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Sample records for eukaryotic 80s ribosomes

  1. Coupled release of eukaryotic translation initiation factors 5B and 1A from 80S ribosomes following subunit joining.

    PubMed

    Fringer, Jeanne M; Acker, Michael G; Fekete, Christie A; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    The translation initiation GTPase eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) binds to the factor eIF1A and catalyzes ribosomal subunit joining in vitro. We show that rapid depletion of eIF5B in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the accumulation of eIF1A and mRNA on 40S subunits in vivo, consistent with a defect in subunit joining. Substituting Ala for the last five residues in eIF1A (eIF1A-5A) impairs eIF5B binding to eIF1A in cell extracts and to 40S complexes in vivo. Consistently, overexpression of eIF5B suppresses the growth and translation initiation defects in yeast expressing eIF1A-5A, indicating that eIF1A helps recruit eIF5B to the 40S subunit prior to subunit joining. The GTPase-deficient eIF5B-T439A mutant accumulated on 80S complexes in vivo and was retained along with eIF1A on 80S complexes formed in vitro. Likewise, eIF5B and eIF1A remained associated with 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GDPNP, whereas these factors were released from the 80S complexes in assays containing GTP. We propose that eIF1A facilitates the binding of eIF5B to the 40S subunit to promote subunit joining. Following 80S complex formation, GTP hydrolysis by eIF5B enables the release of both eIF5B and eIF1A, and the ribosome enters the elongation phase of protein synthesis.

  2. Domain movements of elongation factor eEF2 and the eukaryotic 80S ribosome facilitate tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Christian MT; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G; Grassucci, Robert A; Jørgensen, Rene; Andersen, Gregers R; Beckmann, Roland; Penczek, Pawel A; Ballesta, Juan PG; Frank, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    An 11.7-Å-resolution cryo-EM map of the yeast 80S·eEF2 complex in the presence of the antibiotic sordarin was interpreted in molecular terms, revealing large conformational changes within eEF2 and the 80S ribosome, including a rearrangement of the functionally important ribosomal intersubunit bridges. Sordarin positions domain III of eEF2 so that it can interact with the sarcin–ricin loop of 25S rRNA and protein rpS23 (S12p). This particular conformation explains the inhibitory action of sordarin and suggests that eEF2 is stalled on the 80S ribosome in a conformation that has similarities with the GTPase activation state. A ratchet-like subunit rearrangement (RSR) occurs in the 80S·eEF2·sordarin complex that, in contrast to Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes, is also present in vacant 80S ribosomes. A model is suggested, according to which the RSR is part of a mechanism for moving the tRNAs during the translocation reaction. PMID:14976550

  3. Features of 80S mammalian ribosome and its subunits

    PubMed Central

    Budkevich, Tatyana V.; El'skaya, Anna V.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that basic features of ribosomal functions are universally valid, but a systematic test still stands out for higher eukaryotic 80S ribosomes. Here we report: (i) differences in tRNA and mRNA binding capabilities of eukaryotic and bacterial ribosomes and their subunits. Eukaryotic 40S subunits bind mRNA exclusively in the presence of cognate tRNA, whereas bacterial 30S do bind mRNA already in the absence of tRNA. 80S ribosomes bind mRNA efficiently in the absence of tRNA. In contrast, bacterial 70S interact with mRNA more productively in the presence rather than in the absence of tRNA. (ii) States of initiation (Pi), pre-translocation (PRE) and post-translocation (POST) of the ribosome were checked and no significant functional differences to the prokaryotic counterpart were observed including the reciprocal linkage between A and E sites. (iii) Eukaryotic ribosomes bind tetracycline with an affinity 15 times lower than that of bacterial ribosomes (Kd 30 μM and 1–2 μM, respectively). The drug does not effect enzymatic A-site occupation of 80S ribosomes in contrast to non-enzymatic tRNA binding to the A-site. Both observations explain the relative resistance of eukaryotic ribosomes to this antibiotic. PMID:18632761

  4. Comprehensive Molecular Structure of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J.; Devkota, Batsal; Huang, Andrew D.; Topf, Maya; Narayanan, Eswar; Sali, Andrej; Harvey, Stephen C.; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Despite the emergence of a large number of X-ray crystallographic models of the bacterial 70S ribosome over the past decade, an accurate atomic model of the eukaryotic 80S ribosome is still not available. Eukaryotic ribosomes possess more ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA than bacterial ribosomes, which are implicated in extra-ribosomal functions in the eukaryotic cells. By combining cryo-EM with RNA and protein homology modeling, we obtained an atomic model of the yeast 80S ribosome complete with all ribosomal RNA expansion segments and all ribosomal proteins for which a structural homolog can be identified. Mutation or deletion of 80S ribosomal proteins can abrogate maturation of the ribosome, leading to several human diseases. We have localized one such protein unique to eukaryotes, rpS19e, whose mutations are associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia in humans. Additionally, we characterize crucial and novel interactions between the dynamic stalk base of the ribosome with eukaryotic elongation factor 2. PMID:20004163

  5. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  6. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  7. The structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi reveals unique rRNA components

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haixiao; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Levin, Mariano J.; Frank, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    We present analysis, by cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction, of the structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi, the kinetoplastid protozoan pathogen that causes Chagas disease. The density map of the T. cruzi 80S ribosome shows the phylogenetically conserved eukaryotic rRNA core structure, together with distinctive structural features in both the small and large subunits. Remarkably, a previously undescribed helical structure appears in the small subunit in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. We propose that this rRNA structure likely participates in the recruitment of ribosome onto the 5′ end of mRNA, in facilitating and modulating the initiation of translation that is unique to the trypanosomes. PMID:16014419

  8. The Structure and Function of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel N.; Doudna Cate, Jamie H.

    2012-01-01

    Structures of the bacterial ribosome have provided a framework for understanding universal mechanisms of protein synthesis. However, the eukaryotic ribosome is much larger than it is in bacteria, and its activity is fundamentally different in many key ways. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions and X-ray crystal structures of eukaryotic ribosomes and ribosomal subunits now provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore mechanisms of eukaryotic translation and its regulation in atomic detail. This review describes the X-ray crystal structures of the Tetrahymena thermophila 40S and 60S subunits and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, as well as cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of translating yeast and plant 80S ribosomes. Mechanistic questions about translation in eukaryotes that will require additional structural insights to be resolved are also presented. PMID:22550233

  9. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  10. Eukaryotic ribosome assembly, transport and quality control.

    PubMed

    Peña, Cohue; Hurt, Ed; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2017-09-07

    Eukaryotic ribosome synthesis is a complex, energy-consuming process that takes place across the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and requires more than 200 conserved assembly factors. Here, we discuss mechanisms by which the ribosome assembly and nucleocytoplasmic transport machineries collaborate to produce functional ribosomes. We also highlight recent cryo-EM studies that provided unprecedented snapshots of ribosomes during assembly and quality control.

  11. Comparison of fungal 80 S ribosomes by cryo-EM reveals diversity in structure and conformation of rRNA expansion segments.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jakob; Sengupta, Jayati; Gursky, Richard; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Compared to the prokaryotic 70 S ribosome, the eukaryotic 80 S ribosome contains additional ribosomal proteins and extra segments of rRNA, referred to as rRNA expansion segments (ES). These eukaryotic-specific rRNA ES are mainly on the periphery of the 80 S ribosome, as revealed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies, but their precise function is not known. To address the question of whether the rRNA ES are structurally conserved among 80 S ribosomes of different fungi we performed cryo-electron microscopy on 80 S ribosomes from the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus and compared it to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80 S ribosome. Our analysis reveals general structural conservation of the rRNA expansion segments but also changes in ES27 and ES7/39, as well as the absence of a tertiary interaction between ES3 and ES6 in T. lanuginosus. The differences provide a hint on the role of rRNA ES in regulating translation. Furthermore, we show that the stalk region and interactions with elongation factor 2 (eEF2) are different in T. lanuginosus, exhibiting a more extensive contact with domain I of eEF2.

  12. Comparison of Fungal 80S Ribosomes by Cryo-EM Reveals Diversity in Structure and Conformation of rRNA Expansion Segments

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Jakob; Sengupta, Jayati; Gursky, Richard; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Summary Compared to the prokaryotic 70S ribosome, the eukaryotic 80S ribosome contains additional ribosomal proteins and extra segments of rRNA, referred to as rRNA expansion segments (ES). These eukaryotic-specific rRNA ES are mainly on the periphery of the 80S ribosome, as revealed by cryo-EM studies, but their precise function is not known. To address the question of whether the rRNA ES are structurally conserved among 80S ribosomes of different fungi we performed cryo-electron microscopy on 80S ribosomes from the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus and compared it to Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome. Our analysis reveals general structural conservation of the rRNA expansion segments but also changes in ES27 and ES7/39, as well as the absence of a tertiary interaction between ES3 and ES6 in T. lanuginosus. The differences provide a hint on the role of rRNA ES in regulating translation. Furthermore, we show that the stalk region and interactions with elongation factor 2 (eEF2) are different in T. lanuginosus, exhibiting a more extensive contact with domain I of eEF2. PMID:17434183

  13. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 supports the assembly of functional 80S ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Rene; Golbik, Ralph P.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 has suggested functions in innate immunity, mRNA translocation and translation, and it participates in the propagation of assorted viruses. Exploring initially the role of DDX3 in the life cycle of hepatitis C virus, we observed the protein to be involved in translation directed by different viral internal ribosomal entry sites. Extension of these studies revealed a general supportive role of DDX3 in translation initiation. DDX3 was found to interact in an RNA-independent manner with defined components of the translational pre-initiation complex and to specifically associate with newly assembling 80S ribosomes. DDX3 knock down and in vitro reconstitution experiments revealed a significant function of the protein in the formation of 80S translation initiation complexes. Our study implies that DDX3 assists the 60S subunit joining process to assemble functional 80S ribosomes. PMID:22323517

  14. Structural basis for the inhibition of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Prokhorova, Irina; Holtkamp, Wolf; Rodnina, Marina V; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2014-09-25

    The ribosome is a molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis and a major target for small-molecule inhibitors. Compared to the wealth of structural information available on ribosome-targeting antibiotics in bacteria, our understanding of the binding mode of ribosome inhibitors in eukaryotes is currently limited. Here we used X-ray crystallography to determine 16 high-resolution structures of 80S ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in complexes with 12 eukaryote-specific and 4 broad-spectrum inhibitors. All inhibitors were found associated with messenger RNA and transfer RNA binding sites. In combination with kinetic experiments, the structures suggest a model for the action of cycloheximide and lactimidomycin, which explains why lactimidomycin, the larger compound, specifically targets the first elongation cycle. The study defines common principles of targeting and resistance, provides insights into translation inhibitor mode of action and reveals the structural determinants responsible for species selectivity which could guide future drug development.

  15. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis at a glance.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Hurt, Ed

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes play a pivotal role in the molecular life of every cell. Moreover, synthesis of ribosomes is one of the most energetically demanding of all cellular processes. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome biogenesis requires the coordinated activity of all three RNA polymerases and the orchestrated work of many (>200) transiently associated ribosome assembly factors. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a tightly regulated activity and it is inextricably linked to other fundamental cellular processes, including growth and cell division. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that defects in ribosome biogenesis are associated with several hereditary diseases. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we summarise the current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, with an emphasis on the yeast model system.

  16. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  17. Calcium-dependent interaction of calmodulin with human 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Petra; Davis, Elizabeth; Delaney, Erin; Frohm, Birgitta; Bauer, Mikael; Cedervall, Tommy; O'Connell, David; Åkerfeldt, Karin S; Linse, Sara

    2012-08-28

    Ribosomes are the protein factories of every living cell. The process of protein translation is highly complex and tightly regulated by a large number of diverse RNAs and proteins. Earlier studies indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in protein translation. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulates a large number of proteins participating in many signaling pathways. Several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins have been identified to interact with CaM, and here, we report that CaM binds with high affinity to 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. No binding is observed in buffer with 6 mM Mg(2+) and 1 mM EGTA that chelates Ca(2+), suggesting high specificity of the CaM-ribosome interaction dependent on the Ca(2+) induced conformational change of CaM. The interactions between CaM and ribosomes are inhibited by synthetic peptides comprising putative CaM-binding sites in ribosomal proteins S2 and L14. Using a cell-free in vitro translation system, we further found that these synthetic peptides are potent inhibitors of protein synthesis. Our results identify an involvement of CaM in the translational activity of ribosomes.

  18. Eukaryotic Ribosome Assembly and Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Purnima; Altvater, Martin; Gerhardy, Stefan; Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Weirich, Christine; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2015-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic code into functional polypeptides is key to cellular growth and proliferation. This essential process is carried out by the ribosome, a ribonucleoprotein complex of remarkable size and intricacy. Although the structure of the mature ribosome has provided insight into the mechanism of translation, our knowledge regarding the assembly, quality control, and intracellular targeting of this molecular machine is still emerging. Assembly of the eukaryotic ribosome begins in the nucleolus and requires more than 350 conserved assembly factors, which transiently associate with the preribosome at specific maturation stages. After accomplishing their tasks, early-acting assembly factors are released, preparing preribosomes for nuclear export. Export competent preribosomal subunits are transported through nuclear pore complexes into the cytoplasm, where they undergo final maturation steps, which are closely connected to quality control, before engaging in translation. In this chapter, we focus on the final events that commit correctly assembled ribosomal subunits for translation.

  19. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. PMID:1098024

  20. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-07-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes.

  1. Mefloquine targets the Plasmodium falciparum 80S ribosome to inhibit protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wilson; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Sleebs, Brad E; Triglia, Tony; Brown, Alan; Thompson, Jennifer K; Jackson, Katherine E; Hanssen, Eric; Marapana, Danushka S; Fernandez, Israel S; Ralph, Stuart A; Cowman, Alan F; Scheres, Sjors H W; Baum, Jake

    2017-03-13

    Malaria control is heavily dependent on chemotherapeutic agents for disease prevention and drug treatment. Defining the mechanism of action for licensed drugs, for which no target is characterized, is critical to the development of their second-generation derivatives to improve drug potency towards inhibition of their molecular targets. Mefloquine is a widely used antimalarial without a known mode of action. Here, we demonstrate that mefloquine is a protein synthesis inhibitor. We solved a 3.2 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Plasmodium falciparum 80S ribosome with the (+)-mefloquine enantiomer bound to the ribosome GTPase-associated centre. Mutagenesis of mefloquine-binding residues generates parasites with increased resistance, confirming the parasite-killing mechanism. Furthermore, structure-guided derivatives with an altered piperidine group, predicted to improve binding, show enhanced parasiticidal effect. These data reveal one possible mode of action for mefloquine and demonstrate the vast potential of cryo-electron microscopy to guide the development of mefloquine derivatives to inhibit parasite protein synthesis.

  2. One core, two shells: bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey; Ben-Shem, Adam; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2012-06-05

    Ribosomes are universally conserved enzymes that carry out protein biosynthesis. Bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes, which share an evolutionarily conserved core, are thought to have evolved from a common ancestor by addition of proteins and RNA that bestow different functionalities to ribosomes from different domains of life. Recently, structures of the eukaryotic ribosome, determined by X-ray crystallography, have allowed us to compare these structures to previously determined structures of bacterial ribosomes. Here we describe selected bacteria- or eukaryote-specific structural features of the ribosome and discuss the functional implications of some of them.

  3. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  4. Visualization of the eEF2-80S Ribosome Transition State Complex by Cryo-electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Jayati; Nilsson, Jakob; Gursky, Richard; Kjeldgaard, Morten; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Summary In an attempt to understand ribosome-induced GTP hydrolysis on eEF2, we have determined a 12.6-Å cryo-EM reconstruction of the eEF2-bound 80S ribosome in the presence of aluminum fluoride (AlF4−) and GDP, with AlF4− mimicking the γ-phosphate during hydrolysis. This is the first visualization of a structure representing a transition state complex on the ribosome. Tight interactions are observed between the factor’s G-domain and the large ribosomal subunit, as well as between domain IV and an intersubunit bridge. In contrast, some of the domains of eEF2 implicated in small subunit binding display a large degree of flexibility. Furthermore, we find support for a transition state model conformation of the switch I region in this complex where the reoriented switch I interacts with a conserved rRNA region of the 40S subunit formed by loops of the 18S RNA helices 8 and 14. This complex is structurally distinct from the eEF2-bound 80S ribosome complexes previously published, and analysis of this map sheds light on the GTPase-coupled translocation mechanism. PMID:18644383

  5. Dom34-Hbs1 mediated dissociation of inactive 80S ribosomes promotes restart of translation after stress

    PubMed Central

    den Elzen, Antonia M G; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Following translation termination, ribosomal subunits dissociate to become available for subsequent rounds of protein synthesis. In many translation-inhibiting stress conditions, e.g. glucose starvation in yeast, free ribosomal subunits reassociate to form a large pool of non-translating 80S ribosomes stabilized by the ‘clamping’ Stm1 factor. The subunits of these inactive ribosomes need to be mobilized for translation restart upon stress relief. The Dom34-Hbs1 complex, together with the Rli1 NTPase (also known as ABCE1), have been shown to split ribosomes stuck on mRNAs in the context of RNA quality control mechanisms. Here, using in vitro and in vivo methods, we report a new role for the Dom34-Hbs1 complex and Rli1 in dissociating inactive ribosomes, thereby facilitating translation restart in yeast recovering from glucose starvation stress. Interestingly, we found that this new role is not restricted to stress conditions, indicating that in growing yeast there is a dynamic pool of inactive ribosomes that needs to be split by Dom34-Hbs1 and Rli1 to participate in protein synthesis. We propose that this provides a new level of translation regulation. PMID:24424461

  6. Dom34-Hbs1 mediated dissociation of inactive 80S ribosomes promotes restart of translation after stress.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Antonia M G; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2014-02-03

    Following translation termination, ribosomal subunits dissociate to become available for subsequent rounds of protein synthesis. In many translation-inhibiting stress conditions, e.g. glucose starvation in yeast, free ribosomal subunits reassociate to form a large pool of non-translating 80S ribosomes stabilized by the 'clamping' Stm1 factor. The subunits of these inactive ribosomes need to be mobilized for translation restart upon stress relief. The Dom34-Hbs1 complex, together with the Rli1 NTPase (also known as ABCE1), have been shown to split ribosomes stuck on mRNAs in the context of RNA quality control mechanisms. Here, using in vitro and in vivo methods, we report a new role for the Dom34-Hbs1 complex and Rli1 in dissociating inactive ribosomes, thereby facilitating translation restart in yeast recovering from glucose starvation stress. Interestingly, we found that this new role is not restricted to stress conditions, indicating that in growing yeast there is a dynamic pool of inactive ribosomes that needs to be split by Dom34-Hbs1 and Rli1 to participate in protein synthesis. We propose that this provides a new level of translation regulation.

  7. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  8. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  9. Crystal Structure of Hypusine-Containing Translation Factor eIF5A Bound to a Rotated Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey; Mailliot, Justine; Shin, Byung-Sik; Rigger, Lukas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Micura, Ronald; Dever, Thomas E; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-09-11

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A promotes protein synthesis by resolving polyproline-induced ribosomal stalling. Here, we report a 3.25-Å resolution crystal structure of eIF5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome. The structure reveals a previously unseen conformation of an eIF5A-ribosome complex and highlights a possible functional link between conformational changes of the ribosome during protein synthesis and the eIF5A-ribosome association.

  10. Structures of modified eEF2 80S ribosome complexes reveal the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Derek J; Nilsson, Jakob; Merrill, A Rod; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-05-02

    On the basis of kinetic data on ribosome protein synthesis, the mechanical energy for translocation of the mRNA-tRNA complex is thought to be provided by GTP hydrolysis of an elongation factor (eEF2 in eukaryotes, EF-G in bacteria). We have obtained cryo-EM reconstructions of eukaryotic ribosomes complexed with ADP-ribosylated eEF2 (ADPR-eEF2), before and after GTP hydrolysis, providing a structural basis for analyzing the GTPase-coupled mechanism of translocation. Using the ADP-ribosyl group as a distinct marker, we observe conformational changes of ADPR-eEF2 that are due strictly to GTP hydrolysis. These movements are likely representative of native eEF2 motions in a physiological context and are sufficient to uncouple the mRNA-tRNA complex from two universally conserved bases in the ribosomal decoding center (A1492 and A1493 in Escherichia coli) during translocation. Interpretation of these data provides a detailed two-step model of translocation that begins with the eEF2/EF-G binding-induced ratcheting motion of the small ribosomal subunit. GTP hydrolysis then uncouples the mRNA-tRNA complex from the decoding center so translocation of the mRNA-tRNA moiety may be completed by a head rotation of the small subunit.

  11. Structures of modified eEF2·80S ribosome complexes reveal the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J; Nilsson, Jakob; Merrill, A Rod; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of kinetic data on ribosome protein synthesis, the mechanical energy for translocation of the mRNA–tRNA complex is thought to be provided by GTP hydrolysis of an elongation factor (eEF2 in eukaryotes, EF-G in bacteria). We have obtained cryo-EM reconstructions of eukaryotic ribosomes complexed with ADP-ribosylated eEF2 (ADPR-eEF2), before and after GTP hydrolysis, providing a structural basis for analyzing the GTPase-coupled mechanism of translocation. Using the ADP-ribosyl group as a distinct marker, we observe conformational changes of ADPR-eEF2 that are due strictly to GTP hydrolysis. These movements are likely representative of native eEF2 motions in a physiological context and are sufficient to uncouple the mRNA–tRNA complex from two universally conserved bases in the ribosomal decoding center (A1492 and A1493 in Escherichia coli) during translocation. Interpretation of these data provides a detailed two-step model of translocation that begins with the eEF2/EF-G binding-induced ratcheting motion of the small ribosomal subunit. GTP hydrolysis then uncouples the mRNA–tRNA complex from the decoding center so translocation of the mRNA–tRNA moiety may be completed by a head rotation of the small subunit. PMID:17446867

  12. An overview of pre-ribosomal RNA processing in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Henras, Anthony K; Plisson-Chastang, Célia; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Chakraborty, Anirban; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are the most abundant and universal noncoding RNAs in living organisms. In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs forming the 40S and 60S subunits are borne by a long polycistronic pre-ribosomal RNA. A complex sequence of processing steps is required to gradually release the mature RNAs from this precursor, concomitant with the assembly of the 79 ribosomal proteins. A large set of trans-acting factors chaperone this process, including small nucleolar ribonucleoparticles. While yeast has been the gold standard for studying the molecular basis of this process, recent technical advances have allowed to further define the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis in animals and plants. This renewed interest for a long-lasting question has been fueled by the association of several genetic diseases with mutations in genes encoding both ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis factors, and by the perspective of new anticancer treatments targeting the mechanisms of ribosome synthesis. A consensus scheme of pre-ribosomal RNA maturation is emerging from studies in various kinds of eukaryotic organisms. However, major differences between mammalian and yeast pre-ribosomal RNA processing have recently come to light. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:225–242. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1269 PMID:25346433

  13. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N.; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis. PMID:26715760

  14. Potent, Reversible, and Specific Chemical Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Chen, Zhen; Aoi, Yuki; Patgiri, Anupam; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-10-06

    All cellular proteins are synthesized by ribosomes, whose biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multi-step process completed within minutes. Several chemical inhibitors of ribosome function are available and used as tools or drugs. By contrast, we lack potent validated chemical probes to analyze the dynamics of eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Here, we combine chemical and genetic approaches to discover ribozinoindoles (or Rbins), potent and reversible triazinoindole-based inhibitors of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. Analyses of Rbin sensitivity and resistance conferring mutations in fission yeast, along with biochemical assays with recombinant proteins, provide evidence that Rbins' physiological target is Midasin, an essential ∼540-kDa AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein. Using Rbins to acutely inhibit or activate Midasin function, in parallel experiments with inhibitor-sensitive or inhibitor-resistant cells, we uncover Midasin's role in assembling Nsa1 particles, nucleolar precursors of the 60S subunit. Together, our findings demonstrate that Rbins are powerful probes for eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Eukaryotic ribosomes that lack a 5.8S RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.8S ribosomal RNA is believed to be a universal eukaryotic characteristic. It has no (size) counterpart among the prokaryotes, although its sequence is homologous with the first 150 or so nucleotides of the prokaryotic large subunit (23S) ribosomal RNA. An exception to this rule is reported here. The microsporidian Vairimorpha necatrix is a eukaryote that has no 5.8S rRNA. As in the prokaryotes, it has a single large subunit rRNA, whose 5-prime region corresponds to the 5.8S rRNA.

  16. [Positioning of mRNA 3' of the a site bound codon on the human 80S ribosome].

    PubMed

    Molotkov, M V; Graĭfer, D M; Demeshkina, N A; Repkova, M N; Ven'iaminova, A G; Karpova, G G

    2005-01-01

    Short mRNA analogues carrying a UUU triplet at the 5'-termini and a perfluorophenylazide group at either the N7 atom of the guanosine or the C5 atom of the uridine 3' of the triplet were applied to study positioning of mRNA 3' of the A site codon. Complexes of 80S ribosomes with the mRNA analogues were obtained in the presence of tRNAPhe that directed UUU codon to the P site and consequently provided placement of the nucleotide with cross-linker in positions +9 or +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site bound codon. Both types mRNA analogues cross-linked to the 18S rRNA and 40S proteins under mild UV-irradiation. Cross-linking patterns in the complexes where modified nucleotides of the mRNA analogues were in position +7 were analyzed for comparison (cross-linking to the 18S rRNA in such complexes has been studied previously). The efficiency of cross-linking to the ribosomal components depended on the nature of the modified nucleotide in the mRNA analogue and its position on the ribosome, extent of cross-linking to the 18S rRNA being decreased drastically when the modified nucleotide was moved from position +7 to position +12. The nucleotides of 18S rRNA cross-linked to mRNA analogues were determined. Modified nucleotides in positions +9 and +12 cross-linked to the invariant dinucleotide A1824/A1825 and to variable A1823 in the 3'-minidomain of 18S rRNA as well as to protein S15. The same ribosomal components have been found earlier to cross-link to modified mRNA nucleotides in positions from +4 to +7. Besides, all mRNA analogues cross-linked to the invariant nucleotide c1698 in the 3'-minidomain and to and the conserved region 605-620 closing helix 18 in the 5'-domain.

  17. Eukaryote-specific motif of ribosomal protein S15 neighbors A site codon during elongation and termination of translation.

    PubMed

    Khairulina, Julia; Graifer, Dmitri; Bulygin, Konstantin; Ven'yaminova, Aliya; Frolova, Ludmila; Karpova, Galina

    2010-07-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal protein S15 is a key component of the decoding site in contrast to its prokaryotic counterpart, S19p, which is located away from the mRNA binding track on the ribosome. Here, we determined the oligopeptide of S15 neighboring the A site mRNA codon on the human 80S ribosome with the use of mRNA analogues bearing perfluorophenyl azide-modified nucleotides in the sense or stop codon targeted to the 80S ribosomal A site. The protein was cross-linked to mRNA analogues in specific ribosomal complexes that were obtained in the presence of eRF1 in the experiments with mRNAs bearing stop codon. Digestion of modified S15 with various specific proteolytic agents followed by identification of the resulting modified oligopeptides showed that cross-link was in C-terminal fragment in positions 131-145, most probably, in decapeptide 131-PGIGATHSSR-140. The position of cross-linking site on the S15 protein did not depend on the nature of the A site-bound codon (sense or stop codon) and on the presence of polypeptide chain release factor eRF1 in the ribosomal complexes with mRNA analogues bearing a stop codon. The results indicate an involvement of the mentioned decapeptide in the formation of the ribosomal decoding site during elongation and termination of translation. Alignment of amino acid sequences of eukaryotic S15 and its prokaryotic counterpart, S19p from eubacteria and archaea, revealed that decapeptide PGIGATHSSR in positions 131-140 is strongly conserved in eukaryotes and has minor variations in archaea but has no homology with any sequence in C-terminal part of eubacterial S19p, which suggests involvement of the decapeptide in the translation process in a eukaryote-specific manner.

  18. Effects of cations and cosolvents on eukaryotic ribosomal subunit conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.N.; Spremulli, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of various cations and cosolvents on the conformation of wheat germ ribosomes and ribosomal subunits have been investigated by using the techniques of circular dichroism and differential hydrogen exchange. A class of hydrogens on both the 40S and 60S subunits exchange out more rapidly as the Mg/sup 2 +/ concentration is raised, indicating that Mg/sup 2 +/ causes a change in subunit conformation. Ca/sup 2 +/ and the polyamines produce a similar increase in the rate of hydrogen exchange. These results suggest that increases in cation concentrations permit a tightening of ribosome structure and a greater degree of internalization of the rRNA. The cosolvent glycerol causes an alteration in the CD spectrum of 80S ribosomes in both the nucleic acid and protein portions of the spectrum. Glycerol also causes a decrease in the rate of exchange of a number of hydrogens on both the 40S and 60S subunits. These results are interpreted to mean that glycerol favors a more native, less denatured structure in the ribosome.

  19. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  20. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth.

  1. Tying up loose ends: ribosome recycling in eukaryotes and archaea.

    PubMed

    Nürenberg, Elina; Tampé, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome recycling is the final - or first - step of the cyclic process of mRNA translation. In eukaryotes and archaea, dissociation of the two ribosomal subunits proceeds in a fundamentally different way than in bacteria. It requires the ABC-type ATPase ABCE1 [previously named RNase L inhibitor (Rli)1 or host protein (HP)68], but the reaction and its regulation remain enigmatic. Here, we focus on ribosome recycling in its physiological context, including translation termination and reinitiation. The regulation of this crucial event can only be described by a systems biology approach, involving a network of proteins modulating mRNA translation. The key role of ABCE1, and what is known about the structure and function of this versatile protein, is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  3. Prefabrication of a ribosomal protein subcomplex essential for eukaryotic ribosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Cohue; Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Chang, Yiming; Panse, Vikram G

    2016-01-01

    Spatial clustering of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) through tertiary interactions is a striking structural feature of the eukaryotic ribosome. However, the functional importance of these intricate inter-connections, and how they are established is currently unclear. Here, we reveal that a conserved ATPase, Fap7, organizes interactions between neighboring r-proteins uS11 and eS26 prior to their delivery to the earliest ribosome precursor, the 90S. In vitro, uS11 only when bound to Fap7 becomes competent to recruit eS26 through tertiary contacts found between these r-proteins on the mature ribosome. Subsequently, Fap7 ATPase activity unloads the uS11:eS26 subcomplex onto its rRNA binding site, and therefore ensures stoichiometric integration of these r-proteins into the 90S. Fap7-depletion in vivo renders uS11 susceptible to proteolysis, and precludes eS26 incorporation into the 90S. Thus, prefabrication of a native-like r-protein subcomplex drives efficient and accurate construction of the eukaryotic ribosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21755.001 PMID:27929371

  4. Selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS)-binding protein 2 alters conformational dynamics of residues involved in tRNA accommodation in 80 S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Caban, Kelvin; Copeland, Paul R

    2012-03-23

    Sec-tRNA(Sec) is site-specifically delivered at defined UGA codons in selenoprotein mRNAs. This recoding event is specified by the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element and requires the selenocysteine (Sec)-specific elongation factor, eEFSec, and the SECIS binding protein, SBP2. Sec-tRNA(Sec) is delivered to the ribosome by eEFSec-GTP, but this ternary complex is not sufficient for Sec incorporation, indicating that its access to the ribosomal A-site is regulated. SBP2 stably associates with ribosomes, and mutagenic analysis indicates that this interaction is essential for Sec incorporation. However, the ribosomal function of SBP2 has not been elucidated. To shed light on the functional relevance of the SBP2-ribosome interaction, we screened the functional centers of the 28 S rRNA in translationally competent 80 S ribosomes using selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). We demonstrate that SBP2 specifically alters the reactivity of specific residues in Helix 89 (H89) and expansion segment 31 (ES31). These results are indicative of a conformational change in response to SBP2 binding. Based on the known functions of H89 during translation, we propose that SBP2 allows Sec incorporation by either promoting Sec-tRNA(Sec) accommodation into the peptidyltransferase center and/or by stimulating the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of eEFSec.

  5. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5′ UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5′ UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  6. A general procedure for the production of antibody reagents against eukaryotic ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Bottarelli, Lorena; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-08-01

    Despite recent progress in the structural and functional analysis of bacterial and archaeal ribosomes, the structure and biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosomes still awaits a detailed characterization. Ribosomal protein-specific antibodies would be valuable tools for such studies, but their production is commonly hindered by the poor expression and solubility of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in E. coli. We report here an improved general procedure for the over-production of recombinant eukaryotic ribosomal proteins and for the generation of the corresponding polyclonal antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of detection of the antibodies produced by this procedure are documented.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of ribosomal particles from the eukaryote Artemia.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuysen, P; Clauwaert, J

    1981-09-25

    Cytoplasmic ribosomes and their large and small subunits have been isolated from the brine shrimp Artemia, and their basic physicochemical properties have been determined. From measurements of their ratio of absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, phosphorus and protein content, buoyant density in a CsCl gradient, and density increment, values have been derived for their RNA content (49, 52, and 43 +/- 2%, respectively), absorbance coefficient at 260 nm (12.1, 2.8, and 10.5, +/- 0.4 ml/mg, respectively), and partial specific volume (0.63, 0.62, and 0.65 +/- 0.002 ml/g, respectively). Analytical boundary sedimentation has yielded their standard sedimentation coefficient (81, 59, and 38, +/- 1 S, respectively). Photon correlation spectroscopy of laser light scattered from centrifuged solutions has yielded their translational diffusion coefficients (1.41 +/- 0.02, 1.61 +/- 0.03, and 1.80 +/- 0.04 X 10(-7) cm2/s, respectively). Combinations of these data have yielded values for their molecular weight (3.85 +/- 0.2, 2.45 +/- 0.2, and 1.45 +/- 0.1 X 10(6), respectively), for the total molecular weight of the free acid form of their RNA (1.9 +/- 0.1, 1.27 +/- 0.08, and 0.62 +/- 0.04 X 10(6), respectively) and of their proteins (2.0 +/- 0.1, 1.2 +/- 0.1, and 0.83 +/- 0.08 X 10(6), respectively), for their frictional coefficient ratio (1.54 +/- 0.04, 1.58 +/- 0.05, and 1.66 +/- 0.06, respectively), for their hydrodynamic and dry particle volume and radius, and for their hydrodynamic solvation. All the results are highly consistent. The various intact ribosomal particles of Artemia have nearly the same solvation (1.7 g/g); in this respect they resemble Escherichia coli ribosomal particles; this finding contrasts, however, with the few published data on eukaryotic ribosomes. This work strengthens the basis for a comparative study and for a more detailed elucidation of the structure of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  8. The Functional Role of eL19 and eB12 Intersubunit Bridge in the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kisly, Ivan; Gulay, Suna P; Mäeorg, Uno; Dinman, Jonathan D; Remme, Jaanus; Tamm, Tiina

    2016-05-22

    During translation, the two eukaryotic ribosomal subunits remain associated through 17 intersubunit bridges, five of which are eukaryote specific. These are mainly localized to the peripheral regions and are believed to stabilize the structure of the ribosome. The functional importance of these bridges remains largely unknown. Here, the essentiality of the eukaryote-specific bridge eB12 has been investigated. The main component of this bridge is ribosomal protein eL19 that is composed of an N-terminal globular domain, a middle region, and a long C-terminal α-helix. The analysis of deletion mutants demonstrated that the globular domain and middle region of eL19 are essential for cell viability, most likely functioning in ribosome assembly. The eB12 bridge, formed by contacts between the C-terminal α-helix of eL19 and 18S rRNA in concert with additional stabilizing interactions involving either eS7 or uS17, is dispensable for viability. Nevertheless, eL19 mutants impaired in eB12 bridge formation displayed slow growth phenotypes, altered sensitivity/resistance to translational inhibitors, and enhanced hyperosmotic stress tolerance. Biochemical analyses determined that the eB12 bridge contributes to the stability of ribosome subunit interactions in vitro. 60S subunits containing eL19 variants defective in eB12 bridge formation failed to form 80S ribosomes regardless of Mg(2+) concentration. The reassociation of 40S and mutant 60S subunits was markedly improved in the presence of deacetylated tRNA, emphasizing the importance of tRNAs during the subunit association. We propose that the eB12 bridge plays an important role in subunit joining and in optimizing ribosome functionality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  10. Lateral transfer of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes: an emerging concern for molecular ecology of microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akinori; Toyofuku, Takashi; Takishita, Kiyotaka

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are widely utilized in depicting organismal diversity and distribution in a wide range of environments. Although a few cases of lateral transfer of rRNA genes between closely related prokaryotes have been reported, it remains to be reported from eukaryotes. Here, we report the first case of lateral transfer of eukaryotic rRNA genes. Two distinct sequences of the 18S rRNA gene were detected from a clonal culture of the stramenopile, Ciliophrys infusionum. One was clearly derived from Ciliophrys, but the other gene originated from a perkinsid alveolate. Genome-walking analyses revealed that this alveolate-type rRNA gene is immediately adjacent to two protein-coding genes (ubc12 and usp39), and the origin of both genes was shown to be a stramenopile (that is, Ciliophrys) in our phylogenetic analyses. These findings indicate that the alveolate-type rRNA gene is encoded on the Ciliophrys genome and that eukaryotic rRNA genes can be transferred laterally.

  11. Coordinated Ribosomal L4 Protein Assembly into the Pre-Ribosome Is Regulated by Its Eukaryote-Specific Extension.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Philipp; Huber, Ferdinand M; Kunze, Ruth; Flemming, Dirk; Hoelz, André; Hurt, Ed

    2015-06-04

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires nuclear import and hierarchical incorporation of ∼80 ribosomal proteins (RPs) into the ribosomal RNA core. In contrast to prokaryotes, many eukaryotic RPs possess long extensions that interdigitate in the mature ribosome. RpL4 is a prime example, with an ∼80-residue-long surface extension of unknown function. Here, we identify assembly chaperone Acl4 that initially binds the universally conserved internal loop of newly synthesized RpL4 via its superhelical TPR domain, thereby restricting RpL4 loop insertion at its cognate nascent rRNA site. RpL4 release from Acl4 is orchestrated with pre-ribosome assembly, during which the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension makes several distinct interactions with the 60S surface, including a co-evolved site on neighboring RpL18. Consequently, mutational inactivation of this contact site, on either RpL4 or RpL18, impairs RpL4-Acl4 disassembly and RpL4 pre-ribosome incorporation. We propose that hierarchical ribosome assembly can be achieved by eukaryotic RP extensions and dedicated assembly chaperones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Protein S3 in the human 80S ribosome adjoins mRNA from 3'-side of the A-site codon].

    PubMed

    Molotkov, M V; Graĭfer, D M; Popugaeva, E A; Bulygin, K N; Meshchaninova, M I; Ven'iaminova, A G; Karpova, G G

    2007-01-01

    The protein environment of mRNA 3' of the A-site codon (the decoding site) in the human 80S ribosome was studied using a set of oligoribonucleotide derivatives bearing a UUU triplet at the 5'-end and a perfluoroarylazide group at one of the nucleotide residues at the 3'-end of this triplet. Analogues of mRNA were phased into the ribosome using binding at the tRNAPhe P-site, which recognizes the UUU codon. Mild UV irradiation of ribosome complexes with tRNAPhe and mRNA analogues resulted in the predominant crosslinking of the analogues with the 40S subunit components, mainly with proteins and, to a lesser extent, with rRNA. Among the 40S subunit ribosomal proteins, the S3 protein was the main target for modification in all cases. In addition, minor crosslinking with the S2 protein was observed. The crosslinking with the S3 and S2 proteins occurred both in triple complexes and in the absence of tRNA. Within triple complexes, crosslinking with S15 protein was also found, its efficiency considerably falling when the modified nucleotide was moved from positions +5 to +12 relative to the first codon nucleotide in the P-site. In some cases, crosslinking with the S30 protein was observed, it was most efficient for the derivative containing a photoreactive group at the +7 adenosine residue. The results indicate that the S3 protein in the human ribosome plays a key role in the formation of the mRNA binding site 3' of the codon in the decoding site.

  13. Structures of Eukaryotic Ribosomal Stalk Proteins and Its Complex with Trichosanthin, and Their Implications in Recruiting Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins to the Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Andrew K. H.; Wong, Eddie C. K.; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA. PMID:25723321

  14. Structures of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins and its complex with trichosanthin, and their implications in recruiting ribosome-inactivating proteins to the ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew K H; Wong, Eddie C K; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-02-25

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA.

  15. Arrangement of mRNA 3' of the A site codon on the human 80S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Molotkov, Maxim; Graifer, Dmitri; Demeshkna, Natalia; Repkova, Marina; Ven'yaminova, Aliya; Karpova, Galina

    2005-04-01

    Positioning of mRNA 3' of the A site codon was studied with the use of short mRNA analogues carrying a UUU triplet at the 5'-termini and a perfluorophenylazide group at either the N7 atom of the guanosine or the C5 atom of the uridine 3' of the triplet. Modified nucleotides were directed to positions +7, +9 or +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon by tRNA(Phe) cognate to the UUU triplet targeted to the P site. Mild UV-irradiation resulted in cross-linking of the mRNA analogues to the 18S rRNA and to 40S proteins, the yield of cross-linking depending on the nature of the mRNA nucleotide bearing the modified group and its position on the ribosome. In addition, the yield of cross-linking to the 18S rRNA decreased strongly when the modified nucleotide was moved from position +7 to position +12. All the mRNA analogues cross-linked to the 18S rRNA nucleotides that had been found earlier at the decoding site, namely, to the invariant dinucleotide A1824/A1825 and the variable A1823 in the 3'-minidomain of the 18S rRNA, and also to the invariant nucleotide C1698 in the 3'-minidomain and the conserved region 605-620 in the apical region of helix 18 in the 5'-domain. The results indicate that (1) the mRNA makes a sharp turn between positions +6 and +7, (2) the triplet immediately 3' of the A site codon neighbors the 18S rRNA and proteins, and (3) the codon 3' of the triplet mentioned is surrounded mainly by proteins.

  16. Deletion of L4 domains reveals insights into the importance of ribosomal protein extensions in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2014-11-01

    Numerous ribosomal proteins have a striking bipartite architecture: a globular body positioned on the ribosomal exterior and an internal loop buried deep into the rRNA core. In eukaryotes, a significant number of conserved r-proteins have evolved extra amino- or carboxy-terminal tail sequences, which thread across the solvent-exposed surface. The biological importance of these extended domains remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the universally conserved internal loop and the eukaryote-specific extensions of yeast L4. We show that in contrast to findings with bacterial L4, deleting the internal loop of yeast L4 causes severely impaired growth and reduced levels of large ribosomal subunits. We further report that while depleting the entire L4 protein blocks early assembly steps in yeast, deletion of only its extended internal loop affects later steps in assembly, revealing a second role for L4 during ribosome biogenesis. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire eukaryote-specific carboxy-terminal tail of L4 has no effect on viability, production of 60S subunits, or translation. These unexpected observations provide impetus to further investigate the functions of ribosomal protein extensions, especially eukaryote-specific examples, in ribosome assembly and function. © 2014 Gamalinda and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. mRNA 3' of the A site bound codon is located close to protein S3 on the human 80S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Molotkov, Maxim V; Graifer, Dmitri M; Popugaeva, Elena A; Bulygin, Konstantin N; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Karpova, Galina G

    2006-07-01

    Ribosomal proteins neighboring the mRNA downstream of the codon bound at the decoding site of human 80S ribosomes were identified using three sets of mRNA analogues that contained a UUU triplet at the 5' terminus and a perfluorophenylazide cross-linker at guanosine, adenosine or uridine residues placed at various locations 3' of this triplet. The positions of modified mRNA nucleotides on the ribosome were governed by tRNA(Phe) cognate to the UUU triplet targeted to the P site. Upon mild UV-irradiation, the mRNA analogues cross-linked preferentially to the 40S subunit, to the proteins and to a lesser extent to the 18S rRNA. Cross-linked nucleotides of 18S rRNA were identified previously. In the present study, it is shown that among the proteins the main target for cross-linking with all the mRNA analogues tested was protein S3 (homologous to prokaryotic S3, S3p); minor cross-linking to protein S2 (S5p) was also detected. Both proteins cross-linked to mRNA analogues in the ternary complexes as well as in the binary complexes (without tRNA). In the ternary complexes protein S15 (S19p) also cross-linked, the yield of the cross-link decreased significantly when the modified nucleotide moved from position +5 to position +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site bound codon. In several ternary complexes minor cross-linking to protein S30 was likewise detected. The results of this study indicate that S3 is a key protein at the mRNA binding site neighboring mRNA downstream of the codon at the decoding site in the human ribosome.

  18. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L

    2014-01-15

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA-protein particles evolved.

  19. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA–protein particles evolved. PMID:24449272

  20. Interaction network of the ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile.

    PubMed

    Baßler, Jochen; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Kallas, Martina; Kornprobst, Markus; Calviño, Fabiola R; Gnädig, Marén; Thoms, Matthias; Stier, Gunter; Ismail, Sherif; Kharde, Satyavati; Castillo, Nestor; Griesel, Sabine; Bastuck, Sonja; Bradatsch, Bettina; Thomson, Emma; Flemming, Dirk; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotic cells is a highly dynamic and complex process innately linked to cell proliferation. The assembly of ribosomes is driven by a myriad of biogenesis factors that shape pre-ribosomal particles by processing and folding the ribosomal RNA and incorporating ribosomal proteins. Biochemical approaches allowed the isolation and characterization of pre-ribosomal particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which lead to a spatiotemporal map of biogenesis intermediates along the path from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. Here, we cloned almost the entire set (∼180) of ribosome biogenesis factors from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum in order to perform an in-depth analysis of their protein-protein interaction network as well as exploring the suitability of these thermostable proteins for structural studies. First, we performed a systematic screen, testing about 80 factors for crystallization and structure determination. Next, we performed a yeast 2-hybrid analysis and tested about 32,000 binary combinations, which identified more than 1000 protein-protein contacts between the thermophilic ribosome assembly factors. To exemplary verify several of these interactions, we performed biochemical reconstitution with the focus on the interaction network between 90S pre-ribosome factors forming the ctUTP-A and ctUTP-B modules, and the Brix-domain containing assembly factors of the pre-60S subunit. Our work provides a rich resource for biochemical reconstitution and structural analyses of the conserved ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  1. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  2. Roles of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in maturation and transport of pre-18S rRNA and ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Pöll, Gisela; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2005-10-28

    Despite the rising knowledge about ribosome function and structure and how ribosomal subunits assemble in vitro in bacteria, the in vivo role of many ribosomal proteins remains obscure both in pro- and eukaryotes. Our systematic analysis of yeast ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the small subunit revealed that most eukaryotic r-proteins fulfill different roles in ribosome biogenesis, making them indispensable for growth. Different r-proteins control distinct steps of nuclear and cytoplasmic pre-18S rRNA processing and, thus, ensure that only properly assembled ribosomes become engaged in translation. Comparative analysis of dynamic and steady-state maturation assays revealed that several r-proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of pre-18S rRNA, suggesting that they form an interaction platform with the export machinery. In contrast, the presence of other r-proteins is mainly required before nuclear export is initiated. Our studies draw a correlation between the in vitro assembly, structural localization, and in vivo function of r-proteins.

  3. [Part of the matrix on the 5' side from codon in the E-segment is close to protein S26 on the human 80S ribosome].

    PubMed

    Molotkov, M V; Graĭfer, D M; Eremina, A V; Ivanov, A V; Laletina, E S; Repkova, M N; Ven'iaminova, A G; Karpova, G G

    2004-01-01

    Positioning of mRNA on the 80S ribosome upstream the E site bound codon was studied using derivatives of nona- and dodecaribonucleotides containing the triplet UUU coding for Phe at the 3'-terminus, and a perfluorophenylazide cross-linker on either the first or the third nucleotide. Two sets of the mRNA analogues were used, with the photoactivatable groups on either the C5 atom of the uridine or the N7 atom of the guanosine. The modified nucleotides were directed to positions from -4 to -9 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site bound codon by tRNA(Phe) cognate to the triplet UUU targeted to the P site. Mild UV-irradiation of ribosomecomplexes with tRNA(Phe) and mRNA analogues resulted in the cross-linking to the 40S subunits preferentially, mainly to the proteins. The principal target for the cross-linking was protein S26 in all cases. Location of the photoactivatable group on the nucleotide at position -4 lead also to the minor cross-linking to protein S3, and at position -6 to protein S14. In the absence of tRNA, all mRNA analogues cross-linked to protein S3.

  4. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  5. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of ribosomes in a eukaryotic system: Is there a facilitated transport process

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna-Gupta, A.; Ware, V.C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have examined the kinetics of the process by which ribosomes are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm using Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected into the germinal vesicle with radiolabeled ribosomes or ribosomal subunits from X. laevis, Tetrahymena thermophila, or Escherichia coli. Microinjected eukaryotic mature ribosomes are redistributed into the oocyte cytoplasm by an apparent carrier-mediated transport process that exhibits saturation kinetics as increasing amounts of ribosomes are injected. T. thermophila ribosomes are competent to traverse the Xenopus nuclear envelope, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying ribosome transport is evolutionarily conserved. Microinjected E. coli ribosomes are not transported in this system, indicating that prokaryotic ribosomes lack the signals required for transport. Surprisingly, coinjected small (40S) and large (60S) subunits from T. thermophila are transported significantly faster than individual subunits. These observations support a facilitated transport model for the translocation of ribosomal subunits as separate units across the nuclear envelope whereby the transport rate of 60S or 40S subunits is enhanced by the presence of the partner subunit. Although the basic features of the transport mechanism have been preserved through evolution, other aspects of the process may be mediated through species-specific interactions. They hypothesize that a species-specific nuclear 40S-60S subunit association may expedite the transport of individual subunits across the nuclear envelope.

  6. A Small-Molecule Anti-secretagogue of PCSK9 Targets the 80S Ribosome to Inhibit PCSK9 Protein Translation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Donna N; Hawkins, Julie; Ruangsiriluk, Wanida; Stevens, Kimberly A; Maguire, Bruce A; O'Connell, Thomas N; Rocke, Benjamin N; Boehm, Markus; Ruggeri, Roger B; Rolph, Tim; Hepworth, David; Loria, Paula M; Carpino, Philip A

    2016-11-17

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a secreted protein that downregulates low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R) levels on the surface of hepatocytes, resulting in decreased clearance of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Phenotypic screening of a small-molecule compound collection was used to identify an inhibitor of PCSK9 secretion, (R)-N-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(piperidin-3-yl)propanamide (R-IMPP), which was shown to stimulate uptake of LDL-C in hepatoma cells by increasing LDL-R levels, without altering levels of secreted transferrin. Systematic investigation of the mode of action revealed that R-IMPP did not decrease PCSK9 transcription or increase PCSK9 degradation, but instead caused transcript-dependent inhibition of PCSK9 translation. In support of this surprising mechanism of action, we found that R-IMPP was able to selectively bind to human, but not E. coli, ribosomes. This study opens a new avenue for the development of drugs that modulate the activity of target proteins by mechanisms involving inhibition of eukaryotic translation.

  7. Eukaryotic rpL10 drives ribosomal rotation.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Sergey O; Gülay, Suna P; Anjos, Margarida; Patchett, Stephanie; Meskauskas, Arturas; Johnson, Arlen W; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2014-02-01

    Ribosomes transit between two conformational states, non-rotated and rotated, through the elongation cycle. Here, we present evidence that an internal loop in the essential yeast ribosomal protein rpL10 is a central controller of this process. Mutations in this loop promote opposing effects on the natural equilibrium between these two extreme conformational states. rRNA chemical modification analyses reveals allosteric interactions involved in coordinating intersubunit rotation originating from rpL10 in the core of the large subunit (LSU) through both subunits, linking all the functional centers of the ribosome. Mutations promoting rotational disequilibria showed catalytic, biochemical and translational fidelity defects. An rpL3 mutation promoting opposing structural and biochemical effects, suppressed an rpL10 mutant, re-establishing rotational equilibrium. The rpL10 loop is also involved in Sdo1p recruitment, suggesting that rotational status is important for ensuring late-stage maturation of the LSU, supporting a model in which pre-60S subunits undergo a 'test drive' before final maturation.

  8. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 Ramesh and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Engineering of ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural and artificial bacterial riboswitches have been reported thus far. However, they generally function only in bacteria, not in eukaryotes. This is because of the differences of expression mechanisms (transcription, translation, and so on) between these two main types of organisms. For example, the mechanism of translation initiation is quite different between bacteria and eukaryotes, especially in ribosome loading on mRNA. While the bacterial ribosome binds to a well-conserved, internal sequence some bases before the start codon to initiate translation, the eukaryotic one is loaded on the 5' terminus with the help of certain eukaryotic initiation factors. This means not only that bacterial riboswitches regulating translation initiation are not available in eukaryotic translation systems, but also that it is physically difficult to construct eukaryotic ON riboswitches that regulate the eukaryotic canonical translation initiation, because an aptamer cannot be inserted upstream of the ribosome loading site. However, the mechanism of noncanonical translation initiation via "ribosomal shunt" enables us to design translation initiation-modulating (specifically, ribosomal shunt-modulating) eukaryotic ON riboswitches. This chapter describes a facile method for engineering these ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system. Because these riboswitches do not require hybridization switching thanks to a unique shunting mechanism, they have the major advantages of a low energy requirement for upregulation and relatively straightforward design over common hybridization switch-based ON riboswitches. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of the yeast and rabbit 80 S ribosome reveals the topology of the nascent chain exit tunnel, inter-subunit bridges and mammalian rRNA expansion segments.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D G; Ménétret, J F; Radermacher, M; Neuhof, A; Akey, I V; Rapoport, T A; Akey, C W

    2000-08-11

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is mediated by both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound ribosomes. During the co-translational translocation of secretory and membrane proteins, eukaryotic ribosomes dock with the protein conducting channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. An understanding of these processes will require the detailed structure of a eukaryotic ribosome. To this end, we have compared the three-dimensional structures of yeast and rabbit ribosomes at 24 A resolution. In general, we find that the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation have been highly conserved. It is interesting that a channel was visualized in the neck of the small subunit whose entrance is formed by a deep groove. By analogy with the prokaryotic small subunit, this channel may provide a conserved portal through which mRNA is threaded into the decoding center. In addition, both the small and large subunits are built around a dense tubular network. Our analysis further suggests that the nascent chain exit tunnel and the docking surface for the endoplasmic reticulum channel are formed by this network. We surmise that many of these features correspond to rRNA, based on biochemical and structural data. Ribosomal function is critically dependent on the specific association of small and large subunits. Our analysis of eukaryotic ribosomes reveals four conserved inter-subunit bridges with a geometry similar to that found in prokaryotes. In particular, a double-bridge connects the small subunit platform with the interface canyon on the large subunit. Moreover, a novel bridge is formed between the platform and the base of the L1 domain. Finally, size differences between mammalian and yeast large subunit rRNAs have been correlated with five expansion segments that form two large spines and three extended fingers. Overall, we find that expansion segments within the large subunit rRNA have been incorporated at positions distinct from the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation.

  11. Combined eukaryotic and bacterial community fingerprinting of natural freshwater biofilms using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Lise C; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Gaubert, Philippe; Bouchez, Théodore; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2010-12-01

    Biofilms are complex communities playing an important role in aquatic ecosystems. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) has been used successfully to explore biofilm bacterial diversity. However, a gap remains to be filled as regards its application to biofilm eukaryotic populations. The aim of this study is to use ARISA to detect eukaryotic population shifts in biofilm. We designed a new set of primers to focus specifically on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of diatoms and tested it on natural biofilms. Additionally, we tested universal primers, used previously to perform ARISA on fungal communities. Cloning and sequencing showed that the universal primer set amplified various eukaryotes, whereas the new set was diatom specific. The new set amplified a wider variety of diatoms. Therefore, the universal set is appropriate to study the general eukaryotic population shifts in biofilms, whereas the new set is more appropriate to study diatoms specifically. We used both primer sets, along with a bacterial set, to study the population shifts in natural river biofilms. Principal component analysis of the ARISA fingerprints revealed seasonal shifts that did not coincide for bacterial and eukaryotic communities. Therefore, the use of both eukaryotic and bacterial primers provides a useful insight to assess microbial succession in biofilms.

  12. The bacterial toxin RelE induces specific mRNA cleavage in the A site of the eukaryote ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Terenin, Ilya; Dmitriev, Sergey; Ehrenberg, Måns; Shatsky, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    RelE/RelB is a well-characterized toxin–anti-toxin pair involved in nutritional stress responses in Bacteria and Archae. RelE lacks any eukaryote homolog, but we demonstrate here that it efficiently and specifically cleaves mRNA in the A site of the eukaryote ribosome. The cleavage mechanism is similar to that in bacteria, showing the feasibility of A-site cleavage of mRNA for regulatory purposes also in eukaryotes. RelE cleavage in the A-site codon of a stalled eukaryote ribosome is precise and easily monitored, making “RelE printing” a useful complement to toeprinting to determine the exact mRNA location on the eukaryote ribosome and to probe the occupancy of its A site. PMID:18083838

  13. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  14. Eukaryotic Cells Producing Ribosomes Deficient in Rpl1 Are Hypersensitive to Defects in the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Kerri B.; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132. PMID:21858174

  15. Eukaryotic cells producing ribosomes deficient in Rpl1 are hypersensitive to defects in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Kerri B; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M; Warner, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132.

  16. Insights into the mechanisms of eukaryotic translation gained with ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitry E.; O'Connor, Patrick B. F.; Loughran, Gary; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2017-01-01

    The development of Ribosome Profiling (RiboSeq) has revolutionized functional genomics. RiboSeq is based on capturing and sequencing of the mRNA fragments enclosed within the translating ribosome and it thereby provides a ‘snapshot’ of ribosome positions at the transcriptome wide level. Although the method is predominantly used for analysis of differential gene expression and discovery of novel translated ORFs, the RiboSeq data can also be a rich source of information about molecular mechanisms of polypeptide synthesis and translational control. This review will focus on how recent findings made with RiboSeq have revealed important details of the molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes. These include mRNA translation sensitivity to drugs affecting translation initiation and elongation, the roles of upstream ORFs in response to stress, the dynamics of elongation and termination as well as details of intrinsic ribosome behavior on the mRNA after translation termination. As the RiboSeq method is still at a relatively early stage we will also discuss the implications of RiboSeq artifacts on data interpretation. PMID:27923997

  17. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  18. Asc1p/RACK1 Connects Ribosomes to Eukaryotic Phosphosignaling.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kerstin; Smolinski, Nadine; Neumann, Piotr; Schmaul, Samantha; Hofer-Pretz, Verena; Braus, Gerhard H; Valerius, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    WD40 repeat proteins fold into characteristic β-propeller structures and control signaling circuits during cellular adaptation processes within eukaryotes. The RACK1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Asc1p, consists exclusively of a single seven-bladed β-propeller that operates from the ribosomal base at the head region of the 40S subunit. Here we show that the R38D K40E ribosomal binding-compromised variant (Asc1DEp) is severely destabilized through mutation of phosphosite T143 to a dephosphorylation-mimicking alanine, probably through proteasomal degradation, leading to asc1(-) phenotypes. Phosphosite Y250 contributes to resistance to translational inhibitors but does not influence Asc1DEp stability. Beyond its own phosphorylation at T143, Y250, and other sites, Asc1p heavily influences the phosphorylation of as many as 90 proteins at 120 sites. Many of these proteins are regulators of fundamental processes ranging from mRNA translation to protein transport and turnover, cytoskeleton organization, and cellular signaling. Our data expose Asc1p/RACK1 as a key factor in phosphosignaling and manifest it as a control point at the head of the ribosomal 40S subunit itself regulated through posttranslational modification. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  20. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  1. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-09-06

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1-Utp21, Utp12-Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data.

  2. A functional involvement of ABCE1, eukaryotic ribosome recycling factor, in nonstop mRNA decay in Drosophila melanogaster cells.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Isao; Takahashi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Yoshifumi; Sakota, Eri; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Inada, Toshifumu

    2014-11-01

    When ribosomes encounter mRNAs lacking stop codons, two quality-control machineries, NSD for nonstop mRNA decay and ribosome quality control (RQC) for co-translational degradation of the nonstop protein by the proteasome, are triggered to eliminate aberrant molecules. In yeast, it is known that Dom34 (a homolog of eRF1) and Ltn1 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase) play crucial roles in NSD and RQC, respectively, by triggering ribosome rescue at the 3' end of nonstop mRNAs and proteasome-dependent polypeptide degradation. Here we confirmed the essential role of Ltn1 in RQC for nonstop products in Drosophila cells, and further uncovered a functional role of ABCE1, a eukaryotic ribosome recycling factor, in NSD in Drosophila cells.

  3. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  4. Characterization of Anti-Citrinin Specific ScFvs Selected from Non-Immunized Mouse Splenocytes by Eukaryotic Ribosome Display

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Haiwei; Chen, Yifei; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xueqiu; Guo, Xiaolu; Du, Aifang

    2015-01-01

    Single chain variable fragments (scFvs) against citrinin (CIT) were selected from a scFv library constructed from the splenocytes of non-immunized mice by an improved eukaryotic ribosome display technology in this study. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)/ CIT-BSA and ovalbumin (OVA)/ CIT-OVA were used as the antigens to select specific anti-CIT scFvs. Eukaryotic in situ RT-PCR method was used to recover the selected mRNA after every affinity selection. After six rounds of ribosome display, expression vector pTIG-TRX carrying specific scFv DNAs were constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) for protein expression. Thirteen positive clones were selected out of which three (designated 23, 68 and 109) showed high binding activity and specificity to CIT by indirect ELISA, while no clone showed binding activity with carrier proteins. The three scFvs showed high specificity to CIT and the cross reactivity with other mycotoxins was below 0.01% as determined by indirect competitive ELISA. These specific scFvs offer a potential novel immunoassay method for CIT residues. This study confirmed the effectiveness of the improved eukaryotic ribosome display system and could be used as a reference for the selection of scFvs specific to other small molecules using ribosome display. PMID:26131718

  5. Insights into remodeling events during eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit assembly provided by high resolution cryo-EM structures.

    PubMed

    Biedka, Stephanie; Wu, Shan; LaPeruta, Amber J; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2017-03-07

    Ribosomes are responsible for translating the genome, in the form of mRNA, into the proteome in all organisms. Biogenesis of ribosomes in eukaryotes is a complex process involving numerous remodeling events driven in part by the concerted actions of hundreds of protein assembly factors. A major challenge in studying eukaryotic ribosome assembly has, until recently, been a lack of structural data to facilitate understanding of the conformational and compositional changes the pre-ribosome undergoes during its construction. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has begun filling these gaps; recent advances in cryo-EM have enabled the determination of several high resolution pre-ribosome structures. This review focuses mainly on lessons learned from the study of pre-60S particles purified from yeast using the assembly factor Nog2 as bait. These Nog2 particles provide insight into many aspects of nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly, including construction of major 60S subunit functional centers and processing of the ITS2 spacer RNA.

  6. Transcriptome-wide studies uncover the diversity of modes of mRNA recruitment to eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shatsky, Ivan N; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Andreev, Dmitri E; Terenin, Ilya M

    2014-01-01

    The conventional paradigm of translation initiation in eukaryotes states that the cap-binding protein complex eIF4F (consisting of eIF4E, eIF4G and eIF4A) plays a central role in the recruitment of capped mRNAs to ribosomes. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that this paradigm should be revised. This review summarizes the data which have been mostly accumulated in a post-genomic era owing to revolutionary techniques of transcriptome-wide analysis. Unexpectedly, these techniques have uncovered remarkable diversity in the recruitment of cellular mRNAs to eukaryotic ribosomes. These data enable a preliminary classification of mRNAs into several groups based on their requirement for particular components of eIF4F. They challenge the widely accepted concept which relates eIF4E-dependence to the extent of secondary structure in the 5' untranslated regions of mRNAs. Moreover, some mRNA species presumably recruit ribosomes to their 5' ends without the involvement of either the 5' m(7)G-cap or eIF4F but instead utilize eIF4G or eIF4G-like auxiliary factors. The long-standing concept of internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-elements in cellular mRNAs is also discussed.

  7. GTP-independent tRNA Delivery to the Ribosomal P-site by a Novel Eukaryotic Translation Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Ivanov, Pavel A.; Dunaevsky, Jacov E.; Merrick, William C.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2010-01-01

    During translation, aminoacyl-tRNAs are delivered to the ribosome by specialized GTPases called translation factors. Here, we report the tRNA binding to the P-site of 40 S ribosomes by a novel GTP-independent factor eIF2D isolated from mammalian cells. The binding of tRNAiMet occurs after the AUG codon finds its position in the P-site of 40 S ribosomes, the situation that takes place during initiation complex formation on the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site or on some other specific RNAs (leaderless mRNA and A-rich mRNAs with relaxed scanning dependence). Its activity in tRNA binding with 40 S subunits does not require the presence of the aminoacyl moiety. Moreover, the factor possesses the unique ability to deliver non-Met (elongator) tRNAs into the P-site of the 40 S subunit. The corresponding gene is found in all eukaryotes and includes an SUI1 domain present also in translation initiation factor eIF1. The versatility of translation initiation strategies in eukaryotes is discussed. PMID:20566627

  8. Architecture of the 90S Pre-ribosome: A Structural View on the Birth of the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, Markus; Turk, Martin; Kellner, Nikola; Cheng, Jingdong; Flemming, Dirk; Koš-Braun, Isabelle; Koš, Martin; Thoms, Matthias; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-07-14

    The 90S pre-ribosome is an early biogenesis intermediate formed during co-transcriptional ribosome formation, composed of ∼70 assembly factors and several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that associate with nascent pre-rRNA. We report the cryo-EM structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum 90S pre-ribosome, revealing how a network of biogenesis factors including 19 β-propellers and large α-solenoid proteins engulfs the pre-rRNA. Within the 90S pre-ribosome, we identify the UTP-A, UTP-B, Mpp10-Imp3-Imp4, Bms1-Rcl1, and U3 snoRNP modules, which are organized around 5'-ETS and partially folded 18S rRNA. The U3 snoRNP is strategically positioned at the center of the 90S particle to perform its multiple tasks during pre-rRNA folding and processing. The architecture of the elusive 90S pre-ribosome gives unprecedented structural insight into the early steps of pre-rRNA maturation. Nascent rRNA that is co-transcriptionally folded and given a particular shape by encapsulation within a dedicated mold-like structure is reminiscent of how polypeptides use chaperone chambers for their protein folding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Competition between trichodermin and several other sesquiterpene antibiotics for binding to their receptor site(s) on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, M; Jimenez, A; Vazquez, D

    1976-01-01

    1. Of the five sesquiterpene antibiotics tested and found to inhibit protein synthesis in yeast spheroplasts, trichothecin, trichodermol or trichodermin stabilized polyribosomes whereas, in contrast, verrucarin A or T-2 toxin induced 'run off' of polyribosomes with a corresponding increase in 80S monoribosomes. The effect of fusarenon X on the system could not be determined as the drug failed to enter the cells. 2. [acetyl-14C]Trichodermin bound to yeast polyribosomes with a dissociation constant of 2.10 muM and to yeast 'run off' ribosomes with a dissociation constant of 0.72 muM. 3. Trichothecin, trichodermol, fusarenon X, T-2 toxin and verrucarin A competed with [acetyl-14C]trichodermin for binding to its receptor site on 'run off' ribosomes. The observed competition was quantitatively similar for all drugs tested. In contrast, the five drugs competed to different extents with trichodermin for binding to its receptor site on polyribosomes. Thus trichothecin competed with relative efficiency, whereas verrucarin A competed poorly, and the other drugs occupied intermediate positions between these two extremes. 4. Studies were also carried out with yeast 'run off' ribosomes prepared from both a wild-type strain and a strain resistant to trichodermin. Competition experiments between verrucarin A and [3H]anisomycin indicated that verrucarin A bound to 'run off' ribosomes from the mutant strain less efficiently than to those from the wild-type. PMID:795427

  10. Characterization of hibernating ribosomes in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mithu; Mullins, Michael R; Yuan, Celvie L; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Merrick, William C; Komar, Anton A

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis across kingdoms involves the assembly of 70S (prokaryotes) or 80S (eukaryotes) ribosomes on the mRNAs to be translated. 70S ribosomes are protected from degradation in bacteria during stationary growth or stress conditions by forming dimers that migrate in polysome profiles as 100S complexes. Formation of ribosome dimers in Escherichia coli is mediated by proteins, namely the ribosome modulation factor (RMF), which is induced in the stationary phase of cell growth. It is reported here a similar ribosomal complex of 110S in eukaryotic cells, which forms during nutrient starvation. The dynamic nature of the 110S ribosomal complex (mammalian equivalent of the bacterial 100S) was supported by the rapid conversion into polysomes upon nutrient-refeeding via a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of translation initiation. Several experiments were used to show that the 110S complex is a dimer of nontranslating ribosomes. Cryo-electron microscopy visualization of the 110S complex revealed that two 80S ribosomes are connected by a flexible, albeit localized, interaction. We conclude that, similarly to bacteria, rat cells contain stress-induced ribosomal dimers. The identification of ribosomal dimers in rat cells will bring new insights in our thinking of the ribosome structure and its function during the cellular response to stress conditions. PMID:21768774

  11. Characterization of hibernating ribosomes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Krokowski, Dawid; Gaccioli, Francesca; Majumder, Mithu; Mullins, Michael R; Yuan, Celvie L; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Merrick, William C; Komar, Anton A; Taylor, Derek; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2011-08-15

    Protein synthesis across kingdoms involves the assembly of 70S (prokaryotes) or 80S (eukaryotes) ribosomes on the mRNAs to be translated. 70S ribosomes are protected from degradation in bacteria during stationary growth or stress conditions by forming dimers that migrate in polysome profiles as 100S complexes. Formation of ribosome dimers in Escherichia coli is mediated by proteins, namely the ribosome modulation factor (RMF), which is induced in the stationary phase of cell growth. It is reported here a similar ribosomal complex of 110S in eukaryotic cells, which forms during nutrient starvation. The dynamic nature of the 110S ribosomal complex (mammalian equivalent of the bacterial 100S) was supported by the rapid conversion into polysomes upon nutrient-refeeding via a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of translation initiation. Several experiments were used to show that the 110S complex is a dimer of nontranslating ribosomes. Cryo-electron microscopy visualization of the 110S complex revealed that two 80S ribosomes are connected by a flexible, albeit localized, interaction. We conclude that, similarly to bacteria, rat cells contain stress-induced ribosomal dimers. The identification of ribosomal dimers in rat cells will bring new insights in our thinking of the ribosome structure and its function during the cellular response to stress conditions.

  12. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process.

  13. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process. PMID:27099964

  14. A possible tertiary rRNA interaction between expansion segments ES3 and ES6 in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    ALKEMAR, GUNNAR; NYGÅRD, ODD

    2003-01-01

    Eukaryotic 16S-like ribosomal RNAs contain 12 so-called expansion segments, i.e., sequences not included in the RNA secondary structure core common to eubacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Two of these expansion segments, ES3 and ES6, are juxtaposed in the recent three-dimensional model of the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit. We have analyzed ES3 and ES6 sequences from more than 2900 discrete eukaryotic species, for possible sequence complementarity between the two expansion segments. The data show that ES3 and ES6 could interact by forming a helix consisting of seven to nine contiguous base pairs in almost all analyzed species. We, therefore, suggest that ES3 and ES6 form a direct RNA–RNA contact in the ribosome. PMID:12554872

  15. A possible tertiary rRNA interaction between expansion segments ES3 and ES6 in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2003-01-01

    Eukaryotic 16S-like ribosomal RNAs contain 12 so-called expansion segments, i.e., sequences not included in the RNA secondary structure core common to eubacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Two of these expansion segments, ES3 and ES6, are juxtaposed in the recent three-dimensional model of the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit. We have analyzed ES3 and ES6 sequences from more than 2900 discrete eukaryotic species, for possible sequence complementarity between the two expansion segments. The data show that ES3 and ES6 could interact by forming a helix consisting of seven to nine contiguous base pairs in almost all analyzed species. We, therefore, suggest that ES3 and ES6 form a direct RNA-RNA contact in the ribosome.

  16. Amicoumacin A induces cancer cell death by targeting the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorova, Irina V.; Akulich, Kseniya A.; Makeeva, Desislava S.; Osterman, Ilya A.; Skvortsov, Dmitry A.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    Amicoumacin A is an antibiotic that was recently shown to target bacterial ribosomes. It affects translocation and provides an additional contact interface between the ribosomal RNA and mRNA. The binding site of amicoumacin A is formed by universally conserved nucleotides of rRNA. In this work, we showed that amicoumacin A inhibits translation in yeast and mammalian systems by affecting translation elongation. We determined the structure of the amicoumacin A complex with yeast ribosomes at a resolution of 3.1  Å. Toxicity measurement demonstrated that human cancer cell lines are more susceptible to the inhibition by this compound as compared to non-cancerous ones. This might be used as a starting point to develop amicoumacin A derivatives with clinical value. PMID:27296282

  17. Use of Eukaryotic Native Small Ribosomal Subunits for the Translation of Globin Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Freienstein, Christoph; Blobel, Günter

    1974-01-01

    A highly active in vitro system for the translation of globin mRNA, resulting in more than 10 rounds of translation, is described. The reconstituted system consists of native small ribosomal subunits of rabbit reticulocytes (as a source of initiation factors as well as small ribosomal subunits), large subunits derived from rat liver polysomes by the puromycin-KCl procedure, and a pH 5 fraction obtained from a Krebs ascites cell high speed supernatant. In this system no differences were found between globin messenger ribonucleoprotein and globin mRNA. Images PMID:4530315

  18. Potential Key Bases of Ribosomal RNA to Kingdom-Specific Spectra of Antibiotic Susceptibility and the Possible Archaeal Origin of Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qiang; Wang, Yanhui; Lin, Jinzhong; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ying; Bu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    In support of the hypothesis of the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotes, much evidence has been found to support the idea that some organelles of eukaryotic cells originated from bacterial ancestors. Less attention has been paid to the identity of the host cell, although some biochemical and molecular genetic properties shared by archaea and eukaryotes have been documented. Through comparing 507 taxa of 16S–18S rDNA and 347 taxa of 23S–28S rDNA, we found that archaea and eukaryotes share twenty-six nucleotides signatures in ribosomal DNA. These signatures exist in all living eukaryotic organisms, whether protist, green plant, fungus, or animal. This evidence explicitly supports the archaeal origin of eukaryotes. In the ribosomal RNA, besides A2058 in Escherichia coli vs. G2400 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there still exist other twenties of sites, in which the bases are kingdom-specific. Some of these sites concentrate in the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the 23S–28S rRNA. The results suggest potential key sites to explain the kingdom-specific spectra of drug resistance of ribosomes. PMID:22247777

  19. Potential key bases of ribosomal RNA to kingdom-specific spectra of antibiotic susceptibility and the possible archaeal origin of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang; Wang, Yanhui; Lin, Jinzhong; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ying; Bu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    In support of the hypothesis of the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotes, much evidence has been found to support the idea that some organelles of eukaryotic cells originated from bacterial ancestors. Less attention has been paid to the identity of the host cell, although some biochemical and molecular genetic properties shared by archaea and eukaryotes have been documented. Through comparing 507 taxa of 16S-18S rDNA and 347 taxa of 23S-28S rDNA, we found that archaea and eukaryotes share twenty-six nucleotides signatures in ribosomal DNA. These signatures exist in all living eukaryotic organisms, whether protist, green plant, fungus, or animal. This evidence explicitly supports the archaeal origin of eukaryotes. In the ribosomal RNA, besides A2058 in Escherichia coli vs. G2400 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there still exist other twenties of sites, in which the bases are kingdom-specific. Some of these sites concentrate in the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the 23S-28S rRNA. The results suggest potential key sites to explain the kingdom-specific spectra of drug resistance of ribosomes.

  20. Ribosome stalling regulates IRES-mediated translation in eukaryotes, a parallel to prokaryotic attenuation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, James; Yaman, Ibrahim; Huang, Charles; Liu, Haiyan; Lopez, Alex B; Komar, Anton A; Caprara, Mark G; Merrick, William C; Snider, Martin D; Kaufman, Randal J; Lamers, Wouter H; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2005-02-04

    It was previously shown that the mRNA for the cat-1 Arg/Lys transporter is translated from an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is regulated by cellular stress. Amino acid starvation stimulated cat-1 translation via a mechanism that requires translation of an ORF in the mRNA leader and remodeling of the leader to form an active IRES (the "zipper model" of translational control). It is shown here that slowing of the leader peptide elongation rate, either by cycloheximide or the introduction of rare codons, stimulated translation of the downstream ORF. These results suggest that ribosome stalling in the upstream ORF causes mRNA remodeling and formation of an active IRES. This control is reminiscent of translation attenuation in prokaryotic operons, where inhibition of translation elongation can regulate both mRNA translation and gene transcription by altering mRNA structure.

  1. ‘Ribozoomin’ – Translation Initiation from the Perspective of the Ribosome-bound Eukaryotic Initiation Factors (eIFs)

    PubMed Central

    Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental biological mechanism bringing the DNA-encoded genetic information into life by its translation into molecular effectors - proteins. The initiation phase of translation is one of the key points of gene regulation in eukaryotes, playing a role in processes from neuronal function to development. Indeed, the importance of the study of protein synthesis is increasing with the growing list of genetic diseases caused by mutations that affect mRNA translation. To grasp how this regulation is achieved or altered in the latter case, we must first understand the molecular details of all underlying processes of the translational cycle with the main focus put on its initiation. In this review I discuss recent advances in our comprehension of the molecular basis of particular initiation reactions set into the context of how and where individual eIFs bind to the small ribosomal subunit in the pre-initiation complex. I also summarize our current knowledge on how eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 controls gene expression in the gene-specific manner via reinitiation. PMID:22708493

  2. Global eukaryote phylogeny: Combined small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA trees support monophyly of Rhizaria, Retaria and Excavata.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bass, David; López-García, Purificación; Chao, Ema; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Resolution of the phylogenetic relationships among the major eukaryotic groups is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology that is still only partially solved. This task was initially addressed using a single marker, the small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), although in recent years it has been shown that it does not contain enough phylogenetic information to robustly resolve global eukaryotic phylogeny. This has prompted the use of multi-gene analyses, especially in the form of long concatenations of numerous conserved protein sequences. However, this approach is severely limited by the small number of taxa for which such a large number of protein sequences is available today. We have explored the alternative approach of using only two markers but a large taxonomic sampling, by analysing a combination of SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences. This strategy allows also the incorporation of sequences from non-cultivated protists, e.g., Radiozoa (=radiolaria minus Phaeodarea). We provide the first LSU rRNA sequences for Heliozoa, Apusozoa (both Apusomonadida and Ancyromonadida), Cercozoa and Radiozoa. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses for 91 eukaryotic combined SSU+LSU sequences yielded much stronger support than hitherto for the supergroup Rhizaria (Cercozoa plus Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and several well-recognised groups and also for other problematic clades, such as the Retaria (Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and, with more moderate support, the Excavata. Within opisthokonts, the combined tree strongly confirms that the filose amoebae Nuclearia are sisters to Fungi whereas other Choanozoa are sisters to animals. The position of some bikont taxa, notably Heliozoa and Apusozoa, remains unresolved. However, our combined trees suggest a more deeply diverging position for Ancyromonas, and perhaps also Apusomonas, than for other bikonts, suggesting that apusozoan zooflagellates may be central for understanding the early evolution of

  3. Accessing of recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from patient libraries by eukaryotic ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Wang, Lin; Markiv, Anatoliy; Jeffs, Simon A; Dreja, Hanna; McKnight, Áine; He, Mingyue; Kang, Angray S

    2012-01-01

    What are effective antibodies and when do they arise to prevent or delay disease onset during a natural infection or in the course of vaccination? To address these questions at a molecular level requires longitudinal studies, capturing and analyzing the antibody repertoire at regular intervals following exposure or sero-conversion. Such studies require a method that allows the rapid generation and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies from relatively small volumes of blood. Here we describe an approach for rapidly generating human monoclonal antibodies in vitro by directly screening single-chain antibody repertories derived from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells using ribosome display. Two single-chain antibody libraries were constructed using RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two HIV-1 long-term non-progressor donors (K530 and M325). Both libraries were subjected to a single round of in vitro ribosome display for enrichment of human monoclonal antibodies against recombinant gp120(K530), derived from virus isolated from donor K530. This study has validated a novel, in vitro method for the rapid generation of human monoclonal antibodies. An antibody library could be constructed from as little as 3 μg of total RNA, the equivalent of 3-5 mL of human blood.

  4. Ribosomal protein L3 functions as a ‘rocker switch’ to aid in coordinating of large subunit-associated functions in eukaryotes and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Arturas

    2008-01-01

    Although ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprise the bulk of the ribosome and carry out its main functions, ribosomal proteins also appear to play important structural and functional roles. Many ribosomal proteins contain long, nonglobular domains that extend deep into the rRNA cores. In eukaryotes and Archaea, ribosomal protein L3 contains two such extended domains tethered to a common globular hub, thus providing an excellent model to address basic questions relating to ribosomal protein structure/function relationships. Previous work in our laboratory identified the central ‘W-finger’ extension of yeast L3 in helping to coordinate ribosomal functions. New studies on the ‘N-terminal’ extension in yeast suggest that it works with the W-finger to coordinate opening and closing of the corridor through which the 3′ end of aa-tRNA moves during the process of accommodation. Additionally, the effect of one of the L3 N-terminal extension mutants on the interaction between C75 of the aa-tRNA and G2921 (Escherichia coli G2553) of 25S rRNA provides the first evidence of the effect of a ribosomal protein on aa-tRNA positioning and peptidyltransfer, possibly through the induced fit model. A model is presented describing how all three domains of L3 may function together as a ‘rocker switch’ to coordinate the stepwise processes of translation elongation. PMID:18832371

  5. A prokaryotic-like mode of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosome binding to the initiation codon during internal translation initation of hepatitis C and classical swine fever virus RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pestova, Tatyana V.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Fletcher, Simon P.; Jackson, Richard J.; Hellen, Christopher U.T.

    1998-01-01

    Initiation of translation of hepatitis C virus and classical swine fever virus mRNAs results from internal ribosomal entry. We reconstituted internal ribosomal entry in vitro from purified translation components and monitored assembly of 48S ribosomal preinitiation complexes by toe-printing. Ribosomal subunits (40S) formed stable binary complexes on both mRNAs. The complex structure of these RNAs determined the correct positioning of the initiation codon in the ribosomal “P” site in binary complexes. Ribosomal binding and positioning on these mRNAs did not require the initiation factors eIF3, eIF4A, eIF4B, and eIF4F and translation of these mRNAs was not inhibited by a trans-dominant eIF4A mutant. Addition of Met–tRNAiMet, eIF2, and GTP to these binary ribosomal complexes resulted in formation of 48S preinitiation complexes. The striking similarities between this eukaryotic initiation mechanism and the mechanism of translation initiation in prokaryotes are discussed. PMID:9420332

  6. A small nucleolar RNP protein is required for pseudouridylation of eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet-Antonelli, C; Henry, Y; G'elugne, J P; Caizergues-Ferrer, M; Kiss, T

    1997-01-01

    Eukaryotic rRNAs possess numerous post-transcriptionally modified nucleotides. The most abundant modifications, 2'-O-ribose methylation and pseudouridylation, occur in the nucleolus during rRNA processing. The nucleolus contains a large number of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) most of which can be classified into two distinct families defined by conserved sequence boxes and common associated proteins. The C and D box-containing snoRNAs are associated with fibrillarin, and most of them function as guide RNAs in site-specific ribose methylation of rRNAs. The nucleolar function of the other class of snoRNAs, which share box H and ACA elements and are associated with a glycine- and arginine-rich nucleolar protein, Gar1p, remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gar1 snoRNP protein plays an essential and specific role in the overall pseudouridylation of yeast rRNAs. These results establish a novel function for Gar1 protein and indicate that the box H/ACA snoRNAs, or at least a subset of these snoRNAs, function in the site-specific pseudouridylation of rRNAs. PMID:9303321

  7. An overview of the secondary structure of the V4 region of eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nickrent, D L; Sargent, M L

    1991-01-01

    The V4 region of the small subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA was examined in 72 different sequences representing a broad sample eukaryotic diversity. This domain is the most variable region of the 18S rRNA molecule and ranges in length from ca. 230 to over 500 bases. Based upon comparative analysis, secondary structural models were constructed for all sequences and the resulting generalized model shows that most organisms possess seven helices for this region. The protists and two insects show from one to as many as four helices in addition to the above seven. In this report, we summarize secondary structure information presented elsewhere for the V4 region, describe the general features for helical and apical regions, and identify signature sequences useful in helix identification. Our model generally agrees with other current concepts; however, we propose modifications or alternative structures for the start of the V4 region, the large protist inserts, and the sector that may possibly contain a pseudoknot. PMID:2014163

  8. Optimal eukaryotic 18S and universal 16S/18S ribosomal RNA primers and their application in a study of symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Gao, Zhao Ming; Bougouffa, Salim; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene primers that feature a wide coverage are critical in detecting the composition of eukaryotic microscopic organisms in ecosystems. Here, we predicted 18S rRNA primers based on consecutive conserved sites and evaluated their coverage efficiency and scope of application to different eukaryotic groups. After evaluation, eight of them were considered as qualified 18S primers based on coverage rate. Next, we examined common conserved regions in prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA sequences to design 16S/18S universal primers. Three 16S/18S candidate primers, U515, U1390 and U1492, were then considered to be suitable for simultaneous amplification of the rRNA sequences in three domains. Eukaryotic 18S and prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes in a sponge were amplified simultaneously using universal primers U515 and U1390, and the subsequent sorting of pyrosequenced reads revealed some distinctive communities in different parts of the sample. The real difference in biodiversity between prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts could be discerned as the dissimilarity between OTUs was increased from 0.005 to 0.1. A network of the communities in external and internal parts of the sponge illustrated the co-variation of some unique microbes in certain parts of the sponge, suggesting that the universal primers are useful in simultaneous detection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities.

  9. Optimal Eukaryotic 18S and Universal 16S/18S Ribosomal RNA Primers and Their Application in a Study of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Gao, Zhao Ming; Bougouffa, Salim; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene primers that feature a wide coverage are critical in detecting the composition of eukaryotic microscopic organisms in ecosystems. Here, we predicted 18S rRNA primers based on consecutive conserved sites and evaluated their coverage efficiency and scope of application to different eukaryotic groups. After evaluation, eight of them were considered as qualified 18S primers based on coverage rate. Next, we examined common conserved regions in prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA sequences to design 16S/18S universal primers. Three 16S/18S candidate primers, U515, U1390 and U1492, were then considered to be suitable for simultaneous amplification of the rRNA sequences in three domains. Eukaryotic 18S and prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes in a sponge were amplified simultaneously using universal primers U515 and U1390, and the subsequent sorting of pyrosequenced reads revealed some distinctive communities in different parts of the sample. The real difference in biodiversity between prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts could be discerned as the dissimilarity between OTUs was increased from 0.005 to 0.1. A network of the communities in external and internal parts of the sponge illustrated the co-variation of some unique microbes in certain parts of the sponge, suggesting that the universal primers are useful in simultaneous detection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities. PMID:24594623

  10. Degradation of newly synthesized polypeptides by ribosome-associated RACK1/c-Jun N-terminal kinase/eukaryotic elongation factor 1A2 complex.

    PubMed

    Gandin, Valentina; Gutierrez, Gustavo J; Brill, Laurence M; Varsano, Tal; Feng, Yongmei; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Au, Qingyan; McLaughlan, Shannon; Ferreira, Tiago A; Alain, Tommy; Sonenberg, Nahum; Topisirovic, Ivan; Ronai, Ze'ev A

    2013-07-01

    Folding of newly synthesized polypeptides (NSPs) into functional proteins is a highly regulated process. Rigorous quality control ensures that NSPs attain their native fold during or shortly after completion of translation. Nonetheless, signaling pathways that govern the degradation of NSPs in mammals remain elusive. We demonstrate that the stress-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is recruited to ribosomes by the receptor for activated protein C kinase 1 (RACK1). RACK1 is an integral component of the 40S ribosome and an adaptor for protein kinases. Ribosome-associated JNK phosphorylates the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A isoform 2 (eEF1A2) on serines 205 and 358 to promote degradation of NSPs by the proteasome. These findings establish a role for a RACK1/JNK/eEF1A2 complex in the quality control of NSPs in response to stress.

  11. Secondary structure of two regions in expansion segments ES3 and ES6 with the potential of forming a tertiary interaction in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2004-03-01

    The 18S rRNA of the small eukaryotic ribosomal subunit contains several expansion segments. Electron microscopy data indicate that two of the largest expansion segments are juxtaposed in intact 40S subunits, and data from phylogenetic sequence comparisons indicate that these two expansion segments contain complementary sequences that could form a direct tertiary interaction on the ribosome. We have investigated the secondary structure of the two expansion segments in the region around the putative tertiary interaction. Ribosomes from yeast, wheat, and mouse-three organisms representing separate eukaryotic kingdoms-were isolated, and the structure of ES3 and part of the ES6 region were analyzed using the single-strand-specific chemical reagents CMCT and DMS and the double-strand-specific ribonuclease V1. The modification patterns were analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The investigated sequences were relatively exposed to chemical and enzymatic modification. This is in line with their indicated location on the surface at the solvent side of the subunit. The complementary ES3 and ES6 sequences were clearly inaccessible to single-strand modification, but available for cleavage by double-strand-specific RNase V1. The results are compatible with a direct helical interaction between bases in ES3 and ES6. Almost identical results were obtained with ribosomes from the three organisms investigated.

  12. Secondary structure of two regions in expansion segments ES3 and ES6 with the potential of forming a tertiary interaction in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    ALKEMAR, GUNNAR; NYGÅRD, ODD

    2004-01-01

    The 18S rRNA of the small eukaryotic ribosomal subunit contains several expansion segments. Electron microscopy data indicate that two of the largest expansion segments are juxtaposed in intact 40S subunits, and data from phylogenetic sequence comparisons indicate that these two expansion segments contain complementary sequences that could form a direct tertiary interaction on the ribosome. We have investigated the secondary structure of the two expansion segments in the region around the putative tertiary interaction. Ribosomes from yeast, wheat, and mouse—three organisms representing separate eukaryotic kingdoms—were isolated, and the structure of ES3 and part of the ES6 region were analyzed using the single-strand-specific chemical reagents CMCT and DMS and the double-strand-specific ribonuclease V1. The modification patterns were analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The investigated sequences were relatively exposed to chemical and enzymatic modification. This is in line with their indicated location on the surface at the solvent side of the subunit. The complementary ES3 and ES6 sequences were clearly inaccessible to single-strand modification, but available for cleavage by double-strand-specific RNase V1. The results are compatible with a direct helical interaction between bases in ES3 and ES6. Almost identical results were obtained with ribosomes from the three organisms investigated. PMID:14970386

  13. Linker 2 of the eukaryotic pre-ribosomal processing factor Mrd1p is an essential interdomain functionally coupled to upstream RNA Binding Domain 2 (RBD2).

    PubMed

    Lackmann, Fredrik; Belikov, Sergey; Wieslander, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is an essential process in all cells. In Sacharomyces cerevisiae, the precursor rRNA, 35S pre-rRNA, is folded and assembled into a 90S pre-ribosomal complex. The 40S ribosomal subunit is processed from the pre-ribosomal complex. This requires concerted action of small nucleolar RNAs, such as U3 snoRNA, and a large number of trans-acting factors. Mrd1p, one of the essential small ribosomal subunit synthesis factors is required for cleavage of the 35S pre-rRNA to generate 18S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Mrd1p is evolutionary conserved in all eukaryotes and in yeast it contains five RNA Binding Domains (RBDs) separated by linker regions. One of these linkers, Linker 2 between RBD2 and RBD3, is conserved in length, predicted to be structured and contains conserved clusters of amino acid residues. In this report, we have analysed Linker 2 mutations and demonstrate that it is essential for Mrd1p function during pre-ribosomal processing. Extensive changes of amino acid residues as well as specific changes of conserved clusters of amino acid residues were found to be incompatible with synthesis of pre-40S ribosomes and cell growth. In addition, gross changes in primary sequence of Linker 2 resulted in Mrd1p instability, leading to degradation of the N-terminal part of the protein. Our data indicates that Linker 2 is functionally coupled to RBD2 and argues for that these domains constitute a functional module in Mrd1p. We conclude that Linker 2 has an essential role for Mrd1p beyond just providing a defined length between RBD2 and RBD3.

  14. Cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast ribosome reveals the location of plastid-specific ribosomal proteins and extensions.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael; Arenz, Stefan; Huter, Paul; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Nováček, Jiří; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing machines of the cell. Recent advances in cryo-EM have led to the determination of structures from a variety of species, including bacterial 70S and eukaryotic 80S ribosomes as well as mitoribosomes from eukaryotic mitochondria, however, to date high resolution structures of plastid 70S ribosomes have been lacking. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast 70S ribosome, with an average resolution of 5.4 Å for the small 30S subunit and 3.6 Å for the large 50S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals the location of the plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (RPs) PSRP1, PSRP4, PSRP5 and PSRP6 as well as the numerous plastid-specific extensions of the RPs. We discover many features by which the plastid-specific extensions stabilize the ribosome via establishing additional interactions with surrounding ribosomal RNA and RPs. Moreover, we identify a large conglomerate of plastid-specific protein mass adjacent to the tunnel exit site that could facilitate interaction of the chloroplast ribosome with the thylakoid membrane and the protein-targeting machinery. Comparing the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with that of the spinach chloroplast ribosome provides detailed insight into the co-evolution of RP and rRNA.

  15. Preparation of biologically active Arabidopsis ribosomes and comparison with yeast ribosomes for binding to a tRNA-mimic that enhances translation of plant plus-strand RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Stupina, Vera A.; Simon, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of biologically active cell components from multicellular eukaryotic organisms often poses difficult challenges such as low yields and inability to retain the integrity and functionality of the purified compound. We previously identified a cap-independent translation enhancer (3′CITE) in the 3′UTR of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) that structurally mimics a tRNA and binds to yeast 80S ribosomes and 60S subunits in the P-site. Yeast ribosomes were used for these studies due to the lack of methods for isolation of plant ribosomes with high yields and integrity. To carry out studies with more natural components, a simple and efficient procedure has been developed for the isolation of large quantities of high quality ribosomes and ribosomal subunits from Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts prepared from seed-derived callus tissue. Attempts to isolate high quality ribosomes from wheat germ, bean sprouts, and evacuolated protoplasts were unsuccessful. Addition of purified Arabidopsis 80S plant ribosomes to ribosome-depleted wheat germ lysates resulted in a greater than 1200-fold enhancement in in vitro translation of a luciferase reporter construct. The TCV 3′CITE bound to ribosomes with a three to sevenfold higher efficiency when using plant 80S ribosomes compared with yeast ribosomes, indicating that this viral translational enhancer is adapted to interact more efficiently with host plant ribosomes. PMID:23885260

  16. Structure–function insights reveal the human ribosome as a cancer target for antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Kundhavai Natchiar, S.; Nebout, Marielle; Hazemann, Isabelle; Imbert, Véronique; Khatter, Heena; Peyron, Jean-François; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics in clinical use target the bacterial ribosome by interfering with the protein synthesis machinery. However, targeting the human ribosome in the case of protein synthesis deregulations such as in highly proliferating cancer cells has not been investigated at the molecular level up to now. Here we report the structure of the human 80S ribosome with a eukaryote-specific antibiotic and show its anti-proliferative effect on several cancer cell lines. The structure provides insights into the detailed interactions in a ligand-binding pocket of the human ribosome that are required for structure-assisted drug design. Furthermore, anti-proliferative dose response in leukaemic cells and interference with synthesis of c-myc and mcl-1 short-lived protein markers reveals specificity of a series of eukaryote-specific antibiotics towards cytosolic rather than mitochondrial ribosomes, uncovering the human ribosome as a promising cancer target. PMID:27665925

  17. Partial methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of baker's yeast reveals ribosome heterogeneity on the level of eukaryotic rRNA modification.

    PubMed

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Sharma, Sunny; Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2'-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2'-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process.

  18. Partial Methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of Baker's Yeast Reveals Ribosome Heterogeneity on the Level of Eukaryotic rRNA Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2′-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2′-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process. PMID:24586927

  19. Diversity of microbial eukaryotes in sediment at a deep-sea methane cold seep: surveys of ribosomal DNA libraries from raw sediment samples and two enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Yubuki, Naoji; Kakizoe, Natsuki; Inagaki, Yuji; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2007-07-01

    Recent culture-independent surveys of eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) from many environments have unveiled unexpectedly high diversity of microbial eukaryotes (microeukaryotes) at various taxonomic levels. However, such surveys were most probably biased by various technical difficulties, resulting in underestimation of microeukaryotic diversity. In the present study on oxygen-depleted sediment from a deep-sea methane cold seep of Sagami Bay, Japan, we surveyed the diversity of eukaryotic rDNA in raw sediment samples and in two enrichment cultures. More than half of all clones recovered from the raw sediment samples were of the basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus curvatus. Among other clones, phylotypes of eukaryotic parasites, such as Apicomplexa, Ichthyosporea, and Phytomyxea, were identified. On the other hand, we observed a marked difference in phylotype composition in the enrichment samples. Several phylotypes belonging to heterotrophic stramenopiles were frequently found in one enrichment culture, while a phylotype of Excavata previously detected at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent dominated the other. We successfully established a clonal culture of this excavate flagellate. Since these phylotypes were not identified in the raw sediment samples, the approach incorporating a cultivation step successfully found at least a fraction of the "hidden" microeukaryotic diversity in the environment examined.

  20. Identification of previously unrecognized common elements in eukaryotic promoters. A ribosomal RNA gene initiator element for RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, C A; Gong, X; Bartholomew, B; Paule, M R

    1997-02-07

    A new ribosomal RNA promoter element with a functional role similar to the RNA polymerase II initiator (Inr) was identified. This sequence, which we dub the ribosomal Inr (rInr) is unusually conserved, even in normally divergent RNA polymerase I promoters. It functions in the recruitment of the fundamental, TATA-binding protein (TBP)-containing transcription factor, TIF-IB. All upstream elements of the exceptionally strong Acanthamoeba castellanii ribosomal RNA core promoter, to within 6 base pairs of the transcription initiation site (tis), can be deleted without loss of specific transcription initiation. Thus, the A. castellanii promoter can function in a manner similar to RNA polymerase II TATA-less promoters. Sequence-specific photo-cross-linking localizes a 96-kDa subunit of TIF-IB and the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit (A133) to the rInr sequence. A185 also photo-cross-links when polymerase is stalled at +7.

  1. Stable binding of the eukaryotic acidic phosphoproteins to the ribosome is not an absolute requirement for in vivo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Remacha, M; Santos, C; Bermejo, B; Naranda, T; Ballesta, J P

    1992-06-15

    The genes encoding the four acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins have been inactivated in Saccharomyces cerevisae by recombination with truncated genes carrying different genetic markers. By crossing single haploid disruptants, strains harboring two simultaneously inactivated acidic protein genes were constructed. None of the six possible double disruptions was lethal, but the simultaneous inactivation of either YP1 alpha and YP1 beta(L44') or YP2 alpha(L44) and YP2 beta(L45) caused an important decrease in the cell growth rate. Ribosomes isolated from these slow-growing strains did not contain acidic proteins, not even the two polypeptides whose genes were still intact, although these proteins were present in the cell extracts and they seem to be able to form high-molecular weight protein complexes. Transformation of a slow-growing double transformant with a plasmid containing one of the disrupted genes restored the presence of the acidic proteins in the ribosomes and normal growth rates. The particles of the slow-growing strains were active in an in vitro amino acid polymerizing system, although their activity could be stimulated by the exogenous addition of the missing proteins. These results indicate that in the absence of either YP1 alpha and YP1 beta(L44') or YP2 alpha (L44) and YP2 beta(L45), the remaining acidic proteins are unable to interact with the ribosome in a stable manner, but that a strong interaction of these ribosomal components with the particle is not an absolute requirement for in vivo and in vitro protein synthesis.

  2. RNA chaperones stimulate formation and yield of the U3 snoRNA-pre-rRNA duplexes needed for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Shah, Binal N.; Manzo, Anthony J.; Walter, Nils G.; Correll, Carl C.

    2010-01-01

    To satisfy the high demand for ribosome synthesis in rapidly growing eukaryotic cells, short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) must form quickly and with high yield. These interactions, designated the U3-ETS and U3-18S duplexes, are essential to initiate the processing of small subunit rRNA. Previously, we showed in vitro that duplexes corresponding to those in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are only observed after addition of one of two proteins: Imp3p or Imp4p. Here, we used fluorescence-based and other in vitro assays to determine whether these proteins possess RNA chaperone activities and to assess whether these activities are sufficient to satisfy the duplex yield and rate requirements expected in vivo. Assembly of both proteins with the U3 snoRNA into a chaperone complex destabilizes a U3-stem structure, apparently to expose its 18S base-pairing site. As a result, the chaperone complex accelerates formation of the U3-18S duplex from an undetectable rate to one comparable to the intrinsic rate observed for hybridizing short duplexes. The chaperone complex also stabilizes the U3-ETS duplex by 2.7 kcal/mol. These chaperone activities provide high U3-ETS duplex yield and rapid U3-18S duplex formation over a broad concentration range to help ensure that the U3-pre-rRNA interactions limit neither ribosome biogenesis nor rapid cell growth. The thermodynamic and kinetic framework used is general and thus suitable to investigate the mechanism of action of other RNA chaperones. PMID:19482034

  3. Driving ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kressler, Dieter; Hurt, Ed; Bassler, Jochen

    2010-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental process that provides cells with the molecular factories for cellular protein production. Accordingly, its misregulation lies at the heart of several hereditary diseases (e.g., Diamond-Blackfan anemia). The process of ribosome assembly comprises the processing and folding of the pre-rRNA and its concomitant assembly with the ribosomal proteins. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis relies on a large number (>200) of non-ribosomal factors, which confer directionality and accuracy to this process. Many of these non-ribosomal factors fall into different families of energy-consuming enzymes, notably including ATP-dependent RNA helicases, AAA-ATPases, GTPases, and kinases. Ribosome biogenesis is highly conserved within eukaryotic organisms; however, due to the combination of powerful genetic and biochemical methods, it is best studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes our current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome assembly, with particular focus on the molecular role of the involved energy-consuming enzymes.

  4. The 18S ribosomal RNA sequence of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata and its evolutionary position among other eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, L; Van de Peer, Y; Van Herck, M; Neefs, J M; De Wachter, R

    1990-09-03

    Evolutionary trees based on partial small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of 22 metazoa species have been published [(1988) Science 239, 748-753]. In these trees, cnidarians (Radiata) seemed to have evolved independently from the Bilateria, which is in contradiction with the general evolutionary view. In order to further investigate this problem, the complete srRNA sequence of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata was determined and evolutionary trees were constructed using a matrix optimization method. In the tree thus obtained the sea anemone and Bilateria together form a monophyletic cluster, with the sea anemone forming the first line of the metazoan group.

  5. [C-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein S15 is located at the decoding site of the human ribosome].

    PubMed

    Khaĭrulina, Iu S; Molotkov, M V; Bulygin, K N; Graĭfer, D M; Ven'iaminova, A G; Karpova, G G

    2008-01-01

    Protein S15 is a characteristic component of the mammalian 80S ribosome that neighbors mRNA codon at the decoding site and the downstream triplets. In this study we determined S15 protein fragments located close to mRNA positions +4 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon on the human ribosome. For cross-linking to ribosomal protein S15, a set of mRNA was used that contained triplet UUU/UUC at the 5'-termini and a perfluorophenyl azide-modified uridine in position 3' of this triplet. The locations of mRNA analogues on the ribosome were governed by tRNAPhe cognate to the UUU/UUC triplet targeted to the P site. Cross-linked S15 protein was isolated from the irradiated with mild UV light complexes of 80S ribosomes with tRNAPhe and mRNA analogues with subsequent cleavage with CNBr that splits polypeptide chain after methionines. Analysis of modified oligopeptides resulted from the cleavage revealed that in all cases cross-linking site was located in C-terminal fragment 111-145 of protein S15 indicating that this fragment is involved in formation of decoding site of the eukaryotic ribosome.

  6. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles.

  7. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  8. Education in the 80's: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Mary Budd, Ed.

    Designed to serve as a resource for science teachers, kindergarten through college, this publication contains 10 chapters, each focused on a topic of interest to science teachers working in the 1980's. Chapter titles and their authors are: (1) Understanding Science as a Cultural Phenomenon - Mission for the 80's, Drew Christianson; (2) What…

  9. Intoxicants, Human Development, and the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Major developments in learning technologies, particularly interactive television systems, will result in increases in self-defeating behaviors. They might be used to deepen our hypnotic preoccupation with high impact diversions. If this happens, counselors and students of the 80s can look forward to higher levels of destructive dependencies,…

  10. Educational Technology for the '80's: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Robert E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of a symposium on research and utilization of educational media for teaching the deaf, "Educational Technology for the 80s" is presented. Among developments reviewed are the video cassette, the video disc, and a "closed captioning" system for television sets in which only those sets with a special adaptor will produce captions. (PHR)

  11. Intoxicants, Human Development, and the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Major developments in learning technologies, particularly interactive television systems, will result in increases in self-defeating behaviors. They might be used to deepen our hypnotic preoccupation with high impact diversions. If this happens, counselors and students of the 80s can look forward to higher levels of destructive dependencies,…

  12. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  13. Molecular inventory control in ribosome biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Warner, J R; Johnson, S P

    1986-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell coordinates the accumulation of each ribosomal protein with every other ribosomal protein, with ribosomal RNA and with the needs of the cell. To do so it regulates the transcription, processing, translation and lifetime of the mRNA for ribosomal proteins. When all else fails, it rapidly degrades any excess ribosomal protein which is synthesized.

  14. EXPANDING THE RIBOSOMAL UNIVERSE

    PubMed Central

    Dinman, Jonathan D.; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In this issue of Structure, Frank and colleagues (Taylor et al., 2009) present the most complete model of a eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery. PMID:20004156

  15. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-09

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  16. The scanning mechanism of eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the translation initiation codon is generally identified by the scanning mechanism, wherein every triplet in the messenger RNA leader is inspected for complementarity to the anticodon of methionyl initiator transfer RNA (Met-tRNAi). Binding of Met-tRNAi to the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, in a ternary complex (TC) with eIF2-GTP, is stimulated by eukaryotic initiation factor 1 (eIF1), eIF1A, eIF3, and eIF5, and the resulting preinitiation complex (PIC) joins the 5' end of mRNA preactivated by eIF4F and poly(A)-binding protein. RNA helicases remove secondary structures that impede ribosome attachment and subsequent scanning. Hydrolysis of eIF2-bound GTP is stimulated by eIF5 in the scanning PIC, but completion of the reaction is impeded at non-AUG triplets. Although eIF1 and eIF1A promote scanning, eIF1 and possibly the C-terminal tail of eIF1A must be displaced from the P decoding site to permit base-pairing between Met-tRNAi and the AUG codon, as well as to allow subsequent phosphate release from eIF2-GDP. A second GTPase, eIF5B, catalyzes the joining of the 60S subunit to produce an 80S initiation complex that is competent for elongation.

  17. Metaxa: a software tool for automated detection and discrimination among ribosomal small subunit (12S/16S/18S) sequences of archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in metagenomes and environmental sequencing datasets.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Johan; Eriksson, K Martin; Hartmann, Martin; Wang, Zheng; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Abarenkov, Kessy; Petri, Anna; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Nilsson, R Henrik

    2011-10-01

    The ribosomal small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene has emerged as an important genetic marker for taxonomic identification in environmental sequencing datasets. In addition to being present in the nucleus of eukaryotes and the core genome of prokaryotes, the gene is also found in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic eukaryotes. These three sets of genes are conceptually paralogous and should in most situations not be aligned and analyzed jointly. To identify the origin of SSU sequences in complex sequence datasets has hitherto been a time-consuming and largely manual undertaking. However, the present study introduces Metaxa ( http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa/ ), an automated software tool to extract full-length and partial SSU sequences from larger sequence datasets and assign them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial, or chloroplast origin. Using data from reference databases and from full-length organelle and organism genomes, we show that Metaxa detects and scores SSU sequences for origin with very low proportions of false positives and negatives. We believe that this tool will be useful in microbial and evolutionary ecology as well as in metagenomics.

  18. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  19. Studies on the 3'-terminal sequences of the large ribosomal ribonucleic acid of different eukaryotes and those associated with "hidden" breaks in heart-dissociable insects 26S ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Shine, J; Hunt, J A; Dalgarno, L

    1974-09-01

    The 3'-terminal sequences associated with the large rRNA complex from a range of eukaryotes were determined after pancreatic or T(1)-ribonuclease digestion of RNA terminally labelled with [(3)H]isoniazid. In all higher eukaryotes examined except Drosophila melanogaster, the 3'-terminal sequences Y-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) were demonstrated for the large RNA component(s) and for 6S RNA respectively. The 3'-terminal sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S RNA was Y-G-U(OH) and that of 6S RNA Y-A-U-U-U(OH). Three 3'-terminal sequences were found in equimolar amounts in the heat-dissociable 26S rRNA characteristic of insect ribosomes. These were Y-G-U-G-U(OH), Y-C-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) for cultured Antheraea eucalypti cells, Y-G-U(OH), Y-G-U(OH) and G-C-U(OH) for Galleria mellonella larvae and Y-C-G-A(OH), Y-G-U-A(OH) and G-Y-U-G(OH) for Drosophila melanogaster flies. Thus the introduction of the central scission in insect 26S rRNA results in the generation of a unique 3'-terminus and does not arise from random cleavage of the polynucleotide chain.

  20. Functional Specialization of Ribosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved macromolecular machines responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Work published in the past year shows that changes to the ribosome core can affect the mechanism of translation initiation that is favored in the cell, potentially leading to specific changes in the relative efficiencies with which different proteins are made. Here I examine recent data from expression and proteomic studies suggesting that cells make slightly different ribosomes under different growth conditions and discuss genetic evidence that such differences are functional. In particular, I will argue that eukaryotic cells likely produce ribosomes that lack one or more ‘core’ ribosomal proteins (RPs) under some conditions, and that ‘core’ RPs contribute differentially to translation of distinct subpopulations of mRNAs. PMID:21242088

  1. Localization of BiP to translating ribosomes increases soluble accumulation of secreted eukaryotic proteins in an E. coli cell-free system

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, John P.; Bonomo, Jeanne; Swartz, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident Hsp70 chaperone, BiP, docks to the Sec translocon and interacts co-translationally with polypeptides entering the ER to encourage proper folding. In order to recreate this interaction in E. coli cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) reactions, a fusion protein was formed between the ribosome binding portion of the E. coli protein Trigger Factor (TF) and BiP. The biophysical affinity to ribosomes as well as the characteristic Hsp70 ATPase activity were both verified for the fusion protein. When added to E. coli-based CFPS reactions, the TF-BiP fusion chaperone increased soluble yields of several protein fragments that are normally secreted through the ER and have poor solubility in typical CFPS reactions. For comparison, a fusion between TF and the native E. coli Hsp70, DnaK, was also constructed. This fusion was also biologically active and increased soluble yields of certain protein targets in CFPS. The TF-BiP fusion described in this study can be seen as a first step in reconstituting and better understanding ER folding pathways in the prokaryotic environment of E. coli CFPS. PMID:21351069

  2. Localization of BiP to translating ribosomes increases soluble accumulation of secreted eukaryotic proteins in an Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John P; Bonomo, Jeanne; Swartz, James R

    2011-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident Hsp70 chaperone, BiP, docks to the Sec translocon and interacts co-translationally with polypeptides entering the ER to encourage proper folding. In order to recreate this interaction in Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) reactions, a fusion protein was formed between the ribosome-binding portion of the E. coli protein trigger factor (TF) and BiP. The biophysical affinity to ribosomes as well as the characteristic Hsp70 ATPase activity were both verified for the fusion protein. When added to E. coli-based CFPS reactions, the TF-BiP fusion chaperone increased soluble yields of several protein fragments that are normally secreted through the ER and have poor solubility in typical CFPS reactions. For comparison, a fusion between TF and the native E. coli Hsp70, DnaK, was also constructed. This fusion was also biologically active and increased soluble yields of certain protein targets in CFPS. The TF-BiP fusion described in this study can be seen as a first step in reconstituting and better understanding ER folding pathways in the prokaryotic environment of E. coli CFPS. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. BALANCED PRODUCTION OF RIBOSOMAL PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes contain one molecule each of 79 different proteins. The genes encoding these proteins are usually at widely scattered loci and have distinctive promoters with certain common features. This minireview discusses the means by which cells manage to balance the production of ribosomal proteins so as to end up with equimolar quantities in the ribosome. Regulation at all levels of gene expression, from transcription to protein turnover, is considered. PMID:17689889

  4. Structural basis for selectivity and toxicity of ribosomal antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Kidan, Yishak; Sander, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal antibiotics must discriminate between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes to various extents. Despite major differences in bacterial and eukaryotic ribosome structure, a single nucleotide or amino acid determines the selectivity of drugs affecting protein synthesis. Analysis of resistance mutations in bacteria allows the prediction of whether cytoplasmic or mitochondrial ribosomes in eukaryotic cells will be sensitive to the drug. This has important implications for drug specificity and toxicity. Together with recent data on the structure of ribosomal subunits these data provide the basis for development of new ribosomal antibiotics by rationale drug design. PMID:11306553

  5. Structure and 3D arrangement of endoplasmic reticulum membrane-associated ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Stefan; Brandt, Florian; Hrabe, Thomas; Lang, Sven; Eibauer, Matthias; Zimmermann, Richard; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-05

    In eukaryotic cells, cotranslational protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane requires an elaborate macromolecular machinery. While structural details of ribosomes bound to purified and solubilized constituents of the translocon have been elucidated in recent years, little structural knowledge of ribosomes bound to the complete ER protein translocation machinery in a native membrane environment exists. Here, we used cryoelectron tomography to provide a three-dimensional reconstruction of 80S ribosomes attached to functional canine pancreatic ER microsomes in situ. In the resulting subtomogram average at 31 Å resolution, we observe direct contact of ribosomal expansion segment ES27L and the membrane and distinguish several membrane-embedded and lumenal complexes, including Sec61, the TRAP complex and another large complex protruding 90 Å into the lumen. Membrane-associated ribosomes adopt a preferred three-dimensional arrangement that is likely specific for ER-associated polyribosomes and may explain the high translation efficiency of ER-associated ribosomes compared to their cytosolic counterparts.

  6. All Ribosomes Are Created Equal. Really?

    PubMed

    Preiss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Ribosomes are generally thought of as molecular machines with a constitutive rather than regulatory role during protein synthesis. A study by Slavov et al.[1] now shows that ribosomes of distinct composition and functionality exist within eukaryotic cells, giving credence to the concept of 'specialized' ribosomes.

  7. Coordinated movements of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF1, eIF1A, and eIF5 trigger phosphate release from eIF2 in response to start codon recognition by the ribosomal preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Jagpreet S; Saini, Adesh K; Muñoz, Antonio M; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-22

    Accurate recognition of the start codon in an mRNA by the eukaryotic translation preinitiation complex (PIC) is essential for proper gene expression. The process is mediated by eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) in conjunction with the 40 S ribosomal subunit and (initiator) tRNA(i). Here, we provide evidence that the C-terminal tail (CTT) of eIF1A, which we previously implicated in start codon recognition, moves closer to the N-terminal domain of eIF5 when the PIC encounters an AUG codon. Importantly, this movement is coupled to dissociation of eIF1 from the PIC, a critical event in start codon recognition, and is dependent on the scanning enhancer elements in the eIF1A CTT. The data further indicate that eIF1 dissociation must be accompanied by the movement of the eIF1A CTT toward eIF5 in order to trigger release of phosphate from eIF2, which converts the latter to its GDP-bound state. Our results also suggest that release of eIF1 from the PIC and movement of the CTT of eIF1A are triggered by the same event, most likely accommodation of tRNA(i) in the P site of the 40 S subunit driven by base pairing between the start codon in the mRNA and the anticodon in tRNA(i). Finally, we show that the C-terminal domain of eIF5 is responsible for the factor's activity in antagonizing eIF1 binding to the PIC. Together, our data provide a more complete picture of the chain of molecular events that is triggered when the scanning PIC encounters an AUG start codon in the mRNA.

  8. Human eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) protein binds to eIF3c, -d, and -e to promote mRNA recruitment to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy; Do, Angelie; Hershey, John W B; Fraser, Christopher S

    2013-11-15

    Recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit requires the coordinated interaction of a large number of translation initiation factors. In mammals, the direct interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF3 is thought to act as the molecular bridge between the mRNA cap-binding complex and the 40S subunit. A discrete ∼90 amino acid domain in eIF4G is responsible for binding to eIF3, but the identity of the eIF3 subunit(s) involved is less clear. The eIF3e subunit has been shown to directly bind eIF4G, but the potential role of other eIF3 subunits in stabilizing this interaction has not been investigated. It is also not clear if the eIF4A helicase plays a role in stabilizing the interaction between eIF4G and eIF3. Here, we have used a fluorescence anisotropy assay to demonstrate that eIF4G binds to eIF3 independently of eIF4A binding to the middle region of eIF4G. By using a site-specific cross-linking approach, we unexpectedly show that the eIF4G-binding surface in eIF3 is comprised of the -c, -d and -e subunits. Screening multiple cross-linker positions reveals that eIF4G contains two distinct eIF3-binding subdomains within the previously identified eIF3-binding domain. Finally, by employing an eIF4G-dependent translation assay, we establish that both of these subdomains are required for efficient mRNA recruitment to the ribosome and stimulate translation. Our study reveals unexpected complexity to the eIF3-eIF4G interaction that provides new insight into the regulation of mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

  9. Chromatographic purification of highly active yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-10-24

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  10. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 plays distinct roles at the mRNA entry and exit channels of the ribosomal preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Beznosková, Petra; Vlčkova, Vladislava; Chiu, Wen-Ling; Zhou, Fujun; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is a central player in recruitment of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) to mRNA. We probed the effects on mRNA recruitment of a library of S. cerevisiae eIF3 functional variants spanning its 5 essential subunits using an in vitro-reconstituted system. Mutations throughout eIF3 disrupt its interaction with the PIC and diminish its ability to accelerate recruitment to a native yeast mRNA. Alterations to the eIF3a CTD and eIF3b/i/g significantly slow mRNA recruitment, and mutations within eIF3b/i/g destabilize eIF2•GTP•Met-tRNAi binding to the PIC. Using model mRNAs lacking contacts with the 40S entry or exit channels, we uncovered a critical role for eIF3 requiring the eIF3a NTD, in stabilizing mRNA interactions at the exit channel, and an ancillary role at the entry channel requiring residues of the eIF3a CTD. These functions are redundant: defects at each channel can be rescued by filling the other channel with mRNA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20934.001 PMID:27782884

  11. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F.; Yaremchuk, Anna D.; Vlasenko, Dmytro O.; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S.; Tukalo, Michail A.; El'skaya, Anna V.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon–anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the ‘GTP’- and ‘GDP’-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:25326326

  12. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Vlasenko, Dmytro O; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S; Tukalo, Michail A; El'skaya, Anna V

    2014-11-10

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon-anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the 'GTP'- and 'GDP'-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Powering through ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Bethany S.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is required for cell growth in all organisms. Classic in vitro work in bacteria has led to a detailed understanding of the biophysical, thermodynamic, and structural basis for the ordered and correct assembly of ribosomal proteins on ribosomal RNA. Furthermore, it has enabled reconstitution of active subunits from ribosomal RNA and proteins in vitro. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires a large macromolecular machinery in vivo. Many of these assembly factors such as ATPases, GTPases, and kinases hydrolyze nucleotide triphosphates. Because these enzymes are likely regulatory proteins, much work to date has focused on understanding their role in the assembly process. Here, we review these factors, as well as other sources of energy, and their roles in the ribosome assembly process. In addition, we propose roles of energy-releasing enzymes in the assembly process, to explain why energy is used for a process that occurs largely spontaneously in bacteria. Finally, we use literature data to suggest testable models for how these enzymes could be used as targets for regulation of ribosome assembly. PMID:19850913

  14. Structural characterization of ribosome recruitment and translocation by type IV IRES.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jason; Savva, Christos G; Shin, Byung-Sik; Dever, Thomas E; Ramakrishnan, V; Fernández, Israel S

    2016-05-09

    Viral mRNA sequences with a type IV IRES are able to initiate translation without any host initiation factors. Initial recruitment of the small ribosomal subunit as well as two translocation steps before the first peptidyl transfer are essential for the initiation of translation by these mRNAs. Using electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) we have structurally characterized at high resolution how the Cricket Paralysis Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (CrPV-IRES) binds the small ribosomal subunit (40S) and the translocation intermediate stabilized by elongation factor 2 (eEF2). The CrPV-IRES restricts tvhe otherwise flexible 40S head to a conformation compatible with binding the large ribosomal subunit (60S). Once the 60S is recruited, the binary CrPV-IRES/80S complex oscillates between canonical and rotated states (Fernández et al., 2014; Koh et al., 2014), as seen for pre-translocation complexes with tRNAs. Elongation factor eEF2 with a GTP analog stabilizes the ribosome-IRES complex in a rotated state with an extra ~3 degrees of rotation. Key residues in domain IV of eEF2 interact with pseudoknot I (PKI) of the CrPV-IRES stabilizing it in a conformation reminiscent of a hybrid tRNA state. The structure explains how diphthamide, a eukaryotic and archaeal specific post-translational modification of a histidine residue of eEF2, is involved in translocation.

  15. Ribosome Biogenesis in African Trypanosomes Requires Conserved and Trypanosome-Specific Factors

    PubMed Central

    Umaer, Khan; Ciganda, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Large ribosomal subunit protein L5 is responsible for the stability and trafficking of 5S rRNA to the site of eukaryotic ribosomal assembly. In Trypanosoma brucei, in addition to L5, trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37 also participate in this process. These two essential proteins form a novel preribosomal particle through interactions with both the ribosomal protein L5 and 5S rRNA. We have generated a procyclic L5 RNA interference cell line and found that L5 itself is a protein essential for trypanosome growth, despite the presence of other 5S rRNA binding proteins. Loss of L5 decreases the levels of all large-subunit rRNAs, 25/28S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNAs, but does not alter small-subunit 18S rRNA. Depletion of L5 specifically reduced the levels of the other large ribosomal proteins, L3 and L11, whereas the steady-state levels of the mRNA for these proteins were increased. L5-knockdown cells showed an increase in the 40S ribosomal subunit and a loss of the 60S ribosomal subunits, 80S monosomes, and polysomes. In addition, L5 was involved in the processing and maturation of precursor rRNAs. Analysis of polysomal fractions revealed that unprocessed rRNA intermediates accumulate in the ribosome when L5 is depleted. Although we previously found that the loss of P34 and P37 does not result in a change in the levels of L5, the loss of L5 resulted in an increase of P34 and P37 proteins, suggesting the presence of a compensatory feedback loop. This study demonstrates that ribosomal protein L5 has conserved functions, in addition to nonconserved trypanosome-specific features, which could be targeted for drug intervention. PMID:24706018

  16. A Rural Education Policy for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Robert M.

    The address of the Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education before the 1983 Rural Education Association Conference reviews recent Department of Education activities in support of rural education and details the Department's rural education policy for the 80's. Characteristics of rural America and rural education are briefly…

  17. Four translation initiation pathways employed by the leaderless mRNA in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Akulich, Kseniya A.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Smirnova, Victoria V.; Anisimova, Aleksandra S.; Makeeva, Desislava S.; Arkhipova, Valentina I.; Stolboushkina, Elena A.; Garber, Maria B.; Prokofjeva, Maria M.; Spirin, Pavel V.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    mRNAs lacking 5′ untranslated regions (leaderless mRNAs) are molecular relics of an ancient translation initiation pathway. Nevertheless, they still represent a significant portion of transcriptome in some taxons, including a number of eukaryotic species. In bacteria and archaea, the leaderless mRNAs can bind non-dissociated 70 S ribosomes and initiate translation without protein initiation factors involved. Here we use the Fleeting mRNA Transfection technique (FLERT) to show that translation of a leaderless reporter mRNA is resistant to conditions when eIF2 and eIF4F, two key eukaryotic translation initiation factors, are inactivated in mammalian cells. We report an unconventional translation initiation pathway utilized by the leaderless mRNA in vitro, in addition to the previously described 80S-, eIF2-, or eIF2D-mediated modes. This mechanism is a bacterial-like eIF5B/IF2-assisted initiation that has only been reported for hepatitis C virus-like internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs). Therefore, the leaderless mRNA is able to take any of four different translation initiation pathways in eukaryotes. PMID:27892500

  18. Structural insights into ribosome translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF‐G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF‐2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single‐molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the ‘head’ domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward‐ and back‐swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF‐G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF‐G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620–636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  19. Insights into the Mechanism of Ribosomal Incorporation of Mammalian L13a Protein during Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Priyanka; Basu, Abhijit; Biswas, Aditi; Poddar, Darshana; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Komar, Anton A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to prokaryotes, the precise mechanism of incorporation of ribosomal proteins into ribosomes in eukaryotes is not well understood. For the majority of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins, residues critical for rRNA binding, a key step in the hierarchical assembly of ribosomes, have not been well defined. In this study, we used the mammalian ribosomal protein L13a as a model to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying eukaryotic ribosomal protein incorporation into ribosomes. This work identified the arginine residue at position 68 of L13a as being essential for L13a binding to rRNA and incorporation into ribosomes. We also demonstrated that incorporation of L13a takes place during maturation of the 90S preribosome in the nucleolus, but that translocation of L13a into the nucleolus is not sufficient for its incorporation into ribosomes. Incorporation of L13a into the 90S preribosome was required for rRNA methylation within the 90S complex. However, mutations abolishing ribosomal incorporation of L13a did not affect its ability to be phosphorylated or its extraribosomal function in GAIT element-mediated translational silencing. These results provide new insights into the mechanism of ribosomal incorporation of L13a and will be useful in guiding future studies aimed at fully deciphering mammalian ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23689135

  20. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E; Stansfield, I; Romano, M C

    2014-09-06

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3' end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called 'closed-loop' model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired.

  1. Supernumerary proteins of mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Messenger RNAs encoded by mitochondrial genomes are translated on mitochondrial ribosomes that have unique structure and protein composition compared to prokaryotic and cytoplasmic ribosomes. Mitochondrial ribosomes are a patchwork of core proteins that share homology with prokaryotic ribosomal proteins and new, supernumerary proteins that can be unique to different organisms. In mammals, there are specific supernumerary ribosomal proteins that are not present in other eukaryotes. Here we discuss the roles of supernumerary proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and compare them among different eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we consider if differences in the structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes may have contributed to the acquisition of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins with new functions. The distinct and diverse compositions of mitochondrial ribosomes illustrate the high evolutionary divergence found between mitochondrial genetic systems. Elucidating the role of the organism-specific supernumerary proteins may provide a window into the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression through evolution in response to distinct evolutionary paths taken by mitochondria in different organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Frontiers of Mitochondrial Research. © 2013.

  2. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  3. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  4. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  5. Structural insights into ribosomal rescue by Dom34 and Hbs1 at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hilal, Tarek; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Loerke, Justus; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2016-01-01

    The surveillance of mRNA translation is imperative for homeostasis. Monitoring the integrity of the message is essential, as the translation of aberrant mRNAs leads to stalling of the translational machinery. During ribosomal rescue, arrested ribosomes are specifically recognized by the conserved eukaryotic proteins Dom34 and Hbs1, to initiate their recycling. Here we solve the structure of Dom34 and Hbs1 bound to a yeast ribosome programmed with a nonstop mRNA at 3.3 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. The structure shows that Domain N of Dom34 is inserted into the upstream mRNA-binding groove via direct stacking interactions with conserved nucleotides of 18S rRNA. It senses the absence of mRNA at the A-site and part of the mRNA entry channel by direct competition. Thus, our analysis establishes the structural foundation for the recognition of aberrantly stalled 80S ribosomes by the Dom34·Hbs1·GTP complex during Dom34-mediated mRNA surveillance pathways. PMID:27995908

  6. Energy in the '80s: a call for leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The theme of this conference - Energy in the '80s: A Call for Leadership - was selected to focus attention on what was believed to be what America needs now - to get on with the tasks at hand. This proceedings of the Public Awareness Symposium, held on February 19, featured six speakers; the address of Senator Jackson at the banquet on February 20, which concluded the conference is also included; a separate abstract was prepared for each of these seven presentations. Also, the society-sponsored technical session papers are listed in Appendix A, and the Engineering/Communication scholarships are noted in Appendix B.

  7. Quantitative studies of ribosome conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-05-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic machine that undergoes many conformational rearrangements during the initiation of protein synthesis. Significant differences exist between the process of protein synthesis initiation in eubacteria and eukaryotes. In particular, the initiation of eukaryotic protein synthesis requires roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factors to promote efficient mRNA recruitment and ribosomal recognition of the start codon than are needed for eubacterial initiation. The mechanisms by which these initiation factors promote ribosome conformational changes during stages of initiation have been studied using cross-linking, footprinting, site-directed probing, cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, fluorescence spectroscopy and single-molecule techniques. Here, we review how the results of these different approaches have begun to converge to yield a detailed molecular understanding of the dynamic motions that the eukaryotic ribosome cycles through during the initiation of protein synthesis.

  8. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  9. Role of GTPases in bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Britton, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome, a complex molecular machine composed of RNA and protein, is a poorly understood process. Recent work has demonstrated that GTPases are likely to play key roles in the assembly of ribosomes in bacteria and eukaryotes. This review highlights several bacterial ribosome assembly GTPases (RA-GTPases) and discusses possible functions for these proteins in the biogenesis of individual ribosomal subunits and subunit joining. RA-GTPases appear to link various aspects of the cell cycle and metabolism with translation. How these RA-GTPases may coordinate these connections are discussed.

  10. Eukaryotic origins

    PubMed Central

    Lake, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the eukaryotes is a fundamental scientific question that for over 30 years has generated a spirited debate between the competing Archaea (or three domains) tree and the eocyte tree. As eukaryotes ourselves, humans have a personal interest in our origins. Eukaryotes contain their defining organelle, the nucleus, after which they are named. They have a complex evolutionary history, over time acquiring multiple organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticula, and other organelles all of which may hint at their origins. It is the evolutionary history of the nucleus and their other organelles that have intrigued molecular evolutionists, myself included, for the past 30 years and which continues to hold our interest as increasingly compelling evidence favours the eocyte tree. As with any orthodoxy, it takes time to embrace new concepts and techniques. PMID:26323753

  11. Analysis of ribosome biogenesis factor-modules in yeast cells depleted from pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Merl, Juliane; Jakob, Steffen; Ridinger, Katrin; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Formation of eukaryotic ribosomes requires more than 150 biogenesis factors which transiently interact with the nascent ribosomal subunits. Previously, many pre-ribosomal intermediates could be distinguished by their protein composition and rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA) content. We purified complexes of ribosome biogenesis factors from yeast cells in which de novo synthesis of rRNA precursors was down-regulated by genetic means. We compared the protein composition of these largely pre-rRNA free assemblies with the one of analogous pre-ribosomal preparations by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The experimental setup minimizes the possibility that the analysed pre-rRNA free protein modules were derived from (partially) disrupted pre-ribosomal particles and provides thereby strong evidence for their pre-ribosome independent existence. In support of the validity of this approach (i) the predicted composition of the analysed protein modules was in agreement with previously described rRNA-free complexes and (ii) in most of the cases we could identify new candidate members of reported protein modules. An unexpected outcome of these analyses was that free large ribosomal subunits are associated with a specific set of ribosome biogenesis factors in cells where neo-production of nascent ribosomes was blocked. The data presented strengthen the idea that assembly of eukaryotic pre-ribosomal particles can result from transient association of distinct building blocks. PMID:20100801

  12. Triffid - Tactical radio relay for the 80s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, R. I.

    The Triffid Radio Relay Equipment (UK/TRC 471) has been designed to meet the requirements for a new generation of radio relay equipment for the British Army. It is required to operate initially as a replacement for the existing radios used in the Bruin system, and then to be easily converted to form the main trunk radio bearer in the Ptarmigan system which is to be introduced in the early 80s. The Triffid equipment has been designed to handle data rates of 250, 256, 500, and 512k bit/s, thus meeting both Bruin and Ptarmigan requirements by simply setting a front panel switch. A description is provided of the Band III R.F. Head covering the frequency band from 1350 to 1850 MHz. This is the most recently designed unit extending the frequency coverage above the maximum 960 MHz provided by Band II. The Triffid equipment has been subjected to extensive field trials, and the experience gained during these trials has been very encouraging.

  13. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  14. Cryo-EM structure of Hepatitis C virus IRES bound to the human ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, Nick; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; van den Heuvel, Joop; Ban, Nenad

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a widespread human pathogen, is dependent on a highly structured 5'-untranslated region of its mRNA, referred to as internal ribosome entry site (IRES), for the translation of all of its proteins. The HCV IRES initiates translation by directly binding to the small ribosomal subunit (40S), circumventing the need for many eukaryotic translation initiation factors required for mRNA scanning. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the human 40S ribosomal subunit in complex with the HCV IRES at 3.9 Å resolution, determined by focused refinement of an 80S ribosome-HCV IRES complex. The structure reveals the molecular details of the interactions between the IRES and the 40S, showing that expansion segment 7 (ES7) of the 18S rRNA acts as a central anchor point for the HCV IRES. The structural data rationalizes previous biochemical and genetic evidence regarding the initiation mechanism of the HCV and other related IRESs.

  15. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  16. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  17. Structure-function insights into prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2009-06-01

    Translation initiation is the rate-limiting and most complexly regulated step of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the last few years, cryo-electron microscopy has provided several novel insights into the universal process of translation initiation. Structures of prokaryotic 30S and 70S ribosomal initiation complexes with initiator transfer RNA (tRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), and initiation factors have recently revealed the mechanism of initiator tRNA recruitment to the assembling ribosomal machinery, involving molecular rearrangements of the ribosome and associated factors. First three-dimensional pictures of the particularly complex eukaryotic translation initiation machinery have been obtained, revealing how initiation factors tune the ribosome for recruiting the mRNA. A comparison of the available prokaryotic and eukaryotic structures shows that--besides significant differences--some key ribosomal features are universally conserved.

  18. Structural characterization of ribosome recruitment and translocation by type IV IRES

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jason; Savva, Christos G; Shin, Byung-Sik; Dever, Thomas E; Ramakrishnan, V; Fernández, Israel S

    2016-01-01

    Viral mRNA sequences with a type IV IRES are able to initiate translation without any host initiation factors. Initial recruitment of the small ribosomal subunit as well as two translocation steps before the first peptidyl transfer are essential for the initiation of translation by these mRNAs. Using electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) we have structurally characterized at high resolution how the Cricket Paralysis Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (CrPV-IRES) binds the small ribosomal subunit (40S) and the translocation intermediate stabilized by elongation factor 2 (eEF2). The CrPV-IRES restricts the otherwise flexible 40S head to a conformation compatible with binding the large ribosomal subunit (60S). Once the 60S is recruited, the binary CrPV-IRES/80S complex oscillates between canonical and rotated states (Fernández et al., 2014; Koh et al., 2014), as seen for pre-translocation complexes with tRNAs. Elongation factor eEF2 with a GTP analog stabilizes the ribosome-IRES complex in a rotated state with an extra ~3 degrees of rotation. Key residues in domain IV of eEF2 interact with pseudoknot I (PKI) of the CrPV-IRES stabilizing it in a conformation reminiscent of a hybrid tRNA state. The structure explains how diphthamide, a eukaryotic and archaeal specific post-translational modification of a histidine residue of eEF2, is involved in translocation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13567.001 PMID:27159451

  19. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  20. Mitochondrial ribosomes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Maiti, Priyanka; Barrientos, Antoni

    2017-04-23

    Mitochondria play fundamental roles in the regulation of life and death of eukaryotic cells. They mediate aerobic energy conversion through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, and harbor and control the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. As a descendant of a bacterial endosymbiont, mitochondria retain a vestige of their original genome (mtDNA), and its corresponding full gene expression machinery. Proteins encoded in the mtDNA, all components of the multimeric OXPHOS enzymes, are synthesized in specialized mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes). Mitoribosomes are therefore essential in the regulation of cellular respiration. Additionally, an increasing body of literature has been reporting an alternative role for several mitochondrial ribosomal proteins as apoptosis-inducing factors. No surprisingly, the expression of genes encoding for mitoribosomal proteins, mitoribosome assembly factors and mitochondrial translation factors is modified in numerous cancers, a trait that has been linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this article, we will review the current knowledge regarding the dual function of mitoribosome components in protein synthesis and apoptosis and their association with cancer susceptibility and development. We will also highlight recent developments in targeting mitochondrial ribosomes for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rli1/ABCE1 Recycles Terminating Ribosomes and Controls Translation Reinitiation in 3'UTRs In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Young, David J; Guydosh, Nicholas R; Zhang, Fan; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Green, Rachel

    2015-08-13

    To study the function of Rli1/ABCE1 in vivo, we used ribosome profiling and biochemistry to characterize its contribution to ribosome recycling. When Rli1 levels were diminished, 80S ribosomes accumulated both at stop codons and in the adjoining 3'UTRs of most mRNAs. Frequently, these ribosomes reinitiated translation without the need for a canonical start codon, as small peptide products predicted by 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in all three reading frames were confirmed by western analysis and mass spectrometry. Eliminating the ribosome-rescue factor Dom34 dramatically increased 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in Rli1 depleted cells, indicating that Dom34 clears the bulk of unrecycled ribosomes. Thus, Rli1 is crucial for ribosome recycling in vivo and controls ribosome homeostasis. 3'UTR translation occurs in wild-type cells as well, and observations of elevated 3'UTR ribosomes during stress suggest that modulating recycling and reinitiation is involved in responding to environmental changes.

  2. Voices of Chinese Post-­80s Students in English Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Que, Hua; Li, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    This study looks into the changing voice of Chinese Post-80s' students in English academic writing. Data were collected qualitatively through interviews with four Chinese Post-80s overseas graduate students and through an examination of their English essays with a focus on discursive features. Findings indicate that Chinese Post-80s' voice is…

  3. Role of GTPases in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Karbstein, Katrin

    2007-09-01

    GTPases are a universally conserved class of regulatory proteins involved in such diverse cellular functions as signal transduction, translation, cytoskeleton formation, and intracellular transport. GTPases are also required for ribosome assembly in eukaryotes and bacteria, where they present themselves as possible regulatory molecules. Strikingly, in bacteria they represent the largest class of essential assembly factors. A review of their common structural, biochemical and genetic interactions is presented and integrated with models for their function in ribosome assembly. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  4. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  5. Isolation and mapping of the human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, D.M.; Wasco, W.; Murell, J.

    1994-09-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 (eIF-5) is essential for the initiation of protein synthesis. eIF-5 catalyzes the hydrolysis of GTP on the 40S ribosomal initiation complex. Subsequent to GTP hydrolysis and the release of eIF-2-GDP, the 60S ribosomal subunit is joined to the 40S subunit to form an 80S initiation complex which can engage in peptide transfer. In an effort to isolate the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) gene on chromosome 14, we have isolated expressed sequences from this autosome in the form of exons `trapped` from chromosome 14-specific cosmids (library provided by L. Deaven, Los Alamos, NM). One cosmid yielded multiple exons displaying strong DNA and amino acid homology (>90%) with the rat eIF-5 gene. These exons were used to isolate full-length cDNAs from a human brain library. The eIF-5 message is approximately 3.6 kB in size and is ubiquitously expressed. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals multiple phosphorylation sites which may be involved in regulation of activity of eIF-5 and regions with homology to the GTPase superfamily, consistent with eIF-5`s role in GTP hydrolysis. Further studies are underway to determine whether the eIF-5 gene resides within the FAD minimal candidate region on chromosome 14q24.3.

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Ur Rahman, Muhammad Saif; Jia, Zhenyu; Jiang, Cao

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advancements have shown tremendous mechanistic accomplishments in our understanding of the mechanism of messenger RNA translation in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic messenger RNA translation is very complex process that includes four phases (initiation, elongation, termination, and ribosome recycling) and diverse mechanisms involving protein and non-protein molecules. Translation regulation is principally achieved during initiation step of translation, which is organized by multiple eukaryotic translation initiation factors. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor proteins help in stabilizing the formation of the functional ribosome around the start codon and provide regulatory mechanisms in translation initiation. Dysregulated messenger RNA translation is a common feature of tumorigenesis. Various oncogenic and tumor suppressive genes affect/are affected by the translation machinery, making the components of the translation apparatus promising therapeutic targets for the novel anticancer drug. This review provides details on the role of eukaryotic translation initiation factors in messenger RNA translation initiation, their contribution to onset and progression of tumor, and how dysregulated eukaryotic translation initiation factors can be used as a target to treat carcinogenesis.

  7. Role of DNA damage and repair in the function of eukaryotic genes: radiation-induced single-strand breaks and their rejoining in chromosomal and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1980-04-01

    The production and rejoining of single-strand breaks (SSB) in chromosomal DNA and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were investigated after sublethal doses of ..gamma.. radiation to exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Hydrogen-3-labeled total nuclear DNA isolated from either control or irradiated cells was heat denatured and electrophoresed in agarose gels containing formaldehyde. Ribosomal DNA was identified by hybridization to (/sup 32/P)rRNA after transferring the DNA from the gels to nitrocellulose strips. It was found that (a) approximately 0.68 SSB is produced in each strand of rDNA exposed to 40 krad; (b) greater than 80% of SSB were rejoined within the first 20 min after irradiation in both chromosomal and rDNA; and (c) the rejoining process in both chromosomal and rDNA proceeded in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, or oxidative metabolism. While the majority of SSB induced by 40 krad is rejoined within 20 min after irradiation, the resumption of rRNA synthesis does not occur until 30 min thereafter; it is concluded that the restoration of the normal size of the rDNA template is probably necessary but not sufficient for the resumption of rRNA synthesis.

  8. Stepwise splitting of ribosomal proteins from yeast ribosomes by LiCl.

    PubMed

    Piir, Kerli; Tamm, Tiina; Kisly, Ivan; Tammsalu, Triin; Remme, Jaanus

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies have revealed that the core of the ribosome structure is conserved among ribosomes of all kingdoms. Kingdom-specific ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are located in peripheral parts of the ribosome. In this work, the interactions between rRNA and r-proteins of eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome were investigated applying LiCl induced splitting and quantitative mass spectrometry. R-proteins were divided into four groups according to their binding properties to the rRNA. Most yeast r-proteins are removed from rRNA by 0.5-1 M LiCl. Eukaryote-specific r-proteins are among the first to dissociate. The majority of the strong binders are known to be required for the early ribosome assembly events. As compared to the bacterial ribosome, yeast r-proteins are dissociated from rRNA at lower ionic strength. Our results demonstrate that the nature of protein-RNA interactions in the ribosome is not conserved between different kingdoms.

  9. Cryo-EM structure of Hepatitis C virus IRES bound to the human ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Quade, Nick; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; van den Heuvel, Joop; Ban, Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a widespread human pathogen, is dependent on a highly structured 5′-untranslated region of its mRNA, referred to as internal ribosome entry site (IRES), for the translation of all of its proteins. The HCV IRES initiates translation by directly binding to the small ribosomal subunit (40S), circumventing the need for many eukaryotic translation initiation factors required for mRNA scanning. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the human 40S ribosomal subunit in complex with the HCV IRES at 3.9 Å resolution, determined by focused refinement of an 80S ribosome–HCV IRES complex. The structure reveals the molecular details of the interactions between the IRES and the 40S, showing that expansion segment 7 (ES7) of the 18S rRNA acts as a central anchor point for the HCV IRES. The structural data rationalizes previous biochemical and genetic evidence regarding the initiation mechanism of the HCV and other related IRESs. PMID:26155016

  10. Functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein Rpl3p in ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Iván V.; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis in eukaryotes requires a multitude of trans-acting factors. These factors act at many steps as the pre-ribosomal particles travel from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In contrast to the well-studied trans-acting factors, little is known about the contribution of the ribosomal proteins to ribosome biogenesis. Herein, we have analysed the role of ribosomal protein Rpl3p in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. In vivo depletion of Rpl3p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This phenotype is likely due to the instability of early and intermediate pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels of 27SA3, 27SBS and 7SL/S precursors. Furthermore, depletion of Rpl3p impairs the nucleocytoplasmic export of pre-60S ribosomal particles. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis indicates that Rpl3p-depleted cells arrest in the G1 phase. Altogether, we suggest that upon depletion of Rpl3p, early assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits is aborted and subsequent steps during their maturation and export prevented. PMID:17569673

  11. β-Hairpin Loop of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 1 (eIF1) Mediates 40 S Ribosome Binding to Regulate Initiator tRNAMet Recruitment and Accuracy of AUG Selection in Vivo * ♦

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Nanda, Jagpreet; Luna, Rafael E.; Wagner, Gerhard; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of the translation initiation codon is thought to require dissociation of eIF1 from the 40 S ribosomal subunit, enabling irreversible GTP hydrolysis (Pi release) by the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAi ternary complex (TC), rearrangement of the 40 S subunit to a closed conformation incompatible with scanning, and stable binding of Met-tRNAi to the P site. The crystal structure of a Tetrahymena 40 S·eIF1 complex revealed several basic amino acids in eIF1 contacting 18 S rRNA, and we tested the prediction that their counterparts in yeast eIF1 are required to prevent premature eIF1 dissociation from scanning ribosomes at non-AUG triplets. Supporting this idea, substituting Lys-60 in helix α1, or either Lys-37 or Arg-33 in β-hairpin loop-1, impairs binding of yeast eIF1 to 40 S·eIF1A complexes in vitro, and it confers increased initiation at UUG codons (Sui− phenotype) or lethality, in a manner suppressed by overexpressing the mutant proteins or by an eIF1A mutation (17–21) known to impede eIF1 dissociation in vitro. The eIF1 Sui− mutations also derepress translation of GCN4 mRNA, indicating impaired ternary complex loading, and this Gcd− phenotype is likewise suppressed by eIF1 overexpression or the 17–21 mutation. These findings indicate that direct contacts of eIF1 with 18 S rRNA seen in the Tetrahymena 40 S·eIF1 complex are crucial in yeast to stabilize the open conformation of the 40 S subunit and are required for rapid TC loading and ribosomal scanning and to impede rearrangement to the closed complex at non-AUG codons. Finally, we implicate the unstructured N-terminal tail of eIF1 in blocking rearrangement to the closed conformation in the scanning preinitiation complex. PMID:23893413

  12. Enhanced purity, activity and structural integrity of yeast ribosomes purified using a general chromatographic method

    PubMed Central

    Leshin, Jonathan A.; Rakauskaitė, Rasa; Dinman, Jonathan D.; Meskauskas, Arturas

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing researchers working with eukaryotic ribosomes lies in their lability relative to their eubacterial and archael counterparts. In particular, lysis of cells and purification of eukaryotic ribosomes by conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods exposes them for long periods of time to a wide range of co-purifying proteases and nucleases, negatively impacting their structural integrity and functionality. A chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin was adapted to address these problems. This fast and simple method significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing good yields of highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes with fewer nicks in their rRNAs. In particular, the chromatographic purification protocol significantly improved the quality of ribosomes isolated from mutant cells. This method is likely applicable to mammalian ribosomes as well. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes. PMID:20404492

  13. Enhanced purity, activity and structural integrity of yeast ribosomes purified using a general chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Leshin, Jonathan A; Rakauskaitė, Rasa; Dinman, Jonathan D; Meskauskas, Arturas

    2010-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing researchers working with eukaryotic ribosomes lies in their lability relative to their eubacterial and archael counterparts. In particular, lysis of cells and purification of eukaryotic ribosomes by conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods exposes them for long periods of time to a wide range of co-purifying proteases and nucleases, negatively impacting their structural integrity and functionality. A chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin was adapted to address these problems. This fast and simple method significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing good yields of highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes with fewer nicks in their rRNAs. In particular, the chromatographic purification protocol significantly improved the quality of ribosomes isolated from mutant cells. This method is likely applicable to mammalian ribosomes as well. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  14. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome protein Nep1 (Emg1) has a dual role in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, as an essential assembly factor and in the methylation of Ψ1191 in yeast 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kötter, Peter; Leisegang, Matthias S; Schilling, Valeska; Buchhaupt, Markus; Held, Martin; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael; Heckel, Alexander; Bohnsack, Markus T; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The Nep1 (Emg1) SPOUT-class methyltransferase is an essential ribosome assembly factor and the human Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is caused by a specific Nep1(D86G) mutation. We recently showed in vitro that Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Nep1 is a sequence-specific pseudouridine-N1-methyltransferase. Here, we show that in yeast the in vivo target site for Nep1-catalyzed methylation is located within loop 35 of the 18S rRNA that contains the unique hypermodification of U1191 to 1-methyl-3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-pseudouri-dine (m1acp3Ψ). Specific (14)C-methionine labelling of 18S rRNA in yeast mutants showed that Nep1 is not required for acp-modification but suggested a function in Ψ1191 methylation. ESI MS analysis of acp-modified Ψ-nucleosides in a Δnep1-mutant showed that Nep1 catalyzes the Ψ1191 methylation in vivo. Remarkably, the restored growth of a nep1-1(ts) mutant upon addition of S-adenosylmethionine was even observed after preventing U1191 methylation in a Δsnr35 mutant. This strongly suggests a dual Nep1 function, as Ψ1191-methyltransferase and ribosome assembly factor. Interestingly, the Nep1 methyltransferase activity is not affected upon introduction of the BCS mutation. Instead, the mutated protein shows enhanced dimerization propensity and increased affinity for its RNA-target in vitro. Furthermore, the BCS mutation prevents nucleolar accumulation of Nep1, which could be the reason for reduced growth in yeast and the Bowen-Conradi syndrome.

  15. Interaction between 25S rRNA A loop and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B promotes subunit joining and ensures stringent AUG selection.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Shin, Byung-Sik; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Nemoto, Naoki; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Graham, Jymie; Cox, Christian; Reid, Megan; Brown, Susan J; Asano, Katsura

    2013-09-01

    In yeast, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During the last step of translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) promotes the 60S subunit joining with the 40S initiation complex (IC). Malfunctional 60S subunits produced by misfolding or mutation may disrupt the 40S IC stalling on the start codon, thereby altering the stringency of initiation. Using several point mutations isolated by random mutagenesis, here we studied the role of 25S rRNA in start codon selection. Three mutations changing bases near the ribosome surface had strong effects, allowing the initiating ribosomes to skip both AUG and non-AUG codons: C2879U and U2408C, altering the A loop and P loop, respectively, of the peptidyl transferase center, and G1735A, mapping near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. Overexpression of eIF5B specifically suppressed the phenotype caused by C2879U, suggesting functional interaction between eIF5B and the A loop. In vitro reconstitution assays showed that C2879U decreased eIF5B-catalyzed 60S subunit joining with a 40S IC. Thus, eIF5B interaction with the peptidyl transferase center A loop increases the accuracy of initiation by stabilizing the overall conformation of the 80S initiation complex. This study provides an insight into the effect of ribosomal mutations on translation profiles in eukaryotes.

  16. Structural integrity of {alpha}-helix H12 in translation initiation factor eIF5B is critical for 80S complex stability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Kim, Joo-Ran; Maher, Kathryn N; Arefin, Shamsul M; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    Translation initiation factor eIF5B promotes GTP-dependent ribosomal subunit joining in the final step of the translation initiation pathway. The protein resembles a chalice with the α-helix H12 forming the stem connecting the GTP-binding domain cup to the domain IV base. Helix H12 has been proposed to function as a rigid lever arm governing domain IV movements in response to nucleotide binding and as a molecular ruler fixing the distance between domain IV and the G domain of the factor. To investigate its function, helix H12 was lengthened or shortened by one or two turns. In addition, six consecutive residues in the helix were substituted by Gly to alter the helical rigidity. Whereas the mutations had minimal impacts on the factor's binding to the ribosome and its GTP binding and hydrolysis activities, shortening the helix by six residues impaired the rate of subunit joining in vitro and both this mutation and the Gly substitution mutation lowered the yield of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) bound to 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP. Thus, these two mutations, which impair yeast cell growth and enhance ribosome leaky scanning in vivo, impair the rate of formation and stability of the 80S product of subunit joining. These data support the notion that helix H12 functions as a ruler connecting the GTPase center of the ribosome to the P site where Met-tRNA(i)(Met) is bound and that helix H12 rigidity is required to stabilize Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding.

  17. The RACK1 signal anchor protein from Trypanosoma brucei associates with eukaryotic elongation factor 1A: a role for translational control in cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Sandesh; Rothberg, Karen G; Hubbard, James G; Ruben, Larry

    2008-01-01

    RACK1 is a WD-repeat protein that forms signal complexes at appropriate locations in the cell. RACK1 homologues are core components of ribosomes from yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, a cryo-EM analysis of trypanosome ribosomes failed to detect RACK1, thus eliminating an important translational regulatory mechanism. Here we report that TbRACK1 from Trypanosoma brucei associates with eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1a (eEF1A) as determined by tandem MS of TAP-TbRACK1 affinity eluates, co-sedimentation in a sucrose gradient, and co-precipitation assays. Consistent with these observations, sucrose gradient purified 80S monosomes and translating polysomes each contained TbRACK1. When RNAi was used to deplete cells of TbRACK1, a shift in the polysome profile was observed, while the phosphorylation of a ribosomal protein increased. Under these conditions, cell growth became hypersensitive to the translational inhibitor anisomycin. The kinetoplasts and nuclei were misaligned in the postmitotic cells, resulting in partial cleavage furrow ingression during cytokinesis. Overall, these findings identify eEF1A as a novel TbRACK1 binding partner and establish TbRACK1 as a component of the trypanosome translational apparatus. The synergy between anisomycin and TbRACK1 RNAi suggests that continued translation is required for complete ingression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:18786142

  18. Ribosome recycling: An essential process of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Michael C; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira

    2007-01-01

    A preponderance of textbooks outlines cellular protein synthesis (translation) in three basic steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. However, researchers in the field of translation accept that a vital fourth step exists; this fourth step is called ribosome recycling. Ribosome recycling occurs after the nascent polypeptide has been released during the termination step. Despite the release of the polypeptide, ribosomes remain bound to the mRNA and tRNA. It is only during the fourth step of translation that ribosomes are ultimately released from the mRNA, split into subunits, and are free to bind new mRNA, thus the term "ribosome recycling." This step is essential to the viability of cells. In bacteria, it is catalyzed by two proteins, elongation factor G and ribosome recycling factor, a near perfect structural mimic of tRNA. Eukaryotic organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G homologues, but the nature of ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cytoplasm is still under investigation. In this review, the discovery of ribosome recycling and the basic mechanisms involved are discussed so that textbook writers and teachers can include this vital step, which is just as important as the three conventional steps, in sections dealing with protein synthesis.

  19. RIBOSOME PRECURSOR PARTICLES IN NUCLEOLI

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Ming C.; Perry, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles containing the precursors of ribosomal RNA were extracted from L cell nucleoli and analyzed under conditions comparable to those used in the characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Using nucleoli from cells suitably labeled with 3H-uridine, we detected three basic RNP components, sedimenting at approximately 62S, 78S, and 110S in sucrose gradients containing magnesium. A fourth particle, sedimenting at about 95S, appears to be a dimer of the 62S and 78S components. When centrifuged in gradients containing EDTA, the 62S, 78S, and 110S particles sediment at about 55S, 65S, and 80S, respectively. RNA was extracted from RNP particles which were prepared by two cycles of zonal centrifugation. The 62S particles yielded 32S RNA and a detectable amount of 28S RNA, the 78S structures, 32S RNA and possibly some 36S RNA, and the 110S particles, a mixture of 45S, 36S, and 32S RNA's. When cells were pulsed briefly and further incubated in the presence of actinomycin D, there was a gradual shift of radioactivity from heavier to lighter particles. This observation is consistent with the scheme of maturation: 110S → 78S → 62S. The principal buoyant densities in cesium chloride of the 110S, 78S, and 62S particles are 1.465, 1.490, and 1.545, respectively. These densities are all significantly lower than 1.570, which is characteristic of the mature large subunit of cytoplasmic ribosomes, suggesting that the precursor particles have a relatively higher ratio of protein to RNA, and that ribosome maturation involves, in addition to decrease in the size of the RNA molecules, a progressive decrease in the proportion of associated protein. PMID:5815062

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L26 is not essential for ribosome assembly and function.

    PubMed

    Babiano, Reyes; Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we study the evolutionarily conserved L26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which assembles into pre-60S ribosomal particles in the nucle(ol)us. Yeast L26 is one of the many ribosomal proteins encoded by two functional genes. We have disrupted both genes; surprisingly, the growth of the resulting rpl26 null mutant is apparently identical to that of the isogenic wild-type strain. The absence of L26 minimally alters 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome analysis revealed the appearance of half-mers. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicated that L26 is mainly required to optimize 27S pre-rRNA maturation, without which the release of pre-60S particles from the nucle(ol)us is partially impaired. Ribosomes lacking L26 exhibit differential reactivity to dimethylsulfate in domain I of 25S/5.8S rRNAs but apparently are able to support translation in vivo with wild-type accuracy. The bacterial homologue of yeast L26, L24, is a primary rRNA binding protein required for 50S ribosomal subunit assembly in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore potential differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome assembly. We discuss the reasons why yeast L26 plays such an apparently nonessential role in the cell.

  1. Binding of cycloheximide to ribosomes from wild-type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Stöcklein, W; Piepersberg, W

    1980-01-01

    Cycloheximide bound to cytoplasmic (80S) ribosomes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an association constant (Ka) of 2.0 (+/- 0.5) x 10(7) M-1. The number of binding sites found per ribosome was between 0.4 and 0.6; it was reduced by high-salt treatment of ribosomes 60S particles prepared in the presence of high salt had a lower affinity (Ka: 5.5 [+/- 0.5] x 10(6) M-1) than did 80S ribosomes, but a greater proportion of particles (0.8) were able to bind. No specific binding to 40S subunits was observed. The addition of supernatant fractions (S100, high-salt wash fraction) increased the number of binding sites found per 80S ribosome up to 0.8, leaving the association constant unchanged. In contrast, the affinity of 60S subunits was enhanced to a Ka value of 3.5 x 10(-7) M-1 by the addition of supernatant fractions, whereas the number of binding sites stayed constant. A model to explain these facts is proposed. 80S ribosomes, as well as 60S subunits of strain cy32, which is highly resistant to cycloheximide and altered in ribosomal protein L29 (18), showed a drastically reduced affinity for the drug (Ka values of 2.0 x 10(6) M-1). PMID:7016025

  2. Active yeast ribosome preparation using monolithic anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Antonio M; Yourik, Paul; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Nanda, Jagpreet S; Lorsch, Jon R; Walker, Sarah E

    2017-02-01

    In vitro studies of translation provide critical mechanistic details, yet purification of large amounts of highly active eukaryotic ribosomes remains a challenge for biochemists and structural biologists. Here, we present an optimized method for preparation of highly active yeast ribosomes that could easily be adapted for purification of ribosomes from other species. The use of a nitrogen mill for cell lysis coupled with chromatographic purification of the ribosomes results in 10-fold-increased yield and less variability compared with the traditional approach, which relies on sedimentation through sucrose cushions. We demonstrate that these ribosomes are equivalent to those made using the traditional method in a host of in vitro assays, and that utilization of this new method will consistently produce high yields of active yeast ribosomes.

  3. Macrolide antibiotics allosterically predispose the ribosome for translation arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sothiselvam, Shanmugapriya; Liu, Bo; Han, Wei; Ramu, Haripriya; Klepacki, Dorota; Atkinson, Gemma Catherine; Brauer, Age; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel; Schulten, Klaus; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Translation arrest directed by nascent peptides and small cofactors controls expression of important bacterial and eukaryotic genes, including antibiotic resistance genes, activated by binding of macrolide drugs to the ribosome. Previous studies suggested that specific interactions between the nascent peptide and the antibiotic in the ribosomal exit tunnel play a central role in triggering ribosome stalling. However, here we show that macrolides arrest translation of the truncated ErmDL regulatory peptide when the nascent chain is only three amino acids and therefore is too short to be juxtaposed with the antibiotic. Biochemical probing and molecular dynamics simulations of erythromycin-bound ribosomes showed that the antibiotic in the tunnel allosterically alters the properties of the catalytic center, thereby predisposing the ribosome for halting translation of specific sequences. Our findings offer a new view on the role of small cofactors in the mechanism of translation arrest and reveal an allosteric link between the tunnel and the catalytic center of the ribosome. PMID:24961372

  4. Active yeast ribosome preparation using monolithic anion exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Antonio M.; Yourik, Paul; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Lorsch, Jon R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro studies of translation provide critical mechanistic details, yet purification of large amounts of highly active eukaryotic ribosomes remains a challenge for biochemists and structural biologists. Here, we present an optimized method for preparation of highly active yeast ribosomes that could easily be adapted for purification of ribosomes from other species. The use of a nitrogen mill for cell lysis coupled with chromatographic purification of the ribosomes results in 10-fold-increased yield and less variability compared with the traditional approach, which relies on sedimentation through sucrose cushions. We demonstrate that these ribosomes are equivalent to those made using the traditional method in a host of in vitro assays, and that utilization of this new method will consistently produce high yields of active yeast ribosomes. PMID:27981882

  5. The role of the ribosome in the regulation of longevity and lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    MacInnes, Alyson W

    2016-01-01

    The most energy-consuming process that a cell must undertake to stay viable is the continuous biogenesis of ribosomes for the translation of RNA into protein. Given the inextricable links between energy consumption and cellular lifespan, it is not surprising that mutations and environmental cues that reduce ribosome biogenesis result in an extension of eukaryotic lifespan. This review goes into detail describing recent discoveries of different and often unexpected elements that play a role in the regulation of longevity by virtue of their ribosome biogenesis functions. These roles include controlling the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the translation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and the number of ribosomes overall. Together these findings suggest that a fundamental mechanism across eukaryotic species for extending lifespan is to slow down or halt the expenditure of cellular energy that is normally absorbed by the manufacturing and assembly of new ribosomes.

  6. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ~76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. PMID:28062837

  7. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast.

    PubMed

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L

    2017-01-15

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ∼76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Dissecting functional similarities of ribosome-associated chaperones from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Thomas; Hundley, Heather A; Pfund, Chris; Wegrzyn, Renee D; Walter, William; Kramer, Günter; Kim, So-Young; Craig, Elizabeth A; Deuerling, Elke

    2005-07-01

    Ribosome-tethered chaperones that interact with nascent polypeptide chains have been identified in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. However, these ribosome-associated chaperones share no sequence similarity: bacterial trigger factors (TF) form an independent protein family while the yeast machinery is Hsp70-based. The absence of any component of the yeast machinery results in slow growth at low temperatures and sensitivity to aminoglycoside protein synthesis inhibitors. After establishing that yeast ribosomal protein Rpl25 is able to recruit TF to ribosomes when expressed in place of its Escherichia coli homologue L23, the ribosomal TF tether, we tested whether such divergent ribosome-associated chaperones are functionally interchangeable. E. coli TF was expressed in yeast cells that lacked the endogenous ribosome-bound machinery. TF associated with yeast ribosomes, cross-linked to yeast nascent polypeptides and partially complemented the aminoglycoside sensitivity, demonstrating that ribosome-associated chaperones from divergent organisms share common functions, despite their lack of sequence similarity.

  9. Communities of microbial eukaryotes in the mammalian gut within the context of environmental eukaryotic diversity.

    PubMed

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Walters, William A; Lauber, Christian L; Clemente, Jose C; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Teiling, Clotilde; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Brunelle, Julie; Driscoll, Mark; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A; Knight, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbes (protists) residing in the vertebrate gut influence host health and disease, but their diversity and distribution in healthy hosts is poorly understood. Protists found in the gut are typically considered parasites, but many are commensal and some are beneficial. Further, the hygiene hypothesis predicts that association with our co-evolved microbial symbionts may be important to overall health. It is therefore imperative that we understand the normal diversity of our eukaryotic gut microbiota to test for such effects and avoid eliminating commensal organisms. We assembled a dataset of healthy individuals from two populations, one with traditional, agrarian lifestyles and a second with modern, westernized lifestyles, and characterized the human eukaryotic microbiota via high-throughput sequencing. To place the human gut microbiota within a broader context our dataset also includes gut samples from diverse mammals and samples from other aquatic and terrestrial environments. We curated the SILVA ribosomal database to reflect current knowledge of eukaryotic taxonomy and employ it as a phylogenetic framework to compare eukaryotic diversity across environment. We show that adults from the non-western population harbor a diverse community of protists, and diversity in the human gut is comparable to that in other mammals. However, the eukaryotic microbiota of the western population appears depauperate. The distribution of symbionts found in mammals reflects both host phylogeny and diet. Eukaryotic microbiota in the gut are less diverse and more patchily distributed than bacteria. More broadly, we show that eukaryotic communities in the gut are less diverse than in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and few taxa are shared across habitat types, and diversity patterns of eukaryotes are correlated with those observed for bacteria. These results outline the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in the mammalian gut and across

  10. Communities of microbial eukaryotes in the mammalian gut within the context of environmental eukaryotic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Walters, William A.; Lauber, Christian L.; Clemente, Jose C.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Teiling, Clotilde; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Brunelle, Julie; Driscoll, Mark; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbes (protists) residing in the vertebrate gut influence host health and disease, but their diversity and distribution in healthy hosts is poorly understood. Protists found in the gut are typically considered parasites, but many are commensal and some are beneficial. Further, the hygiene hypothesis predicts that association with our co-evolved microbial symbionts may be important to overall health. It is therefore imperative that we understand the normal diversity of our eukaryotic gut microbiota to test for such effects and avoid eliminating commensal organisms. We assembled a dataset of healthy individuals from two populations, one with traditional, agrarian lifestyles and a second with modern, westernized lifestyles, and characterized the human eukaryotic microbiota via high-throughput sequencing. To place the human gut microbiota within a broader context our dataset also includes gut samples from diverse mammals and samples from other aquatic and terrestrial environments. We curated the SILVA ribosomal database to reflect current knowledge of eukaryotic taxonomy and employ it as a phylogenetic framework to compare eukaryotic diversity across environment. We show that adults from the non-western population harbor a diverse community of protists, and diversity in the human gut is comparable to that in other mammals. However, the eukaryotic microbiota of the western population appears depauperate. The distribution of symbionts found in mammals reflects both host phylogeny and diet. Eukaryotic microbiota in the gut are less diverse and more patchily distributed than bacteria. More broadly, we show that eukaryotic communities in the gut are less diverse than in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and few taxa are shared across habitat types, and diversity patterns of eukaryotes are correlated with those observed for bacteria. These results outline the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in the mammalian gut and across

  11. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manjuli R.; Booth, Timothy M.; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.

    2009-01-01

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show that (i) the overall structure of the Lmr is considerably more porous, (ii) the topology of the intersubunit space is significantly different, with fewer intersubunit bridges, but more tunnels, and (iii) several of the functionally-important rRNA regions, including the α-sarcin-ricin loop, have different relative positions within the structure. Furthermore, the major portions of the mRNA channel, the tRNA passage, and the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel contain Lmr-specific proteins, suggesting that the mechanisms for mRNA recruitment, tRNA interaction, and exiting of the nascent polypeptide in Lmr must differ markedly from the mechanisms deduced for ribosomes in other organisms. Our study identifies certain structural features that are characteristic solely of mitochondrial ribosomes and other features that are characteristic of both mitochondrial and chloroplast ribosomes (i.e., organellar ribosomes). PMID:19497863

  12. RIBOSOME-MEMBRANE INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, M. R.; Sabatini, David D.; Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    In a medium of high ionic strength, rat liver rough microsomes can be nondestructively disassembled into ribosomes and stripped membranes if nascent polypeptides are discharged from the bound ribosomes by reaction with puromycin. At 750 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 50 mM Tris·HCl, pH 7 5, up to 85% of all bound ribosomes are released from the membranes after incubation at room temperature with 1 mM puromycin. The ribosomes are released as subunits which are active in peptide synthesis if programmed with polyuridylic acid. The ribosome-denuded, or stripped, rough microsomes (RM) can be recovered as intact, essentially unaltered membranous vesicles Judging from the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into hot acid-insoluble material and from the release of [3H]leucine-labeled nascent polypeptide chains from bound ribosomes, puromycin coupling occurs almost as well at low (25–100 mM) as at high (500–1000 mM) KCl concentrations. Since puromycin-dependent ribosome release only occurs at high ionic strength, it appears that ribosomes are bound to membranes via two types of interactions: a direct one between the membrane and the large ribosomal subunit (labile at high KCl concentration) and an indirect one in which the nascent chain anchors the ribosome to the membrane (puromycin labile). The nascent chains of ribosomes specifically released by puromycin remain tightly associated with the stripped membranes. Some membrane-bound ribosomes (up to 40%) can be nondestructively released in high ionic strength media without puromycin; these appear to consist of a mixture of inactive ribosomes and ribosomes containing relatively short nascent chains. A fraction (∼15%) of the bound ribosomes can only be released from membranes by exposure of RM to ionic conditions which cause extensive unfolding of ribosomal subunits, the nature and significance of these ribosomes is not clear. PMID:4682341

  13. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale.

    PubMed

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23696005

  15. Futurism in the Education of the Deaf: Directions and Alternatives for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, William J. A.

    The author presents a rationale for the study of futurism in education and analyzes the effects of significant future changes upon deaf education in the 80s. The roles that change agents play in influencing the permanence of innovations within the school are examined: advocacy, information sharing, and organizational development training.…

  16. Therapeutic Discourse and ACOA Films of the '80s and '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joan Driscoll

    2000-01-01

    Argues that many family melodramas in films of the '80s and '90s focus their narrative on the negative dynamics of the parental relationship. Identifies underlying generic patterns and ideas found in these films. Explores representations of mothers, fathers, and children; gender representation and codependency; and familial dysfunction. Broadens…

  17. Trend indicators needed for effective recreation planning - a statistical blueprint for the 80's

    Treesearch

    H. Fred Kaiser; George H. Moeller

    1980-01-01

    Here we outline important elements in recreation planning and describe how the process is changing, using Federal land management agencies as our example. We outline some factors that will impact on planning in the 80's, encourage establishment of a system to monitor trends in key factors that influence recreation behavior.

  18. Therapeutic Discourse and ACOA Films of the '80s and '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joan Driscoll

    2000-01-01

    Argues that many family melodramas in films of the '80s and '90s focus their narrative on the negative dynamics of the parental relationship. Identifies underlying generic patterns and ideas found in these films. Explores representations of mothers, fathers, and children; gender representation and codependency; and familial dysfunction. Broadens…

  19. Futurism in the Education of the Deaf: Directions and Alternatives for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, William J. A.

    The author presents a rationale for the study of futurism in education and analyzes the effects of significant future changes upon deaf education in the 80s. The roles that change agents play in influencing the permanence of innovations within the school are examined: advocacy, information sharing, and organizational development training.…

  20. Advertising for the 80's. Marketing and Distributive Education. Advertising. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Craig; Elias, John

    This module contains a teacher's guide, student materials for a seminar on "advertising for the 80's" conducted for small business representatives, a 35mm slide presentation, and an audiocassette. The instructor guide contains an outline of the course, time plan, end-of-course critique, a script for the slide-tape presentation (with content on the…

  1. Advertising for the 80's. Marketing and Distributive Education. Advertising. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Craig; Elias, John

    This module contains a teacher's guide, student materials for a seminar on "advertising for the 80's" conducted for small business representatives, a 35mm slide presentation, and an audiocassette. The instructor guide contains an outline of the course, time plan, end-of-course critique, a script for the slide-tape presentation (with content on the…

  2. Isolation of Mitochondrial Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrial encoded mRNAs by mitochondrial ribosomes is thought to play a major role in regulating the expression of mitochondrial proteins. However, the structure and function of plant mitochondrial ribosomes remains poorly understood. To study mitochondrial ribosomes, it is necessary to separate them from plastidic and cytosolic ribosomes that are generally present at much higher concentrations. Here, a straight forward protocol for the preparation of fractions highly enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes from plant cells is described. The method begins with purification of mitochondria followed by mitochondrial lysis and ultracentrifugation of released ribosomes through sucrose cushions and gradients. Dark-grown Arabidopsis cells were used in this example because of the ease with which good yields of pure mitochondria can be obtained from them. However, the steps for isolation of ribosomes from mitochondria could be applied to mitochondria obtained from other sources. Proteomic analyses of resulting fractions have confirmed strong enrichment of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  3. The Ribosome Filter Redux

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Vincent P.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  4. Why is start codon selection so precise in eukaryotes?

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Katsura

    2014-01-01

    Translation generally initiates with the AUG codon. While initiation at GUG and UUG is permitted in prokaryotes (Archaea and Bacteria), cases of CUG initiation were recently reported in human cells. The varying stringency in translation initiation between eukaryotic and prokaryotic domains largely stems from a fundamental problem for the ribosome in recognizing a codon at the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. Initiation factors specific to each domain of life evolved to confer stringent initiation by the ribosome. The mechanistic basis for high accuracy in eukaryotic initiation is described based on recent findings concerning the role of the multifactor complex (MFC) in this process. Also discussed are whether non-AUG initiation plays any role in translational control and whether start codon accuracy is regulated in eukaryotes. PMID:26779403

  5. DExD/H-box RNA helicases in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Straub, Annika U.; Doebele, Carmen; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis requires a multitude of cofactors, among them DExD/H-box RNA helicases. Bacterial RNA helicases involved in ribosome assembly are not essential, while eukaryotes strictly require multiple DExD/H-box proteins that are involved in the much more complex ribosome biogenesis pathway. Here, RNA helicases are thought to act in structural remodeling of the RNPs including the modulation of protein binding, and they are required for allowing access or the release of specific snoRNPs from pre-ribosomes. Interestingly, helicase action is modulated by specific cofactors that can regulate recruitment and enzymatic activity. This review summarizes the current knowledge and focuses on recent findings and open questions on RNA helicase function and regulation in ribosome synthesis. PMID:22922795

  6. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  7. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  8. Proteomic characterization of archaeal ribosomes reveals the presence of novel archaeal-specific ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Viter; Fröhlich, Thomas; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sohmen, Daniel; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Berninghausen, Otto; Thomm, Michael; Beckmann, Roland; Arnold, Georg J; Wilson, Daniel N

    2011-02-04

    Protein synthesis occurs in macromolecular particles called ribosomes. All ribosomes are composed of RNA and proteins. While the protein composition of bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes has been well-characterized, a systematic analysis of archaeal ribosomes has been lacking. Here we report the first comprehensive two-dimensional PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis of archaeal ribosomes isolated from the thermophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum and the thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Crenarchaeota. Our analysis identified all 66 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the P. aerophilum small and large subunits, as well as all but two (62 of 64; 97%) r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius small and large subunits that are predicted genomically. Some r-proteins were identified with one or two lysine methylations and N-terminal acetylations. In addition, we identify three hypothetical proteins that appear to be bona fide r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius large subunit. Dissociation of r-proteins from the S. acidocaldarius large subunit indicates that the novel r-proteins establish tighter interactions with the large subunit than some integral r-proteins. Furthermore, cryo electron microscopy reconstructions of the S. acidocaldarius and P. aerophilum 50S subunits allow for a tentative localization of the binding site of the novel r-proteins. This study illustrates not only the potential diversity of the archaeal ribosomes but also the necessity to experimentally analyze the archaeal ribosomes to ascertain their protein composition. The discovery of novel archaeal r-proteins and factors may be the first step to understanding how archaeal ribosomes cope with extreme environmental conditions.

  9. Dual binding mode of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex reveals a novel universal adapter site on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Pech, Markus; Spreter, Thomas; Beckmann, Roland; Beatrix, Birgitta

    2010-06-18

    Nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) was identified in eukaryotes as the first cytosolic factor that contacts the nascent polypeptide chain emerging from the ribosome. NAC is present as a homodimer in archaea and as a highly conserved heterodimer in eukaryotes. Mutations in NAC cause severe embryonically lethal phenotypes in mice, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAC is quantitatively associated with ribosomes. Here we show that NAC contacts several ribosomal proteins. The N terminus of betaNAC, however, specifically contacts near the tunnel exit ribosomal protein Rpl31, which is unique to eukaryotes and archaea. Moreover, the first 23 amino acids of betaNAC are sufficient to direct an otherwise non-associated protein to the ribosome. In contrast, alphaNAC (Egd2p) contacts Rpl17, the direct neighbor of Rpl31 at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. Rpl31 was also recently identified as a contact site for the SRP receptor and the ribosome-associated complex. Furthermore, in Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF) interacts with the corresponding surface area on the eubacterial ribosome. In addition to the previously identified universal adapter site represented by Rpl25/Rpl35, we therefore refer to Rpl31/Rpl17 as a novel universal docking site for ribosome-associated factors on the eukaryotic ribosome.

  10. Ocean plankton. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean.

    PubMed

    de Vargas, Colomban; Audic, Stéphane; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Mahé, Frédéric; Logares, Ramiro; Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Le Bescot, Noan; Probert, Ian; Carmichael, Margaux; Poulain, Julie; Romac, Sarah; Colin, Sébastien; Aury, Jean-Marc; Bittner, Lucie; Chaffron, Samuel; Dunthorn, Micah; Engelen, Stefan; Flegontova, Olga; Guidi, Lionel; Horák, Aleš; Jaillon, Olivier; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Lukeš, Julius; Malviya, Shruti; Morard, Raphael; Mulot, Matthieu; Scalco, Eleonora; Siano, Raffaele; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel; Grimsley, Nigel; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Raes, Jeroen; Sieracki, Michael E; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric

    2015-05-22

    Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size. We assessed eukaryotic diversity from 334 size-fractionated photic-zone plankton communities collected across tropical and temperate oceans during the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition. We analyzed 18S ribosomal DNA sequences across the intermediate plankton-size spectrum from the smallest unicellular eukaryotes (protists, >0.8 micrometers) to small animals of a few millimeters. Eukaryotic ribosomal diversity saturated at ~150,000 operational taxonomic units, about one-third of which could not be assigned to known eukaryotic groups. Diversity emerged at all taxonomic levels, both within the groups comprising the ~11,200 cataloged morphospecies of eukaryotic plankton and among twice as many other deep-branching lineages of unappreciated importance in plankton ecology studies. Most eukaryotic plankton biodiversity belonged to heterotrophic protistan groups, particularly those known to be parasites or symbiotic hosts.

  11. An inventory of yeast proteins associated with nucleolar and ribosomal components

    PubMed Central

    Staub, Eike; Mackowiak, Sebastian; Vingron, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Although baker's yeast is a primary model organism for research on eukaryotic ribosome assembly and nucleoli, the list of its proteins that are functionally associated with nucleoli or ribosomes is still incomplete. We trained a naïve Bayesian classifier to predict novel proteins that are associated with yeast nucleoli or ribosomes based on parts lists of nucleoli in model organisms and large-scale protein interaction data sets. Phylogenetic profiling and gene expression analysis were carried out to shed light on evolutionary and regulatory aspects of nucleoli and ribosome assembly. Results We predict that, in addition to 439 known proteins, a further 62 yeast proteins are associated with components of the nucleolus or the ribosome. The complete set comprises a large core of archaeal-type proteins, several bacterial-type proteins, but mostly eukaryote-specific inventions. Expression of nucleolar and ribosomal genes tends to be strongly co-regulated compared to other yeast genes. Conclusion The number of proteins associated with nucleolar or ribosomal components in yeast is at least 14% higher than known before. The nucleolus probably evolved from an archaeal-type ribosome maturation machinery by recruitment of several bacterial-type and mostly eukaryote-specific factors. Not only expression of ribosomal protein genes, but also expression of genes encoding the 90S processosome, are strongly co-regulated and both regulatory programs are distinct from each other. PMID:17067374

  12. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    PubMed Central

    Espinar-Marchena, Francisco J.; Babiano, Reyes; Cruz, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as "placeholders". Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway. PMID:28685141

  13. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  14. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  15. How Ribosomes Translate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Sergey O; Hofman, Isabel J F; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2017-09-18

    A wealth of novel findings, including congenital ribosomal mutations in ribosomopathies and somatic ribosomal mutations in various cancers, have significantly increased our understanding of the relevance of ribosomes in oncogenesis. Here, we explore the growing list of mechanisms by which the ribosome is involved in carcinogenesis-from the hijacking of ribosomes by oncogenic factors and dysregulated translational control, to the effects of mutations in ribosomal components on cellular metabolism. Of clinical importance, the recent success of RNA polymerase inhibitors highlights the dependence on "onco-ribosomes" as an Achilles' heel of cancer cells and a promising target for further therapeutic intervention.Significance: The recent discovery of somatic mutations in ribosomal proteins in several cancers has strengthened the link between ribosome defects and cancer progression, while also raising the question of which cellular mechanisms such defects exploit. Here, we discuss the emerging molecular mechanisms by which ribosomes support oncogenesis, and how this understanding is driving the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1-19. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates translation by binding directly to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eileen; Sharma, Manjuli R; Shi, Xinying; Agrawal, Rajendra K; Joseph, Simpson

    2014-05-08

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited mental retardation, and it is caused by loss of function of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is involved in the translational regulation of several neuronal mRNAs. However, the precise mechanism of translational inhibition by FMRP is unknown. Here, we show that FMRP inhibits translation by binding directly to the L5 protein on the 80S ribosome. Furthermore, cryoelectron microscopic reconstruction of the 80S ribosome⋅FMRP complex shows that FMRP binds within the intersubunit space of the ribosome such that it would preclude the binding of tRNA and translation elongation factors on the ribosome. These findings suggest that FMRP inhibits translation by blocking the essential components of the translational machinery from binding to the ribosome.

  17. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  18. Evidence that Yih1 resides in a complex with ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Waller, Tracey; Lee, Su Jung; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2012-05-01

    Adjusting protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) is a major mechanism by which eukaryotes adapt to and overcome stress. The eIF2α kinase Gcn2 is essential for overcoming amino acid starvation in all eukaryotes. We have shown that to sense starvation, the Gcn2 RWD domain must directly contact its effector protein, Gcn1, and both must bind to the ribosome, suggesting that starvation is sensed within a Gcn1-Gcn2-ribosome complex. The mammalian protein IMPACT, highly expressed in neurons, and its yeast orthologue yeast IMPACT homologue (Yih1) harbour an RWD domain with Gcn1-binding activity. We have shown that Yih1 downregulates Gcn2 by competing with Gcn2 for Gcn1-binding. Here, we provide evidence that Yih1 forms a complex with ribosomes. In velocity sedimentation assays, overexpressed glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged Yih1 cosedimented with polyribosomes independently of Gcn1. Reduction of polyribosomes to monosomes concomitantly decreased GST-Yih1 sedimentation in the heavy fractions where polyribosomes are normally found. Furthermore, GST-Yih1 coprecipitated large ribosomal protein Rpl39 independently of Gcn1. GST-Yih1 overexpression did not significantly affect Gcn1-ribosome or Gcn2-ribosome cosedimentation. myc-tagged Yih1 expressed from its own promoter cosedimented with polyribosomes independently of Gcn1, indicating that Yih1-ribosome interaction occurs under physiological conditions. GST-IMPACT cosedimented with yeast ribosomes and coprecipitated Rpl39 in a Gcn1-independent fashion, suggesting that Yih1/IMPACT-ribosome association is evolutionarily conserved. Moreover, GST-IMPACT coprecipitated actin as found for GST-Yih1. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that IMPACT/Yih1 associates with ribosomes and that these ribosomes may simultaneously carry Gcn1 and Gcn2. Close physical proximity of Yih1 to the Gcn1-Gcn2-ribosome complex would allow cells to quickly inhibit Gcn2 whenever or wherever

  19. Ribosomal Chamber Music: Toward an Understanding of IRES Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Unbehaun, Anett; Spahn, Christian M T

    2017-08-01

    Internal initiation is a 5'-end-independent mode of translation initiation engaged by many virus- and putatively some cell-encoded templates. Internal initiation is facilitated by specific RNA tertiary folds, called internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs), in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the respective transcripts. In this review we discuss recent structural insight into how established IRESs first capture and then manipulate the eukaryotic translation machinery through non-canonical interactions and by guiding the intrinsic conformational flexibility of the eukaryotic ribosome. Because IRESs operate with reduced complexity and constitute minimal systems of initiation, comparison with canonical initiation may allow common mechanistic principles of the ribosome to be delineated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peptidyltransferase center of ribosomes. On the mechanism of action of alkaloid lycorine.

    PubMed

    Kukhanova, M; Victorova, L; Krayevsky, A

    1983-08-22

    The molecular mechanism of action of the alkaloid lycorine has been revised. According to our results, lycorine inhibits the binding of CACCA-Leu comes from Ac to the donor site of the peptidyltransferase center of wheat-germ ribosomes, whereas the transpeptidation reaction in the system with the minimal model donor is not inhibited. The equilibrium constant of CACCA-Leu comes from Ac to the donor site of 80 S ribosomes is measured.

  1. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-07-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server.

  2. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server. PMID:8332524

  3. Acidocalcisomes of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Roberto; Huang, Guozhong

    2016-08-01

    Acidocalcisomes are organelles rich in polyphosphate and cations and acidified by proton pumps. Although they have also been described in prokaryotes they have been better characterized in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes. Eukaryotic acidocalcisomes belong to the group of lysosome-related organelles. They have a variety of functions, from the storage of cations and phosphorus to calcium signaling, autophagy, osmoregulation, blood coagulation, and inflammation. Acidocalcisomes of several unicellular eukaryotes possess a variety of transporters, channels and pumps implying a large energetic requirement for their maintenance and suggesting other important functions waiting to be discovered.

  4. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-09-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment.

  5. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  6. Direct link between RACK1 function and localization at the ribosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Scott M; Gilbert, Wendy V; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-03-01

    The receptor for activated C-kinase (RACK1), a conserved protein implicated in numerous signaling pathways, is a stoichiometric component of eukaryotic ribosomes located on the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit. To test the hypothesis that ribosome association is central to the function of RACK1 in vivo, we determined the 2.1-A crystal structure of RACK1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Asc1p) and used it to design eight mutant versions of RACK1 to assess roles in ribosome binding and in vivo function. Conserved charged amino acids on one side of the beta-propeller structure were found to confer most of the 40S subunit binding affinity, whereas an adjacent conserved and structured loop had little effect on RACK1-ribosome association. Yeast mutations that confer moderate to strong defects in ribosome binding mimic some phenotypes of a RACK1 deletion strain, including increased sensitivity to drugs affecting cell wall biosynthesis and translation elongation. Furthermore, disruption of RACK1's position at the 40S ribosomal subunit results in the failure of the mRNA binding protein Scp160 to associate with actively translating ribosomes. These results provide the first direct evidence that RACK1 functions from the ribosome, implying a physical link between the eukaryotic ribosome and cell signaling pathways in vivo.

  7. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-03-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC.

  8. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC. PMID:25802992

  9. Bacterial and Eukaryotic Replisome Machines

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nina; O’Donnell, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomic DNA is replicated by a multiprotein replisome machine. The replisome contains numerous essential factors that unwind, prime and synthesize each of the two strands of duplex DNA. The antiparallel structure of DNA, and unidirectional activity of DNA polymerases, requires the two strands of DNA to be extended in opposite directions, and this structural feature requires distinctive processes for synthesis of the two strands. Genome duplication is of central importance to all cell types, and one may expect the replisome apparatus to be conserved from bacteria to human, as is the case with RNA polymerase driven transcription and ribosome mediated translation. However, it is known that the replication factors of bacteria are not homologous to those of archaea and eukaryotes, indicating that the replication process evolved twice, independently, rather than from a common ancestor cell. Thus, the different domains of life may exhibit significant differences in their mechanistic strategy of replication. In this review, we compare and contrast the different structures and mechanistic features of the cellular replication machinery in the three domains of life. PMID:28042596

  10. Rapid cytoplasmic turnover of yeast ribosomes in response to rapamycin inhibition of TOR.

    PubMed

    Pestov, Dimitri G; Shcherbik, Natalia

    2012-06-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway is the central regulator of cell growth in eukaryotes. Inhibition of TOR by rapamycin elicits changes in translation attributed mainly to altered translation initiation and repression of the synthesis of new ribosomes. Using quantitative analysis of rRNA, we found that the number of existing ribosomes present in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture during growth in rich medium rapidly decreases by 40 to 60% when the cells are treated with rapamycin. This process is not appreciably affected by a suppression of autophagy, previously implicated in degradation of ribosomes in eukaryotes upon starvation. Yeast cells deficient in the exosome function or lacking its cytoplasmic Ski cofactors show an abnormal pattern of rRNA degradation, particularly in the large ribosomal subunit, and accumulate rRNA fragments after rapamycin treatment and during diauxic shift. The exosome and Ski proteins are thus important for processing of rRNA decay intermediates, although they are probably not responsible for initiating rRNA decay. The role of cytoplasmic nucleases in rapamycin-induced rRNA degradation suggests mechanistic parallels of this process to nutrient-controlled ribosome turnover in prokaryotes. We propose that ribosome content is regulated dynamically in eukaryotes by TOR through both ribosome synthesis and the cytoplasmic turnover of mature ribosomes.

  11. Symbiosis in eukaryotic evolution.

    PubMed

    López-García, Purificación; Eme, Laura; Moreira, David

    2017-02-28

    Fifty years ago, Lynn Margulis, inspiring in early twentieth-century ideas that put forward a symbiotic origin for some eukaryotic organelles, proposed a unified theory for the origin of the eukaryotic cell based on symbiosis as evolutionary mechanism. Margulis was profoundly aware of the importance of symbiosis in the natural microbial world and anticipated the evolutionary significance that integrated cooperative interactions might have as mechanism to increase cellular complexity. Today, we have started fully appreciating the vast extent of microbial diversity and the importance of syntrophic metabolic cooperation in natural ecosystems, especially in sediments and microbial mats. Also, not only the symbiogenetic origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts has been clearly demonstrated, but improvement in phylogenomic methods combined with recent discoveries of archaeal lineages more closely related to eukaryotes further support the symbiogenetic origin of the eukaryotic cell. Margulis left us in legacy the idea of 'eukaryogenesis by symbiogenesis'. Although this has been largely verified, when, where, and specifically how eukaryotic cells evolved are yet unclear. Here, we shortly review current knowledge about symbiotic interactions in the microbial world and their evolutionary impact, the status of eukaryogenetic models and the current challenges and perspectives ahead to reconstruct the evolutionary path to eukaryotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Disorder in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Tompa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Based on early bioinformatic studies on a handful of species, the frequency of structural disorder of proteins is generally thought to be much higher in eukaryotes than in prokaryotes. To refine this view, we present here a comparative prediction study and analysis of 194 fully described eukaryotic proteomes and 87 reference prokaryotes for structural disorder. We found that structural disorder does distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes, but its frequency spans a very wide range in the two superkingdoms that largely overlap. The number of disordered binding regions and different Pfam domain types also contribute to distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes. Unexpectedly, the highest levels – and highest variability – of predicted disorder is found in protists, i.e. single-celled eukaryotes, often surpassing more complex eukaryote organisms, plants and animals. This trend contrasts with that of the number of domain types, which increases rather monotonously toward more complex organisms. The level of structural disorder appears to be strongly correlated with lifestyle, because some obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have the lowest levels, whereas host-changing parasites have the highest level of predicted disorder. We conclude that protists have been the evolutionary hot-bed of experimentation with structural disorder, in a period when structural disorder was actively invented and the major functional classes of disordered proteins established. PMID:22496841

  13. Structural disorder in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Pancsa, Rita; Tompa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Based on early bioinformatic studies on a handful of species, the frequency of structural disorder of proteins is generally thought to be much higher in eukaryotes than in prokaryotes. To refine this view, we present here a comparative prediction study and analysis of 194 fully described eukaryotic proteomes and 87 reference prokaryotes for structural disorder. We found that structural disorder does distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes, but its frequency spans a very wide range in the two superkingdoms that largely overlap. The number of disordered binding regions and different Pfam domain types also contribute to distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes. Unexpectedly, the highest levels--and highest variability--of predicted disorder is found in protists, i.e. single-celled eukaryotes, often surpassing more complex eukaryote organisms, plants and animals. This trend contrasts with that of the number of domain types, which increases rather monotonously toward more complex organisms. The level of structural disorder appears to be strongly correlated with lifestyle, because some obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have the lowest levels, whereas host-changing parasites have the highest level of predicted disorder. We conclude that protists have been the evolutionary hot-bed of experimentation with structural disorder, in a period when structural disorder was actively invented and the major functional classes of disordered proteins established.

  14. An archaeal origin of eukaryotes supports only two primary domains of life.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Foster, Peter G; Cox, Cymon J; Embley, T Martin

    2013-12-12

    The discovery of the Archaea and the proposal of the three-domains 'universal' tree, based on ribosomal RNA and core genes mainly involved in protein translation, catalysed new ideas for cellular evolution and eukaryotic origins. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the three-domains tree may be incorrect: evolutionary trees made using newer methods place eukaryotic core genes within the Archaea, supporting hypotheses in which an archaeon participated in eukaryotic origins by founding the host lineage for the mitochondrial endosymbiont. These results provide support for only two primary domains of life--Archaea and Bacteria--because eukaryotes arose through partnership between them.

  15. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  16. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations.

  17. Chaos and Hyperchaos in a Model of Ribosome Autocatalytic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Likhoshvai, Vitaly A.; Kogai, Vladislav V.; Fadeev, Stanislav I.; Khlebodarova, Tamara M.

    2016-01-01

    Any vital activities of the cell are based on the ribosomes, which not only provide the basic machinery for the synthesis of all proteins necessary for cell functioning during growth and division, but for biogenesis itself. From this point of view, ribosomes are self-replicating and autocatalytic structures. In current work we present an elementary model in which the autocatalytic synthesis of ribosomal RNA and proteins, as well as enzymes ensuring their degradation are described with two monotonically increasing functions. For certain parameter values, the model, consisting of one differential equation with delayed argument, demonstrates both stationary and oscillatory dynamics of the ribosomal protein synthesis, which can be chaotic and hyperchaotic dependent on the value of the delayed argument. The biological interpretation of the modeling results and parameter estimation suggest the feasibility of chaotic dynamics in molecular genetic systems of eukaryotes, which depends only on the internal characteristics of functioning of the translation system. PMID:27941909

  18. The SSU Processome in Ribosome Biogenesis – Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Kathleen R.; Charette, J. Michael; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The small subunit (SSU) processome is a 2.2 MDa ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing, assembly and maturation of the SSU of eukaryotic ribosomes. The identities of many of the factors involved in SSU biogenesis have been elucidated over the past 40 years. However, as our understanding increases, so do the number of questions about the nature of this complicated process. Cataloguing the components is the first step towards understanding the molecular workings of a system. This review will focus on how identifying components of ribosome biogenesis has led to the knowledge of how these factors, protein and RNA alike, associate with one another into sub-complexes, with a concentration on the small ribosomal subunit. We will also explore how this knowledge of sub-complex assembly has informed our understanding of the workings of the ribosome synthesis system as a whole. PMID:21318072

  19. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael S.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Park, Edwards A.; Parker, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  20. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks.

  1. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  2. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  3. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G J; Overbeek, R; Larsen, N; Marsh, T L; McCaughey, M J; Maciukenas, M A; Kuan, W M; Macke, T J; Xing, Y; Woese, C R

    1992-05-11

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  4. Functional Interaction between Ribosomal Protein L6 and RbgA during Ribosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.; Britton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins. PMID:25330043

  5. Functional interaction between ribosomal protein L6 and RbgA during ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Megha; Jain, Nikhil; Davis, Joseph H; Williamson, James R; Britton, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins.

  6. The 3′ Untranslated Region of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Contains Two T-Shaped, Ribosome-Binding, Cap-Independent Translation Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Szarko, Christine; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant viruses without 5′caps or 3′ poly(A) tails contain 3′ proximal, cap-independent translation enhancers (3′CITEs) that bind to ribosomal subunits or translation factors thought to assist in ribosome recruitment. Most 3′CITEs participate in a long-distance kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin to deliver ribosomal subunits to the 5′ end for translation initiation. Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) contains two adjacent 3′CITEs in the center of its 703-nucleotide 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), the ribosome-binding, kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding Panicum mosaic virus-like translation enhance (PTE). We now report that PEMV contains a third, independent 3′CITE located near the 3′ terminus. This 3′CITE is composed of three hairpins and two pseudoknots, similar to the TSS 3′CITE of the carmovirus Turnip crinkle virus (TCV). As with the TCV TSS, the PEMV 3′TSS is predicted to fold into a T-shaped structure that binds to 80S ribosomes and 60S ribosomal subunits. A small hairpin (kl-H) upstream of the 3′TSS contains an apical loop capable of forming a kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin and is critical for the accumulation of full-length PEMV in protoplasts. Although the kl-H and 3′TSS are dispensable for the translation of a reporter construct containing the complete PEMV 3′UTR in vitro, deleting the normally required kl-TSS and PTE 3′CITEs and placing the kl-H and 3′TSS proximal to the reporter termination codon restores translation to near wild-type levels. This suggests that PEMV requires three 3′CITEs for proper translation and that additional translation enhancers may have been missed if reporter constructs were used in 3′CITE identification. IMPORTANCE The rapid life cycle of viruses requires efficient translation of viral-encoded proteins. Many plant RNA viruses contain 3′ cap-independent translation

  7. Assembly of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shajani, Zahra; Sykes, Michael T; Williamson, James R

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomes from a discrete set of components is a key aspect of the highly coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. In this review, we present a brief history of the early work on ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli, including a description of in vivo and in vitro intermediates. The assembly process is believed to progress through an alternating series of RNA conformational changes and protein-binding events; we explore the effects of ribosomal proteins in driving these events. Ribosome assembly in vivo proceeds much faster than in vitro, and we outline the contributions of several of the assembly cofactors involved, including Era, RbfA, RimJ, RimM, RimP, and RsgA, which associate with the 30S subunit, and CsdA, DbpA, Der, and SrmB, which associate with the 50S subunit.

  8. The Epigenetic Pathways to Ribosomal DNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rakesh; Srivastava, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterochromatin is the transcriptionally repressed portion of eukaryotic chromatin that maintains a condensed appearance throughout the cell cycle. At sites of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) heterochromatin, epigenetic states contribute to gene silencing and genome stability, which are required for proper chromosome segregation and a normal life span. Here, we focus on recent advances in the epigenetic regulation of rDNA silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammals, including regulation by several histone modifications and several protein components associated with the inner nuclear membrane within the nucleolus. Finally, we discuss the perturbations of rDNA epigenetic pathways in regulating cellular aging and in causing various types of diseases. PMID:27250769

  9. Subseabed Radioactive Waste Disposal Feasibility Program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with other related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's.

  10. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  11. Health characteristics of heart transplant recipients surviving into their 80s.

    PubMed

    Tabachnick, Deborah R; Bowen, Megan E; Stehlik, Josef; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Caine, William T; Selzman, Craig H; McKellar, Stephen H

    2017-08-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure and has been successful for >30 y. The clinical course of recipients at the extreme of age is unknown. We reviewed our experience to determine the overall health and prevalence of Tx-related medical problems for recipients in their ninth decade. We reviewed the UCTP experience from 1985 to present to identify patients who survived into their 80s and matched (1:1) with other recipients for gender and age at HTx, but did not survive to ≥80 y. The end point was the prevalence of medical problems. Since 1985, 1129 adult HTx have been performed and 14 patients (1.2%) survived to ≥80 y old. The mean age at HTx was 63 ± 4 y. Of octogenarians, the majority were males with ischemic cardiomyopathy. The average survival after transplant was 19 ± 5 y in the octogenarians and 5 ± 5 y in the controls (P < 0.01). Over time, the prevalence of comorbidities increased. Compared with nonoctogenarians, we observed higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (P = 0.02), and chronic renal insufficiency (P = 0.02) during follow-up. Cardiac function was normal (ejection fraction > 55%) for all octogenarians at age 80 y. Despite improvements in posttransplant care, survival of HTx patients into the ninth decade is rare (1%). For those surviving into their 80s, cardiac function is preserved but dyslipidemia, renal insufficiency, and skin cancers are common. As the age of Htx patients continues to increase, posttransplant care should be tailored to minimize post-HTx complications and further extend survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolutionary implications of intron-exon distribution and the properties and sequences of the RPL10A gene in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Eva M; Casano, Leonardo M; Barreno, Eva

    2013-03-01

    The RPL10A gene encodes the RPL10 protein, required for joining 40S and 60S subunits into a functional 80S ribosome. This highly conserved gene, ubiquitous across all eukaryotic super-groups, is characterized by a variable number of spliceosomal introns, present in most organisms. These properties facilitate the recognition of orthologs among distant taxa and thus comparative studies of sequences as well as the distribution and properties of introns in taxonomically distant groups of eukaryotes. The present study examined the multiple ways in which RPL10A conservation vs. sequence changes in the gene over the course of evolution, including in exons, introns, and the encoded proteins, can be exploited for evolutionary analysis at different taxonomic levels. At least 25 different positions harboring introns within the RPL10A gene were determined in different taxa, including animals, plants, fungi, and alveolates. Generally, intron positions were found to be well conserved even across different kingdoms. However, certain introns seemed to be restricted to specific groups of organisms. Analyses of several properties of introns, including insertion site, phase, and length, along with exon and intron GC content and exon-intron boundaries, suggested biases within different groups of organisms. The use of a standard primer pair to analyze a portion of the intron-containing RPL10A gene in 12 genera of green algae within Chlorophyta is presented as a case study for evolutionary analyses of introns at intermediate and low taxonomic levels. Our study shows that phylogenetic reconstructions at different depths can be achieved using RPL10A nucleotide sequences from both exons and introns as well as the amino acid sequences of the encoded protein.

  13. Eukaryotic selenoproteins and selenoproteomes

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Alexey V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for which both beneficial and toxic effects in human health have been described. It is now clear that the importance of having adequate amounts of this micronutrient in the diet is primarily due to the fact that selenium is required for biosynthesis of selenocysteine, the twenty first naturally occurring amino acid in protein. In this review, we provide an overview of eukaryotic selenoproteins and selenoproteomes, which are sets of selenoproteins in these organisms. In eukaryotes, selenoproteins show a mosaic occurrence, with some organisms, such as vertebrates and algae, having dozens of these proteins, while other organisms, such as higher plants and fungi, having lost all selenoproteins during evolution. We also discuss selenoprotein functions and evolutionary trends in the use of these proteins in eukaryotes. Functional analysis of selenoproteins is critical for better understanding of the role of selenium in human health and disease. PMID:19477234

  14. Initiation of Translation in Bacteria by a Structured Eukaryotic IRES RNA

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A.; Jaafar, Zane A.; Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Noller, Harry F.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA→RNA→protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive1,2. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the steps of translation following initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life3,4. We asked whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here, we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by tRNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence as an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life. PMID:25652826

  15. Eukaryotic aspects of translation initiation brought into focus.

    PubMed

    Aylett, Christopher H S; Ban, Nenad

    2017-03-19

    In all organisms, mRNA-directed protein synthesis is catalysed by ribosomes. Although the basic aspects of translation are preserved in all kingdoms of life, important differences are found in the process of translation initiation, which is rate-limiting and the most important step for translation regulation. While great strides had been taken towards a complete structural understanding of the initiation of translation in eubacteria, our understanding of the eukaryotic process, which includes numerous eukaryotic-specific initiation factors, was until recently limited owing to a lack of structural information. In this review, we discuss recent results in the field that provide an increasingly complete molecular description of the eukaryotic initiation process. The structural snapshots obtained using a range of methods now provide insights into the architecture of the initiation complex, start-codon recognition by the initiator tRNA and the process of subunit joining. Future advances will require both higher-resolution insights into previously characterized complexes and mapping of initiation factors that control translation on an additional level by interacting only peripherally or transiently with ribosomal subunits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  17. Conserved motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic polypeptide release factors: tRNA-protein mimicry hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ebihara, K; Uno, M; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    Translation termination requires two codon-specific polypeptide release factors in prokaryotes and one omnipotent factor in eukaryotes. Sequences of 17 different polypeptide release factors from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were compared. The prokaryotic release factors share residues split into seven motifs. Conservation of many discrete, perhaps critical, amino acids is observed in eukaryotic release factors, as well as in the C-terminal portion of elongation factor (EF) G. Given that the C-terminal domains of EF-G interacts with ribosomes by mimicry of a tRNA structure, the pattern of conservation of residues in release factors may reflect requirements for a tRNA-mimicry for binding to the A site of the ribosome. This mimicry would explain why release factors recognize stop codons and suggests that all prokaryotic and eukaryotic release factors evolved from the progenitor of EF-G. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643594

  18. Ribosome-dependent conversion of polyA-containing heterogenous nuclear RNA into smaller RNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Grozdanovic, J; Hradec, J

    1975-01-01

    The polyA-containing heterogenous nuclear RNA fraction separated from total rat liver nRNA by gel filtration on Sepharose 4B followed by affinity chromatography on polyU-Sepharose and containing predominantly the 45S components becomes enzymatically bound to homologous 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes at 0 degree C. If 80S ribosomes or polyribosomes with bound poly-a-containing HnRNA are subjected to a further incubation at 37 degree C, the original 45S RNA is gradually converted into smaller RNA species of 10- 35S which remain bound to the particle. This ribosome-dependent cleavage of larger HnRNA species into smaller RNA molecules may represent the ultimate step of mRNA maturation. PMID:1144064

  19. When stable RNA becomes unstable: the degradation of ribosomes in bacteria and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maiväli, Ülo; Paier, Anton; Tenson, Tanel

    2013-07-01

    This review takes a comparative look at the various scenarios where ribosomes are degraded in bacteria and eukaryotes with emphasis on studies involving Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the molecular mechanisms of degradation in bacteria and yeast appear somewhat different, we argue that the underlying causes of ribosome degradation are remarkably similar. In both model organisms during ribosomal assembly, partially formed pre-ribosomal particles can be degraded by at least two different sequentially-acting quality control pathways and fully assembled but functionally faulty ribosomes can be degraded in a separate quality control pathway. In addition, ribosomes that are both structurally- and functionally-sound can be degraded as an adaptive measure to stress.

  20. Eukaryotic Cell Panorama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. This report describes the scientific results that support an illustration of a eukaryotic cell, enlarged by one million times to show the distribution and arrangement of macromolecules. The panoramic cross section includes eight panels that extend…

  1. Eukaryotic Cell Panorama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. This report describes the scientific results that support an illustration of a eukaryotic cell, enlarged by one million times to show the distribution and arrangement of macromolecules. The panoramic cross section includes eight panels that extend…

  2. Collodictyon—An Ancient Lineage in the Tree of Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sen; Burki, Fabien; Bråte, Jon; Keeling, Patrick J.; Klaveness, Dag; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    The current consensus for the eukaryote tree of life consists of several large assemblages (supergroups) that are hypothesized to describe the existing diversity. Phylogenomic analyses have shed light on the evolutionary relationships within and between supergroups as well as placed newly sequenced enigmatic species close to known lineages. Yet, a few eukaryote species remain of unknown origin and could represent key evolutionary forms for inferring ancient genomic and cellular characteristics of eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the evolutionary origin of the poorly studied protist Collodictyon (subphylum Diphyllatia) by sequencing a cDNA library as well as the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes. Phylogenomic trees inferred from 124 genes placed Collodictyon close to the bifurcation of the “unikont” and “bikont” groups, either alone or as sister to the potentially contentious excavate Malawimonas. Phylogenies based on rDNA genes confirmed that Collodictyon is closely related to another genus, Diphylleia, and revealed a very low diversity in environmental DNA samples. The early and distinct origin of Collodictyon suggests that it constitutes a new lineage in the global eukaryote phylogeny. Collodictyon shares cellular characteristics with Excavata and Amoebozoa, such as ventral feeding groove supported by microtubular structures and the ability to form thin and broad pseudopods. These may therefore be ancient morphological features among eukaryotes. Overall, this shows that Collodictyon is a key lineage to understand early eukaryote evolution. PMID:22319147

  3. Collodictyon--an ancient lineage in the tree of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sen; Burki, Fabien; Bråte, Jon; Keeling, Patrick J; Klaveness, Dag; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2012-06-01

    The current consensus for the eukaryote tree of life consists of several large assemblages (supergroups) that are hypothesized to describe the existing diversity. Phylogenomic analyses have shed light on the evolutionary relationships within and between supergroups as well as placed newly sequenced enigmatic species close to known lineages. Yet, a few eukaryote species remain of unknown origin and could represent key evolutionary forms for inferring ancient genomic and cellular characteristics of eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the evolutionary origin of the poorly studied protist Collodictyon (subphylum Diphyllatia) by sequencing a cDNA library as well as the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes. Phylogenomic trees inferred from 124 genes placed Collodictyon close to the bifurcation of the "unikont" and "bikont" groups, either alone or as sister to the potentially contentious excavate Malawimonas. Phylogenies based on rDNA genes confirmed that Collodictyon is closely related to another genus, Diphylleia, and revealed a very low diversity in environmental DNA samples. The early and distinct origin of Collodictyon suggests that it constitutes a new lineage in the global eukaryote phylogeny. Collodictyon shares cellular characteristics with Excavata and Amoebozoa, such as ventral feeding groove supported by microtubular structures and the ability to form thin and broad pseudopods. These may therefore be ancient morphological features among eukaryotes. Overall, this shows that Collodictyon is a key lineage to understand early eukaryote evolution.

  4. Microbiology: eukaryotic diversity in Spain's River of Fire.

    PubMed

    Amaral Zettler, Linda A; Gómez, Felipe; Zettler, Erik; Keenan, Brendan G; Amils, Ricardo; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2002-05-09

    The Rio Tinto, known by the Phoenicians as 'Ur-yero', or 'River of Fire', because of its deep red colour and high acidity, flows through the world's largest pyritic belt in southwestern Spain. Surprisingly, eukaryotic microbes are the principal contributors of biomass in this hostile river, which has a pH of 2 and contains much higher concentrations of heavy metals than are typically found in fresh waters. Here we show that the Rio Tinto shows an unexpected degree of eukaryotic diversity and includes new lineages that we have identified by sequence analysis of genes encoding small-subunit ribosomal RNAs. The diversity of these eukaryotes is much greater than that of prokaryotes, whose metabolism is responsible for the extreme environment.

  5. The elongation, termination, and recycling phases of translation in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dever, Thomas E; Green, Rachel

    2012-07-01

    This work summarizes our current understanding of the elongation and termination/recycling phases of eukaryotic protein synthesis. We focus here on recent advances in the field. In addition to an overview of translation elongation, we discuss unique aspects of eukaryotic translation elongation including eEF1 recycling, eEF2 modification, and eEF3 and eIF5A function. Likewise, we highlight the function of the eukaryotic release factors eRF1 and eRF3 in translation termination, and the functions of ABCE1/Rli1, the Dom34:Hbs1 complex, and Ligatin (eIF2D) in ribosome recycling. Finally, we present some of the key questions in translation elongation, termination, and recycling that remain to be answered.

  6. RiboVision suite for visualization and analysis of ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Chad R; Petrov, Anton S; Waterbury, Chris C; Jett, James; Li, Fengbo; Freil, Larry E; Xiong, Xiao; Wang, Lan; Migliozzi, Blacki L R; Hershkovits, Eli; Xue, Yuzhen; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Bowman, Jessica C; Harvey, Stephen C; Grover, Martha A; Wartell, Zachary J; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    RiboVision is a visualization and analysis tool for the simultaneous display of multiple layers of diverse information on primary (1D), secondary (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) structures of ribosomes. The ribosome is a macromolecular complex containing ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins and is a key component of life responsible for the synthesis of proteins in all living organisms. RiboVision is intended for rapid retrieval, analysis, filtering, and display of a variety of ribosomal data. Preloaded information includes 1D, 2D, and 3D structures augmented by base-pairing, base-stacking, and other molecular interactions. RiboVision is preloaded with rRNA secondary structures, rRNA domains and helical structures, phylogeny, crystallographic thermal factors, etc. RiboVision contains structures of ribosomal proteins and a database of their molecular interactions with rRNA. RiboVision contains preloaded structures and data for two bacterial ribosomes (Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli), one archaeal ribosome (Haloarcula marismortui), and three eukaryotic ribosomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens). RiboVision revealed several major discrepancies between the 2D and 3D structures of the rRNAs of the small and large subunits (SSU and LSU). Revised structures mapped with a variety of data are available in RiboVision as well as in a public gallery (). RiboVision is designed to allow users to distill complex data quickly and to easily generate publication-quality images of data mapped onto secondary structures. Users can readily import and analyze their own data in the context of other work. This package allows users to import and map data from CSV files directly onto 1D, 2D, and 3D levels of structure. RiboVision has features in rough analogy with web-based map services capable of seamlessly switching the type of data displayed and the resolution or magnification of the display. RiboVision is available at .

  7. Histone deacetylase 6 associates with ribosomes and regulates de novo protein translation during arsenite stress.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, Kyle V; Zhang, Jack; Dinh, Thai Nho; Strom, Joshua G; Chen, Qin M

    2012-05-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is known as a cytoplasmic enzyme that regulates cell migration, cell adhesion, and degradation of misfolded proteins by deacetylating substrates such as α-tubulin and Hsp90. When HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to 1-200μM sodium arsenite, we observed perinuclear localization of HDAC6 within 30 min. Although the overall level of HDAC6 protein did not change, sodium arsenite caused an increase of HDAC6 in ribosomal fractions. Separation of ribosomal subunits versus intact ribosomes or polysomes indicated that HDAC6 was mainly detected in 40/43S fractions containing the small ribosomal subunit in untreated cells but was associated with 40/43S and 60/80S ribosomal fractions in arsenite-treated cells. Immunocytochemistry studies revealed that arsenite caused colocalization of HDAC6 with the ribosomal large and small subunit protein L36a and S6. Both L36a and S6 were detected in the immunocomplex of HDAC6 isolated from arsenite-treated cells. The observed physical interaction of HDAC6 with ribosomes pointed to a role of HDAC6 in stress-induced protein translation. Among arsenite stress-induced proteins, de novo Nrf2 protein translation was inhibited by Tubastatin A. These data demonstrate that HDAC6 was recruited to ribosomes, physically interacted with ribosomal proteins, and regulated de novo protein translation in keratinocytes responding to arsenite stress.

  8. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  9. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells. PMID:6965093

  10. Analysis of plant ribosomes with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Tuomainen, Päivi; Eskelin, Katri

    2014-02-01

    Ribosome profiling is a technique used to separate ribosomal subunits, 80S ribosomes (monosomes), and polyribosomes (polysomes) from other RNA-protein complexes. It is traditionally performed in sucrose gradients. In this study, we used asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) to characterize ribosome profiles of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. With the optimized running conditions, we were able to separate free molecules from ribosomal subunits and intact ribosomes. We used various chemical and enzymatic treatments to validate the positions of subunits, monosomes, and polysomes in the AsFlFFF fractograms. We also characterized the protein and RNA content of AsFlFFF fractions by gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that ribosomes remained bound to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) during the analysis. Therefore, we conclude that AsFlFFF can be used for ribosome profiling to study the mRNAs that are being translated. It can also be used to study the protein composition of ribosomes that are active in translation at that particular moment.

  11. Transition State Analogues Rescue Ribosomes from Saporin-L1 Ribosome Inactivating Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Matthew B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Evans, Gary B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) catalyze the hydrolytic depurination of one or more adenosine residues from eukaryotic ribosomes. Depurination of the ribosomal sarcin-ricin tetraloop (GAGA) causes inhibition of protein synthesis and cellular death. We characterized the catalytic properties of saporin-L1 from Saponaria officinalis (soapwort) leaves and demonstrate robust activity against defined nucleic acid substrates and mammalian ribosomes. Transition state analogue mimics of small oligonucleotide substrates of saporin-L1 are powerful, slow-onset inhibitors when adenosine is replaced with the transition state mimic 9-deazaadenine-9-methylene-N-hydroxypyrrolidine (DADMeA). Linear, cyclic and stem-loop oligonucleotide inhibitors containing DADMeA and based on the GAGA sarcin-ricin tetraloop gave slow-onset tight-binding inhibition constants (Ki*) of 2.3 to 8.7 nM at physiological conditions and bind up to 40,000-fold tighter than RNA substrates. Saporin-L1 inhibition of rabbit reticulocyte translation was protected by these inhibitors. Transition state analogues of saporin-L1 have potential in cancer therapy that employs saporin-L1 linked immunotoxins. PMID:19764816

  12. Precambrian Skeletonized Microbial Eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, Jere H.

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal heterotrophic eukaryotes are mostly absent from the Precambrian, although algal eukaryotes appear about 2.2 billion years ago. Tintinnids, radiolaria and foraminifera have molecular origins well back into the Precambrian yet no representatives of these groups are known with certainty in that time. These data infer times of the last common ancestors, not the appearance of true representatives of these groups which may well have diversified or not been preserved since those splits. Previous reports of these groups in the Precambrian are misinterpretations of other objects in the fossil record. Reported tintinnids at 1600 mya from China are metamorphic shards or mineral artifacts, the many specimens from 635-715 mya in Mongolia may be eukaryotes but they are not tintinnids, and the putative tintinnids at 580 mya in the Doushantou formation of China are diagenetic alterations of well-known acritarchs. The oldest supposed foraminiferan is Titanotheca from 550 to 565 mya rocks in South America and Africa is based on the occurrence of rutile in the tests and in a few modern agglutinated foraminifera, as well as the agglutinated tests. Neither of these nor the morphology are characteristic of foraminifera; hence these fossils remain as indeterminate microfossils. Platysolenites, an agglutinated tube identical to the modern foraminiferan Bathysiphon, occurs in the latest Neoproterozoic in Russia, Canada, and the USA (California). Some of the larger fossils occurring in typical Ediacaran (late Neoproterozoic) assemblages may be xenophyophorids (very large foraminifera), but the comparison is disputed and flawed. Radiolaria, on occasion, have been reported in the Precambrian, but the earliest known clearly identifiable ones are in the Cambrian. The only certain Precambrian heterotrophic skeletal eukaryotes (thecamoebians) occur in fresh-water rocks at about 750 mya. Skeletonized radiolaria and foraminifera appear sparsely in the Cambrian and radiate in the Ordovician

  13. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health. PMID:26030272

  14. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  15. Ribosome dynamics during decoding.

    PubMed

    Rodnina, Marina V; Fischer, Niels; Maracci, Cristina; Stark, Holger

    2017-03-19

    Elongation factors Tu (EF-Tu) and SelB are translational GTPases that deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) to the ribosome. In each canonical round of translation elongation, aa-tRNAs, assisted by EF-Tu, decode mRNA codons and insert the respective amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Stop codons usually lead to translation termination; however, in special cases UGA codons are recoded to selenocysteine (Sec) with the help of SelB. Recruitment of EF-Tu and SelB together with their respective aa-tRNAs to the ribosome is a multistep process. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the role of ribosome dynamics in aa-tRNA selection. We describe the path to correct codon recognition by canonical elongator aa-tRNA and Sec-tRNA(Sec) and discuss the local and global rearrangements of the ribosome in response to correct and incorrect aa-tRNAs. We present the mechanisms of GTPase activation and GTP hydrolysis of EF-Tu and SelB and summarize what is known about the accommodation of aa-tRNA on the ribosome after its release from the elongation factor. We show how ribosome dynamics ensures high selectivity for the cognate aa-tRNA and suggest that conformational fluctuations, induced fit and kinetic discrimination play major roles in maintaining the speed and fidelity of translation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  16. Molecular basis for protection of ribosomal protein L4 from cellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Ferdinand M.; Hoelz, André

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the nuclear import of ∼80 nascent ribosomal proteins and the elimination of excess amounts by the cellular degradation machinery. Assembly chaperones recognize nascent unassembled ribosomal proteins and transport them together with karyopherins to their nuclear destination. We report the crystal structure of ribosomal protein L4 (RpL4) bound to its dedicated assembly chaperone of L4 (Acl4), revealing extensive interactions sequestering 70 exposed residues of the extended RpL4 loop. The observed molecular recognition fundamentally differs from canonical promiscuous chaperone–substrate interactions. We demonstrate that the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension harbours overlapping binding sites for Acl4 and the nuclear transport factor Kap104, facilitating its continuous protection from the cellular degradation machinery. Thus, Acl4 serves a dual function to facilitate nuclear import and simultaneously protect unassembled RpL4 from the cellular degradation machinery. PMID:28148929

  17. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  18. Rli1/ABCE1 recycles terminating ribosomes and controls translation reinitiation in 3′UTRs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Young, David J.; Guydosh, Nicholas R.; Zhang, Fan; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    To study the function of ABCE1/Rli1 in vivo, we used ribosome profiling and biochemistry to characterize its contribution to ribosome recycling. When Rli1 levels were diminished, 80S ribosomes accumulated both at stop codons and in the adjoining 3′UTRs of most messenger RNAs. Frequently these ribosomes reinitiated translation without the need for a canonical start codon, as small peptide products predicted by 3′UTR ribosome occupancy in all 3 reading frames were confirmed by Western analysis and mass spectrometry. Eliminating the ribosome-rescue factor Dom34 dramatically increased 3′UTR ribosome occupancy in Rli1 depleted cells, indicating that Dom34 clears the bulk of unrecycled ribosomes. Thus, Rli1 is crucial for ribosome recycling in vivo and controls ribosome homeostasis. 3′UTR translation occurs in wild-type cells as well, and observations of elevated 3′UTR ribosomes during stress suggest that modulating recycling and reinitiation is involved in responding to environmental changes. PMID:26276635

  19. Reinitiation and other unconventional posttermination events during eukaryotic translation.

    PubMed

    Skabkin, Maxim A; Skabkina, Olga V; Hellen, Christopher U T; Pestova, Tatyana V

    2013-07-25

    During ribosome recycling, posttermination complexes are dissociated by ABCE1 and eRF1 into 60S and tRNA/mRNA-associated 40S subunits, after which tRNA and mRNA are released by eIF1/eIF1A, Ligatin, or MCT-1/DENR. Occasionally, 40S subunits remain associated with mRNA and reinitiate at nearby AUGs. We recapitulated reinitiation using a reconstituted mammalian translation system. The presence of eIF2, eIF3, eIF1, eIF1A, and Met-tRNAi(Met) was sufficient for recycled 40S subunits to remain on mRNA, scan bidirectionally, and reinitiate at upstream and downstream AUGs if mRNA regions flanking the stop codon were unstructured. Imposition of 3' directionality additionally required eIF4F. Strikingly, posttermination ribosomes were not stably anchored on mRNA and migrated bidirectionally to codons cognate to the P site tRNA. Migration depended on the mode of peptide release (puromycin > eRF1⋅eRF3) and nature of tRNA and was enhanced by eEF2. The mobility of posttermination ribosomes suggests that some reinitiation events could involve 80S ribosomes rather than 40S subunits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pokeweed antiviral protein region Gly209-Lys225 is critical for RNA N-glycosidase activity of the prokaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yoshimi; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kondo, Toshiya

    2008-05-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) isolated from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that has RNA N-glycosidase (RNG) activity towards both eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. In contrast, karasurin-A (KRN), a RIP from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. japonica, is active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Stepwise selection of chimera proteins between PAP and KRN indicated that the C-terminal region of PAP (residues 209-225) was critical for RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosomes. When the region of PAP (residues 209-225) was replaced with the corresponding region of KRN the PAP chimera protein, like KRN, was active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Furthermore, insertion of the region of PAP (residues 209-225) into the KRN chimera protein resulted not only in the detectable RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosome, but also activity toward the eukaryotic ribosomes as well that was seven-fold higher than for the original KRN. In this study, the possibility of genetic manipulation of the activity and substrate specificity of RIPs is demonstrated.

  1. Eukaryotic transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, R D

    1999-12-01

    Some 30 years ago, following the elucidation of transcriptional control in prokaryotes, attention turned to the corresponding problem in eukaryotes: how are so many genes transcribed in a cell-type-specific, developmentally regulated manner? The answer has been found in two modes of regulation, one involving chromatin and the other the chief transcribing enzyme, RNA polymerase II. Although basic features of the prokaryotic mechanism have been preserved, the demands of eukaryotic transcription control are met by a huge increase in complexity and by the addition of new layers to the transcription apparatus. Discovering the components of this apparatus has been a major theme of research over the past three decades; unravelling the mechanisms is a challenge for the future.

  2. Listerin-dependent nascent protein ubiquitination relies on ribosome subunit dissociation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Sichen; von der Malsburg, Karina; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2013-06-06

    Quality control of defective mRNAs relies on their translation to detect the lesion. Aberrant proteins are therefore an obligate byproduct of mRNA surveillance and must be degraded to avoid disrupting protein homeostasis. These defective translation products are thought to be ubiquitinated at the ribosome, but the mechanism of ubiquitin ligase selectivity for these ribosomes is not clear. Here, we in vitro reconstitute ubiquitination of nascent proteins produced from aberrant mRNAs. Stalled 80S ribosome-nascent chain complexes are dissociated by the ribosome recycling factors Hbs1/Pelota/ABCE1 to a unique 60S-nascent chain-tRNA complex. The ubiquitin ligase Listerin preferentially recognizes 60S-nascent chains and triggers efficient nascent chain ubiquitination. Interfering with Hbs1 function stabilizes 80S complexes, precludes efficient Listerin recruitment, and reduces nascent chain ubiquitination. Thus, ribosome recycling factors control Listerin localization, explaining how translation products of mRNA surveillance are efficiently ubiquitinated while sparing translating ribosomes.

  3. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Jan A. K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components will be catabolized by (macro)autophagy in order to re-use building blocks and to support ATP production. In many cases, autophagy takes care of cellular housekeeping to sustain cellular viability. Autophagy encompasses a multitude of related and often highly specific processes that are implicated in both biogenetic and catabolic processes. Recent data indicate that in some unicellular eukaryotes that undergo profound differentiation during their life cycle (e.g. kinetoplastid parasites and amoebes), autophagy is essential for the developmental change that allows the cell to adapt to a new host or form spores. This review summarizes the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy as well as the cytoplasm-to-vacuole-targeting pathway, pexophagy, mitophagy, ER-phagy, ribophagy and piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus, all highly selective forms of autophagy that have first been uncovered in yeast species. Additionally, a detailed analysis will be presented on the state of knowledge on autophagy in non-yeast unicellular eukaryotes with emphasis on the role of this process in differentiation. PMID:20124347

  4. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Jan A K W

    2010-03-12

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components will be catabolized by (macro)autophagy in order to re-use building blocks and to support ATP production. In many cases, autophagy takes care of cellular housekeeping to sustain cellular viability. Autophagy encompasses a multitude of related and often highly specific processes that are implicated in both biogenetic and catabolic processes. Recent data indicate that in some unicellular eukaryotes that undergo profound differentiation during their life cycle (e.g. kinetoplastid parasites and amoebes), autophagy is essential for the developmental change that allows the cell to adapt to a new host or form spores. This review summarizes the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy as well as the cytoplasm-to-vacuole-targeting pathway, pexophagy, mitophagy, ER-phagy, ribophagy and piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus, all highly selective forms of autophagy that have first been uncovered in yeast species. Additionally, a detailed analysis will be presented on the state of knowledge on autophagy in non-yeast unicellular eukaryotes with emphasis on the role of this process in differentiation.

  5. Proteins at the Polypeptide Tunnel Exit of the Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Gruschke, Steffi; Gröne, Kerstin; Heublein, Manfred; Hölz, Stefanie; Israel, Lars; Imhof, Axel; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Ott, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria requires the synthesis of proteins encoded in the mitochondrial DNA. The mitochondrial translation machinery differs significantly from that of the bacterial ancestor of the organelle. This is especially evident from many mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. An important site of the ribosome is the polypeptide tunnel exit. Here, nascent chains are exposed to an aqueous environment for the first time. Many biogenesis factors interact with the tunnel exit of pro- and eukaryotic ribosomes to help the newly synthesized proteins to mature. To date, nothing is known about the organization of the tunnel exit of mitochondrial ribosomes. We therefore undertook a comprehensive approach to determine the composition of the yeast mitochondrial ribosomal tunnel exit. Mitochondria contain homologues of the ribosomal proteins located at this site in bacterial ribosomes. Here, we identified proteins located in their proximity by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed a complex network of interacting proteins including proteins and protein domains specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. This network includes Mba1, the membrane-bound ribosome receptor of the inner membrane, as well as Mrpl3, Mrpl13, and Mrpl27, which constitute ribosomal proteins exclusively found in mitochondria. This unique architecture of the tunnel exit is presumably an adaptation of the translation system to the specific requirements of the organelle. PMID:20404317

  6. Mechanisms of In Vivo Ribosome Maintenance Change in Response to Nutrient Signals*

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Andrew D.; Naylor, Bradley C.; Carson, Richard H.; Evans, Eric; Harwell, Justin; Knecht, Jared; Hexem, Eric; Peelor, Fredrick F.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Price, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Control of protein homeostasis is fundamental to the health and longevity of all organisms. Because the rate of protein synthesis by ribosomes is a central control point in this process, regulation, and maintenance of ribosome function could have amplified importance in the overall regulatory circuit. Indeed, ribosomal defects are commonly associated with loss of protein homeostasis, aging, and disease (1–4), whereas improved protein homeostasis, implying optimal ribosomal function, is associated with disease resistance and increased lifespan (5–7). To maintain a high-quality ribosome population within the cell, dysfunctional ribosomes are targeted for autophagic degradation. It is not known if complete degradation is the only mechanism for eukaryotic ribosome maintenance or if they might also be repaired by replacement of defective components. We used stable-isotope feeding and protein mass spectrometry to measure the kinetics of turnover of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 71 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in mice. The results indicate that exchange of individual proteins and whole ribosome degradation both contribute to ribosome maintenance in vivo. In general, peripheral r-proteins and those with more direct roles in peptide-bond formation are replaced multiple times during the lifespan of the assembled structure, presumably by exchange with a free cytoplasmic pool, whereas the majority of r-proteins are stably incorporated for the lifetime of the ribosome. Dietary signals impact the rates of both new ribosome assembly and component exchange. Signal-specific modulation of ribosomal repair and degradation could provide a mechanistic link in the frequently observed associations among diminished rates of protein synthesis, increased autophagy, and greater longevity (5, 6, 8, 9). PMID:27932527

  7. Purification of 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-02

    Here we describe the further purification of prokaryotic ribosomal particles obtained after the centrifugation of a crude cell lysate through a sucrose cushion. In this final purification step, a fraction containing ribosomes, ribosomal subunits, and polysomes is centrifuged through a 7%-30% (w/w) linear sucrose gradient to isolate tight couple 70S ribosomes, as well as dissociated 30S and 50S subunits. The tight couples fraction, or translationally active ribosome fraction, is composed of intact vacant ribosomes that can be used in cell-free translation systems.

  8. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  9. Principles of cotranslational ubiquitination and quality control at the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Duttler, Stefanie; Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2013-05-09

    Achieving efficient cotranslational folding of complex proteomes poses a challenge for eukaryotic cells. Nascent polypeptides that emerge vectorially from the ribosome often cannot fold stably and may be susceptible to misfolding and degradation. The extent to which nascent chains are subject to cotranslational quality control and degradation remains unclear. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess cotranslational ubiquitination and identify, at a systems level, the determinants and factors governing this process. Cotranslational ubiquitination occurs at very low levels and is carried out by a complex network of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Ribosome-associated chaperones and cotranslational folding protect the majority of nascent chains from premature quality control. Nonetheless, a number of nascent chains whose intrinsic properties hinder efficient cotranslational folding remain susceptible for cotranslational ubiquitination. We find that quality control at the ribosome is achieved through a tiered system wherein nascent polypeptides have a chance to fold before becoming accessible to ubiquitination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic analysis reveals the ordered coupling of translation termination and ribosome recycling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Christopher J; Green, Rachel

    2011-12-20

    Although well defined in bacterial systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cells have only begun to be explored. Recent studies have proposed a direct role for eukaryotic termination factors eRF1 and eRF3 (and the related factors Dom34 and Hbs1) in downstream recycling processes; however, our understanding of the connection between termination and recycling in eukaryotes is limited. Here, using an in vitro reconstituted yeast translation system, we identify a key role for the multifunctional ABC-family protein Rli1 in stimulating both eRF1-mediated termination and ribosome recycling in yeast. Through subsequent kinetic analysis, we uncover a network of regulatory features that provides mechanistic insight into how the events of termination and recycling are obligately ordered. These results establish a model in which eukaryotic termination and recycling are not clearly demarcated events, as they are in bacteria, but coupled stages of the same release-factor mediated process.

  11. RNase MRP and the RNA processing cascade in the eukaryotic ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Woodhams, Michael D; Stadler, Peter F; Penny, David; Collins, Lesley J

    2007-01-01

    Background Within eukaryotes there is a complex cascade of RNA-based macromolecules that process other RNA molecules, especially mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. An example is RNase MRP processing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome biogenesis. One hypothesis is that this complexity was present early in eukaryotic evolution; an alternative is that an initial simpler network later gained complexity by gene duplication in lineages that led to animals, fungi and plants. Recently there has been a rapid increase in support for the complexity-early theory because the vast majority of these RNA-processing reactions are found throughout eukaryotes, and thus were likely to be present in the last common ancestor of living eukaryotes, herein called the Eukaryotic Ancestor. Results We present an overview of the RNA processing cascade in the Eukaryotic Ancestor and investigate in particular, RNase MRP which was previously thought to have evolved later in eukaryotes due to its apparent limited distribution in fungi and animals and plants. Recent publications, as well as our own genomic searches, find previously unknown RNase MRP RNAs, indicating that RNase MRP has a wide distribution in eukaryotes. Combining secondary structure and promoter region analysis of RNAs for RNase MRP, along with analysis of the target substrate (rRNA), allows us to discuss this distribution in the light of eukaryotic evolution. Conclusion We conclude that RNase MRP can now be placed in the RNA-processing cascade of the Eukaryotic Ancestor, highlighting the complexity of RNA-processing in early eukaryotes. Promoter analyses of MRP-RNA suggest that regulation of the critical processes of rRNA cleavage can vary, showing that even these key cellular processes (for which we expect high conservation) show some species-specific variability. We present our consensus MRP-RNA secondary structure as a useful model for further searches. PMID:17288571

  12. Ribosome dynamics during decoding

    PubMed Central

    Maracci, Cristina; Stark, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Elongation factors Tu (EF-Tu) and SelB are translational GTPases that deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) to the ribosome. In each canonical round of translation elongation, aa-tRNAs, assisted by EF-Tu, decode mRNA codons and insert the respective amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Stop codons usually lead to translation termination; however, in special cases UGA codons are recoded to selenocysteine (Sec) with the help of SelB. Recruitment of EF-Tu and SelB together with their respective aa-tRNAs to the ribosome is a multistep process. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the role of ribosome dynamics in aa-tRNA selection. We describe the path to correct codon recognition by canonical elongator aa-tRNA and Sec-tRNASec and discuss the local and global rearrangements of the ribosome in response to correct and incorrect aa-tRNAs. We present the mechanisms of GTPase activation and GTP hydrolysis of EF-Tu and SelB and summarize what is known about the accommodation of aa-tRNA on the ribosome after its release from the elongation factor. We show how ribosome dynamics ensures high selectivity for the cognate aa-tRNA and suggest that conformational fluctuations, induced fit and kinetic discrimination play major roles in maintaining the speed and fidelity of translation. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Perspectives on the ribosome’. PMID:28138068

  13. Structural basis for stop codon recognition in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Shao, Sichen; Murray, Jason; Hegde, Ramanujan S; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-08-27

    Termination of protein synthesis occurs when a translating ribosome encounters one of three universally conserved stop codons: UAA, UAG or UGA. Release factors recognize stop codons in the ribosomal A-site to mediate release of the nascent chain and recycling of the ribosome. Bacteria decode stop codons using two separate release factors with differing specificities for the second and third bases. By contrast, eukaryotes rely on an evolutionarily unrelated omnipotent release factor (eRF1) to recognize all three stop codons. The molecular basis of eRF1 discrimination for stop codons over sense codons is not known. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures at 3.5-3.8 Å resolution of mammalian ribosomal complexes containing eRF1 interacting with each of the three stop codons in the A-site. Binding of eRF1 flips nucleotide A1825 of 18S ribosomal RNA so that it stacks on the second and third stop codon bases. This configuration pulls the fourth position base into the A-site, where it is stabilized by stacking against G626 of 18S rRNA. Thus, eRF1 exploits two rRNA nucleotides also used during transfer RNA selection to drive messenger RNA compaction. In this compacted mRNA conformation, stop codons are favoured by a hydrogen-bonding network formed between rRNA and essential eRF1 residues that constrains the identity of the bases. These results provide a molecular framework for eukaryotic stop codon recognition and have implications for future studies on the mechanisms of canonical and premature translation termination.

  14. Origin and diversification of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Katz, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    The bulk of the diversity of eukaryotic life is microbial. Although the larger eukaryotes-namely plants, animals, and fungi-dominate our visual landscapes, microbial lineages compose the greater part of both genetic diversity and biomass, and contain many evolutionary innovations. Our understanding of the origin and diversification of eukaryotes has improved substantially with analyses of molecular data from diverse lineages. These data have provided insight into the nature of the genome of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Yet, the origin of key eukaryotic features, namely the nucleus and cytoskeleton, remains poorly understood. In contrast, the past decades have seen considerable refinement in hypotheses on the major branching events in the evolution of eukaryotic diversity. New insights have also emerged, including evidence for the acquisition of mitochondria at the time of the origin of eukaryotes and data supporting the dynamic nature of genomes in LECA.

  15. A novel RNA-binding motif in omnipotent suppressors of translation termination, ribosomal proteins and a ribosome modification enzyme?

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V; Bork, P; Sander, C

    1994-06-11

    Using computer methods for database search, multiple alignment, protein sequence motif analysis and secondary structure prediction, a putative new RNA-binding motif was identified. The novel motif is conserved in yeast omnipotent translation termination suppressor SUP1, the related DOM34 protein and its pseudogene homologue; three groups of eukaryotic and archaeal ribosomal proteins, namely L30e, L7Ae/S6e and S12e; an uncharacterized Bacillus subtilis protein related to the L7A/S6e group; and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein modification enzyme RimK. We hypothesize that a new type of RNA-binding domain may be utilized to deliver additional activities to the ribosome.

  16. Use of 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequences to Infer Relationships among Archaebacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-16

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Archaebacteria; Eubacteria ; Eukaryotes; 16S Ribosomal RNA; 08 I Phylogeny; rRNA; RNA Sequencing; Molecular Clock; Urkingdoms; r...16S rRNA data were used to infer the relat onships among the archaebacteria, and of the archaebacteria to the eubacteria and eukaryotes. ur programs for...been published (1, 2, 16, 18). The analyses render untenable the suggestions of Lake and colleagues (Lake et al., 1985) that the eubacteria derive from

  17. A translation-like cycle is a quality control checkpoint for maturing 40S ribosome subunits.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Bethany S; Novak, Megan N; Young, Crystal L; Karbstein, Katrin

    2012-07-06

    Assembly factors (AFs) prevent premature translation initiation on small (40S) ribosomal subunit assembly intermediates by blocking ligand binding. However, it is unclear how AFs are displaced from maturing 40S ribosomes, if or how maturing subunits are assessed for fidelity, and what prevents premature translation initiation once AFs dissociate. Here we show that maturation involves a translation-like cycle whereby the translation factor eIF5B, a GTPase, promotes joining of large (60S) subunits with pre-40S subunits to give 80S-like complexes, which are subsequently disassembled by the termination factor Rli1, an ATPase. The AFs Tsr1 and Rio2 block the mRNA channel and initiator tRNA binding site, and therefore 80S-like ribosomes lack mRNA or initiator tRNA. After Tsr1 and Rio2 dissociate from 80S-like complexes Rli1-directed displacement of 60S subunits allows for translation initiation. This cycle thus provides a functional test of 60S subunit binding and the GTPase site before ribosomes enter the translating pool.

  18. [Similar features in mechanisms of translation initiation of mRNAs in eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems].

    PubMed

    Andreev, D E; Terenin, I M; Dmitriev, S E; Shatskiĭ, I N

    2006-01-01

    Using as examples non-canonical features of translation initiation for some bacterial and mammalian mRNAs with unusual 5'- untranslated regions (5'-UTR) or lacking these regions (leaderless mRNAs), the authors of this review discuss similarities in mechanisms of translation initiation on prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes.

  19. The Sec translocon mediated protein transport in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Denks, Kärt; Vogt, Andreas; Sachelaru, Ilie; Petriman, Narcis-Adrian; Kudva, Renuka; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Protein transport via the Sec translocon represents an evolutionary conserved mechanism for delivering cytosolically-synthesized proteins to extra-cytosolic compartments. The Sec translocon has a three-subunit core, termed Sec61 in Eukaryotes and SecYEG in Bacteria. It is located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Eukaryotes and in the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacteria where it constitutes a channel that can be activated by multiple partner proteins. These partner proteins determine the mechanism of polypeptide movement across the channel. During SRP-dependent co-translational targeting, the ribosome threads the nascent protein directly into the Sec channel. This pathway is in Bacteria mainly dedicated for membrane proteins but in Eukaryotes also employed by secretory proteins. The alternative pathway, leading to post-translational translocation across the Sec translocon engages an ATP-dependent pushing mechanism by the motor protein SecA in Bacteria and a ratcheting mechanism by the lumenal chaperone BiP in Eukaryotes. Protein transport and biogenesis is also assisted by additional proteins at the lateral gate of SecY/Sec61α and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum or in the periplasm of bacterial cells. The modular assembly enables the Sec complex to transport a vast array of substrates. In this review we summarize recent biochemical and structural information on the prokaryotic and eukaryotic Sec translocons and we describe the remarkably complex interaction network of the Sec complexes.

  20. Eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Arnadóttir, Jóhanna; Chalfie, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are gated directly by physical stimuli and transduce these stimuli into electrical signals. Several criteria must apply for a channel to be considered mechanically gated. Mechanosensitive channels from bacterial systems have met these criteria, but few eukaryotic channels have been confirmed by the same standards. Recent work has suggested or confirmed that diverse types of channels, including TRP channels, K(2P) channels, MscS-like proteins, and DEG/ENaC channels, are mechanically gated. Several studies point to the importance of the plasma membrane for channel gating, but intracellular and/or extracellular structures may also be required.

  1. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  2. Constructing ribosomes along the Danube

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The EMBO Conference on Ribosome Synthesis held last summer explored the latest breakthroughs in ribosome assembly and how it affects disease. Both of these topics have recently seen important advances that enlighten how almost 200 proteins cooperate to produce a ribosome and how the cell responds to a malfunction in this process. PMID:20010797

  3. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe.

  4. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin

    PubMed Central

    Martin, William F.; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  5. Ribosome Profiling Reveals Pervasive Translation Outside of Annotated Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Brar, Gloria A.; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S.; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J. S.; Jackson, Sarah E.; Wills, Mark R.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be non-coding, including 5′ UTRs and lncRNAs. Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: co-purification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts to understand how cells manage and exploit its consequences. PMID:25159147

  6. Ribosome profiling reveals pervasive translation outside of annotated protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ingolia, Nicholas T; Brar, Gloria A; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J S; Jackson, Sarah E; Wills, Mark R; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2014-09-11

    Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be noncoding, including 5' UTRs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here, we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: copurification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including the induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts at understanding how cells manage and exploit its consequences.

  7. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-10-18

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA-rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

  8. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA–rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27708161

  9. Specialized Yeast Ribosomes: A Customized Tool for Selective mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F.; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered ‘specialized’ ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered. PMID:23861776

  10. Specialized yeast ribosomes: a customized tool for selective mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johann W; Brandl, Clemens; Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered 'specialized' ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered.

  11. Final Pre-40S Maturation Depends on the Functional Integrity of the 60S Subunit Ribosomal Protein L3

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Juan J.; Rosado, Iván V.; Tollervey, David; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L3 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in the assembly of early pre-60S particles. We report that the rpl3[W255C] allele, which affects the affinity and function of translation elongation factors, impairs cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA. This was not seen for other mutations in or depletion of L3 or other 60S ribosomal proteins. Surprisingly, pre-40S particles containing 20S pre-rRNA form translation-competent 80S ribosomes, and translation inhibition partially suppresses 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The GTP-dependent translation initiation factor Fun12 (yeast eIF5B) shows similar in vivo binding to ribosomal particles from wild-type and rpl3[W255C] cells. However, the GTPase activity of eIF5B failed to stimulate processing of 20S pre-rRNA when assayed with ribosomal particles purified from rpl3[W255C] cells. We conclude that L3 plays an important role in the function of eIF5B in stimulating 3′ end processing of 18S rRNA in the context of 80S ribosomes that have not yet engaged in translation. These findings indicate that the correct conformation of the GTPase activation region is assessed in a quality control step during maturation of cytoplasmic pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:24603549

  12. Isolation of ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-02

    Here we describe a preparative differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of ribosomes from a crude cell homogenate. The subcellular fraction obtained is enriched in ribosome monomers and polysomes. The protocol has been optimized for the homogenization and collection of the ribosomal fraction from prokaryotic cells, mammalian and plant tissues, reticulocytes, and chloroplasts. The quality of the ribosomal preparation is enhanced by the removal of the remaining cellular components and adsorbed proteins by pelleting through a sucrose cushion with a high concentration of monovalent salts, NH4Cl or KCl. The different components of the ribosomal fraction isolated using this protocol can be further purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation.

  13. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches

    PubMed Central

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome ‘sliding’ represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05534.001 PMID:25695637

  14. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches.

    PubMed

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-02-19

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome 'sliding' represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation.

  15. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  17. The eukaryotic RNA exosome.

    PubMed

    Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D

    2014-02-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is an essential multi-subunit ribonuclease complex that contributes to the degradation or processing of nearly every class of RNA in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Its nine-subunit core shares structural similarity to phosphorolytic exoribonucleases such as bacterial PNPase. PNPase and the RNA exosome core feature a central channel that can accommodate single stranded RNA although unlike PNPase, the RNA exosome core is devoid of ribonuclease activity. Instead, the core associates with Rrp44, an endoribonuclease and processive 3'→5' exoribonuclease, and Rrp6, a distributive 3'→5' exoribonuclease. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that the exosome core is essential because it coordinates Rrp44 and Rrp6 recruitment, RNA can pass through the central channel, and the association with the core modulates Rrp44 and Rrp6 activities.

  18. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  19. Structural basis for stop codon recognition in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jason; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Termination of protein synthesis occurs when a translating ribosome encounters one of three universally conserved stop codons: UGA, UAA, or UAG. Release factors recognise stop codons in the ribosomal A site to mediate release of the nascent chain and recycling of the ribosome. Bacteria decode stop codons using two separate release factors with differing specificities for the second and third bases1. By contrast, eukaryotes rely on an evolutionarily unrelated omnipotent release factor (eRF1) to recognise all three stop codons2. The molecular basis of eRF1 discrimination for stop codons over sense codons is not known. Here, we present electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures at 3.5 – 3.8 Å resolution of mammalian ribosomal complexes containing eRF1 interacting with each of the three stop codons in the A site. Binding of eRF1 flips nucleotide A1825 of 18S rRNA so that it stacks on the second and third stop codon bases. This configuration pulls the fourth position base into the A site, where it is stabilised by stacking against G626 of 18S rRNA. Thus, eRF1 exploits two rRNA nucleotides also used during tRNA selection to drive mRNA compaction. Stop codons are favoured in this compacted mRNA conformation by a hydrogen-bonding network with essential eRF1 residues that constrains the identity of the bases. These results provide a molecular framework for eukaryotic stop codon recognition and have implications for future studies on the mechanisms of canonical and premature translation termination3,4. PMID:26245381

  20. Evaluation of ribosomal RNA removal protocols for Salmonella RNA-Seq projects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful technology and its application to sequencing entire RNA populations of food-borne pathogens will provide valuable insights. A problem unique to prokaryotic RNA-Seq is the massive abundance of ribosomal RNA. Unlike eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), bacterial ...

  1. The evolution of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from a yeast perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ebersberger, Ingo; Simm, Stefan; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Schmitzberger, Peter; Mirus, Oliver; von Haeseler, Arndt; Bohnsack, Markus T.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is fundamental for cellular life, but surprisingly little is known about the underlying pathway. In eukaryotes a comprehensive collection of experimentally verified ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) exists only for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Far less is known for other fungi, animals or plants, and insights are even more limited for archaea. Starting from 255 yeast RBFs, we integrated ortholog searches, domain architecture comparisons and, in part, manual curation to investigate the inventories of RBF candidates in 261 eukaryotes, 26 archaea and 57 bacteria. The resulting phylogenetic profiles reveal the evolutionary ancestry of the yeast pathway. The oldest core comprising 20 RBF lineages dates back to the last universal common ancestor, while the youngest 20 factors are confined to the Saccharomycotina. On this basis, we outline similarities and differences of ribosome biogenesis across contemporary species. Archaea, so far a rather uncharted domain, possess 38 well-supported RBF candidates of which some are known to form functional sub-complexes in yeast. This provides initial evidence that ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotes and archaea follows similar principles. Within eukaryotes, RBF repertoires vary considerably. A comparison of yeast and human reveals that lineage-specific adaptation via RBF exclusion and addition characterizes the evolution of this ancient pathway. PMID:24234440

  2. THE NATURE AND PROCESSING OF RIBOSOMAL RIBONUCLEIC ACID IN A DINOFLAGELLATE

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Peter M. M.

    1970-01-01

    Certain features of the dinoflagellate nucleus suggest that it represents a primitive form of eukaryotic nucleus. For this reason, it was of interest to characterize dinoflagellate ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and its mode of synthesis to determine if it also deviated from typical eukaryotic patterns. Gyrodinium cohnii was chosen for this examination. Gyrodinium ribosomal RNA species are 16 and 25s as judged by their sedimentation velocities in isokinetic sucrose gradients. These values are typical of higher plants. In addition, the RNA cosedimented precisely with rRNA from the ciliate Tetrahymena. Nucleotide ratio analyses revealed a GMP + CMP content of 46% for both species of rRNA. The kinetics of incorporation of a radioactive precursor into ribosomal RNA have also been studied, and it seems likely that the maturation of rRNA starts with the synthesis of a 38s molecule. This serves as precursor to the 16s species, and, after a 27s intermediate, the 25s ribosomal component. The process is similar to that in other eukaryotes. The structure of the nucleolus has also been examined, and is seen to be typically eukaryotic. PMID:5459003

  3. Suppression of eukaryotic translation termination by selected RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, J; Frolova, L; Zinnen, S; Drugeon, G; Phillippe, M; Justesen, J; Haenni, A L; Leinwand, L; Kisselev, L L; Yarus, M

    2000-01-01

    Using selection-amplification, we have isolated RNAs with affinity for translation termination factors eRF1 and eRF1.eRF3 complex. Individual RNAs not only bind, but inhibit eRF1-mediated release of a model nascent chain from eukaryotic ribosomes. There is also significant but weaker inhibition of eRF1-stimulated eRF3 GTPase and eRF3 stimulation of eRF1 release activity. These latter selected RNAs therefore hinder eRF1.eRF3 interactions. Finally, four RNA inhibitors of release suppress a UAG stop codon in mammalian extracts dependent for termination on eRF1 from several metazoan species. These RNAs are therefore new specific inhibitors for the analysis of eukaryotic termination, and potentially a new class of omnipotent termination suppressors with possible therapeutic significance. PMID:11073222

  4. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T Ashton; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T Ashton; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-02-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T Ashton; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2009-10-27

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-11-17

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Origins of eukaryotic sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Sexual reproduction is a nearly universal feature of eukaryotic organisms. Given its ubiquity and shared core features, sex is thought to have arisen once in the last common ancestor to all eukaryotes. Using the perspectives of molecular genetics and cell biology, we consider documented and hypothetical scenarios for the instantiation and evolution of meiosis, fertilization, sex determination, uniparental inheritance of organelle genomes, and speciation.

  14. Endosymbiosis and Eukaryotic Cell Evolution.

    PubMed

    Archibald, John M

    2015-10-05

    Understanding the evolution of eukaryotic cellular complexity is one of the grand challenges of modern biology. It has now been firmly established that mitochondria and plastids, the classical membrane-bound organelles of eukaryotic cells, evolved from bacteria by endosymbiosis. In the case of mitochondria, evidence points very clearly to an endosymbiont of α-proteobacterial ancestry. The precise nature of the host cell that partnered with this endosymbiont is, however, very much an open question. And while the host for the cyanobacterial progenitor of the plastid was undoubtedly a fully-fledged eukaryote, how - and how often - plastids moved from one eukaryote to another during algal diversification is vigorously debated. In this article I frame modern views on endosymbiotic theory in a historical context, highlighting the transformative role DNA sequencing played in solving early problems in eukaryotic cell evolution, and posing key unanswered questions emerging from the age of comparative genomics.

  15. A congruent phylogenomic signal places eukaryotes within the Archaea.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Foster, Peter G; Nye, Tom M W; Cox, Cymon J; Embley, T Martin

    2012-12-22

    Determining the relationships among the major groups of cellular life is important for understanding the evolution of biological diversity, but is difficult given the enormous time spans involved. In the textbook 'three domains' tree based on informational genes, eukaryotes and Archaea share a common ancestor to the exclusion of Bacteria. However, some phylogenetic analyses of the same data have placed eukaryotes within the Archaea, as the nearest relatives of different archaeal lineages. We compared the support for these competing hypotheses using sophisticated phylogenetic methods and an improved sampling of archaeal biodiversity. We also employed both new and existing tests of phylogenetic congruence to explore the level of uncertainty and conflict in the data. Our analyses suggested that much of the observed incongruence is weakly supported or associated with poorly fitting evolutionary models. All of our phylogenetic analyses, whether on small subunit and large subunit ribosomal RNA or concatenated protein-coding genes, recovered a monophyletic group containing eukaryotes and the TACK archaeal superphylum comprising the Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Korarchaeota. Hence, while our results provide no support for the iconic three-domain tree of life, they are consistent with an extended eocyte hypothesis whereby vital components of the eukaryotic nuclear lineage originated from within the archaeal radiation.

  16. Mitochondrial ribosomes in a trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Tittawella, Ivor; Yasmin, Lubna; Baranov, Vladimir

    2003-08-01

    The nature, and even the existence, of trypanosome mitochondrial ribosomes has been the subject of some debate. We investigated this further in the insect trypanosome, Crithidia fasciculata. In sucrose gradients of parasite lysates, mitochondrial ribosomal RNA co-sediments at approximately 35S with nascent peptides synthesized in the presence of the cytosolic translational inhibitor, cycloheximide. Co-sedimenting peptides in this peak are much reduced when the parasites are treated with the bacterial translational inhibitor, chloramphenicol. In CsCl gradients this peak resolves at a buoyant density of 1.42 g/cm(3), a value typical for mito-ribosomes. Electron microscopy of peak material shows particles smaller than cytosolic ribosomes, but with characteristic ribosomal shapes. We propose that these particles represent the parasite's mitochondrial ribosomes.

  17. Structures and stabilization of kinetoplastid-specific split rRNAs revealed by comparing leishmanial and human ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Lai, Mason; Chang, Winston; Yu, Iris; Ding, Ke; Mrazek, Jan; Ng, Hwee L.; Yang, Otto O.; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    The recent success in ribosome structure determination by cryoEM has opened the door to defining structural differences between ribosomes of pathogenic organisms and humans and to understand ribosome-targeting antibiotics. Here, by direct electron-counting cryoEM, we have determined the structures of the Leishmania donovani and human ribosomes at 2.9 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. Our structure of the leishmanial ribosome elucidates the organization of the six fragments of its large subunit rRNA (as opposed to a single 28S rRNA in most eukaryotes, including humans) and reveals atomic details of a unique 20 amino acid extension of the uL13 protein that pins down the ends of three of the rRNA fragments. The structure also fashions many large rRNA expansion segments. Direct comparison of our human and leishmanial ribosome structures at the decoding A-site sheds light on how the bacterial ribosome-targeting drug paromomycin selectively inhibits the eukaryotic L. donovani, but not human, ribosome. PMID:27752045

  18. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R.; Andrews, Philip C.; Maddock, Janine R.; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  19. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. © 2016 Talkish et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    From unicellular organisms as small as a few microns to the largest vertebrates on earth we find groups of beating flagella or cilia that exhibit striking spatio-temporal organization. This may take the form of precise frequency and phase locking as frequently found in the swimming of green algae, or beating with long-wavelength phase modulations known as metachronal waves, seen in ciliates and in our respiratory systems. The remarkable similarity in the underlying molecular structure of flagella across the whole eukaryotic world leads naturally to the hypothesis that a similarly universal mechanism might be responsible for synchronization. Although this mechanism is poorly understood, one appealing hypothesis is that it results from hydrodynamic interactions between flagella. In this talk I will describe a synthesis of recent experimental and theoretical studies of this issue that have provided the strongest evidence to date for the hydrodynamic origin of flagellar synchronization. At the unicellular level this includes studies of the beating of the two flagella of the wild type unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their native state and under conditions of regrowth following autotomy, and of the flagellar dominance mutant ptx1, which displays unusual anti-phase synchronization. Analysis of the related multicellular organism Volvox carteri shows it to be an ideal model organism for the study of metachronal waves. Supported by BBSRC, EPSRC, ERC, and The Wellcome Trust.

  1. Cytokinesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, David A.; Trautmann, Susanne; McCollum, Dannel

    2002-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final event of the cell division cycle, and its completion results in irreversible partition of a mother cell into two daughter cells. Cytokinesis was one of the first cell cycle events observed by simple cell biological techniques; however, molecular characterization of cytokinesis has been slowed by its particular resistance to in vitro biochemical approaches. In recent years, the use of genetic model organisms has greatly advanced our molecular understanding of cytokinesis. While the outcome of cytokinesis is conserved in all dividing organisms, the mechanism of division varies across the major eukaryotic kingdoms. Yeasts and animals, for instance, use a contractile ring that ingresses to the cell middle in order to divide, while plant cells build new cell wall outward to the cortex. As would be expected, there is considerable conservation of molecules involved in cytokinesis between yeast and animal cells, while at first glance, plant cells seem quite different. However, in recent years, it has become clear that some aspects of division are conserved between plant, yeast, and animal cells. In this review we discuss the major recent advances in defining cytokinesis, focusing on deciding where to divide, building the division apparatus, and dividing. In addition, we discuss the complex problem of coordinating the division cycle with the nuclear cycle, which has recently become an area of intense research. In conclusion, we discuss how certain cells have utilized cytokinesis to direct development. PMID:12040122

  2. Conservation of RNA sequence and cross-linking ability in ribosomes from a higher eukaryote: photochemical cross-linking of the anticodon of P site bound tRNA to the penultimate cytidine of the UACACACG sequence in Artemia salina 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Ciesiolka, J; Nurse, K; Klein, J; Ofengand, J

    1985-06-18

    The complex of Artemia salina ribosomes and Escherichia coli acetylvalyl-tRNA could be cross-linked by irradiation with near-UV light. Cross-linking required the presence of the codon GUU, GUA being ineffective. The acetylvalyl group could be released from the cross-linked tRNA by treatment with puromycin, demonstrating that cross-linking had occurred at the P site. This was true both for pGUU- and also for poly(U2,G)-dependent cross-linking. All of the cross-linking was to the 18S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Photolysis of the cross-link at 254 nm occurred with the same kinetics as that for the known cyclobutane dimer between this tRNA and Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. T1 RNase digestion of the cross-linked tRNA yielded an oligonucleotide larger in molecular weight than any from un-cross-linked rRNA or tRNA or from a prephotolyzed complex. Extended electrophoresis showed this material to consist of two oligomers of similar mobility, a faster one-third component and a slower two-thirds component. Each oligomer yielded two components on 254-nm photolysis. The slower band from each was the tRNA T1 oligomer CACCUCCCUVACAAGp, which includes the anticodon. The faster band was the rRNA 9-mer UACACACCGp and its derivative UACACACUG. Unexpectedly, the dephosphorylated and slower moving 9-mer was derived from the faster moving dimer. Deamination of the penultimate C to U is probably due to cyclobutane dimer formation and was evidence for that nucleotide being the site of cross-linking. Direct confirmation of the cross-linking site was obtained by "Z"-gel analysis [Ehresmann, C., & Ofengand, J. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 438-445].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng; Song, Rentao

    2016-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Following the signal sequence from ribosomal tunnel exit to signal recognition particle.

    PubMed

    Halic, Mario; Blau, Michael; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Pool, Martin R; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Beckmann, Roland

    2006-11-23

    Membrane and secretory proteins can be co-translationally inserted into or translocated across the membrane. This process is dependent on signal sequence recognition on the ribosome by the signal recognition particle (SRP), which results in targeting of the ribosome-nascent-chain complex to the protein-conducting channel at the membrane. Here we present an ensemble of structures at subnanometre resolution, revealing the signal sequence both at the ribosomal tunnel exit and in the bacterial and eukaryotic ribosome-SRP complexes. Molecular details of signal sequence interaction in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic complexes were obtained by fitting high-resolution molecular models. The signal sequence is presented at the ribosomal tunnel exit in an exposed position ready for accommodation in the hydrophobic groove of the rearranged SRP54 M domain. Upon ribosome binding, the SRP54 NG domain also undergoes a conformational rearrangement, priming it for the subsequent docking reaction with the NG domain of the SRP receptor. These findings provide the structural basis for improving our understanding of the early steps of co-translational protein sorting.

  6. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-06-02

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  7. In vivo assembling of bacterial ribosomal protein L11 into yeast ribosomes makes the particles sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton.

    PubMed

    García-Marcos, Alberto; Morreale, Antonio; Guarinos, Esther; Briones, Elisa; Remacha, Miguel; Ortiz, Angel R; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal stalk protein L12 and its bacterial orthologue L11 play a central role on ribosomal conformational changes during translocation. Deletion of the two genes encoding L12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a very slow-growth phenotype. Gene RPL12B, but not the RPL12A, cloned in centromeric plasmids fully restored control protein level and the growth rate when expressed in a L12-deprived strain. The same strain has been transformed to express Escherichia coli protein EcL11 under the control of yeast RPL12B promoter. The bacterial protein has been found in similar amounts in washed ribosomes from the transformed yeast strain and from control E. coli cells, however, EcL11 was unable to restore the defective acidic protein stalk composition caused by the absence of ScL12 in the yeast ribosome. Protein EcL11 induced a 10% increase in L12-defective cell growth rate, although the in vitro polymerizing capacity of the EcL11-containing ribosomes is restored in a higher proportion, and, moreover, the particles became partially sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton. Molecular dynamic simulations using modelled complexes support the correct assembly of bacterial L11 into the yeast ribosome and confirm its direct implication of its CTD in the binding of thiostrepton to ribosomes.

  8. Structural insights into the interaction of the ribosomal P stalk protein P2 with a type II ribosome-inactivating protein ricin

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaojiao; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that depurinates A4324 at the sarcin-ricin loop of 28 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), thus inactivating the ribosome by preventing elongation factors from binding to the GTPase activation centre. Recent studies have disclosed that the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) of eukaryotic ribosomal P stalk proteins is involved in the process that RIPs target ribosome. However, the details of the molecular interaction between ricin and P stalk proteins remain unknown. Here, we report the structure of ricin-A chain (RTA) in a complex with the CTD of the human ribosomal protein P2. The structure shows that the Phe111, Leu113 and Phe114 residues of P2 insert into a hydrophobic pocket formed by the Tyr183, Arg235, Phe240 and Ile251 residues of RTA, while Asp115 of P2 forms hydrogen bonds with Arg235 of RTA. The key residues in RTA and P2 for complex formation were mutated, and their importance was determined by pull-down assays. The results from cell-free translation assays further confirmed that the interaction with P stalk proteins is essential for the inhibition of protein synthesis by RTA. Taken together, our results provide a structural basis that will improve our understanding of the process by which ricin targets the ribosome, which will benefit the development of effective small-molecule inhibitors for use as therapeutic agents. PMID:27886256

  9. Probing the secondary structure of expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2006-07-04

    Expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA is, unlike many other expansion segments, present in all eukaryotes. The available data suggest that ES6 is located on the surface of the small ribosomal subunit. Here we have analyzed the secondary structure of the complete ES6 sequence in intact ribosomes from three eukaryotes, wheat, yeast, and mouse, representing different eukaryotic kingdoms. The availability of the ES6 sequence for modification and cleavage by structure sensitive chemicals and enzymatic reagents was analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The experimental results were used to restrict the number of possible secondary structure models of ES6 generated by the folding software MFOLD. The modification data obtained from the three experimental organisms were very similar despite the sequence variation. Consequently, similar secondary structure models were obtained for the ES6 sequence in wheat, yeast, and mouse ribosomes. A comparison of sequence data from more than 6000 eukaryotes showed that similar structural elements could also be formed in other organisms. The comparative analysis also showed that the extent of compensatory base changes in the suggested helices was low. The in situ structure analysis was complemented by a secondary structure analysis of wheat ES6 transcribed and folded in vitro. The obtained modification data indicate that the secondary structure of the in vitro transcribed sequence differs from that observed in the intact ribosome. These results suggest that chaperones, ribosomal proteins, and/or tertiary rRNA interactions could be involved in the in vivo folding of ES6.

  10. Isolation of ribosomes by chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2015-04-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography on cysteine-SulfoLink resin efficiently separates ribosomes from cell lysates and is particularly effective at rapidly removing endogenous proteases and nucleases, resulting in ribosomes of improved purity, integrity, and activity. Binding occurs partly by anion exchange of the RNA of the ribosomes, so that cells must be lysed in a buffer of moderate ionic strength (conductivity no more than 20 mS for chromatography of bacterial ribosomes) without any highly charged additives (e.g., heparin, which is used to inhibit RNases in yeast). A robust protocol for Escherichia coli is given here as an example.

  11. Ribonuclease selection for ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful method to assess global gene translation, but methodological and analytical challenges often lead to inconsistencies across labs and model organisms. A critical issue in ribosome profiling is nuclease treatment of ribosome–mRNA complexes, as it is important to ensure both stability of ribosomal particles and complete conversion of polysomes to monosomes. We performed comparative ribosome profiling in yeast and mice with various ribonucleases including I, A, S7 and T1, characterized their cutting preferences, trinucleotide periodicity patterns and coverage similarities across coding sequences, and showed that they yield comparable estimations of gene expression when ribosome integrity is not compromised. However, ribosome coverage patterns of individual transcripts had little in common between the ribonucleases. We further examined their potency at converting polysomes to monosomes across other commonly used model organisms, including bacteria, nematodes and fruit flies. In some cases, ribonuclease treatment completely degraded ribosome populations. Ribonuclease T1 was the only enzyme that preserved ribosomal integrity while thoroughly converting polysomes to monosomes in all examined species. This study provides a guide for ribonuclease selection in ribosome profiling experiments across most common model systems. PMID:27638886

  12. The initiation of eukaryotic and prokaryotic protein synthesis: a selective accessibility and multisubstrate enzyme reaction.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tokumasa

    2007-11-15

    An extension of our unique accessibility hypothesis for the initiation of protein synthesis is proposed following a review of the initiation of protein synthesis. The E. coli model initiation sequence generated by computer from 68 initiation sequences and the eukaryotic consensus initiation sequence derived by non-computer analysis of 211 initiation sequences do not contain a specific base in any position; they are only assigned preferred bases. The initiation site, in other words, is a varied sequence of preferred bases and its sequence is non-unique. This indicates that the ribosomal recognition of the initiation site may be the result of multiple interactions that are cooperative and cumulative and typical of multisubstrate enzymes. Because of this characteristic, the model of multisubstrate enzymes with broad substrate specificity is proposed as a paradigm for the initiation of protein synthesis. As predicted by this model, changes in the leader and downstream sequences that improve the agreement with the preferred base sequence do indeed enhance the rate of protein synthesis. The eukaryotic/prokaryotic hybrid studies show a considerable overlap in the specificities of the two groups of ribosomes. The scanning of the mRNA from the 5'-end postulated by the scanning hypothesis is not a necessary step since eukaryotic ribosomes are able to bind to internal mRNA sites and initiate synthesis. Our unique accessibility hypothesis, which is extended by coupling cooperative and cumulative specificity in ribosomal function, is referred to for brevity as the cumulative specificity hypothesis. The hypothesis actually postulates a selective accessibility and cooperative-cumulative specificity mechanism; it is able to account for the behavior of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic initiation of protein synthesis. From another perspective, the hypothesis can be regarded as providing a mechanism that enables ribosomes to recognize the IS in the absence of a unique initiation

  13. Ribosomal vaccines. I. Immunogenicity of ribosomal fractions isolated from Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W

    1972-06-01

    The immunogenicity of ribosomes and ribosomal subfractions isolated from Yersina pestis and Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. Ribosomes and ribosomal protein isolated from S. typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid isolated by phenol extraction failed to induce any significant level of protection in mice. None of the ribosomes or ribosomal subfractions isolated from Y. pestis were effective in inducing immunity to lethal challenge. These results suggest that the immunogen of the ribosomal vaccine is protein.

  14. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ribosome subunit dissociation by chloramphenicol and Blasticidin: a new mode of action of the antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, B K; Mondal, S; Barat, C

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the ribosome to assist in folding of proteins both in vitro and in vivo is well documented and is a nontranslational function of the ribosome. The interaction of the unfolded protein with the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the bacterial large ribosomal subunit is followed by release of the protein in the folding competent state and rapid dissociation of ribosomal subunits. Our study demonstrates that the PTC-specific antibiotics, chloramphenicol and blasticidin S inhibit unfolded protein-mediated subunit dissociation. During post-termination stage of translation in bacteria, ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is used together with elongation factor G to recycle the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits for the next round of translation. Ribosome dissociation mediated by RRF and induced at low magnesium concentration was also inhibited by the antibiotics indicating that the PTC antibiotics exert an associative effect on ribosomal subunits. In vivo, the antibiotics can also reduce the ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation, a process requiring ribosome subunit dissociation. This study reveals a new mode of action of the broad-spectrum antibiotics chloramphenicol and blasticidin. Ribosome synthesizes protein in all organisms and is the target for multiple antimicrobial agents. Our study demonstrates that chloramphenicol and blasticidin S that target the peptidyl transferase centre of the bacterial ribosome can then inhibit dissociation of 70S ribosome mediated by (i) unfolded protein, (ii) translation factors or (iii) low Mg(+2) concentrations in vitro and thereby suppresses ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation in vivo. The demonstration of this new mode of action furthers the understanding of these broad-spectrum antibiotics that differentially inhibit protein synthesis in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. N(6)-methyladenine DNA modification in the unicellular eukaryotic organism Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Sheng, Yalan; Liu, Yongqiang; Pan, Bo; Huang, Jie; Warren, Alan; Gao, Shan

    2017-04-01

    N(6)-methyladenine DNA (6mA) modification exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes in which it plays a crucial role in regulating numerous biological processes. In prokaryotes, 6mA is a marker to distinguish self from foreign DNA. Its role in eukaryotes, however, remains elusive. Ciliates were among the first eukaryotes reported to contain 6mA. In the model organism T. thermophila, cellular localization and features of 6mA have been extensively studied, especially in ribosomal DNA (rDNA) molecules. Here, we summarize the features and potential functions of 6mA in Tetrahymena thermophila and other ciliates, and the major findings and contributions of the Tetrahymena model in studies of 6mA methylation. We also discuss other questions in order to improve understanding of the function and evolution of 6mA in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Ribosomes in a Stacked Array

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yui; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Sotta, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Toru; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Satake, Akiko; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Expression of CGS1, which codes for an enzyme of methionine biosynthesis, is feedback-regulated by mRNA degradation in response to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). In vitro studies revealed that AdoMet induces translation arrest at Ser-94, upon which several ribosomes stack behind the arrested one, and mRNA degradation occurs at multiple sites that presumably correspond to individual ribosomes in a stacked array. Despite the significant contribution of stacked ribosomes to inducing mRNA degradation, little is known about the ribosomes in the stacked array. Here, we assigned the peptidyl-tRNA species of the stacked second and third ribosomes to their respective codons and showed that they are arranged at nine-codon intervals behind the Ser-94 codon, indicating tight stacking. Puromycin reacts with peptidyl-tRNA in the P-site, releasing the nascent peptide as peptidyl-puromycin. This reaction is used to monitor the activity of the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) in arrested ribosomes. Puromycin reaction of peptidyl-tRNA on the AdoMet-arrested ribosome, which is stalled at the pre-translocation step, was slow. This limited reactivity can be attributed to the peptidyl-tRNA occupying the A-site at this step rather than to suppression of PTC activity. In contrast, puromycin reactions of peptidyl-tRNA with the stacked second and third ribosomes were slow but were not as slow as pre-translocation step ribosomes. We propose that the anticodon end of peptidyl-tRNA resides in the A-site of the stacked ribosomes and that the stacked ribosomes are stalled at an early step of translocation, possibly at the P/E hybrid state. PMID:24652291

  17. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: potent poisons and molecular tools.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-11-15

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms.

  18. Sequence requirements for ribosome stalling by the arginine attenuator peptide.

    PubMed

    Spevak, Christina C; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Sachs, Matthew S

    2010-12-24

    The 5' regions of eukaryotic mRNAs often contain upstream open reading frames (uORFs). The Neurospora crassa arg-2 uORF encodes the 24-residue arginine attenuator peptide (AAP). This regulatory uORF-encoded peptide, which is evolutionarily conserved in fungal transcripts specifying an arginine biosynthetic enzyme, functions as a nascent peptide within the ribosomal tunnel and negatively regulates gene expression. The nascent AAP causes ribosomes to stall at the uORF stop codon in response to arginine, thus, blocking ribosomes from reaching the ARG-2 initiation codon. Here scanning mutagenesis with alanine and proline was performed to systematically determine which AAP residues were important for conferring regulation. Changing many of the most highly conserved residues (Asp-12, Tyr-13, Lys-14, and Trp-19) abolished regulatory function. The minimal functional domain of the AAP was determined by positioning AAP sequences internally within a large polypeptide. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that residues 9-20 of the AAP composed the minimal domain that was sufficient to confer regulatory function. An extensive analysis of predicted fungal AAPs revealed that the minimal functional domain of the N. crassa AAP corresponded closely to the region that was most highly conserved among the fungi. We also observed that the tripeptide RGD could function similarly to arginine in triggering AAP-mediated ribosome stalling. These studies provide a better understanding of the elements required for a nascent peptide and a small regulatory molecule to control translational processes.

  19. Alternative Ways to Think about Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry*

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2010-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are specialized mRNA elements that allow recruitment of eukaryotic ribosomes to naturally uncapped mRNAs or to capped mRNAs under conditions in which cap-dependent translation is inhibited. Putative cellular IRESs have been proposed to play crucial roles in stress responses, development, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and neuronal function. However, most of the evidence for cellular IRES activity rests on bicistronic reporter assays, the reliability of which has been questioned. Here, the mechanisms underlying cap-independent translation of cellular mRNAs and the contributions of such translation to cellular protein synthesis are discussed. I suggest that the division of cellular mRNAs into mutually exclusive categories of “cap-dependent” and “IRES-dependent” should be reconsidered and that the implications of cellular IRES activity need to be incorporated into our models of cap-dependent initiation. PMID:20576611

  20. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J.; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure. PMID:25713412

  1. Reprogramming the genetic code: the emerging role of ribosomal frameshifting in regulating cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Vivek M.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Reading frame maintenance is a critical property of ribosomes. However, a number of genetic elements have been described that can induce ribosomes to shift on mRNAs, the most well understood of which are a class that directs ribosomal slippage by one base in 5′ (-1) direction. This is referred to as programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Recently, a new -1 PRF promoting element was serendipitously discovered in a study examining the effects of stretches of adenosines in the coding sequences of mRNAs. Here, we discuss this finding, recent studies describing how -1 PRF is used to control gene expression in eukaryotes, and how -1 PRF is itself regulated. The implications of dysregulation of -1 PRF on human health are examined, as are possible new areas in which novel -1 PRF promoting elements might be discovered. PMID:26661048

  2. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  3. Protein quality control at the ribosome: focus on RAC, NAC and RQC.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, Martin

    2016-10-15

    The biogenesis of new polypeptides by ribosomes and their subsequent correct folding and localization to the appropriate cellular compartments are essential key processes to maintain protein homoeostasis. These complex mechanisms are governed by a repertoire of protein biogenesis factors that directly bind to the ribosome and chaperone nascent polypeptide chains as soon as they emerge from the ribosomal tunnel exit. This nascent chain 'welcoming committee' regulates multiple co-translational processes including protein modifications, folding, targeting and degradation. Acting at the front of the protein production line, these ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors lead the way in the cellular proteostasis network to ensure proteome integrity. In this article, I focus on three different systems in eukaryotes that are critical for the maintenance of protein homoeostasis by controlling the birth, life and death of nascent polypeptide chains.

  4. The pathway of hepatitis C virus mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis begins with mRNA positioning in the ribosomal decoding channel in a process typically controlled by translation-initiation factors. Some viruses use an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in their mRNA to harness ribosomes independently of initiation factors. We show here that a ribosome conformational change that is induced upon hepatitis C viral IRES binding is necessary but not sufficient for correct mRNA positioning. Using directed hydroxyl radical probing to monitor the assembly of IRES-containing translation-initiation complexes, we have defined a crucial step in which mRNA is stabilized upon initiator tRNA binding. Unexpectedly, however, this stabilization occurs independently of the AUG codon, underscoring the importance of initiation factor-mediated interactions that influence the configuration of the decoding channel. These results reveal how an IRES RNA supplants some, but not all, of the functions normally carried out by protein factors during initiation of protein synthesis.

  5. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  6. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-09-16

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome.

  7. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-01-01

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome. PMID:18768810

  8. Origins of Eukaryotic Sexual Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is a nearly universal feature of eukaryotic organisms. Given its ubiquity and shared core features, sex is thought to have arisen once in the last common ancestor to all eukaryotes. Using the perspectives of molecular genetics and cell biology, we consider documented and hypothetical scenarios for the instantiation and evolution of meiosis, fertilization, sex determination, uniparental inheritance of organelle genomes, and speciation. PMID:24591519

  9. Ribosome binding to a 5' translational enhancer is altered in the presence of the 3' untranslated region in cap-independent translation of turnip crinkle virus.

    PubMed

    Stupina, Vera A; Yuan, Xuefeng; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Simon, Anne E

    2011-05-01

    Plus-strand RNA viruses without 5' caps require noncanonical mechanisms for ribosome recruitment. A translational enhancer in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) contains an internal T-shaped structure (TSS) that binds to 60S ribosomal subunits. We now report that the 63-nucleotide (nt) 5' UTR of TCV contains a 19-nt pyrimidine-rich element near the initiation codon that supports translation of an internal open reading frame (ORF) independent of upstream 5' UTR sequences. Addition of 80S ribosomes to the 5' UTR reduced the flexibility of the polypyrimidine residues and generated a toeprint consistent with binding to this region. Binding of salt-washed 40S ribosomal subunits was reduced 6-fold when the pyrimidine-rich sequence was mutated. 40S subunit binding generated the same toeprint as 80S ribosomes but also additional ones near the 5' end. Generation of out-of-frame AUGs upstream of the polypyrimidine region reduced translation, which suggests that 5'-terminal entry of 40S subunits is followed by scanning and that the polypyrimidine region is needed for an alternative function that requires ribosome binding. No evidence for RNA-RNA interactions between 5' and 3' sequences was found, suggesting that TCV utilizes an alternative means for circularizing its genome. Combining 5' and 3' UTR fragments in vitro had no discernible effect on the structures of the RNAs. In contrast, when 80S ribosomes were added to both fragments, structural changes were found in the 5' UTR polypyrimidine tract that were not evident when ribosomes interacted with the individual fragments. This suggests that ribosomes can promote an interaction between the 5' and 3' UTRs of TCV.

  10. Archaeology of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the characterization of the archaeal DNA replication system together with comparative genomic analysis have led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized archaeal proteins involved in replication and currently reveal a nearly complete correspondence between the components of the archaeal and eukaryotic replication machineries. It can be inferred that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes and even the last common ancestor of all extant archaea possessed replication machineries that were comparable in complexity to the eukaryotic replication system. The eukaryotic replication system encompasses multiple paralogs of ancestral components such that heteromeric complexes in eukaryotes replace archaeal homomeric complexes, apparently along with subfunctionalization of the eukaryotic complex subunits. In the archaea, parallel, lineage-specific duplications of many genes encoding replication machinery components are detectable as well; most of these archaeal paralogs remain to be functionally characterized. The archaeal replication system shows remarkable plasticity whereby even some essential components such as DNA polymerase and single-stranded DNA-binding protein are displaced by unrelated proteins with analogous activities in some lineages. PMID:23881942

  11. Parallel Structural Evolution of Mitochondrial Ribosomes and OXPHOS Complexes

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluis, Eli O.; Bauerschmitt, Heike; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Frauenfeld, Jens; Berninghausen, Otto; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The five macromolecular complexes that jointly mediate oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria consist of many more subunits than those of bacteria, yet, it remains unclear by which evolutionary mechanism(s) these novel subunits were recruited. Even less well understood is the structural evolution of mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes): while it was long thought that their exceptionally high protein content would physically compensate for their uniquely low amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), this hypothesis has been refuted by structural studies. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 73S mitoribosome from Neurospora crassa, together with genomic and proteomic analyses of mitoribosome composition across the eukaryotic domain. Surprisingly, our findings reveal that both structurally and compositionally, mitoribosomes have evolved very similarly to mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes via two distinct phases: A constructive phase that mainly acted early in eukaryote evolution, resulting in the recruitment of altogether approximately 75 novel subunits, and a reductive phase that acted during metazoan evolution, resulting in gradual length-reduction of mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. Both phases can be well explained by the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations and deletions, respectively, in mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. We argue that the main role of the newly recruited (nuclear encoded) ribosomal- and OXPHOS proteins is to provide structural compensation to the mutationally destabilized mitochondrially encoded components. While the newly recruited proteins probably provide a selective advantage owing to their compensatory nature, and while their presence may have opened evolutionary pathways toward novel mitochondrion-specific functions, we emphasize that the initial events that resulted in their recruitment was nonadaptive in nature. Our framework is supported by population genetic

  12. Parallel Structural Evolution of Mitochondrial Ribosomes and OXPHOS Complexes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Eli O; Bauerschmitt, Heike; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Frauenfeld, Jens; Berninghausen, Otto; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-04-09

    The five macromolecular complexes that jointly mediate oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria consist of many more subunits than those of bacteria, yet, it remains unclear by which evolutionary mechanism(s) these novel subunits were recruited. Even less well understood is the structural evolution of mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes): while it was long thought that their exceptionally high protein content would physically compensate for their uniquely low amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), this hypothesis has been refuted by structural studies. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 73S mitoribosome from Neurospora crassa, together with genomic and proteomic analyses of mitoribosome composition across the eukaryotic domain. Surprisingly, our findings reveal that both structurally and compositionally, mitoribosomes have evolved very similarly to mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes via two distinct phases: A constructive phase that mainly acted early in eukaryote evolution, resulting in the recruitment of altogether approximately 75 novel subunits, and a reductive phase that acted during metazoan evolution, resulting in gradual length-reduction of mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. Both phases can be well explained by the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations and deletions, respectively, in mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. We argue that the main role of the newly recruited (nuclear encoded) ribosomal- and OXPHOS proteins is to provide structural compensation to the mutationally destabilized mitochondrially encoded components. While the newly recruited proteins probably provide a selective advantage owing to their compensatory nature, and while their presence may have opened evolutionary pathways toward novel mitochondrion-specific functions, we emphasize that the initial events that resulted in their recruitment was nonadaptive in nature. Our framework is supported by population genetic

  13. Phylogenetic relationships of Cryptosporidium determined by ribosomal RNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Fielke, R; Lumb, R; Baverstock, P R

    1990-04-01

    Reverse transcription of total cellular RNA was used to obtain a partial sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA of Cryptosporidium, a protist currently placed in the phylum Apicomplexa. The semi-conserved regions were aligned with homologous sequences in a range of other eukaryotes, and the evolutionary relationships of Cryptosporidium were determined by two different methods of phylogenetic analysis. The prokaryotes Escherichia coli and Halobacterium cuti were included as outgroups. The results do not show an especially close relationship of Cryptosporidium to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa.

  14. Reconstitution of a Minimal Ribosome-Associated Ubiquitination Pathway with Purified Factors

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ribosomes stalled on aberrant mRNAs engage quality control mechanisms that degrade the partially translated nascent polypeptide. Ubiquitination of the nascent protein is mediated by the E3 ligase Listerin via a mechanism involving ribosome subunit dissociation. Here, we reconstitute ribosome-associated ubiquitination with purified factors to define the minimal components and essential steps in this process. We find that the primary role of the ribosome splitting factors Hbs1, Pelota, and ABCE1 is to permit Listerin access to the nascent chain. Listerin alone can discriminate 60S- from 80S-nascent chain complexes to selectively ubiquitinate the former. Splitting factors can be bypassed by artificially removing the 40S subunit, suggesting that mere steric hindrance impedes Listerin recruitment. This was illustrated by a cryo-EM reconstruction of the 60S-Listerin complex that identifies a binding interface that clashes with the 40S ribosomal subunit. These results reveal the mechanistic logic of the core steps in a ribosome-associated quality control pathway. PMID:25132172

  15. Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Zhang, Gong; Nagar, Apoorva; Ignatova, Zoya; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    A simple measure for the efficiency of protein synthesis by ribosomes is provided by the steady state amount of protein per messenger RNA (mRNA), the so-called translational ratio, which is proportional to the translation rate. Taking the degradation of mRNA into account, we show theoretically that both the translation rate and the translational ratio decrease with increasing mRNA length, in agreement with available experimental data for the prokaryote Escherichia coli. We also show that, compared to prokaryotes, mRNA degradation in eukaryotes leads to a less rapid decrease of the translational ratio. This finding is consistent with the fact that, compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes tend to have longer proteins.

  16. Principles of start codon recognition in eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Christoffer; Åqvist, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the correct start codon during initiation of translation on the ribosome is a key event in protein synthesis. In eukaryotic initiation, several factors have to function in concert to ensure that the initiator tRNA finds the cognate AUG start codon during mRNA scanning. The two initiation factors eIF1 and eIF1A are known to provide important functions for the initiation process and codon selection. Here, we have used molecular dynamics free energy calculations to evaluate the energetics of initiator tRNA binding to different near-cognate codons on the yeast 40S ribosomal subunit, in the presence and absence of these two initiation factors. The results show that eIF1 and eIF1A together cause a relatively uniform and high discrimination against near-cognate codons. This works such that eIF1 boosts the discrimination against a first position near-cognate G-U mismatch, and also against a second position A-A base pair, while eIF1A mainly acts on third codon position. The computer simulations further reveal the structural basis of the increased discriminatory effect caused by binding of eIF1 and eIF1A to the 40S ribosomal subunit. PMID:27280974

  17. Ribosomal Peptide Natural Products: Bridging the Ribosomal and Nonribosomal Worlds

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, John A.; Donia, Mohamed S.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized bacterial natural products rival the nonribosomal peptides in their structural and functional diversity. The last decade has seen substantial progress in the identification and characterization of biosynthetic pathways leading to ribosomal peptide natural products with new and unusual structural motifs. In some of these cases, the motifs are similar to those found in nonribosomal peptides, and many are constructed by convergent or even paralogous enzymes. Here, we summarize the major structural and biosynthetic categories of ribosomally synthesized bacterial natural products and, where applicable, compare them to their homologs from nonribosomal biosynthesis. PMID:19642421

  18. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  19. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2014-11-11

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes.

  20. Cap-dependent translation is mediated by 'RNA looping' rather than 'ribosome scanning'.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Key; Paek, Ki Young

    2016-01-01

    The 40S ribosomal subunit cannot directly recognize the start codon of eukaryotic mRNAs. Instead, it recognizes the start codon after its association with the 5'-cap structure via translation initiation factors. Base-by-base inspection of the 5'UTR by a scanning ribosome is the generally accepted hypothesis of start codon selection. As part of an effort to confirm the underlying mechanism of start codon selection by the 40S ribosome, we investigated the role of eIF4G, which participates in the recruitment of 40S ribosomes to various translation enhancers, such as 5'-cap structure, poly(A) tail, and several internal ribosome entry sites. We found that an artificial translation factor composed of recombinant eIF4G fused with MS2 greatly enhanced translation of an upstream reporter gene when it was tethered to the 3'UTR. These data suggest that the 40S ribosome recruited to a translation enhancer can find the start codon by looping of the intervening RNA segment. The 'RNA-looping' hypothesis of translation start codon recognition was further supported by an analysis of the effect of 5'UTR length on translation efficiency and the mathematically predicted probability of RNA-loop-mediated interactions between the start codon and the 40S ribosome associated at the 5'-end.

  1. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  2. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P.; Hiley, Shawna L.; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L.

    2007-01-01

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors—e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs—remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm. PMID:17938242

  3. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P; Hiley, Shawna L; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L

    2007-10-15

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors--e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs--remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm.

  4. Segregation of the polypeptide translocation apparatus to regions of the endoplasmic reticulum containing ribophorins and ribosomes. I. Functional tests on rat liver microsomal subfractions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A preparation of rat liver microsomes containing 70% of the total cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes was subfractionated by isopycnic density centrifugation. Twelve subfractions of different ribosome content ranging in density from 1.06 to 1.29 were obtained and analyzed with respect to marker enzymes, RNA, and protein content, as well as the capacity of these membranes to bind 80S ribosomes in vitro. After removal of native polysomes from these microsomal subfractions by puromycin in a buffer of high ionic strength their capacity to rebind 80S ribosomes approached levels found in the corresponding native membranes before ribosome stripping. This indicates that in vitro rebinding of ribosomes occurs to the same sites occupied in the cell by membrane-bound polysomes. Microsomes in the microsomal subfractions were also tested for their capacity to effect the translocation of nascent secretory proteins into the microsomal lumen utilizing a rabbit reticulocyte translation system programmed with mRNA coding for the precursor of human placental lactogen. Membranes from microsomes with the higher isopycnic density and a high ribosome content showed the highest translocation activity, whereas membranes derived from smooth microsomes had only a very low translocation activity. These results indicate the membranes of the rough and smooth portions of the endoplasmic reticulum are functionally differentiated so that sites for ribosome binding and the translocation of nascent polypeptides are segregated to the rough domain of the organelle. PMID:6501423

  5. Transcriptome-wide measurement of ribosomal occupancy by ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Aeschimann, Florian; Xiong, Jieyi; Arnold, Andreas; Dieterich, Christoph; Grosshans, Helge

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiling provides a tool to analyze the internal states of cells or organisms, and their responses to perturbations. While global measurements of mRNA levels have thus been widely used for many years, it is only through the recent development of the ribosome profiling technique that an analogous examination of global mRNA translation programs has become possible. Ribosome profiling reveals which RNAs are being translated to what extent and where the translated open reading frames are located. In addition, different modes of translation regulation can be distinguished and characterized. Here, we present an optimized, step-by-step protocol for ribosome profiling. Although established in Caenorhabditis elegans, our protocol and optimization approaches should be equally usable for other model organisms or cell culture with little adaptation. Next to providing a protocol, we compare two different methods for isolation of single ribosomes and two different library preparations, and describe strategies to optimize the RNase digest and to reduce ribosomal RNA contamination in the libraries. Moreover, we discuss bioinformatic strategies to evaluate the quality of the data and explain how the data can be analyzed for different applications. In sum, this article seeks to facilitate the understanding, execution, and optimization of ribosome profiling experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D.; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100–200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how “normal” copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a “normal” rDNA copy number. PMID:28915237

  7. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation, chaperone assistance and antibiotics activity.

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2005-08-31

    The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) is located in a protein free environment, thus confirming that the ribosome is a ribozyme. This arched void has dimensions suitable for accommodating the 3' ends of the A-and the P-site tRNAs, and is situated within a universal sizable symmetry-related region that connects all ribosomal functional centers involved in amino-acid polymerization. The linkage between the elaborate PTC architecture and the A-site tRNA position revealed that the A- to P-site passage of the tRNA 3' end is performed by a rotatory motion, which leads to stereochemistry suitable for peptide bond formation and for substrate mediated catalysis, thus suggesting that the PTC evolved by gene-fusion. Adjacent to the PTC is the entrance of the protein exit tunnel, shown to play active roles in sequence-specific gating of nascent chains and in responding to cellular signals. This tunnel also provides a site that may be exploited for local co-translational folding and seems to assist in nascent chain trafficking into the hydrophobic space formed by the first bacterial chaperone, the trigger factor. Many antibiotics target ribosomes. Although the ribosome is highly conserved, subtle sequence and/or conformational variations enable drug selectivity, thus facilitating clinical usage. Comparisons of high-resolution structures of complexes of antibiotics bound to ribosomes from eubacteria resembling pathogens, to an archaeon that shares properties with eukaryotes and to its mutant that allows antibiotics binding, demonstrated the unambiguous difference between mere binding and therapeutical effectiveness. The observed variability in antibiotics inhibitory modes, accompanied by the elucidation of the structural basis to antibiotics mechanism justifies expectations for structural based improved properties of existing compounds as well as for the development of novel drugs.

  8. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  9. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-06-24

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies.

  10. The revised classification of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Adl, Sina M; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lane, Christopher E; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S; Brown, Matthew W; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; Le Gall, Line; Lynn, Denis H; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A D; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E; Parfrey, Laura W; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Laura; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad L; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W

    2012-09-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 52 (2005) 399], retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information.

  11. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Fairlamb, Alan H.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Matthews, Keith R.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  12. Does higher education expansion promote educational homogamy? Evidence from married couples of the post-80s generation in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anning; Qian, Zhenchao

    2016-11-01

    The expansion of higher education witnessed in many societies influences the pattern of educational assortative mating. Structural transition theory predicts growing educational homogamy due to increasing preference for highly-educated partners who become more widely available. In contrast, social closure theory suggests depressed educational homogamy because the inflation of the education elite circle fosters the openness of marriage market, reducing the preference for a highly-educated mate and increasing the penetrability across social-status boundaries. Capitalizing the survey data that are representative of the post-80s one-child generation collected in Shanghai, China, we test the hypotheses derived from the two theories. Empirical results suggest that, with increasing availability of highly educated individuals, the extent of educational homogamy by birth cohort reveals a U-shaped pattern. This U-shaped pattern demonstrates increasing levels of educational homogamy and lends support to structural transition theory.

  13. Recent advances in the uses and applications of ribosome-inactivating proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Girbés, T; Ferreras, J M; Iglesias, R; Citores, L; De Torre, C; Carbajales, M L; Jiménez, P; De Benito, F M; Muñoz, R

    1996-06-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are inhibitors present in all parts of plants that irreversibly inactivate eukaryotic ribosomes, thus impairing protein synthesis. RIPs are enzymes with N-glycosidase activity on the large rRNA. Their powerful inhibitory activity has been made use of advantageously to construct conjugates with suitable carriers targeted to altered specific cells. RIPs may be used to inhibit replication of both animal and plant viruses. The introduction of genes coding for RIPs into the genome of plants leads to an increase in resistance towards fungal pathogens and viruses. RIPs are important tools for the treatment of cancer and AIDS and for the protection of crop production.

  14. Variation in the ribosome interacting loop of the Sec61α from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Abhishek; Ray, Atrayee; Ganguly, Sandipan; Ghosh Dastidar, Shubhra; Sarkar, Srimonti

    2015-09-30

    The interaction between the ribosome and the endoplasmic reticulum-located Sec61 protein translocon is mediated through an arginine residue of Sec61α, which is conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic orthologues characterized to date. Using in silico approaches we report that instead of arginine, this ribosome-interaction function is most likely discharged by a lysine residue in the protist Giardia lamblia. This functional substitution of the R with a K in GlSec61α may have taken place to accommodate a G-rich rRNA.

  15. Crystal structures of complexes containing domains from two viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs bound to the 70S ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jianyu; Korostelev, Andrei; Costantino, David A.; Donohue, John P.; Noller, Harry F.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2011-08-24

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are elements of viral or cellular mRNAs that bypass steps of canonical eukaryotic cap-dependent translation initiation. Understanding of the structural basis of IRES mechanisms is limited, partially due to a lack of high-resolution structures of IRES RNAs bound to their cellular targets. Prompted by the universal phylogenetic conservation of the ribosomal P site, we solved the crystal structures of proposed P site binding domains from two intergenic region IRES RNAs bound to bacterial 70S ribosomes. The structures show that these IRES domains nearly perfectly mimic a tRNA-mRNA interaction. However, there are clear differences in the global shape and position of this IRES domain in the intersubunit space compared to those of tRNA, supporting a mechanism for IRES action that invokes hybrid state mimicry to drive a noncanonical mode of translocation. These structures suggest how relatively small structured RNAs can manipulate complex biological machines.

  16. Pan-eukaryote ITS2 homologies revealed by RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2007-01-01

    For evolutionary comparisons, phylogenetics and evaluation of potential interbreeding taxa of a species, various loci have served for animals and plants and protistans. One [second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA] is highly suitable for all. Its sequence is species specific. It has already been used extensively and very successfully for plants and some protistans, and a few animals (where historically, the mitochondrial genes have dominated species studies). Despite initial impressions that ITS2 is too variable, it has proven to provide useful biological information at higher taxonomic levels, even across all eukaryotes, thanks to the conserved aspects of its transcript secondary structure. The review of all eukaryote groups reveals that ITS2 is expandable, but always retains in its RNA transcript a common core structure of two helices with hallmark characteristics important for ribosomal RNA processing. This aspect of its RNA transcript secondary structure can rescue difficult alignment problems, making the ITS2 a more powerful tool for phylogenetics. Equally important, the recognition of eukaryote-wide homology regions provides extensive and detailed information to test experimental studies of ribosomal rRNA processing. PMID:17459886

  17. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1997-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  18. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  19. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1997-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:9016515

  20. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  1. The kissing-loop T-shaped structure translational enhancer of Pea enation mosaic virus can bind simultaneously to ribosomes and a 5' proximal hairpin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D; Shapiro, Bruce A; Simon, Anne E

    2013-11-01

    The Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) 3' translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5'-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5' and 3' PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3' translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5' hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5' end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation.

  2. Targeting ricin to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    May, Kerrie L; Yan, Qing; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-07-01

    The plant toxin ricin is highly toxic for mammalian cells and is of concern for bioterrorism. Ricin belongs to a family of functionally related toxins, collectively referred to as ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), which disable ribosomes and halt protein synthesis. Currently there are no specific antidotes against ricin or related RIPs. The catalytic subunit of ricin is an N-glycosidase that depurinates a universally conserved adenine residue within the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA. This depurination activity inhibits translation and its biochemistry has been intensively studied. Yet, recent developments paint a more complex picture of toxicity, with ribosomal proteins and cellular signaling pathways contributing to the potency of ricin. In particular, several studies have now established the importance of the ribosomal stalk structure in facilitating the depurination activity and ribosome specificity of ricin and other RIPs. This review highlights recent developments defining toxin-ribosome interactions and examines the significance of these interactions for toxicity and therapeutic intervention.

  3. Yeast Asc1p and Mammalian RACK1 Are Functionally Orthologous Core 40S Ribosomal Proteins That Repress Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gerbasi, Vincent R.; Weaver, Connie M.; Hill, Salisha; Friedman, David B.; Link, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into protein is a fundamental step in eukaryotic gene expression requiring the large (60S) and small (40S) ribosome subunits and associated proteins. By modern proteomic approaches, we previously identified a novel 40S-associated protein named Asc1p in budding yeast and RACK1 in mammals. The goals of this study were to establish Asc1p or RACK1 as a core conserved eukaryotic ribosomal protein and to determine the role of Asc1p or RACK1 in translational control. We provide biochemical, evolutionary, genetic, and functional evidence showing that Asc1p or RACK1 is indeed a conserved core component of the eukaryotic ribosome. We also show that purified Asc1p-deficient ribosomes have increased translational activity compared to that of wild-type yeast ribosomes. Further, we demonstrate that asc1Δ null strains have increased levels of specific proteins in vivo and that this molecular phenotype is complemented by either Asc1p or RACK1. Our data suggest that one of Asc1p's or RACK1's functions is to repress gene expression. PMID:15340087

  4. Yeast Asc1p and mammalian RACK1 are functionally orthologous core 40S ribosomal proteins that repress gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerbasi, Vincent R; Weaver, Connie M; Hill, Salisha; Friedman, David B; Link, Andrew J

    2004-09-01

    Translation of mRNA into protein is a fundamental step in eukaryotic gene expression requiring the large (60S) and small (40S) ribosome subunits and associated proteins. By modern proteomic approaches, we previously identified a novel 40S-associated protein named Asc1p in budding yeast and RACK1 in mammals. The goals of this study were to establish Asc1p or RACK1 as a core conserved eukaryotic ribosomal protein and to determine the role of Asc1p or RACK1 in translational control. We provide biochemical, evolutionary, genetic, and functional evidence showing that Asc1p or RACK1 is indeed a conserved core component of the eukaryotic ribosome. We also show that purified Asc1p-deficient ribosomes have increased translational activity compared to that of wild-type yeast ribosomes. Further, we demonstrate that asc1Delta null strains have increased levels of specific proteins in vivo and that this molecular phenotype is complemented by either Asc1p or RACK1. Our data suggest that one of Asc1p's or RACK1's functions is to repress gene expression.

  5. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  6. Characterization of silk gland ribosomes from a bivoltine caddisfly, Stenopsyche marmorata: translational suppression of a silk protein in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takaomi; Ito, Miho; Kanamori, Mai; Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Arai, Ryoichi; Tsukada, Masuhiro; Hirabayashi, Kimio; Ohkawa, Kousaku

    2016-01-08

    Larval Stenopsyche marmorata constructs food capture nets and fixed retreats underwater using self-produced proteinaceous silk fibers. In the Chikuma River (Nagano Prefecture, Japan) S. marmorata has a bivoltine life cycle; overwintering larvae grow slowly with reduced net spinning activity in winter. We recently reported constant transcript abundance of S. marmorata silk protein 1 (Smsp-1), a core S. marmorata silk fiber component, in all seasons, implying translational suppression in the silk gland during winter. Herein, we prepared and characterized silk gland ribosomes from seasonally collected S. marmorata larvae. Ribosomes from silk glands immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen (LN2) after dissection exhibited comparable translation elongation activity in spring, summer, and autumn. Conversely, silk glands obtained in winter did not contain active ribosomes and Smsp-1. Ribosomes from silk glands immersed in ice-cold physiological saline solution for approximately 4 h were translationally inactive, despite summer collection and Smsp-1 expression. The ribosomal inactivation occurs because of defects in the formation of 80S ribosomes, presumably due to splitting of 60S subunits containing 28S rRNA with central hidden break, in response to cold stress. These results suggest a novel-type ribosome-regulated translation control mechanism.

  7. Changing ideas about eukaryotic origins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Embley, T Martin

    2015-09-26

    The origin of eukaryotic cells is one of the most fascinating challenges in biology, and has inspired decades of controversy and debate. Recent work has led to major upheavals in our understanding of eukaryotic origins and has catalysed new debates about the roles of endosymbiosis and gene flow across the tree of life. Improved methods of phylogenetic analysis support scenarios in which the host cell for the mitochondrial endosymbiont was a member of the Archaea, and new technologies for sampling the genomes of environmental prokaryotes have allowed investigators to home in on closer relatives of founding symbiotic partners. The inference and interpretation of phylogenetic trees from genomic data remains at the centre of many of these debates, and there is increasing recognition that trees built using inadequate methods can prove misleading, whether describing the relationship of eukaryotes to other cells or the root of the universal tree. New statistical approaches show promise for addressing these questions but they come with their own computational challenges. The papers in this theme issue discuss recent progress on the origin of eukaryotic cells and genomes, highlight some of the ongoing debates, and suggest possible routes to future progress.

  8. The early eukaryotic fossil record.

    PubMed

    Javaux, Emmanuelle J

    2007-01-01

    The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the evolution of major biological innovations. The late Archean record for eukaryotes is limited to trace amounts of biomarkers. Morphological evidence appears in late Paleoproterozoic and early Mesoproterozoic (1800-1300 Ma) rocks. The moderate diversity of preservable eukaryotic organisms includes cell walls without surface ornament (but with complex ultrastructure), with regularly distributed surface ornamentation, and with irregularly or regularly arranged processes. Collectively, these fossils suggest that eukaryotes with flexible membranes and cytoskeletons existed in mid-Proterozoic oceans. The late Mesoproterozoic-early Neoproterozoic (1300-750 Ma) is a time of diversification and evolution when direct evidence for important biological innovations occurs in the fossil record such as multicellularity, sex, photosynthesis, biomineralization, predation, and heterotrophy. Members of extant clades can be recognized and include bangiophyte red algae, xanthophyte algae, cladophorale green algae, euglyphid, lobose, and filose amoebae and possible fungi. In the late Neoproterozoic, besides more diversification of ornamented fossils, florideophyte red algae and brown algae diversify, and animals take the stage. The record of biological innovations documented by the fossils shows that eukaryotes had evolved most cytological and molecular complexities very early in the Proterozoic but environmental conditions delayed their diversification within clades until oxygen level and predation pressure increased significantly.

  9. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  10. Eukaryotic organisms in Proterozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, A.H; Javaux, E.J; Hewitt, D; Cohen, P

    2006-01-01

    The geological record of protists begins well before the Ediacaran and Cambrian diversification of animals, but the antiquity of that history, its reliability as a chronicle of evolution and the causal inferences that can be drawn from it remain subjects of debate. Well-preserved protists are known from a relatively small number of Proterozoic formations, but taphonomic considerations suggest that they capture at least broad aspects of early eukaryotic evolution. A modest diversity of problematic, possibly stem group protists occurs in ca 1800–1300 Myr old rocks. 1300–720 Myr fossils document the divergence of major eukaryotic clades, but only with the Ediacaran–Cambrian radiation of animals did diversity increase within most clades with fossilizable members. While taxonomic placement of many Proterozoic eukaryotes may be arguable, the presence of characters used for that placement is not. Focus on character evolution permits inferences about the innovations in cell biology and development that underpin the taxonomic and morphological diversification of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16754612

  11. Changing ideas about eukaryotic origins

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tom A.; Embley, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    The origin of eukaryotic cells is one of the most fascinating challenges in biology, and has inspired decades of controversy and debate. Recent work has led to major upheavals in our understanding of eukaryotic origins and has catalysed new debates about the roles of endosymbiosis and gene flow across the tree of life. Improved methods of phylogenetic analysis support scenarios in which the host cell for the mitochondrial endosymbiont was a member of the Archaea, and new technologies for sampling the genomes of environmental prokaryotes have allowed investigators to home in on closer relatives of founding symbiotic partners. The inference and interpretation of phylogenetic trees from genomic data remains at the centre of many of these debates, and there is increasing recognition that trees built using inadequate methods can prove misleading, whether describing the relationship of eukaryotes to other cells or the root of the universal tree. New statistical approaches show promise for addressing these questions but they come with their own computational challenges. The papers in this theme issue discuss recent progress on the origin of eukaryotic cells and genomes, highlight some of the ongoing debates, and suggest possible routes to future progress. PMID:26323752

  12. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  13. Construction of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries using low input of total environmental metatranscriptomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajiv Kumar; Barbi, Florian; Ziller, Antoine; Luis, Patricia; Marmeisse, Roland; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence

    2014-09-03

    Construction of high quality cDNA libraries from the usually low amounts of eukaryotic mRNA extracted from environmental samples is essential in functional metatranscriptomics for the selection of functional, full-length genes encoding proteins of interest. Many of the inserts in libraries constructed by standard methods are represented by truncated cDNAs due to premature stoppage of reverse transcriptase activity and preferential cloning of short cDNAs. We report here a simple and cost effective technique for preparation of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from as low as three microgram of total soil RNA dominated by ribosomal and bacterial RNA. cDNAs synthesized by a template switching approach were size-fractionated by two dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis prior to PCR amplification and cloning. Effective size selection was demonstrated by PCR amplification of conserved gene families specific of each size class. Libraries of more than one million independent inserts whose sizes ranged between one and four kb were thus produced. Up to 80% of the insert sequences were homologous to eukaryotic gene sequences present in public databases. A simple and cost effective technique has been developed to construct sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from environmental samples. This technique will facilitate expression cloning of environmental eukaryotic genes and contribute to a better understanding of basic biological and/or ecological processes carried out by eukaryotic microbial communities.

  14. Active eukaryotes in microbialites from Highborne Cay, Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool (Shark Bay), Australia.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Bernhard, Joan M; Summons, Roger E; Orsi, William; Beaudoin, David; Visscher, Pieter T

    2014-02-01

    Microbialites are organosedimentary structures that are formed through the interaction of benthic microbial communities and sediments and include mineral precipitation. These lithifying microbial mat structures include stromatolites and thrombolites. Exuma Sound in the Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia, are two locations where significant stands of modern microbialites exist. Although prokaryotic diversity in these structures is reasonably well documented, little is known about the eukaryotic component of these communities and their potential to influence sedimentary fabrics through grazing, binding and burrowing activities. Accordingly, comparisons of eukaryotic communities in modern stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats can potentially provide insight into the coexistence of both laminated and clotted mat structures in close proximity to one another. Here we examine this possibility by comparing eukaryotic diversity based on Sanger and high-throughput pyrosequencing of small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) genes. Analyses were based on total RNA extracts as template to minimize input from inactive or deceased organisms. Results identified diverse eukaryotic communities particularly stramenopiles, Alveolata, Metazoa, Amoebozoa and Rhizaria within different mat types at both locations, as well as abundant and diverse signatures of eukaryotes with <80% sequence similarity to sequences in GenBank. This suggests the presence of significant novel eukaryotic diversity, particularly in hypersaline Hamelin Pool. There was evidence of vertical structuring of protist populations and foraminiferal diversity was highest in bioturbated/clotted thrombolite mats of Highborne Cay.

  15. Active eukaryotes in microbialites from Highborne Cay, Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool (Shark Bay), Australia

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Bernhard, Joan M; Summons, Roger E; Orsi, William; Beaudoin, David; Visscher, Pieter T

    2014-01-01

    Microbialites are organosedimentary structures that are formed through the interaction of benthic microbial communities and sediments and include mineral precipitation. These lithifying microbial mat structures include stromatolites and thrombolites. Exuma Sound in the Bahamas, and Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia, are two locations where significant stands of modern microbialites exist. Although prokaryotic diversity in these structures is reasonably well documented, little is known about the eukaryotic component of these communities and their potential to influence sedimentary fabrics through grazing, binding and burrowing activities. Accordingly, comparisons of eukaryotic communities in modern stromatolitic and thrombolitic mats can potentially provide insight into the coexistence of both laminated and clotted mat structures in close proximity to one another. Here we examine this possibility by comparing eukaryotic diversity based on Sanger and high-throughput pyrosequencing of small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) genes. Analyses were based on total RNA extracts as template to minimize input from inactive or deceased organisms. Results identified diverse eukaryotic communities particularly stramenopiles, Alveolata, Metazoa, Amoebozoa and Rhizaria within different mat types at both locations, as well as abundant and diverse signatures of eukaryotes with <80% sequence similarity to sequences in GenBank. This suggests the presence of significant novel eukaryotic diversity, particularly in hypersaline Hamelin Pool. There was evidence of vertical structuring of protist populations and foraminiferal diversity was highest in bioturbated/clotted thrombolite mats of Highborne Cay. PMID:23924782

  16. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  17. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A protein inventory of human ribosome biogenesis reveals an essential function of exportin 5 in 60S subunit export.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Horvath, Peter; Wyler, Emanuel; Widmann, Barbara; Badertscher, Lukas; Zemp, Ivo; Kozak, Karol; Csucs, Gabor; Lund, Elsebet; Kutay, Ulrike

    2010-10-26

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process so far mostly studied in yeast. In S. cerevisiae, more than 200 factors including ribosomal proteins and trans-acting factors are required for the ordered assembly of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. To date, only few human homologs of these yeast ribosome synthesis factors have been characterized. Here, we used a systematic RNA interference (RNAi) approach to analyze the contribution of 464 candidate factors to ribosomal subunit biogenesis in human cells. The screen was based on visual readouts, using inducible, fluorescent ribosomal proteins as reporters. By performing computer-based image analysis utilizing supervised machine-learning techniques, we obtained evidence for a functional link of 153 human proteins to ribosome synthesis. Our data show that core features of ribosome assembly are conserved from yeast to human, but differences exist for instance with respect to 60S subunit export. Unexpectedly, our RNAi screen uncovered a requirement for the export receptor Exportin 5 (Exp5) in nuclear export of 60S subunits in human cells. We show that Exp5, like the known 60S exportin Crm1, binds to pre-60S particles in a RanGTP-dependent manner. Interference with either Exp5 or Crm1 function blocks 60S export in both human cells and frog oocytes, whereas 40S export is compromised only upon inhibition of Crm1. Thus, 60S subunit export is dependent on at least two RanGTP-binding exportins in vertebrate cells.

  19. The essential GTPase RbgA (YlqF) is required for 50S ribosome assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Uicker, William C; Schaefer, Laura; Britton, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the essential GTPase YlqF is shown to participate in the biogenesis of the 50S ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis. Cells depleted of YlqF displayed gene expression profiles and nucleoid morphologies that were consistent with a function for YlqF in translation. In addition, YlqF is evolutionarily linked to two eukaryotic GTPases, Nog2p and Nug1p, that are involved in the biogenesis and the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Analysis of ribosomes from cells depleted of YlqF demonstrated that the formation of 70S ribosomes was greatly reduced and the large subunit sedimented at 45S. Cells grown with varying depleted levels of YlqF, yielding doubling times ranging from 38 min to 150 min, all displayed the 45S intermediate. Purified YlqF-His(6) protein associates with the 45S intermediate, but not the mature 50S subunit in vitro. Analysis of proteins from the 45S intermediate indicated that ribosomal protein L16, which is added late during in vitro Escherichia coli 50S ribosome biogenesis, was missing from the 45S intermediate. These results support a model in which YlqF participates in the formation of active 70S ribosomes in the cell by functioning in a late step of 50S subunit biogenesis. Based on these results we propose to rename the ylqF gene rbgA (ribosome biogenesis GTPase A).

  20. Hierarchical recruitment into nascent ribosomes of assembly factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Zhang, Jingyu; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Horsey, Edward W.; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    To better define the roles of assembly factors required for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, we have focused on one specific step in maturation of yeast 60 S ribosomal subunits: processing of 27SB pre-ribosomal RNA. At least 14 assembly factors, the ‘B-factor’ proteins, are required for this step. These include most of the major functional classes of assembly factors: RNA-binding proteins, scaffolding protein, DEAD-box ATPases and GTPases. We have investigated the mechanisms by which these factors associate with assembling ribosomes. Our data establish a recruitment model in which assembly of the B-factors into nascent ribosomes ultimately leads to the recruitment of the GTPase Nog2. A more detailed analysis suggests that this occurs in a hierarchical manner via two largely independent recruiting pathways that converge on Nog2. Understanding recruitment has allowed us to better determine the order of association of all assembly factors functioning in one step of ribosome assembly. Furthermore, we have identified a novel subcomplex composed of the B-factors Nop2 and Nip7. Finally, we identified a means by which this step in ribosome biogenesis is regulated in concert with cell growth via the TOR protein kinase pathway. Inhibition of TOR kinase decreases association of Rpf2, Spb4, Nog1 and Nog2 with pre-ribosomes. PMID:22735702

  1. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  2. Universal and domain-specific sequences in 23S–28S ribosomal RNA identified by computational phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Doris, Stephen M.; Smith, Deborah R.; Beamesderfer, Julia N.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Nathanson, Judith A.; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has elucidated phylogenetic relationships. However, this powerful approach has not been fully exploited to address ribosome function. Here we identify stretches of evolutionarily conserved sequences, which correspond with regions of high functional importance. For this, we developed a structurally aligned database, FLORA (full-length organismal rRNA alignment) to identify highly conserved nucleotide elements (CNEs) in 23S–28S rRNA from each phylogenetic domain (Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea). Universal CNEs (uCNEs) are conserved in sequence and structural position in all three domains. Those in regions known to be essential for translation validate our approach. Importantly, some uCNEs reside in areas of unknown function, thus identifying novel sequences of likely great importance. In contrast to uCNEs, domain-specific CNEs (dsCNEs) are conserved in just one phylogenetic domain. This is the first report of conserved sequence elements in rRNA that are domain-specific; they are largely a eukaryotic phenomenon. The locations of the eukaryotic dsCNEs within the structure of the ribosome suggest they may function in nascent polypeptide transit through the ribosome tunnel and in tRNA exit from the ribosome. Our findings provide insights and a resource for ribosome function studies. PMID:26283689

  3. Structural basis for 5'-ETS recognition by Utp4 at the early stages of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kornprobst, Markus; Schermann, Géza; Birkle, Fabienne; Wild, Klemens; Fischer, Tamas; Hurt, Ed; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis begins with the co-transcriptional assembly of the 90S pre-ribosome. The ‘U three protein’ (UTP) complexes and snoRNP particles arrange around the nascent pre-ribosomal RNA chaperoning its folding and further maturation. The earliest event in this hierarchical process is the binding of the UTP-A complex to the 5'-end of the pre-ribosomal RNA (5'-ETS). This oligomeric complex predominantly consists of β-propeller and α-solenoidal proteins. Here we present the structure of the Utp4 subunit from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.15 Å resolution and analyze its function by UV RNA-crosslinking (CRAC) and in context of a recent cryo-EM structure of the 90S pre-ribosome. Utp4 consists of two orthogonal and highly basic β-propellers that perfectly fit the EM-data. The Utp4 structure highlights an unusual Velcro-closure of its C-terminal β-propeller as relevant for protein integrity and potentially Utp8 recognition in the context of the pre-ribosome. We provide a first model of the 5'-ETS RNA from the internally hidden 5'-end up to the region that hybridizes to the 3'-hinge sequence of U3 snoRNA and validate a specific Utp4/5'-ETS interaction by CRAC analysis. PMID:28575120

  4. Ribosome Collision Is Critical for Quality Control during No-Go Decay.

    PubMed

    Simms, Carrie L; Yan, Liewei L; Zaher, Hani S

    2017-09-15

    No-go decay (NGD) is a eukaryotic quality control mechanism that evolved to cope with translational arrests. The process is characterized by an endonucleolytic cleavage near the stall sequence, but the mechanistic details are unclear. Our analysis of cleavage sites indicates that cleavage requires multiple ribosomes on the mRNA. We also show that reporters harboring stall sequences near the initiation codon, which cannot accommodate multiple ribosomes, are not subject to NGD. Consistent with our model, we uncover an inverse correlation between ribosome density per mRNA and cleavage efficiency. Furthermore, promoting global ribosome collision in vivo resulted in ubiquitination of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that collision is sensed by the cell to initiate downstream quality control processes. Collectively, our data suggest that NGD and subsequent quality control are triggered by ribosome collision. This model provides insight into the regulation of quality control processes and the manner by which they reduce off-target effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies on the Assembly Characteristics of Large Subunit Ribosomal Proteins in S. cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Sauert, Martina; Ossowski, Julius; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Leger-Silvestre, Isabelle; Faubladier, Marlène; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Woolford, John; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    During the assembly process of ribosomal subunits, their structural components, the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and the ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) have to join together in a highly dynamic and defined manner to enable the efficient formation of functional ribosomes. In this work, the assembly of large ribosomal subunit (LSU) r-proteins from the eukaryote S. cerevisiae was systematically investigated. Groups of LSU r-proteins with specific assembly characteristics were detected by comparing the protein composition of affinity purified early, middle, late or mature LSU (precursor) particles by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The impact of yeast LSU r-proteins rpL25, rpL2, rpL43, and rpL21 on the composition of intermediate to late nuclear LSU precursors was analyzed in more detail. Effects of these proteins on the assembly states of other r-proteins and on the transient LSU precursor association of several ribosome biogenesis factors, including Nog2, Rsa4 and Nop53, are discussed. PMID:23874617

  6. Multiple GTPases participate in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Laura; Uicker, William C; Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Jault, Jean-Michel; Britton, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    GTPases have been demonstrated to be necessary for the proper assembly of the ribosome in bacteria and eukaryotes. Here, we show that the essential GTPases YphC and YsxC are required for large ribosomal subunit biogenesis in Bacillus subtilis. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of large ribosomal subunits isolated from YphC-depleted cells and YsxC-depleted cells indicates that they are similar to the 45S intermediate previously identified in RbgA-depleted cells. The sedimentation of the large-subunit intermediate isolated from YphC-depleted cells was identical to the intermediate found in RbgA-depleted cells, while the intermediate isolated from YsxC-depleted cells sedimented slightly slower than 45S, suggesting that it is a novel intermediate. Analysis of the protein composition of the large-subunit intermediates isolated from either YphC-depleted cells or YsxC-depleted cells indicated that L16 and L36 are missing. Purified YphC and YsxC are able to interact with the ribosome in vitro, supporting a direct role for these two proteins in the assembly of the 50S subunit. Our results indicate that, as has been demonstrated for Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome biogenesis, bacterial 50S ribosome assembly requires the function of multiple essential GTPases.

  7. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  8. Structural basis for 5'-ETS recognition by Utp4 at the early stages of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kornprobst, Markus; Schermann, Géza; Birkle, Fabienne; Wild, Klemens; Fischer, Tamas; Hurt, Ed; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis begins with the co-transcriptional assembly of the 90S pre-ribosome. The 'U three protein' (UTP) complexes and snoRNP particles arrange around the nascent pre-ribosomal RNA chaperoning its folding and further maturation. The earliest event in this hierarchical process is the binding of the UTP-A complex to the 5'-end of the pre-ribosomal RNA (5'-ETS). This oligomeric complex predominantly consists of β-propeller and α-solenoidal proteins. Here we present the structure of the Utp4 subunit from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.15 Å resolution and analyze its function by UV RNA-crosslinking (CRAC) and in context of a recent cryo-EM structure of the 90S pre-ribosome. Utp4 consists of two orthogonal and highly basic β-propellers that perfectly fit the EM-data. The Utp4 structure highlights an unusual Velcro-closure of its C-terminal β-propeller as relevant for protein integrity and potentially Utp8 recognition in the context of the pre-ribosome. We provide a first model of the 5'-ETS RNA from the internally hidden 5'-end up to the region that hybridizes to the 3'-hinge sequence of U3 snoRNA and validate a specific Utp4/5'-ETS interaction by CRAC analysis.

  9. Balanced Production of Ribosome Components Is Required for Proper G1/S Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae *

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Maya, Douglas; Arista-Romero, María; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is a very accurate process that ensures cell viability and the genomic integrity of daughter cells. A fundamental part of this regulation consists in the arrest of the cycle at particular points to ensure the completion of a previous event, to repair cellular damage, or to avoid progression in potentially risky situations. In this work, we demonstrate that a reduction in nucleotide levels or the depletion of RNA polymerase I or III subunits generates a cell cycle delay at the G1/S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This delay is concomitant with an imbalance between ribosomal RNAs and proteins which, among others, provokes an accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. Consistently with a direct impact of free L5 on the G1/S transition, rrs1 mutants, which weaken the assembly of L5 and L11 on pre-60S ribosomal particles, enhance both the G1/S delay and the accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. We propose the existence of a surveillance mechanism that couples the balanced production of yeast ribosomal components and cell cycle progression through the accumulation of free ribosomal proteins. This regulatory pathway resembles the p53-dependent nucleolar-stress checkpoint response described in human cells, which indicates that this is a general control strategy extended throughout eukaryotes. PMID:24043628

  10. Ribosomal proteins L7 and L8 function in concert with six A3 assembly factors to propagate assembly of domains I and II of 25S rRNA in yeast 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Talkish, Jason; Alexander, Lisa; Linnemann, Jan; Milkereit, Philipp; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a complex multistep process that involves alternating steps of folding and processing of pre-rRNAs in concert with assembly of ribosomal proteins. Recently, there has been increased interest in the roles of ribosomal proteins in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis in vivo, focusing primarily on their function in pre-rRNA processing. However, much less is known about participation of ribosomal proteins in the formation and rearrangement of preribosomal particles as they mature to functional subunits. We have studied ribosomal proteins L7 and L8, which are required for the same early steps in pre-rRNA processing during assembly of 60S subunits but are located in different domains within ribosomes. Depletion of either leads to defects in processing of 27SA3 to 27SB pre-rRNA and turnover of pre-rRNAs destined for large ribosomal subunits. A specific subset of proteins is diminished from these residual assembly intermediates: six assembly factors required for processing of 27SA3 pre-rRNA and four ribosomal proteins bound to domain I of 25S and 5.8S rRNAs surrounding the polypeptide exit tunnel. In addition, specific sets of ribosomal proteins are affected in each mutant: In the absence of L7, proteins bound to domain II, L6, L14, L20, and L33 are greatly diminished, while proteins L13, L15, and L36 that bind to domain I are affected in the absence of L8. Thus, L7 and L8 might establish RNP structures within assembling ribosomes necessary for the stable association and function of the A3 assembly factors and for proper assembly of the neighborhoods containing domains I and II. PMID:22893726

  11. Preparation and proteomic analysis of chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics of chloroplast ribosomes in spinach and Chlamydomonas revealed unique protein composition and structures of plastid ribosomes. These studies have suggested the presence of some ribosomal proteins unique to plastid ribosomes which may be involved in plastid-unique translation regulation. Considering the strong background of genetic analysis and molecular biology in Arabidopsis, the in-depth proteomic characterization of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomes would facilitate further understanding of plastid translation in higher plants. Here, I describe simple and rapid methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomes from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis using sucrose gradients. I also describe purity criteria and methods for yield estimation of the purified plastid ribosomes and subunits, methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomal proteins, as well as the identification of some Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  12. Through the '80s: thinking globally, acting locally. [Combined Canadian Futures Society and Third General Assembly of World Future Society

    SciTech Connect

    Feather, F.

    1980-01-01

    This volume was prepared in conjunction with the First Global Conference on the Future, held in Toronto, Canada, July 20-24, 1980. The conference combined the Third General Assembly of the World Future Society and the fifth annual conference of the Canadian Futures Society. The 59 papers presented here were selected from the very large number submitted to the conference committee; space limitations permitted only a small number of papers to be published in this volume. Included also are: the foreword, Mystery of the Future, by Edward R. Schreyer, Governor General of Canada; preface, A Time for Action, by Maurice F. Strong; introduction, Transition to Harmonic Globalism, by Frank Feather; conclusion, What We Must Do: An Agenda for Futurists; and postscript, The Challenge of the '80s, by Aurelio Peccei. The papers were presented under the following topics: The Trauma of Change (4); A Global Perspective (7); Inventorying Our Resources (7); The International Context (8); Economics: Getting Down to Business (9); Human Values: Personal, Social, Religious (6); Communications: Connecting Ourselves Together (4); Education: Learning to Meet Tomorrow (4); Health: New Approaches to Staying Fit (3); Futurism as a Way of Life (5); and Dreams into Action: Methods and Real-Life Experience (2).

  13. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  14. Evolution: Steps on the road to eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, T. Martin; Williams, Tom A.

    2015-05-01

    A new archaeal phylum represents the closest known relatives of eukaryotes, the group encompassing all organisms that have nucleated cells. The discovery holds promise for a better understanding of eukaryotic origins. See Article p.173

  15. The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S6.

    PubMed

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Forzani, Céline; Azzopardi, Marianne; Davanture, Marlène; Moreau, Manon; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Chicher, Johana; Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Robaglia, Christophe; Ryabova, Lyubov A; Hanson, Johannes; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5' terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase.

  16. The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S6

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Forzani, Céline; Azzopardi, Marianne; Davanture, Marlène; Moreau, Manon; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Chicher, Johana; Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Robaglia, Christophe; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Hanson, Johannes; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5′ terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase. PMID:27877176

  17. Selective ribosome profiling as a tool to study the interaction of chaperones and targeting factors with nascent polypeptide chains and ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annemarie H.; Oh, Eugene; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of factors is involved in the maturation of newly synthesized proteins, including chaperones, membrane targeting factors, and enzymes. Many factors act cotranslationally through association with ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but their target specificities and modes of action remain poorly understood. We developed selective ribosome profiling (SeRP) to identify substrate pools and points of RNC engagement of these factors. SeRP is based on sequencing mRNA fragments covered by translating ribosomes (general ribosome profiling, RP), combined with a procedure to selectively isolate RNCs whose nascent polypeptides are associated with the factor of interest. Factor–RNC interactions are stabilized by crosslinking, the resulting factor–RNC adducts are then nuclease-treated to generate monosomes, and affinity-purified. The ribosome-extracted mRNA footprints are converted to DNA libraries for deep sequencing. The protocol is specified for general RP and SeRP in bacteria. It was first applied to the chaperone trigger factor and is readily adaptable to other cotranslationally acting factors, including eukaryotic factors. Factor–RNC purification and sequencing library preparation takes 7–8 days, sequencing and data analysis can be completed in 5–6 days. PMID:24136347

  18. Crystal Structure of Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Ricin A Chain in Complex with the C-Terminal Peptide of the Ribosomal Stalk Protein P2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Wei; Tang, Yun-Sang; Sze, See-Yuen; Zhu, Zhen-Ning; Wong, Kam-Bo; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), containing a catalytic A chain and a lectin-like B chain. It inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the N-glycosidic bond at α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA, which thereby prevents the binding of elongation factors to the GTPase activation center of the ribosome. Here, we present the 1.6 Å crystal structure of Ricin A chain (RTA) complexed to the C-terminal peptide of the ribosomal stalk protein P2, which plays a crucial role in specific recognition of elongation factors and recruitment of eukaryote-specific RIPs to the ribosomes. Our structure reveals that the C-terminal GFGLFD motif of P2 peptide is inserted into a hydrophobic pocket of RTA, while the interaction assays demonstrate the structurally untraced SDDDM motif of P2 peptide contributes to the interaction with RTA. This interaction mode of RTA and P protein is in contrast to that with trichosanthin (TCS), Shiga-toxin (Stx) and the active form of maize RIP (MOD), implying the flexibility of the P2 peptide-RIP interaction, for the latter to gain access to ribosome. PMID:27754366

  19. Eukaryotic evolution: early origin of canonical introns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; MacQuarrie, Erin K; Roger, Andrew J

    2002-09-19

    Spliceosomal introns, one of the hallmarks of eukaryotic genomes, were thought to have originated late in evolution and were assumed not to exist in eukaryotes that diverged early -- until the discovery of a single intron with an aberrant splice boundary in the primitive 'protozoan' Giardia. Here we describe introns from a close relative of Giardia, Carpediemonas membranifera, that have boundary sequences of the normal eukaryotic type, indicating that canonical introns are likely to have arisen very early in eukaryotic evolution.

  20. Simulating activity of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Computational modeling studies that investigate activity of the bacterial ribosome were reviewed. Computational approaches became possible with the availability of three-dimensional atomic resolution structures of the ribosomal subunits. However, due to the enormous size of the system, theoretical efforts to study the ribosome are few and challenging. For example, to extend the simulation timescales to biologically relevant ones, often, reduced models that require tedious parameterizations need to be applied. To that end, modeling of the ribosome focused on its internal dynamics, electrostatic properties, inhibition by antibiotics, polypeptide folding in the ribosome tunnel and assembly mechanisms driving the formation of the small ribosomal subunit.

  1. Apramycin Recognition by the Human Ribosomal Decoding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann,T.; Tereshko, V.; Skripkin, E.; Patel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind specifically to the bacterial ribosomal decoding-site RNA and thereby interfere with fidelity but not efficiency of translation. Apramycin stands out among aminoglycosides for its mechanism of action which is based on blocking translocation and its ability to bind also to the eukaryotic decoding site despite differences in key residues required for apramycin recognition by the bacterial target. To elucidate molecular recognition of the eukaryotic decoding site by apramycin we have determined the crystal structure of an oligoribonucleotide containing the human sequence free and in complex with the antibiotic at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The drug binds in the deep groove of the RNA which forms a continuously stacked helix comprising non-canonical C{center_dot}A and G{center_dot}A base pairs and a bulged-out adenine. The binding mode of apramycin at the human decoding-site RNA is distinct from aminoglycoside recognition of the bacterial target, suggesting a molecular basis for the actions of apramycin in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  2. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Afonina, Zhanna A.; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A.; Spirin, Alexander S.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-11-01

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  3. [Eukaryotes origin: a new scenario].

    PubMed

    Gonchikov, G G

    2010-01-01

    A new scenario of eukaryotes origin is proposed that explains the cytoskeleton genesis, and the genesis of cell nucleus as a "cell within cell" structure. The scenario is based on the peculiarities of spore-forming firmicutes life cycle and structure, unique for prokaryotes. It is supposed that a euryarchaeon cell was engulfed by a "bare" sporangium of an ancient polyendosporogenic and endoskeletal clostridia, bearer of microtubular endospore appendages, in the process of "abortive" forespore engulfment. In the result, a new driving force for cell transitions was formed, associated with compartmentalization of prokaryotic chromosomes. Further recombination of chromosomes induced two transitions: transformation of euryarchaeon into true cell nucleus, and transformation of microtubular endospore appendages into nucleus mitotic apparatus. In-cell reproducing organelles, such as mitochondrion and plastids, appeared later. Forthcoming full-genome studies of endoskeletal firmicutes, bearers of microtubular endospore appendages, and some eukaryotes may help to reveal the mystery of the first true nuclear cell origin.

  4. The revised classification of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Adl, Sina M.; Simpson, Alastair. G.; Lane, Christopher E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S.; Brown, Matt; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; leGall, Line; Lynn, Denis H.; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E.; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. (2005), retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information. PMID:23020233

  5. Eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic chemosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Sbarbati, Andrea; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    In the last decades, microbiologists demonstrated that microorganisms possess chemosensory capabilities and communicate with each other via chemical signals. In parallel, it was demonstrated that solitary eukaryotic chemosensory cells are diffusely located on the mucosae of digestive and respiratory apparatuses. It is now evident that on the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates, two chemoreceptorial systems (i.e. eukaryotic and prokaryotic) coexist in a common microenvironment. To date, it is not known if the two chemosensory systems reciprocally interact and compete for detection of chemical cues. This appears to be a fruitful field of study and future researches must consider that the mucosal epithelia possess more chemosensory capabilities than previously supposed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Dual effects of MLS antibiotics: transcriptional modulation and interactions on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Wayne H W; Yim, Grace; Wang, Helena Huimi; McClure, JoAnn E; Surette, Michael G; Davies, Julian

    2004-09-01

    The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics are an important group of translation inhibitors that act on the 50S ribosome. We show that, at subinhibitory concentrations, members of the MLS group modulate specific groups of bacterial promoters, as detected by screening a library of promoter-luxCDABE reporter clones of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The patterns of transcription permit identification of classes of promoters having differential responses to antibiotics of related structure and mode-of-action; studies of antibiotic synergy or antagonism showed that eukaryotic translation inhibitors may act on the 50S ribosome. The mechanism of transcriptional modulation is not known but may involve bacterial stress responses and/or the disturbance and subsequent compensation of metabolic networks as a result of subtle interference with ribosome function. Transcriptional patterns detected with promoter-lux clones provide a novel approach to antibiotic discovery and mode-of-action studies.

  7. Signal recognition particle-ribosome binding is sensitive to nascent chain length.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Thomas R; Tsai, Albert; Elvekrog, Margaret M; Petrov, Alexey; Neher, Saskia B; Chen, Jin; Bradshaw, Niels; Puglisi, Joseph D; Walter, Peter

    2014-07-11

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) directs ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs) displaying signal sequences to protein translocation channels in the plasma membrane of prokaryotes and endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotes. It was initially proposed that SRP binds the signal sequence when it emerges from an RNC and that successful binding becomes impaired as translation extends the nascent chain, moving the signal sequence away from SRP on the ribosomal surface. Later studies drew this simple model into question, proposing that SRP binding is unaffected by nascent chain length. Here, we reinvestigate this issue using two novel and independent fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. We show that the arrival and dissociation rates of SRP binding to RNCs vary according to nascent chain length, resulting in the highest affinity shortly after a functional signal sequence emerges from the ribosome. Moreover, we show that SRP binds RNCs in multiple and interconverting conformations, and that conversely, RNCs exist in two conformations distinguished by SRP interaction kinetics.

  8. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  9. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia M.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed. PMID:24688483

  10. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia M; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed.

  11. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo—that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  12. Distinct types of translation termination generate substrates for ribosome-associated quality control

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbik, Natalia; Chernova, Tatiana A.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2016-01-01

    Cotranslational degradation of polypeptide nascent chains plays a critical role in quality control of protein synthesis and the rescue of stalled ribosomes. In eukaryotes, ribosome stalling triggers release of 60S subunits with attached nascent polypeptides, which undergo ubiquitination by the E3 ligase Ltn1 and proteasomal degradation facilitated by the ATPase Cdc48. However, the identity of factors acting upstream in this process is less clear. Here, we examined how the canonical release factors Sup45–Sup35 (eRF1–eRF3) and their paralogs Dom34-Hbs1 affect the total population of ubiquitinated nascent chains associated with yeast ribosomes. We found that the availability of the functional release factor complex Sup45–Sup35 strongly influences the amount of ubiquitinated polypeptides associated with 60S ribosomal subunits, while Dom34-Hbs1 generate 60S-associated peptidyl-tRNAs that constitute a relatively minor fraction of Ltn1 substrates. These results uncover two separate pathways that target nascent polypeptides for Ltn1-Cdc48-mediated degradation and suggest that in addition to canonical termination on stop codons, eukaryotic release factors contribute to cotranslational protein quality control. PMID:27325745

  13. Distinct types of translation termination generate substrates for ribosome-associated quality control.

    PubMed

    Shcherbik, Natalia; Chernova, Tatiana A; Chernoff, Yury O; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2016-08-19

    Cotranslational degradation of polypeptide nascent chains plays a critical role in quality control of protein synthesis and the rescue of stalled ribosomes. In eukaryotes, ribosome stalling triggers release of 60S subunits with attached nascent polypeptides, which undergo ubiquitination by the E3 ligase Ltn1 and proteasomal degradation facilitated by the ATPase Cdc48. However, the identity of factors acting upstream in this process is less clear. Here, we examined how the canonical release factors Sup45-Sup35 (eRF1-eRF3) and their paralogs Dom34-Hbs1 affect the total population of ubiquitinated nascent chains associated with yeast ribosomes. We found that the availability of the functional release factor complex Sup45-Sup35 strongly influences the amount of ubiquitinated polypeptides associated with 60S ribosomal subunits, while Dom34-Hbs1 generate 60S-associated peptidyl-tRNAs that constitute a relatively minor fraction of Ltn1 substrates. These results uncover two separate pathways that target nascent polypeptides for Ltn1-Cdc48-mediated degradation and suggest that in addition to canonical termination on stop codons, eukaryotic release factors contribute to cotranslational protein quality control.

  14. Challenges in describing ribosome dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul Charles

    2017-04-01

    For decades, protein folding and functional dynamics have been described in terms of diffusive motion across an underlying energy landscape. With continued advances in structural biology and high-performance computing, the field is positioned to extend these approaches to large biomolecular assemblies. Through the application of energy landscape techniques to the ribosome, one may work towards establishing a comprehensive description of the dynamics, which will bridge theoretical concepts and experimental observations. In this perspective, we discuss a few of the challenges that will need to be addressed as we extend the application of landscape principles to the ribosome.

  15. Biochemical characterization of ribosome assembly GTPase RbgA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Achila, David; Gulati, Megha; Jain, Nikhil; Britton, Robert A

    2012-03-09

    The ribosome biogenesis GTPase A protein RbgA is involved in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis, and homologs of RbgA are implicated in the biogenesis of mitochondrial, chloroplast, and cytoplasmic ribosomes in archaea and eukaryotes. The precise function of how RbgA contributes to ribosome assembly is not understood. Defects in RbgA give rise to a large ribosomal subunit that is immature and migrates at 45 S in sucrose density gradients. Here, we report a detailed biochemical analysis of RbgA and its interaction with the ribosome. We found that RbgA, like most other GTPases, exhibits a very slow k(cat) (14 h(-1)) and has a high K(m) (90 μM). Homology modeling of the RbgA switch I region using the K-loop GTPase MnmE as a template suggested that RbgA requires K(+) ions for GTPase activity, which was confirmed experimentally. Interaction with 50 S subunits, but not 45 S intermediates, increased GTPase activity by ∼55-fold. Stable association with 50 S subunits and 45 S intermediates was nucleotide-dependent, and GDP did not support strong interaction with either of the subunits. GTP and guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (GMPPNP) were sufficient to promote association with the 45 S intermediate, whereas only GMPPNP was able to support binding to the 50 S subunit, presumably due to the stimulation of GTP hydrolysis. These results support a model in which RbgA promotes a late step in ribosome biogenesis and that one role of GTP hydrolysis is to stimulate dissociation of RbgA from the ribosome.

  16. Cytonuclear interactions and relaxed selection accelerate sequence evolution in organelle ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Triant, Deborah A; Wu, Martin; Taylor, Douglas R

    2014-03-01

    Many mitochondrial and plastid protein complexes contain subunits that are encoded in different genomes. In animals, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins often exhibit rapid sequence evolution, which has been hypothesized to result from selection for mutations that compensate for changes in interacting subunits encoded in mutation-prone animal mitochondrial DNA. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed nuclear genes encoding cytosolic and organelle ribosomal proteins in flowering plants. The model angiosperm genus Arabidopsis exhibits low organelle mutation rates, typical of most plants. Nevertheless, we found that (nuclear-encoded) subunits of organelle ribosomes in Arabidopsis have higher amino acid sequence polymorphism and divergence than their counterparts in cytosolic ribosomes, suggesting that organelle ribosomes experience relaxed functional constraint. However, the observed difference between organelle and cytosolic ribosomes was smaller than in animals and could be partially attributed to rapid evolution in N-terminal organelle-targeting peptides that are not involved in ribosome function. To test the role of organelle mutation more directly, we used transcriptomic data from an angiosperm genus (Silene) with highly variable rates of organelle genome evolution. We found that Silene species with unusually fast-evolving mitochondrial and plastid DNA exhibited increased amino acid sequence divergence in ribosomal proteins targeted to the organelles but not in those that function in cytosolic ribosomes. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that rapid organelle genome evolution has selected for compensatory mutations in nuclear-encoded proteins. We conclude that coevolution between interacting subunits encoded in different genomic compartments within the eukaryotic cell is an important determinant of variation in rates of protein sequence evolution.

  17. Satratoxin G interaction with 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits precedes apoptosis in the macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Hee Kyong; Shinozuka, Junko; Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J.

    2009-06-01

    Satratoxin G (SG) and other macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins are potent inhibitors of eukaryotic translation that are potentially immunosuppressive. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that SG-induced apoptosis in the macrophage correlates with binding of this toxin to the ribosome. Exposure of RAW 264.7 murine macrophages to SG at concentrations of 10 to 80 ng/ml induced DNA fragmentation within 4 h that was indicative of apoptosis. To relate these findings to ribosome binding of SG, RAW cells were exposed to different toxin concentrations for various time intervals, ribosomal fractions isolated by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and resultant fractions analyzed for SG by competitive ELISA. SG was found to specifically interact with 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits as early as 5 min and that, at high concentrations or extended incubation times, the toxin induced polysome disaggregation. While co-incubation with the simple Type B trichothecene DON had no effect on SG uptake into cell cytoplasm, it inhibited SG binding to the ribosome, suggesting that the two toxins bound to identical sites and that SG binding was reversible. Although both SG and DON induced mobilization of p38 and JNK 1/2 to the ribosome, phosphorylation of ribosomal bound MAPKs occurred only after DON treatment. SG association with the 40S and 60S subunits was also observed in the PC-12 neuronal cell model which is similarly susceptible to apoptosis. To summarize, SG rapidly binds small and large ribosomal subunits in a concentration- and time-dependent manner that was consistent with induction of apoptosis.

  18. Inhibitors of Ribosome Rescue Arrest Growth of Francisella tularensis at All Stages of Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Goralski, Tyler D. P.; Dewan, Kalyan K.; Alumasa, John N.; Avanzato, Victoria; Place, David E.; Markley, Rachel L.; Katkere, Bhuvana; Rabadi, Seham M.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria require at least one pathway to rescue ribosomes stalled at the ends of mRNAs. The primary pathway for ribosome rescue is trans-translation, which is conserved in >99% of sequenced bacterial genomes. Some species also have backup systems, such as ArfA or ArfB, which can rescue ribosomes in the absence of sufficient trans-translation activity. Small-molecule inhibitors of ribosome rescue have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacteria grown in liquid culture. These compounds were tested against the tier 1 select agent Francisella tularensis to determine if they can limit bacterial proliferation during infection of eukaryotic cells. The inhibitors KKL-10 and KKL-40 exhibited exceptional antimicrobial activity against both attenuated and fully virulent strains of F. tularensis in vitro and during ex vivo infection. Addition of KKL-10 or KKL-40 to macrophages or liver cells at any time after infection by F. tularensis prevented further bacterial proliferation. When macrophages were stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine gamma interferon before being infected by F. tularensis, addition of KKL-10 or KKL-40 reduced intracellular bacteria by >99%, indicating that the combination of cytokine-induced stress and a nonfunctional ribosome rescue pathway is fatal to F. tularensis. Neither KKL-10 nor KKL-40 was cytotoxic to eukaryotic cells in culture. These results demonstrate that ribosome rescue is required for F. tularensis growth at all stages of its infection cycle and suggest that KKL-10 and KKL-40 are good lead compounds for antibiotic development. PMID:26953190

  19. Ribosomal oxygenases are structurally conserved from prokaryotes to humans.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Sekirnik, Rok; Brissett, Nigel C; Krojer, Tobias; Ho, Chia-Hua; Ng, Stanley S; Clifton, Ian J; Ge, Wei; Kershaw, Nadia J; Fox, Gavin C; Muniz, Joao R C; Vollmar, Melanie; Phillips, Claire; Pilka, Ewa S; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; von Delft, Frank; Oppermann, Udo; McDonough, Michael A; Doherty, Aidan J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-06-19

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases have important roles in the regulation of gene expression via demethylation of N-methylated chromatin components and in the hydroxylation of transcription factors and splicing factor proteins. Recently, 2OG-dependent oxygenases that catalyse hydroxylation of transfer RNA and ribosomal proteins have been shown to be important in translation relating to cellular growth, TH17-cell differentiation and translational accuracy. The finding that ribosomal oxygenases (ROXs) occur in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans raises questions as to their structural and evolutionary relationships. In Escherichia coli, YcfD catalyses arginine hydroxylation in the ribosomal protein L16; in humans, MYC-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53; also known as MINA) and nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) catalyse histidine hydroxylation in the ribosomal proteins RPL27A and RPL8, respectively. The functional assignments of ROXs open therapeutic possibilities via either ROX inhibition or targeting of differentially modified ribosomes. Despite differences in the residue and protein selectivities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ROXs, comparison of the crystal structures of E. coli YcfD and Rhodothermus marinus YcfD with those of human MINA53 and NO66 reveals highly conserved folds and novel dimerization modes defining a new structural subfamily of 2OG-dependent oxygenases. ROX structures with and without their substrates support their functional assignments as hydroxylases but not demethylases, and reveal how the subfamily has evolved to catalyse the hydroxylation of different residue side chains of ribosomal proteins. Comparison of ROX crystal structures with those of other JmjC-domain-containing hydroxylases, including the hypoxia-inducible factor asparaginyl hydroxylase FIH and histone N(ε)-methyl lysine demethylases, identifies branch points in 2OG-dependent oxygenase evolution and distinguishes between JmjC-containing hydroxylases and demethylases

  20. Processive selenocysteine incorporation during synthesis of eukaryotic selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Fixsen, S M; Howard, Michael T

    2010-06-11

    Selenoproteins are a family of proteins that share the common feature of containing selenocysteine, the "twenty-first" amino acid. Selenocysteine incorporation occurs during translation of selenoprotein messages by redefinition of UGA codons, which normally specify termination of translation. Studies of the eukaryotic selenocysteine incorporation mechanism suggest that selenocysteine insertion is inefficient compared with termination. Nevertheless, selenoprotein P and several other selenoproteins are known to contain multiple selenocysteines. The production of full-length (FL) protein from these messages would seem to demand highly efficient selenocysteine incorporation due to the compounding effect of termination at each UGA codon. We present data demonstrating that efficient incorporation of multiple selenocysteines can be reconstituted in rabbit reticulocyte lysate translation reactions. Selenocysteine incorporation at the first UGA codon is inefficient but increases by approximately 10-fold at subsequent downstream UGA codons. We found that ribosomes in the "processive" phase of selenocysteine incorporation (i.e., after decoding the first UGA codon as selenocysteine) are fully competent to terminate translation at UAG and UAA codons, that ribosomes become less efficient at selenocysteine incorporation as the distance between UGA codons is increased, and that efficient selenocysteine incorporation is not dependent on cis-acting elements unique to selenoprotein P. Furthermore, we found that the percentage of ribosomes decoding a UGA codon as selenocysteine rather than termination can be increased by 3- to 5-fold by placing the murine leukemia virus UAG read-through element upstream of the first UGA codon or by providing a competing messenger RNA in trans. The mechanisms of selenocysteine incorporation and selenoprotein synthesis are discussed in light of these results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of two domains with novel RNA-processing activities throws light on the complex evolution of ribosomal RNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis has been extensively investigated, especially to identify the elusive nucleases and cofactors involved in the complex rRNA processing events in eukaryotes. Large-scale screens in yeast identified two biochemically uncharacterized proteins, TSR3 and TSR4, as being key players required for rRNA maturation. Using multiple computational approaches we identify the conserved domains comprising these proteins and establish sequence and structural features providing novel insights regarding their roles. TSR3 is unified with the DTW domain into a novel superfamily of predicted enzymatic domains, with the balance of the available evidence pointing toward an RNase role with the archaeo-eukaryotic TSR3 proteins processing rRNA and the bacterial versions potentially processing tRNA. TSR4, its other eukaryotic homologs PDCD2/rp-8, PDCD2L, Zfrp8, and trus, the predominantly bacterial DUF1963 proteins, and other uncharacterized proteins are unified into a new domain superfamily, which arose from an ancient duplication event of a strand-swapped, dimer-forming all-beta unit. We identify conserved features mediating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and propose a potential chaperone-like function. While contextual evidence supports a conserved role in ribosome biogenesis for the eukaryotic TSR4-related proteins, there is no evidence for such a role for the bacterial versions. Whereas TSR3-related proteins can be traced to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) with a well-supported archaeo-eukaryotic branch, TSR4-related proteins of eukaryotes are derived from within the bacterial radiation of this superfamily, with archaea entirely lacking them. This provides evidence for "systems admixture," which followed the early endosymbiotic event, playing a key role in the emergence of the uniquely eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis process.

  2. Analysis of two domains with novel RNA-processing activities throws light on the complex evolution of ribosomal RNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Aravind, L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis has been extensively investigated, especially to identify the elusive nucleases and cofactors involved in the complex rRNA processing events in eukaryotes. Large-scale screens in yeast identified two biochemically uncharacterized proteins, TSR3 and TSR4, as being key players required for rRNA maturation. Using multiple computational approaches we identify the conserved domains comprising these proteins and establish sequence and structural features providing novel insights regarding their roles. TSR3 is unified with the DTW domain into a novel superfamily of predicted enzymatic domains, with the balance of the available evidence pointing toward an RNase role with the archaeo-eukaryotic TSR3 proteins processing rRNA and the bacterial versions potentially processing tRNA. TSR4, its other eukaryotic homologs PDCD2/rp-8, PDCD2L, Zfrp8, and trus, the predominantly bacterial DUF1963 proteins, and other uncharacterized proteins are unified into a new domain superfamily, which arose from an ancient duplication event of a strand-swapped, dimer-forming all-beta unit. We identify conserved features mediating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and propose a potential chaperone-like function. While contextual evidence supports a conserved role in ribosome biogenesis for the eukaryotic TSR4-related proteins, there is no evidence for such a role for the bacterial versions. Whereas TSR3-related proteins can be traced to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) with a well-supported archaeo-eukaryotic branch, TSR4-related proteins of eukaryotes are derived from within the bacterial radiation of this superfamily, with archaea entirely lacking them. This provides evidence for “systems admixture,” which followed the early endosymbiotic event, playing a key role in the emergence of the uniquely eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis process. PMID:25566315

  3. Changing perspectives on the origin of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Katz, L A

    1998-12-01

    From the initial application of molecular techniques to the study of microbial organisms, three domains of life emerged, with eukaryotes and archaea as sister taxa. However, recent analyses of an expanding molecular data set reveal that the eukaryotic genome is chimeric with respect to archaea and bacteria. Moreover, there is now evidence that the primitive eukaryotic group `Archezoa' once harbored mitochondia. These discoveries have challenged the traditional stepwise model of the evolution of eukaryotes, in which the nucleus and microtubules evolve before the acquisition of mitochondria, and consequently compel a revision of existing models of the origin of eukaryotic cells.

  4. The origin of nucleus: rebuild from the prokaryotic ancestors of ribosome export factors.

    PubMed

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    Various hypotheses have been proposed on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic nucleus. Because one of the major cargoes in the nucleocytoplasmic export in the eukaryotic cell is the ribosome, its stimulating proteins called Ribosome Export Factors (REFs) might have an evolutionary history of inscribing the origin of eukaryotic nucleus. With the aim of understanding the evolutionary origin of the nucleus, here we employed the yeast REFs and searched for their evolutionary origin in more than 500 genomes of archaea and eubacteria by the PSI-BLAST search. Our results showed that the non-membranous REFs (non-mREFs) originated exclusively from eubacterial proteins, whereas the membranous REFs (mREFs) are from both archaeal and eubacterial proteins. Since the non-mREFs just work inside the nucleus while the mREFs shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, these results suggest that the extant REFs working inside the nucleus have derived exclusively from eubacterial proteins, implying that the nucleus arose in a cell that contained chromosomes possessing a substantial fraction of eubacterial genes, in line with the predictions of several models entailing endosymbiosis at eukaryote origins.

  5. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  6. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  7. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  8. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  9. Sequence of the 16S Ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an Archaebacterium.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Lanter, J M; Woese, C R

    1983-08-12

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Microbial Eukaryotes in Anoxic Sediment of the Saline Meromictic Lake Namako-ike (Japan): On the Detection of Anaerobic or Anoxic-tolerant Lineages of Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Kawato, Masaru; Oguri, Kazumasa; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    Available sequence data on eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) directly retrieved from various environments have increased recently, and the diversity of microbial eukaryotes (protists) has been shown to be much greater than previously expected. However, the molecular information accumulated to date does still not thoroughly reveal ecological distribution patterns of microbial eukaryotes. In the ongoing challenge to detect anaerobic or anoxic-tolerant lineages of eukaryotes, we directly extracted DNA from the anoxic sediment of a saline meromictic lake, constructed genetic libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, and performed phylogenetic analyses with the cloned SSU rDNA sequences. Although a few sequences could not be confidently assigned to any major eukaryotic groups in the analyses and are debatable regarding their taxonomic positions, most sequences obtained have affiliations with known major lineages of eukaryotes (Cercozoa, Alveolata, Stramenopiles, and Opisthokonta). Among these sequences, some branched with lineages predominantly composed of uncultured environmental clones retrieved from other anoxic environments, while others were closely related to those of eukaryotic parasites (e.g. Phytomyxea of Cercozoa, Gregarinea of Alveolata, and Ichthyosporea of Opisthokonta).

  11. The ribosomal protein Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of short mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gangaramani, Paritosh; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2016-01-01

    Translation is a core cellular process carried out by a highly conserved macromolecular machine, the ribosome. There has been remarkable evolutionary adaptation of this machine through the addition of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins whose individual effects on ribosome function are largely unknown. Here we show that eukaryote-specific Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of mRNAs with short open reading frames that show greater than average translational efficiency in diverse eukaryotes. ASC1 mutants in S. cerevisiae display compromised translation of specific functional groups, including cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and display cellular phenotypes consistent with their gene-specific translation defects. Asc1-sensitive mRNAs are preferenti