method and validated with external validation method. The results showed that the predicted results were influenced by sample's section, thickness, roughness and moisture content. The best near infrared spectroscopy prediction model was built under the condition of transverse section, 2-5 mm thickness, 12% moisture content and meticulous roughness of wood.

  13. Wood as an adherend

    Treesearch

    Bryan H. River; Charles B. Vick; Robert H. Gillespie

    1991-01-01

    Wood is a porous, permeable, hygroscopic, orthotropic, biological composite material of extreme chemical diversity and physical intricacy. Table 1.1 provides an overview of the may variables, including wood variables, that bear on the bonding and performance of wood in wood joints and wood-based materials. Of particular note is the fact that wood properties vary...

  14. Changes in hair properties by Eucalyptus extract.

    PubMed

    Mamada, Akira; Ishihama, Mariko; Fukuda, Reiko; Inoue, Shigeto

    2008-01-01

    A long-term usage investigation of a scalp lotion containing Eucalyptus extract, which increases the amount of ceramide in the skin, was carried out to explore the change in physical properties of the hair fiber. Half-head or whole-head usage studies of a scalp lotion with Eucalyptus extract were carried out for the following groups: Japanese female, Japanese senior female, Japanese male, and Caucasian female panelists. As a result, the improvement in hair luster and bounce in the root part of the hair were recognized by the panelists after the long-term application of the scalp lotion with Eucalyptus extract. Measurement of hair gloss intensity and bending stress at the root suggests that this improvement is based on changes in these physical properties. These results indicate that the recognition of panelists is based on an actual change in the hair fiber properties. The efficacy of Eucalyptus extract is expressed regardless of race, age, or gender, since similar results were confirmed in all panelist groups. In order to investigate the cause of these phenomena, we measured the elasticity (Young's modulus) of the new-growth part of the cortex in Eucalyptus extract-treated hair and placebo hair by the nano-indentation method of atomic force microscopy (AFM). These results suggest that the Young's modulus of the new-growth part of the cortex in Eucalyptus extract treated-hair increases in comparison with placebo hair. The IR spectra of treated samples of hair show changes that appear to confirm a decrease in the alpha-helix structure and an increase in the beta-sheet structure.

  15. Botanical, Phytochemical, and Anticancer Properties of the Eucalyptus Species.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan V; Chalmers, Anita C; Jyoti Bhuyan, Deep; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies.

  16. Seasonal Variation of Carbon Metabolism in the Cambial Zone of Eucalyptus grandis

    PubMed Central

    Budzinski, Ilara G. F.; Moon, David H.; Lindén, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas; Labate, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are the most widely hardwood planted in the world. It is one of the successful examples of commercial forestry plantation in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries. The tree is valued for its rapid growth, adaptability and wood quality. Wood formation is the result of cumulative annual activity of the vascular cambium. This cambial activity is generally related to the alternation of cold and warm, and/or dry and rainy seasons. Efforts have focused on analysis of cambial zone in response to seasonal variations in trees from temperate zones. However, little is known about the molecular changes triggered by seasonal variations in trees from tropical countries. In this work we attempted to establish a global view of seasonal alterations in the cambial zone of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden, emphasizing changes occurring in the carbon metabolism. Using transcripts, proteomics and metabolomics we analyzed the tissues harvested in summer-wet and winter-dry seasons. Based on proteomics analysis, 70 proteins that changed in abundance were successfully identified. Transcripts for some of these proteins were analyzed and similar expression patterns were observed. We identified 19 metabolites differentially abundant. Our results suggest a differential reconfiguration of carbon partioning in E. grandis cambial zone. During summer, pyruvate is primarily metabolized via ethanolic fermentation, possibly to regenerate NAD+ for glycolytic ATP production and cellular maintenance. However, in winter there seems to be a metabolic change and we found that some sugars were highly abundant. Our results revealed a dynamic change in E. grandis cambial zone due to seasonality and highlight the importance of glycolysis and ethanolic fermentation for energy generation and maintenance in Eucalyptus, a fast growing tree. PMID:27446160

  17. Comparative Genomics Analyses Reveal Extensive Chromosome Colinearity and Novel Quantitative Trait Loci in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Li, Fagen; Zhou, Changpin; Weng, Qijie; Li, Mei; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Yong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gan, Siming

    2015-01-01

    Dense genetic maps, along with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected on such maps, are powerful tools for genomics and molecular breeding studies. In the important woody genus Eucalyptus, the recent release of E. grandis genome sequence allows for sequence-based genomic comparison and searching for positional candidate genes within QTL regions. Here, dense genetic maps were constructed for E. urophylla and E. tereticornis using genomic simple sequence repeats (SSR), expressed sequence tag (EST) derived SSR, EST-derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (EST-CAPS), and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers. The E. urophylla and E. tereticornis maps comprised 700 and 585 markers across 11 linkage groups, totaling at 1,208.2 and 1,241.4 cM in length, respectively. Extensive synteny and colinearity were observed as compared to three earlier DArT-based eucalypt maps (two maps with E. grandis × E. urophylla and one map of E. globulus) and with the E. grandis genome sequence. Fifty-three QTLs for growth (10-56 months of age) and wood density (56 months) were identified in 22 discrete regions on both maps, in which only one colocalizaiton was found between growth and wood density. Novel QTLs were revealed as compared with those previously detected on DArT-based maps for similar ages in Eucalyptus. Eleven to 585 positional candidate genes were obained for a 56-month-old QTL through aligning QTL confidence interval with the E. grandis genome. These results will assist in comparative genomics studies, targeted gene characterization, and marker-assisted selection in Eucalyptus and the related taxa.

  18. Comparative Genomics Analyses Reveal Extensive Chromosome Colinearity and Novel Quantitative Trait Loci in Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Qijie; Li, Mei; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Yong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gan, Siming

    2015-01-01

    Dense genetic maps, along with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected on such maps, are powerful tools for genomics and molecular breeding studies. In the important woody genus Eucalyptus, the recent release of E. grandis genome sequence allows for sequence-based genomic comparison and searching for positional candidate genes within QTL regions. Here, dense genetic maps were constructed for E. urophylla and E. tereticornis using genomic simple sequence repeats (SSR), expressed sequence tag (EST) derived SSR, EST-derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (EST-CAPS), and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers. The E. urophylla and E. tereticornis maps comprised 700 and 585 markers across 11 linkage groups, totaling at 1,208.2 and 1,241.4 cM in length, respectively. Extensive synteny and colinearity were observed as compared to three earlier DArT-based eucalypt maps (two maps with E. grandis × E. urophylla and one map of E. globulus) and with the E. grandis genome sequence. Fifty-three QTLs for growth (10–56 months of age) and wood density (56 months) were identified in 22 discrete regions on both maps, in which only one colocalizaiton was found between growth and wood density. Novel QTLs were revealed as compared with those previously detected on DArT-based maps for similar ages in Eucalyptus. Eleven to 585 positional candidate genes were obained for a 56-month-old QTL through aligning QTL confidence interval with the E. grandis genome. These results will assist in comparative genomics studies, targeted gene characterization, and marker-assisted selection in Eucalyptus and the related taxa. PMID:26695430

  19. Correspondence between performance of Eucalyptus spp trees selected from family and clonal tests.

    PubMed

    Reis, C A F; Gonçalves, F M A; Rosse, L N; Costa, R R G F; Ramalho, M A P

    2011-06-21

    We examined the correspondence in performance between trees selected from a family test and their respective clones from a clonal test of Eucalyptus. Full-sib families were obtained from controlled pollination among individuals of Eucalyptus grandis and between E. grandis and E. urophylla. The hybridizations did not follow a factorial scheme. The family tests were carried out at three locations in Eunápolis and Itabela counties, in Bahia, Brazil, in 2003. Four hundred and ninety-seven high-performance trees were selected, by the individual BLUP procedure, in the family tests at two years of age, based on wood volume. The clones from these trees and 14 checks were evaluated in clonal tests carried out in the same region in 2006. The wood volume of the clones was evaluated at two years of age. Trait correlation between the trees selected from the family and clonal tests was low. The estimate of the coincidence between the best trees and the best clones using an average of the different intensities of selection was only 27%. These results demonstrate that the selection of trees in the family test should not be too drastic; otherwise the chance plus clones may be overlooked.

  20. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of the NAC domain protein family in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Steven G; Saïdi, Mohammed N; Hefer, Charles A; Myburg, Alexander A; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    NAC domain transcription factors regulate many developmental processes and stress responses in plants and vary widely in number and family structure. We analysed the characteristics and evolution of the NAC gene family of Eucalyptus grandis, a fast-growing forest tree in the rosid order Myrtales. NAC domain genes identified in the E. grandis genome were subjected to amino acid sequence, phylogenetic and motif analyses. Transcript abundance in developing tissues and abiotic stress conditions in E. grandis and E. globulus was quantified using RNA-seq and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). One hundred and eighty-nine E. grandis NAC (EgrNAC) proteins, arranged into 22 subfamilies, are extensively duplicated in subfamilies associated with stress response. Most EgrNAC genes form tandem duplicate arrays that frequently carry signatures of purifying selection. Sixteen amino acid motifs were identified in EgrNAC proteins, eight of which are enriched in, or unique to, Eucalyptus. New candidates for the regulation of normal and tension wood development and cold responses were identified. This first description of a Myrtales NAC domain family reveals an unique history of tandem duplication in stress-related subfamilies that has likely contributed to the adaptation of eucalypts to the challenging Australian environment. Several new candidates for the regulation of stress, wood formation and tree-specific development are reported.

  1. Emission factors of particulate matter, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and levoglucosan from wood combustion in south-central Chile.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jorge; Farias, Oscar; Quiroz, Roberto; Yañez, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    In south-central Chile, wood stoves have been identified as an important source of air pollution in populated areas. Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), Chilean oak (Nothofagus oblique), and mimosa (Acacia dealbata) were burned in a single-chamber slow-combustion wood stove at a controlled testing facility located at the University of Concepción, Chile. In each experiment, 2.7-3.1 kg of firewood were combusted while continuously monitoring temperature, exhaust gases, burn rate, and collecting particulate matter samples in Teflon filters under isokinetic conditions for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and levoglucosan analyses. Mean particulate matter emission factors were 2.03, 4.06, and 3.84 g/kg dry wood for eucalyptus, oak, and mimosa, respectively. The emission factors were inversely correlated with combustion efficiency. The mean emission factors of the sums of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particle phases were 1472.5, 2134.0, and 747.5 μg/kg for eucalyptus, oak, and mimosa, respectively. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, and chrysene were present in the particle phase in higher proportions compared with other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that were analyzed. Mean levoglucosan emission factors were 854.9, 202.3, and 328.0 mg/kg for eucalyptus, oak, and mimosa, respectively. Since the emissions of particulate matter and other pollutants were inversely correlated with combustion efficiency, implementing more efficient technologies would help to reduce air pollutant emissions from wood combustion. Residential wood burning has been identified as a significant source of air pollution in populated areas. Local wood species are combusted for home cooking and heating, which releases several toxic air pollutants, including particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Air pollutant emissions depend on the type of wood and the technology and operational conditions of the wood stove. A better understanding of emissions from

  2. Actinomycetes from Eucalyptus and their biological activities for controlling Eucalyptus leaf and shoot blight.

    PubMed

    Himaman, Winanda; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Pathom-Aree, Wasu; Duangmal, Kannika

    2016-01-01

    In Thailand, Eucalyptus plantations rapidly expand across the country. Leaf and shoot blight caused by Cryptosporiopsis eucalypti, Cylindrocladium sp. and Teratosphaeria destructans is a serious disease in Eucalyptus plantations. In this study, a total of 477 actinomycete strains were successfully isolated from roots and rhizosphere soil of Eucalyptus. Four hundred and thirty nine isolates were classified as streptomycetes and 38 isolates were non-streptomycetes. Among these isolates, 272 (57.0%), 118 (24.7%) and 241 (50.5%) isolates were antagonistic to Cryptosporiopsis eucalypti, Cylindrocladium sp. and Teratosphaeria destructans, respectively. All isolates were tested for their abilities to produce siderophores, indole acetic acid (IAA) and solubilise phosphate. Most isolates (464, 97.3%) produced siderophores. The majority of isolates (345, 72.3%) solubilised phosphate. In addition, almost half of these isolates (237, 49.7%) produced indole acetic acid. Strain EUSKR2S82 which showed the strongest inhibitory effect against all tested fungi with plant growth promoting ability was selected to test with Eucalyptus. This strain could colonize plant roots and increase Eucalyptus roots length. In a detached leaves bioassay, the disease severity of EUSKR2S82-inoculated Eucalyptus leaves was only 30% compared to 95% in the control treatment. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the strain EUSKR2S82 was related to Streptomyces ramulosus NRRL-B 2714(T) (99.44% similarity). Identification of non-streptomycete isolates using 16S rRNA gene sequences classified them into 9 genera: Actinoallomurus, Actinomadura, Amycolatopsis, Cryptosporangium, Microbispora, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nonomuraea and Pseudonocardia. It is evident that Eucalyptus tree harbored several genera of actinomycetes. The selected isolate, EUSKR2S82 showed potential as a candidate for biocontrol agent of leaf and shoot blight of Eucalyptus and to promote growth.

  3. Integrated production of nano-fibrillated cellulose and cellulosic biofuel (ethanol) by enzymatic fractionation of wood fibers

    Treesearch

    Junyong Zhu; Ronald Sabo; Xiaolin Luo

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of integrating the production of nano-fibrillated cellulose (NFC), a potentially highly valuable biomaterial, with sugar/biofuel (ethanol) from wood fibers. Commercial cellulase enzymes were used to fractionate the less recalcitrant amorphous cellulose from a bleached Kraft eucalyptus pulp, resulting in a highly crystalline and...

  4. Ceratocystis eucalypticola sp. nov. from Eucalyptus in South Africa and comparison to global isolates from this tree.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Marelize; Roux, Jolanda; Nkuekam, Gilbert Kamgan; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Eucalyptus trees, mostly native to Australia, are widely planted in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere for the production of wood and pulp. Worldwide surveys of diseases on these trees have yielded a large collection of Ceratocystis isolates from dying trees or from wounds on their stems. The aim of this study was to characterise these isolates and to consider their relatedness to each other. Culture appearance, morphological features and a distinctive fruity odour in all cultures were typical of species in the Ceratocystis fimbriatasensu lato (s. lat.) complex. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the combined ITS, βt-1 and TEF1-α gene regions revealed a genetically diverse group of isolates residing in a single large clade, that were distinct from all other species in the C. fimbriatas. lat. complex. Based on morphology and phylogenetic inference, the Eucalyptus isolates are recognised as closely related. The South African isolates are described here as a new species, C. eucalypticola.

  5. Energy from wood biomass: The experience of the Brazilian forest sector

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, L.; Graca, L.R.; Betters, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    Wood biomass is one of the most significant renewable sources of energy in Brazil. Fuelwood and charcoal play a very important role not only for household energy consumption but also for the cement, iron and steel industries. Wood is used as an energy source by the pulp and paper, composite board and other industries of the country, mainly for steam and electricity generation. Ethanol, lignin-based coke and methanol from wood were produced at experimental units in Brazil but were not implemented on a commercial scale. Currently, a new experimental plant using a technology developed in the US is being built in the state of Bahia to generate electricity from Eucalyptus. This technology is a Biomass Integrated Gasification/Gas Turbine process which is expected to make the use of wood biomass economically feasible for electricity generation. Forest plantations are the main source of wood biomass for energy consumption by the Brazilian industrial sector. Fiscal incentives in the 1960s helped the country to begin a massive reforestation program mainly using Eucalyptus and Pinus species. A native species, bracatinga (Mimosa scabrella) has also been used extensively for wood energy plantations in southern Brazil. Technical, economic, social and environmental impacts of these plantation forests are discussed along with a forecast of the future wood energy utilization in Brazil.

  6. Chemical composition and acaricidal activity of essential oil from Lippia sidoides on larvae of Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) and larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Geovany Amorim; Monteiro, Caio Márcio de Oliveira; Senra, Tatiane de Oliveira Souza; Zeringota, Viviane; Calmon, Fernanda; Matos, Renata da Silva; Daemon, Erik; Gois, Roberto Wagner da Silva; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the compounds and to investigate the acaricidal activity of the essential oil from the leaves of Lippia sidoides on Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In total, 15 compounds comprising 99.97 % of the total peak area were identified. The main constituent of the essential oil was thymol (67.60 %). The acaricidal activity was assessed by the modified larval packet test, with oil concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 μl/ml, and by the female immersion test with concentrations of 10.0, 20.0, 40.0, 60.0, and 80.0 μl/ml. The mortality of the R. microplus and D. nitens larvae was greater than 95 % starting at concentrations of 10.0 and 20.0 μl/ml, respectively. In the test with the engorged females, the L. sidoides essential oil starting at a concentration of 40.0 μl/ml caused a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the values of the egg mass weight and egg production index. The viability of the eggs was affected in all the treated groups, with significantly lower hatching rates (p < 0.05) in relation to the control group. The control percentages at concentrations of 10.0, 20.0, and 30.0 μl/ml were 54, 57, and 72 %, and reached 100 % at the highest two concentrations (60.0 and 80.0 μl/ml). Therefore, it can be concluded that the essential oil from the leaves of L. sidoides has acaricidal activity on R. microplus and D. nitens.

  7. Managing a Coastal Bluegum (Eucalyptus globules) forest

    Treesearch

    Ralph S. Osterling

    1983-01-01

    Eucalyptus was thought to be a replacement to oak and other hardwoods for many products. Thousands of acres have been planted and now are in need of management. Management techniques are discussed in context with a coastal stand of approximately 300 acres of mixed aged bluegum. Potential markets are explored.

  8. Fertilizer Tablets Stimulate Eucalyptus in Florida Trial

    Treesearch

    George Meskimen

    1971-01-01

    Eucalyptus plantings in south Florida must grow rapidly to withstand first-year frosts and dominate herbaceous competition. Fertilizer tablets in the planting holes of E. camaldulensis stimulated immediate growth, resulting in stems 50 percent taller and 83 percent thicker than check trees at 6 months. Effects of tablets persisted after 4 years, with...

  9. Growth and yield in Eucalyptus globulus

    Treesearch

    James A. Rinehart; Richard B. Standiford

    1983-01-01

    A study of the major Eucalyptus globulus stands throughout California conducted by Woodbridge Metcalf in 1924 provides a complete and accurate data set for generating variable site-density yield models. Two models were developed using linear regression techniques. Model I depicts a linear relationship between age and yield best used for stands between five and fifteen...

  10. Micropropagation of frost-resistant Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Michel Boulay

    1983-01-01

    A method for the in vitro propagation of frost resistant eucalyptus is presented. It was used for the propagation of 2-30 years old trees. This method is presently used for the fast production of mother trees from selected trees.

  11. Flavonoids in monospecific eucalyptus honeys from Australia.

    PubMed

    Martos, I; Ferreres, F; Yao, L; D'Arcy, B; Caffin, N; Tomás-Barberán, F A

    2000-10-01

    The HPLC analyses of Australian unifloral Eucalyptus honeys have shown that the flavonoids myricetin (3,5,7,3',4', 5'-hexahydroxyflavone), tricetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone), quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone), luteolin (5,7,3', 4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), and kaempferol (3,5,7, 4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) are present in all samples. These compounds were previously suggested as floral markers of European Eucalyptus honeys. The present results confirm the use of flavonoid analysis as an objective method for the botanical origin determination of eucalyptus honey. Honeys from E. camaldulensis (river red gum honey) contain tricetin as the main flavonoid marker, whereas in honeys from E. pilligaensis (mallee honey), luteolin is the main flavonoid marker, suggesting that species-specific differences can be detected with this analysis. The main difference between the flavonoid profiles of Australian and European Eucalyptus honeys is that in the Australian honeys, the propolis-derived flavonoids (pinobanksin (3,5, 7-trihydroxyflavanone), pinocembrin (5,7-dihydroxyflavanone), and chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone)) are seldom found and in much smaller amounts.

  12. Air-drying of Robusta eucalyptus lumber

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1964-01-01

    A study of air-drying 4/4 Eucalyptus robusta lumber in Hilo, Hawaii showed that during typical summer weather it can be dried to below 20 percent moisture content in 2-1/2 months. Grade reduction in 36 percent of the lumber was caused by end splits, insect damage, warp, and surface checking.

  13. Clonal propagation of eucalyptus in Brazilian nurseries

    Treesearch

    Ken McNabb; Natal Goncalves; Jose Goncalves

    2002-01-01

    Brazil has established extensive Eucalyptus plantations to support a growing forest products industry. During the past 25 years, the country has been a pioneer in developing clonal propagation systems to regenerate these highly productive plantations. Original clonal selections optimized disease resistance, coppicing ability, and volume growth, while recent priorities...

  14. First detection of the adventive large rove beetle Ocypus nitens (Schrank) in Canada and an update of its Nearctic distribution using data generated by the public

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The adventive rove beetle Ocypus nitens (Staphylinidae: Staphylininae) is newly recorded in Canada (Ontario) and the state of Vermont, and additional range expansion is documented. The updated distribution of this large, conspicuous species is based mostly on data from digital photographs posted by users of the online community BugGuide. All available data are summarized and made available as a DarwinCore dataset, and an updated distribution map is provided. Citizen-generated distributional data continues to be a valuable ally in the detection of adventive insects and the study of their distributional dynamics. PMID:27956855

  15. Characterization of an acetylated heteroxylan from Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Tomás, Jorge L; Silva, Artur M S; Neto, Carlos Pascoal

    2003-03-28

    A heteroxylan was isolated from Eucalyptus globulus wood by extraction of peracetic acid delignified holocellulose with dimethyl sulfoxide. Besides (1-->4)-linked beta-D-xylopyranosyl units of the backbone and short side chains of terminal (1-->2)-linked 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronosyl residues (MeGlcA) in a 1:10 molar ratio, this hemicellulose contained galactosyl and glucosyl units attached at O-2 of MeGlcA originating from rhamnoarabinogalactan and glucan backbones, respectively. About 30% of MeGlcA units were branched at O-2. The O-acetyl-(4-O-methylglucurono)xylan showed an acetylation degree of 0.61, as determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and a weight-average molecular weight (M(w)) of about 36 kDa (P=1.05) as revealed from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. About half of the beta-D-xylopyranosyl units of the backbone were found as acetylated moieties at O-3 (34 mol%), O-2 (15 mol%) or O-2,3 (6 mol%). Practically, all beta-D-xylopyranosyl units linked at O-2 with MeGlcA residues were 3-O-acetylated (10 mol%).

  16. Chemical composition of 8 eucalyptus species' essential oils and the evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 1957, Tunisia introduced 117 species of Eucalyptus; they have been used as fire wood, for the production of mine wood and to fight erosion. Actually, Eucalyptus essential oil is traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, and sinusitis. A few investigations were reported on the biological activities of Eucalyptus oils worldwide. In Tunisia, our previous works conducted in 2010 and 2011 had been the first reports to study the antibacterial activities against reference strains. At that time it was not possible to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial strains and other pathogens such as virus and fungi. Methods The essential oils of eight Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman, Korbous (North East Tunisia) and Souinet arboreta (North of Tunisia) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution methods against seven bacterial isolates: Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, the bactericidal, fungicidal and the antiviral activities of the tested oils were carried out. Results Twenty five components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. These components were used to correlate with the biological activities of the tested oils. The chemical principal component analysis identified three groups, each of them constituted a chemotype. According to the values of zone diameter and percentage of the inhibition (zdi, % I, respectively), four groups and subgroups of bacterial strains and three groups of fungal strains were characterized by their sensitivity levels to Eucalyptus oils. The cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity varied significantly within Eucalyptus species oils. Conclusions E. odorata showed the strongest activity against S. aureus, H. influenzae, S. agalactiae, S. pyogenes

  17. Chemical composition of 8 eucalyptus species' essential oils and the evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Rouis, Zyed; Salem, Nabil Abid Ben; Mabrouk, Samia; ben Salem, Youssef; Salah, Karima Bel Haj; Aouni, Mahjoub; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi

    2012-06-28

    In 1957, Tunisia introduced 117 species of Eucalyptus; they have been used as fire wood, for the production of mine wood and to fight erosion. Actually, Eucalyptus essential oil is traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, and sinusitis. A few investigations were reported on the biological activities of Eucalyptus oils worldwide. In Tunisia, our previous works conducted in 2010 and 2011 had been the first reports to study the antibacterial activities against reference strains. At that time it was not possible to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial strains and other pathogens such as virus and fungi. The essential oils of eight Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman, Korbous (North East Tunisia) and Souinet arboreta (North of Tunisia) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution methods against seven bacterial isolates: Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, the bactericidal, fungicidal and the antiviral activities of the tested oils were carried out. Twenty five components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. These components were used to correlate with the biological activities of the tested oils. The chemical principal component analysis identified three groups, each of them constituted a chemotype. According to the values of zone diameter and percentage of the inhibition (zdi, % I, respectively), four groups and subgroups of bacterial strains and three groups of fungal strains were characterized by their sensitivity levels to Eucalyptus oils. The cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity varied significantly within Eucalyptus species oils. E. odorata showed the strongest activity against S. aureus, H. influenzae, S. agalactiae, S. pyogenes, S. pneumoniae and against all the

  18. Significance of wood extractives for wood bonding.

    PubMed

    Roffael, Edmone

    2016-02-01

    Wood contains primary extractives, which are present in all woods, and secondary extractives, which are confined in certain wood species. Extractives in wood play a major role in wood-bonding processes, as they can contribute to or determine the bonding relevant properties of wood such as acidity and wettability. Therefore, extractives play an immanent role in bonding of wood chips and wood fibres with common synthetic adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde-resins (UF-resins) and phenol-formaldehyde-resins (PF-resins). Extractives of high acidity accelerate the curing of acid curing UF-resins and decelerate bonding with alkaline hardening PF-resins. Water-soluble extractives like free sugars are detrimental for bonding of wood with cement. Polyphenolic extractives (tannins) can be used as a binder in the wood-based industry. Additionally, extractives in wood can react with formaldehyde and reduce the formaldehyde emission of wood-based panels. Moreover, some wood extractives are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and insofar also relevant to the emission of VOC from wood and wood-based panels.

  19. Stumps of Eucalyptus globulus as a source of antioxidant and antimicrobial polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ângelo; Neiva, Duarte; Pereira, Helena; Gominho, Jorge; Domingues, Fernanda; Duarte, Ana Paula

    2014-10-13

    These past years have seen an enormous development of the area of natural antioxidants and antimicrobials. Eucalyptus globulus is widely cultivated in subtropical and Mediterranean regions in intensive short rotation coppice plantations. In the Portuguese context, E. globulus is the third species in terms of forest area. The stump is the basal part of the tree, including the near-the-ground stem portion and the woody roots that remain after stem felling. The purpose of this work was to study the phytochemical profile and to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of several crude stump wood and stump bark extracts of E. globulus, comparing it with similar extracts of E. globulus wood (industrial chips). The results showed the presence of high concentrations of total phenolic compounds (>200 mg GAE/g extract) and flavonoids (>10 mg QE/g extract) in E. globulus stump extracts. Generally the stump wood extracts stands out from the other ones, presenting the highest percentages of inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. It was also possible to conclude that the extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria, presenting low MIC values. This study thus provides information supporting the economic valorization of E. globulus stump wood.

  20. Wood fuel preparation

    Treesearch

    L. H. Reineke

    1965-01-01

    This report gives information on the preparation of wood fuel from wood residues and other wood raw materials. Types of wood fuel discussed are cordwood, stovewood, slabwood, kindling, chips, hogged fuel, sawdust and shavings, bark, charcoal, alcohol, and briquets. Related information is given on types of machinery for preparing wood fuel and on possible markets for...

  1. Finishes for Wood Decks

    Treesearch

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction. Wood decks can add versatile living space to a home and, with minimal maintenance, provide decades of use. However, wood decks are exposed to high levels of stress from severe weather conditions that shrink and swell the wood. Without proper maintenance, wood decks can develop problems such as checks...

  2. Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus orchard. Camera facing 118" east-southeast. - Goerlitz House, 9893 Highland Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Stable Isotopes Reveal the Contribution of Corticular Photosynthesis to Growth in Branches of Eucalyptus miniata1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Hutley, Lindsay B.

    2011-01-01

    The deciduous bark habit is widespread in the woody plant genus Eucalyptus. Species with deciduous bark seasonally shed a layer of dead bark, thereby maintaining smooth-bark surfaces on branches and stems as they age and increase in diameter. This has a significant cost in terms of fire protection, because smooth-barked species have thinner bark than rough-barked species that accumulate successive layers of dead bark. Eucalypts are closely associated with fire, suggesting that the smooth-bark habit must also provide a significant benefit. We suggest that this benefit is corticular photosynthesis. To test this, we quantified the contribution of corticular photosynthesis to wood production in smooth-barked branches of Eucalyptus miniata growing in tropical savanna in northern Australia. We covered branch sections with aluminum foil for 4 years to block corticular photosynthesis and then compared the oxygen and carbon stable isotope composition of foil-covered and uncovered branch sections. We developed theory to calculate the proportion of wood constructed from corticular photosynthate and the mean proportional refixation rate during corticular photosynthesis from the observed isotopic differences. Coverage with aluminum foil for 4 years increased wood δ13C by 0.5‰ (P = 0.002, n = 6) and wood δ18O by 0.5‰ (P = 0.02, n = 6). Based on these data, we estimated that 11% ± 3% of wood in the uncovered branch sections was constructed from corticular photosynthate, with a mean δ13C of −34.8‰, and that the mean proportional refixation rate during corticular photosynthesis was 0.71 ± 0.15. This demonstrates that corticular photosynthesis makes a significant contribution to the carbon economy of smooth-barked eucalypts. PMID:21078864

  4. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  5. Oxidative stress proteins as an indicator of a low quality of eucalyptus clones for the pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Britto, D S; Pirovani, C P; Gonzalez, E R; Silva, J F; Gesteira, A S; Cascardo, J C M

    2012-10-19

    Eucalyptus is a genus widely cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world as one of the main sources of raw materials for the pulp and paper industry. Identification of clones and selection of genotypes with desirable agronomic characteristics would be useful. We assessed eucalyptus full-sibs that varied in wood quality, using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify differentially expressed proteins as candidates for quality markers. Thirty-one differently expressed proteins were identified, including three proteins of clone X1, four of clone X2, and 12 each of clones X3 and X4. These proteins are involved in various biological processes, including polyphosphate biosynthesis, catalytic activity, nucleotide excision repair, cellular metabolic processes, cell redox homeostasis, response to salt stress, response to temperature, oxidation and reduction processes, cellular water homeostasis, and protein phosphorylation. In the cambial region of each clone, the proteins ketol-acid reductoisomerase, uncharacterized protein MG428, receptor-like serine/threonine-protein kinase and a heat shock protein were found in larger quantities in clone X4 than in clone X1. These proteins are known to be related to protection against oxidative stress and biosynthesis of lignin. A high buildup of proteins involved in response to stress in the cambial region of eucalyptus would indicate clones with undesirable characteristics for use in the pulp and paper industry.

  6. Use of response surface methodology for selection of nutrient levels for culturing Paecilomyces variotii in eucalyptus hemicellulosic hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Almeida e Silva, J B; Lima, U A; Taqueda, M E S; Guaragna, F G

    2003-03-01

    Eucalyptus hemicellulose was hydrolyzed by treating eucalyptus wood chips with sulfuric acid. The hydrolyzate was used as the substrate to produce single-cell protein by growing Paecilomyces variotii IOC-3764 for 72 or 96 h. The influences of rice bran, ammonium sulfate and fermentation time were verified by a 23 full-factorial central composite design. At the optimum process conditions, the cell concentration was 12.06 g/l, which was obtained when the microorganisms were cultivated for 89 h in a medium composed of 10 g/l rice bran, 2.0 g/l nitrogen and 1.1 g/l sodium phosphate. The mathematical model Y = 10.65 + 2.40X2 + 2.36X3 + 1.16X2X3 - 2.10X2(2) - 1.06X3(2) describes biomass production by P. variotii in eucalyptus hemicellulosic hydrolyzate with a determination coefficient of R2 = 0.9561, where X2 and X3 are ammonium sulfate and fermentation time, respectively.

  7. A microsatellite-based consensus linkage map for species of Eucalyptus and a novel set of 230 microsatellite markers for the genus

    PubMed Central

    Brondani, Rosana PV; Williams, Emlyn R; Brondani, Claudio; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2006-01-01

    Background Eucalypts are the most widely planted hardwood trees in the world occupying globally more than 18 million hectares as an important source of carbon neutral renewable energy and raw material for pulp, paper and solid wood. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) in Eucalyptus have been localized on pedigree-specific RAPD or AFLP maps seriously limiting the value of such QTL mapping efforts for molecular breeding. The availability of a genus-wide genetic map with transferable microsatellite markers has become a must for the effective advancement of genomic undertakings. This report describes the development of a novel set of 230 EMBRA microsatellites, the construction of the first comprehensive microsatellite-based consensus linkage map for Eucalyptus and the consolidation of existing linkage information for other microsatellites and candidate genes mapped in other species of the genus. Results The consensus map covers ~90% of the recombining genome of Eucalyptus, involves 234 mapped EMBRA loci on 11 linkage groups, an observed length of 1,568 cM and a mean distance between markers of 8.4 cM. A compilation of all microsatellite linkage information published in Eucalyptus allowed us to establish the homology among linkage groups between this consensus map and other maps published for E. globulus. Comparative mapping analyses also resulted in the linkage group assignment of other 41 microsatellites derived from other Eucalyptus species as well as candidate genes and QTLs for wood and flowering traits published in the literature. This report significantly increases the availability of microsatellite markers and mapping information for species of Eucalyptus and corroborates the high conservation of microsatellite flanking sequences and locus ordering between species of the genus. Conclusion This work represents an important step forward for Eucalyptus comparative genomics, opening stimulating perspectives for evolutionary studies and molecular breeding applications

  8. Characterization of Cytospora isolates from wood cankers of declining grapevine in North America, with the descriptions of two new Cytospora species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cytospora species are ubiquitous pathogens of woody plants, causing dieback and wood cankers in numerous perennial hosts, including agronomic crops (e.g., Prunus), timber trees (e.g., Eucalyptus), and riparian hosts (e.g., Salix). Cytospora chrysosperma, C. cincta, and C. leucostoma have been report...

  9. Eucalyptus Forest Information System for the Portuguese pulp and paper industry

    Treesearch

    Luis Fonseca; Rita Crespo; Henk Feith; Jose Luis Carvalho; Antonio Macedo; Joao Pedro Pina

    2000-01-01

    To support the management of the Portuguese eucalyptus forest, the Association of Portuguese Pulp and Paper Industries (CELPA) decided to develop a Eucalyptus Forest Information System (EFIS). The specific goals of the EFIS are: characterization and development of the eucalyptus forest over time; planning of successive national eucalyptus forest inventories; estimation...

  10. Lignin Composition and Structure in Young versus Adult Eucalyptus globulus Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Nieto, Lidia; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Faulds, Craig B.; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Martínez, Ángel T.; del Río, José C.

    2011-01-01

    Lignin changes during plant growth were investigated in a selected Eucalyptus globulus clone. The lignin composition and structure were studied in situ by a new procedure enabling the acquisition of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectra on wood gels formed in the NMR tube as well as by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, milled-wood lignins were isolated and analyzed by 2D-NMR, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and thioacidolysis. The data indicated that p-hydroxyphenyl and guaiacyl units are deposited at the earlier stages, whereas the woods are enriched in syringyl (S) lignin during late lignification. Wood 2D-NMR showed that β-O-4′ and resinol linkages were predominant in the eucalypt lignin, whereas other substructures were present in much lower amounts. Interestingly, open β-1′ structures could be detected in the isolated lignins. Phenylcoumarans and cinnamyl end groups were depleted with age, spirodienone abundance increased, and the main substructures (β-O-4′ and resinols) were scarcely modified. Thioacidolysis revealed a higher predominance of S units in the ether-linked lignin than in the total lignin and, in agreement with NMR, also indicated that resinols are the most important nonether linkages. Dimer analysis showed that most of the resinol-type structures comprised two S units (syringaresinol), the crossed guaiacyl-S resinol appearing as a minor substructure and pinoresinol being totally absent. Changes in hemicelluloses were also shown by the 2D-NMR spectra of the wood gels without polysaccharide isolation. These include decreases of methyl galacturonosyl, arabinosyl, and galactosyl (anomeric) signals, assigned to pectin and related neutral polysaccharides, and increases of xylosyl (which are approximately 50% acetylated) and 4-O-methylglucuronosyl signals. PMID:21098672

  11. Finishing of wood

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams

    1999-01-01

    The primary function of any wood finish (paint, varnish, and stain, for example) is to protect the wood surface, help maintain a certain appearance, and provide a cleanable surface. Although wood can be used both outdoors and indoors without finishing, unfinished wood surfaces exposed to the weather change color, are roughened by photodegradation and surface checking,...

  12. Kinetics of Eucalyptus globulus delignification in a methanol-water medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Santos, A.; Oliet, M.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.; Tijero, J.

    1999-09-01

    The kinetics of Eucalyptus Globulus delignification in methanol-water pulping has been studied. A total of 17 isothermal runs at a liquor-to-wood ratio of 50 L/kg were carried out to develop the kinetic model describing the system. In a first series of experiments, eight models were considered to study the influence of temperature on the delignification rate. The most suitable model, which was discriminated according to statistical criteria, describes delignification as the consecutive dissolution of three lignin species: initial, bulk, and residual lignin, their content in wood being 10, 69, and 21%, respectively. Initial and residual delignification were considered as irreversible reactions and bulk delignification as reversible. The influence of hydrogen ion concentration was taken into account by means of a general power-law expression. The model proposed was taken into account by means of a general power-law expression. The model proposed was validated by reproducing the experimental data from four runs carried out under nonisothermal conditions and a liquor-to-wood ratio of 7 L/kg, which are closer to industrial operating conditions.

  13. Development of Genetic Markers in Eucalyptus Species by Target Enrichment and Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Modhumita Ghosh; Dharanishanthi, Veeramuthu; Agarwal, Ishangi; Krutovsky, Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has facilitated large-scale discovery, validation and assessment of genetic markers for high density genotyping. The present study was undertaken to identify markers in genes supposedly related to wood property traits in three Eucalyptus species. Ninety four genes involved in xylogenesis were selected for hybridization probe based nuclear genomic DNA target enrichment and exome sequencing. Genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf tissues and used for on-array probe hybridization followed by Illumina sequencing. The raw sequence reads were trimmed and high-quality reads were mapped to the E. grandis reference sequence and the presence of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions/ deletions (InDels) were identified across the three species. The average read coverage was 216X and a total of 2294 SNVs and 479 InDels were discovered in E. camaldulensis, 2383 SNVs and 518 InDels in E. tereticornis, and 1228 SNVs and 409 InDels in E. grandis. Additionally, SNV calling and InDel detection were conducted in pair-wise comparisons of E. tereticornis vs. E. grandis, E. camaldulensis vs. E. tereticornis and E. camaldulensis vs. E. grandis. This study presents an efficient and high throughput method on development of genetic markers for family– based QTL and association analysis in Eucalyptus. PMID:25602379

  14. Long cold exposure induces transcriptional and biochemical remodelling of xylem secondary cell wall in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Ployet, Raphael; Soler, Marçal; Carocha, Victor; Ladouce, Nathalie; Alves, Ana; Rodrigues, José-Carlos; Harvengt, Luc; Marque, Christiane; Teulières, Chantal; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Mounet, Fabien

    2017-06-13

    Although eucalypts are the most planted hardwood trees worldwide, the majority of them are frost sensitive. The recent creation of frost-tolerant hybrids such as Eucalyptus gundal plants (E. gunnii × E. dalrympleana hybrids), now enables the development of industrial plantations in northern countries. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of cold on the wood structure and composition of these hybrids, and on the biosynthetic and regulatory processes controlling their secondary cell-wall (SCW) formation. We used an integrated approach combining histology, biochemical characterization and transcriptomic profiling as well as gene co-expression analyses to investigate xylem tissues from Eucalyptus hybrids exposed to cold conditions. Chilling temperatures triggered the deposition of thicker and more lignified xylem cell walls as well as regulation at the transcriptional level of SCW genes. Most genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, except those specifically dedicated to syringyl unit biosynthesis, were up-regulated. The construction of a co-expression network enabled the identification of both known and potential new SCW transcription factors, induced by cold stress. These regulators at the crossroads between cold signalling and SCW formation are promising candidates for functional studies since they may contribute to the tolerance of E. gunnii × E. dalrympleana hybrids to cold. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Optimal stomatal conductance in relation to photosynthesis in climatically contrasting Eucalyptus species under drought.

    PubMed

    Héroult, Arnaud; Lin, Yan-Shih; Bourne, Aimee; Medlyn, Belinda E; Ellsworth, David S

    2013-02-01

    Models of stomatal conductance (g(s)) are based on coupling between g(s) and CO(2) assimilation (A(net)), and it is often assumed that the slope of this relationship ('g(1) ') is constant across species. However, if different plant species have adapted to different access costs of water, then there will be differences in g(1) among species. We hypothesized that g(1) should vary among species adapted to different climates, and tested the theory and its linkage to plant hydraulics using four Eucalyptus species from different climatic origins in a common garden. Optimal stomatal theory predicts that species from sub-humid zones have a lower marginal water cost of C gain, hence lower g(1) than humid-zone species. In agreement with the theory that g(1) is related to tissue carbon costs for water supply, we found a relationship between wood density and g(1) across Eucalyptus species of contrasting climatic origins. There were significant reductions in the parameter g(1) during drought in humid but not sub-humid species, with the latter group maintaining g(1) in drought. There are strong differences in stomatal behaviour among related tree species in agreement with optimal stomatal theory, and these differences are consistent with the economics involved in water uptake and transport for carbon gain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Development of genetic markers in Eucalyptus species by target enrichment and exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Modhumita Ghosh; Dharanishanthi, Veeramuthu; Agarwal, Ishangi; Krutovsky, Konstantin V

    2015-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has facilitated large-scale discovery, validation and assessment of genetic markers for high density genotyping. The present study was undertaken to identify markers in genes supposedly related to wood property traits in three Eucalyptus species. Ninety four genes involved in xylogenesis were selected for hybridization probe based nuclear genomic DNA target enrichment and exome sequencing. Genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf tissues and used for on-array probe hybridization followed by Illumina sequencing. The raw sequence reads were trimmed and high-quality reads were mapped to the E. grandis reference sequence and the presence of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions/ deletions (InDels) were identified across the three species. The average read coverage was 216X and a total of 2294 SNVs and 479 InDels were discovered in E. camaldulensis, 2383 SNVs and 518 InDels in E. tereticornis, and 1228 SNVs and 409 InDels in E. grandis. Additionally, SNV calling and InDel detection were conducted in pair-wise comparisons of E. tereticornis vs. E. grandis, E. camaldulensis vs. E. tereticornis and E. camaldulensis vs. E. grandis. This study presents an efficient and high throughput method on development of genetic markers for family- based QTL and association analysis in Eucalyptus.

  17. New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South China.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Chen, S F; Mou, X; Zhou, X D; Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J

    2015-03-01

    Plantation forestry is expanding rapidly in China to meet an increasing demand for wood and pulp products globally. Fungal pathogens including species of Calonectria represent a serious threat to the growth and sustainability of this industry. Surveys were conducted in the Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan Provinces of South China, where Eucalyptus trees in plantations or cuttings in nurseries displayed symptoms of leaf blight. Isolations from symptomatic leaves and soils collected close to infected trees resulted in a large collection of Calonectria isolates. These isolates were identified using the Consolidated Species Concept, employing morphological characters and DNA sequence comparisons for the β-tubulin, calmodulin, histone H3 and translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene regions. Twenty-one Calonectria species were identified of which 18 represented novel taxa. Of these, 12 novel taxa belonged to Sphaero-Naviculate Group and the remaining six to the Prolate Group. Southeast Asia appears to represent a centre of biodiversity for the Sphaero-Naviculate Group and this fact could be one of the important constraints to Eucalyptus forestry in China. The remarkable diversity of Calonectria species in a relatively small area of China and associated with a single tree species is surprising.

  18. New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South China

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, L.; Chen, S.F.; Mou, X.; Zhou, X.D.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plantation forestry is expanding rapidly in China to meet an increasing demand for wood and pulp products globally. Fungal pathogens including species of Calonectria represent a serious threat to the growth and sustainability of this industry. Surveys were conducted in the Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan Provinces of South China, where Eucalyptus trees in plantations or cuttings in nurseries displayed symptoms of leaf blight. Isolations from symptomatic leaves and soils collected close to infected trees resulted in a large collection of Calonectria isolates. These isolates were identified using the Consolidated Species Concept, employing morphological characters and DNA sequence comparisons for the β-tubulin, calmodulin, histone H3 and translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene regions. Twenty-one Calonectria species were identified of which 18 represented novel taxa. Of these, 12 novel taxa belonged to Sphaero-Naviculate Group and the remaining six to the Prolate Group. Southeast Asia appears to represent a centre of biodiversity for the Sphaero-Naviculate Group and this fact could be one of the important constraints to Eucalyptus forestry in China. The remarkable diversity of Calonectria species in a relatively small area of China and associated with a single tree species is surprising. PMID:26955194

  19. Liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive system as a strategy to improve the prophylactic action of Syngonanthus nitens (Bong.) Ruhland against infection by Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; Calixto, Giovana; de Toledo, Luciani Gaspar; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal infections caused by Candida krusei are a problem of extreme complexity due to the intrinsic resistance to azole drugs. The species Syngonanthus nitens (Bong.) Ruhland is a plant of the Eriocaulaceae family that has demonstrated promising antifungal activity. In phyto-formulation research, liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive systems (LCPM) stand out as drug delivery systems for vaginal administration because they increase the activity and overcome the problems associated with plant-based medicines. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of the methanolic extract of scapes of S. nitens (S. nitens extract [SNE]) and an SNE-loaded LCPM against C. krusei as prophylaxis for vulvovaginal candidiasis. LCPM formulation developed consisted of oleic acid as the oil phase (50% w/w), polyoxypropylene (5) polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl alcohol (40% w/w) as the surfactant and a polymeric dispersion containing 2.5% Carbopol® 974P and 2.5% polycarbophil (10% w/w) as the aqueous phase. LCPM formulation developed was characterized using polarized light microscopy, rheological analysis, and in vitro mucoadhesive studies. Different strains of C. krusei, including one standard strain (American Type Culture Collection 6258) and three clinically isolated strains from the vaginal region (CKV1, 2, and 3), were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration, inhibition of biofilms, and time kill. The in vivo prophylaxis assay was performed using the standard strain (American Type Culture Collection 6258). The analyses of F by polarized light microscopy and rheology showed isotropy; however, the addition of 100% artificial vaginal mucus (F100) made it more viscous and anisotropic. Moreover, the mucoadhesive strength was modified, which makes F an excellent formulation for vaginal applications. SNE was active against all strains studied, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 125 to 62.5 µg/mL; after incorporating SNE into F (FE

  20. Liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive system as a strategy to improve the prophylactic action of Syngonanthus nitens (Bong.) Ruhland against infection by Candida krusei.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; Calixto, Giovana; de Toledo, Luciani Gaspar; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo; Chorilli, Marlus; Bauab, Taís Maria

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal infections caused by Candida krusei are a problem of extreme complexity due to the intrinsic resistance to azole drugs. The species Syngonanthus nitens (Bong.) Ruhland is a plant of the Eriocaulaceae family that has demonstrated promising antifungal activity. In phyto-formulation research, liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive systems (LCPM) stand out as drug delivery systems for vaginal administration because they increase the activity and overcome the problems associated with plant-based medicines. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of the methanolic extract of scapes of S. nitens (S. nitens extract [SNE]) and an SNE-loaded LCPM against C. krusei as prophylaxis for vulvovaginal candidiasis. LCPM formulation developed consisted of oleic acid as the oil phase (50% w/w), polyoxypropylene (5) polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl alcohol (40% w/w) as the surfactant and a polymeric dispersion containing 2.5% Carbopol(®) 974P and 2.5% polycarbophil (10% w/w) as the aqueous phase. LCPM formulation developed was characterized using polarized light microscopy, rheological analysis, and in vitro mucoadhesive studies. Different strains of C. krusei, including one standard strain (American Type Culture Collection 6258) and three clinically isolated strains from the vaginal region (CKV1, 2, and 3), were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration, inhibition of biofilms, and time kill. The in vivo prophylaxis assay was performed using the standard strain (American Type Culture Collection 6258). The analyses of F by polarized light microscopy and rheology showed isotropy; however, the addition of 100% artificial vaginal mucus (F100) made it more viscous and anisotropic. Moreover, the mucoadhesive strength was modified, which makes F an excellent formulation for vaginal applications. SNE was active against all strains studied, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 125 to 62.5 µg/mL; after incorporating SNE into F

  1. Antimicrobial activities of eucalyptus leaf extracts and flavonoids from Eucalyptus maculata.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kokubo, R; Sakaino, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activities of eucalyptus leaf extracts to find effective antibacterial agents. The antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from 26 species of eucalyptus were measured. Extracts of Eucalyptus globulus, E. maculata and E. viminalis significantly inhibited the growth of six Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Propionibacterium acnes), and of a fungus (Trichophyton mentagrophytes), but they did not show strong antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida). 2',6'-dihydroxy-3'-methyl-4'-methoxy-dihydrochalcone, eucalyptin and 8-desmethyl-eucalyptin, isolated from E. maculata extracts, exhibited potent antimicrobial activities against seven micro-organisms with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.0 to 31 mg l(-1). The eucalyptus extracts and three compounds from E. maculata were found to be effective against micro-organisms that cause food poisoning, acne and athlete's foot. This study shows potential uses of extracts from E. globulus, E. maculata and E. viminalis, and antimicrobial compounds isolated from E. maculata.

  2. Performance of Australian provenances of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus saligna in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1986-01-01

    Australian provenances of Eucalyptus grandis and E. saligna were compared at four locations on the island of Hawaii to seek seed sources better than those in current use which were introduced earlier from unrecorded locations in Australia. A broad range of latitude and elevation was represented among the provenances. At all four...

  3. Differential expression of three eucalyptus secondary cell wall-related cellulose synthase genes in response to tension stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shanfa; Li, Laigeng; Yi, Xiaoping; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P; Chiang, Vincent L

    2008-01-01

    Trees constitute the majority of lignocellulosic biomass existing on our planet. Trees also serve as important feedstock materials for various industrial products. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of cellulose synthase (CesA) genes of trees. Here, the cloning and characterization of three CesA genes (EgraCesA1, EgraCesA2, and EgraCesA3) from an economically important tree species, Eucalyptus grandis, are reported. All three genes were specifically expressed in xylem cells of eucalyptus undergoing secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The GUS gene, expressed under the control of the EgraCesA2 or EgraCesA3 promoter, was also localized in the secondary xylem in transgenic tobacco stems. However, the EgraCesA1 promoter alone or along with its 5'-UTR introns was insufficient to direct appropriate GUS expression. EgraCesA2 and EgraCesA3 gene expression was up-regulated in tension-stressed eucalyptus xylem cells. Accordingly, GUS expression directed by the EgraCesA2 or EgraCesA3 promoter was also up-regulated. EgraCesA1 had no such response. Thus, it is most unlikely that EgraCesA1 is a subunit of the EgraCesA2-EgraCesA3 complex. The presence of at least two types of cellulose biosynthesis machinery in wood formation is an important clue in deciphering the underpinnings of the perennial growth of trees in various environmental conditions. By analysing GUS gene expression directed by the EgraCesA3 promoter or its deletions, several negative and positive regulatory regions controlling gene expression in xylem or phloem were identified. Also a region which is likely to contain mechanical stress-responsive elements was deduced. These results will guide further studies on identifying cis-regulatory elements directing CesA gene transcription and wood formation regulatory networks.

  4. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1) digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb) to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba), very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×), contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae, including genome

  5. Oldest Known Eucalyptus Macrofossils Are from South America

    PubMed Central

    Zamaloa, María C.; Nixon, Kevin C.; González, Cynthia C.; Wilf, Peter; Cúneo, N. Rubén; Johnson, Kirk R.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary history of Eucalyptus and the eucalypts, the larger clade of seven genera including Eucalyptus that today have a natural distribution almost exclusively in Australasia, is poorly documented from the fossil record. Little physical evidence exists bearing on the ancient geographical distributions or morphologies of plants within the clade. Herein, we introduce fossil material of Eucalyptus from the early Eocene (ca. 51.9 Ma) Laguna del Hunco paleoflora of Chubut Province, Argentina; specimens include multiple leaves, infructescences, and dispersed capsules, several flower buds, and a single flower. Morphological similarities that relate the fossils to extant eucalypts include leaf shape, venation, and epidermal oil glands; infructescence structure; valvate capsulate fruits; and operculate flower buds. The presence of a staminophore scar on the fruits links them to Eucalyptus, and the presence of a transverse scar on the flower buds indicates a relationship to Eucalyptus subgenus Symphyomyrtus. Phylogenetic analyses of morphological data alone and combined with aligned sequence data from a prior study including 16 extant eucalypts, one outgroup, and a terminal representing the fossils indicate that the fossils are nested within Eucalyptus. These are the only illustrated Eucalyptus fossils that are definitively Eocene in age, and the only conclusively identified extant or fossil eucalypts naturally occurring outside of Australasia and adjacent Mindanao. Thus, these fossils indicate that the evolution of the eucalypt group is not constrained to a single region. Moreover, they strengthen the taxonomic connections between the Laguna del Hunco paleoflora and extant subtropical and tropical Australasia, one of the three major ecologic-geographic elements of the Laguna del Hunco paleoflora. The age and affinities of the fossils also indicate that Eucalyptus subgenus Symphyomyrtus is older than previously supposed. Paleoecological data indicate that the

  6. Characterisation of PM 10 emissions from woodstove combustion of common woods grown in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Alves, Célia; Evtyugina, Margarita; Mirante, Fátima; Pio, Casimiro; Caseiro, Alexandre; Schmidl, Christoph; Bauer, Heidi; Carvalho, Fernando

    2010-11-01

    A series of source tests was performed to evaluate the chemical composition of particle emissions from the woodstove combustion of four prevalent Portuguese species of woods: Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus), Quercus suber (cork oak) and Acacia longifolia (golden wattle). Analyses included water-soluble ions, metals, radionuclides, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), humic-like substances (HULIS), cellulose and approximately l80 organic compounds. Particle (PM 10) emission factors from eucalyptus and oak were higher than those from pine and acacia. The carbonaceous matter represented 44-63% of the particulate mass emitted during the combustion process, regardless of species burned. The major organic components of smoke particles, for all the wood species studied, with the exception of the golden wattle (0.07-1.9% w/w), were anhydrosugars (0.2-17% w/w). Conflicting with what was expected, only small amounts of cellulose were found in wood smoke. As for HULIS, average particle mass concentrations ranged from 1.5% to 3.0%. The golden wattle wood smoke presented much higher concentrations of ions and metal species than the emissions from the other wood types. The results of the analysis of radionuclides revealed that the 226Ra was the naturally occurring radionuclide more enriched in PM 10. The chromatographically resolved organics included n-alkanes, n-alkenes, PAH, oxygenated PAH, n-alkanals, ketones, n-alkanols, terpenoids, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, alcohols, n-alkanoic acids, n-di-acids, unsaturated acids and alkyl ester acids.

  7. Pretreatment with laccase and a phenolic mediator degrades lignin and enhances saccharification of Eucalyptus feedstock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biofuel production from lignocellulosic material is hampered by biomass recalcitrance towards enzymatic hydrolysis due to the compact architecture of the plant cell wall and the presence of lignin. The purpose of this work is to study the ability of an industrially available laccase-mediator system to modify and remove lignin during pretreatment of wood (Eucalyptus globulus) feedstock, thus improving saccharification, and to analyze the chemical modifications produced in the whole material and especially in the recalcitrant lignin moiety. Results Up to 50% lignin removal from ground eucalypt wood was attained by pretreatment with recombinant Myceliophthora thermophila laccase and methyl syringate as mediator, followed by alkaline peroxide extraction in a multistage sequence. The lignin removal directly correlated with increases (approximately 40%) in glucose and xylose yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment using laccase alone (without mediator) removed up to 20% of lignin from eucalypt wood. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the pretreated wood revealed modifications of the lignin polymer, as shown by lignin markers with shortened side chains and increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio. Additional information on the chemical modifications produced was obtained by two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of the whole wood swollen in dimethylsulfoxide-d6. The spectra obtained revealed the removal of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin units, although with a preferential removal of the former, and the lower number of aliphatic side-chains per phenylpropane unit (involved in main β-O-4ʹ and β-βʹ inter-unit linkages), in agreement with the pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results, without a substantial change in the wood polysaccharide signals. However, the most noticeable modification observed in the spectra was the formation of Cα-oxidized syringyl lignin units during the enzymatic treatment. Further insight into

  8. Pretreatment with laccase and a phenolic mediator degrades lignin and enhances saccharification of Eucalyptus feedstock.

    PubMed

    Rico, Alejandro; Rencoret, Jorge; Del Río, José C; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2014-01-08

    Biofuel production from lignocellulosic material is hampered by biomass recalcitrance towards enzymatic hydrolysis due to the compact architecture of the plant cell wall and the presence of lignin. The purpose of this work is to study the ability of an industrially available laccase-mediator system to modify and remove lignin during pretreatment of wood (Eucalyptus globulus) feedstock, thus improving saccharification, and to analyze the chemical modifications produced in the whole material and especially in the recalcitrant lignin moiety. Up to 50% lignin removal from ground eucalypt wood was attained by pretreatment with recombinant Myceliophthora thermophila laccase and methyl syringate as mediator, followed by alkaline peroxide extraction in a multistage sequence. The lignin removal directly correlated with increases (approximately 40%) in glucose and xylose yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment using laccase alone (without mediator) removed up to 20% of lignin from eucalypt wood. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the pretreated wood revealed modifications of the lignin polymer, as shown by lignin markers with shortened side chains and increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio. Additional information on the chemical modifications produced was obtained by two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of the whole wood swollen in dimethylsulfoxide-d6. The spectra obtained revealed the removal of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin units, although with a preferential removal of the former, and the lower number of aliphatic side-chains per phenylpropane unit (involved in main β-O-4' and β-β' inter-unit linkages), in agreement with the pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results, without a substantial change in the wood polysaccharide signals. However, the most noticeable modification observed in the spectra was the formation of Cα-oxidized syringyl lignin units during the enzymatic treatment. Further insight into the modifications of

  9. Color reduction of sulfonated eucalyptus kraft lignin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Bai, Youcan; Zhou, Wanpeng; Chen, Fangeng

    2017-04-01

    Several eucalyptus lignins named as HSL, SML and BSL were prepared by high temperature sulfonation, sulfomethylation, butane sultone sulfonation respectively. The color properties of samples were investigated. Under optimized conditions the sulfonic group (SO3H) content of HSL, SML and BSL reached 1.52, 1.60 and 1.58mmol/g, respectively. Samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, GPC and brightness test, respectively. The results revealed that BSL performed a higher molecular weight and lighter color due to the phenolic hydroxyl blocking by 1,4-butane sultone (1,4-BS). The color reduction of sodium borohydride treated BSL (labeled as SBSL) was further enhanced and the brightness value was improved by 76.1% compared with the darkest HSL. SBSL process was much better than HSL and SML process. Hydroxyl blocking effect of 1,4-BS and reducibility of sodium borohydride played important roles in the color reduction of sulfonated eucalyptus kraft lignin.

  10. Fuzzy logic applied to prospecting for areas for installation of wood panel industries.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre Rosa; Paterlini, Ewerthon Mattos; Fiedler, Nilton Cesar; Ribeiro, Carlos Antonio Alvares Soares; Lorenzon, Alexandre Simões; Domingues, Getulio Fonseca; Marcatti, Gustavo Eduardo; de Castro, Nero Lemos Martins; Teixeira, Thaisa Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Gleissy Mary Amaral Dino Alves; Juvanhol, Ronie Silva; Branco, Elvis Ricardo Figueira; Mota, Pedro Henrique Santos; da Silva, Lilianne Gomes; Pirovani, Daiani Bernardo; de Jesus, Waldir Cintra; Santos, Ana Carolina de Albuquerque; Leite, Helio Garcia; Iwakiri, Setsuo

    2017-05-15

    Prospecting for suitable areas for forestry operations, where the objective is a reduction in production and transportation costs, as well as the maximization of profits and available resources, constitutes an optimization problem. However, fuzzy logic is an alternative method for solving this problem. In the context of prospecting for suitable areas for the installation of wood panel industries, we propose applying fuzzy logic analysis for simulating the planting of different species and eucalyptus hybrids in Espírito Santo State, Brazil. The necessary methodological steps for this study are as follows: a) agriclimatological zoning of different species and eucalyptus hybrids; b) the selection of the vector variables; c) the application of the Euclidean distance to the vector variables; d) the application of fuzzy logic to matrix variables of the Euclidean distance; and e) the application of overlap fuzzy logic to locate areas for installation of wood panel industries. Among all the species and hybrids, Corymbia citriodora showed the highest percentage values for the combined very good and good classes, with 8.60%, followed by Eucalyptus grandis with 8.52%, Eucalyptus urophylla with 8.35% and Urograndis with 8.34%. The fuzzy logic analysis afforded flexibility in prospecting for suitable areas for the installation of wood panel industries in the Espírito Santo State can bring great economic and social benefits to the local population with the generation of jobs, income, tax revenues and GDP increase for the State and municipalities involved. The proposed methodology can be adapted to other areas and agricultural crops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reference genes for high-throughput quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of gene expression in organs and tissues of Eucalyptus grown in various environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cassan-Wang, Hua; Soler, Marçal; Yu, Hong; Camargo, Eduardo Leal O; Carocha, Victor; Ladouce, Nathalie; Savelli, Bruno; Paiva, Jorge A P; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2012-12-01

    Interest in the genomics of Eucalyptus has skyrocketed thanks to the recent sequencing of the genome of Eucalyptus grandis and to a growing number of large-scale transcriptomic studies. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) is the method of choice for gene expression analysis and can now also be used as a high-throughput method. The selection of appropriate internal controls is becoming of utmost importance to ensure accurate expression results in Eucalyptus. To this end, we selected 21 candidate reference genes and used high-throughput microfluidic dynamic arrays to assess their expression among a large panel of developmental and environmental conditions with a special focus on wood-forming tissues. We analyzed the expression stability of these genes by using three distinct statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and ΔCt), and used principal component analysis to compare methods and rankings. We showed that the most stable genes identified depended not only on the panel of biological samples considered but also on the statistical method used. We then developed a comprehensive integration of the rankings generated by the three methods and identified the optimal reference genes for 17 distinct experimental sets covering 13 organs and tissues, as well as various developmental and environmental conditions. The expression patterns of Eucalyptus master genes EgMYB1 and EgMYB2 experimentally validated our selection. Our findings provide an important resource for the selection of appropriate reference genes for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data in the organs and tissues of Eucalyptus trees grown in a range of conditions including abiotic stresses.

  12. Changes in soil quality due to converting Pinus to Eucalyptus plantations and subsequent successive Eucalyptus planting in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Zheng, H.; Chen, F. L.; Ouyang, Z. Y.; Wang, Y.; Wu, Y. F.; Lan, J.; Fu, M.; Xiang, X. W.

    2014-09-01

    Plants play a key role in maintaining soil quality, but long-term changes in soil quality due to plant species change and successive planting are rarely reported. Using the space-for-time substitution method, adjacent plantations of Pinus and 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th generations of Eucalyptus in Guangxi, China were used to study changes in soil quality caused by converting Pinus to Eucalyptus and successive Eucalyptus planting. Soil chemical and biological properties were measured and a soil quality index (SQI) was calculated. Soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, alkaline hydrolytic nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, cellobiosidase, phenol oxidase, peroxidase and acid phosphatase activities significantly decreased in the 1st and 2nd generations of Eucalyptus plantations after conversion from Pinus to Eucalyptus but gradually recovered in the 3rd and 4th generations. Soil total and available potassium were significantly lower, but total phosphorus was significantly higher in Eucalyptus plantations compared to the Pinus plantation. As an integrated indicator, SQI was highest in the Pinus plantation (0.92), but decreased to 0.24 and 0.13 in the 1st and 2nd generations of Eucalyptus plantations, respectively. However, it recovered to 0.36 and 0.38 in the 3rd and 4th generations, respectively. Changing tree species, reclamation and fertilization may have contributed to the "U" shaped change observed in soil quality during conversion of Pinus to Eucalyptus and successive Eucalyptus planting. Litter retention, keeping understory coverage, and reducing soil disturbance during logging and subsequent establishment of the next rotation should be considered to help improving soil quality during plantation management.

  13. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... more For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  14. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... message For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  15. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  16. Temporal dynamics of the response to Al stress in Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, Berenice K de; Pizzaia, Daniel; Piotto, Fernando A; Borgo, Lucélia; Brondani, Gilvano E; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation and root elongation of Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis were studied under stress conditions in response to aluminum (Al), a metal known to limit agricultural productivity in acidic soils primarily due to reduced root elongation. In Brazil, the Grancam 1277 hybrid (E. grandis × E. camaldulensis) has been planted in the "Cerrado", a region of the country with a wide occurrence of acidic soils. The present study demonstrated that the hybrid exhibited root growth reduction and increased levels of lipid peroxidation after 24h of treatment with 100 µM of Al, which was followed by a reduction in lipid peroxidation levels and the recovery of root elongation after 48 h of Al exposure, suggesting a rapid response to the early stressful conditions induced by Al. The understanding of the temporal dynamics of Al tolerance may be useful for selecting more tolerant genotypes and for identifying genes of interest for applications in bioengineering.

  17. Nanofibrillated cellulose (CNF) from eucalyptus sawdust as a dry strength agent of unrefined eucalyptus handsheets.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, María Evangelina; Felissia, Fernando Esteban; Area, María Cristina; Ehman, Nanci Vanesa; Tarrés, Quim; Mutjé, Pere

    2016-03-30

    Nanofibrillated cellulose has been obtained from the cellulosic fraction of eucalyptus sawdust. The fractionation process involved the partial removal of hemicelluloses and lignin. CNF was obtained using TEMPO oxidation with NaOCl in basic medium followed by mechanical homogenization. The obtained CNF was subsequently used as a dry strength agent on unbleached unrefined eucalyptus pulp. The addition of 3, 6 and 9 wt.% of CNF increased lineally the tensile index of handsheets to about 55 N mg(-1) at 35°SR, compatible with papermachine runnability. The other mechanical properties also increased substantially, and porosity decreased moderately. The estimated specific surface and average diameter of these CNF were 60 m(2)g(-1), and of 41.0 nm, respectively. The addition of 9 wt.% of CNF produced an increase in mechanical strength, equivalent to that produced by PFI refining at 1600 revolutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron Stain on Wood

    Treesearch

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  19. Wood Formation in Trees

    Treesearch

    Melanie Mauriat; Gregoire Le Provost; Phillippe Rozenberg; Sylvain Delzon; Nathalie Breda; Bruno Clair; Catherine Coutand; Jean-Christoph Domec; Thierry Fourcaud; Jacqueline Grima-Pettenati; Raul Herrera; Jean-Charles Leple; Nicolas Richet; Jean-Francois Trontin; Christophe Plomion

    2014-01-01

    Among the ecosystem services provided by forests, wood provisioning takes a central position. Wood and derived products have played a critical role in the evolution of human kind and demand for raw material is increasing in a foreseeable future. Wood is used for energy production, construction and a wide variety of products for which different properties are required....

  20. Wood and society

    Treesearch

    Christopher D. Risbrudt

    2005-01-01

    Forests, and the wood they produce, have played an important role in human activity since before recorded history. Indeed, one of the first major innovations of humankind was utilizing fire, fueled by wood, for cooking and heating. It is very likely that early hominids used wood fires for cooking as long as 1.5 million years ago (Clark and Harris 1985). Clear evidence...

  1. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Roger M. Rowell

    2010-01-01

    The wood industry can expand into new sustainable markets with the formation of a new class of composites with the marriage of the wood industry and the plastics industry. The wood component, usually a flour or fiber, is combined with a thermoplastic to form an extrudable, injectable or thermoformable composite that can be used in many non-structural applications....

  2. Wood preservative testing

    Treesearch

    Rebecca Ibach; Stan T. Lebow

    2012-01-01

    Most wood species used in commercial and residential construction have little natural biological durability and will suffer from biodeterioration when exposed to moisture. Historically, this problem has been overcome by treating wood for outdoor use with toxic wood preservatives. As societal acceptance of chemical use changes, there is continual pressure to develop and...

  3. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  4. Chemical modification of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The properties of any resource are, in general, a result of the chemistry of the components of that resource. In the case of wood, the cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin) are the components that, if modified, would change the properties of the resource. If the properties of the wood are modified, the performance of the modified wood would be...

  5. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  6. Biodeterioration of wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2010-01-01

    Under proper conditions, wood will give centuries of service. However, under conditions that permit the development of wood-degrading organisms, protection must be provided during processing, merchandising, and use. The organisms that can degrade wood are principally fungi, insects, bacteria, and marine borers.

  7. Biodeterioration of wood

    Treesearch

    Terry L. Highley

    1999-01-01

    Under proper conditions, wood will give centuries of service. However, if conditions exist that permit the development of wood-degrading organisms, protection must be provided during processing, merchandising, and use. The principal organisms that can degrade wood are fungi, insects, bacteria, and marine borers. Molds, most sapwood stains, and decay are caused by fungi...

  8. Energy from wood

    Treesearch

    J.I. Zerbe

    2004-01-01

    In most developing countries wood and charcoal are the predominant fuels for preparation of food to maintain the quality of life that encompasses the majority of citizens. In many developing countries wood fuels are also important for small and medium size industries. Moreover, energy from wood continues to be important in industrial countries. In the USA biomass...

  9. Insights into temperature modulation of the Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus grandis antioxidant and lignification subproteomes.

    PubMed

    de Santana Costa, Marília Gabriela; Mazzafera, Paulo; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2017-05-01

    Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus are among the most widely cultivated trees, differing in lignin composition and plantation areas, as E. grandis is mostly cultivated in tropical regions while E. globulus is preferred in temperate areas. As temperature is a key modulator in plant metabolism, a large-scale proteome analysis was carried out to investigate changes in the antioxidant system and the lignification metabolism in plantlets grown at different temperatures. Our strategy allowed the identification of 3111 stem proteins. A total of 103 antioxidant proteins were detected in the stems of both species. Hierarchical clustering revealed that alterations in the antioxidant proteins are more prominent when Eucalyptus seedlings were exposed to high temperature and that the superoxide isoforms coded by the gene Eucgr.B03930 are the most abundant antioxidant enzymes induced by thermal stimulus. Regarding the lignin biosynthesis, our proteomics approach resulted in the identification of 13 of the 17 core proteins involved in this metabolism, corroborating with gene predictions and the proposed lignin toolbox. Quantitative analyses revealed significant differences in 8 protein isoforms, including the ferulate 5-hydroxylase isoform F5H1, a key enzyme in catalyzing the synthesis of sinapyl alcohol, and the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase isoform CAD2, the last enzyme in monolignol biosynthesis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005743.

  10. High-resolution genetic maps of Eucalyptus improve Eucalyptus grandis genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Bartholomé, Jérôme; Mandrou, Eric; Mabiala, André; Jenkins, Jerry; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Klopp, Christophe; Schmutz, Jeremy; Plomion, Christophe; Gion, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Genetic maps are key tools in genetic research as they constitute the framework for many applications, such as quantitative trait locus analysis, and support the assembly of genome sequences. The resequencing of the two parents of a cross between Eucalyptus urophylla and Eucalyptus grandis was used to design a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array of 6000 markers evenly distributed along the E. grandis genome. The genotyping of 1025 offspring enabled the construction of two high-resolution genetic maps containing 1832 and 1773 markers with an average marker interval of 0.45 and 0.5 cM for E. grandis and E. urophylla, respectively. The comparison between genetic maps and the reference genome highlighted 85% of collinear regions. A total of 43 noncollinear regions and 13 nonsynthetic regions were detected and corrected in the new genome assembly. This improved version contains 4943 scaffolds totalling 691.3 Mb of which 88.6% were captured by the 11 chromosomes. The mapping data were also used to investigate the effect of population size and number of markers on linkage mapping accuracy. This study provides the most reliable linkage maps for Eucalyptus and version 2.0 of the E. grandis genome.

  11. Numerical analysis of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla heat-treatment: A dynamically detecting method of mass loss during the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zijian; Ma, Qing; Mu, Jun; Yi, Songlin; He, Zhengbin

    Eucalyptus particles, lamellas and boards were applied to explore a simply-implemented method with neglected heat and mass transfer to inspect the mass loss during the heat-treatment course. The results revealed that the mass loss of a certain period was theoretically the definite integration of loss rate to time in this period, and a monitoring model for mass loss speed was developed with the particles and validated with the lamellas and boards. The loss rate was correlated to the temperature and temperature-evolving speed in the model which was composed of three functions during different temperature-evolving period. The sample mass loss was calculated in the MATLAB for the lamellas and boards and the model was validated and adjusted based on the difference between the computed results and the practically measured loss values. The error ranges of the new models were -16.30% to 18.35% for wood lamellas and -9.86% to 6.80% for wood boards. This method made it possible to acquire the instantaneous loss value through continuously detecting the wood temperature evolution. This idea could provide a reference for the Eucalyptus heat-treatment to detect the treating course and control the final material characteristics.

  12. Streptomyces rhizobacteria modulate the secondary metabolism of Eucalyptus plants.

    PubMed

    Salla, Tamiris Daros; da Silva, Ramos; Astarita, Leandro Vieira; Santarém, Eliane Romanato

    2014-12-01

    The genus Eucalyptus comprises economically important species, such as Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus, used especially as a raw material in many industrial sectors. Species of Eucalyptus are very susceptible to pathogens, mainly fungi, which leads to mortality of plant cuttings in rooting phase. One alternative to promote plant health and development is the potential use of microorganisms that act as agents for biological control, such as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Rhizobacteria Streptomyces spp have been considered as PGPR. This study aimed at selecting strains of Streptomyces with ability to promote plant growth and modulate secondary metabolism of E. grandis and E. globulus in vitro plants. The experiments assessed the development of plants (root number and length), changes in key enzymes in plant defense (polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase) and induction of secondary compounds(total phenolic and quercetinic flavonoid fraction). The isolate Streptomyces PM9 showed highest production of indol-3-acetic acid and the best potential for root induction. Treatment of Eucalyptus roots with Streptomyces PM9 caused alterations in enzymes activities during the period of co-cultivation (1-15 days), as well as in the levels of phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Shoots also showed alteration in the secondary metabolism, suggesting induced systemic response. The ability of Streptomyces sp. PM9 on promoting root growth, through production of IAA, and possible role on modulation of secondary metabolism of Eucalyptus plants characterizes this isolate as PGPR and indicates its potential use as a biological control in forestry.

  13. Economics of wood dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    This article reviews the economic effects of wood dust. The most important use of wood today is a fuel, and wood chips and shavings are sources of feedstock for boilers. Other uses include wood chips in the manufacture of particleboard, wood dust as bedding in riding stables and race tracks, as mulch for florists, and as an absorbent in the meat packing industry. The installation of dust collection systems is strongly urged as the consequences of inadequate collection include rapid machine wear, poor environmental conditions for workers, general interference with work, and its combustibility makes it a constant fire hazard.

  14. Supercritical water gasification of Eucalyptus grandis and related pyrolysis char: Effect of feedstock composition.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-09-01

    Eucalyptus grandis (E. grandis) wood and char products derived from pyrolysis of E. grandis wood, were gasified in supercritical water at 450°C - with and without the use of a homogeneous (K2CO3) and heterogeneous (Ni/Al2O3-SiO2) catalyst. Gas yields and gasification efficiencies were measured experimentally and compared to calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values, specifically considering the effects of the O/C ratio and volatile matter content of the feed material. Thermodynamically, feed material with lower O/C ratios (0.22) typically resulted in higher CH4 yields (30mol/kgfeed,dry) and gasification efficiencies (188%). However, experimentally, feed material with lower O/C ratios and lower volatile matter resulted in the lowest CH4 yields and gasification efficiencies. Furthermore, a linear relationship between the carbon efficiency (CE) and both the volatile matter content and O/C ratio of the feed material was found to hold true in both catalytic and non-catalytic experiments.

  15. Effects of Planting Density on Transpiration, Stem Flow and Interception for Two Clones Differing in Drought Tolerance in a High Productivity Eucalyptus Plantation in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, R. M.; Hakemada, R.; Ferraz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Eucalypt plantations cover about 20 M hectares worldwide and expansion is expected to mainly occur in marginal growing areas where dry conditions may lead to water conflicts. One of the principal reasons for the expansion of Eucalyptus plantations is rapid wood growth but these forests also transpire large amounts of water. Genotype selection and planting density, are key factors regulating carbon and water tradeoffs at a stand scale, but few studies have examined these simultaneously especially in highly productive clonal plantations. Our goal in this study was to examine the effects of planting density on carbon and water interactions using a drought tolerant and drought sensitive eucalyptus clone. This work is part of a larger study (TECHS project - Tolerance of Eucalyptus Clones to Hydric and Thermal Stresses) and is located in a flat Oxisol in southeast of Brazil. A drought tolerant (E. grandis x E. camaldulensis (Grancam) and drought sensitive clone E. grandis x E. urophylla (Urograndis) were planted at four densities ranging from 600 to 3.000 stem ha-1. We measured transpiration using thermal heat dissipation probes, wood growth, canopy interception and stemflow during a full year (21 to 33 months old). Precipitation during the study period was 738 mm. Independently of genetics, growth increased with increasing density. Transpiration also increased with planting density and ranged from 515-595 mm at wider spacing to 735-978 mm at tighter spacing. Interception increased with planting density representing 18-22% of precipitation versus 13-14% in wider spacing while stem flow represented 2-5% in denser spacing and 1-2% at broader spacing. When density was higher than 1.250 and 1.750 stems ha-1 in Urograndis and Grancam clones, respectively, the water balance were negative. On a stand scale, results show both genetics and spacing can be used as silvicultural tools to better manage the tradeoff between wood growth and water consumption.

  16. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  17. Medium density fiberboard made from Eucalyptus saligna

    Treesearch

    Andrzej M. Krzysik; James H. Muehl; John A. Youngquist; Fabio Spina. Franca

    2001-01-01

    The production of industrial wood from natural forests is predicted to decline in the future. Factors that will contribute to this decline include changes in land use patterns, depletion of resources in some parts of the world, and the withdrawal of...

  18. Assessing specific gravity of young Eucalyptus plantation trees using a resistance drilling technique

    Treesearch

    José Tarcísio da Silva Oliveira; Xiping Wang; Graziela Baptista Vidaurre

    2017-01-01

    The resistance drilling technique has been in focus for assessing the specific gravity (SG) of young Eucalyptus trees from plantations for pulpwood production. Namely, the data of 50 34-month-old and 50 62-monthold trees from Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophylla clonal plantations was evaluated, while...

  19. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  20. Structure and function of wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Regis B. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Despite the many human uses to which various woods are suited, at a fundamental level wood is a complex biological structure, itself a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of the plant. Although humans have striven to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood...

  1. Lignification and tension wood.

    PubMed

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  2. Influence of nutrient availability, stand age, and canopy structure on isoprene flux in a Eucalyptus saligna experimental forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Giardina, Christian P.; Knohl, Alexander; Lerdau, Manuel T.

    2006-06-01

    Eucalyptus plantations occupy approximately 10 million ha of land in the tropics and, increasingly, afforestation and reforestation projects are relying on this genus to provide rapid occupation of degraded sites, large quantities of high-quality wood products, and high rates of carbon sequestration. Members of the genus Eucalyptus are also very high emitters of isoprene, the dominant volatile organic compound emitted by trees in tropical ecosystems, which significantly influences the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. While fertilization growth response of these trees has been intensively studied, little is known about how fertilization and tree age alter isoprene production from plantations of these trees. Here we examined the effects of fertilization and tree age on leaf-level isoprene flux from 2- and 6-year-old trees in a Eucalyptus saligna experimental forest in Hawaii. Leaf-level emission at a given canopy height did not differ between fertilized and unfertilized 6-year-old trees likely because leaf nitrogen content did not vary with fertilization. Across treatments, however, the standardized emission rate of isoprene (emission at a standard light and temperature) followed patterns of leaf N content and declined with canopy depth. Although leaf nitrogen content was similar between 2-year and 6-year fertilized trees, leaf-level emission rates declined with stand age. Surprisingly, despite differences in stand leaf area and leaf area distribution, modeled canopy-level isoprene flux was similar across stands varying in fertilization and tree age. Model results suggest that leaf area index was high enough in all treatments to absorb most of the light penetrating the canopy, leading to similar canopy flux rates despite the very different sized canopies.

  3. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation and a consolidated bioprocessing for Hinoki cypress and Eucalyptus after fibrillation by steam and subsequent wet-disk milling.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Akio; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2014-06-01

    An advanced pretreatment method that combines steam treatment (ST) with wet disk milling (WDM) was evaluated using two different species of woods, viz., Hinoki cypress (softwood) and Eucalyptus (hardwood). Bioconversion of the pretreated products was performed using enzymatic saccharification via a commercial cellulase mixture and two types of fermentation processing, i.e., yeast-based simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and Clostridium thermocellum-based consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). A higher yield of glucose was obtained in the enzymatic saccharification and fermentation products from SSF and CBP with pretreatment consisting of WDM after ST, as compared to either ST or WDM alone. Maximum ethanol production via SSF and CBP were 359.3 and 79.4 mg/g-cellulose from Hinoki cypress, and 299.5 and 73.1 mg/g-cellulose from Eucalyptus, respectively. While the main fermentation product generated in CBP was acetate, the total products yield was 319.9 and 262.0 mg/g-cellulose from Hinoki cypress and Eucalyptus, respectively.

  4. Chapter 9: Wood Energy

    Treesearch

    Francisco X. Aguilar; Karen Abt; Branko Glavonjic; Eugene Lopatin; Warren  Mabee

    2016-01-01

    The availabilty of information on wood energy continues to improve, particularly for commoditized woodfuels.  Wood energy consumption and production vary in the UNECE region because demand is strngly affected by weather and the prices of competing energy sources.  There has been an increase in wood energy in the power-and-heat sector in the EU28 and North American...

  5. Cary Woods Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Describes the school reading program at Cary Woods Elementary School (in Auburn, Alabama), one of several school reading programs designated by the International Reading Association as exemplary. (SR)

  6. Wood formation in Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Déjardin, Annabelle; Laurans, Françoise; Arnaud, Dominique; Breton, Christian; Pilate, Gilles; Leplé, Jean-Charles

    2010-04-01

    Wood formation is a complex biological process, involving five major developmental steps, including (1) cell division from a secondary meristem called the vascular cambium, (2) cell expansion (cell elongation and radial enlargement), (3) secondary cell wall deposition, (4) programmed cell death, and (5) heartwood formation. Thanks to the development of genomic studies in woody species, as well as genetic engineering, recent progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. In this review, we will focus on two different aspects, the lignification process and the control of microfibril angle in the cell wall of wood fibres, as they are both key features of wood material properties.

  7. Cary Woods Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Describes the school reading program at Cary Woods Elementary School (in Auburn, Alabama), one of several school reading programs designated by the International Reading Association as exemplary. (SR)

  8. Chemical Variability and Biological Activities of Eucalyptus spp. Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Luiz Claudio Almeida; Filomeno, Claudinei Andrade; Teixeira, Robson Ricardo

    2016-12-07

    Many plant species produce mixtures of odorous and volatile compounds known as essential oils (EOs). These mixtures play important roles in Nature and have been utilized by mankind for different purposes, such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, aromatherapy, and food flavorants. There are more than 3000 EOs reported in the literature, with approximately 300 in commercial use, including the EOs from Eucalyptus species. Most EOs from Eucalyptus species are rich in monoterpenes and many have found applications in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, food flavorants, and perfumes. Such applications are related to their diverse biological and organoleptic properties. In this study, we review the latest information concerning the chemical composition and biological activities of EOs from different species of Eucalyptus. Among the 900 species and subspecies of the Eucalyptus genus, we examined 68 species. The studies associated with these species were conducted in 27 countries. We have focused on the antimicrobial, acaricidal, insecticidal and herbicidal activities, hoping that such information will contribute to the development of research in this field. It is also intended that the information described in this study can be useful in the rationalization of the use of Eucalyptus EOs as components for pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications as well as food preservatives and flavorants.

  9. Phylogeny Explains Variation in The Root Chemistry of Eucalyptus Species.

    PubMed

    Senior, John K; Potts, Brad M; Davies, Noel W; Wooliver, Rachel C; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Bailey, Joseph K; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M

    2016-10-01

    Plants are dependent on their root systems for survival, and thus are defended from belowground enemies by a range of strategies, including plant secondary metabolites (PSMs). These compounds vary among species, and an understanding of this variation may provide generality in predicting the susceptibility of forest trees to belowground enemies and the quality of their organic matter input to soil. Here, we investigated phylogenetic patterns in the root chemistry of species within the genus Eucalyptus. Given the known diversity of PSMs in eucalypt foliage, we hypothesized that (i) the range and concentrations of PSMs and carbohydrates in roots vary among Eucalyptus species, and (ii) that phylogenetic relationships explain a significant component of this variation. To test for interspecific variation in root chemistry and the influence of tree phylogeny, we grew 24 Eucalyptus species representing two subgenera (Eucalyptus and Symphyomyrtus) in a common garden for two years. Fine root samples were collected from each species and analyzed for total phenolics, condensed tannins, carbohydrates, terpenes, and formylated phloroglucinol compounds. Compounds displaying significant interspecific variation were mapped onto a molecular phylogeny and tested for phylogenetic signal. Although all targeted groups of compounds were present, we found that phenolics dominated root defenses and that all phenolic traits displayed significant interspecific variation. Further, these compounds displayed a significant phylogenetic signal. Overall, our results suggest that within these representatives of genus Eucalyptus, more closely related species have more similar root chemistry, which may influence their susceptibility to belowground enemies and soil organic matter accrual.

  10. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Profiling of the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) Gene Family in Eucalyptus grandis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Soler, Marçal; Mila, Isabelle; San Clemente, Hélène; Savelli, Bruno; Dunand, Christophe; Paiva, Jorge A. P.; Myburg, Alexander A.; Bouzayen, Mondher; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Cassan-Wang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Auxin is a central hormone involved in a wide range of developmental processes including the specification of vascular stem cells. Auxin Response Factors (ARF) are important actors of the auxin signalling pathway, regulating the transcription of auxin-responsive genes through direct binding to their promoters. The recent availability of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence allowed us to examine the characteristics and evolutionary history of this gene family in a woody plant of high economic importance. With 17 members, the E. grandis ARF gene family is slightly contracted, as compared to those of most angiosperms studied hitherto, lacking traces of duplication events. In silico analysis of alternative transcripts and gene truncation suggested that these two mechanisms were preeminent in shaping the functional diversity of the ARF family in Eucalyptus. Comparative phylogenetic analyses with genomes of other taxonomic lineages revealed the presence of a new ARF clade found preferentially in woody and/or perennial plants. High-throughput expression profiling among different organs and tissues and in response to environmental cues highlighted genes expressed in vascular cambium and/or developing xylem, responding dynamically to various environmental stimuli. Finally, this study allowed identification of three ARF candidates potentially involved in the auxin-regulated transcriptional program underlying wood formation. PMID:25269088

  11. Genome-wide characterization and expression profiling of the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) gene family in Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Soler, Marçal; Mila, Isabelle; San Clemente, Hélène; Savelli, Bruno; Dunand, Christophe; Paiva, Jorge A P; Myburg, Alexander A; Bouzayen, Mondher; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Cassan-Wang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Auxin is a central hormone involved in a wide range of developmental processes including the specification of vascular stem cells. Auxin Response Factors (ARF) are important actors of the auxin signalling pathway, regulating the transcription of auxin-responsive genes through direct binding to their promoters. The recent availability of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence allowed us to examine the characteristics and evolutionary history of this gene family in a woody plant of high economic importance. With 17 members, the E. grandis ARF gene family is slightly contracted, as compared to those of most angiosperms studied hitherto, lacking traces of duplication events. In silico analysis of alternative transcripts and gene truncation suggested that these two mechanisms were preeminent in shaping the functional diversity of the ARF family in Eucalyptus. Comparative phylogenetic analyses with genomes of other taxonomic lineages revealed the presence of a new ARF clade found preferentially in woody and/or perennial plants. High-throughput expression profiling among different organs and tissues and in response to environmental cues highlighted genes expressed in vascular cambium and/or developing xylem, responding dynamically to various environmental stimuli. Finally, this study allowed identification of three ARF candidates potentially involved in the auxin-regulated transcriptional program underlying wood formation.

  12. Competition for light and light use efficiency for Acacia mangium and Eucalyptus grandis trees in mono-specific and mixed-species plantations in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maire, G.; Nouvellon, Y.; Gonçalves, J.; Bouillet, J.; Laclau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mixed plantations with N-fixing species might be an attractive option for limiting the use of fertilizer in highly productive Eucalyptus plantations. A randomized block design was set up in southern Brazil, including a replacement series and an additive series design, as well as a nitrogen fertilization treatment, and conducted during a full 6 years rotation. The gradient of competition between Eucalyptus and Acacia in this design resulted in very different conditions of growth of Acacia, from totally dominated up to dominant canopies. We used the MAESTRA model to estimate the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) at tree level. This model requires the description of the scene and distinct structural variables of the two species, and their evolution with time. The competition for light is analysed by comparing the inter-specific values of APAR during a period of 2 years at the end of the rotation. APAR is further compared to the measured increment in stem wood biomass of the tree, and their ratio is an estimation of the light use efficiency for stemwood production at tree-scale. Variability of these LUE are analysed in respect to the species, the size of the tree, and at plot scale (competition level). Stemwood production was 3400, 3900 and 2400 gDM/m2 while APAR was 1640, 2280 and 2900 MJ/y for the pure Eucalyptus, pure Acacia and 50/50 mixed plantation, respectively, for an average LAI of 3.7, 3.3 and 4.5, respectively. Individual LUE for stemwood was estimated at an average value of 1.72 and 1.41 gDM/MJ/tree for Eucalyptus and Acacia, respectively, and at 0.92 and 0.40 gDM/MJ/tree when they were planted in mixed 50/50 plantations. LUE was highly dependant on tree size for both species. At the plot scale, LUE for stemwood were 2.1 gDM/MJ and 1.75 for Eucalyptus and Acacias, respectively, and 0.85 for the mixed 50/50 plantation. These results suggest that the mixed 50/50 plantation, which absorbed a higher amount of light, produce less

  13. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus torelliana

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Christiana Bola A.; Lawal, Temitope Olufunmilayo; Mahady, Gail B.

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell. (Myrtaceae), Nigerian medicinal plants, was investigated in six strains of H. pylori, namely, ATCC 4504, ATCC 47619, A2, TI8984, 019A, and A6. The susceptibility of these strains was determined using a standardized agar dilution method (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines) with Mueller–Hinton agar, supplemented with defibrinated horse blood. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts against all the tested strains ranged from 12.5 to 400 μg/mL. Phytochemical screening of the plant extracts revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, and cardenolides. The anti-H. pylori activities demonstrated by these plants may be attributed to their chemical constituents, and explain their reported traditional uses, as well as their gastroprotective properties as demonstrated previously in experimental animals. The results of this work suggest that, in accordance with their traditional medical use in Nigeria, E. camaldalensis and E. torelliana have some therapeutic potential against H. pylori, and thus are of interest for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:20396588

  14. Should Exotic Eucalyptus be Planted in Subtropical China: Insights from Understory Plant Diversity in Two Contrasting Eucalyptus Chronosequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianping; Fan, Houbao; Liu, Wenfei; Huang, Guomin; Tang, Jianfu; Zeng, Ruijin; Huang, Jing; Liu, Zhanfeng

    2015-11-01

    Although Eucalyptus is widely planted in South China, whose effects on native biodiversity are unclear. The objective of this study was to quantify the richness and composition of understory plants in two contrasting Eucalyptus chronosequences in South China. One was in Zhangzhou City with plantation age of 2, 4, and 6 years after clear-cutting Chinese fir forests, while the other was in Heshan City with plantation age of 2, 3, and 24 years that reforested on barren lands. Results showed that the richness of understory plants and functional groups was not significantly altered in the Zhangzhou chronosequence, while increased in the 24-year-old plantations, with a significantly larger proportion of woody plants than the younger plantations for the Heshan chronosequence. Moreover, a higher richness of woody plants accompanied by a lower richness of herbaceous species was detected in the Zhangzhou chronosequence compared with the Heshan one. To balance the need for pulp production and plant diversity conservation, we suggest that intercropping approaches between exotic Eucalyptus plantations and native forests should be considered in the fast rotation Eucalyptus plantations. However, Eucalyptus plantations may be used as pioneer species to sustain ecosystem functioning for the degraded lands.

  15. Should Exotic Eucalyptus be Planted in Subtropical China: Insights from Understory Plant Diversity in Two Contrasting Eucalyptus Chronosequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Fan, Houbao; Liu, Wenfei; Huang, Guomin; Tang, Jianfu; Zeng, Ruijin; Huang, Jing; Liu, Zhanfeng

    2015-11-01

    Although Eucalyptus is widely planted in South China, whose effects on native biodiversity are unclear. The objective of this study was to quantify the richness and composition of understory plants in two contrasting Eucalyptus chronosequences in South China. One was in Zhangzhou City with plantation age of 2, 4, and 6 years after clear-cutting Chinese fir forests, while the other was in Heshan City with plantation age of 2, 3, and 24 years that reforested on barren lands. Results showed that the richness of understory plants and functional groups was not significantly altered in the Zhangzhou chronosequence, while increased in the 24-year-old plantations, with a significantly larger proportion of woody plants than the younger plantations for the Heshan chronosequence. Moreover, a higher richness of woody plants accompanied by a lower richness of herbaceous species was detected in the Zhangzhou chronosequence compared with the Heshan one. To balance the need for pulp production and plant diversity conservation, we suggest that intercropping approaches between exotic Eucalyptus plantations and native forests should be considered in the fast rotation Eucalyptus plantations. However, Eucalyptus plantations may be used as pioneer species to sustain ecosystem functioning for the degraded lands.

  16. Genetic Control of Heterochrony in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey J.; Freeman, Jules S.; Jones, Rebecca C.; Potts, Brad M.; Wong, Melissa M. L.; Weller, James L.; Hecht, Valérie F. G.; Poethig, R. Scott; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2014-01-01

    A change in the timing or rate of developmental events throughout ontogeny is referred to as heterochrony, and it is a major evolutionary process in plants and animals. We investigated the genetic basis for natural variation in the timing of vegetative phase change in the tree Eucalyptus globulus, which undergoes a dramatic change in vegetative morphology during the juvenile-to-adult transition. Quantitative trait loci analysis in an outcross F2 family derived from crosses between individuals from a coastal population of E. globulus with precocious vegetative phase change and individuals from populations in which vegetative phase change occurs several years later implicated the microRNA EglMIR156.5 as a potential contributor to this heterochronic difference. Additional evidence for the involvement of EglMIR156.5 was provided by its differential expression in trees with early and late phase change. Our findings suggest that changes in the expression of miR156 underlie natural variation in vegetative phase change in E. globulus, and may also explain interspecific differences in the timing of this developmental transition. PMID:24950963

  17. Foliar nutrient retranslocation in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Saur, E; Nambiar, E K; Fife, D N

    2000-10-01

    We measured patterns of change in concentrations and contents of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and calcium in fully expanded leaves of young Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) trees growing in a plantation in southeastern Australia, over a 12-month period beginning at the onset of spring. There was significant net retranslocation of mobile nutrients on a seasonal basis from green leaves, coinciding with continued growth and production of foliage. There was a close positive relationship between initial nutrient content (N, P and K) of the leaf and amount retranslocated, and a tight coupling between N and P retranslocated from leaves. Net retranslocation was significantly correlated with basal area growth increments. Artificial shading of leaves resulted in senescence and reduction in leaf mass. It also induced retranslocation of N, P and K from leaves of different ages and from different position in the canopy. Although the mechanisms underlying the effects of shading intensity on these changes were not elucidated, shading provided an experimental tool for studying retranslocation. Comparison of the results with published data for Pinus radiata (D. Don) grown in the same environment indicated a similarity between the species in patterns of change in foliar nutrient contents and in factors governing foliar nutrient retranslocation, giving rise to unifying principles.

  18. Suppression of branches in Eucalyptus trees.

    PubMed

    Senthalir, P; Sharanya, S; Paramathma, M

    2004-06-01

    The effect of neem oil, which acts as a suckericide in tobacco, on branch suppression in Eucalyptus tereticornis was assessed to help maximize stem biomass. Lateral branches of selected trees were pruned, and neem oil solutions at concentrations of either 80%, 40%, 20%, 10%, or 0% (untreated control) were applied to leaf axils of the pruned branches. Regeneration of branches was suppressed, and the magnitude of suppression was proportional to the concentration of neem oil. Compared to the control, the percentage reduction in branching at 80% neem oil was 41.6%. When regenerated branches were repruned and neem oil applied at either 100%, 80%, or 0% (control), the regenerating ability of these branches was severely repressed by 78% at 100% neem oil relative to the control. Apical shoots were also topped and treated at either 100% or 0% (control) neem oil to identify the principal suppressive component in neem oil. The principal component azadirachtin was tested at 375, 750, 1500, 3125, 6250, 12 500, 25 000, 50 000, and 100 000 ppm and 0 ppm as the control. Reduction in the coppicing shoot was as high as 85%. Azadirachtin was responsible for the suppression. By pruning the lateral branches with neem oil, wasteful consumption of photosynthates can be precluded and the stem biomass maximized.

  19. Heat sterilization of wood

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  20. Wood supply and demand

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Ince; David B. McKeever

    2011-01-01

    At times in history, there have been concerns that demand for wood (timber) would be greater than the ability to supply it, but that concern has recently dissipated. The wood supply and demand situation has changed because of market transitions, economic downturns, and continued forest growth. This article provides a concise overview of this change as it relates to the...

  1. Chemical modification of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2007-01-01

    After millions of years of evolution, wood was designed to perform in a wet environment, and nature is programmed to recycle it, in a timely way, back to the basic building blocks of carbon dioxide and water through biological, thermal, aqueous, photochemical, chemical, and mechanical degradation. The properties of wood are, for the most part, a result of the chemistry...

  2. How James Wood Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Evan R., Comp.

    2008-01-01

    Reading through news-media clippings about James Wood, one might reasonably conclude that "pre-eminent critic" is his official job title. In fact, Wood is a staff writer for "The New Yorker" and a professor of the practice of literary criticism at Harvard University. But at a time when there is much hand-wringing about the death of the…

  3. Structure of wood

    Treesearch

    Regis B. Miller

    1999-01-01

    The fibrous nature of wood strongly influences how it is used. Wood is primarily composed of hollow, elongate, spindle-shaped cells that are arranged parallel to each other along the trunk of a tree. When lumber and other products are cut from the tree, the characteristics of these fibrous cells and their arrangement affect such properties as strength and shrinkage as...

  4. How James Wood Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Evan R., Comp.

    2008-01-01

    Reading through news-media clippings about James Wood, one might reasonably conclude that "pre-eminent critic" is his official job title. In fact, Wood is a staff writer for "The New Yorker" and a professor of the practice of literary criticism at Harvard University. But at a time when there is much hand-wringing about the death of the…

  5. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...

  6. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Rodney E. Jacobson; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood-plastic composites” refers to any number of composites that contain wood (of any form) and either thermoset or thermoplastic polymers. Thermosets or thermoset polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins, such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar (...

  7. Wood : mechanical fasteners

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer

    2001-01-01

    The strength and stability of any structure depends heavily on the fasteners that hold its parts together. One prime advantage of wood as a structural material is the ease with which wood structural parts can be joined together using a wide variety of fasteners: nails, staples, screws, lag screws, bolts, and various types of metal connectors. For the utmost rigidity,...

  8. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of Eucalyptus infected with Calonectria pseudoreteaudii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanzhu; Guo, Wenshuo; Feng, Lizhen; Ye, Xiaozhen; Xie, Wanfeng; Huang, Xiuping; Liu, Jinyan

    2015-02-06

    Cylindrocladium leaf blight is one of the most severe diseases in Eucalyptus plantations and nurseries. There are Eucalyptus cultivars with resistance to the disease. However, little is known about the defense mechanism of resistant cultivars. Here, we investigated the transcriptome and proteome of Eucalyptus leaves (E. urophylla×E. tereticornis M1), infected or not with Calonectria pseudoreteaudii. A total of 8585 differentially expressed genes (|log2 ratio| ≥1, FDR ≤0.001) at 12 and 24hours post-inoculation were detected using RNA-seq. Transcriptional changes for five genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR. A total of 3680 proteins at the two time points were identified using iTRAQ technique.The combined transcriptome and proteome analysis revealed that the shikimate/phenylpropanoid pathway, terpenoid biosynthesis, signalling pathway (jasmonic acid and sugar) were activated. The data also showed that some proteins (WRKY33 and PR proteins) which have been reported to involve in plant defense response were up-regulated. However, photosynthesis, nucleic acid metabolism and protein metabolism were impaired by the infection of C. pseudoreteaudii. This work will facilitate the identification of defense related genes and provide insights into Eucalyptus defense responses to Cylindrocladium leaf blight. In this study, a total of 130 proteins and genes involved in the shikimate/phenylpropanoid pathway, terpenoid biosynthesis, signalling pathway, cell transport, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism and protein metabolism in Eucalyptus leaves after infected with C. pseudoreteaudii were identified. This is the first report of a comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of Eucalyptus in response to Calonectria sp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden inoculated with Pisolithus microcarpus (UFSC-Pt116) in land subject to the sandy process in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Eduardo Lorensi; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Machado, Rafael Goulart; Eckhardt, Daniel Pazzini; Dahmer, Sabrina de Fátima Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Eucalypts is one of the main species used for commercial reforestation in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. This study aimed to evaluate the survival and early growth of eucalyptus trees in an area subject to sandy process after three years of growth. The Eucalyptus grandis seedlings were grown in a greenhouse, inoculated or not with the isolated ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus microcarpus (UFSC-Pt116), produced in peat or Entisol. After 120 days, the seedlings were transplanted to an area subject to the sandy process, in the São Francisco de Assis city, RS. The plants have been evaluated regarding survival, height, stem diameter, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium levels and total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, organic phosphorus and wood production on different days after planting. The seedlings grown on the Entisol which was inoculated with the isolated UFSC-Pt116 presented higher survival rates, height, stem diameter, nitrogen concentration and wood production then non-inoculated seedlings. Inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi enhanced the production of E. grandis seedlings in survival rates, height, stem diameter.

  10. Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden inoculated with Pisolithus microcarpus (UFSC-Pt116) in land subject to the sandy process in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Eduardo Lorensi; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Machado, Rafael Goulart; Eckhardt, Daniel Pazzini; Dahmer, Sabrina de Fátima Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Eucalypts is one of the main species used for commercial reforestation in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. This study aimed to evaluate the survival and early growth of eucalyptus trees in an area subject to sandy process after three years of growth. The Eucalyptus grandis seedlings were grown in a greenhouse, inoculated or not with the isolated ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus microcarpus (UFSC-Pt116), produced in peat or Entisol. After 120 days, the seedlings were transplanted to an area subject to the sandy process, in the São Francisco de Assis city, RS. The plants have been evaluated regarding survival, height, stem diameter, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium levels and total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, organic phosphorus and wood production on different days after planting. The seedlings grown on the Entisol which was inoculated with the isolated UFSC-Pt116 presented higher survival rates, height, stem diameter, nitrogen concentration and wood production then non-inoculated seedlings. Inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi enhanced the production of E. grandis seedlings in survival rates, height, stem diameter. PMID:25763017

  11. Wood adhesives : vital for producing most wood products

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    A main route for the efficient utilization of wood resources is to reduce wood to small pieces and then bond them together (Frihart and Hunt 2010). Although humankind has been bonding wood since early Egyptian civilizations, the quality and quantity of bonded wood products has increased dramatically over the past 100 years with the development of new adhesives and...

  12. Enhanced membrane filtration of wood hydrolysates for hemicelluloses recovery by pretreatment with polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Elsi; Kallioinen, Mari; Sainio, Tuomo; Antón, Enrique; Luque, Susana; Mänttäri, Mika

    2013-09-01

    In this study adsorption of foulants from birch and pine/eucalyptus wood hydrolysates on two polymeric adsorbents was studied aiming to reduce the membrane fouling. The effect of the pretreatment of hydrolysate on polyethersulphone membrane performance was studied in dead-end filtration experiments. Adsorption pretreatment improved significantly filtration capacity and decreased membrane fouling. Especially high-molecular weight lignin was efficiently removed. A multistep adsorption pretreatment was found to reduce the amount of adsorbent required. While large adsorbent amount was shown to increase flux in filtration, it was found also to cause significant hemicellulose losses.

  13. Fungicidal value of wood tar from pyrolysis of treated wood.

    PubMed

    Mazela, Bartłomiej

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the paper was to estimate the fungicidal value of wood tar extracted as a product of pyrolysis of wood previously treated with either creosote oil or CCB-type salt preservative. The effectiveness of wood treated with one of these two wood tar residuals was compared to the effectiveness of wood treated with virgin creosote oil (type WEI-B) and an untreated control. Wood was impregnated with alcohol solutions of the two extracted preservatives or virgin creosote oil and then subjected to the Coniophora puteana, Poria placenta and Coriolus versicolor fungi. The fungicidal values of the investigated preservatives were determined with the use of the short agar-block method and the aging test according to the standard EN 84. It was found that wood tar extracted by pyrolysis of old creosote-treated wood and then used to treat wood may have potential as a preservative for wood protection or as a component of preservatives.

  14. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Trojanowski, R.; Wei, G.

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  15. A reference linkage map for Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are invaluable resources in plant research. They provide a key tool for many genetic applications including: mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL); comparative mapping; identifying unlinked (i.e. independent) DNA markers for fingerprinting, population genetics and phylogenetics; assisting genome sequence assembly; relating physical and recombination distances along the genome and map-based cloning of genes. Eucalypts are the dominant tree species in most Australian ecosystems and of economic importance globally as plantation trees. The genome sequence of E. grandis has recently been released providing unprecedented opportunities for genetic and genomic research in the genus. A robust reference linkage map containing sequence-based molecular markers is needed to capitalise on this resource. Several high density linkage maps have recently been constructed for the main commercial forestry species in the genus (E. grandis, E. urophylla and E. globulus) using sequenced Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. To provide a single reference linkage map for eucalypts a composite map was produced through the integration of data from seven independent mapping experiments (1950 individuals) using a marker-merging method. Results The composite map totalled 1107 cM and contained 4101 markers; comprising 3880 DArT, 213 microsatellite and eight candidate genes. Eighty-one DArT markers were mapped to two or more linkage groups, resulting in the 4101 markers being mapped to 4191 map positions. Approximately 13% of DArT markers mapped to identical map positions, thus the composite map contained 3634 unique loci at an average interval of 0.31 cM. Conclusion The composite map represents the most saturated linkage map yet produced in Eucalyptus. As the majority of DArT markers contained on the map have been sequenced, the map provides a direct link to the E. grandis genome sequence and will serve as an important reference for

  16. Chapter 6: Wood energy and competing wood product markers

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Karen Abt

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effect of expanding wood energy markets is important to all wood-dependent industries and to policymakers debating the implementation of public programs to support the expansion of wood energy generation. A key factor in determining the feasibility of wood energy projects (e.g. wood boiler or pellet plant) is the long-term (i.e. 20-30year) supply...

  17. Structure and Function of Wood

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many cell types and chemistries acting together to serve the needs of living plant. Attempting to understand wood inthe context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants-conduction of water from the...

  18. Mixed plantations of Eucalyptus and leguminous trees enhance biomass production

    Treesearch

    Dean S. DeBell; Craig D. Whitesell; Thomas H. Schubert

    1985-01-01

    Two Eucalyptus species-E. saligna Sm. and E. grandis Hill-are especially favored in Hawaii forwood, fiber, and fuel production because of their quick growth and high yields. Their growth is limited, however, on many sites by low levels of available nitrogen. Supplemental nitrogen can be provided by nitrogen-...

  19. Cut-to-length harvesting of short-rotation Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Hartsough; David J. Cooper

    1999-01-01

    Traditional whole-tree harvesting systems work well in short-rotation hardwood plantations, but other methods are needed where it is desirable to leave the residues on the site. We tested a system consisting of a cut-to-length harvester, forwarder, mobile chipper, and chip screen to clearcut a 7-year-old plantation of Eucalyptus viminalis. Three...

  20. Lumber grade recoverey from Hawaii-grown robusta Eucalyptus logs

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1970-01-01

    In part to supplement meager data on lumber grade yield of Hawaii-grown timber, 30 robusta eucalyptus logs were shipped to a Michigan sawmill for processing. The logs were from 12 trees in three different stands. The lumber produced was graded according to National Hardwood Lumber Association standards. The sample was too small to provide a basis for predicting grade...

  1. Ongoing molecular studies of Eucalyptus powdery mildew in Brazil

    Treesearch

    N. R. Fonseca; L. M. S. Guimaraes; R. P. Pires; Ned Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim; A. C. Alfenas

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew diseases are caused by biotrophic fungi in the Erysiphales. These fungal pathogens are easily observed by the whitish powdery appearance caused by their colonization of the aerial surfaces on living plants (Stadnik & Rivera, 2001) (Figure 1). In Brazil, powdery mildew of Eucalyptus spp is increasing under the current nursery production...

  2. Clonal propagation on Eucalyptus by cuttings in France

    Treesearch

    H. Chaperon

    1983-01-01

    A.FO.CEL has developed a technique for mass propagation by cuttings of Eucalyptus in France. This technique is described from the selection of the ortet to the mass propagation of the clone for afforestation: the first stage is the mobilization of the ortet, the second stage is called pre-propagation which includes rejuvenating and rooting conditioning, the third stage...

  3. Soil conservation service tests of Eucalyptus species for windbreaks

    Treesearch

    Gary L. Young

    1983-01-01

    The Soil Conservation Service is in the early stages of testing many species of Eucalyptus or windbreaks. Over 260 different species have been collected. The pre-planting selection criteria and process is described as well as the test conditions and procedures. Some sources of information on the use of the Eucalypts may be misleading through...

  4. Large-scale Eucalyptus energy farms and power cogeneration

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Noroña

    1983-01-01

    A thorough evaluation of all factors possibly affecting a large-scale planting of eucalyptus is foremost in determining the cost effectiveness of the planned operation. Seven basic areas of concern must be analyzed:1. Species Selection 2. Site Preparation 3. Planting 4. Weed Control 5....

  5. Tests of 36 Eucalyptus species in northern California

    Treesearch

    James P. King; Stanley L. Krugmanand

    1980-01-01

    A trial of 36 species of Eucalyptus near Concord, California, found species of sufficiently rapid growth and good survival to merit further screening. Species from western Australia and of the subgenus Monocalyprus all failed on the site. E. camaldulensis, E. dalrympleana, E....

  6. Chemical characterisation of PM10 emissions from combustion in a closed stove of common woods grown in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, C.; Alves, C.; Pio, C.; Rzaca, M.; Schmidl, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-04-01

    A series of source tests were conducted to determine the wood elemental composition, combustion gases and the chemical constitution of PM10 emissions from the closed stove combustion of four species of woods grown in Portugal: Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia. The burning tests were made in a closed stove with a dilution source sampler. To ascertain the combustion phase and conditions, continuous emission monitors measured O2, CO2, CO, NO, hydrocarbons, temperature and pressure, during each burning cycle. Woodsmoke samples have been collected and analysed to estimate the contribution of plant debris and biomass smoke to atmospheric aerosols. At this stage of work, cellulose, anhydrosugars and humic-like substances (HULIS) have been measured. Cellulose was determined photometrically after its conversion to D-Glucose. The determination of levoglucosan and other anhydrosugars, including mannosan and galactosan, was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. HULIS determination was made with a total organic carbon analyser and an infrared non dispersive detector, after the isolation of substances. Cellulose was present in PM10 at mass fractions (w/w) of 0.13%, 0.13%, 0.05% and 0.08% for Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia, respectively. Levoglucosan was the major anhydrosugar present in the samples, representing mass fractions of 14.71%, 3.80%, 6.78% and 1.91%, concerning the above mentioned wood species, respectively. The levoglucosan-to-mannosan ratio, usually used to evaluate the proportion of hardwood or softwood smoke in PM10, gave average values of 34.9 (Eucalyptus globulos), 3.40 (Pinus pinaster), 24.8 (Quercus suber) and 10.4 (Acacia longifolia). HULIS were present at mass fractions of 2.35%, 2.99%, 1.52% and 1.72% for the four wood species listed in the same order as before.

  7. Combination of steam explosion and laccase-mediator treatments prior to Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sampedro, R; Eugenio, M E; Carbajo, J M; Villar, J C

    2011-07-01

    The effect of a pretreatment consisting of steam explosion (SE) followed by a laccase mediator system (LMS) stage on Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping has been evaluated and compared with fungal pretreatments. Pretreatment with SE and LMS was more efficient than pretreatments using Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes sp. I-62. Steam explosion not only improved the enzyme penetration into the wood chips and shortened the pulping process by 60%, but also extracted around 50% of the hemicelluloses which could be converted into value-added products. The optimal conditions for the LMS treatment were 3h, 3UA/g and 40°C. Compared to SE, the SE/LMS treatment yielded an increase in delignification of 13.9% without affecting pulp properties, provided a similar screened kraft yield, and reduced consumption of chemical reagents Na(2)S and NaOH by 11.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Therefore, SE/LMS is a promising pretreatment for converting the pulp mill into a forest bio-refinery.

  8. Effect of alkaline preswelling on the structure of lignins from Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jing; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Yun-Yan; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Run-Cang

    2017-05-02

    A clear elucidation of structural feature of whole lignin in plant cell wall is of great importance for understanding lignin biosynthesis mechanism and developing lignin based chemicals or materials under the current biorefinery scenario. Swollen residual enzyme lignin (SREL) has been identified as an ideal representative for native lignin in the plant walls. To investigate the influence of preswelling conditions on the structural features, the SREL obtained through preswelling the ball-milled Eucalyptus wood powder in 2, 4 and 8% NaOH solutions and subsequent in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis were thoroughly characterized. A cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) was also prepared as a comparison. The quantitative NMR analyses indicated that the relative contents of β-O-4' linkages in SRELs were higher than that in CEL. The lignin structure tended to undergo more destruction with the elevated NaOH concentration. A relatively low NaOH concentration (2% in this study), which could be applied to effectively remove hemicelluloses and transform cellulose structure from cellulose I to cellulose II, was competent to prepare SREL as an ideal representative for the protolignin. An optimization of SREL preparation was essential for a better understanding of the whole protolignin.

  9. Fractionation of Eucalyptus grandis chips by dilute acid-catalysed steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Emmel, Alexandre; Mathias, Alvaro L; Wypych, Fernando; Ramos, Luiz P

    2003-01-01

    Steam explosion of Eucalyptus grandis has been carried out under various pretreatment conditions (200-210 degrees C, 2-5 min) after impregnation of the wood chips with 0.087 and 0.175% (w/w) H2SO4. This study, arranged as a 2(3) factorial design, indicated that pretreatment temperature is the most critical variable affecting the yield of steam-treated fractions. Pretreatment of 0.175% (w/w) H2SO4-impregnated chips at 210 degrees C for 2 min was the best condition for hemicellulose recovery (mostly as xylose) in the water soluble fraction, reaching almost 70% of the corresponding xylose theoretical yield. By contrast, lower pretreatment temperatures of 200 degrees C were enough to yield steam-treated substrates from which a 90% cellulose conversion was obtained in 48 h, using low enzyme loadings of a Celluclast 1.5 1 plus Novozym 188 mixture (Novo Nordisk). Release of water-soluble chromophores was monitored by UV spectroscopy and their concentration increased with pretreatment severity. The yield of alkali-soluble lignin increased at higher levels of acid impregnation and pretreatment temperatures. Thermoanalysis of these lignin fractions indicated a pattern of lignin fragmentation towards greater pretreatment severities but lignin condensation prevailed at the most drastic pretreatment conditions.

  10. Velcro mechanics in wood

    Treesearch

    David Kretschmann

    2003-12-01

    The remarkable deformability of wood in a moist environment resembles that of ductile metals. A combination of traditional mechanical tests and cutting-edge diffraction experiments reveal the molecular mechanism that determines such behaviour.

  11. Maximizing wood Failure

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1965-01-01

    The durability of plywood bonds in exterior exposure is commonly measured indirectly by failing wetted specimens in shear; a high percentage of wood failure is accepted in the industry as evidence that the gluebond will be durable.

  12. Profile: Susan Wood.

    PubMed

    Wilan, Ken

    2007-05-01

    When US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official Susan Wood resigned over foot-dragging on Plan B, she found herself at the center of a maelstrom concerning political interference in agency decision-making.

  13. Impact Tests for Woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Although it is well known that the strength of wood depends greatly upon the time the wood is under the load, little consideration has been given to this fact in testing materials for airplanes. Here, results are given of impact tests on clear, straight grained spruce. Transverse tests were conducted for comparison. Both Izod and Charpy impact tests were conducted. Results are given primarily in tabular and graphical form.

  14. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  15. Mechanical properties of wood

    Treesearch

    David Kretschmann

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties presented in this chapter were obtained from tests of pieces of wood termed “clear” and “straight grained” because they did not contain characteristics such as knots, cross grain, checks, and splits. These test pieces did have anatomical characteristics such as growth rings that occurred in consistent patterns within each piece. Clear wood...

  16. Changes in essential oil during enzyme-assisted ensiling of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.) and lemon eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook).

    PubMed

    Dudai, N; Weinberg, Z G; Larkov, O; Ravid, U; Ashbell, G; Putievsky, E

    2001-05-01

    Changes in essential oil during ensiling of lemongrass and lemon eucalyptus were studied. Wilted lemongrass and eucalyptus leaves were ensiled in 0.25-L anaerobic jars. Samples consisted of a control (no additives) and a treated sample (0.5% glucose and lactic acid bacteria and 1% cellulase plus 1% hemicellulase plus pectinase). Three jars per treatment were sampled on days 2, 6, 10, and 36 for analysis of essential oil. Essential oil was obtained by extraction and by hydrodistillation. Extraction efficacy of essential oil from the lemongrass was improved by the enzyme treatment, but it was much lower than the amount obtained by distillation. The major components of the essential oil were neral and geranial. In the eucalyptus, total essential oils obtained by distillation decreased during ensiling, and the amount was similar to the amount obtained by extraction. Citronellal, which was the major component of the essential oil in the fresh eucalyptus leaves, decreased, whereas isopulegol and 3,8-terpinolhydrate increased during ensiling.

  17. Growing with wood waste

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.M.

    1995-05-01

    When officials at Regional Waste Services (Peabody, Mass.) were looking for an outlet for their used wood products in the late 1980s, they had no idea that the material would eventually turn into a whole new market for them. Simply tired of paying exorbitant disposal fees and seeking out obscure landfills willing to accept the waste, company officials decided to build and operate their own 1,000-tpd wood recycling facility. Encouraged by the immediate success of the facility, principals at Regional Waste Services, which at the time was the fifth largest independent waste hauling, transfer, and disposal firm in the US made a strategic business decision to sell their waste hauling business and to concentrate on the wood recycling operation full time. Their newly named company, Wood Recycling, Inc. (WRI, Peabody, Mass.), was officially established in July 1990. Today, nearly five years later, that decision appears to be paying off in a big way. WRI has successfully diverted thousands of tons of urban wood wastes from landfills. It also has turned that waste into an innovative line of recycled wood and paper fiber mulch lawn care products that are being marketed to consumers and commercial entities across the country.

  18. Antihyperglycemic actions of Eucalyptus globulus (Eucalyptus) are associated with pancreatic and extra-pancreatic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, A M; Flatt, P R

    1998-12-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus) is used as a traditional treatment for diabetes. In this study, incorporation of eucalyptus in the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/L) reduced the hyperglycemia and associated weight loss of streptozotocin-treated mice. An aqueous extract of eucalyptus (AEE) (0.5 g/L) enhanced 2-deoxy-glucose transport by 50%, glucose oxidation by 60% and incorporation of glucose into glycogen by 90% in mouse abdominal muscle. In acute, 20 min incubations, 0.25-0.5 g AEE/L evoked a stepwise 70-160% enhancement of insulin secretion from the clonal pancreatic beta-cell line (BRIN-BD11). The stimulatory effect of 0.5 g/L AEE was unaltered by the presence of 400 micromol diazoxide/L and prior exposure to AEE did not alter subsequent insulin secretory response to L-alanine, thereby negating adetrimental effect on cell viability. The effect of AEE was not potentiated by glucose or demonstrable in cells exposed to a depolarizing concentration of KCl. Further study of the insulin-releasing effects of AEE revealed the activity to be heat stable, acetone insoluble, stable to acid, but abolished by exposure to alkali. Sequential extraction with solvents revealed activity in both methanol and water fractions, indicating the presence of more than one biologically active extract constituent. These data indicate that Eucalyptus globulus represents an effective antihyperglycemic dietary adjunct for the treatment of diabetes and a potential source for discovery of new orally active agent(s) for future therapy.

  19. [Preliminary screening tests of molluscicidal effect of extracts from Eucalyptus leaves].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Zhu, Dan; Li, Ming-Ya

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the molluscicidal effects of extracts from five Eucalyptus leaves collected from Guangdong Province, China. According to the WHO recommended indoor immersed method, the molluscicidal effects of extracts from five Eucalyptus leaves with 250, 100, 10 mg/L of water extraction, alcohol precipitation and organic solvent extraction were investigated. The dose-effect relationship showed that all the mortality rates of Oncomelania hupensis reached 80% with the volatile oil from five Eucalyptus leaves immersed at the concentrations of 100 mg/L for 48 h, and the mortality rates were both 93.3% with the volatile oil from Corymbia citriodora and Eucalyptus urophylla leaves. The mortality rate was up to 95% with the chloroform extract, and the mortality rate reached 60% at the concentrations of 10 mg/L for 48 h. The volatile oils from five Eucalyptus leaves and the chloroform extract in alcohol extraction from Eucalyptus urophylla leaves are better than other solvents.

  20. Characterization, refining and antioxidant activity of saccharides derived from hemicelluloses of wood and rice husks.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Sandra; Conde, Enma; Moure, Andrés; Domínguez, Herminia; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Samples of rice husks, Eucalyptus globulus wood and Pinus pinaster wood (containing arabinoxylan, acetylated glucuronoxylan and acetylated glucomannan as major hemicellulose components, respectively) were subjected to autohydrolysis. The resulting liquid phases, containing mainly hemicellulose-derived saccharides, were refined by physicochemical methods to reduce their contents of monosaccharides and non-saccharide compounds. Raw autohydrolysis liquors and refined concentrates coming from aqueous treatments were assayed for antioxidant activity using the following assays: reducing power (FRAP), DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity and protection of β-carotene-linoleic emulsions from oxidation. The reducing power and radical scavenging capacity of the non refined fractions were comparable to the ones determined for the reference compound butylhydroxytoluene. Hemicellulose concentrated from the different feedstocks and refining protocols showed a dose dependent antioxidant activity in the range of concentrations evaluated. The in vitro antioxidant activity of concentrates correlated with their phenolic content.

  1. Genome-wide variation in recombination rate in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Gion, Jean-Marc; Hudson, Corey J; Lesur, Isabelle; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Freeman, Jules S

    2016-08-09

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental evolutionary process. It not only generates diversity, but influences the efficacy of natural selection and genome evolution. There can be significant heterogeneity in recombination rates within and between species, however this variation is not well understood outside of a few model taxa, particularly in forest trees. Eucalypts are forest trees of global economic importance, and dominate many Australian ecosystems. We studied recombination rate in Eucalyptus globulus using genetic linkage maps constructed in 10 unrelated individuals, and markers anchored to the Eucalyptus reference genome. This experimental design provided the replication to study whether recombination rate varied between individuals and chromosomes, and allowed us to study the genomic attributes and population genetic parameters correlated with this variation. Recombination rate varied significantly between individuals (range = 2.71 to 3.51 centimorgans/megabase [cM/Mb]), but was not significantly influenced by sex or cross type (F1 vs. F2). Significant differences in recombination rate between chromosomes were also evident (range = 1.98 to 3.81 cM/Mb), beyond those which were due to variation in chromosome size. Variation in chromosomal recombination rate was significantly correlated with gene density (r = 0.94), GC content (r = 0.90), and the number of tandem duplicated genes (r = -0.72) per chromosome. Notably, chromosome level recombination rate was also negatively correlated with the average genetic diversity across six species from an independent set of samples (r = -0.75). The correlations with genomic attributes are consistent with findings in other taxa, however, the direction of the correlation between diversity and recombination rate is opposite to that commonly observed. We argue this is likely to reflect the interaction of selection and specific genome architecture of Eucalyptus. Interestingly, the differences amongst

  2. Dynamic-Mechanical Characterization of Polyester Matrix Composites Reinforced with Eucalyptus Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Caroline G.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Simonassi, Noan T.; Pereira, Artur C.; Margem, Frederico M.; Barbosa, Anderson; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Recently, the eucalyptus fibers have been investigated as a potential option in composites application, due to some advantages in comparison with synthetic fibers. It is largely cultivated in all Brazilian territory. The present work has as objective to characterize the dynamic-mechanical behavior of eucalyptus fiber composites subjected to thermal and mechanical constraints. In this work, the temperature variation and the dynamic-mechanical parameters of polyester composites incorporated with up to 30% in volume of eucalyptus fibers were investigated by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) experiments. The results showed that the incorporation of eucalyptus fibers tends to increase the viscoelastic stiffness of the polyester matrix. It was also observed

  3. Transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons in Eucalyptus genus are differentially expressed and insertionally polymorphic.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Helena Sanches; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Silva, Juliana Costa; Borges, Rafael Junqueira; Matioli, Fábio Filippi; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Marino, Celso Luis

    2015-08-14

    In Eucalyptus genus, studies on genome composition and transposable elements (TEs) are particularly scarce. Nearly half of the recently released Eucalyptus grandis genome is composed by retrotransposons and this data provides an important opportunity to understand TE dynamics in Eucalyptus genome and transcriptome. We characterized nine families of transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons from Copia and Gypsy superfamilies in Eucalyptus grandis genome and we depicted genomic distribution and copy number in two Eucalyptus species. We also evaluated genomic polymorphism and transcriptional profile in three organs of five Eucalyptus species. We observed contrasting genomic and transcriptional behavior in the same family among different species. RLC_egMax_1 was the most prevalent family and RLC_egAngela_1 was the family with the lowest copy number. Most families of both superfamilies have their insertions occurring <3 million years, except one Copia family, RLC_egBianca_1. Protein theoretical models suggest different properties between Copia and Gypsy domains. IRAP and REMAP markers suggested genomic polymorphisms among Eucalyptus species. Using EST analysis and qRT-PCRs, we observed transcriptional activity in several tissues and in all evaluated species. In some families, osmotic stress increases transcript values. Our strategy was successful in isolating transcriptionally active retrotransposons in Eucalyptus, and each family has a particular genomic and transcriptional pattern. Overall, our results show that retrotransposon activity have differentially affected genome and transcriptome among Eucalyptus species.

  4. [Biomass- and energy allocation in Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus tereticornis plantations at different stand ages].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qun-Ying; Chen, Shao-Xiong; Han, Fei-Yang; Chen, Wen-Ping; Wu, Zhi-Hua

    2010-01-01

    An investigation was made on the biomass- and energy allocation in 1-4-year-old Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus tereticornis plantations at Beipo Forest Farm of Suixi County in Guangdong Province. Stand age had significant effects on the retained biomass of the plantations (P < 0.01). The biomass was in the range of 10.61-147.28 t x hm(-2). Both the total biomass and the biomass of above- and belowground components increased with increasing stand age. The proportions of leaf-, branch- and bark biomass to total biomass decreased with year, while that of stem biomass was in reverse. The biomass allocation of the components in 1- and 2-year-old plantations decreased in order of stem > branch > bark > root > leaf, and that in 3- and 4 -year-old plantations was in order of stem > root > branch > bark > leaf. The mean ash content (AC) of the five components at different stand ages ranged from 0.47% to 5.91%, being the highest in bark and the lowest in stem. The mean gross caloric value (GCV) and ash free caloric value (AFCV) of different components ranged from 17.33 to 20. 60 kJ x g(-1) and from 18.42 to 21.59 kJ x g(-1) respectively. Of all the components, leaf had the highest GVC and AFCV, while bark had the lowest ones. Stand age had significant effects on the GVC of branch, stem, and bark, and on the AFCV of leaf, stem, and bark (P < 0.05), but the effects on the GVC of leaf and root, the AFCV of branch and root, and the GVC and AFCV of individual trees were not significant (P > 0.05). The retained energy of 1-4-year-old plantations ranged from 199.98 to 2837.20 GJ x hm(-2), with significant differences among the stand ages (P < 0.01). The retained energy of various components and plantations increased with stand age, and the energy allocation of various components had the same trend as biomass allocation.

  5. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation in Eucalyptus grandis developing xylem.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Steven G; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Groover, Andrew; Berger, Dave K; Myburg, Alexander A

    2015-05-10

    Histone modifications play an integral role in plant development, but have been poorly studied in woody plants. Investigating chromatin organization in wood-forming tissue and its role in regulating gene expression allows us to understand the mechanisms underlying cellular differentiation during xylogenesis (wood formation) and identify novel functional regions in plant genomes. However, woody tissue poses unique challenges for using high-throughput chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) techniques for studying genome-wide histone modifications in vivo. We investigated the role of the modified histone H3K4me3 (trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3) in gene expression during the early stages of wood formation using ChIP-seq in Eucalyptus grandis, a woody biomass model. Plant chromatin fixation and isolation protocols were optimized for developing xylem tissue collected from field-grown E. grandis trees. A "nano-ChIP-seq" procedure was employed for ChIP DNA amplification. Over 9 million H3K4me3 ChIP-seq and 18 million control paired-end reads were mapped to the E. grandis reference genome for peak-calling using Model-based Analysis of ChIP-Seq. The 12,177 significant H3K4me3 peaks identified covered ~1.5% of the genome and overlapped some 9,623 protein-coding genes and 38 noncoding RNAs. H3K4me3 library coverage, peaking ~600 - 700 bp downstream of the transcription start site, was highly correlated with gene expression levels measured with RNA-seq. Overall, H3K4me3-enriched genes tended to be less tissue-specific than unenriched genes and were overrepresented for general cellular metabolism and development gene ontology terms. Relative expression of H3K4me3-enriched genes in developing secondary xylem was higher than unenriched genes, however, and highly expressed secondary cell wall-related genes were enriched for H3K4me3 as validated using ChIP-qPCR. In this first genome-wide analysis of a modified histone in a woody tissue, we optimized a ChIP-seq procedure suitable

  6. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  7. Wood for sound.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.

  8. New cryptic species of Teratosphaeria on Eucalyptus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Andjic, Vera; Maxwell, Aaron; Hardy, Giles E StJ; Burgess, Treena I

    2016-12-01

    Teratosphaeria destructans and T. viscida are serious pathogens causing leaf, bud and shoot blight diseases of Eucalyptus plantations in the subtropics and tropics of South-East Asia (T. destructans) and North Queensland, Australia (T. viscida). During disease surveys in northern Western Australia and the Northern Territory of Australia, symptoms resembling those of T. destructans were observed on young and adult leaves of native and plantation Eucalyptus spp. and its hybrids. Phylogenetic studies revealed Teratosphaeria species associated with these symptoms are new taxonomic novelties described here as T. novaehollandiae and T. tiwiana spp. nov. Isolates from previous records of T. destructans recorded in Australia were re-examined and based upon the phylogenetic evidence are reassigned to these new taxa. We conclude that T. destructans is absent from Australia.

  9. Wood energy-commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Wood energy is being widely investigated in many areas of the country because of the many obvious benefits of wood fuel such as the low price per million Btus relative to coal, oil, and gas; the wide availability of noncommercial wood and the proven ability to harvest it; established technology which is reliable and free of pollution; renewable resources; better conservation for harvested land; and the potential for jobs creation. The Southeastern United States has a specific leadership role in wood energy based on its established forest products industry experience and the potential application of wood energy to other industries and institutions. Significant questions about the widespread usage of wood energy are being answered in demonstrations around the country as well as the Southeast in areas of wood storage and bulk handling; high capitalization costs for harvesting and combustion equipment; long term supply and demand contracts; and the economic feasibility of wood energy outside the forest products industry.

  10. Wood energy-commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Wood energy is being widely investigated in many areas of the country because of the many obvious benefits of wood fuel such as the low price per million Btus relative to coal, oil, and gas; the wide availability of noncommercial wood and the proven ability to harvest it; established technology which is reliable and free of pollution; renewable resources; better conservation for harvested land; and the potential for jobs creation. The Southeastern United States has a specific leadership role in wood energy based on its established forest products industry experience and the potential application of wood energy to other industries and institutions. Significant questions about the widespread usage of wood energy are being answered in demonstrations around the country as well as the Southeast in areas of wood storage and bulk handling; high capitalization costs for harvesting and combustion equipment; long term supply and demand contracts; and the economic feasibility of wood energy outside the forest products industry.

  11. North of Wood Street Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Located at the far northern end of the upper harbor is the North of Wood Street study area. This area extends for about a quarter of a mile north of the Wood Street Bridge between New Bedford and Acushnet, Massachusetts.

  12. Valuation of pollinator forage services provided by Eucalyptus cladocalyx.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Willem J; Veldtman, Ruan; Allsopp, Mike H

    2013-08-15

    We assess the monetary value of forage provisioning services for honeybees as provided by an alien tree species in the Western Cape province of South Africa. Although Eucalyptus cladocalyx is not an officially declared invader, it is cleared on a regular basis along with other invasive Eucalyptus species such as Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Eucalyptus conferruminata (which have been prioritised for eradication in South Africa). We present some of the trade-offs associated with the clearing of E. cladocalyx by means of a practical example that illustrates a situation where the benefits of the species to certain stakeholders could support the containment of the species in demarcated areas, while allowing clearing outside such areas. Given the absence of market prices for such forage provisioning services, the replacement cost is used to present the value of the loss in forage as provided by E. cladocalyx if the alien tree species is cleared along with invasive alien tree species. Two replacement scenarios formed the basis for our calculations. The first scenario was an artificial diet as replacement for the forage provisioning service, which yielded a direct cost estimate of US$7.5 m per year. The second was based on a Fynbos cultivation/restoration initiative aimed at substituting the forage provisioning service of E. cladocalyx, which yielded a direct cost of US$20.2 m per year. These figures provide estimates of the potential additional cost burden on the beekeeping industry if E. cladocalyx is completely eradicated from the Western Cape. The cost estimates should be balanced against the negative impacts of E. cladocalyx on ecosystem services in order to make an informed decision with regard to appropriate management strategies for this species. The findings therefore serve as useful inputs to balance trade-offs for alien species that are considered as beneficial to some, but harmful to other. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Avalanches in Wood Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Alava, Mikko J.

    2015-07-01

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  14. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  15. Emissions from fireplace and woodstove combustion of prevalent Portuguese woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Célia

    2010-05-01

    P. Fernandes, C. Gonçalves, C.A. Alves, L. Tarelho, F. Mirante, T. Nunes and C. Pio Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Environment, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal In Portugal, it was estimated that around 390000 ton/year of wood is burned in fireplaces, although the chemical characterisation of emission profiles has not yet been performed. Emission inventories and source apportionment, photochemistry and climate change models use values obtained for American or Alpine wood-fuels, uncommon in South Europe. Previous work has suggested that the species of wood used can have a huge influence on the particle emissions. Since the distribution of compounds emitted differs by species and burning conditions and there are many variations among published profiles, it is desirable to obtain specific data at a regional level on the chemical characterisation of wood smoke. A series of source tests was performed to compare the emission profiles from the woodstove combustion to those of fireplaces. Eight types of biomass were burned in the laboratory: seven species of wood grown in Portugal (Pinus pinaster, Eucalyptus globulus, Quercus suber, Acacia longifolia, Quercus faginea, Olea europea, Quercus ilex rotundifolia), and briquettes of biomass residues. The gas sampling was carried out in the exhaust ducts of both combustion systems. The collection of particles (PM2.5) was conducted in the dilution tunnel that was directly coupled to the chimney. Dilution sampling was used to characterise fine particle emissions from the combustion sources because it simulates the rapid cooling and dilution that occurs as exhaust mixes with the atmosphere. During each burning cycle, the concentrations of O2, CO2 and CO, as well as operational parameters (e.g. temperatures, flows, etc.), were automatically monitored. The PM2.5 samples were analysed by a thermal optical technique in order to obtain their organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) content

  16. Bacterial associations with decaying wood : a review

    Treesearch

    C. A. Clausen

    1996-01-01

    Wood-inhabiting bacteria are associated with wood decay and may have an indirect influence on the decay process. Bacteria are able to affect wood permeability, attack wood structure, or work synergistically with other bacteria and soft-rot fungi to predispose wood to fungal attack. Bacteria that can inhabit chemically treated wood are recognized. The natural ability of...

  17. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Treesearch

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  18. Structure and function of wood

    Treesearch

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2010-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of a living plant. Attempting to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants― conduction of water...

  19. Characterization of an endophytic bacterial community associated with Eucalyptus spp.

    PubMed

    Procópio, R E L; Araújo, W L; Maccheroni, W; Azevedo, J L

    2009-11-24

    Endophytic bacteria were isolated from stems of Eucalyptus spp (Eucalyptus citriodora, E. grandis, E. urophylla, E. camaldulensis, E. torelliana, E. pellita, and a hybrid of E. grandis and E. urophylla) cultivated at two sites; they were characterized by RAPD and amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Endophytic bacteria were more frequently isolated from E. grandis and E. pellita. The 76 isolates were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Erwinia/Pantoea (45%), Agrobacterium sp (21%), Curtobacterium sp (9%), Brevibacillus sp (8%), Pseudomonas sp (8%), Acinetobacter sp (4%), Burkholderia cepacia (2.6%), and Lactococcus lactis (2.6%). Genetic characterization of these endophytic bacteria isolates showed at least eight ARDRA haplotypes. The genetic diversity of 32 Erwinia/Pantoea and 16 Agrobacterium sp isolates was assessed with the RAPD technique. There was a high level of genetic polymorphism among all the isolates and there was positive correlation between the clusters and the geographic origin of the strains. These endophytic bacteria were further analyzed for in vitro interaction with endophytic fungi from Eucalyptus spp. We found that metabolites secreted by Erwinia/Pantoea and B. cepacia isolates had an inhibitory growth effect on some endophytic fungi, suggesting that these metabolites play a role in bacterial-fungal interactions inside the host plant. Apparently, these bacteria could have an important role in plant development; in the future they may be useful for biological control of diseases and plant growth promotion, as well as for the production of new metabolites and enzymes.

  20. Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Bongani; Burgess, Treena I; Coutinho, Teresa A; Wingfield, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    A recent study to determine the cause of collar and root rot disease outbreaks of cold tolerant Eucalyptus species in South Africa resulted in the isolation of two putative new Phytophthora species. Based on phylogenetic comparisons using the ITS and beta-tubulin gene regions, these species were shown to be distinct from known species. These differences were also supported by robust morphological characteristics. The names, Phytophthora frigida sp. nov. and Phytophthora alticola sp. nov. are thus provided for these taxa, which are phylogenetically closely related to species within the ITS clade 2 (P. citricola, P. tropicali and P.multivesiculata) and 4 (P. arecae and P. megakarya), respectively. Phytophthora frigida is heterothallic, and produces stellate to rosaceous growth patterns on growth medium, corraloid hyphae, sporangia with a variety of distorted shapes and has the ability to grow at low temperatures. Phytophthora alticola is homothallic and has a slower growth rate in culture. Both P. frigida and P. alticola are pathogenic to Eucalyptus dunnii. In pathogenicity tests, they were, however, less pathogenic than P. cinnamomi, which is a well-known pathogen of Eucalyptus in South Africa.

  1. Anticariogenic and phytochemical evaluation of Eucalyptus globules Labill.

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B.; Chauhan, Jenabhai B.; Barad, Mahesh B.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, in vitro anticariogenic potential of ethyl acetate, hexane and methanol and aqueous extracts of plant leaves of Eucalyptus globules Labill. were evaluated by using four cariogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans. Agar well diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were used for this purpose. The ethyl acetate extracted fraction of plant leaves showed good inhibitory effects against all selected bacteria. In Eucalyptus globules, hexane and ethyl acetate extracts found highly effective against, Lactobacillus acidophilus with MIC value of 0.031 and 0.062 mg/mL, respectively. Qualitative phytochemical investigation of above extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, phenolic compounds, steroids, cardiac glycosides and terpenes. Based on the MIC value and bioautography, ethyl acetate of plant leaf was selected for further study. Further investigation on the structure elucidation of the bioactive compound using IR, GC-MS and NMR techniques revealed the presence of alpha-farnesene, a sesquiterpene. Eucalyptus globules plant leaf extracts have great potential as anticariogenic agents that may be useful in the treatment of oral disease. PMID:23961222

  2. Unintentional exposure of young children to camphor and eucalyptus oils.

    PubMed

    Flaman, Z; Pellechia-Clarke, S; Bailey, B; McGuigan, M

    2001-02-01

    Essential oils, such as camphorated and eucalyptus oils, are volatile oils that can be absorbed by mouth and through the skin; if ingested orally by children, they can be harmful, even life-threatening. To determine the frequency of essential oil ingestion among children in Toronto, Ontario. Charts from December 1995 through March 1997 at the Ontario Regional Poison Information Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto were reviewed to collect information on calls about essential oil ingestion, and a search of MEDLINE articles from 1966 to 1998 was conducted using the key words: 'camphor', 'eucalyptus', 'paediatric', and 'poisoning'. Callers to the Poison Information Centre reported that 251 children had ingested an essential oil or product: eucalyptus oil 50 children; camphorated oil 18 children; VapAir (Drug Trading, Canada) vaporizing liquid 93 children; and Vicks VaporRub (Procter & Gamble, Canada) 90 children. The most common symptoms were cough, vomiting and cough associated with vomiting. Two children had seizures but recovered. The MEDLINE search found 18 reports of paediatric ingestion of the oils or oil products. The main symptoms were vomiting, lethargy, coma and seizures. One child died. Although widely used by health care consumers, essential oils and the products that contain them can be harmful when ingested by children. Further education for parents and other caregivers about the risks involved in exposure to these products is required.

  3. Disentangling respiratory acclimation and adaptation to growth temperature by Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jörg; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Adams, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    • Respiratory acclimation to growth temperature differs between species, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory acclimation of CO(2) release is a consequence of growth regulation such that growth rates of young foliage of Eucalyptus spp. are similar at contrasting growth temperatures. Further, we tested whether such a response is affected by adaptation of Eucalyptus to different thermal environments via growth at different altitudes in the Australian Alps. • We employed calorimetric methods to relate rates of CO(2) release (mainly from substrate oxidation) and rates of O(2) reduction to conservation of energy. Temperature responses of these processes provided insight into mechanisms that control energy conservation and expenditure, and helped define 'instantaneous enthalpic growth capacity' (CapG). • CapG increased with altitude, but was counteracted by other factors in species adapted to highland habitats. The acclimation response was partly driven by changes in respiratory capacity (CapR(CO2)), and partly by more pronounced dynamic responses of CO(2) release (δ(R(CO2))) to measurement temperature. We observed enhanced temperature sensitivity of O(2) reduction (E(o)(R(O2))) at higher altitudes. • Adaptation to growth temperature included differences in respiration and growth capacities, but there was little evidence that Eucalyptus species vary in metabolic flexibility.

  4. Do changes in carbon allocation account for the growth response to potassium and sodium applications in tropical Eucalyptus plantations?

    PubMed

    Epron, Daniel; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Almeida, Julio C R; Gonçalves, José Leonardo M; Ponton, Stephane; Sette, Carlos R; Delgado-Rojas, Juan S; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Nouvellon, Yann

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms that account for the impact of potassium (K) fertilization and its replacement by sodium (Na) on tree growth is key to improving the management of forest plantations that are expanding over weathered tropical soils with low amounts of exchangeable bases. A complete randomized block design was planted with Eucalyptus grandis (W. Hill ex Maiden) to quantify growth, carbon uptake and carbon partitioning using a carbon budget approach. A combination of approaches including the establishment of allometric relationships over the whole rotation and measurements of soil CO(2) efflux and aboveground litterfall at the end of the rotation were used to estimate aboveground net production (ANPP), total belowground carbon flux and gross primary production (GPP). The stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) of stem wood α-cellulose produced every year was used as a proxy for stomatal limitation of photosynthesis. Potassium fertilization increased GPP and decreased the fraction of carbon allocated belowground. Aboveground net production was strongly enhanced, and because leaf lifespan increased, leaf biomass was enhanced without any change in leaf production, and wood production (P(W)) was dramatically increased. Sodium application decreased the fraction of carbon allocated belowground in a similar way, and enhanced GPP, ANPP and P(W), but to a lesser extent compared with K fertilization. Neither K nor Na affected δ(13)C of stem wood α-cellulose, suggesting that water-use efficiency was the same among the treatments and that the inferred increase in leaf photosynthesis was not only related to a higher stomatal conductance. We concluded that the response to K fertilization and Na addition on P(W) resulted from drastic changes in carbon allocation.

  5. Oligo-carrageenans enhance growth and contents of cellulose, essential oils and polyphenolic compounds in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    PubMed

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Moenne, Alejandra

    2013-07-24

    Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae) originated in Australia and has been introduced in countries with temperate weather in order to obtain wood for cellulose extraction and building purposes. In this work, we analyzed the potential stimulation of growth in height and trunk diameter as well as the content of holo-cellulose, α-cellulose (long cellulose chains), essential oils and polyphenolic compounds (PPCs) in E. globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenans (OCs) kappa, lambda and iota, at 1 mg mL⁻¹, once a week, four times in total and then cultivated for three additional years without further treatment. Eucalyptus treated with OCs kappa, lambda and iota showed an increase in height, mainly with OCs kappa and iota by 58% and 47%, respectively, and in trunk diameter by 44% and 40%, respectively. In addition, OCs induced an increase in the contents of holo-cellulose and α-cellulose, mainly OCs kappa and iota which increased holo-cellulose by 8% and 5%, respectively, and α-cellulose by 16 and 13%, respectively. Moreover, OCs increased the content of essential oils, mainly OCs kappa and iota by 67% and 39%, respectively. Furthermore, OCs decreased the concentration of total phenolic compounds but differentially changed the concentration of several PPCs such as genistein, rutin, ellagic acid, morin, luteolin and quercetin with potential antimicrobial activities. Thus, marine algae OCs kappa, lambda and iota stimulate growth of E. globulus trees by enhancing height and trunk diameter as well as the content of α-cellulose, total essential oils, and some PPCs with potential antimicrobial activities.

  6. Compression debarking of wood chips.

    Treesearch

    Rodger A. Arola; John R. Erickson

    1973-01-01

    Presents results from 2 years testing of a single-pass compression process for debarking wood chips of several species. The most significant variable was season of cut. Depending on species, approximately 70% of the bark was removed from wood cut in the growing season while approximately 45% was removed from wood cut in the dormant season.

  7. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  8. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  9. Extraction of pinocembrin from leaves of different species of Eucalyptus and its quantitative analysis by qNMR and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Sarat, Isha; Choudhary, Alka; Sharma, Ram Jee; Dandia, Karthik; Marsh, Karen J; Foley, William J; Singh, Inder Pal

    2015-03-01

    Pinocembrin, a flavanone with a variety of biological activities was isolated from Eucalyptus sieberi leaves and quantified in several other Eucalyptus species using qNMR and HPTLC densitometry. The effect of different extraction procedures on the extraction of the compound from Eucalyptus sieberi was also studied. The methods were validated in terms ofselectivity, specificity, linearity, recovery, precision and repeatability.

  10. Dissection of the Transcriptional Program Regulating Secondary Wall Biosynthesis during Wood Formation in Poplar1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ruiqin; McCarthy, Ryan L.; Lee, Chanhui; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Wood biomass is mainly made of secondary cell walls; hence, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis during wood formation will be instrumental to design strategies for genetic improvement of wood biomass. Here, we provide direct evidence demonstrating that the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) wood-associated NAC domain transcription factors (PtrWNDs) are master switches activating a suite of downstream transcription factors, and together, they are involved in the coordinated regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis during wood formation. We show that transgenic poplar plants with dominant repression of PtrWNDs functions exhibit a drastic reduction in secondary wall thickening in woody cells, and those with PtrWND overexpression result in ectopic deposition of secondary walls. Analysis of PtrWND2B overexpressors revealed up-regulation of the expression of a number of wood-associated transcription factors, the promoters of which were also activated by PtrWND6B and the Eucalyptus EgWND1. Transactivation analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that PtrWNDs and EgWND1 activated gene expression through direct binding to the secondary wall NAC-binding elements, which are present in the promoters of several wood-associated transcription factors and a number of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and modification. The WND-regulated transcription factors PtrNAC150, PtrNAC156, PtrNAC157, PtrMYB18, PtrMYB74, PtrMYB75, PtrMYB121, PtrMYB128, PtrZF1, and PtrGATA8 were able to activate the promoter activities of the biosynthetic genes for all three major wood components. Our study has uncovered that the WND master switches together with a battery of their downstream transcription factors form a transcriptional network controlling secondary wall biosynthesis during wood formation. PMID:21908685

  11. Constancy, Distribution, and Frequency of Lepidoptera Defoliators of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla (Myrtaceae) in Four Brazilian Regions.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, G T; Zanuncio, J C; de S Tavares, W; de S Ramalho, F; Serrão, J E

    2016-12-01

    The growth of the Brazilian forest sector with monocultures favors the adaptation of Arthropoda pests. The Lepidoptera order includes major pests of Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae). The aim of this work is to study the population constancy, distribution, and frequency of Lepidoptera primary pests of Eucalyptus spp. Lepidoptera pests in Eucalyptus spp. plantations were collected in Três Marias and Guanhães (state of Minas Gerais), Niquelândia (state of Goiás), and Monte Dourado (state of Pará), Brazil, for a period of 5 years, with light traps and captures, every 15 days, for every region. The number of primary pest species (12) has been similar in the four regions, and even with 1.5 to 2.4% of the total species collected, this group has shown a high frequency, especially in Três Marias, Niquelândia, and Monte Dourado, with 66.3, 54.2, and 40.0% of the individuals collected, respectively, for 5 years. The primary pest species have been constant and frequent in all the regions, with population peaks from February to September in Três Marias, February and May in Niquelândia, and from July to September in Monte Dourado. The highest population peaks of these species have been recorded when the Eucalyptus spp. plants are 3 to 6 years old. The Guanhães region is more stable and, therefore, has a lower possibility of outbreaks of the Lepidoptera primary pest species.

  12. Wood dust exposure in wood industry and forestry.

    PubMed

    Puntarić, Dinko; Kos, Ankica; Smit, Zdenko; Zecić, Zeljko; Sega, Kresimir; Beljo-Lucić, Ruzica; Horvat, Dubravko; Bosnir, Jasna

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine occupational exposure in Croatian wood processing industry and forest workers to harmful effects of wood dust on the risk of nose, nasal cavity and lung carcinoma. Mass concentrations of respirable particles and total wood dust were measured at two wood processing plants, three woodwork shops, and one lumbering site, where 225 total wood dust samples and 221 respirable particle samples were collected. Wood dust mass concentration was determined by the gravimetric method. Mass concentrations exceeding total wood dust maximal allowed concentration (MAC, 3 mg/m3) were measured for beechwood and oakwood dust in 38% (79/206) of study samples from wood processing facilities (plants and woodwork shops). Mass concentrations of respirable particles exceeding MAC (1 mg/m3) were recorded in 24% (48/202) of samples from wood processing facilities (mean 2.38 +/- 2.08 mg/m3 in plants and 3.6 +/- 2.22 mg/m3 in woodwork shops). Thus, 13% (27/206) of work sites in wood processing facilities failed to meet health criteria according to European guidelines. Launching of measures to reduce wood dust emission to the work area is recommended.

  13. In vitro anticancer properties of selected Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Deep Jyoti; Sakoff, Jennette; Bond, Danielle R; Predebon, Melanie; Vuong, Quan V; Chalmers, Anita C; van Altena, Ian A; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    In spite of the recent advancements in oncology, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer has not improved over the last five decades. Eucalypts have been linked with cytotoxic and anticancer properties in various studies; however, there is very little scientific evidence that supports the direct role of eucalypts in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. This study assessed the anticancer properties of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of four Eucalyptus species using an MTT assay. The most promising extracts were further evaluated using a CCK-8 assay. Apoptotic studies were performed using a caspase 3/7 assay in MIA PaCa-2 cells. The aqueous extract of Eucalyptus microcorys leaf and the ethanolic extract of Eucalyptus microcorys fruit inhibited the growth of glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, lung and pancreatic cancer cells by more than 80% at 100 μg/mL. The E. microcorys and Eucalyptus saligna extracts showed lower GI50 values than the ethanolic Eucalyptus robusta extract in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Aqueous E. microcorys leaf and fruit extracts at 100 μg/mL exerted significantly higher cell growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells than other extracts (p < 0.05). Statistically similar IC50 values (p > 0.05) were observed in aqueous E. microcorys leaf (86.05 ± 4.75 μg/mL) and fruit (64.66 ± 15.97 μg/mL) and ethanolic E. microcorys leaf (79.30 ± 29.45 μg/mL) extracts in MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CCK-8 assay. Caspase 3/7-mediated apoptosis and morphological changes of cells were also witnessed in MIA PaCa-2 cells after 24 h of treatment with the extracts. This study highlighted the significance of E. microcorys as an important source of phytochemicals with efficacy against pancreatic cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to purify and structurally identify individual compounds and elucidate their mechanisms of action for the development of more potent and specific chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Cottonwood: An American Wood

    Treesearch

    Harvey E. Kennedy

    1985-01-01

    Two species of cottonwood trees in the United States are commercially important: eastern cottonwood and black cottonwood. Eastern cottonwood is the more important of these. Wood of both species is similar in appearance and properties, being light in weight and color with a fairly straight grain and uniform texture. It is not strong and decays rapidly in damp areas or...

  15. History of wood machining

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1967-01-01

    The history of wood machining is closely tied to advanced in metallurgy and power sources. It has been strongly and continuously shaped by prevailing economic forces and the rise and decline of other contemporary industries. This paper sketches a few of the highlights, with emphasis on developments in North America.

  16. Structural fire design : wood

    Treesearch

    E. L. Schaffer

    Analytical procedures to predict the fire endurance of structural wood members have been developed worldwide. This research is reviewed for capability to predict the results of tests in North America and what considerations are necessary to apply the information here. Critical research needs suggested include: (1) Investigation of load levels used in reported tests,...

  17. Identification of coniferous woods

    Treesearch

    B. Francis Kukachka

    1960-01-01

    The identification of coniferous woods is generally regarded as being more difficult than for the hardwood species. This is due to the fact that conifers are more elemental in their structure and, as a consequence, the number of diagnostic features that may he employed is proportionately smaller. Instructions are given here in the sequential use of primary diagnostic...

  18. Taper of wood poles

    Treesearch

    Billy Bohannan; Hermann Habermann; Joan E. Lengel

    1974-01-01

    Round wood pole use has changed without accompanying advancement in engineering design data. Previous pole design was based on the assumption that maximum stress occurred at the groundline but, with the larger poles that are now being used, maximum stress may occur along the pole length. For accurate engineering analysis the shape or taper of a pole must be known. Both...

  19. Harvesting wood for energy.

    Treesearch

    Rodger A. Arola; Edwin W. Miyata

    1981-01-01

    Illustrates the potential of harvesting wood for industrial energy, based on the results of five harvesting studies. Presents information on harvesting operations, equipment costs, and productivity. Discusses mechanized thinning of hardwoods, clearcutting of low-value stands and recovery of hardwood tops and limbs. Also includes basic information on the physical and...

  20. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  1. Chemistry of wood strength

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents a theoretical model to explain the relationship between the mechanical properties and the chemical components of wood. This model is then used to describe the effects of altered composition on those mechanical properties. Many of the theories presented are only partially proven and just beginning to be understood. These theories should be...

  2. Plasma treatment of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, G. G.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Sinitsyn, V. A.; Volokitin, O. G.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Vaschenko, S. P.; Kuz'min, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma technology was developed to create protective-decorative coatings on the wood surfaces. Experimental investigation on applying the protective coating using the low-temperature plasma energy as well as studies of the distribution of temperature fields over the section of the treated workpiece have been carried out, and the calculated results have been compared with the experimental data.

  3. Grant Wood: "American Gothic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Diane M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan which exposes students in grades 10-12 to the visual symbols and historical references contained in Grant Wood's "American Gothic." Includes background information on the artist and the painting, instructional strategies, a studio activity, and evaluation criteria. (GEA)

  4. Effect of surfactant concentration on the spreading properties of pesticide droplets on Eucalyptus leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The area wetted by 500-µm diameter droplets of pesticide and deionised water placed at different positions on Eucalyptus urophylla × E. grandis (E.u × E.g) and Eucalyptus tereticornis (E.t) leaves was determined at an air temperature of 30 °C and a relative humidity of 60%. Dimethyl dichlorovinyl ph...

  5. Projecting potential adoption of genetically engineered freeze-tolerant Eucalyptus in the United States

    Treesearch

    David N. Wear; Ernest Dixon IV; Robert C. Abt; Navinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Development of commercial Eucalyptus plantations has been limited in the United States because of the species’ sensitivity to freezing temperatures. Recently developed genetically engineered clones of a Eucalyptus hybrid, which confer freeze tolerance, could expand the range of commercial plantations. This study explores how...

  6. Eucalyptus essential oil toxicity against permethrin-resistant Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Toloza, Ariel C; Lucía, Alejandro; Zerba, Eduardo; Masuh, Hector; Picollo, María Inés

    2010-01-01

    During the past decades, chemical control against the head louse Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer has been based in the application of products containing permethrin. The repetitive overuse of pediculicides has resulted in the development of high levels of resistance to one or more of these products worldwide. Essential oils obtained from aromatic plants like Eucalyptus are good and safe alternatives due to their low toxicity to mammals and easy biodegradability. In the present study, we reported the chemical composition of Eucalyptus dunnii and Eucalyptus gunni, and the fumigant activity of five Eucalyptus essential oils and their main compounds against permethrin-resistant head lice from Argentina. The most effective essential oils were Eucalyptus sideroxylon, Eucalyptus globulus ssp globulus, and Eucalyptus globulus ssp maidenii, with knockdown time 50% (KT(50)) values of 24.75, 27.73, and 31.39 min. A linear regression analysis between percentage of 1,8-Cineole and KT(50) values of the essential oils showed a significant correlation at a p < 0.01. Since Eucalyptus essential oils showed to be effective against head lice and are classified as safer compounds, they can be employed into pediculicide formulations.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1271 - Eucalyptus oil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... exemption from the requirement of tolerance is established for residues of eucalyptus oil in or on honey, honeycomb, and honeycomb with honey when used at 2g or less eucalyptus oil per hive, where the...

  8. Eucalyptus beyond its native range: Environmental issues in exotic bioenergy plantations

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Eric D. Vance; Thomas R. Fox; Matias Kirst

    2013-01-01

    The genus Eucalyptus is native to Australia and Indonesia but has been widely planted in many countries. Eucalyptus has proven to be particularly successful in tropical and subtropical regions. Several species are also successful in some temperate regions, but problems with sudden and severe frosts pose limitations. Current...

  9. Direct seeding of brushbox, lemon-gum eucalyptus, and cluster pine in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gerald A. Walters

    1969-01-01

    Seeds of brushbox, lemon-gum eucalyptus, and cluster pine were sown in separate seed spots on the Mokuleia Forest Reserve, Oahu. Half the seed spots were mulched. After 1 year, only two brushbox seed spots were stocked; lemon-gum eucalyptus had significantly (5 percent level) more seed spots stocked in the mulched plots; cluster pine had significantly less. These two...

  10. Modelo empirico integral de una plantacion de Eucalyptus grandis en Concordia, Entre Rios

    Treesearch

    Jorge Frangi; Carolina Perez; Juan Goya; Natalia Teson; Marcelo Barrera; Marcelo Arturi

    2016-01-01

    The Argentinian Mesopotamia is the core of fast-growing tree species plantations of the country. Eucalyptus grandis plantations constitute 90 % of the forested area with Eucalyptus spp. in NE Entre Rios. Based on previous studies on structural and functional features, a comprehensive model is here proposed on emergence of new properties linked to matter and ecosystem...

  11. Processed eucalyptus trees as a substrate component for greenhouse crop production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fast growing eucalyptus species are selected for commercial plantings worldwide and are harvested for a variety of uses. Eucalyptus plantings in south Florida are harvested for landscape mulch production, yet this material may have potential as a container substrate for horticulture crop production....

  12. Effects of irrigation on water use and water use efficiency in two fast growing Eucalyptus plantations

    Treesearch

    Robert M. Hubbard; Jose Stape; Michael G. Ryan; Auro C. Almeida; Juan Rojas

    2010-01-01

    Eucalyptus plantations occupy almost 20 million ha worldwide and exceed 3.7 million ha in Brazil alone. Improved genetics and silviculture have led to as much as a three-fold increase in productivity in Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil and the large land area occupied by these highly productive ecosystems raises concern over their...

  13. Herbicide site preparation and release options for eucalyptus plantation establishment in the western gulf

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Blazier; John Johnson; Eric L. Taylor; Brad Osbon

    2012-01-01

    Cold-tolerant species of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.) are increasingly grown in the Western Gulf region as short-rotation pulpwood feedstock. Operational chemical suppression of competing vegetation has been relatively costly and inefficient because it requires frequent applications of glyphosate applied via backpack sprayers. A series of studies...

  14. Partial transparency of compressed wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed novel wood composite with optical transparency at arbitrary region. Pores in wood cells have a great variation in size. These pores expand the light path in the sample, because the refractive indexes differ between constituents of cell and air in lumen. In this study, wood compressed to close to lumen had optical transparency. Because the condition of the compression of wood needs the plastic deformation, wood was impregnated phenolic resin. The optimal condition for high transmission is compression ratio above 0.7.

  15. Stoichiometry of wood liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.G.

    1980-10-01

    The overall chemistry of Douglas Fir liquefaction as evidenced by Rust Engineering Company's Test Run 8 at Albany, Oregon has been examined. It is concluded that the true total yield of non-gaseous product (oil + water solubles + char) is higher than was measured - probably as high as 52 to 55% of dry wood feed. Wood decomposes to give water and carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide in the gas feed reacts with water to give carbon dioxide and hydrogen. However, there is a substantial net reaction of synthesis gas (CO + H/sub 2/) during the process. This indicates that the reaction CO + (wood product) = CO/sub 2/ + (reduced wood product) is important in formation of low oxygen product oil. Overall stoichiometry (approximate) is: 100 lbs wood + 0.5 Mol CO ..-->.. 1.1 Mol CO/sub 2/ + 0.5 Mol H/sub 2/O + 55 lbs non-vapor product. Consumption of synthesis gas in the process is (very approximately) 1300 SCF/bbl product. The product oil has a hydrogen/carbon atom ratio of 1.2 and is highly aromatic. This analysis of the reaction applies specifically to the particular mode of operation used at Albany; i.e., to the so-called PERC process with a very high recycle of product oil. However, it is shown that the total yield of non-gaseous products is quite insensitive to the average analysis of the product. Thus we would expect total yields in the 50s with alternate processes - such as the LBL water slurry process. What will be different and must be determined is the distribution among water insoluble oil, water solubles and char and the degree of reduction of oxygen content by reaction with carbon monoxide.

  16. Coordinated Genetic Regulation of Growth and Lignin Revealed by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of cDNA Microarray Data in an Interspecific Backcross of Eucalyptus1

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Matias; Myburg, Alexander A.; De León, José P.G.; Kirst, Mariana E.; Scott, Jay; Sederoff, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and transcript level (microarray) data from an interspecific backcross population of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus were integrated to dissect the genetic and metabolic network underlying growth variation. Transcript abundance, measured for 2,608 genes in the differentiating xylem of a 91 (E. grandis × E. globulus) × E. grandis backcross progeny was correlated with diameter variation, revealing coordinated down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis and associated methylation pathways in fast growing individuals. Lignin analysis of wood samples confirmed the content and quality predicted by the transcript levels measured on the microarrays. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of transcript levels of lignin-related genes showed that their mRNA abundance is regulated by two genetic loci, demonstrating coordinated genetic control over lignin biosynthesis. These two loci colocalize with QTLs for growth, suggesting that the same genomic regions are regulating growth, and lignin content and composition in the progeny. Genetic mapping of the lignin genes revealed that most of the key biosynthetic genes do not colocalize with growth and transcript level QTLs, with the exception of the locus encoding the enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthase. This study illustrates the power of integrating quantitative analysis of gene expression data and genetic map information to discover genetic and metabolic networks regulating complex biological traits. PMID:15299141

  17. Eucalyptus Tree: A Potential Source of Cryptococcus neoformans in Egyptian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Dalia; Elhelw, Rehab; Refai, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, the River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a well-known tree and is highly appreciated by the rural and urban dwellers. The role of Eucalyptus trees in the ecology of Cryptococcus neoformans is documented worldwide. The aim of this survey was to show the prevalence of C. neoformans during the flowering season of E. camaldulensis at the Delta region in Egypt. Three hundred and eleven samples out of two hundred Eucalyptus trees, including leaves, flowers, and woody trunks, were collected from four governorates in the Delta region. Thirteen isolates of C. neoformans were recovered from Eucalyptus tree samples (4.2%). Molecular identification of C. neoformans was done by capsular gene specific primer CAP64 and serotype identification was done depending on LAC1 gene. This study represents an update on the ecology of C. neoformans associated with Eucalyptus tree in Egyptian environment. PMID:26884765

  18. Pretreatment of Eucalyptus in biphasic system for furfural production and accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiudong; Bai, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Runcang

    2017-08-01

    Herein, an efficient biphasic pretreatment process was developed to improve the production of furfural (FF) and glucose from Eucalyptus. The influence of formic acid and NaCl on FF production from xylose in water and various biphasic systems was investigated. Results showed that the addition of formic acid and NaCl significantly promoted the FF yield, and the biphasic system of MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone)/water exhibited the best performance for FF production. Then the Eucalyptus was pretreated in the MIBK/water system, and a maximum FF yield of 82.0% was achieved at 180°C for 60min. Surface of the pretreated Eucalyptus became relatively rough and loose, and its crystallinity index increased obviously due to the removal of hemicelluloses and lignin. The pretreated Eucalyptus samples showed much higher enzymatic hydrolysis rates (26.2-70.7%) than the raw Eucalyptus (14.5%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Automation of solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry extraction of eucalyptus volatiles.

    PubMed

    Zini, Cláudia A; Lord, Heather; Christensen, Eva; de, Assis Teotĵnio F; Caramão, Elina B; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2002-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography (GC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) is employed to analyze fragrance compounds from different species of eucalyptus trees: Eucalyptus dunnii, Eucalyptus saligna, Eucalyptus grandis, and hybrids of other species. The analyses are performed using an automated system for preincubation, extraction, injection, and analysis of samples. The autosampler used is a CombiPAL and has much flexibility for the development of SPME methods and accommodates a variety of vial sizes. For automated fragrance analysis the 10- and 20-mL vials are the most appropriate. The chromatographic separation and identification of the analytes are performed with a Varian Saturn 4D GC-ITMS using an HP-5MS capillary column. Several compounds of eucalyptus volatiles are identified, with good reproducibility for both the peak areas and retention times. Equilibrium extraction provides maximal sensitivity but requires additional consideration for the effect of carryover. Preequilibrium extraction allows good sensitivity with minimal carryover.

  20. Genetic linkage maps of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla using a pseudo-testcross: mapping strategy and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Sederoff, R

    1994-08-01

    We have used a "two-way pseudo-testcross" mapping strategy in combination with the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to construct two moderate density genetic linkage maps for species of Eucalyptus. In the cross between two heterozygous individuals many single-dose RAPD markers will be heterozygous in one parent, null in the other and therefore segregate 1:1 in their F1 progeny following a testcross configuration. Meiosis and gametic segregation in each individual can be directly and efficiently analyzed using RAPD markers. We screened 305 primers of arbitrary sequence, and selected 151 to amplify a total of 558 markers. These markers were grouped at LOD 5.0, theta = 0.25, resulting in the maternal Eucalyptus grandis map having a total of 240 markers into 14 linkage groups (1552 cM) and the paternal Eucalyptus urophylla map with 251 markers in 11 linkage groups (1101 cM) (n = 11 in Eucalyptus). Framework maps ordered with a likelihood support > or = 1000:1 were assembled covering 95% of the estimated genome size in both individuals. Characterization of genome complexity of a sample of 48 mapped random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers indicate that 53% amplify from low copy regions. These are the first reported high coverage linkage maps for any species of Eucalyptus and among the first for any hardwood tree species. We propose the combined use of RAPD markers and the pseudo-testcross configuration as a general strategy for the construction of single individual genetic linkage maps in outbred forest trees as well as in any highly heterozygous sexually reproducing living organisms. A survey of the occurrence of RAPD markers in different individuals suggests that the pseudo-testcross/RAPD mapping strategy should also be efficient at the intraspecific level and increasingly so with crosses of genetically divergent individuals. The ability to quickly construct single-tree genetic linkage maps in any forest species opens the way for a shift from the

  1. Comparison of classical and ultrasound-assisted isolation procedures of cellulose from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus rodustrus Sm.).

    PubMed

    Pappas, C; Tarantilis, P A; Daliani, I; Mavromoustakos, T; Polissiou, M

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of classical and ultrasound-assisted extraction and purification of cellulose from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus rodustrus Sm.), has been conducted. The isolated cellulose samples were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectroscopy and the crystallinity was also determined. The use of ultrasound decreased the total time of treatment, in addition the purity of the obtained cellulose was very high.

  2. Genetic variation for growth and selection in adult plants of Eucalyptus badjensis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Paulo Eduardo Telles; Paludzyszyn, Estefano; da Silva, Lorenzo Teixeira de Melo; Vandresen, Paula Burigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate Eucalyptus badjensis concerning the genetic variation for growth traits and the potential of the species in supporting a breeding programme. The field trial was a provenance/progeny test established in Campina da Alegria, Santa Catarina, Brazil (latitude 26°52′05.1″ S, longitude 51°48′47.5″ W, altitude 1,015 m) in a soil classified as Latossolic Alumino-Ferric Brown Nitosol. The experiment comprised 60 open-pollinated progenies from the provenances Glenbog and Badja State Forest, New South Wales, Australia. Ten replicates and plots with six plants in row were used. At the age of 17 years, 279 trees were assessed for diameter of the bole at breast height (DBH), total tree height (H) and volume of wood with bark (Vol). After submitting the data to statistical genetic analysis, the overall means for DBH, H and Vol were 45.17 cm, 33.30 m and 2.84 m3, and the estimates of additive coefficient of variation [CV^a(%)] were 12.59%, 5.91% and 26.51%, respectively. Heritability coefficients of additive effects (h^a2) were also estimated and the following values were found: 0.443, 0.312 and 0.358. Thirty-nine trees from 25 different progenies were selected. The expected means of the provenances after improvement were 50.02 cm, 34.35 m and 3.47 m3 for DBH, H and Vol, respectively. PMID:26692156

  3. Control of Passion Fruit Fungal Diseases Using Essential Oils Extracted from Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus agglomerata) in Egerton University Main Campus Njoro, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Waithaka, Paul Njenga; Gathuru, Eliud Mugu; Githaiga, Benson Muriuki; Kimani, Salome Nduta

    2017-01-01

    Growth of fruits which form an important part of human diet has been jeopardized by the many fungal diseases that are present today. This study was conceived to isolate the most common fungal pathogens in passion fruits. Fungi were isolated using potato dextrose agar in addition to characterization using morphological, cultural, and biochemical means. Extraction of essential oils from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus agglomerata) was done. Before carrying the sensitivity test of essential oils to the fungal isolates, constituents of the essential oils were determined. The most common fungal pathogens isolated from passion fruits were Alternaria spp. (45%), Fusarium spp. (22%), Colletotrichum spp. (17%), and Penicillium spp. (16%). There was a relationship between heating time and yield of essential oils in rosemary (r = 0.99) and eucalyptus (r = 0.99). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the amount of essential oils produced by rosemary and eucalyptus (P = 0.08). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in growth inhibition of the fungal pathogens between essential oils from rosemary and eucalyptus (P = 0.000438). Fungal pathogens isolated from passion fruits can be controlled using essential oils from rosemary and eucalyptus. The oils need to be produced in large scale.

  4. Control of Passion Fruit Fungal Diseases Using Essential Oils Extracted from Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus agglomerata) in Egerton University Main Campus Njoro, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gathuru, Eliud Mugu; Githaiga, Benson Muriuki; Kimani, Salome Nduta

    2017-01-01

    Growth of fruits which form an important part of human diet has been jeopardized by the many fungal diseases that are present today. This study was conceived to isolate the most common fungal pathogens in passion fruits. Fungi were isolated using potato dextrose agar in addition to characterization using morphological, cultural, and biochemical means. Extraction of essential oils from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus agglomerata) was done. Before carrying the sensitivity test of essential oils to the fungal isolates, constituents of the essential oils were determined. The most common fungal pathogens isolated from passion fruits were Alternaria spp. (45%), Fusarium spp. (22%), Colletotrichum spp. (17%), and Penicillium spp. (16%). There was a relationship between heating time and yield of essential oils in rosemary (r = 0.99) and eucalyptus (r = 0.99). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the amount of essential oils produced by rosemary and eucalyptus (P = 0.08). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in growth inhibition of the fungal pathogens between essential oils from rosemary and eucalyptus (P = 0.000438). Fungal pathogens isolated from passion fruits can be controlled using essential oils from rosemary and eucalyptus. The oils need to be produced in large scale. PMID:28458692

  5. Impacts of Population Structure and Analytical Models in Genome-Wide Association Studies of Complex Traits in Forest Trees: A Case Study in Eucalyptus globulus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Martín N.; Acuña, Cintia; Borralho, Nuno M. G.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Marcucci Poltri, Susana N.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of association genetics to identify genes or genomic regions controlling complex traits has generated a flurry of interest. Such phenotype-genotype associations could be useful to accelerate tree breeding cycles, increase precision and selection intensity for late expressing, low heritability traits. However, the prospects of association genetics in highly heterozygous undomesticated forest trees can be severely impacted by the presence of cryptic population and pedigree structure. To investigate how to better account for this, we compared the GLM and five combinations of the Unified Mixed Model (UMM) on data of a low-density genome-wide association study for growth and wood property traits carried out in a Eucalyptus globulus population (n = 303) with 7,680 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. Model comparisons were based on the degree of deviation from the uniform distribution and estimates of the mean square differences between the observed and expected p-values of all significant marker-trait associations detected. Our analysis revealed the presence of population and family structure. There was not a single best model for all traits. Striking differences in detection power and accuracy were observed among the different models especially when population structure was not accounted for. The UMM method was the best and produced superior results when compared to GLM for all traits. Following stringent correction for false discoveries, 18 marker-trait associations were detected, 16 for tree diameter growth and two for lignin monomer composition (S∶G ratio), a key wood property trait. The two DArT markers associated with S∶G ratio on chromosome 10, physically map within 1 Mbp of the ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) gene, providing a putative independent validation of this marker-trait association. This study details the merit of collectively integrate population structure and relatedness in association analyses in undomesticated, highly

  6. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK(-1) , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m(-3) (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Wood-burning stove

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, W.

    1983-09-06

    A wood-burning stove includes side walls joined together in an airtight manner to form a firebox and a heat chamber thereabove. The firebox contains upstanding rails to support wood logs for combustion. Streams of heated air are discharged from a manifold that extends from rail-to-rail outwardly from one terminal end of each rail between opposite side walls of the stove. A plate is adjusted to control the flow of air into the manifold. An access door has openings in a spacer side wall for supplying air as desired to the firebox. The spacer walls of the door support a glass panel at an outwardly spaced location from a deflector to prevent deposits of creosote and other materials on the glass.

  8. Lump wood combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  9. Out of the woods.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America women are pushed out of forests and from their maintenance by governments and private interests for cash crop development disregarding the role of women in conserving forests. In developing countries forests are a source of wood for fuel; 60-80% of women gather wood for family needs in America. Fruits, vegetables, and nuts gathered in woods enhance their diet. Indonesian women pick bananas, mangos, guavas, and avocados from trees around their homes; in Senegal shea-nut butter is made from a local tree fruit to be sold for cash. Women provide labor also in logging, wood processing, and tree nurseries. They make charcoal and grow seedlings for sale. In India 40% of forest income and 75% of forest products export earnings are derived from nonwood resources. Poor, rural women make items out of bamboo, rattan, and rope to sell: 48% of women in an Egyptian province make a living through such activities. In India 600,000 women harvest tendu leaves for use as wrappings for cigarettes. The expansion of commercial tree plantations replacing once communal natural forests has forced poor households to spend up to 4-% of their income on fuel that they used to find in forests. Tribal women in India know the medicinal uses of 300 forest species, and women in Sierra Leone could name 31 products they obtained or made from trees and bushes, while men named only 8 items. Only 1 forestry project appraised by the World Bank during 1984-97 named women as beneficiaries, and only 1 out of 33 rural development programs funded by the World Bank did. Women provide food, fuel, and water for their families in subsistence economies, they know sustainable methods of forestry, yet they are not included in development programs whose success or failure could hinge on more attention to women's contribution and on more equity.

  10. Mechanical properties of wood

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Jerrold E. Winandy; David E. Kretschmann

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties presented in this chapter were obtained from tests of small pieces of wood termed “clear” and “straight grained” because they did not contain characteristics such as knots, cross grain, checks, and splits. These test pieces did have anatomical characteristics such as growth rings that occurred in consistent patterns within each piece. Clear...

  11. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  12. Patterns of Reproductive Isolation in Eucalyptus-A Phylogenetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Matthew J; Holland, Barbara; Steane, Dorothy A; Jones, Rebecca C; Nicolle, Dean; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2015-07-01

    We assess phylogenetic patterns of hybridization in the speciose, ecologically and economically important genus Eucalyptus, in order to better understand the evolution of reproductive isolation. Eucalyptus globulus pollen was applied to 99 eucalypt species, mainly from the large commercially important subgenus, Symphyomyrtus. In the 64 species that produce seeds, hybrid compatibility was assessed at two stages, hybrid-production (at approximately 1 month) and hybrid-survival (at 9 months), and compared with phylogenies based on 8,350 genome-wide DArT (diversity arrays technology) markers. Model fitting was used to assess the relationship between compatibility and genetic distance, and whether or not the strength of incompatibility "snowballs" with divergence. There was a decline in compatibility with increasing genetic distance between species. Hybridization was common within two closely related clades (one including E. globulus), but rare between E. globulus and species in two phylogenetically distant clades. Of three alternative models tested (linear, slowdown, and snowball), we found consistent support for a snowball model, indicating that the strength of incompatibility accelerates relative to genetic distance. Although we can only speculate about the genetic basis of this pattern, it is consistent with a Dobzhansky-Muller-model prediction that incompatibilities should snowball with divergence due to negative epistasis. Different rates of compatibility decline in the hybrid-production and hybrid-survival measures suggest that early-acting postmating barriers developed first and are stronger than later-acting barriers. We estimated that complete reproductive isolation can take up to 21-31 My in Eucalyptus. Practical implications for hybrid eucalypt breeding and genetic risk assessment in Australia are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For

  13. Bioconversion of eucalyptus bark waste into soil conditioner.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K R; Sharma, R K; Kothari, R M

    2002-01-01

    An optimized protocol for the bioconversion of eucalyptus bark was devised. It comprised: (i) mechanical reduction in bark size to 0.5-3.0 cm, (ii) moistening to 60-65%, (iii) fortification with ligninase-rich fungus Volvariella sp. (S-1) and 2% urea and (iv) maintenance of this composting mix under aerobic and ambient condition for 14-15 weeks. The resulting bark soil conditioner (BSC) was an easily crumbling, reddish brown biomass, with physico-chemical and microbial properties which would enrich soil fertility/productivity.

  14. Spasmolytic constituents from Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. obtusa leaves.

    PubMed

    Begum, S; Farhat, F; Sultana, I; Siddiqui, B S; Shaheen, F; Gilani, A H

    2000-09-01

    Phytochemical studies on the leaves of Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. obtusa have resulted in the isolation of a new triterpenoid camaldulin (3beta-formyloxyurs-11-en-28,13beta-olide) (1) along with ursolic acid lactone acetate (2), ursolic acid lactone (3), betulinic acid (4), and beta-sitosterol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5). The structures were assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR studies. Compounds 1-3 were tested for spasmolytic activity and were found to possess calcium antagonist activity.

  15. Seasonal influence on the essential oil of Eucalyptus microcorys.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Flávia N M; Fortes, Gilmara A C; Paula, José R; Ferri, Pedro H; Santos, Suzana C

    2014-04-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil, phenolic contents, and foliar nutrients of Eucalyptus microcorys leaves, cultivated in Brazil, was analysed on a monthly basis for one year. Canonical redundancy analysis correlated results with climate conditions (rainfall, humidity, and mean temperature), allowing three groups to be distinguished as regards temperature, flavonoids, and the content of some metals. Strong correlations between Mn, Cu, Zn, Ca, P, and K with some monoterpenes and phenolic compounds were observed. Oxygenated monoterpenes were predominant in all sampling months. Oil chemovariation may be influenced by climatic factors as well as by foliar nutrient variation.

  16. Interaction of copper wood preservatives and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2003-01-01

    Compared to other substrates, wood is generally easy to bond. However, adhesion is diminished when the wood surface is covered by chemicals, whether natural oils and resins or added chemicals. Among the chemicals added to wood are fire retardants and wood preservatives. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been widely used to protect wood against rot and termites, but...

  17. Biotechnology in the wood industry.

    PubMed

    Mai, C; Kües, U; Militz, H

    2004-02-01

    Wood is a natural, biodegradable and renewable raw material, used in construction and as a feedstock in the paper and wood product industries and in fuel production. Traditionally, biotechnology found little attention in the wood product industries, apart from in paper manufacture. Now, due to growing environmental concern and increasing scientific knowledge, legal restrictions to conventional processes have altered the situation. Biotechnological approaches in the area of wood protection aim at enhancing the treatability of wood with preservatives and replacing chemicals with biological control agents. The substitution of conventional chemical glues in the manufacturing of board materials is achieved through the application of fungal cultures and isolated fungal enzymes. Moreover, biotechnology plays an important role in the waste remediation of preservative-treated waste wood.

  18. Estimations of evapotranspiration in an age sequence of Eucalyptus plantations in subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenfei; Wu, Jianping; Fan, Houbao; Duan, Honglang; Li, Qiang; Yuan, Yinghong; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are widely planted for reforestation in subtropical China. However, the effects of Eucalyptus plantations on the regional water use remain poorly understood. In an age sequence of 2-, 4- and 6-year-old Eucalyptus plantations, the tree water use and soil evaporation were examined by linking model estimations and field observations. Results showed that annual evapotranspiration of each age sequence Eucalyptus plantations was 876.7, 944.1 and 1000.7 mm, respectively, accounting for 49.81%, 53.64% and 56.86% of the annual rainfall. In addition, annual soil evaporations of 2-, 4- and 6-year-old were 318.6, 336.1, and 248.7 mm of the respective Eucalyptus plantations. Our results demonstrated that Eucalyptus plantations would potentially reduce water availability due to high evapotranspiration in subtropical regions. Sustainable management strategies should be implemented to reduce water consumption in Eucalyptus plantations in the context of future climate change scenarios such as drought and warming.

  19. Estimations of evapotranspiration in an age sequence of Eucalyptus plantations in subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Houbao; Duan, Honglang; Li, Qiang; Yuan, Yinghong; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are widely planted for reforestation in subtropical China. However, the effects of Eucalyptus plantations on the regional water use remain poorly understood. In an age sequence of 2-, 4- and 6-year-old Eucalyptus plantations, the tree water use and soil evaporation were examined by linking model estimations and field observations. Results showed that annual evapotranspiration of each age sequence Eucalyptus plantations was 876.7, 944.1 and 1000.7 mm, respectively, accounting for 49.81%, 53.64% and 56.86% of the annual rainfall. In addition, annual soil evaporations of 2-, 4- and 6-year-old were 318.6, 336.1, and 248.7 mm of the respective Eucalyptus plantations. Our results demonstrated that Eucalyptus plantations would potentially reduce water availability due to high evapotranspiration in subtropical regions. Sustainable management strategies should be implemented to reduce water consumption in Eucalyptus plantations in the context of future climate change scenarios such as drought and warming. PMID:28399174

  20. Chapter 1: Wood and Society

    Treesearch

    Chrisopher D. Risbrudt

    2013-01-01

    Forests, and the wood they produce, have played an important role in human activity since before recorded history. Indeed, one of the first major innovations was utilizing fire, fueled by wood, for cooking and heating. It is very likely that early hominids used wood fires for cooking, as long as 1.5 million years ago (Clark and Harris 1985). Clear evidence of this use...

  1. Controlling mold on wood Pallets

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2012-01-01

    THE WOOD PALLET AND CONTAINER INDUSTRY CONSUMES 4.5 billion board feet (BBF) of hardwoods and 1.8 BBF of softwoods for the annual production of 400-500 million solid wood pallets. While alternative materials such as plastic, corrugated paperboard and metal have entered the market, solid wood remains the material of choice for a majority of pallets on the market (more...

  2. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Results Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden) and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus) were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase), SAND (SAND protein), ACT (actin), and A-Tub (α-tubulin) genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Conclusion Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin). It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified genes in this study

  3. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Araújo, Pedro; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Souza, Uiara Romero; Viana, Juliana de Oliveira Fernandes; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-11-14

    The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden) and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus) were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase), SAND (SAND protein), ACT (actin), and A-Tub (α-tubulin) genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin). It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified genes in this study should be used as reference genes

  4. Antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities of volatile oils and extracts from stems, leaves, and flowers of Eucalyptus sideroxylon and Eucalyptus torquata.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Hossam M

    2008-03-01

    Eucalyptus species leaves have been traditionally used to heal wounds and fungal infections. Essential oils and extracts of some Eucalyptus species possess antimicrobial and antitumor properties. We sought to determine antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of oils and extracts of leaves, stems, and flowers of Eucalyptus sideroxylon and Eucalyptus torquata grown in Egypt. An agar diffusion method was used to analyze antimicrobial activities of essential oils and extracts of Eucalyptus against medically important gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A sulphorhodamine B assay was used to analyze the in vitro cytotoxic activities of oils and extracts against Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2), and Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7). Gram-positive bacteria were highly susceptible to oils and extracts of both Eucalyptus species. With the exception of Escherichia coli, gram-negative bacteria were resistant to extracts, but susceptible to the oil obtained from at least one organ of E sideroxylon and E torquata. Although Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were resistant to the extracts, essential oils of E sideroxylon and E torquata generally exhibited moderate to high antifungal activities against Candida albicans, A flavus and A niger. Oils of E torquata stems exhibited cytotoxic activities on MCF7 cells followed by oils of E torquata leaves and E sideroxylon leaves. However, oils from both species failed to exert cytotoxic effects on HEPG2 cells. This is the first report of antimicrobial and antitumor properties of E sideroxylon and E torquata. Results suggest a wider use of Eucalyptus species products in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food preparations.

  5. New Ceratocystis species from Eucalyptus and Cunninghamia in South China.

    PubMed

    Liu, FeiFei; Mbenoun, Michael; Barnes, Irene; Roux, Jolanda; Wingfield, Michael J; Li, GuoQing; Li, JieQiong; Chen, ShuaiFei

    2015-06-01

    During routine surveys for possible fungal pathogens in the rapidly expanding plantations of Eucalyptus and Cunninghamia lanceolata in China, numerous isolates of unknown species in the genus Ceratocystis (Microascales) were obtained from tree wounds. In this study we identified the Ceratocystis isolates from Eucalyptus and Cunninghamia in the GuangDong, GuangXi, FuJian and HaiNan Provinces of South China based on morphology and through comparisons of DNA sequence data for the ITS, partial β-tubulin and TEF-1α gene regions. Morphological and DNA sequence comparisons revealed two previously unknown species residing in the Indo-Pacific Clade. These are described here as Ceratocystis cercfabiensis sp. nov. and Ceratocystis collisensis sp. nov. Isolates of Ceratocystis cercfabiensis showed intragenomic variation in their ITS sequences and four strains were selected for cloning of the ITS gene region. Twelve ITS haplotypes were obtained from 17 clones selected for sequencing, differing in up to seven base positions and representing two separate phylogenetic groups. This is the first evidence of multiple ITS types in isolates of Ceratocystis residing in the Indo-Pacific Clade. Caution should thus be exercised when using the ITS gene region as a barcoding marker for Ceratocystis species in this clade. This study also represents the first record of a species of Ceratocystis from Cunninghamia.

  6. Unintentional exposure of young children to camphor and eucalyptus oils

    PubMed Central

    Flaman, Zorina; Pellechia-Clarke, Sandra; Bailey, Benoit; McGuigan, Michael

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Essential oils, such as camphorated and eucalyptus oils, are volatile oils that can be absorbed by mouth and through the skin; if ingested orally by children, they can be harmful, even life-threatening. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of essential oil ingestion among children in Toronto, Ontario. METHODS: Charts from December 1995 through March 1997 at the Ontario Regional Poison Information Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto were reviewed to collect information on calls about essential oil ingestion, and a search of MEDLINE articles from 1966 to 1998 was conducted using the key words: ‘camphor’, ‘eucalyptus’, ‘paediatric’, and ‘poisoning’. RESULTS: Callers to the Poison Information Centre reported that 251 children had ingested an essential oil or product: eucalyptus oil 50 children; camphorated oil 18 children; VapAir (Drug Trading, Canada) vaporizing liquid 93 children; and Vicks VaporRub (Procter & Gamble, Canada) 90 children. The most common symptoms were cough, vomiting and cough associated with vomiting. Two children had seizures but recovered. The MEDLINE search found 18 reports of paediatric ingestion of the oils or oil products. The main symptoms were vomiting, lethargy, coma and seizures. One child died. CONCLUSION: Although widely used by health care consumers, essential oils and the products that contain them can be harmful when ingested by children. Further education for parents and other caregivers about the risks involved in exposure to these products is required. PMID:20084213

  7. Role of corticular photosynthesis following defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; O'Grady, Anthony P; Worledge, Dale; Warren, Charles R

    2009-08-01

    Defoliation can reduce net fixation of atmospheric CO(2) by the canopy, but increase the intensity and duration of photosynthetically active radiation on stems. Stem CO(2) flux and leaf gas exchange in young Eucalyptus globulus seedlings were measured to assess the impact of defoliation on these processes and to determine the potential contribution of re-fixation by photosynthetic inner bark in offsetting the effects of defoliation in a woody species. Pot and field trials examined how artificial defoliation of the canopy affected the photosynthetic characteristics of main stems of young Eucalyptus globulus seedlings. Defoliated potted seedlings were characterized by transient increases in foliar photosynthetic rates and concomitant decreases in stem CO(2) fluxes (both in the dark and light). Defoliated field-grown seedlings showed similar stem CO(2) flux responses, but of reduced magnitude. Despite demonstrating increased re-fixation capability, defoliated potted-seedlings had slowed stem growth. The green stem of seedlings exhibited largely shade-adapted characteristics. Defoliation reduced stem chlorophyll a/b ratio and increased carotenoid concentration. An increased capacity to re-fix internally respired CO(2) (up to 96%) suggested that stem re-fixation represents a previously unexplored mechanism to minimize the impact of foliar loss by maximizing the contribution of all photosynthetic tissues, particularly for young seedlings.

  8. Removal of chromium from industrial waste by using eucalyptus bark.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Vikrant; Pant, K K

    2006-01-01

    Several low cost biomaterials such as baggase, charred rice husk, activated charcoal and eucalyptus bark (EB) were tested for removal of chromium. All the experiments were carried out in batch process with laboratory prepared samples and wastewater obtained from metal finishing section of auto ancillary unit. The adsorbent, which had highest chromium(VI) removal was EB. Influences of chromium concentration, pH, contact time on removal of chromium from effluent was investigated. The adsorption data were fitted well by Freundlich isotherm. The kinetic data were analyzed by using a first order Lagergren kinetic. The Gibbs free energy was obtained for each system and was found to be -1.879 kJ mol(-1) for Cr(VI) and -3.885 kJ mol(-1) for Cr(III) for removal from industrial effluent. The negative value of deltaG0 indicates the feasibility and spontaneous nature of adsorption. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2. Adsorption capacity was found to be 45 mg/g of adsorbent, at Cr(VI) concentration in the effluent being 250 mg/l. A waste water sample containing Cr(VI), Cr(III), Mg, and Ca obtained from industrial unit showed satisfactory removal of chromium. The results indicate that eucalyptus bark can be used for the removal of chromium.

  9. Quantifying arthropod contributions to wood decay

    Treesearch

    Michael Ulyshen; Terry Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Termites carry large amounts of soil into dead wood, and this behaviour complicates efforts to measure their contributions to wood decay. A novel method for isolating termite soil by burning the wood is described, and some preliminary results are presented.

  10. Assessing the expected response to genomic selection of individuals and families in Eucalyptus breeding with an additive-dominant model.

    PubMed

    Resende, R T; Resende, M D V; Silva, F F; Azevedo, C F; Takahashi, E K; Silva-Junior, O B; Grattapaglia, D

    2017-10-01

    We report a genomic selection (GS) study of growth and wood quality traits in an outbred F2 hybrid Eucalyptus population (n=768) using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Going beyond previous reports in forest trees, models were developed for different selection targets, namely, families, individuals within families and individuals across the entire population using a genomic model including dominance. To provide a more breeder-intelligible assessment of the performance of GS we calculated the expected response as the percentage gain over the population average expected genetic value (EGV) for different proportions of genomically selected individuals, using a rigorous cross-validation (CV) scheme that removed relatedness between training and validation sets. Predictive abilities (PAs) were 0.40-0.57 for individual selection and 0.56-0.75 for family selection. PAs under an additive+dominance model improved predictions by 5 to 14% for growth depending on the selection target, but no improvement was seen for wood traits. The good performance of GS with no relatedness in CV suggested that our average SNP density (~25 kb) captured some short-range linkage disequilibrium. Truncation GS successfully selected individuals with an average EGV significantly higher than the population average. Response to GS on a per year basis was ~100% more efficient than by phenotypic selection and more so with higher selection intensities. These results contribute further experimental data supporting the positive prospects of GS in forest trees. Because generation times are long, traits are complex and costs of DNA genotyping are plummeting, genomic prediction has good perspectives of adoption in tree breeding practice.

  11. Wood formation and the concept of wood quality

    Treesearch

    Philip R. Larson

    1969-01-01

    Wood has been the principal product of trees from the first hunting club or digging tool of ancient man to the rich variety of industrial and decorative uses of modern civilization. The universal practical value and aesthetic appeal of wood may be traced to the seemingly infinite variation in its characteristics. These variations arise from the structure and...

  12. Corrosion of Fasteners in Wood Treated with Newer Wood Preservatives

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This document compiles recent research findings related to corrosion of metals in preservative treated wood into a single report on corrosion of metals in wood. The research was conducted as part of the Research, Technology and Education portion of the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation (NHCBP) Program administered by the Federal Highway Administration. The...

  13. Wood Substitutes; A Base Syllabus on Wood Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Kentucky Univ., Richmond.

    This curriculum guide is for use by college instructors concerned with expanding traditional woodworking programs. It was developed in a National Defense Education Act summer institute and is based on an outline provided by members of a previous institute. The content concerns wood substitutes which are made to resemble wood and are often used…

  14. Integrated hot-compressed water and laccase-mediator treatments of Eucalyptus grandis fibers: structural changes of fiber and lignin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Quan; Wen, Jia-Long; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-02-18

    Eucalyptus grandis fibers were treated with hot-compressed water (HCW) and laccase mediator to enhance the fiber characteristics and to produce an active lignin substrate for binderless fiberboard production. The composition, morphology, and crystallinity index (CrI) analysis of fibers showed that the HCW treatment increased the CrI and lignin content of the treated fibers through partial removal of hemicelluloses. Simultaneously, the HCW treatment produced some granules and holes on the surface of the fibers, which possibly facilitated the accessibility of the laccase mediator. Milled wood lignins and enzymatic hydrolysis lignins isolated from the control and treated fibers were comparatively characterized. A reduction of molecular weight was observed, which indicated that a preferential degradation of lignin occurred after exposure to the laccase mediator. Quantitative (13)C, 2D-HSQC and (31)P NMR characterization revealed that the integrated treatment resulted in the cleavage of β-O-4' linkages, removal of G' (oxidized α-ketone) substructures, and an increase in the S/G ratio and free phenolic hydroxyls.

  15. Shifts in biomass and resource allocation patterns following defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus growing with varying water and nutrient supplies.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Mohammed, Caroline

    2009-06-01

    In woody species, potential mechanisms to compensate for tissue loss to herbivory and diseases have been related to post-event shifts in growth, biomass and internal resource allocation patterns, as modulated by external resource limitations. We examined the interactive effects of belowground resource limitations by varying nutrient and water availability, and aboveground carbon limitation imposed by a single defoliation event (40% leaf removal) on stem growth, whole-tree and within-tree resource allocation patterns (total non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen) and below- and aboveground biomass allocation patterns in 8-month-old, field-grown Eucalyptus globulus Labill. saplings. Two months after treatments were imposed, the direction of the stem growth response to defoliation depended on the abiotic treatment. Five months after defoliation, however, we found little evidence that resource availability constrained the expression of tolerance to defoliation. With the exception of the combined low-nutrient and low-water supply treatment, saplings grown with (1) adequate water and nutrient supplies and even with (2) low-water supply or (3) low-nutrient supply were able to compensate for the 40% foliage loss. The observed compensatory responses were attributed to the activation of several short- and longer-term physiological mechanisms including reduced biomass allocation to coarse roots, mobilization of carbohydrate reserves, robust internal N dynamics and increased ratio of foliage to wood dry mass.

  16. Composites from wood and plastics

    Treesearch

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Composites made from thermoplastics and fillers or reinforcements derived from wood or other natural fibers are a dynamic research area encompassing a wide variety of composite materials. For example, as the use of biopolymers grows, wood and other natural fiber sources are being investigated as renewable sources of fillers and reinforcements to modify performance....

  17. Properties of seven Colombian woods

    Treesearch

    B. A. Bendtsen; M. Chudnoff

    1981-01-01

    Woods from abroad are an important raw material to the forest products industries in the United States. A major concern in effective utilization of this resource is the lack of technical information on many species. This report presents the results of an evaluation of the mechanical properties of small, clear specimens of seven Colombian woods. These results are...

  18. Wood shipments to Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Harold W. Wisdom; James E. Granskog; Keith A. Blatner

    1983-01-01

    Puerto Rico's importance as an offshore market for U.S. wood products is often overlooked. Because of Puerto Rico's unique Commonwealth status, trade flows between the United States and Puerto Rico are recorded separately and are not counted in the U.S. foreign trade statistics. In 1981, wood product shipments from the United States to Puerto Rico totaled...

  19. Aquatic wood -- an insect perspective

    Treesearch

    Peter S. Cranston; Brendan McKie

    2006-01-01

    Immersed wood provides refugia and substrate for a diverse array of macroinvertebrates, and food for a more restricted genuinely xylophagous fauna. Worldwide, xylophages are found across aquatic insect orders, including Coleoptera, Diptera, Trichoptera and Plecoptera. Xylophages often are specialised, feeding on the wood surface or mining deep within. Many feed...

  20. Electric moisture meters for wood

    Treesearch

    William L. James

    1963-01-01

    Common methods of measuring the moisture content of wood are described briefly, and a short historical account of the development of electric moisture meters is given. Electrical properties of wood are discussed briefly, and the basic operation of the resistance type and the radio- frequency types of moisture meter is outlined. Data relating the electrical resistance...

  1. Measuring wood specific gravity, correctly

    Treesearch

    G. Bruce Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    The specific gravity (SG) of wood is a measure of the amount of structural material a tree species allocates to support and strength. In recent years, wood specific gravity, traditionally a forester’s variable, has become the domain of ecologists exploring the universality of plant functional traits and conservationists estimating global carbon stocks. While these...

  2. Assessing potential sustainable wood yield

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Powers

    2001-01-01

    Society is making unprecedented demands on world forests to produce and sustain many values. Chief among them is wood supply, and concerns are rising globally about the ability of forests to meet increasing needs. Assessing this is not easy. It requires a basic understanding of the principles governing forest productivity: how wood yield varies with tree and stand...

  3. Holistic approach to wood protection

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    When untreated wood is exposed to adverse outdoor conditions, nature has a series of chemistries to degrade it to its original building blocks of carbon dioxide and water. Fungi, termites, heat, moisture, ultraviolet (UV) energy, and chemicals take their toll on the performance properties of wood. We tend to study each of these degradation chemistries as individual...

  4. Public opinion and wood energy

    Treesearch

    Sarah Hitchner; John Schelhas; Teppo Hujala; J. Peter Brosius

    2014-01-01

    As wood-based bioenergy continues to develop around the world, it will utilize forestlands in new ways and will have different effects on a number of stakeholders, including forest landowners, local communities, extant industries, policymakers, investors, and others. As more stakeholders become involved in the wood energy web, and as the general public becomes more...

  5. The sustainable wood production initiative.

    Treesearch

    Robert. Deal

    2004-01-01

    To address concerns about sustainable forestry in the region, the Focused Science Delivery Program is sponsoring a three year Sustainable Wood Production Initiative. The Pacific Northwest is one of the world's major timber producing regions, and the ability of this region to produce wood on a sustained yield basis is widely recognized. Concerns relating to the...

  6. The case of General Wood.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, B

    1982-04-01

    The first successful operation ever on a parasagittal meningioma was performed in 1910 by Harvey Cushing. The operation turned out to be critical event in his career as a neurosurgeon and made him confident about the possibilities of brain surgery. The patient was Leonard Wood, Major General and Chief of Staff of the United States Army, who was a military surgeon turned career officer. In the election campaign or the president to succeed Woodrow Wilson in 1920, Leonard Wood, the personification of competence, became the Republican favorite. General Wood was, however, eliminated from the presidential election campaign by complicated intrigues. From the next year on, General Wood experienced increasing warning signs of a recurrent tumor, which he unfortunately neglected. Not until 1927 did Wood again come under the care of Dr. Cushing, who had just returned from Britain, where in the course of a single month he had been awarded no less than seven distinctions from different medical societies. Deeply concerned at Wood's condition. Cushing decided to attempt extirpation of the recurrent tumor. General Wood died a few hours after the operation. No tragedy caused Cushing more distress than the death of General Wood, who 7 years earlier had been on the verge of being President of the United States.

  7. Wood burning furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, A.D.

    1986-03-25

    An improved furnace for burning wood is described which is resistant to creosote deposits from smoke. It consists of: an upright frame; a fire box carried by the frame and having a door for the insertion of the wood; a heat exchanger carried on the fire box and having an interior chamber with a top and bottom; means connecting the fire box and the heat exchanger and directing smoke from the fire box into the exchanger chamber; a chimney stack fixed to and extending upwardly from the exchanger to discharge smoke, the stack also extending substantially downwardly within the exchanger chamber to receive smoke from adjacent the bottom of the chamber to thereby retain hot smoke adjacent the top of the exchanger for an increased time interval to allow additional heat transfer from the smoke to the exchanger; an insulative housing carried on the frame to define an air plenum within the housing and about the fire box and exchanger to permit air in the plenum to be heated by contact with the fire box and the exchanger; and an air inlet for cold air to enter the plenum and an air outlet by which heated air may leave the plenum.

  8. Variation in chemical composition and acaricidal activity against Dermanyssus gallinae of four eucalyptus essential oils.

    PubMed

    George, David R; Masic, Dino; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Guy, Jonathan H

    2009-06-01

    The results of this study suggest that certain eucalyptus essential oils may be of use as an alternative to synthetic acaricides in the management of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae. At a level of 0.21 mg/cm(2), the essential oil from Eucalyptus citriodora achieved 85% mortality in D. gallinae over a 24 h exposure period in contact toxicity tests. A further two essential oils from different eucalyptus species, namely E. globulus and E. radiata, provided significantly (P < 0.05) lower mite mortality (11 and 19%, respectively). Notable differences were found between the eucalyptus essential oils regarding their chemical compositions. There appeared to be a trend whereby the essential oils that were composed of the fewer chemical components were the least lethal to D. gallinae. It may therefore be the case that the complexity of an essential oil's chemical make up plays an important role in dictating the toxicity of that oil to pests such as D. gallinae.

  9. Lack of association between allozyme heterozygosity and juvenile traits in Eucalyptus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variability for juvenile waits, which included basal diameter, height, biomass accumulation, and growth increment, was studied in eight provenances involving four species, Eucalyptus grandis, E. saligna, E. camaldulensis and E. urophylla, under uniform greenhouse conditions. The species diff...

  10. Chemical compositions and larvicidal activities of leaf essential oils from two eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sen-Sung; Huang, Chin-Gi; Chen, Ying-Ju; Yu, Jane-Jane; Chen, Wei-June; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2009-01-01

    In the current study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of leaf essential oils and their constituents from two eucalyptus species (Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus urophylla) against two mosquito species, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, was investigated. In addition, the chemical compositions of the leaf essential oils were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results from the larvicidal tests revealed that essential oil from the leaves of E. camaldulensis had an excellent inhibitory effect against both A. aegypti and A. albopictus larvae. The 12 pure constituents extracted from the two eucalyptus leaf essential oils were also tested individually against two mosquito larvae. Among the six effective constituents, alpha-terpinene exhibits the best larvicidal effect against both A. aegypti and A. albopictus larvae. Results of this study show that the leaf essential oil of E. camaldulensis and its effective constituents might be considered as a potent source for the production of fine natural larvicides.

  11. Dietary specialization and Eucalyptus species preferences in Queensland koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Higgins, Alexis L; Bercovitch, Fred B; Tobey, Jennifer R; Andrus, Chris Hamlin

    2011-01-01

    Koalas specialize on Eucalyptus leaves, but also feed selectively. Food choice is not random, but depends on various factors that are not well understood, although most research has focused on the role of secondary plant compounds. We studied the feeding choices of four adult male koalas housed at the San Diego Zoo. All subjects had a choice of nine types of Eucalyptus leaves over the eight-week study. The most preferred species was E. camuldulensis, but individual males exhibited different feeding preferences. We conclude that food selectivity among koalas is probably due to multiple factors, rather than only a consequence of secondary plant chemicals. A combination of intrinsic factors, such as developmental trajectory and reproductive state, as well as extrinsic factors, such as leaf chemical fingerprint and moisture, probably interact to shape koala foraging preferences. Koalas forage almost exclusively on Eucalyptus species, but have evolved an adaptive flexibility, enabling them to exploit various Eucalyptus species. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Enzymatic saccharification of dilute acid pretreated eucalyptus chips for fermentable sugar production.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weiqi; Wu, Shubin; Liu, Liguo

    2012-04-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid was used to pretreat eucalyptus chips prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. After both pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis processes. Attention is paid to sugar recovery. The maximum total sugars yield (combined xylose and glucose, 47.69g/100g raw material, representing 82% of total sugars in the eucalyptus biomass) was obtained at 160°C, 0.75% acid concentration and 10min residence time, which is consider to be the best reasonable conditions for the dilute acid pretreatment of eucalyptus, corresponding concentrations of acetic acid, HMF, and furfural in the prehydrolysate were about 2.01g/L, 0.13g/L and 1.37g/L, respectively. Under this optimal pretreatment condition, the acid-insoluble lignin recovery in the insoluble solid resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis, was 22.7g/100g raw material, representing 80% of acid-insoluble lignin in the eucalyptus biomass.

  13. Note on gynandromorphism in the eucalyptus defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1782) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Aline S; Zanuncio, Teresinha V; Zanuncio, José C; Lima, Eraldo R; Serrão, José E

    2007-06-01

    The brown moth Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1872) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) is an important pest in Brazilian eucalyptus plantations. A gynandromorph individual of T. arnobia was found in a population of this pest in a laboratory rearing and it is described.

  14. Processing of post-consumer HDPE reinforced with wood flour: Effect of functionaliation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, A. L.; Montagna, L. S.; Rossini, K.; Santana, R. M. C.

    2014-05-01

    A way very interesting used in the reuse of waste cellulose derivatives such as wood flour is its incorporation into thermoplastics matrix. As the olefinic polymers have no interaction with cellulose derivatives, some chemical treatments have been used in the modification of vegetable fibers, to increase the interfacial adhesion between the cellulosic reinforcement and the polymeric matrix. In this sense, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the methodology of the incorporation of compatibilizer agent (CA) in polyolefin matrix and evaluate the mechanical and morphological properties of composites. HDPE, wood flour from Eucalyptus grandis species (EU) and graftized polyethylene with maleic anhydride (CA) were used in composites, being extruded and after injection molding. The mixtures were processed in a single screw extruder (L/D: 22), with the temperature profile from 170° to 190°C. In a first step, the materials were processed together in the extruder, and after the samples were injected a temperature of 185°C and pressure of 600 bar. In a second step, the HDPE with the compatibilizer agent were first processed in the extruder in order to functionalize the polyolefin, and added after the wood flour (EU) sieved (30% w/w). Results showed that composites with CA had a higher mechanical performance compared to nocompatibilized. Also showed that composites compatibilized previously in the extruder with CA had better performance in comparison to other where the polymer matrix was not previously compatibilized.

  15. Size and composition distribution of fine particulate matter emitted from wood burning, meat charbroiling, and cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeman, M.J.; Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    1999-10-15

    A dilution source sampling system is augmented to measure the size-distributed chemical composition of fine particle emissions from air pollution sources. Measurements are made using a laser optical particle counter (OPC), a differential mobility analyzer/condensation nucleus counter (DMA/CNC) combination, and a pair of microorifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs). The sources tested with this system include wood smoke (pine, oak, eucalyptus), meat charbroiling, and cigarettes. The particle mass distributions from all wood smoke sources have a single mode that peaks at approximately 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter. The smoke from meat charbroiling shows a major peak in the particle mass distribution at 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter, with some material present at larger particle sizes. Particle mass distributions from cigarettes peak between 0.3 and 0.4 {micro}m particle diameter. Chemical composition analysis reveals that particles emitted from the sources tested here are largely composed of organic compounds. Noticeable concentrations of elemental carbon are found in the particles emitted from wood burning. The size distributions of the trace species emissions from these sources also are presented, including data for Na, K, Ti, Fe, Br, Ru, Cl, Al, Zn, Ba, Sr, V, Mn, Sb, La, Ce, as well as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion when present in statistically significant amounts. These data are intended for use with air quality models that seek to predict the size distribution of the chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles.

  16. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  17. Acoustical classification of woods for string instruments.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Shigeru

    2007-07-01

    Two basic types of wood are used to make stringed musical instruments: woods for soundboards (top plates) and those for frame boards (back and side plates). A new way to classify the acoustical properties of woods and clearly separate these two groups is proposed in this paper. The transmission parameter (product of propagation speed and Q value of the longitudinal wave along the wood grain) and the antivibration parameter (wood density divided by the propagation speed along the wood grain) are introduced in the proposed classification scheme. Two regression lines, drawn for traditional woods, show the distinctly different functions required by soundboards and frame boards. These regression lines can serve as a reference to select the best substitute woods when traditional woods are not available. Moreover, some peculiarities of Japanese string instruments, which are made clear by comparing woods used for them with woods used for Western and Chinese instruments, are briefly discussed.

  18. Soil microbial community structure and function responses to successive planting of Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Falin; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Kai; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Huailin; Wu, Bing; Shi, Qian

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have shown soil degradation after the conversion of native forests to exotic Eucalyptus plantations. However, few studies have investigated the long-term impacts of short-rotation forestry practices on soil microorganisms. The impacts of Eucalyptus successive rotations on soil microbial communities were evaluated by comparing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) abundances, compositions, and enzyme activities of native Pinus massoniana plantations and adjacent 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th generation Eucalyptus plantations. The conversion from P. massoniana to Eucalyptus plantations significantly decreased soil microbial community size and enzyme activities, and increased microbial physiological stress. However, the PLFA abundances formed "u" shaped quadratic functions with Eucalyptus plantation age. Alternatively, physiological stress biomarkers, the ratios of monounsaturated to saturated fatty acid and Gram+ to Gram- bacteria, formed "n"' shaped quadratic functions, and the ratio of cy17:0 to 16:1omega7c decreased with plantation age. The activities of phenol oxidase, peroxidase, and acid phosphatase increased with Eucalyptus plantation age, while the cellobiohydrolase activity formed "u" shaped quadratic functions. Soil N:P, alkaline hydrolytic nitrogen, soil organic carbon, and understory cover largely explained the variation in PLFA profiles while soil N:P, alkaline hydrolytic nitrogen, and understory cover explained most of the variability in enzyme activity. In conclusion, soil microbial structure and function under Eucalyptus plantations were strongly impacted by plantation age. Most of the changes could be explained by altered soil resource availability and understory cover associated with successive planting of Eucalyptus. Our results highlight the importance of plantation age for assessing the impacts of plantation conversion as well as the importance of reducing disturbance for plantation management.

  19. Study on the Modification of Bleached Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp Using Birch Xylan

    Treesearch

    Wenjia Han; Chuanshan Zhao; Thomas Elder; Rendang Yang; Dongho Kim; Yunqiao Pu; Jeffery Hsieh; Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2012-01-01

    In this study, birch xylan was deposited onto elementally chlorine free (ECF) bleached eucalyptus kraft pulp, and the corresponding changes in physical properties were determined. An aqueous 5% birch xylan solution at pH 9 was added to 5 wt% slurry of bleached kraft eucalyptus fibers, with stirring at 70 C for 15 min after which the pH was adjusted to 5–6. The xylan...

  20. Saligna eucalyptus growth in a 15-year old spacing study in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gerald A. Walters

    1980-01-01

    A spacing study was started in 1961 to test the effects of four different spacings on the growth and development of saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus saligna Smith) trees in Hawaii. Spacings tested were 8 by 8 feet (2.4 m), 10 by 10 feet (3.0 m), 12 by 12 feet (3.7 m), and 14 by 14 feet (4.3 m). Plot trees were measured at ages 1, 2,5, 10, and 15 years...

  1. Eucalyptus plantations for energy production in Hawaii. Technical status report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-14

    Progress made on accomplishing research objectives is reported. The objectives of this project are: (1) to increase the biomass production of Eucalyptus; (2) to determine the optimum requirements to maximize yield; (3) to assess planting, cultivation, harvesting, and transportation equipment requirements; (4) to determine the optimum mixture of biomass (eucalyptus and bagasse) at the generator for the production of electricity; and (5) to evaluate a complete production/conversion system which utilized optimum management conditions in relationship to costs. (DMC)

  2. Projected wood energy impact on US forest wood resources

    SciTech Connect

    Skog, K.E.

    1993-12-31

    The USDA Forest Service has developed long-term projections of wood energy use as part of a 1993 assessment of demand for and supply of resources from forest and range lands in the United States. To assess the impact of wood energy demand on timber resources, a market equilibrium model based on linear programming was developed to project residential, industrial, commercial, and utility wood energy use from various wood energy sources: roundwood from various land sources, primary wood products mill residue, other wood residue, and black liquor. Baseline projections are driven by projected price of fossil fuels compared to price of wood fuels and the projected increase in total energy use in various end uses. Wood energy use is projected to increase from 2.67 quad in 1986 to 3.5 quad in 2030 and 3.7 quad in 2040. This is less than the DOE National Energy Strategy projection of 5.5 quad in 2030. Wood energy from forest sources (roundwood) is projected to increase from 3.1 billion (10{sup 9}) ft{sup 3} in 1986 to 4.4. billion ft{sup 3} in 2030 and 4.8 billion ft{sup 3} in 2040 (88, 124 and 136 million m{sup 3}, respectively). This rate of increase of roundwood use for fuel -- 0.8 percent per year -- is virtually the same as the projected increase rate for roundwood for pulpwood. Pulpwood roundwood is projected to increase from 4.2 billion ft{sup 3} in 1986 to 6.0 billion ft{sup 3} in 2030 and 6.4 billion ft{sup 3} in 2040 (119, 170 and 183 million m{sup 3}, respectively).

  3. Isolation of Enterobacter cowanii from Eucalyptus showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Brady, C L; Venter, S N; Cleenwerck, I; Engelbeen, K; de Vos, P; Wingfield, M J; Telechea, N; Coutinho, T A

    2009-10-01

    This study was performed to identify bacterial strains isolated simultaneously with Pantoea species from Eucalyptus trees showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Uruguay. Several molecular techniques including 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization were used to characterize the gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, slime-producing bacterial strains isolated along with Pantoea species from Eucalyptus. Hypersensitivity reactions (HR) and pathogenicity tests were performed on tobacco and Eucalyptus seedlings, respectively. The isolates clustered closely with the type strain of Enterobacter cowanii in both phylogenetic trees constructed. The DNA-DNA similarity between the isolates and the type strain of Ent. cowanii ranged from 88% to 92%. A positive HR was observed on the tobacco seedlings, but no disease symptoms were visible on the inoculated Eucalyptus seedlings. Enterobacter cowanii was isolated from trees with symptoms of bacterial blight although strains of this bacterial species do not appear to be the causal agent of the disease. This study provides the first report of Ent. cowanii isolated from Eucalyptus. Its presence in Eucalyptus tissue suggests that it is an endophyte in trees showing symptoms of blight.

  4. Eucalyptus (gracilis, oleosa, salubris, and salmonophloia) essential oils: their chemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ben Marzoug, Hajer Naceur; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ennajar, Monia; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Mathieu, Florence; Couderc, François; Abderraba, Manef; Romdhane, Mehrez

    2010-08-01

    Essential oils of four different Eucalyptus species (Eucalyptus salubris, Eucalyptus salmonophloia, Eucalyptus oleosa, and Eucalyptus gracilis) grown in southern Tunisia were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties as well as their chemical compositions. According to gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, chemical compositions of the Eucalyptus species E. salubris (27 compounds; 99.2%), E. salmonophloia (31 compounds; 99.2%), E. oleosa (32 compounds; 97.6%), and E. gracilis (18 compounds; 97.7%) were identified. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, the antioxidant activity was in the range of 12.0-52.8 mg/mL, whereas in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate assay, E. oleosa (176.5 +/- 3.1 mg/L) gave the best inhibition result. To evaluate antimicrobial activity, all essential oils were tested against bacteria (two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative), two yeast, and two fungi. Essential oils exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all microorganisms tested (activity was better against Gram-positive bacteria) except for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Correlations between chemical composition and biological and antioxidant activities were studied.

  5. Eucalyptus essential oil as a natural food preservative: in vivo and in vitro antiyeast potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Tabanelli, Giulia; Montanari, Chiara; Malik, Anushree; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the application of eucalyptus essential oil/vapour as beverages preservative is reported. The chemical composition of eucalyptus oil was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and solid phase microextraction GC-MS (SPME/GC-MS) analyses. GC-MS revealed that the major constituents were 1,8-cineole (80.5%), limonene (6.5%), α-pinene (5%), and γ-terpinene (2.9%) while SPME/GC-MS showed a relative reduction of 1,8-cineole (63.9%) and an increase of limonene (13.8%), α-pinene (8.87%), and γ-terpinene (3.98%). Antimicrobial potential of essential oil was initially determined in vitro against 8 different food spoilage yeasts by disc diffusion, disc volatilization, and microdilution method. The activity of eucalyptus vapours was significantly higher than the eucalyptus oil. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) varied from 0.56 to 4.50 mg/mL and from 1.13 to 9 mg/mL, respectively. Subsequently, the combined efficacy of essential oil and thermal treatment were used to evaluate the preservation of a mixed fruit juice in a time-dependent manner. These results suggest eucalyptus oil as a potent inhibitor of food spoilage yeasts not only in vitro but also in a real food system. Currently, this is the first report that uses eucalyptus essential oil for fruit juice preservation against food spoiling yeast.

  6. Eucalyptus tolerance mechanisms to lanthanum and cerium: subcellular distribution, antioxidant system and thiol pools.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yichang; Zhang, Shirong; Li, Sen; Xu, Xiaoxun; Jia, Yongxia; Gong, Guoshu

    2014-12-01

    Guanglin 9 (Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophlla) and Eucalyptus grandis 5 are two eucalyptus species which have been found to grow normally in soils contaminated with lanthanum and cerium, but the tolerance mechanisms are not clear yet. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of the eucalyptus to lanthanum and cerium. Cell walls stored 45.40-63.44% of the metals under lanthanum or cerium stress. Peroxidase and catalase activities enhanced with increasing soil La or Ce concentrations up to 200 mg kg(-1), while there were no obvious changes in glutathione and ascorbate concentrations. Non-protein thiols concentrations increased with increasing treatment levels up to 200 mg kg(-1), and then decreased. Phytochelatins concentrations continued to increase under La or Ce stress. Therefore, the two eucalyptus species are La and Ce tolerant plants, and the tolerance mechanisms include cell wall deposition, antioxidant system response, and thiol compound synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Eucalyptus biodiesel as an alternative to diesel fuel: preparation and tests on DI diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Tarabet, Lyes; Loubar, Khaled; Lounici, Mohand Said; Hanchi, Samir; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the increasing oil consumption throughout the world induces crucial economical, security, and environmental problems. As a result, intensive researches are undertaken to find appropriate substitution to fossil fuels. In view of the large amount of eucalyptus trees present in arid areas, we focus in this study on the investigation of using eucalyptus biodiesel as fuel in diesel engine. Eucalyptus oil is converted by transesterification into biodiesel. Eucalyptus biodiesel characterization shows that the physicochemical properties are comparable to those of diesel fuel. In the second phase, a single cylinder air-cooled, DI diesel engine was used to test neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel in various ratios (75, 50, and 25 by v%) at several engine loads. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate are determined. Performances and exhaust emissions are also evaluated at all operating conditions. Results show that neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends present significant improvements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulates emissions especially at high loads with equivalent performances to those of diesel fuel. However, the NOx emissions are slightly increased when the biodiesel content is increased in the blend.

  8. Eucalyptus Biodiesel as an Alternative to Diesel Fuel: Preparation and Tests on DI Diesel Engine

    PubMed Central

    Tarabet, Lyes; Loubar, Khaled; Lounici, Mohand Said; Hanchi, Samir; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the increasing oil consumption throughout the world induces crucial economical, security, and environmental problems. As a result, intensive researches are undertaken to find appropriate substitution to fossil fuels. In view of the large amount of eucalyptus trees present in arid areas, we focus in this study on the investigation of using eucalyptus biodiesel as fuel in diesel engine. Eucalyptus oil is converted by transesterification into biodiesel. Eucalyptus biodiesel characterization shows that the physicochemical properties are comparable to those of diesel fuel. In the second phase, a single cylinder air-cooled, DI diesel engine was used to test neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel in various ratios (75, 50, and 25 by v%) at several engine loads. The engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate are determined. Performances and exhaust emissions are also evaluated at all operating conditions. Results show that neat eucalyptus biodiesel and its blends present significant improvements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulates emissions especially at high loads with equivalent performances to those of diesel fuel. However, the NOx emissions are slightly increased when the biodiesel content is increased in the blend. PMID:22675246

  9. Calonectria species associated with cutting rot of Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Zhou, X D; Crous, P W; Wingfield, B D; Wingfield, M J

    2010-06-01

    Decline in the productivity of Eucalyptus hybrid cutting production in the Guangdong Province of China is linked to cutting rot associated with several Calonectria spp. The aim of this study was to identify these fungi using morphological and DNA sequence comparisons. Two previously undescribed Calonectria spp., Ca. pseudoreteaudii sp. nov. and Ca. cerciana sp. nov. were identified together with Ca. pauciramosa. Calonectria pseudoreteaudii resides in the Ca. reteaudii complex and Ca. cerciana is closely related to Ca. morganii. Connected to the discovery of Ca. pseudoreteaudii, species in the Ca. reteaudii complex were re-considered and the group is shown to accommodate two cryptic species. These originate from Australia and are described as Ca. queenslandica sp. nov. and Ca. terrae-reginae sp. nov.

  10. Obtaining biobleached eucalyptus cellulose fibres by using various enzyme combinations.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Cadena, Edith M; Blanca Roncero, M

    2013-01-30

    Various combinations of laccases, xylanase and cellulase were used to biobleach cellulose fibres from eucalyptus. The Trametes villosa and Myceliophthora thermophila laccases were used in combination with violuric acid (VA(TvL) system) and methyl syringate (MeS(MtL) system), respectively, as mediator. A dissimilar mode of action of the two systems was found: the VA(TvL) treatment released both hexenuronic acids and lignin, whereas the MeS(MtL) released lignin alone. Pulp properties were further improved by applying the mediator before the enzyme during treatment. Pulp properties comparable to those provided by industrial TCF sequences were obtained by inserting a xylanase pretreatment before VA(TvL), but no significant effect was observed after the cellulase pretreatment. As an added value, the resulting enzymatically bleached fibres possess a reduced hexenuronic acid content. The chemical oxygen demand of the effluents from each stage was also assessed.

  11. Microsatellite analysis of population structure in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Vaillancourt, René E; Steane, Dorothy A; Jones, Rebecca C; Marques, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Eucalyptus globulus subsp. globulus Labill. (Tasmanian Blue Gum), native to southeast Australia, is a benchmark species for the pulp and paper industry. We genotyped 397 trees from 16 populations of E. globulus representing the native diversity in Australia using 24 microsatellite loci. Eight genetically distinct groups were detected, consistent with genetic groupings detected in previous quantitative and molecular studies. A sample of 29 Portuguese individuals was added to help clarify the origin of the Portuguese landrace. The results suggest a southern and eastern Tasmania origin for the Portuguese landrace. This genetic framework will enable researchers to investigate the provenance of individuals of unknown pedigree and assess the levels of representation of E. globulus natural variation in the Portuguese landrace.

  12. A new flavonol from the kino of Eucalyptus citriodora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shwu-Woan; Hung, Wei-Jing; Chen, Zong-Tsi

    2017-01-01

    A new flavonol, 6-[1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]rhamnocitrin (3) together with two known compounds, kaempferol (4) and 7-O-methyl aromadendrin (5) were isolated from the kino of Eucalyptus citriodora and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR spectra. Rhamnocitrin (1), 6-[1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]-7-O-methyl aromadendrin (2), previously isolated from this plant and compounds 3-5 were tested for inhibitory activity against 15-lipoxygenase. All compounds exhibited moderate to strong inhibitory activities, of which compounds 2, 3 and 5 showed stronger inhibitory activity (IC50 19.7 ± 0.5, 29.3 ± 0.9 and 31.4 ± 1.0 μM, respectively) than the positive control quercetin (IC50 37.5 ± 0.8 μM).

  13. Valorisation of by Products from Bleached Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. C.; Lopes, O. R.; Colodette, J. L.; Porto, A. O.; Rieumont, J.; Chaussy, D.; Belgacem, M. N.; Silva, G. G.

    2008-08-01

    Three industrial wastes arising from bleached hardwood kraft pulps, namely: unbleached screen rejects (USR), effluent treatment (ETW), and eucalyptus bark (EB) were analyzed with the aim of their possible valorization as an alternative source of cellulose. Their morphological properties were determined using MorFi apparatus. For this study the sample bleached kraft pulp, BKP, was analyzed as a reference. Lignin and carbohydrate contents were also quantified. These by-products were studied as such (i.e. without careful purification) because we intended to find rational and low-cost way of valorization. In fact any additional operation will induce an over cost. The results obtained indicate that these industrial wastes can be potential raw material in fibre-based applications (paper, composites…), since they contain a high proportion of cellulose with preserved fibrillar morphology. Some of these materials have low lignin and inorganic residue contents.

  14. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    PubMed

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant.

  15. Microsporogenesis and flower development in Eucalyptus urophylla × E. tereticornis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Kang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    We compared microsporogenesis and flower development in Eucalyptus urophylla × E. tereticornis. In this study, although microsporogenesis and cytokinesis occurred simultaneously during meiosis of pollen mother cells, we observed a strong asynchronism in different anthers from a flower bud. The developmental period of microsporogenesis in anthers originated from the long thrum before the short thrum. Flower development was also asynchronous at different locations on a branch. The flower buds grew on the lower side of the branch and showed greater increases in diameter. In addition, we observed a relationship between microsporogenesis development and flower bud diameter growth. Generally, when the pachytene stage was first observed in a small single flower bud growing on top of a flowering branch, the remaining microsporogenesis stages (from diplotene to tetrad) in the whole branch occurred over the next 5-9 days. Thus, the start of microsporogenesis in E. urophylla × E. tereticornis could be determined, which may be applicable to future breeding studies.

  16. Heat pulse observations of Eucalyptus grandis transpiration in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, P.J.; Olbrich, B.W.

    1992-12-31

    Forest plantations in South Africa are currently limited to areas experiencing a minimum mean annual rainfall of 800 mm, and cover approximately 1.18 million ha. Of this total area, 37% is planted to Eucalyptus spp., of which 76% comprise E. grandis Hill ex Maiden. Micrometeorological methods of measuring evapotranspiration are impractical in many areas of South African forestry owing to the rugged topography and heterogeneous canopy and boundary layer conditions. The heat pulse velocity (HPV) technique shows great promise as a suitable method of measuring sap flow in even-aged forest plantations. This paper describes the method in detail, as well as the results of comparisons between HPV sap flow estimates and cut-tree uptake rates for two size classes of E. grandis.

  17. Wood power in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, J.G.; Guessous, L.

    1993-12-31

    North Carolina (NC) is one of the most forested states, and supports a major wood products industry. The NC Department of Natural Resources sponsored a study by Research Triangle Institute to examine new, productive uses of the State`s wood resources, especially electric power generation by co-firing with coal. This paper summarizes our research of the main factors influencing wood power generation opportunities, i.e., (1) electricity demand; (2) initiative and experience of developers; (3) available fuel resources; (4) incentives for alternate fuels; and (5) power plant technology and economics. The results cover NC forests, short rotation woody crops, existing wood energy facilities, electrical power requirements, and environmental regulations/incentives. Quantitative assessments are based on the interests of government agencies, utilities, electric cooperatives, developers and independent power producers, forest products industries, and the general public. Several specific, new opportunities for wood-to-electricity in the State are identified and described. Comparisons are made with nationwide resources and wood energy operations. Preferred approaches in NC are co-generation in existing or modified boilers and in dedicated wood power plants in forest industry regions. Co-firing is mainly an option for supplementing unreliable primary fuel supplies to existing boilers.

  18. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  19. Hylax bahiensis Bechyné (Chrysomelidae: Eumolpinae): a New Potential Pest of Eucalyptus and Species Used for Atlantic Rainforest Restoration.

    PubMed

    Mafia, R G; da Silva, J B; Ramos, J F; Mafia, G V; Rosado-Neto, G H; Ferronatto, E M O

    2015-02-01

    Hylax bahiensis Bechyné (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a new pest of forest species, including eucalyptus (hybrid Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis), Joannesia princeps, Mimosa artemisiana, Croton urucurana, Croton floribundus, and Senna multijuga is recorded. The insect attack in clonal eucalyptus plantations and in forest restoration areas between 2010 and 2013 in the states of Espírito Santo, Bahia and Minas Gerais, Brasil, was observed for the first time. The outbreaks generally occurred from September to March. This new potential pest can affect the growth, productivity, and quality of the trees. We recommended monitoring this leaf-eating beetle especially during the critical period of its occurrence.

  20. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  1. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  2. Environmental aspects of eucalyptus based ethanol production and use.

    PubMed

    González-García, Sara; Moreira, Ma Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    2012-11-01

    A renewable biofuel economy is projected as a pathway to decrease dependence on fossil fuels as well as to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. Ethanol produced on large-scale from lignocellulosic materials is considered the automotive fuel with the highest potential. In this paper, a life cycle assessment (LCA) study was developed to evaluate the environmental implications of the production of ethanol from a fast-growing short rotation crop (SRC): eucalyptus as well as its use in a flexi-fuel vehicle (FFV). The aim of the analysis was to assess the environmental performance of three ethanol based formulations: E10, E85 and E100, in comparison with conventional gasoline. The standard framework of LCA from International Standards Organization was followed and the system boundaries included the cultivation of the eucalyptus biomass, the processing to ethanol conversion, the blending with gasoline (when required) and the final use of fuels. The environmental results show reductions in all impact categories under assessment when shifting to ethanol based fuels, excluding photochemical oxidant formation, eutrophication as well as terrestrial and marine ecotoxicity which were considerably influenced by upstream activities related to ethanol manufacture. The LCA study remarked those stages where the researchers and technicians need to work to improve the environmental performance. Special attention must be paid on ethanol production related activities, such as on-site energy generation and distillation, as well as forest activities oriented to the biomass production. The use of forest machinery with higher efficiency levels, reduction of fertilizers dose and the control of diffuse emissions from the conversion plant would improve the environmental profile.

  3. A GC-FID validated method for the quality control of Eucalyptus globulus raw material and its pharmaceutical products, and gc-ms fingerprinting of 12 Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Buenoa, Paula Carolina Pires; Junior, Milton Groppo; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2014-12-01

    In this work we have validated a method to standardize and control the quality of Eucalyptus globulus raw material and phytomedicines containing either the essential oil or the fluid extract of this plant in the final formulation. Internal standardization provided a simple, fast, and reproducible GC-FID analytical method that accurately quantified 1,8-cineol in different E. globulus sub-products, such as its essential oil, dried leaves, fluid extract, and syrup. In addition, GC-MS identification of the main compounds ofE. globulus species afforded fingerprints for the qualitative analysis of different Eucalyptus species.

  4. Production and carbon allocation in monocultures and mixed-species plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nouvellon, Yann; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Epron, Daniel; Le Maire, Guerric; Bonnefond, Jean-Marc; Gonçalves, José Leonardo M; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Introducing nitrogen-fixing tree species in fast-growing eucalypt plantations has the potential to improve soil nitrogen availability compared with eucalypt monocultures. Whether or not the changes in soil nutrient status and stand structure will lead to mixtures that out-yield monocultures depends on the balance between positive interactions and the negative effects of interspecific competition, and on their effect on carbon (C) uptake and partitioning. We used a C budget approach to quantify growth, C uptake and C partitioning in monocultures of Eucalyptus grandis (W. Hill ex Maiden) and Acacia mangium (Willd.) (treatments E100 and A100, respectively), and in a mixture at the same stocking density with the two species at a proportion of 1 : 1 (treatment MS). Allometric relationships established over the whole rotation, and measurements of soil CO(2) efflux and aboveground litterfall for ages 4-6 years after planting were used to estimate aboveground net primary production (ANPP), total belowground carbon flux (TBCF) and gross primary production (GPP). We tested the hypotheses that (i) species differences for wood production between E. grandis and A. mangium monocultures were partly explained by different C partitioning strategies, and (ii) the observed lower wood production in the mixture compared with eucalypt monoculture was mostly explained by a lower partitioning aboveground. At the end of the rotation, total aboveground biomass was lowest in A100 (10.5 kg DM m(-2)), intermediate in MS (12.2 kg DM m(-2)) and highest in E100 (13.9 kg DM m(-2)). The results did not support our first hypothesis of contrasting C partitioning strategies between E. grandis and A. mangium monocultures: the 21% lower growth (ΔB(w)) in A100 compared with E100 was almost entirely explained by a 23% lower GPP, with little or no species difference in ratios such as TBCF/GPP, ANPP/TBCF, ΔB(w)/ANPP and ΔB(w)/GPP. In contrast, the 28% lower ΔB(w) in MS than in E100 was explained both by

  5. Fire resistance of exposed wood members

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2004-01-01

    Fire resistance data on exposed wood beams and columns are plentiful, but few studies have been done on exposed wood members in tension and in decks. To provide data to verify the application of a new calculation procedure, a limited series of fire resistance tests were conducted on wood members loaded in tension and on exposed wood decks.

  6. The Carbon Impacts of Wood Products

    Treesearch

    Richard Bergman; Maureen Puettmann; Adam Taylor; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    Wood products have many environmental advantages over nonwood alternatives. Documenting and publicizing these merits helps the future competitiveness of wood when climate change impacts are being considered. The manufacture of wood products requires less fossil fuel than nonwood alternative building materials such as concrete, metals, or plastics. By nature, wood is...

  7. FIRE INSURANCE AND WOOD SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PURCELL, FRANK X.

    A COMPARISON OF FIRE INSURANCE COSTS OF WOOD, MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES SHOWS FIRE INSURANCE PREMIMUMS ON WOOD STRUCTURES TEND TO BE HIGHER THAN PREMIUMS ON MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE BUILDINGS, HOWEVER, THE INITIAL COST OF THE WOOD BUILDINGS IS LOWER. DATA SHOW THAT THE SAVINGS ACHIEVED IN THE INITIAL COST OF WOOD STRUCTURES OFFSET…

  8. Physical properties and moisture relations of wood

    Treesearch

    William Simpson; Anton TenWolde

    1999-01-01

    The versatility of wood is demonstrated by a wide variety of products. This variety is a result of a spectrum of desirable physical characteristics or properties among the many species of wood. In many cases, more than one property of wood is important to the end product. For example, to select a wood species for a product, the value of appearance- type properties,...

  9. Treatments that enhance physical properties of wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; Peggy Konkol

    1987-01-01

    This paper was prepared for anyone who wants to know more about enhancing wood’s physical properties, from the amateur wood carver to the president of a forest products company. The authors describe chemical and physical treatments of wood that enhance the strength, stiffness, water repellency, and stability of wood. Five types of treatments are described: 1. water-...

  10. Wood-based composites and panel products

    Treesearch

    John A. Youngquist

    1999-01-01

    Because wood properties vary among species, between trees of the same species, and between pieces from the same tree, solid wood cannot match reconstituted wood in the range of properties that can be controlled in processing. When processing variables are properly selected, the end result can sometimes surpass nature’s best effort. With solid wood, changes in...

  11. Moisture relations and physical properties of wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel V. Glass; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2010-01-01

    Wood, like many natural materials, is hygroscopic; it takes on moisture from the surrounding environment. Moisture exchange between wood and air depends on the relative humidity and temperature of the air and the current amount of water in the wood. This moisture relationship has an important influence on wood properties and performance. Many of the challenges of using...

  12. FIRE INSURANCE AND WOOD SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PURCELL, FRANK X.

    A COMPARISON OF FIRE INSURANCE COSTS OF WOOD, MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES SHOWS FIRE INSURANCE PREMIMUMS ON WOOD STRUCTURES TEND TO BE HIGHER THAN PREMIUMS ON MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE BUILDINGS, HOWEVER, THE INITIAL COST OF THE WOOD BUILDINGS IS LOWER. DATA SHOW THAT THE SAVINGS ACHIEVED IN THE INITIAL COST OF WOOD STRUCTURES OFFSET…

  13. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  14. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  15. Oxalate analysis methodology for decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; William Kenealy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2008-01-01

    Oxalate from partially decayed southern pine wood was analyzed by HPLC or colorimetric assay. Oxalate extraction efficiency, assessed by comparing analysis of whole wood cubes with ground wood, showed that both wood geometries could be extracted with comparable efficiency. To differentiate soluble oxalate from total oxalate, three extraction methods were assessed,...

  16. The challenge of bonding treated wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    Wood products are quite durable if exposure to moisture is minimized; however, most uses of wood involve considerable exposure to moisture. To preserve the wood, chemicals are used to minimize moisture pickup, to prevent insect attack, and/or to resist microbial growth. The chemicals used as preservatives can interfere with adhesive bonds to wood. Given the many...

  17. Wood Condition Assessment Manual: Second Edition

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Robert H. White

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes information on condition assessment of in-service wood, including visual inspection of wood and timbers, use of ultrasound and probing/boring techniques for inspection, and assessment of wood and timbers that have been exposed to fire. The report also includes information on assigning allowable design values for in-service wood.

  18. Bioprocessing preservative-treated waste wood

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang; Les. Ferge

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of preservative-treated waste wood is a growing problem worldwide. Bioprocessing the treated wood offers one approach to waste management under certain conditions. One goal is to use wood decay fungi to reduce the volume of waste with an easily managed system in a cost-effective manner. Wood decay fungi were obtained from culture collections in the Mycology...

  19. USANS study of wood structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Knott, Robert B.; Searson, Matthew; Conroy, Jann P.

    2006-11-01

    Wood performs a vascular and structural function in trees. In this study we used the double-crystal diffractometer BT5 at the NIST Center for Neutron Scattering (Gaithersburg, USA) to study the pore structure inside wood sections. The slit-smeared intensity of scattered neutrons was measured from wood sections in directions parallel, orthogonal and transverse to the tree's trunk axis over a scattering vector range 0.00004-0.002 Å -1. The interpretation of the data in terms of a reductionist model consisting of infinitely long cylinders (cell lumens) is discussed.

  20. Changes in soil quality after converting Pinus to Eucalyptus plantations in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Zheng, H.; Chen, F. L.; Ouyang, Z. Y.; Wang, Y.; Wu, Y. F.; Lan, J.; Fu, M.; Xiang, X. W.

    2015-02-01

    Vegetation plays a key role in maintaining soil quality, but long-term changes in soil quality due to plant species change and successive planting are rarely reported. Using the space-for-time substitution method, adjacent plantations of Pinus and first, second, third and fourth generations of Eucalyptus in Guangxi, China were used to study changes in soil quality caused by converting Pinus to Eucalyptus and successive Eucalyptus planting. Soil chemical and biological properties were measured and a soil quality index was calculated using principal component analysis. Soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, alkaline hydrolytic nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, cellobiosidase, phenol oxidase, peroxidase and acid phosphatase activities were significantly lower in the first and second generations of Eucalyptus plantations compared with Pinus plantation, but they were significantly higher in the third and fourth generations than in the first and second generations and significantly lower than in Pinus plantation. Soil total and available potassium were significantly lower in Eucalyptus plantations (1.8-2.5 g kg-1 and 26-66 mg kg-1) compared to the Pinus plantation (14.3 g kg-1 and 92 mg kg-1), but total phosphorus was significantly higher in Eucalyptus plantations (0.9-1.1 g kg-1) compared to the Pinus plantation (0.4 g kg-1). As an integrated indicator, soil quality index was highest in the Pinus plantation (0.92) and lowest in the first and second generations of Eucalyptus plantations (0.24 and 0.13). Soil quality index in the third and fourth generations (0.36 and 0.38) was between that in Pinus plantation and in first and second generations of Eucalyptus plantations. Changing tree species, reclamation and fertilization may have contributed to the change observed in soil quality during conversion of Pinus to Eucalyptus and successive Eucalyptus planting. Litter retention, keeping understorey coverage, and reducing soil disturbance during